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Sample records for primacy concept-based employee

  1. Emotional Dissonance and Sickness Absence Among Employees Working With Customers and Clients: A Moderated Mediation Model via Exhaustion and Human Resource Primacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indregard, Anne-Marthe R; Ulleberg, Pål; Knardahl, Stein; Nielsen, Morten B

    2018-01-01

    Emotional dissonance, i.e., a discrepancy between required and felt emotions, has been established as a predictor of sickness absence in studies, but little is known about mechanisms that can explain this association. In order to prevent and reduce the impact of emotional dissonance on sickness absence, there is a need for greater attention to variables explaining when and how emotional dissonance is related to sickness absence. The overarching aim of this study was to examine whether emotional dissonance has an indirect association with sickness absence through exhaustion. In addition, we examined whether human resource primacy (HRP), which is the employer's degree of concern for human resources, moderates this indirect effect. A sample of 7758 employees, all working with customers and clients, were recruited from 96 Norwegian organizations. Emotional dissonance, exhaustion, and HRP were measured through surveys and then linked to registry data on medically certified sickness absence for the year following the survey assessment. Results showed that exhaustion is a mediator for the relationship between emotional dissonance and sickness absence. Furthermore, higher levels of HRP were found to reduce the positive association between emotional dissonance and exhaustion, and the indirect effect of emotional dissonance on sickness absence through exhaustion is found to be weaker when HRP is high. By testing this moderated mediation model, the current study contributes to the literature on emotion work by clarifying mechanisms that are crucial for the development of targeted interventions that aim to reduce and prevent sickness absence in client-driven work environments.

  2. Emotional Dissonance and Sickness Absence Among Employees Working With Customers and Clients: A Moderated Mediation Model via Exhaustion and Human Resource Primacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indregard, Anne-Marthe R.; Ulleberg, Pål; Knardahl, Stein; Nielsen, Morten B.

    2018-01-01

    Emotional dissonance, i.e., a discrepancy between required and felt emotions, has been established as a predictor of sickness absence in studies, but little is known about mechanisms that can explain this association. In order to prevent and reduce the impact of emotional dissonance on sickness absence, there is a need for greater attention to variables explaining when and how emotional dissonance is related to sickness absence. The overarching aim of this study was to examine whether emotional dissonance has an indirect association with sickness absence through exhaustion. In addition, we examined whether human resource primacy (HRP), which is the employer’s degree of concern for human resources, moderates this indirect effect. A sample of 7758 employees, all working with customers and clients, were recruited from 96 Norwegian organizations. Emotional dissonance, exhaustion, and HRP were measured through surveys and then linked to registry data on medically certified sickness absence for the year following the survey assessment. Results showed that exhaustion is a mediator for the relationship between emotional dissonance and sickness absence. Furthermore, higher levels of HRP were found to reduce the positive association between emotional dissonance and exhaustion, and the indirect effect of emotional dissonance on sickness absence through exhaustion is found to be weaker when HRP is high. By testing this moderated mediation model, the current study contributes to the literature on emotion work by clarifying mechanisms that are crucial for the development of targeted interventions that aim to reduce and prevent sickness absence in client-driven work environments. PMID:29670556

  3. Why international primacy matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.P.

    1993-01-01

    Does international primacy matter? The answer seems so obvious that one first wonders why someone as intelligent, perceptive, and knowledgeable as Robert Jervis raises the question. On further thought, however, one sees that while the answer may be obvious for most people, the reasons why it is obvious may not be all that clear and may have been forgotten or lost in the other concerns of political scientists and economists studying international relations. By posing this question at this time of change in world affairs Jervis has constructively forced us to rethink why primacy is of central importance. This issue involves several subordinate questions

  4. Affective Primacy vs. Cognitive Primacy: Dissolving the Debate

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Vicky Tzuyin; Hagoort, Peter; Casasanto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    When people see a snake, they are likely to activate both affective information (e.g., dangerous) and non-affective information about its ontological category (e.g., animal). According to the Affective Primacy Hypothesis, the affective information has priority, and its activation can precede identification of the ontological category of a stimulus. Alternatively, according to the Cognitive Primacy Hypothesis, perceivers must know what they are looking at before they can make an affective judg...

  5. Affective Primacy vs. Cognitive Primacy: Dissolving the Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Vicky Tzuyin; Hagoort, Peter; Casasanto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    When people see a snake, they are likely to activate both affective information (e.g., dangerous) and non-affective information about its ontological category (e.g., animal). According to the Affective Primacy Hypothesis, the affective information has priority, and its activation can precede identification of the ontological category of a stimulus. Alternatively, according to the Cognitive Primacy Hypothesis, perceivers must know what they are looking at before they can make an affective judgment about it. We propose that neither hypothesis holds at all times. Here we show that the relative speed with which affective and non-affective information gets activated by pictures and words depends upon the contexts in which stimuli are processed. Results illustrate that the question of whether affective information has processing priority over ontological information (or vice versa) is ill-posed. Rather than seeking to resolve the debate over Cognitive vs. Affective Primacy in favor of one hypothesis or the other, a more productive goal may be to determine the factors that cause affective information to have processing priority in some circumstances and ontological information in others. Our findings support a view of the mind according to which words and pictures activate different neurocognitive representations every time they are processed, the specifics of which are co-determined by the stimuli themselves and the contexts in which they occur.

  6. Affective Primacy vs. Cognitive Primacy: Dissolving the debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky T. Lai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available When people see a snake, they are likely to activate both affective information (e.g., dangerous and non-affective information about its ontological category (e.g., animal. According to the Affective Primacy Hypothesis, the affective information has priority, and its activation can precede identification of the ontological category of a stimulus. Alternatively, according to the Cognitive Primacy Hypothesis, perceivers must know what they are looking at before they can make an affective judgment about it. We propose that neither hypothesis holds at all times. Here we show that the relative speed with which affective and non-affective information gets activated by pictures and words depends upon the contexts in which stimuli are processed. Results illustrate that the question of whether affective information has processing priority over ontological information (or vice versa is ill posed. Rather than seeking to resolve the debate over Cognitive vs. Affective Primacy in favor of one hypothesis or the other, a more productive goal may be to determine the factors that cause affective information to have processing priority in some circumstances and ontological information in others. Our findings support a view of the mind according to which words and pictures activate different neurocognitive representations every time they are processed, the specifics of which are co-determined by the stimuli themselves and the contexts in which they occur.

  7. Restoring primacy in amnesic free recall: evidence for the recency theory of primacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Michaela; Brown, Gordon D A; Della Sala, Sergio

    2011-09-01

    Primacy and recency effects at immediate recall are thought to reflect the independent functioning of a long-term memory store (primacy) and a short-term memory store (recency). Key evidence for this theory comes from amnesic patients who show severe long-term memory storage deficits, coupled with profoundly attenuated primacy. Here we challenge this dominant dual-store theory of immediate recall by demonstrating that attenuated primacy in amnesic patients can reflect abnormal working memory rehearsal processes. D.A., a patient with severe amnesia, presented with profoundly attenuated primacy when using her preferred atypical noncumulative rehearsal strategy. In contrast, despite her severe amnesia, she showed normal primacy when her rehearsal was matched with that of controls via an externalized cumulative rehearsal schedule. Our data are in keeping with the "recency theory of primacy" and suggest that primacy at immediate recall is dependent upon medial temporal lobe involvement in cumulative rehearsal rather than long-term memory storage.

  8. Beyond shareholder primacy? Reflections on the trajectory of UK corporate governance.

    OpenAIRE

    Armour, J.; Deakin, S.; Konzelmann, Suzanne J.

    2003-01-01

    Core institutions of UK corporate governance, in particular the City Code on Takeovers and Mergers, the Combined Code on Corporate Governance and the law on directors’ duties, are strongly orientated towards the norm of shareholder primacy. Beyond the core, however, stakeholder interests are better represented, in particular at the intersection of insolvency and employment law. This reflects the influence of European Community laws on information and consultation of employees. In addition, th...

  9. The Topological Primacy Thesis: Genetic and Didactic Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Wilhelm

    1983-01-01

    Several critical questions concerning the topological primacy thesis were raised in an extensive literature survey (SE 531 428). Three points related to this criticism are discussed and reinforced, including a reexamination of Laurendeau and Pinard's data (showing that they do not support the hypothesis of topological primacy in children's…

  10. The 'primacy' and 'direct effect' of EU international agreements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gáspár-Szilágyi, Szilárd

    2015-01-01

    The rules on invoking EU norms before the Court of Justice and Member State courts are at the core of EU constitutional law. International agreements binding on the EU form an integral part of EU law and have primacy over inconsistent secondary EU legislation. Moreover, they also have primacy over...

  11. The primacy model: a new model of immediate serial recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M P; Norris, D

    1998-10-01

    A new model of immediate serial recall is presented: the primacy model. The primacy model stores order information by means of the assumption that the strength of activation of successive list items decreases across list position to form a primacy gradient. Ordered recall is supported by a repeated cycle of operations involving a noisy choice of the most active item followed by suppression of the chosen item. Word-length and list-length effects are attributed to a decay process that occurs both during input, when effective rehearsal is prevented, and during output. The phonological similarity effect is attributed to a second stage of processing at which phonological confusions occur. The primacy model produces accurate simulations of the effects of word length, list length, and phonological similarity.

  12. A Critique of the Ontological Primacy of the Political

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Allan Dreyer

    In this paper I take issue with the status granted the political in the writings of Laclau and Mouffe. The main conclusion is that the claim of the ontological primacy of the political over the social must be given up. What can be maintained is the autonomy of the political (vis a vis other...

  13. Cultural differences in the primacy effect for person perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Kamada, Akiko; Shrira, Ilan

    2014-06-01

    Previous work has shown there are robust differences in how North Americans and East Asians form impressions of people. The present research examines whether the tendency to weigh initial information more heavily-the primacy effect-may be another component of these cultural differences. Specifically, we tested whether Americans would be more likely to use first impressions to guide person perception, compared to Japanese participants. In this experiment, participants read a vignette that described a target person's behaviour, then rated the target's personality. Before reading the vignette, some trait information was given to create an expectation about the target's personality. The data revealed that Americans used this initial information to guide their judgments of the target, whereas the Japanese sample based their judgments on all the information more evenly. Thus, Americans showed a stronger primacy effect in their impression formation than Japanese participants, who engaged in more data-driven processing. © 2013 International Union of Psychological Science.

  14. Indian primacy procedures handbook for the public water system supervision (PWSS) program and the underground injection control (UIC) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The handbook defines primacy, the responsibilities of primacy, primacy's advantages and limitations, and how to seek primacy. Primacy is a provision in the 1986 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). It allows Indian Tribes the opportunity to assume principal responsibility in the enforcement of public drinking water and/or underground injection control (UIC) regulations within the Indian Tribe's jurisdiction. To attain primacy a Tribe must have drinking water and underground injection control regulations which are at least as strict as EPA regulations, and must have an independent agency or organization within the Tribal government that has the power to enforce its regulations

  15. Learning from Evaluation by Peer Team: A Case Study of a Family Counselling Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniute-Cobb, Eivina I.; Alfred, Mary V.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how employees learn from Team Primacy Concept-based employee evaluation and how they use the feedback in performing their jobs. Team Primacy Concept-based evaluation is a type of multirater evaluation. The distinctive characteristic of such evaluation is its peer feedback component during which the employee's…

  16. Primacy Performance of Normal and Retarded Children: Stimulus Familiarity or Spatial Memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Lee

    1978-01-01

    Explores the effect of stimulus familiarity on the spatial primacy performance of normal and retarded children. Assumes that serial recall tasks reflect spatial memory rather than verbal rehearsal. (BD)

  17. The Primacy of Shiite Theology over that of the Mutazilites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Karkon Beiragh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Shiites' historically tumultuous life has always been exposed to numerous charges. One of these charges is the claim that the Shiites have received their creed from the Mutazilites. Despite the antiquity of the charge and the fact that Shia scholars have tried to answer it, the charge is still in force. The present study seeks to review the historical roots of such allegations and tries to investigate their causes by referring to some old and modern sources. It also attempts to reply the charges by indicating the distinctions between the Shiite and Mutazilite theological systems and as a result the primacy of Shiite theology over the Mutazilite will be proved. To reject the claim saying the Shiites have obtained their creeds from the Mutazilites, we have mentioned numerous proofs, the titles of which are as follow: A The refutations offered by the Shiites against the Mutazilites B The rebukes of the Mutazilites by Shiite Imams and scholars C The debates of Shiite Imams and scholars with the Mutazilites D The conversion of some Mutazilites to the Shiism E Shiism has been charged with "Rafḍ" by the Mutzilites. F  The difference between Shiite and Mutazilite political position. G The Shiite belief in infallible Imam, despite the Mutzilites.  H The fundamental differences of Shiite and Mu'tazilite beliefs. In this research, to answer the question: "why the Shiites are called Mutazilite by some?" four different reasons have been offered which are as follow: A Shiite and Mutazilite common views in some principles such as the idea of freewill, and rational good and evil. B Studentship of Zaid bin Ali with Vasil bin 'Ata C The Mutazilites calling themselves as the Shiite D The practice of Taqiyyeh by some Shiite scholars Based on what was mentioned above, the differentiation of Shiite and Mutazilite theologies are proved. To prove the primacy of Shiite theology over that of Mutazilite, it is sufficient to refer to some of the remarks of Imam Ali (A

  18. Primacy analysis in the system of Bulgarian cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Zlatinka I.; Ausloos, Marcel

    2015-07-01

    The concept of "primacy" as introduced by Jefferson in 1939 in urban geography leads to the notion of "dominant city" also known as the primate city. Practically, the notion was extended by Sheppard in view of discussing some "hierarchy". The type of dominance is not universal nor any hierarchy reversal. Both can be time and sample dependent. Thus, as an example taking into consideration the existence of both pieces of the puzzle, we consider and discuss the Bulgarian urban system. It is also interesting to compare data on two groups of cities in different time intervals: (i) the whole Bulgaria city system which contains about 250 cities, - studied in the time interval between 2004 and 2011, and (ii) a system of 33 cities, - studied over the time interval 1887 till 2010. These latter cities are selected because the population was already over 10 000 inhabitants in 1946. It is shown that new additional indices are interestingly introduced in order to compensate defects in the Sheppard index. Numerical illustrations are illuminated through a "length ratio" measure, which allows to distinguish the (often) observed departures from the hyperbolic ranking seen by Jefferson.

  19. [Reconsideration of the "conversion theory" from the primacy of the heart to the primacy of the blood--William Harvey's observation, logic and the construction of the exercitatio].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukisawa, M

    1995-01-01

    In De motu cordis, W. Harvey sometimes waxes lyrical on the primacy of the heart. In his another treatise, De generatione, however, he insists on the primacy of the blood. The "conversion theory" explained this discrepancy with Harvey's conversion as caused by his discovery of the antiquity of the blood. But Whitterridge showed that Harvey had already described the antiquity of the blood in his earliest notebook, Prelectiones. As shown in this article, Harvey's observation was not a mere accidental discovery; based on the "classic questions", it was continuously and persistently conducted until he was assured of having seen the blood to exist prior to the pulse and movement to occur in the blood. While this crucial observation was not yet made in Prelectiones and De motu cordis, it was described as crucial evidence of the theory of the primacy of the blood in De generatione, in which this new theory was introduced as an independent topic of the exercitatio. The topic of the order of the generation was a crucial issue in the theoretical medicine of Harvey's days. That is, the Aristotelian primacy of the heart had been seriously challenged by the Galenic tripartite theory which pursued the antiquity of three organs. Harvey's theory, or the primacy of the blood, seems to consists with Aristotle's premise, in that it asserts the existance of the only source of all functions in living animals. Harvey's theory, however, was confronted, on the other hand, with Aristotle's another inconsistency, namely, the issue of two definitions about anima. We must consider the construction and strategy of the exercitatio in Harvey's days to understand the exact meaning of the primacy of the heart in De motu cordis. In De motu cordis, Harvey did not use the primacy of the heart in a central part of the exercitatio, namely, in confirming his unprecedented theory, the circulation of the blood, but he settled this Aristotelian premise in a marginal part, namely, in ratiocinating the final

  20. Primacy and recency effects as indices of the focus of attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra B. Morrison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ongoing debate surrounds the capacity and characteristics of the focus of attention. The present study investigates whether a pattern of larger recency effects and smaller primacy effects reported in previous working memory studies is specific to task conditions used in those studies, or generalizes across manipulations of task-demand. Two experiments varied task-demands by requiring participants to remember lists of letters and to then respond to a subsequent two-item probe by indicating either the item that was presented later in the list (judgment of recency or the item was presented earlier (judgment of primacy. Analyses tested the prediction that a WM task emphasizing later items in a list (judgment of recency would encourage exaggerated recency effects and attenuated primacy effects, while a task emphasizing earlier items (judgment of primacy would encourage exaggerated primacy effects and attenuated recency effects. Behavioral results from two experiments confirmed this prediction. In contrast to past studies, fMRI contrasts revealed no brain regions where activity was significantly altered by the presence of recency items in the probe, for either task condition. However, presence of the primacy item in the probe significantly influenced activity in frontal lobe brain regions linked to active maintenance, but the location and direction of activation changes varied as a function of task instructions. In sum, two experiments demonstrate that the behavioral and neural signatures of WM, specifically related to primacy and recency effects, are dependent on task-demands. Findings are discussed as they inform models of the structure and capacity of WM.

  1. THE PRIMACY EFFECT IN AMNESTIC MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT: ASSOCIATIONS WITH HIPPOCAMPAL FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Brueggen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe primacy effect, i.e., increased memory recall for the first items of a series compared to the following items, is reduced in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. Memory task-fMRI studies showed that primacy recall is associated with higher activation of the hippocampus and temporo-parietal and frontal cortical regions in healthy subjects. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at resting state showed that hippocampus functional connectivity (FC with neocortical brain areas, including regions of the default mode network (DMN, is altered in aMCI. The present study aimed to investigate whether resting state fMRI FC between the hippocampus and cortical brain regions, especially the DMN, is associated with primacy recall performance in aMCI. MethodsA number of 87 aMCI patients underwent resting state fMRI and verbal episodic memory assessment. FC between the left or right hippocampus, respectively, and all other voxels in grey matter was mapped voxel-wise and used in whole-brain regression analyses, testing whether FC values predicted delayed primacy recall score. The delayed primacy score was defined as the number of the first four words recalled on the California Verbal Learning Test. Additionally, a partial least squares analysis (PLS was performed, using DMN regions as seeds to identify the association of their functional interactions with delayed primacy recall.ResultsVoxel-based analyses showed that delayed primacy recall was mainly (positively associated with higher FC between the left and right hippocampus. Additionally, significant associations were found for higher FC between the left hippocampus and bilateral temporal cortex, frontal cortical regions, and for higher FC between the right hippocampus and right temporal cortex, right frontal cortical regions, left medial frontal cortex and right amygdala (p < 0.01, uncorr.. PLS analysis revealed positive associations of delayed primacy recall with FC between regions of

  2. Examining The Evolution Of The Khuzestan Urban Population Using The Urban Primacy Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtar Karami

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Examining the status of a city in the surrounding metropolitan area network not only helpful for Specialists to understand the ups and downs of city life and surrounding it but also can set the groundwork for hierarchical relationships settlements and planners for discipline the urban network is studied. Research to study the evolution of the urban population in Khuzestan province was conducted during the statistical period 1957-2012. The method is a descriptive and analytical study. To collect the data in addition the study of literature the Facts Sheet the statistical yearbooks and census of population and housing censuses in all courses has been used. Then to enter data and analysis it the Excel and Minitab software was used. Models used in this study are Ginsberg index Urban Primacy Index Two City Index Four City Index Mehtas Four City Index Moomav and Alwosabi. The results show that is balance between the parameters of the Urban Primacy Indexes in Khuzestan province since 1957 to 1977. The process of balancing continue and is destroy until the beginning of the Imposed war and the depletion of the population of cities and in 1987 the Urban Primacy Index reached its highest level and due to the problems of the war in Ahvaz it earns the highest the Urban Primacy Index. Since 1987 the Urban Primacy Index reduced and their balancing process continues until 2012 that this balancing process due to natural population growth since after 1997.

  3. Pharmacology Goes Concept-Based: Course Design, Implementation, and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanz, Amelia; Davis, Rebecca G

    Although concept-based curricula are frequently discussed in the nursing education literature, little information exists to guide the development of a concept-based pharmacology course. Traditionally, nursing pharmacology courses are taught with an emphasis on drug class where a prototype drug serves as an exemplar. When transitioning pharmacology to a concept-based course, special considerations are in order. How can educators successfully integrate essential pharmacological content into a curriculum structured around nursing concepts? This article presents one approach to the design and implementation of a concept-based undergraduate pharmacology course. Planning methods, supportive teaching strategies, and course evaluation procedures are discussed.

  4. Two Views on Institutions and Development: The Grand Transition vs the Primacy of Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Erich; Paldam, Martin

    The Grand Transition (GT) view claims that economic development is causal to institutional development, and that many institutional changes can be understood as tran¬sitions occurring at roughly the same level (zones) of development. The Primacy of Insti¬tu¬tions (PoI) view claims that economic d...... as the key strategy for the economic development of poor countries....

  5. Ethics and the Primacy of the Other: A Levinasian Foundation for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper compares Heidegger's “dasein-centric” existential hermeneutic to Levinas's primacy of the Other and the importance the latter places on the ethical relationship. Invoking the concepts of totality and infinity, the paper discusses the ways in which one encounters the Other and how signification arises from the ...

  6. Employee Care

    OpenAIRE

    Zavadilová, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The theme of the bachelor's thesis is the issue of employee care and related provision of employee benefits. The main objective is to analyze the effective legislation and characterize the basic areas of employee care. First of all, the thesis focuses on the matter of employee care and related legislation analyzing the working conditions, professional growth of the employees, catering of employees and special conditions for some employees. Furthermore, the special attention is paid to the vol...

  7. Can social tagged images aid concept-based video search?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setz, A.T.; Snoek, C.G.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper seeks to unravel whether commonly available social tagged images can be exploited as a training resource for concept-based video search. Since social tags are known to be ambiguous, overly personalized, and often error prone, we place special emphasis on the role of disambiguation. We

  8. Concept-Based Grammar Teaching: An Academic Responds to Azar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kent

    2007-01-01

    This response to Azar (this volume) intends to discuss from an academic's perspective the main points raised in her paper (i.e., grammar-based instruction and its relation to focus on form and error correction) and, to encourage a more concept-based approach to grammar instruction (CBT). A CBT approach to language development argues that the…

  9. Concept-Based Content of Professional Linguistic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makshantseva, Nataliia Veniaminovna; Bankova, Liudmila Lvovna

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with professional education of future linguists built on the basis of conceptual approach. The topic is exemplified by the Russian language and a successful attempt to implement the concept-based approach to forming the content of professional language education. Within the framework of the proposed research, the concept is…

  10. Employees development

    OpenAIRE

    Kilijánová, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Employees development is one of the main activities of human resources management. It is connected with other activites, such as training of employees, career development and performance management. In the recent days there is an increased importance put on employees development, although the current economic crisis still has some consequences, such as reduced development budget of many organizations. The thesis mentiones employees development in the first place in the context of management o...

  11. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) show robust primacy and recency in memory for lists from small, but not large, image sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Benjamin M; Hampton, Robert R

    2010-02-01

    The combination of primacy and recency produces a U-shaped serial position curve typical of memory for lists. In humans, primacy is often thought to result from rehearsal, but there is little evidence for rehearsal in nonhumans. To further evaluate the possibility that rehearsal contributes to primacy in monkeys, we compared memory for lists of familiar stimuli (which may be easier to rehearse) to memory for unfamiliar stimuli (which are likely difficult to rehearse). Six rhesus monkeys saw lists of five images drawn from either large, medium, or small image sets. After presentation of each list, memory for one item was assessed using a serial probe recognition test. Across four experiments, we found robust primacy and recency with lists drawn from small and medium, but not large, image sets. This finding is consistent with the idea that familiar items are easier to rehearse and that rehearsal contributes to primacy, warranting further study of the possibility of rehearsal in monkeys. However, alternative interpretations are also viable and are discussed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Roman primacy and the development of the synodal institution in the period of the Arian controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov Georgii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study is process of evolution of church organization in the 4th century, especially the relationships between Roman primacy and synodal institution in the epoch of the Arian controversy. The author examines evolution of the institution of the Roman synod and practice of participation of the Roman See in church councils outside Rome, focusing on the unsuccessful attempt to convene the general council in Rome in 382. Analysis of historical data shows that the ability of the Roman see to organize in a short time a representative council (mainly of the Italian bishops allowed Rome to claim for a special status within the church communion. In the same time the Roman See did not become in the 4th century the center of conciliar activity at the universal level. Participation of Rome in Ecumenical and Western councils was quite passive. In the second part of the paper the author attempts to reconstruct various models of church organization, which were typical for the western and the eastern episcopate in the 4th century. The author concludes that the real initiator of the development of universal primacy of Rome was not originally the pope, but the western episcopate (council of Serdica, 343. In the second part of the 4th century pope Damasus developed this conception, putting the principle of primacy of the Roman See as the chair of Peter above principle of synodal consensus. At the same time eastern bishops considered the Roman chair as the center of the West, rather than the head of the whole Church. Sometimes they invited bishop of Rome and other western bishops to act as arbiters in the eastern conflicts, but more often they defended the idea of full autonomy of the East.

  13. Person perception from changing emotional expressions: primacy, recency, or averaging effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xia; van Kleef, Gerben A; Sauter, Disa A

    2018-02-01

    Dynamic changes in emotional expressions are a valuable source of information in social interactions. As the expressive behaviour of a person changes, the inferences drawn from the behaviour may also change. Here, we test the possibility that dynamic changes in emotional expressions affect person perception in terms of stable trait attributions. Across three experiments, we examined perceivers' inferences about others' personality traits from changing emotional expressions. Expressions changed from one emotion ("start emotion") to another emotion ("end emotion"), allowing us to disentangle potential primacy, recency, and averaging effects. Drawing on three influential models of person perception, we examined perceptions of dominance and affiliation (Experiment 1a), competence and warmth (Experiment 1b), and dominance and trustworthiness (Experiment 2). A strong recency effect was consistently found across all trait judgments, that is, the end emotion of dynamic expressions had a strong impact on trait ratings. Evidence for a primacy effect was also observed (i.e. the information of start emotions was integrated), but less pronounced, and only for trait ratings relating to affiliation, warmth, and trustworthiness. Taken together, these findings suggest that, when making trait judgements about others, observers weigh the most recently displayed emotion in dynamic expressions more heavily than the preceding emotion.

  14. Primacy and ranking of UEFA soccer teams from biasing organization rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausloos, Marcel; Gadomski, Adam; Vitanov, Nikolay K.

    2014-10-01

    A question is raised on whether some implied regularity or structure, as found in the soccer team ranking by the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA), is due to an implicit game result value or score competition conditions. The analysis is based on considerations of complex systems, i.e. finding whether power or other simple law fits are appropriate to describe some internal dynamics. It is observed that the ranking is specifically organized: a major class comprising a few teams emerges after each season. Other classes, which apparently have regular sizes, occur subsequently. Thus, the notion of the Sheppard primacy index is envisaged to describe the findings. Additional primacy indices are discussed for enhancing the features. These measures can be used to sort out peer classes in more general terms. A very simplified toy model containing components of the UEFA ranking rules suggests that such peer classes are an extrinsic property of the ranking, as obtained in many nonlinear systems under boundary condition constraints.

  15. Motivational Hierarchy in the Chinese Brain: Primacy of the Individual Self, Relational Self, or Collective Self?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangru; Wu, Haiyan; Yang, Suyong; Gu, Ruolei

    2016-01-01

    According to the three-tier hierarchy of motivational potency in the self system, the self can be divided into individual self, relational self, and collective self, and individual self is at the top of the motivational hierarchy in Western culture. However, the motivational primacy of the individual self is challenged in Chinese culture, which raises the question about whether the three-tier hierarchy of motivational potency in the self system can be differentiated in the collectivist brain. The present study recorded the event-related potentials (ERPs) to evaluate brain responses when participants gambled for individual self, for a close friend (relational self), or for the class (collective self). The ERP results showed that when outcome feedback was positive, gambling for individual self evoked a larger reward positivity compared with gambling for a friend or for the class, while there is no difference between the latter two conditions. In contrast, when outcome feedback was negative, no significant effect was found between conditions. The present findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence that individual self is at the top of the three-tier hierarchy of the motivational system in the collectivist brain, which supports the classical pancultural view that individual self has motivational primacy.

  16. Employee health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has produced a new guideline looking at improving the health and wellbeing of employees, with a particular focus on organisational culture and context, and the role of line managers.

  17. Concept-Based Curricula: A National Study of Critical Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussow, Jennifer A; Roberts, Karin; Scaruto, Matthew; Sommer, Sheryl; Mills, Christine

    2018-02-22

    As nursing education struggles to address a rapidly changing health care system, overcrowded curricula, and an increased focus on clinical reasoning skills, many programs have adopted or transitioned to concept-based curricula (CBCs), which are structured around key concepts and exemplars. Despite CBC's promised benefits, the process of developing a CBC framework may pose a challenge to programs. To address this barrier, a national study was conducted to develop a representative list of concepts and exemplars. This initiative expands on prior work by suggesting a leveled approach to positioning exemplars within a curricular sequence.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  18. The Emergence and Further Development of the Idea of Papal Primacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Gratsianskiy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The author analyses how the idea of the papal primacy was formed and developed, papal primacy meaning the particular way in which the place of the bishop of Rome was conceived within the Universal Church. The period in question began with the second century and the emergence of a tradition regarding Peter’s martyrdom in Rome and continued through the papacy of Leo I (440–461. It was Leo who summed up the idea of an exclusive ministry of the Roman pontiff within the Church. The author reviews early testimonies (stretching from the second to the fourth century which note the presence of Peter in Rome, and view him first as a Roman martyr, later as the founder of the Roman episcopal see, and finally as Rome’s first bishop. The idea of the position of Peter in the Church of Rome may be viewed as gradually evolving. The author demonstrates how a rather unreliable ancient tradition connecting the death of Peter with Rome evolved during the fourth and fifth centuries into the idea of Peter as the prince of the apostles (princeps apostolorum, who transmitted his authority or power over the Universal Church to his supposed successors, the bishops of Rome, — an idea which was fully developed by Leo I. The author also wishes to describe the way the Church of Rome was conceived during the first centuries of its existence and underlines the limits of its powers and its susciperent ampliorem, per quos ad unam Petri sedem universalis Ecclesiae cura conflueret, et nihil usquam a suo capite dissideret. Qui ergo scit se quibusdam esse praepositum, non moleste ferat aliquem sibi esse praelatum; sed obedientiam quam exigit, etiam ipse dependat…» (Leonis epistula XIV // PL. T. 54. Col. 676. canonical jurisdiction. It is clear that the concept of the Roman papacy’s universal ministry affording it the possibility to extend its universal jurisdiction over the entire Church within the Roman Empire are based on principles of ecclesiastical

  19. Employee Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Madelyn

    2008-09-05

    Welcome to Berkeley Lab. You are joining or are already a part of a laboratory with a sterling tradition of scientific achievement, including eleven Nobel Laureates and thirteen National Medal of Science winners. No matter what job you do, you make Berkeley Lab the outstanding organization that it is. Without your hard work and dedication, we could not achieve all that we have. We value you and thank you for choosing to be part of our community. This Employee Handbook is designed to help you navigate the Lab. With over 3,000 employees, an additional 3,000 guests visiting from countries around the world, a 200-acre campus and many policies and procedures, learning all the ins and outs may seem overwhelming, especially if you're a new employee. However, even if you have been here for a while, this Handbook should be a useful reference tool. It is meant to serve as a guide, highlighting and summarizing what you need to know and informing you where you can go for more detailed information. The general information provided in this Handbook serves only as a brief description of many of the Lab's policies. Policies, procedures and information are found in the Lab's Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM), Summary Plan Descriptions, University of California policies, and provisions of Contract 31 between the Regents of the University and the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, specific terms and conditions for represented employees are found in applicable collective bargaining agreements. Nothing in this Handbook is intended to supplant, change or conflict with the previously mentioned documents. In addition, the information in this Handbook does not constitute a contract or a promise of continued employment and may be changed at any time by the Lab. We believe employees are happier and more productive if they know what they can expect from their organization and what their organization expects from them. The Handbook will familiarize you with the

  20. Lay Definitions of Happiness across Nations: The Primacy of Inner Harmony and Relational Connectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Fave, Antonella; Brdar, Ingrid; Wissing, Marié P; Araujo, Ulisses; Castro Solano, Alejandro; Freire, Teresa; Hernández-Pozo, María Del Rocío; Jose, Paul; Martos, Tamás; Nafstad, Hilde E; Nakamura, Jeanne; Singh, Kamlesh; Soosai-Nathan, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In well-being research the term happiness is often used as synonymous with life satisfaction. However, little is known about lay people's understanding of happiness. Building on the available literature, this study explored lay definitions of happiness across nations and cultural dimensions, analyzing their components and relationship with participants' demographic features. Participants were 2799 adults (age range = 30-60, 50% women) living in urban areas of Argentina, Brazil, Croatia, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, and United States. They completed the Eudaimonic and Hedonic Happiness Investigation (EHHI), reporting, among other information, their own definition of happiness. Answers comprised definitions referring to a broad range of life domains, covering both the contextual-social sphere and the psychological sphere. Across countries and with little variation by age and gender, inner harmony predominated among psychological definitions, and family and social relationships among contextual definitions. Whereas relationships are widely acknowledged as basic happiness components, inner harmony is substantially neglected. Nevertheless, its cross-national primacy, together with relations, is consistent with the view of an ontological interconnectedness characterizing living systems, shared by several conceptual frameworks across disciplines and cultures. At the methodological level, these findings suggest the potential of a bottom-up, mixed method approach to contextualize psychological dimensions within culture and lay understanding.

  1. Lay Definitions of Happiness across Nations: The Primacy of Inner Harmony and Relational Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Fave, Antonella; Brdar, Ingrid; Wissing, Marié P.; Araujo, Ulisses; Castro Solano, Alejandro; Freire, Teresa; Hernández-Pozo, María Del Rocío; Jose, Paul; Martos, Tamás; Nafstad, Hilde E.; Nakamura, Jeanne; Singh, Kamlesh; Soosai-Nathan, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In well-being research the term happiness is often used as synonymous with life satisfaction. However, little is known about lay people's understanding of happiness. Building on the available literature, this study explored lay definitions of happiness across nations and cultural dimensions, analyzing their components and relationship with participants' demographic features. Participants were 2799 adults (age range = 30–60, 50% women) living in urban areas of Argentina, Brazil, Croatia, Hungary, India, Italy, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, and United States. They completed the Eudaimonic and Hedonic Happiness Investigation (EHHI), reporting, among other information, their own definition of happiness. Answers comprised definitions referring to a broad range of life domains, covering both the contextual-social sphere and the psychological sphere. Across countries and with little variation by age and gender, inner harmony predominated among psychological definitions, and family and social relationships among contextual definitions. Whereas relationships are widely acknowledged as basic happiness components, inner harmony is substantially neglected. Nevertheless, its cross-national primacy, together with relations, is consistent with the view of an ontological interconnectedness characterizing living systems, shared by several conceptual frameworks across disciplines and cultures. At the methodological level, these findings suggest the potential of a bottom-up, mixed method approach to contextualize psychological dimensions within culture and lay understanding. PMID:26858677

  2. Automaticity and primacy of auditory streaming: Concurrent subjective and objective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billig, Alexander J; Carlyon, Robert P

    2016-03-01

    Two experiments used subjective and objective measures to study the automaticity and primacy of auditory streaming. Listeners heard sequences of "ABA-" triplets, where "A" and "B" were tones of different frequencies and "-" was a silent gap. Segregation was more frequently reported, and rhythmically deviant triplets less well detected, for a greater between-tone frequency separation and later in the sequence. In Experiment 1, performing a competing auditory task for the first part of the sequence led to a reduction in subsequent streaming compared to when the tones were attended throughout. This is consistent with focused attention promoting streaming, and/or with attention switches resetting it. However, the proportion of segregated reports increased more rapidly following a switch than at the start of a sequence, indicating that some streaming occurred automatically. Modeling ruled out a simple "covert attention" account of this finding. Experiment 2 required listeners to perform subjective and objective tasks concurrently. It revealed superior performance during integrated compared to segregated reports, beyond that explained by the codependence of the two measures on stimulus parameters. We argue that listeners have limited access to low-level stimulus representations once perceptual organization has occurred, and that subjective and objective streaming measures partly index the same processes. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Against Genetic Tests for Athletic Talent: The Primacy of the Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loland, Sigmund

    2015-09-01

    New insights into the genetics of sport performance lead to new areas of application. One area is the use of genetic tests to identify athletic talent. Athletic performances involve a high number of complex phenotypical traits. Based on the ACCE model (review of Analytic and Clinical validity, Clinical utility, and Ethical, legal and social implications), a critique is offered of the lack of validity and predictive power of genetic tests for talent. Based on the ideal of children's right to an open future, a moral argument is given against such tests on children and young athletes. A possible role of genetic tests in sport is proposed in terms of identifying predisposition for injury. In meeting ACCE requirements, such tests could improve individualised injury prevention and increase athlete health. More generally, limitations of science are discussed in the identification of talent and in the understanding of complex human performance phenotypes. An alternative approach to talent identification is proposed in terms of ethically sensitive, systematic and evidence-based holistic observation over time of relevant phenotypical traits by experienced observers. Talent identification in sport should be based on the primacy of the phenotype.

  4. Delivering ideal employee experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marjorie D; Tyink, Steve; Kubiak, Curt

    2009-05-01

    Employee-centric strategies have moved from employee satisfaction and brand awareness to employee "affinity" or "attachment." In today's marketplace, occupational health nurses understand that differentiation (i.e., the perception of uniqueness) is the direct result of superior employee interactions, which lead to better employee care, enduring employee relationships, loyal employees, and satisfied employers. What drives employees to occupational health nurse attachment? The answer is a passion for rising above the competition to create ideal employee experiences.

  5. Motivation of employees and employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Haninger, David

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis examines the subject of employee motivation and employee benefits. The basic terms and theories needed to comprehend the subject are explained in the theoretical part of the work. The theoretical part of the work also focuses on employee benefits, mainly the goal of employee benefits and listing of currently available employee benefits. In the practical part of the work is an analysis and comparison of employee benefits used in two companies that are representing privat...

  6. Employee recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaugh, James A

    2013-01-01

    The way an organization recruits can influence the type of employees it hires, how they perform, and their retention rate. This article provides a selective review of research that has addressed recruitment targeting, recruitment methods, the recruitment message, recruiters, the organizational site visit, the job offer, and the timing of recruitment actions. These and other topics (e.g., the job applicant's perspective) are discussed in terms of their potential influence on prehire (e.g., the quality of job applicants) and posthire (e.g., new employee retention) recruitment outcomes. In reviewing research, attention is given to the current state of scientific knowledge, limitations of previous research, and important issues meriting future investigation.

  7. Categorizing experience-based foraging plasticity in mites: age dependency, primacy effects and memory persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schausberger, Peter; Davaasambuu, Undarmaa; Saussure, Stéphanie; Christiansen, Inga C

    2018-04-01

    Behavioural plasticity can be categorized into activational (also termed contextual) and developmental plasticity. Activational plasticity allows immediate contextual behavioural changes, whereas developmental plasticity is characterized by time-lagged changes based on memory of previous experiences (learning). Behavioural plasticity tends to decline with age but whether this holds true for both plasticity categories and the effects of first-in-life experiences is poorly understood. We tackled this issue by assessing the foraging plasticity of plant-inhabiting predatory mites, Amblyseius swirskii , on thrips and spider mites following age-dependent prey experience, i.e. after hatching or after reaching maturity. Juvenile and young adult predator females were alternately presented thrips and spider mites, for establishing 1st and 2nd prey-in-life experiences, and tested, as gravid females, for their foraging plasticity when offered both prey species. Prey experience by juvenile predators resulted in clear learning effects, which were evident in likelier and earlier attacks on familiar prey, and higher proportional inclusion of familiar prey in total diet. First prey-in-life experience by juvenile but not adult predators resulted in primacy effects regarding attack latency. Prey experience by adult predators resulted mainly in prey-unspecific physiological changes, with easy-to-grasp spider mites providing higher net energy gains than difficult-to-grasp thrips. Prey experience by juvenile, but not adult, predators was adaptive, which was evident in a negative correlation between attack latencies and egg production. Overall, our study provides key evidence that similar experiences by juvenile and adult predators, including first-in-life experiences, may be associated with different types of behavioural plasticity, i.e. developmental and activational plasticity.

  8. Categorizing experience-based foraging plasticity in mites: age dependency, primacy effects and memory persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davaasambuu, Undarmaa; Saussure, Stéphanie; Christiansen, Inga C.

    2018-01-01

    Behavioural plasticity can be categorized into activational (also termed contextual) and developmental plasticity. Activational plasticity allows immediate contextual behavioural changes, whereas developmental plasticity is characterized by time-lagged changes based on memory of previous experiences (learning). Behavioural plasticity tends to decline with age but whether this holds true for both plasticity categories and the effects of first-in-life experiences is poorly understood. We tackled this issue by assessing the foraging plasticity of plant-inhabiting predatory mites, Amblyseius swirskii, on thrips and spider mites following age-dependent prey experience, i.e. after hatching or after reaching maturity. Juvenile and young adult predator females were alternately presented thrips and spider mites, for establishing 1st and 2nd prey-in-life experiences, and tested, as gravid females, for their foraging plasticity when offered both prey species. Prey experience by juvenile predators resulted in clear learning effects, which were evident in likelier and earlier attacks on familiar prey, and higher proportional inclusion of familiar prey in total diet. First prey-in-life experience by juvenile but not adult predators resulted in primacy effects regarding attack latency. Prey experience by adult predators resulted mainly in prey-unspecific physiological changes, with easy-to-grasp spider mites providing higher net energy gains than difficult-to-grasp thrips. Prey experience by juvenile, but not adult, predators was adaptive, which was evident in a negative correlation between attack latencies and egg production. Overall, our study provides key evidence that similar experiences by juvenile and adult predators, including first-in-life experiences, may be associated with different types of behavioural plasticity, i.e. developmental and activational plasticity. PMID:29765663

  9. The primacy of the good midwife in midwifery services: an evolving theory of professionalism in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halldorsdottir, Sigridur; Karlsdottir, Sigfridur Inga

    2011-12-01

    Theory is the acknowledged foundation to practise methodology, professional identity and growth of formalized knowledge. It has been noted that practice must not only be evidence-based but also theory-based. Hence, midwifery must be theory based because theories serve as a broad framework for practice and may also articulate the goals of a profession and core values. In this paper, an evolving theory on the empowerment of childbearing women is introduced, where the midwife's professionalism is central. The theory is synthesized from nine datasets and scholarly work, and then more than three hundred studies were reviewed for clarification and confirmation. According to the theory, the midwife's professionalism is constructed from five main aspects: The professional midwife cares for the childbearing woman and her family. This caring within the professional domain is seen as the core of midwifery. The professional midwife is professionally competent. This professional competence must always have primacy for the sake of safety of woman and child. The professional midwife has professional wisdom and knows how to apply it. Professional wisdom is a new concept used to denote the interplay of knowledge and experience. The professional midwife has interpersonal competence, is capable of empowering communication and positive partnership with the woman and her family. The professional midwife develops herself both personally and professionally, which is the prerequisite for true professionalism. This evolving theory must be regularly reconstructed in the light of current knowledge within midwifery. It is an attempt to identify and articulate the processes and components of the art and science of midwifery practice in an endeavour of continuing the discipline's development by assisting in the understanding and practice of creating further theoretical discourse, processes and products for midwifery practice. The theory has implications for midwifery education and practice.

  10. Employee motivation and employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Limburská, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to get acquainted with the issue of employee motivation from a theoretical perspective, and then analyze the incentive system in a selected company - Sellier & Bellot. In conclusion, I would like to evaluate the lessons learned and propose some changes and recommendations for improving motivation in the analyzed company. The work is divided into four parts. The first three are rather theoretical. The first part deals with the explanation of the concept of motivation...

  11. “Apostolic” and “Imperial” discourse in the development of the Roman Primacy in the 4th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov Georgii

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the evolution of the Roman primacy in the 4th century. The Christianization of the Empire accelerated the process of regional consolidation of the episcopate, but did not lead to the emergence of specific «imperial ecclesiology». At the same time in the 4th century, traditional apostolic ecclesiology has maintained its position both in the West and the East. We can distinguish two different types of the apostolic ecclesiology: locally-historical (the doctrine of St. Irenaeus and Tertullian and universally-hierarchical (the concept of St. Cyprian of Carthage. The first can be fi nd in the works of pope Julius, St. Athanasius and in the letter of the council of Constantinople (382, the second — in the texts of St. Basil the Great and Palladius of Ratiara. At the same time on the council of Serdica (343 Western bishops supported the new “Roman” ecclesiological model. They proclaimed the Roman See as the Chair of Peter the only center of catholic communion and invested it with special legal prerogatives. In fact, this model was the result of ecclesiological synthesis of two early conceptions of apostolicity: the idea of apostolic origins of the Roman Church was connected with the idea of the primacy of Peter as the basis of the Church’s unity. In the future, this conception was adopted by the bishop of Rome. Pope Damasus I (366–384, developing the doctrine of the Roman See as sedes apostolica, actually put principle of Roman primacy above the principle of synodal consensus. Eastern bishops did not support this interpretation of the church order, defending the autonomy of the Eastern Churches. They proclaimed Constantinople New Rome, in fact, denying the uniqueness of the status of the Church of Rome.

  12. Culture, Method, and the Content of Self-Concepts: Testing Trait, Individual-Self-Primacy, and Cultural Psychology Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prado, Alicia M; Church, A Timothy; Katigbak, Marcia S; Miramontes, Lilia G; Whitty, Monica; Curtis, Guy J; de Jesús Vargas-Flores, José; Ibáñez-Reyes, Joselina; Ortiz, Fernando A; Reyes, Jose Alberto S

    2007-12-01

    Three theoretical perspectives on cultural universals and differences in the content of self-concepts were tested in individualistic (United States, n = 178; Australia, n = 112) and collectivistic (Mexico, n = 157; Philippines, n = 138) cultures, using three methods of self-concept assessment. Support was found for both trait perspectives and the individual-self-primacy hypothesis. In contrast, support for cultural psychology hypotheses was limited because traits and other personal attributes were not more salient, or social attributes less salient, in individualistic cultures than collectivistic cultures. The salience of some aspects of self-concept depended on the method of assessment, calling into question conclusions based on monomethod studies.

  13. Employee Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2016-01-01

    -for-performance systems) perceived as fair and when are they not? When can differences in contribution (equity) overrule the social norm of equality? Which contingent reward structure should be applied for teamwork members, if any? Which reward structure should be utilized to motivate employees to a continuous search......This article investigates the factors that determine workplace actors’ appeal to social norms of fairness in some situations and what ‘fairness’ is perceived as consisting of. When is a pay level considered as relativity fair, and when is it not? When are contingent pay systems (i.e. pay...... for smarter working procedures and solutions? These are central concerns of motivation theory, where rational choice decisions are counterbalanced by endowment effects or other fairness concerns. Management is placed in a dilemma between what is, e.g., an economically rational structure of incentives...

  14. Epistemic Primacy vs. Ontological Elusiveness of Spatial Extension: Is There an Evolutionary Role for the Quantum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauri, Massimo

    2011-11-01

    A critical re-examination of the history of the concepts of space (including spacetime of general relativity and relativistic quantum field theory) reveals a basic ontological elusiveness of spatial extension, while, at the same time, highlighting the fact that its epistemic primacy seems to be unavoidably imposed on us (as stated by A.Einstein "giving up the extensional continuum … is like to breathe in airless space"). On the other hand, Planck's discovery of the atomization of action leads to the fundamental recognition of an ontology of non-spatial, abstract entities (Quine) for the quantum level of reality (QT), as distinguished from the necessarily spatio-temporal, experimental revelations ( measurements). The elementary quantum act (measured by Planck's constant) has neither duration nor extension, and any genuinely quantum process literally does not belong in the Raum and time of our experience. As Heisenberg stresses: "Während also die klassische Physik ein objectives Geschehen in Raum and Zeit zum Gegenstand hat, für dessen Existenz seine Beobachtung völlig irrelevant war, behandelt die Quantentheorie Vorgänge, die sozusagen nur in den Momenten der Beobachtung als raumzeitliche Phänomene aufleuchten, und über die in der zwischenzeit anschaulische physikalische Aussagen sinloss sind". An admittedly speculative, hazardous conjecture is then advanced concerning the relation of such quantum ontology with the role of the pre-phenomenal continuum (Husserl) in the perception of macroscopically distinguishable objects in the Raum and time of our experience. Although rather venturesome, it brings together important philosophical issues. Coherently with recent general results in works on the foundations of QT, it is assumed that the linearity of quantum dynamical evolution does not apply to the central nervous system of living beings at a certain level of the evolutionary ramification and at the pre-conscious stage of subjectivity. Accordingly

  15. Information Memory Processing and Retrieval: The Use of Information Theory to Study Primacy and Recency Characteristics of Ninth Grade Science Students Processing Learning Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, David L.

    Reported is another study related to the Project on an Information Memory Model. This study involved using information theory to investigate the concepts of primacy and recency as they were exhibited by ninth-grade science students while processing a biological sorting problem and an immediate, abstract recall task. Two hundred randomly selected…

  16. Survey of Opinions on the Primacy of "g" and Social Consequences of Ability Testing: A Comparison of Expert and Non-Expert Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Charlie L.; Charles, Jennifer E.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examines the views of experts in the science of mental abilities about the primacy and uniqueness of "g" and the social implications of ability testing, and compares their responses to the views of a group of non-expert psychologists. Results indicate expert consensus that "g" is an important, non-trivial determinant (or at least…

  17. Concept-Based Learning in Clinical Experiences: Bringing Theory to Clinical Education for Deep Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Ann

    2016-07-01

    Concept-based learning is used increasingly in nursing education to support the organization, transfer, and retention of knowledge. Concept-based learning activities (CBLAs) have been used in clinical education to explore key aspects of the patient situation and principles of nursing care, without responsibility for total patient care. The nature of best practices in teaching and the resultant learning are not well understood. The purpose of this multiple-case study research was to explore and describe concept-based learning in the context of clinical education in inpatient settings. Four clinical groups (each a case) were observed while they used CBLAs in the clinical setting. Major findings include that concept-based learning fosters deep learning, connection of theory with practice, and clinical judgment. Strategies used to support learning, major teaching-learning foci, and preconditions for concept-based teaching and learning will be described. Concept-based learning is promising to support integration of theory with practice and clinical judgment through application experiences with patients. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(7):365-371.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Březíková, Tereza

    2009-01-01

    The topic of my bachelor's thesis is the employee motivation and benefits. The thesis is divided in two parts, a theoretical one and a practical one. The theoretical part deals with the theory of motivation and individual employee benefits. The practical part describes employee benefits in ČSOB, where I did my research by questionnaires that were filled in by employees from different departments of ČSOB. These employees answered questions about their work motivation and benefits. The resultts...

  19. Determinants of employee punctuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishon-Berkovits, Miriam; Koslowsky, Meni

    2002-12-01

    Although researchers have studied employee lateness empirically (e.g., S. Adler & J. Golan, 1981; C. W. Clegg, 1983), few have attempted to describe the punctual employee. In the present study, results of a discriminant analysis on employees in Israel indicated that a personality characteristic, time urgency, a subcomponent of Type A behavioral pattern, distinguished between punctual and late employees. Organizational commitment and age of employee's youngest child also distinguished between the groups.

  20. Analysis of Employee Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Burešová, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The target of this bachelor thesis is to analyze employee benefits from the perspective of employees and to employers suggest possible ideas to improve their provision. The work is divided into two parts: theoretical and practical. The theoretical part describes the overal remuneration of employees, payroll system and employee benefits. Benefits are included in the remuneration system, broken and some of them are defined. The practical part presents a survey among employees in the Czech Repub...

  1. GDOT employee survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-04

    The research team worked in collaboration with GDOT to conduct the 2016 GDOT Employee Survey. This research study aimed to increase the response rate and the usefulness of the feedback from the GDOT employee survey to support organizational decisions...

  2. Employee wellness program evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Well-designed wellness programs can keep healthy employees healthy, support employees with : health risks to improve their health behaviors, and facilitate organizational efforts to achieve : workforce performance goals. : Productivity lost through a...

  3. Employees with Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome was often 10-15 minutes late for work every day due to amount and quality of sleep. The employer provided this employee with a half an hour flexible start time. Depending on when the employee arrived, ...

  4. Employees with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at work. Allow employee to remain on the job after a seizure when possible Provide flexible schedule Modify an attendance policy Provide leave while the employee is adjusting to medications Work a straight shift instead of rotating shifts Personal ...

  5. Occupational segregation, gender essentialism and male primacy as major barriers to equity in HIV/AIDS caregiving: Findings from Lesotho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoae Lucia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender segregation of occupations, which typically assigns caring/nurturing jobs to women and technical/managerial jobs to men, has been recognized as a major source of inequality worldwide with implications for the development of robust health workforces. In sub-Saharan Africa, gender inequalities are particularly acute in HIV/AIDS caregiving (90% of which is provided in the home, where women and girls make up the informal (and mostly unpaid workforce. Men's and boy's entry into HIV/AIDS caregiving in greater numbers would both increase the equity and sustainability of national and community-level HIV/AIDS caregiving and mitigate health workforce shortages, but notions of gender essentialism and male primacy make this far from inevitable. In 2008 the Capacity Project partnered with the Lesotho Ministry of Health and Social Welfare in a study of the gender dynamics of HIV/AIDS caregiving in three districts of Lesotho to account for men's absence in HIV/AIDS caregiving and investigate ways in which they might be recruited into the community and home-based care (CHBC workforce. Methods The study used qualitative methods, including 25 key informant interviews with village chiefs, nurse clinicians, and hospital administrators and 31 focus group discussions with community health workers, community members, ex-miners, and HIV-positive men and women. Results Study participants uniformly perceived a need to increase the number of CHBC providers to deal with the heavy workload from increasing numbers of patients and insufficient new entries. HIV/AIDS caregiving is a gender-segregated job, at the core of which lie stereotypes and beliefs about the appropriate work of men and women. This results in an inequitable, unsustainable burden on women and girls. Strategies are analyzed for their potential effectiveness in increasing equity in caregiving. Conclusions HIV/AIDS and human resources stakeholders must address occupational segregation

  6. Occupational segregation, gender essentialism and male primacy as major barriers to equity in HIV/AIDS caregiving: Findings from Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance J; Fogarty, Linda; Makoae, Lucia Nthabiseng; Reavely, Erik

    2011-06-08

    Gender segregation of occupations, which typically assigns caring/nurturing jobs to women and technical/managerial jobs to men, has been recognized as a major source of inequality worldwide with implications for the development of robust health workforces. In sub-Saharan Africa, gender inequalities are particularly acute in HIV/AIDS caregiving (90% of which is provided in the home), where women and girls make up the informal (and mostly unpaid) workforce. Men's and boy's entry into HIV/AIDS caregiving in greater numbers would both increase the equity and sustainability of national and community-level HIV/AIDS caregiving and mitigate health workforce shortages, but notions of gender essentialism and male primacy make this far from inevitable.In 2008 the Capacity Project partnered with the Lesotho Ministry of Health and Social Welfare in a study of the gender dynamics of HIV/AIDS caregiving in three districts of Lesotho to account for men's absence in HIV/AIDS caregiving and investigate ways in which they might be recruited into the community and home-based care (CHBC) workforce. The study used qualitative methods, including 25 key informant interviews with village chiefs, nurse clinicians, and hospital administrators and 31 focus group discussions with community health workers, community members, ex-miners, and HIV-positive men and women. Study participants uniformly perceived a need to increase the number of CHBC providers to deal with the heavy workload from increasing numbers of patients and insufficient new entries. HIV/AIDS caregiving is a gender-segregated job, at the core of which lie stereotypes and beliefs about the appropriate work of men and women. This results in an inequitable, unsustainable burden on women and girls. Strategies are analyzed for their potential effectiveness in increasing equity in caregiving. HIV/AIDS and human resources stakeholders must address occupational segregation and the underlying gender essentialism and male primacy if there

  7. Family employees and absenteeism

    OpenAIRE

    Laszlo Goerke; Jörn Block; Jose Maria Millan; Concepcion Roman

    2014-01-01

    Work effort varies greatly across employees, as evidenced by substantial differences in absence rates. Moreover, absenteeism causes sizeable output losses. Using data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP), this paper investigates absence behavior of family employees, i.e. workers who are employed in enterprises owned by a relative. Our estimates indicate that being a family employee instead of a regular employee in the private sector significantly reduces both the probability and...

  8. Documenting Employee Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jason

    2009-01-01

    One of the best ways for a child care program to lose an employment-related lawsuit is failure to document the performance of its employees. Documentation of an employee's performance can provide evidence of an employment-related decision such as discipline, promotion, or discharge. When properly implemented, documentation of employee performance…

  9. Concepts and Relations in Neurally Inspired In Situ Concept-Based Computing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Frank; van der Velde, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In situ concept-based computing is based on the notion that conceptual representations in the human brain are “in situ.” In this way, they are grounded in perception and action. Examples are neuronal assemblies, whose connection structures develop over time and are distributed over different brain

  10. Authoring support in concept-based web information systems for educational applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aroyo, L.M.; Dicheva, D.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of concept-based web information systems (WIS) and their educational applications requires more intelligent support for their authoring. We propose an ontological approach towards a common authoring framework for such systems to formally describe the overall authoring

  11. Links between theory of mind and executive function in young children with autism: clues to developmental primacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicano, Elizabeth

    2007-07-01

    There has been much theoretical discussion of a functional link between theory of mind (ToM) and executive function (EF) in autism. This study sought to establish the relationship between ToM and EF in young children with autism (M = 5 years, 6 months) and to examine issues of developmental primacy. Thirty children with autism and 40 typically developing children, matched on age and ability, were assessed on a battery of tasks measuring ToM (1st- and 2nd-order false belief) and components of EF (planning, set shifting, inhibition). A significant correlation emerged between ToM and EF variables in the autism group, independent of age and ability, while ToM and higher order planning ability remained significantly related in the comparison group. Examination of the pattern of ToM-EF impairments in the autism group revealed dissociations in 1 direction only: impaired ToM with intact EF. These findings support the view that EF may be 1 important factor in the advancement of ToM understanding in autism. The theoretical implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright 2007 APA.

  12. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    Employee recovery addresses either employee well-being or management's practices in aiding employees in recovering themselves following a service failure. This paper surveys the cabin crew at a small, European, low-cost carrier and investigates employees' perceptions of management practices to aid...... personnel achieve service recovery. Employee recovery within service research often focuses on front-line employees that work in a fixed location, however a contribution to the field is made by investigating the recovery of spatially dispersed personnel, such as operational personnel in the transport sector......, who have a work place away from a fixed or central location and have minimal management contact. Results suggest that the support employees receive from management, such as recognition, information sharing, training, and strategic awareness are all important for spatially dispersed front...

  13. Development of concept-based physiology lessons for biomedical engineering undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Regina K; Chesler, Naomi C; Strang, Kevin T

    2013-06-01

    Physiology is a core requirement in the undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. In one or two introductory physiology courses, engineering students must learn physiology sufficiently to support learning in their subsequent engineering courses and careers. As preparation for future learning, physiology instruction centered on concepts may help engineering students to further develop their physiology and biomedical engineering knowledge. Following the Backward Design instructional model, a series of seven concept-based lessons was developed for undergraduate engineering students. These online lessons were created as prerequisite physiology training to prepare students to engage in a collaborative engineering challenge activity. This work is presented as an example of how to convert standard, organ system-based physiology content into concept-based content lessons.

  14. Selecting concepts for a concept-based curriculum: application of a benchmark approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giddens, Jean Foret; Wright, Mary; Gray, Irene

    2012-09-01

    In response to a transformational movement in nursing education, faculty across the country are considering changes to curricula and approaches to teaching. As a result, an emerging trend in many nursing programs is the adoption of a concept-based curriculum. As part of the curriculum development process, the selection of concepts, competencies, and exemplars on which to build courses and base content is needed. This article presents a benchmark approach used to validate and finalize concept selection among educators developing a concept-based curriculum for a statewide nursing consortium. These findings are intended to inform other nurse educators who are currently involved with or are considering this curriculum approach. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. ANTESEDEN EMPLOYEE TURNOVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heryadi Fardilah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This research is concerning the effect of workplace environment, job satisfaction, and  job performance on employee turnover, and the background is to get the convenience of employees condition, the satisfaction of job results, maximum performance, and keep and reduce in and out employees. The purpose of this research is to see how far the influence of workplace environment, job satisfaction, and job performance on employee turnover. Planning of this research uses primary data that is got by handing over questioners to 200 employees in Telecommunication company in East Jakarta. The analysis method which is used is double regresi.  Results of  this  research give conclusion that there's a positive and significant influence of workplace environment, job satisfaction, and job performance on employee turnover.

  16. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  17. Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Hermine Zagat

    1985-01-01

    The author reports company responses to a questionnaire concerning employee assistance programs (EAP). Answers concern EAP structure, staff training, use of outside consultant, services provided by EAPs, program administration, employee confidence in EAPs, advertising the program, program philosophy, problems encountered by EAP users, coverage and…

  18. Employees as social intrapreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Catharina Juul

    2016-01-01

    Employees form an important but less explored and utilized resource in social innovation in social welfare organisations it the third and public sectors. The employees have important knowledge of the everyday challenges of the organisations, the wishes and needs of their users and customers......, and of the local communities which can inspire and refine innovations. They are active, albeit not always consciously so and potential social intrapreneurs. Although wider international research exists the Nordic research seems to dominate the field. The aim of this chapter is to contribute to the existing...... research on employees as social intrapreneurs (the fields of employee-driven innovation and social intrapreneurship) by conceptualizing active employee participation in social innovation and elucidate the potential and multiplicity of the phenomenon. The chapter is theoretical explorative....

  19. DEVELOP CREATIVE EMPLOYEES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertel, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    THAT SOME MANAGERS MUST BE ABLE TO HELP EMPLOYEES DEVELOP OR APPLY CREATIVITY. IN THIS CONFERENCE PAPER WE WILL ANALYSE A CASE STUDY IN ORDER TO PRODUCE A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR IDENTIFYING WHEN AND HOW EMPLOYEES BECOME CREATIVE AT WORK. AN ESSENTIAL ASPECT OF THIS CONFERENCE PAPER WILL BE ANALYZING......PREVIOUS STUDIES (e.g. Hertel, 2015) HAS SHOWN THAT SOME CLEANING INDUSTRIES ARE ACTUALLY REQUIRING CREATIVE EMPLOYEES. HUMAN BEINGS ARE (c.f. Richards, 2010) BY DEFINITION CREATIVE BUT NOT ALL EMPLOYEES ARE USED TO OR ACTUALLY ALLOWED TO APPLY CREATIVITY IN EVERYDAY ORGANIZATIONAL LIFE. THIS MEANS...... THE CREATIVITY PRODUCED BY EMPLOEES. ANALYZING THE CREATIVITY PRODUCED WILL HELP US DEVELOP A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR UNDERSTANDING HOW CREATIVE THE EMPLOYEES ACTUALLY BECOMES....

  20. Teaching Electronic Literacy A Concepts-Based Approach for School Library Media Specialists

    CERN Document Server

    Craver, Kathleen W

    1997-01-01

    School library media specialists will find this concepts-based approach to teaching electronic literacy an indispensable basic tool for instructing students and teachers. It provides step-by-step instruction on how to find and evaluate needed information from electronic databases and the Internet, how to formulate successful electronic search strategies and retrieve relevant results, and how to interpret and critically analyze search results. The chapters contain a suggested lesson plan and sample assignments for the school library media specialist to use in teaching electronic literacy skills

  1. Costs of employee turnover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to establish a general methodology for calculating the costs incurred by employee turnover. This paper deals with identification of costs incurred by the departure of an employee, and does not deal with the cost of recruitment of a new employee. Economic calculations are adjusted to the tax policy in the Czech Republic. The costs of employee turnover (according to Bliss, 2012 include the costs of substitution of the unoccupied position, costs of conducting the exit interview and termination of the contract. The cost of an executive’s time to understand the causes of leaving and costs of the leaving employee’s training were also determined. Important factors in the costs of employee turnover also include the loss of knowledge and possibly also a loss of customers. Costs of lost employee and department productiveness represent an important part of the costs of employee turnover, as well. For all of these costs there have been proposed general calculations formulas.

  2. The Federal Administrative Court confirms unlawfulness of nuclear power moratorium. Political primacy is only valid in the bounds of justice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leidinger, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    With its decision on December 20 th , the Federal Administrative Court (BVwerfG) came to the legally valid conclusion that after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, the supervision court order related to the law on nuclear installation by the Hessian Ministry for the Environment, in order to stop operating nuclear power plants Biblis A and B for 3 months or rather not to put in operation again, was unlawful (BVwerfG 7 B 18.13 und 7 B 19.13). Beforehand, the Hessian Administrative Court (Hess. VGH) had already pronounced its judgement on February 27 th 2013. The supervising orders were part of the so-called nuclear power moratorium. They were issued after the resolution of the federal government, at demand of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) towards their nearby countries, and were identically executed by the supervisory authority of the other site-countries. Besides Biblis in Hesse, nuclear power plants in Neckarwestheim I and Philippsburg 1, Baden-Wurttemberg, Isar 1 in Bavaria, Unterweser in Lower Saxony, as well as Brunsbuettel in Schleswig-Holstein, were affected. However only RWE took legal action and was now affirmed - after the Hessian VGH verdict- by the highest German administrative court: The nuclear power moratorium - the first step to withdrawal of nuclear power in Germany - was unlawful. The decision taken by the BVerwG - as well as the one by the Hessian VGH - indicates a juridical clear and precise argumentation. The partially polemic and unobjective critic, which the VHG-verdict experienced, did not disguise, just as little as the political conflict concerning the withdrawal from nuclear energy, the view of federal judges, regarding the decision-relevant questions nor did they influence their reply. The political primacy finds its limits in the bounds of justice. Existing rights do not become thus a paper waste because there is a fundamental decision. This takes effectiveness for

  3. Essays on Employee Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faigen, Benjamin

    This thesis examines ownership of the firm by its employees, of varying stakes. It begins by identifying the existence of employee ownership in a Chinese context, presented in the form of a general analytical discussion which is informed by a review of the available evidence on the subject...... of this phenomenon. Employee ownership is found to have played a role in Chinese economic transition as a transitory phase before non-state enterprises were afforded official recognition in a context of publicly-owned enterprise privatisation. Senior managers became the key beneficiaries in firm sales and most...

  4. Concepts and Relations in Neurally Inspired In Situ Concept-Based Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velde, Frank

    2016-01-01

    In situ concept-based computing is based on the notion that conceptual representations in the human brain are "in situ." In this way, they are grounded in perception and action. Examples are neuronal assemblies, whose connection structures develop over time and are distributed over different brain areas. In situ concepts representations cannot be copied or duplicated because that will disrupt their connection structure, and thus the meaning of these concepts. Higher-level cognitive processes, as found in language and reasoning, can be performed with in situ concepts by embedding them in specialized neurally inspired "blackboards." The interactions between the in situ concepts and the blackboards form the basis for in situ concept computing architectures. In these architectures, memory (concepts) and processing are interwoven, in contrast with the separation between memory and processing found in Von Neumann architectures. Because the further development of Von Neumann computing (more, faster, yet power limited) is questionable, in situ concept computing might be an alternative for concept-based computing. In situ concept computing will be illustrated with a recently developed BABI reasoning task. Neurorobotics can play an important role in the development of in situ concept computing because of the development of in situ concept representations derived in scenarios as needed for reasoning tasks. Neurorobotics would also benefit from power limited and in situ concept computing.

  5. A study of concept-based similarity approaches for recommending program examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Roya; Brusilovsky, Peter

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates a range of concept-based example recommendation approaches that we developed to provide example-based problem-solving support in the domain of programming. The goal of these approaches is to offer students a set of most relevant remedial examples when they have trouble solving a code comprehension problem where students examine a program code to determine its output or the final value of a variable. In this paper, we use the ideas of semantic-level similarity-based linking developed in the area of intelligent hypertext to generate examples for the given problem. To determine the best-performing approach, we explored two groups of similarity approaches for selecting examples: non-structural approaches focusing on examples that are similar to the problem in terms of concept coverage and structural approaches focusing on examples that are similar to the problem by the structure of the content. We also explored the value of personalized example recommendation based on student's knowledge levels and learning goal of the exercise. The paper presents concept-based similarity approaches that we developed, explains the data collection studies and reports the result of comparative analysis. The results of our analysis showed better ranking performance of the personalized structural variant of cosine similarity approach.

  6. Primacy Without a Plan?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freier, Nathan

    2006-01-01

    ... makers for half a century. These foundational Cold War initiatives chartered grand strategic choices for the nation that were ends-focused, progressively ways- and means-rationalized and thus more readily risk-informed...

  7. Understanding Employee Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, James R.

    1998-01-01

    Extension employees (n=23) ranked the following as the most important motivational factors: interesting work, good wages, appreciation, job security, and good working conditions. The findings were related to theories of motivation formulated by Herzberg, Adams, and Vroom. (SK)

  8. Allegheny County Employee Salaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Employee salaries are a regular Right to Know request the County receives. Here is the disclaimer language that is included with the dataset from the Open Records...

  9. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  10. Hiring the right employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigle, Dale A

    2014-01-01

    Current employees provide the best examples of the type of aptitude, attitude, motivation, and fit we are looking for, or not looking for, in new employees. All four of these attributes are present in star employees. Using what we know about our best and worst employees can assist us in developing questions and scoring templates that will help us categorize current applicants. Hiring managers should formulate questions in a way that elicits informative responses from candidates about past performance in situations similar to those they will face on the job. Nonverbal clues can help provide insight beyond the simple verbal answer given by candidates. Practice, critique, and critical review of the outcomes of our hiring decisions improve our ability to become good hiring managers.

  11. Ombuds’ corner: Employee silence

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2013-01-01

    Although around a hundred cases a year are reported to the Ombuds, several issues may still not be disclosed due to employee silence*. The deliberate withholding of concerns, escalating misunderstandings or genuine conflicts can impede the global process of learning and development of a better respectful organizational workplace environment, and prevent the detection and correction of acts violating the CERN Code of Conduct.   For the employee him/herself, such silence can lead to feelings of anger, resentment, helplessness and humiliation. These feelings will inevitably contaminate personal and interpersonal relations, and poison creativity and effectiveness. Employee silence can be explained by many factors; sometimes it is connected to organizational forces. In their published paper*, authors Michael Knoll and Rolf van Dick found four forms of employee silence. People may stay silent if they feel that their opinion is neither welcomed nor valued by their management. They have gi...

  12. Employee, State of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Business Resources Division of Corporations, Business & Professional Licensing Dept. of Commerce Benefits Resources State Employee Directory State Calendar State Training: LearnAlaska State Travel Manager) Web Mail (Outlook) Login Who to Call Health Insurance Insurance Benefits Health and Optional

  13. Employers meet employees

    OpenAIRE

    Scheuer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    "Leaping into the future of labor economics: the research potential of linking employer and employee data" is the title of a paper by Daniel S Hammermesh published in Labour Economics in 1999. I quote it here, since it captures much of my motivation for the work included in this thesis. Considering applied micro econometrics and labor economics my main elds of interest, the development of linked employer-employee data that took place in Denmark around the time of the new mille...

  14. Employee Selection Process: Integrating Employee Needs and Employer Motivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Brian J.

    1989-01-01

    Offers suggestions for managers relative to the employee selection process, focusing on the identification of a potential employee's needs and the employer's motivators that affect employee productivity. Discusses the use of a preemployment survey and offers a questionnaire that allows matching of the employee's needs with employment…

  15. Employee Benefit Status from E-Employee Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Semseddin; Çoklar, Ahmet Naci

    2017-01-01

    The internet is the one of the most important global network and information source in information age. The internet has changed employee's life enormously. The purpose of this study is to clarify the benefitting situations of employees from e-employee services. For this purpose, a 20-item data collection tool, based on the e-employee services put…

  16. Employee motivation development opportunities seeking to reduce employee turnover

    OpenAIRE

    Pilukienė, Laura; Kšivickaitė, Gertūda

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors analyse one of the main nowadays human resources problem – growing employee turnover. Employee motivation process is analysed as a key competitive advantage in employee retention that leads to the growth of the business company’s productivity and competitive stability. The main goal of the article is to analyse the employee motivation and employee turnover relationship and its development possibilities in Lithuania’s business sector.

  17. A novel BEV concept based on fixed and swappable li-ion battery packs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreras, Jorge Varela; Pinto, C.; de Castro, R.

    2015-01-01

    -based ownership models to distribute the cost of the large battery pack over the vehicle lifetime. A methodology is proposed for the analysis and evaluation of the proposed concept in comparison with a direct owned non swappable single pack BEV, proving that significant improvements on city fuel economy (up to 20......In this paper a novel battery electric vehicle (BEV) concept based on a small fixed and a big swappable li-ion battery pack is proposed in order to achieve: longer range, lower initial purchase price and lower energy consumption at short ranges. For short ranges the BEV is only powered...... by the relatively small fixed battery pack, without the large swappable battery pack. In this way the mass of the vehicle is reduced and therefore the energy consumed per unit distance is improved. For higher ranges the BEV is powered by both battery packs. This concept allows the introduction of subscription...

  18. Evaluation of a Novel BEV Concept Based on Fixed and Swappable Li-Ion Battery Packs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barreras, Jorge Varela; Pinto, Claudio; de Castro, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    -based ownership models to distribute the cost of the large battery pack over the vehicle lifetime. A methodology is proposed for the analysis and evaluation of the proposed concept in comparison with a direct owned nonswappable single-pack BEV, proving that significant improvements on city fuel economy (up to 14......In this paper, a novel battery electric vehicle (BEV) concept based on a small fixed and a big swappable Li-ion battery pack is proposed in order to achieve longer range, lower initial purchase priceand lower energy consumption at short ranges. For short ranges, the BEV is only powered...... by the relatively small-fixed battery pack, without the large swappable battery pack. In this way, the mass of the vehicle is reduced and, therefore, the energy consumed per unit distance is improved. For higher ranges, the BEV is powered by both battery packs. This concept allows the introduction of subscription...

  19. Nonthermal fusion reactor concept based on Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witalis, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The failure of magnetic confinement controlled thermonuclear fusion research to achieve its goal is attributed to its foundation on the incomplete MHD plasma description instead of the more general HMHD (Hall-effect magnetohydrodynamics) theory. The latter allows for a certain magnetic plasma self-confinement under described stringent conditions. A reactor concept based on the formation, acceleration, and forced disintegration of magnetized whirl structures, plasmoids, is proposed. The four conventional MHD theory objections, i.e., absence of dynamo action, fast decay caused by resistivity, non-existence of magnetic self-confinement, and negligible non-thermal fusion yield, are shown not to apply. Support for the scheme from dense plasma focus research is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  20. The employee motivation and benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhrmannová, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor's study is to describe and analyze the employee motivation and benefits in the payroll system and human recources field. Theoretical part attends to general terms as the employee motivation, the theory of the motivation,the types of the employee benefits, the influence of benefits to the employee's working performance. The practial part focuses on Elanor company, includes introduction of the company, it's history and the present, the offer of the employee benefits. Ne...

  1. Employee-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to outline the “grand structure” of the phenomenon in order to identify both the underlying processes and core drivers of employee-driven innovation (EDI). Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper. It particularly applies the insights...... of contemporary research on routine and organizational decision making to the specific case of EDI. Findings – The main result of the paper is that, from a theoretical point of view, it makes perfect sense to involve ordinary employees in innovation decisions. However, it is also outlined that naıve or ungoverned...... participation is counterproductive, and that it is quite difficult to realize the hidden potential in a supportive way. Research limitations/implications – The main implication is that basic mechanisms for employee participation also apply to innovation decisions, although often in a different way. However...

  2. How to Motivate Employees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Kušar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: How to motivate employees and keep them motivated? Purpose: The purpose of this study is to find out what motivates employees and what motivates employees for work. Method: The results of the questionnaire are graphically presented and described. Random sampling was utilized that included participants from various professional areas and demographic characteristics. The results showed a relationship between individual motivational factors related to education, age and type of employment. All of the questions were closed - type questions except for the last question, which was an open question, in which the respondents answered in their own words. Questions were analyzed using frequency analysis of individual responses. Pearson's Chi - squared test, Spearman's rank correlation and Fisher’s Exact test was made using R Commander. Results: The research findings showed which motivational factors motivate employees the most. These are especially non - material motivational factors, such as good relationships, jobs with challenges, advancement opportunities, clear instructions, good work conditions, company reputation, etc. Organization: The study will help managers understand their role in motivating employees as well as the types of motivational factors. Society: The research shows how individuals are motivated. Originality: Certain motivators in the study are ranked differently than was found in previous literature. Most probably the reason is that the respondents in this study favored intangible motivators (good relations with leadership and their colleagues, good working conditions, etc.. Limitations/Future Research: The limitation of this study was that the sample included employees of different ages, gender and years of service in various organizations. To enhance the study and to find similar results as in previous literature, more questions should have been asked as well as increasing the sample size.

  3. Employee assistance program evaluation. Employee perceptions, awareness, and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, T

    1989-12-01

    Periodic evaluation is necessary to maintain a quality employee assistance program. This survey was undertaken to determine employee awareness of the existing EAP and their satisfaction with the program. Likewise, the survey allowed for employee input on areas of the program they had concerns with that may have caused hesitancy in further use of the program. The survey not only documents to management that the program is of value to employees and identifies areas where changes may be focused in the future to meet employee needs, but actually serves as a communication tool in itself as a reminder of the availability of the Employee Assistance Program.

  4. Unifying the concept of consciousness across the disciplines: A concept-based, cross-cultural approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Peter N.

    The majority of studies concerning consciousness have examined and modeled the concept of consciousness in terms of particular lines of inquiry, a process that has circumscribed the general applicability of any results from such approaches. The purpose of this dissertation was to study consciousness from a concept-based, cross-cultural approach and to attempt to unify the concept across the cultures examined. The 4 cultures are the academic disciplines of philosophy, physics, psychology, and anthropology. Consciousness was examined in terms of how the concept is framed and where the major limitations in each line of inquiry occur. The rationale for examining consciousness as a concept across 4 cultures was to determine whether there was any common component in each line's framing that could be used to unify the concept. The study found that experience itself was the primary unifying factor in each field's framing and that experience was treated as a nonreducible property within each line of inquiry. By taking experience itself (but not subjective experience) as a fundamental property, each culture's concept of consciousness becomes tractable. As such, this dissertation argues that experience should be taken as a fundamental property of the concept. The significance of this analysis is that by taking experience as a fundamental property, it becomes possible to unify the concept across the 4 cultures. This unification is presented as a unity thesis, which is a theory arguing for unification of the concept based on the fundamental of experience. Following this theoretical examination, this paper discusses several key implications of the unity thesis, including implications of the unity thesis for the current status of altered states of consciousness and for the so-called hard and easy problems associated with the concept (at least within Occidental ontology). It is argued that the so-called hard problem does not exist when experience is taken as a fundamental property

  5. Employees on the Move!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Sarah

    This paper describes a method for designing, implementing, and evaluating a work-site physical activity campaign aimed at employees who are currently sedentary in their leisure time. Inactivity is a major but modifiable risk factor for coronary heart disease. Increasing the activity levels of underactive adults would have a positive impact on…

  6. Managing Employee Assistance Programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidenberg, Olive C.; Cordery, John L.

    1990-01-01

    Interviews with 20 branch managers and 20 accountants in an Australian bank determined factors influencing the success of an employee assistance program (EAP). It was found that policies requiring supervisors to act against normal managerial practice doom EAPs to failure. Organizational analysis to integrate the EAP within existing organizational…

  7. 20 CFR 439.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 439.640 Section 439.640 Employees... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  8. Mobbing, threats to employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Vene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Is there a connection among perception of hostile and unethical communication, timely removal of causes and employee satisfaction?Purpose: Perceived mobbing in the organization, analysing causes and timely removal of them without any effect; achieve an environment of satisfied employees. The purpose is to study the relationship amongthe categories: perceiving mobbing, removing the effects, employee satisfaction.Methods: Qualitative research approach, method of interview by using the seven steps principles.Results: The findings clearly state that being aware of the negative factors and psychological abuse in organizations was present. The interview participants perceived different negative behaviours especially by the female population and from the side of superiors. In some organizations perceived negative factors are insults,insinuations, low wages, inadequate working day, competition, lobbying, and verbal threats. All negative factors lead to serious implications for employees, in which the organization can lose its reputation, productivity is reduced, costs of employment can increase with more sick leaves and in extreme cases, the results can be soserious that the organization can end in bankruptcy or liquidation.Organization: The result of the study warns management to acceptcertain actions and remediate the situation in organizations. The employer and managers must do everything to protect their subordinates from violence and potential offenders.Society: The research study warns on the seriousness of mobbing among employees, the aim is to bring the issue to individuals and society. The victim usually needs help (health costs, losses in the pension system, increased unemployment, and lower productivity of the whole society.Originality: In view of the sensitivity of the issues, the author concludes that the existing research studies are based especially on closed questions (questionnaires; however, interviews create mutual trust between

  9. Analysis Of Employee Engagement And Company Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Mekel, Peggy A.; Saerang, David P.E.; Silalahi, Immanuel Maradopan

    2014-01-01

    Employee could be a competitive advantage of a company if company manages its employees well. The success of a company could be seen from how a company manages their employees and engages their employees. Most of big companies put their employees in top priority in order to keep their top performance. These big companies manage their employees and try to engage their employees so that their employees could generate high performance. In this study, employee engagement is the factor to examine ...

  10. A universal concept based on cellular neural networks for ultrafast and flexible solving of differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chedjou, Jean Chamberlain; Kyamakya, Kyandoghere

    2015-04-01

    This paper develops and validates a comprehensive and universally applicable computational concept for solving nonlinear differential equations (NDEs) through a neurocomputing concept based on cellular neural networks (CNNs). High-precision, stability, convergence, and lowest-possible memory requirements are ensured by the CNN processor architecture. A significant challenge solved in this paper is that all these cited computing features are ensured in all system-states (regular or chaotic ones) and in all bifurcation conditions that may be experienced by NDEs.One particular quintessence of this paper is to develop and demonstrate a solver concept that shows and ensures that CNN processors (realized either in hardware or in software) are universal solvers of NDE models. The solving logic or algorithm of given NDEs (possible examples are: Duffing, Mathieu, Van der Pol, Jerk, Chua, Rössler, Lorenz, Burgers, and the transport equations) through a CNN processor system is provided by a set of templates that are computed by our comprehensive templates calculation technique that we call nonlinear adaptive optimization. This paper is therefore a significant contribution and represents a cutting-edge real-time computational engineering approach, especially while considering the various scientific and engineering applications of this ultrafast, energy-and-memory-efficient, and high-precise NDE solver concept. For illustration purposes, three NDE models are demonstratively solved, and related CNN templates are derived and used: the periodically excited Duffing equation, the Mathieu equation, and the transport equation.

  11. Employee Attitudes toward an Internal Employee Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Kirk C.

    1998-01-01

    Surveys employees (N=16,603) who had used a large multinational company's employee assistance program (EAP), adult dependents who had used the EAP, employees who had not used the EAP, and adult dependents who had not used the EAP. Findings indicate that EAP users viewed the EAP more positively than nonusers. (Author/MKA)

  12. 2003 Employee Attitude Survey: Analysis of Employee Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    171 --- Reporting Allegations Abuse of MWE Complaint Process (Excessive Complaints) 191 --- Satisfaction with Employee Assistance Program ( EAP ) 251...Satisfaction with Employee Assistance Program ( EAP ) --------------------------------------- General Comments about FAA Policies, Practices, and...contracting; understaffing; FAA policies, practices, and programs ; encouraging hard work; management concern for employees ; promotion equity; comments

  13. Employee Assistance Programs: Effective Tools for Counseling Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Ed

    1991-01-01

    College employee assistance program designs demonstrate the varied needs of a workforce. Whatever the model, the helping approach remains to (1) identify problem employees through performance-related issues; (2) refer them to the assistance program for further intervention; and (3) follow up with employee and supervisor to ensure a successful…

  14. Organizational Hierarchy, Employee Status, and Use of Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstein, Lawrence; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined role of organizational hierarchy and staff status in number of Employee Assistance Program (EAP) referrals made by potential helpers and relationship of these variables to personal EAP use among 157 supervisors and 232 employees. Supervisors suggested more EAP referrals than did employees. Middle level staff received EAP services more…

  15. Employee Information Management System (EIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The EIMS is the Office of Human Resources' web-based employee information system. Direct-hire employees can access and review their USAID personnel information, such...

  16. Bereaved Employee: Returning to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Work Working Through Grief About Us The Bereaved Employee: Returning to Work By Helen Fitzgerald, CT After ... One employer called a grief therapist to help employees after a co-worker reported the death of ...

  17. Broadening Your Employee Benefit Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaski, Nancy J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Cost increases and realization of the diverse needs of employees have prompted organizations to review the cost and value of employee benefits. Examines alternatives including "cafeteria plans," managed care programs, and disability income plans. (MLF)

  18. Employee guide to respiratory protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This employee guide discusses use of respiratory protective equipment for particulates, gases, vapors, supplied air, and self-contained breathing apparatus. It also covers equipment selection medical factors, fitting criteria; care; and employee responsibilities

  19. Employees' motivation and emloyees' benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Nedzelská, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor thesis is analysing methods how to stimulate and motivate employees. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with the concept of motivation, concepts close to motivation and selected existing theories of motivation. It also deals with employee benefits, function, division and benefits which are frequently offered to employees. The practical part of the thesis, mainly based on written and online questionnaires, concentrates on motivation of employees at Nedcon Boh...

  20. Employee Engagement: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmendra MEHTA; Naveen K. MEHTA

    2013-01-01

    Motivated and engaged employees tend to contribute more in terms of organizational productivity and support in maintaining a higher commitment level leading to the higher customer satisfaction. Employees Engagement permeates across the employee-customer boundary, where revenue, corporate goodwill, brand image are also at stake. This paper makes an attempt to study the different dimensions of employee engagement with the help of review of literature. This can be used to provide an overview and...

  1. Employee motivation in health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rosak-Szyrocka

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Employees of any organization are the most central part so they need to be influenced and persuaded towards task fulfillment. Examinations connected with medical services were carried out using the Servqual method. It was stated that care of employees and their motivation to work is a very important factor regarding employee engagement but also about the overall success of an organization.

  2. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  3. Multiplex network analysis of employee performance and employee social relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Meng; Wang, Wei; Cui, Ying; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-01-01

    In human resource management, employee performance is strongly affected by both formal and informal employee networks. Most previous research on employee performance has focused on monolayer networks that can represent only single categories of employee social relationships. We study employee performance by taking into account the entire multiplex structure of underlying employee social networks. We collect three datasets consisting of five different employee relationship categories in three firms, and predict employee performance using degree centrality and eigenvector centrality in a superimposed multiplex network (SMN) and an unfolded multiplex network (UMN). We use a quadratic assignment procedure (QAP) analysis and a regression analysis to demonstrate that the different categories of relationship are mutually embedded and that the strength of their impact on employee performance differs. We also use weighted/unweighted SMN/UMN to measure the predictive accuracy of this approach and find that employees with high centrality in a weighted UMN are more likely to perform well. Our results shed new light on how social structures affect employee performance.

  4. Education of employees

    OpenAIRE

    Malachová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The thesis aims to assess the functioning of educational methods that is being used by LEGO Group and propose appropriate measures or recommendations for future development. The conclusion of this work is evaluating the results of the investigation and provides recommendations counter measures to improve the current situation. The theoretical part describes principles of systematic employee training, forms and methods of education, also it further defines the learning organization. Part of th...

  5. Thermoeconomic analysis of a solar enhanced energy storage concept based on thermodynamic cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henchoz, Samuel; Buchter, Florian; Favrat, Daniel; Morandin, Matteo; Mercangöz, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Large scale energy storage may play an increasingly important role in the power generation and distribution sector, especially when large shares of renewable energies will have to be integrated into the electrical grid. Pumped-hydro is the only large scale storage technology that has been widely used. However the spread of this technology is limited by geographic constraints. In the present work, a particular implementation of a storage concept based on thermodynamic cycles, invented by ABB Switzerland ltd. Corporate Research, has been analysed thermoeconomically. A variant using solar thermal collectors is presented. It benefits from the synergy between daily variations in solar irradiance and in electricity demand. This results in an effective increase of the electric energy storage efficiency. A steady state multi-objective optimization of a 50 MW plant was done; minimizing the investment costs and maximizing the energy storage efficiency. Several types of cold storage substances have been implemented in the formulation and two different types of solar collector were investigated. A storage efficiency of 57% at a cost of 1200 USD/kW was calculated for an optimized plant using solar energy. Finally, a computation of the behaviour of the plant along the year showed a yearly availability of 84.4%. -- Highlights: ► A variant of electric energy storage based on thermodynamic cycles is presented. ► It uses solar collectors to improve the energy storage efficiency. ► An optimization minimizing capital cost and maximizing energy storage efficiency, was carried out. ► Capital costs lie between 982 and 3192 USD/kW and efficiency between 43.8% and 84.4%.

  6. A low-cost hybrid drivetrain concept based on compressed air energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.L.; Atluri, V.P.; Schmiedeler, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new pneumatic hybrid concept is introduced. • A proof-of-concept prototype system is built and tested. • The experimental system has a round-trip efficiency of just under 10%. • A thermodynamics model is used to predict the performance of modified designs. • An efficiency of nearly 50% is possible with reasonable design changes. - Abstract: This paper introduces a new low-cost hybrid drivetrain concept based on compressed air energy storage. In contrast to most contemporary approaches to pneumatic hybridization, which require modification to the primary power plant, this concept is based on a stand-alone pneumatic system that could be readily integrated with existing vehicles. The pneumatic system consists of an air tank and a compressor–expander that is coupled to the rest of the drivetrain via an infinitely variable transmission. Rather than incorporating more expensive technologies such as variable valve timing or a variable compression ratio compressor, a fixed valve system consisting of a rotary valve and passive check valves is optimized to operate efficiently over a range of tank pressures. The feasibility of this approach is established by thermodynamic modeling and the construction of a proof-of-concept prototype, which is also used to fine tune model parameters. While the proof-of-concept system shows a round trip efficiency of just under 10%, modeling shows that a round trip efficiency of 26% is possible with a revised design. If waste heat from the engine is used to maintain an elevated tank temperature, efficiencies of nearly 50% may be possible, indicating that the concept could be effective for practical hybridization of passenger vehicles

  7. Content Validity and Inter-Rater Reliability of the Halliwick-Concept-Based Instrument "Swimming with Independent Measure"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srsen, Katja Groleger; Vidmar, Gaj; Pikl, Masa; Vrecar, Irena; Burja, Cirila; Krusec, Klavdija

    2012-01-01

    The Halliwick concept is widely used in different settings to promote joyful movement in water and swimming. To assess the swimming skills and progression of an individual swimmer, a valid and reliable measure should be used. The Halliwick-concept-based Swimming with Independent Measure (SWIM) was introduced for this purpose. We aimed to determine…

  8. Employee Engagement: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra MEHTA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivated and engaged employees tend to contribute more in terms of organizational productivity and support in maintaining a higher commitment level leading to the higher customer satisfaction. Employees Engagement permeates across the employee-customer boundary, where revenue, corporate goodwill, brand image are also at stake. This paper makes an attempt to study the different dimensions of employee engagement with the help of review of literature. This can be used to provide an overview and references on some of the conceptual and practical work undertaken in the area of the employee engagement practices.

  9. A Research on Employee Ethnocentrism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alptekin Sökmen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify ethnocentric behavior tendencies of 129 boundary spanning role employees, who works in 5 star hotels of Ankara, using Employee Ethnocentrism Survey. Also in this study, independent t-test and analysis of variance tests were used to investigate differences, among respondents’ demographic variables. The results demonstrated that, boundary spanning role employees of 5 star hotels in Ankara have moderately ethnocentric tendency, and several significant differences in terms of respondents’ age and gender. Male employees, 39 age and elders, and high school graduates show a higher ethnocentric tendency among the hotel employees.

  10. 31 CFR 20.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 20.640 Section 20.640 Money...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of... charge employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the...

  11. 43 CFR 43.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 43.640 Section 43.640 Public... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 43.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a... employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of work...

  12. 7 CFR 3021.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 3021.640 Section 3021.640 Agriculture... Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their...

  13. 14 CFR 1267.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 1267.640 Section 1267.640... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a... employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of work...

  14. 15 CFR 29.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 29.640 Section 29.640... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a... employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of work...

  15. Employee recruitment: using behavioral assessments as an employee selection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2007-01-01

    The labor shortage of skilled health care professionals continues to make employee recruitment and retention a challenge for health care managers. Greater accountability is being placed on health care managers to retain their employees. The urgency to retain health care professionals is largely an issue that should be considered during the initial recruitment of potential employees. Health care managers should analyze candidates rigorously to ensure that appropriate hiring decisions are made. Behavioral assessments can be used as a useful employee selection tool to assist managers in the appropriate placement and training of potential new employees. When administered appropriately, these tools can provide managers with a variety of useful information. This information can assist health care managers in demystifying the hiring process. Although there are varying organizational concerns to address when using behavioral assessments as an employee selection tool, the potential return on investment is worth the effort.

  16. License agreement, employee work

    OpenAIRE

    Poncová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    The rigorous thesis is focused on license agreement and employee work. The aim of the thesis is not only an analysis of the use of a copyrighted work by a person different from the author of the work, but also an analysis of the performance of copyright by a person different from the author of the work. The thesis consists of five chapters. The opening chapter provides a summary of the notion of copyright, its sources at the national and international levels, but also the European Union legis...

  17. Re-thinking employee recognition: understanding employee experiences of recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Despite widespread acceptance of the importance of employee recognition for both individuals and organisations and evidence of its increasing use in organisations, employee recognition has received relatively little focused attention from academic researchers. Particularly lacking is research exploring the lived experience of employee recognition and the interpretations and meanings which individuals give to these experiences. Drawing on qualitative interviews conducted as part of my PhD rese...

  18. Employee satisfaction and employee retention: catalysts to patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin S; Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard; Jensen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, most health care facilities have become intensely aware of the need to increase patient satisfaction. However, with today's more consumer-driven market, this can be a daunting task for even the most experienced health care manager. Recent studies indicate that focusing on employee satisfaction and subsequent employee retention may be strong catalysts to patient satisfaction. This study offers a review of how employee satisfaction and retention correlate with patient satisfaction and also examines the current ways health care organizations are focusing on employee satisfaction and retention.

  19. Organisational Stress and Employee Dissatisfaction at Work: A Case Study to Boost Employee Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Upma Goel

    2014-01-01

    Employee satisfaction is the terminology used to describe whether employees are happy and comfortable and fulfilling their desires and needs at work. Many measures purport that employee satisfaction is a factor in employee motivation, employee goal achievement, and positive employee morale in the workplace.Employee satisfaction, while generally a positive in your organization, can also be a downer if mediocre employees stay because they are satisfied with your work environment.Employee satisf...

  20. Work environments for employee creativity

    OpenAIRE

    Dul, Jan; Ceylan, Canan

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInnovative organisations need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process innovation. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the effect of personal, social-organisational and physical factors on employee creativity. Based on this framework an instrument to analyse the extent to which the work environment enhances creativity is developed. We apply this instrument to a sample of 409 employees and find support for the hypothesis that a creative work envir...

  1. Employee Motivation at IKEA Espoo

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Kumar; Adhikari, Devendra

    2013-01-01

    How to motivate employees and the factors affecting motivation have been subjects of concern for many researchers and practitioners for decades. Until recently employees were primarily regarded as a factor of production (i.e. labor), and not, as in the current view, as an integral part of all businesses. Therefore, motivating employees has become essential in order to achieve the strategic goals of any company. However, due to the current state of competition in the job markets it has increas...

  2. Employee Screening : Theory and Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Fali Huang; Peter Cappelli

    2007-01-01

    Arguably the fundamental problem faced by employers is how to elicit effort from employees. Most models suggest that employers meet this challenge by monitoring employees carefully to prevent shirking. But there is another option that relies on heterogeneity across employees, and that is to screen job candidates to find workers with a stronger work ethic who require less monitoring. This should be especially useful in work systems where monitoring by supervisors is more difficult, such as tea...

  3. Employee Referrals and Efficiency Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Kugler, Adriana D.

    2002-01-01

    Many workers believe that personal contacts are crucial for obtaining jobs in high-wage sectors. On the other hand, firms in high-wage sectors report using employee referrals because they help provide screening and monitoring of new employees. This Paper develops a matching model that can explain the link between inter-industry wage differentials and the use of employee referrals. Referrals lower monitoring costs because high-effort referees can exert peer pressure on co-workers, allowing fir...

  4. Recruitment and selection of employees

    OpenAIRE

    Čermochová, Barbora

    2017-01-01

    The Bachelor's thesis focuses on the process of recruitment and selection of employees. The thesis is divided into theoretical and practical part. The theoretical part includes concepts that are important for understanding of issues of the process of recruitment and selection of employees. The practical part is divided into three chapters. The first chapter briefly describes the company xxx. Next two chapters deal with the process of recruitment and selection of employees in the company. The ...

  5. Asserting the primacy of health over patent rights: a comparative study of the processes that led to the use of compulsory licensing in Thailand and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Stephanie T

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1970s, the United States has adopted a trade policy agenda that has forced countries to trade away flexible patent provisions for access to US markets. While pharmaceutical companies have argued that the recognition of patent rights is essential for recovering investments in research and development of pharmaceuticals and incentivizing future innovation, the lack of competition has had damaging consequences for public health, as companies tend to set the prices of treatments beyond the reach of consumers and government programs. Thailand and Brazil are bound by law to provide universal access to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) to People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). This has been made possible in part due to the universal health care systems in each country and the countries' local technical and industrial capacities that provide the government with affordable generic medicines. The introduction of stronger intellectual property protection laws however, has limited possibilities for procuring generic medicines and inflated the cost of treatment. Between 2006-2008, Thailand and Brazil used compulsory licensing to authorize generic competition against the consent of the pharmaceutical companies in order to guarantee the right to health and ensure the viability of government health budgets. This paper will demonstrate how the interaction between individual / collective action and structural and institutional elements in Thailand and Brazil produced propitious conditions for each country to assert the primacy of health over patent rights. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Preserving Employee Privacy in Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Paul E

    2017-07-01

    The proposed "Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act" states that the collection of information about the manifested disease or disorder of a family member shall not be considered an unlawful acquisition of genetic information. The bill recognizes employee privacy protections that are already in place and includes specific language relating to nondiscrimination based on illness. Why did legislation expressly intending to "preserve wellness programs" generate such antipathy about wellness among journalists? This article argues that those who are committed to preserving employee wellness must be equally committed to preserving employee privacy. Related to this, we should better parse between discussions and rules about commonplace health screenings versus much less common genetic testing.

  7. All Employee Census Survey (AES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Office of Personnel Management requires government agencies, at a minimum, to query employees on job satisfaction, organizational assessment and organizational...

  8. Employee benefits or wage increase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper comes from a survey done during the years 2007–2009. It focused on employee satisfaction with the provision of employee benefits. The research included 21 companies, 7 companies were from the engineering sector, 7 companies from the food industry, 3 companies represented the budgetary sphere, 3 companies the services sector and one company operates in pharmaceutical industry.The questionnaire survey consisted of 14 questions, including 5 identification-questions. The paper presents results of the questions on dealing with employees’ awareness of employee benefits and on choosing between employees’ preferences of wage increase or increase in value of benefits provided.Employees are informed about all options of providing employee benefits. Only in 3 cases employees stated dissatisfaction with information. This answer was related with the responses to the second monitored question. Employees of these companies preferred pay increases before benefits’ increases. There was no effect of gender of the respondents, neither the influence of the sector of operation, in the preference of increases in wages or in benefits. Exceptions were the employees of companies operating in the financial sector, who preferred employee benefits before a wage increase. It was found that employees of companies who participated in research in 2009, preferred wage increases before the extension of employee benefits, although the value of the net wage increase is lower than the monetary value of benefits increase.The paper is a part of solution of the research plan MSM 6215648904 The Czech economy in the process of integration and globalization, and the development of agricultural sector and the sector of services under the new conditions of the integrated European market.

  9. Motivating pharmacy employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J; Generali, J A

    1984-07-01

    Concepts from theories of motivation are used to suggest methods for improving the motivational environment of hospital pharmacy departments. Motivation--the state of being stimulated to take action to achieve a goal or to satisfy a need--comes from within individuals, but hospital pharmacy managers can facilitate motivation by structuring the work environment so that it satisfies employees' needs. Concepts from several theories of motivation are discussed, including McGregor's theory X and theory Y assumptions, Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg's motivation hygiene theory, and Massey's value system theory. Concepts from the Japanese style of management that can be used to facilitate motivation, such as quality circles, also are described. The autocratic, participative, and laissez faire styles of leadership are discussed in the context of the motivation theories, and suggested applications of theoretical concepts to practice are presented.

  10. [Employee assistance program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Satoru; Tanaka, Katsutoshi; Ohba, Sayo

    2002-03-01

    Recently the EAP has received much attention in Japan. The first EAP service in the US was conducted by employees who had recovered from alcohol problems. In the early days EAP providers focused on addiction, but mainly after 1980 they expanded their service areas to include mental health, marital problems, legal problems and financial problems. In Japan the EAP was first received attention as a counseling resource outside the workplace where employees could seek professional help confidentially, but the main reasons why this system now interests employers are as a risk-management tool and an outsourcing of mental health services, since the growing number of mental health cases in the workplace has been a big issue for employers. Two movements have also contributed to more recognition of the EAP: one is guidelines on compensation for mental health cases in the workplace and the other is guidelines on mental health promotion in the workplace. There are four types of EAP systems: internal EAP, external EAP, combination EAP, and consortium EAP. EAP core technology consists of 8 functions including problem identification, Crisis intervention, Short-term intervention, Consultation with work organization leader. The literature on cost-benefit analysis of the EAP is very limited. Although the available data suggest that the EAP is highly cost-effective, further studies are needed with the sufficient statistical quality. In Japan the most important issues in the EAP are the standardization and quality assurance of EAP services. For this purpose development of a good educational system for EAP professionals is needed.

  11. Employee Ownership, Motivation and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Jonathan; Oughton, Christine; Bennion, Yvonne

    The relationship between employee ownership, motivation, and productivity was explored. The main data collection activities were as follows: (1) a literature review; (2) interviews with management and employees from 10 selected companies across the United Kingdom; (3) surveys of ICOM (the federation of worker cooperatives) member companies and…

  12. Employee turnover: measuring the malady.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One measure of an organization's value to its employees is turnover. But how do you know if your employees are wondering if the grass is greener elsewhere? Scott Badler in his book What's So Funny about Looking for a Job? suggests a quick quiz to find out.

  13. Assessing New Employee Orientation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Jose M.; Yancey, George B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the importance of new employee orientation (NEO) programs, the quality of typical NEOs, and how to improve NEOs. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a viewpoint of the importance of new employee orientation programs, the quality of typical NEOs, and how to improve NEOs. Findings: Although western…

  14. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  15. ORGANIZATION PERFORMANCE AND EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Milica Jakšiæ, Miloš Jakšiæ

    2014-01-01

    Employee satisfaction related to their job, possibilities of career development, mechanisms of performance measurement and reward, as remuneration systems are of growing importance. Expectations of highly educated workforce continuously increase, so recruiting and retention of such workers becomes key factor of success for modern companies. Success of companies is expected to change together with employee saticfaction.

  16. Work environments for employee creativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Dul (Jan); C. Ceylan (Canan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractInnovative organisations need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process innovation. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the effect of personal, social-organisational and physical factors on employee creativity. Based on this framework an instrument to

  17. Counseling Employees: A Multifaceted Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Daya Singh, Ed.

    This book is divided into five major sections that focus on the various perspectives, needs, and concerns of employees in the workplace. Chapters include: (1) Work: Meaning, Mattering, and Job Satisfaction (K. M. Connolly); (2) Spirituality in the Workplace: An Overview (E. J. Looby and D. S. Sandhu); (3) Developing the Whole Employee: Some…

  18. Public Sector Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Donna R.; Verlinde, Beverly

    This document discusses employee assistance programs (EAPs), programs which have been developed to help employees deal with personal problems that seriously affect job performance. It reviews literature which specifically addresses EAPs in the public sector, noting that there are no exact figures on how many public entities have EAPs. Previous…

  19. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee organizations. 700.549 Section 700.549 Indians... Employee Responsibility and Conduct § 700.549 Employee organizations. An employee may not knowingly be a member of an organization of Government employees that advocates the overthrow of the United States...

  20. 13 CFR 147.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 147.640 Section 147.640... WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2...

  1. 45 CFR 1173.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 1173.640 Section 1173.640 Public Welfare...) Definitions § 1173.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge...

  2. 28 CFR 83.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 83.640 Section 83.640 Judicial...) Definitions § 83.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge...

  3. 21 CFR 1405.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 1405.640 Section 1405.640 Food and Drugs... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  4. 22 CFR 210.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 210.640 Section 210.640 Foreign... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2...

  5. 29 CFR 94.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Employee. 94.640 Section 94.640 Labor Office of the... § 94.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge...

  6. 34 CFR 84.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 84.640 Section 84.640 Education Office of the...) Definitions § 84.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge...

  7. 49 CFR 32.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 32.640 Section 32.640 Transportation... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  8. 10 CFR 607.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 607.640 Section 607.640 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  9. 22 CFR 312.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Employee. 312.640 Section 312.640 Foreign... § 312.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge...

  10. 22 CFR 1509.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Employee. 1509.640 Section 1509.640 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  11. 22 CFR 133.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 133.640 Section 133.640 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  12. 45 CFR 1155.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 1155.640 Section 1155.640 Public Welfare...) Definitions § 1155.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge...

  13. 29 CFR 1917.122 - Employee exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee exits. 1917.122 Section 1917.122 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.122 Employee exits. (a) Employee exits shall be clearly marked. (b) If an employee exit is not visible from employees' work stations, directional signs...

  14. 22 CFR 1008.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Employee. 1008.640 Section 1008.640 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  15. Using Readership Research to Study Employee Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlik, John; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Surveys employees of the Hershey Medical Center in Pennsylvania to examine why they read "Vital Signs," the employee newsletter. Finds that employees with a higher level of organizational integration often place more emphasis on reading the employee newsletter to survey system functions and the employee social network. (MM)

  16. Deterring and remedying employee theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzogany, Bill; Mueller, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Employee theft of patient-related information for personal financial gain is a serious threat to the success and financial viability of many healthcare providers. You can safeguard your financial interest in your patient base by taking three preventative measures designed to dissuade your employees from stealing from you. The first step is the implementation of policies and procedures that inform your employees that patient-related information is a valuable business asset that you vigorously protect from misappropriation. The second step is strictly limiting and monitoring employee access to patient-related information. The third step is educating your employees of the potential legal consequences to them in the event they steal from you and, in the event of theft, pursuing all legal remedies available to you.

  17. Employee Assistance Program Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettleman, Alan G.; McGuire, William

    1999-01-01

    Employee Assistance Program (EAP) officers, as well as personnel in other disciplines from eight NASA Centers, attended this breakout session. Ms. Brenda Blair, MA, CEAP, a guest speaker at the conference, also attended as a consultant. Representatives from the NASA Centers introduced themselves and spoke briefly about their programs. In a discussion related to the conference theme on benchmarking, quality control issues within the EAP community and adequate documentation of cases were addressed. Disposition and provision for quality assurance checks for EAP providers in single person offices were also discussed. Ms. Blair presented methods for consulting with other NASA personnel in single person EAP offices as a quality control measure. EAP intervention in critical incidents was discussed. The question of whether EAP assistance is an asset or a potential liability in those situations was addressed. Suggestions were made of topics for future EAP video-teleconference topics. A program on EAP ethics was planned for a September video teleconference. Each person was asked to provide intake forms they use to Mr. Gettleman or Ms. Blair. Ms. Blair said she would review the forms to ensure that adequate notification is provided to the client for confidentiality. She would also review them to ensure they have adequate limits of confidentiality--a topic for future video teleconferencing. Mr. Gettleman described the NASA initiative to reduce stresses in the workplace, and the activities of an ad-hoc EAP group that will make recommendations to NASA senior management. Alternative training methods were discussed for reaching target audiences such as employees at risk, supervisors, and others. Pfc. David A. Pendleton, Victim Assistance Coordinator, U.S. Capitol Police. U.S. House of Representatives made a special presentation. Pfc. Pendleton was on duty during the tragic shooting of two Federal guards at the U.S. Capitol. He related the events immediately after the incident. He

  18. CAN CSR INFLUENCE EMPLOYEES SATISFACTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Gazzola

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The study shows how CSR for employees may represent a special opportunity to influence: employees’ general impression of the company and expectations about how the organization treats its employees. Companies have very important role to affect change in their communities and the environment by adopting CSR initiatives. Though short-term benefits might be few, it is likely that the importance of CSR will increase in years to come as people become more interested in the social and environmental effects of companies There’s a debate over whether CSR initiatives, that are socially responsible or environmentally friendly improves employees’ perceptions of the company. When a company has CSR initiatives, employees are more proud of and committed to the organization. This is because the personal identities are partly tied up in the companies that person works for. If a company is saving the world, reflects positively on employees and makes them feel good about the work they do for the company. The role CSR plays in enhancing a company's reputation among its own employees, subsequently boosting their motivation and engagement, is perhaps underrated, which is particularly problematic for companies that are inconsistent in their approach to implementing CSR initiatives. Studies involving CSR have not fully explored how organizational social performance impacts individual employee behaviors nor examined the attributes of individuals comprising stakeholder groups such as employees. The objectives of this study are to analyze the implementation of CSR programs and its impact on employees. The main underlying proposition is that organization can influence its employee through his or her own ethical and responsible behavior. The work culture built upon this sense of organization’s voluntary contribution toward a wide number of stakeholders could invite and encourage employee to adopt the same voluntary attitude and behavior to their own fellow

  19. 76 FR 2142 - Employee Benefits Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration Hearing on Definition of ``Fiduciary'' AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security Administration, Labor. ACTION: Notice of hearing and extension of comment period. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Employee Benefits Security Administration will...

  20. Employee resistance and injury during commercial robberies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer; Casteel, Carri; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2015-05-01

    To examine the association between employee resistance and injury and examine whether type or location of property stolen was associated with employee resistance during commercial robberies in a large metropolitan city. Robbery data were abstracted from police crime reports between 2008 and 2012. Log binomial regression models were used to identify predictors of employee resistance and to evaluate the association between employee resistance and injury. Employees resisted a robber in nearly half of all robbery events. Active employee resistance was significantly associated with employee injury (Adj PR: 1.49, 95% confidence interval, 1.34 to 1.65). Goods being stolen were associated with active employee resistance and employee injury, whereas cash only being stolen was inversely associated with employee injury. Results suggest that employee training in nonresistance can be an important strategy in protecting employees working with the exchange of cash and goods.

  1. Fostering employee involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, G P

    1997-11-01

    Every year, the ODA's Economics of Practice Committee, with the help of an independent consulting firm, carries out the Cost of Practice Monitor which tracks the various costs of running a dental practice in Ontario. This article is the result of a joint ODA-Arthur Andersen initiative to provide members with detailed information from the Monitor. Over the next year, there will be a series of articles published under the heading "Best practises for Ontario's Dental Practices." The article featured in this issue focuses on wage expenses in dental practices and how to foster employee involvement as a means of addressing cost-productivity issues. Furthermore, information relating to wage expenses may be used by practitioners to benchmark their practice against the average Ontario dental practice. Appendix C was developed for this purpose. Through benchmarking, the practitioner may gain insight into ways of evaluating their practice and in addressing issues that could improve the management of the practice. For a long time, concepts of best business practises were applied only to manufacturing organizations or large multi-national corporations but experience has demonstrated that these activities are universal to all organizations, including service companies, schools, government and not-for-profit organizations.

  2. Every employee an owner. Really.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Corey; Case, John; Staubus, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Surveys indicate that when new rules on expensing stock options take effect, many companies are likely to limit the number of employees who can receive equity compensation. But companies that reserve equity for executives are bound to suffer in the long run. Study after study proves that broad-based ownership, when done right, leads to higher productivity, lower workforce turnover, better recruits, and bigger profits. "Done right" is the key. Here are the four most important factors in implementing a broad-based employee equity plan: A significant portion of the workforce--generally, most of the full-time people--must hold equity; employees must think the amounts they hold can significantly improve their financial prospects; managerial practices and policies must reinforce the plan; and employees must feel a true sense of company ownership. Those factors add up to an ownership culture in which employees' interests are aligned with the company's. The result is a workforce that is loyal, cooperative, and willing to go above and beyond to make the organization successful. A wide variety of companies have recorded exceptional business performance with the help of employee-ownership programs supported by management policies. The authors examine two: Science Applications International, a research and development contractor, and Scot Forge, which shapes metal and other materials for industrial machinery. At both companies, every employee with a year or so of service holds equity, and employees who stay on can accumulate a comfortable nest egg. Management's sharing of financial information reinforces workers' sense of ownership. So does the expectation that employees will accept the responsibilities of ownership. Workers with an ownership stake internalize their responsibilities and feel they have an obligation not only to management but to one another.

  3. Addressing problems of employee performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2011-01-01

    Employee performance problems are essentially of 2 kinds: those that are motivational in origin and those resulting from skill deficiencies. Both kinds of problems are the province of the department manager. Performance problems differ from problems of conduct in that traditional disciplinary processes ordinarily do not apply. Rather, performance problems are addressed through educational and remedial processes. The manager has a basic responsibility in ensuring that everything reasonable is done to help each employee succeed. There are a number of steps the manager can take to address employee performance problems.

  4. Employee Reward Systems in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Došenović Dragana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Employee rewarding is one of the activities of human resource management concerning the management of money, goods and services that employees receive from their employer in exchange for their work. Given that a properly designed reward system is one of the conditions for a stable business, successful performance of work activities and the achievement of set objectives in each organization, the basic theme of this paper is the employee reward system, with a special focus on different elements of it. The purpose of this paper is to describe the role and significance of the observed system and to draw attention to its role in employee’s motivation.

  5. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...... moderate this effect so that the negative consequences of employee turnover are less severe for larger, older and capital intensive firms. These moderating variables indicate the presence of slack resources in the firm, and thus that the accumulation of slack reduces the efficiency losses from employee...

  6. Does an employee assistance programme benefit employers and employees alike?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAlister, E

    1999-09-01

    EAPs are not a psychological sticking plaster. They are a clinically and corporately balanced service which benefits the employee, via the direct services and the employer, via the feedback in the form of usage statistics derived from the continuous tracking of the account through which organizational and employment issues are identified. Well positioned EAPs offer employees confidential counselling, and information services including legal, financial and child-based issues and are able to offer employers tailored training and consultancy.

  7. Employee share ownership in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortlieb, Renate; Matiaske, Wenzel; Fietze, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Politicians and scholars alike praise the significant benefits associated with employee share ownership (ESO). However, little is known about the concrete motives of firms to provide ESO to their employees. In particular, it is unknown how these motives correlate with firms’ contexts. Drawing...... on an institutional theoretical framework, this article examines what aims firms pursue through the provision of ESO. The data originate from a survey of firms in Germany. The cluster analytic findings indicate distinctive patterns of relationships between aims and firm characteristics. Aims related to employee...... performance are most important to foreign-owned firms, financial aims are most important to non-public small and medium-sized firms and aims related to corporate image are most important to big firms and to firms that do not provide profit sharing. Aims related to employee attraction and retention are almost...

  8. Employee Benefit Reporting After ERISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Wesley W.

    1976-01-01

    The statutory reporting requirements of ERISA and some of the regulations recently promulgated are discussed. All type of employee benefit plans are covered. For journal availability see HE 508 741. (LBH)

  9. Employees' Perceptions of Their Leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović-Stojanović Aleksandra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research about employees and the leaders who are included in leading the organization, as an important segment of the modern business. The aim of this research is to show the real picture about presence new strategies of leaders in the organizations, as well as the analysis of the perception of employees about their leaders. The research in business organizations conducted on the sample of leaders and employees. The construction of high-quality questionnaire represents the important segment of modern statistical and business researches. The issues in questionnaire construction are very complex and they are in the focus of all statistical and research methodologies. It was conducted on the sample of at least 250 examinees (employees in bigger companies in Serbia. Research results showed that understanding communication satisfaction, with its link to job satisfaction, should provide an ability to better target resources to improve communication satisfaction issues.

  10. Work environments for employee creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dul, Jan; Ceylan, Canan

    2011-01-01

    Innovative organisations need creative employees who generate new ideas for product or process innovation. This paper presents a conceptual framework for the effect of personal, social-organisational and physical factors on employee creativity. Based on this framework, an instrument to analyse the extent to which the work environment enhances creativity is developed. This instrument was applied to a sample of 409 employees and support was found for the hypothesis that a creative work environment enhances creative performance. This paper illustrates how the instrument can be used in companies to select and implement improvements. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The ergonomics discipline addresses the work environment mainly for improving health and safety and sometimes productivity and quality. This paper opens a new area for ergonomics: designing work environments for enhancing employee creativity in order to strengthen an organisation's capability for product and process innovation and, consequently, its competitiveness.

  11. Employee Resistance to Computer Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Alan

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of computers to the work place may cause employee stress. Aggressive, protective, and avoidance behaviors are forms of staff resistance. The development of good training programs will enhance productivity. Suggestions for evaluating computer systems are offered. (DF)

  12. Implementing an Employee Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gam, John; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes in detail the implementation of an employee assistance program in a textile plant. Reviews the historical development, referral process, and termination guidelines of the program and contains descriptive statistics for six periods of the program's operation. (Author/JAC)

  13. Strategy Innovation with Employee Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate how employees can be involved in strategy innovation processes and how new strategy practices (new tools and procedures) are used to change strategy praxis in order to sustain value creation. In the strategizing actions, we found that even...... if the managers still dominate, some processes of direct involvement of employees occur, in particular when employees are asked to supplement overall strategic goals and when they directly shape several sub-strategies. Strategy practices found include strategy planning, an open space workshop and organised...... strategy projects. Especially the latter two are important in facilitating the employee involvement. The case, however, also exhibits enterprise-situated praxises related to unplanned events, like the mitigation of taboos....

  14. (Mis)managing employee motivation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Hvidtved, Johan; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    Motivated employees are crucial to all organizations, but some management initiatives may actually decrease motivation. Motivation crowding theory thus expects that command and incentives – if they are perceived as controlling - crowd out intrinsic motivation. The perception is thus expected...

  15. Strategies for improving employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Edward G; Evans, Martin R

    2007-03-28

    This article proposes a solution to the perennial problem of talent retention in the clinical laboratory. It includes the presentation of 12 strategies that may be used to significantly improve institutional identity formation and establishment of the psychological contract that employees form with laboratory management. Identity formation and psychological contracting are deemed as essential in helping reduce employee turnover and increase retention. The 12 conversational strategies may be used as a set of best practices for all employees, but most importantly for new employees, and should be implemented at the critical moment when employees first join the laboratory. This time is referred to as "retention on-boarding"--the period of induction and laboratory orientation. Retention on-boarding involves a dialogue between employees and management that is focused on the psychological, practical, cultural, and political dimensions of the laboratory. It is placed in the context of the modern clinical laboratory, which is faced with employing and managing Generation X knowledge workers. Specific topics and broad content areas of those conversations are outlined.

  16. Employee organizational commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Života

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the results of research on organizational commitment as a type of attitudes that show the identification level of employees with their organizations and their willingness to leave them. The research has been conducted with intention to determine the level of organizational commitment on the territory of Novi Sad, as well as to question whether there is a difference between certain categories of examinees for each commitment base. The research comprised 237 examinees employed in organizations on the territory of Novi Sad. Status of independent variables have gained: gender, years of working experience, educational level, working experience in one or more organizations and estimation of level of personal potentials utility. The questionnaire used is taken from the Greenberg and Baron's 'Behaviour in Organizations', p. 170, done according to set of questions by Meyer and Allen, in 1991. The data have been worked on by calculating arithmetic mean, and by application of Pearson Chi-square test. The results have shown that there is a below average level of organizational (AS=2.88, with the most intensive continual (AS=3.23, and the least intensive normative organizational dedication (AS=2.41. The gender of examinees does not represent relevant source of differences in the levels of each type of three mentioned commitment. Years of working experience and level of educational attainment represent a significant source of differences for continual (YWE: Pearson Chi-square = 30,38; df = 8; p = .000 (LEA: Pearson Chi-square = 7,381; df = 2; p = .05 and normative (YWE: Pearson Chi- square = 20,67; df = 8; p = .000 (LEA: Pearson Chi-square = 10,79; df = 2; p = .00 base of commitment. Work in one or more organizations has shown as a significant source of differences in the level of continual commitment (Pearson Chi-square = 7, 59; df = 2; p = .05. The level of affective commitment is statistically significantly related only to the estimation

  17. The Invisible Employee: University Housekeeping Employees' Perceptions of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bhibha M; Sartore-Baldwin, Melanie; Mahar, Matthew T

    2016-09-01

    A significant literature links race and socioeconomic status with physical inactivity and negative health outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore physical activity (PA) perceptions of an underserved, lower socioeconomic minority sector of the workforce. Two focus groups were conducted to examine university housekeepers' perceptions of physical activity. Demographic and anthropometric data were also obtained. Participants (N = 12; 100% female, 100% African-American) overwhelmingly associated PA with traditional exercise (eg, going to a gym). The most important barrier to PA was the perception of being active on the job, thus not needing to do leisure time PA. The most important perceived benefit to PA was improvement of physical and mental health. Employees perceived that a university investment in employees' health might improve morale, especially within low-pay employee sectors where low levels of job satisfaction may be present. Although perceived benefits to PA in this population are consistent with other employee sectors, perceived barriers to PA may be unique to this sector of the workforce. PA promotion programs should focus on providing resources as well as guidelines that demonstrate the need for PA outside of the workplace setting. Such programs may improve employee health, morale, and productivity.

  18. 10 CFR 61.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 61.9 Section 61.9 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 61.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a...

  19. 10 CFR 70.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 70.7 Section 70.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a Commission license, or...

  20. 10 CFR 60.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 60.9 Section 60.9 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 60.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a...

  1. 10 CFR 50.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 50.7 Section 50.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a Commission license, or...

  2. 10 CFR 63.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected activities... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 63.9 Section 63.9 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee...

  3. 10 CFR 52.5 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... adverse action occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 52.5 Section 52.5 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 52.5 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, holder of a standard...

  4. 10 CFR 72.10 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... adverse action occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 72.10 Section 72.10 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, certificate holder, an applicant for a...

  5. 10 CFR 30.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 30.7 Section 30.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 30.7 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a...

  6. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers' helpers...

  7. Employee voice and engagement : Connections and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rees, C.; Alfes, K.; Gatenby, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between employee voice and employee engagement. Employee perceptions of voice behaviour aimed at improving the functioning of the work group are found to have both a direct impact and an indirect impact on levels of employee engagement. Analysis of data from two

  8. 32 CFR 26.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 26.640 Section 26.640 National Defense... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1...

  9. 38 CFR 48.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 48.640 Section...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award...

  10. 34 CFR 32.4 - Employee response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee response. 32.4 Section 32.4 Education Office... FROM DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EMPLOYEES § 32.4 Employee response. (a) Voluntary repayment agreement. Within 7 days of receipt of the written notice under § 32.3, the employee may submit a request to the...

  11. 29 CFR 1472.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 1472.640 Section 1472.640 Labor Regulations... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All...

  12. 45 CFR 630.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 630.640 Section 630.640 Public Welfare... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All...

  13. 29 CFR 825.110 - Eligible employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligible employee. 825.110 Section 825.110 Labor... employee. (a) An “eligible employee” is an employee of a covered employer who: (1) Has been employed by the... worksite where 50 or more employees are employed by the employer within 75 miles of that worksite. (See...

  14. 25 CFR 502.14 - Key employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Key employee. 502.14 Section 502.14 Indians NATIONAL....14 Key employee. Key employee means: (a) A person who performs one or more of the following functions... gaming operation. (d) Any other person designated by the tribe as a key employee. [57 FR 12392, Apr. 9...

  15. 2 CFR 182.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 182.640 Section 182.640 Grants and... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 182.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award...

  16. 41 CFR 105-74.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 105-74.640...-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award...

  17. 29 CFR 1201.4 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 1201.4 Section 1201.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD DEFINITIONS § 1201.4 Employee. The term employee as... that of an employee or subordinate official in the orders of the Interstate Commerce Commission now in...

  18. 29 CFR 2200.38 - Employee contests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee contests. 2200.38 Section 2200.38 Labor... Pleadings and Motions § 2200.38 Employee contests. (a) Secretary's statement of reasons. Where an affected employee or authorized employee representative files a notice of contest with respect to the abatement...

  19. 20 CFR 404.1045 - Employee expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee expenses. 404.1045 Section 404.1045 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1045 Employee expenses. Amounts...

  20. 28 CFR 97.12 - Employee training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee training. 97.12 Section 97.12... OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.12 Employee training. Private prisoner transport companies must require the completion of a minimum of 100 hours of employee training before an employee may transport violent prisoners...

  1. 24 CFR 21.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 21.640 Section 21.640... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1...

  2. 40 CFR 36.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 36.640 Section 36.640... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 36.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1...

  3. 49 CFR 218.22 - Utility employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Utility employee. 218.22 Section 218.22... employee. (a) A utility employee shall be subject to the Hours of Service Act, and the requirements for... parts 217, 219, and 228 of this chapter. (b) A utility employee shall perform service as a member of...

  4. 17 CFR 204.34 - Employee response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee response. 204.34... DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 204.34 Employee response. (a) Introduction. An employee must respond to... ways discussed in § 204.34, Employee response, and § 204.35, Petition for pre-offset hearing. Where...

  5. 36 CFR 1212.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 1212.640 Section... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award...

  6. 20 CFR 229.45 - Employee benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee benefit. 229.45 Section 229.45 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE Computation of the Overall Minimum Rate § 229.45 Employee benefit. The original...

  7. Are happy employees healthy employees? Researching the effects of employee engagement on absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxsey, Dann

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, a survey was conducted to measure the levels of workplace engagement for British Columbian civil servants. Following the Heskett et al. model of the “service profit chain” (1994, 2002), the government's primary concerns were the increasing attrition rates and their effects on service delivery. Essentially, the model demonstrated that employees who were more engaged were more committed to their work and more likely to stay within the civil service and that this culminated in improved customer service. Under the joint rubrics of absenteeism and job satisfaction, this study uses a construct of engagement (i.e., job satisfaction) to test whether different levels of engagement have any effect on the amount of sick time (absenteeism) an employee incurs. Specifically, the author looks at whether there is any correlation between the amount of sick time used and an individual's level of engagement and proposes that there is an inverse negative relationship: as job engagement increases, sick time used decreases. Testing the old adage “A happy employee is a healthy employee,” this research demonstrates that, though a more engaged employee may use less sick time, the differences in use between highly engaged employees and those not engaged are fairly marginal and that correlations are further confounded by a host of other (often missing) factors.

  8. Unveiling Leadership–Employee Performance Links: Perspective of Young Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehmina Fiaz Qazi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impact of leadership style practiced by managers on their subordinates’ job performance. Emotional Intelligence of the employees has been considered as a moderator to the leadership-performance relationship. Self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted from convenient sampled 100 young employees of telecom and banking sector. They were asked to respond about their perception regarding their manager’s leadership style, job performance and their perceived level of emotional intelligence. 77 out of 100 distributed questionnaires were received back completely filled that yield response rate of 77%. Current research concluded that the style of leadership exhibited by a manager is significantly associated with the subordinates’ job performance while emotional intelligence of employees has no moderating effect on this leadership- performance relationship

  9. Business Ethics & Employee Turnover: CAFE Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sapovadia, Vrajlal; Patel, Sweta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Business ethics is in discussion for its importance universally, so is the employee turnover in business. Unethical practices are unwanted, so is the high employee turnover. Unethical practices and high employee turnover in business is ubiquitous. No consensus exists on defining ethics. Employee turnover is well defined, but there is no consensus on when employee turnover is disadvantageous for the company. The Golden Rule or ethic of reciprocity, a maxim states that either ...

  10. Analysis of employee benefits in company

    OpenAIRE

    Burda, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    The main subject of Bachelor's Thesis called "Analysis of employee benefits in company" is to analyze system of employee benefits used in company Saint-Gobain Construction Products a.s. The theoretical part focuses on the meaning of employee benefits, their categorization, terms of tax legislation a trends. In the practical section of the work, the current state of employee benefits in the firm is discussed and reviewed. A survey was conducted to investigate the satisfaction of employees towa...

  11. Below the Salary Line: Employee Engagement of Non-Salaried Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Brad; Albornoz, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory empirical phenomological study looks at employee engagement using Kahn (1990) and Maslow's (1970) motivational theories to understand the experience of non-salaried employees. This study finds four themes that seem to affect employee engagement: work environment, employee's supervisor, individual characteristics of the employee,…

  12. Putting Order into Our Universe: The Concept of Blended Learning—A Methodology within the Concept-based Terminology Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Fernandes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing the advantages of a methodology design grounded on a concept-based approach to Terminology applied to the most prominent scenario of current Higher Education: blended learning. Terminology is a discipline that aims at representing, describing and defining specialized knowledge through language, putting order into our universe (Nuopponen, 2011. Concepts, as elements of the structure of knowledge (Sager, 1990 emerge as a complex research object. Can they be found in language? A concept-based approach to Terminology implies a clear-cut view of the role of language in terminological work: though language is postulated as being a fundamental tool to grasp, describe and organize knowledge, an isomorphic relationship between language and knowledge cannot be taken for granted. In other words, the foundational premise of a concept-based approach is that there is no one-to-one correspondence between atomic elements of knowledge and atomic elements of linguistic expression. This is why a methodological approach to Terminology merely based upon specialized text research is regarded as biased (Costa, 2013. As a consequence, we argue that interactional strategies between terminologist and domain expert deserve particular research attention. To our mind, the key to concept-based terminological work is to carry out a concept analysis of data gathered from a specialised text corpora combined with an elicitation process of the tacit knowledge and concept-oriented discursive negotiation. Following such view, we put forward a methodology to answer the question: how is blended learning defined in the Post-Bologna scenario? Even though there are numerous high-quality models and practical descriptions for its implementation (similarly to other concepts related to distance learning, the need to understand, demarcate and harmonize the concept of blended learning against the current Higher Education background results from the premise that

  13. Design and evaluation of a telemonitoring concept based on NFC-enabled mobile phones and sensor devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Jürgen; Kumpusch, Hannes; Hayn, Dieter; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Schreier, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of information and communication technologies such as mobile phones and wireless sensor networks becomes more and more common in the field of telemonitoring for chronic diseases. Providing elderly people with a mobile-phone-based patient terminal requires a barrier-free design of the overall user interface including the setup of wireless communication links to sensor devices. To easily manage the connection between a mobile phone and wireless sensor devices, a concept based on the combination of Bluetooth and near-field communication technology has been developed. It allows us initiating communication between two devices just by bringing them close together for a few seconds without manually configuring the communication link. This concept has been piloted with a sensor device and evaluated in terms of usability and feasibility. Results indicate that this solution has the potential to simplify the handling of wireless sensor networks for people with limited technical skills.

  14. How to measure employee satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo, A.

    1998-01-01

    Competitiveness is impossible without satisfied employees. Excellent organisations base their success on customer loyalty, providing products and services which exceed expectations, which are always increasing. For this reason it is necessary to continually improve the organisation's performance and, therefore the activities which lead to this performance. This is not possible to do without the involvement and commitment of the persons carrying out the activities: employees. The presentation places employee satisfaction within the EFQM Business Excellent Model. The persons most adequate for improving the activities carried out by the organisation are those most familiar with them: employees. To bring this about it is necessary to develop capacities, provide tools necessary for improvement, and provide adequate motivation; indeed, satisfy them. In a society such as today's human resources are the most valuable asset. The aim of the presentation is to introduce the Coopers and Lybrand-Galdano model to measure employee satisfaction, based on the comparison of expectations and perceptions with respect to the organisation. (Author)

  15. Strategic Employee Development (SED) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Johnny; Guevara (Castano), Nathalie; Thorpe, Barbara; Barnett, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    As with many other U.S. agencies, succession planning is becoming a critical need for NASA. The primary drivers include (a) NASAs higher-than-average aged workforce with approximately 50 of employees eligible for retirement within 5 years; and (b) employees who need better developmental conversations to increase morale and retention. This problem is particularly concerning for Safety Mission Assurance (SMA) organizations since they traditionally rely on more experienced engineers and specialists to perform their organizations functions.In response to this challenge, the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) SMA organization created the Strategic Employee Development (SED) program. The SED programs goal is to provide a proactive method to counter the primary drivers by creating a deeper bench strength and providing a more comprehensive developmental feedback experience for the employee. The SED is a new succession planning framework that enables customization to any organization, and in this case, specifically for an SMA organization. This is accomplished via the identification of key positions, the corresponding critical competencies, and a process to help managers have relevant and meaningful development conversations with the workforce. As a result of the SED, several tools and products were created that allows management to make better strategic workforce decisions. Although there are opportunities for improvement for the SED program, the most important impact has been on the quality of developmental discussions for employees.

  16. Evolutionary primacy of sodium bioenergetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The F- and V-type ATPases are rotary molecular machines that couple translocation of protons or sodium ions across the membrane to the synthesis or hydrolysis of ATP. Both the F-type (found in most bacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria and chloroplasts and V-type (found in archaea, some bacteria, and eukaryotic vacuoles ATPases can translocate either protons or sodium ions. The prevalent proton-dependent ATPases are generally viewed as the primary form of the enzyme whereas the sodium-translocating ATPases of some prokaryotes are usually construed as an exotic adaptation to survival in extreme environments. Results We combine structural and phylogenetic analyses to clarify the evolutionary relation between the proton- and sodium-translocating ATPases. A comparison of the structures of the membrane-embedded oligomeric proteolipid rings of sodium-dependent F- and V-ATPases reveals nearly identical sets of amino acids involved in sodium binding. We show that the sodium-dependent ATPases are scattered among proton-dependent ATPases in both the F- and the V-branches of the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion Barring convergent emergence of the same set of ligands in several lineages, these findings indicate that the use of sodium gradient for ATP synthesis is the ancestral modality of membrane bioenergetics. Thus, a primitive, sodium-impermeable but proton-permeable cell membrane that harboured a set of sodium-transporting enzymes appears to have been the evolutionary predecessor of the more structurally demanding proton-tight membranes. The use of proton as the coupling ion appears to be a later innovation that emerged on several independent occasions. Reviewers This article was reviewed by J. Peter Gogarten, Martijn A. Huynen, and Igor B. Zhulin. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  17. On the Primacy of Affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajonc, R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Reasserts view that there can be emotional or affective arousal without prior cognitive appraisal. Criticizes Lazarus's rejection of this view on the grounds that it presents no empirical evidence, is based on an arbitrary definition of emotion, and obliterates all distinctions between cognition, sensation, and perception. (CMG)

  18. Making Sense of Employee Discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mona Agerholm

    In response to the growing interest in the field of organizational identification and the analysis of employee attachment in organizations, this paper presents a multidimensional reception model for analyzing the level of employee identification with corporate value statements. The identification...... model extends a multidimensional model for media reception originally proposed by Schrøder in the field of media reception studies. The proposed model combines the reception dimensions Comprehension, Discrimination, Implementation, Motivation, and Position. This model allows the analysis...... of the complexity, nuances and diversities of employee identification with corporate texts in organizations. In addition to this, the model may help to uncover the positive and negative factors that influence the identification level....

  19. Transformational leadership and employee satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Mujkić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper was to carry out an empirical research on whether transformational leadership, in comparison to other contemporary leadership styles, contributes to higher employee satisfaction levels. In total, 399 respondents took part in this research, which was conducted in companies in Bosnia and Herzegovina and Germany. This was the starting point to identify the dominant leadership style in each of the two countries. Using a nonparametric Mann-Whitney test, it was proved that there is a statistically significant difference in employee satisfaction under transformational leadership as opposed to the transactional and charismatic styles. After a detailed research of the literature, it became apparent that research on this subject is scarce. Accordingly, presenting transformational leadership and its influence on employee satisfaction was a particular challenge.

  20. The Transformation of Employee Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Ole Gunni; Knudsen, Herman; Lind, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -model. However, more recent research into psychosocial work environment problems questions the model’s assumption of high job control compensating for high job demands. Taking its point of departure in a `deconstruction´ of the concept of participation based on research on employee participation from the past......This article reviews the research literature on the relationship between employee participation, influence and the work environment. The main part of the literature points to a positive connection in line with how it has been almost institutionalised in Karasek and Theorell´s demand control...... few decades, the article discuss what factors and changes have resulted in that increased employee participation does not seem to result in a healthy work environment. The article concludes on the limitations of the demand control-model in modern working life given contextual changes in the employer...

  1. VULNERABILITY OF PART TIME EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Dimitriu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The employee who concluded a part-time contract is the employee whose normal working hours, calculated weekly or as monthly average, is lower than the number of normal working hours of a comparable full-time employee. Part-time workers generally have the same legal status as full time workers. In fact, the vulnerability of this category of workers is not necessarily legal but rather economic: income - in proportion to the work performed, may be insufficient to cover the needs of living. However, such vulnerability may also have a certain cultural component: in some societies, professional identity is determined by the length of working hours. Also, part time work may hide many types of indirect discrimination.As a result, the part-time contract requires more than a protective legislation: it requires a strategy. This paper proposes a number of milestones of such a strategy, as well as some concrete de lege ferenda proposals.

  2. Employee contract issues for dermatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher E; Indest, George F

    2013-12-01

    Employees and employers routinely face negotiating and preparing physician employment contracts. It is important for both sides to know and understand the basic information on what a comprehensive employment contract for a dermatologist should contain. There are various employment contract provisions from both the employee's perspective and the employer's perspective that must be considered when preparing physician employment contracts. This article provides basic advice and recommendations on requirements that should be included in such contracts. It suggests legal pitfalls that can be avoided through various contract clauses.

  3. Involving Employees in Strategy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Strategy as a practice and continuous innovation approaches are combined to conceptualise dilemmas of short versus long term and to analyse a case of employee participation as a particular example of strategy innovation. The case is a medium size textile company developing its strategy involving ...... and Balanced Score Card consultancy, an ‘open space’ workshop and organized strategy projects. Especially the latter two are important in facilitating the employee involvement. The case however also exhibit enterprise situated praxis’s like mitigation of taboos....

  4. Exploring Employee Engagement from the Employee Perspective: Implications for HRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, M. Brad; Rocco, Tonette S.; Albornoz, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine an employee's unique experience of being engaged in their work. Design/methodology/approach: Following Yin's case study design method, researchers collected documents, conducted semi-structured interviews and recorded observations at a large multinational service corporation ranked as one of the…

  5. Employee Orientation and Job Satisfaction among Professional Employees in Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Lawrence R.; Sekaran, Uma

    1978-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between job satisfaction and employee orientations of professionals in small rural hospitals. Organizational loyalty, peer loyalty and professional identification were used as predictors. Organizational loyalty was found to be the predominant orientation predicting job satisfaction. Replication in other…

  6. EMPLOYEE RETENTION: COMPONENTS OF JOB SATISFACTION OF GREEN INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    OpenAIRE

    Bitsch, Vera; Hogberg, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen businesses participated in case studies of labor management practices. Fifteen non-supervisory employee interviews were analyzed regarding components of job satisfaction. Components were family values, achievement, recognition, work itself, involvement, personal life, interpersonal relationships, job security, supervision, working conditions, organization, safety, compensation and information.

  7. An Employee With Undiagnosed Leprosy: Are Other Employees at Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurati, Ann R

    2017-07-01

    MJ is a janitor working in an office building for the past 5 years. He sustained a third-degree burn with a secondary infection and was sent to the county hospital. He was diagnosed with leprosy. The employees in the office building were concerned with the risk of transmission. This article reviews leprosy, and implications for occupational health nurses are discussed.

  8. 78 FR 64873 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program and Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... family members under the FEHB and the Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program (FEDVIP... procedure, Government employees, Health facilities, Health insurance, Health professions, Hostages, Iraq... Administrative practice and procedure, Government employees, Health insurance, Taxes, Wages. 5 CFR Part 894...

  9. Managing employee motivation: Exploring the connections between managers' enforcement actions, employee perceptions, and employee intrinsic motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Falk; Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2017-01-01

    analyze whether local managers—the primary enforcers of external interventions—affect how employees perceive a command system and thereby affect employee intrinsic motivation. Using a multilevel dataset of 1,190 teachers and 32 school principals, we test whether principals’ use of “hard”, “mixed” or “soft......” enforcement of a command system (obligatory teacher-produced student plans) is associated with teacher intrinsic motivation. Results show that teachers experiencing a “hard” enforcement have lower intrinsic motivation than teachers experiencing a “soft” enforcement. As expected by motivation crowding theory......A number of studies show that the use of external interventions, such as command systems and economic incentives, can decrease employee intrinsic motivation. Our knowledge of why the size of “the hidden cost of rewards” differs between organizations is, however, still sparse. In this paper, we...

  10. Does employee involvement work? Yes, sometimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, J L

    1997-12-01

    Employee involvement per se is not always effective for improving performance and/or employee attitudes. Rather, there are several different forms of employee involvement, some of which are effective, while others are not. This article describes seven forms of employee involvement, giving examples, and summarizes research findings for each form, concluding with a summary of which are the best and which are worst. This article also describes what is necessary for effective employee involvement, focusing on management commitment and training for both management and employees.

  11. Organizational Silence in Sports Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Gulsum; Pala, Adem; Yilmaz, Taner; Duyan, Mehdi; Gunel, Ilker

    2016-01-01

    Organizational silence can be defined as a way of behaviour belonging to men and women employees in the organization exhibited without reflecting their feelings, ideas, concerns and suggestions related with their workplaces, works for which they are responsible or other activities of the organization. In the period of organizational silence,…

  12. Caring for the Disabled Employee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    lives of disabled people (Barnes & Mercer 2005, Paterson & Hughes 2010). A recurrent theme in this study’s transcribed and coded interviews was not an awareness of bullying and harassment, as other studies have found (e.g., Fevre et al. 2013), but rather how managers and employees without impairments...

  13. Employee Assistance Programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Employee assistance programs (EAP) are evaluated in questionnaire responses from 73 of 109 (67 percent) Canadian school boards and 35 (50 percent) of the clients of the EAP in London, Ontario. Explores the nature of current programs and emerging trends in this field. (MLF)

  14. 20 CFR 226.14 - Employee regular annuity rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee regular annuity rate. 226.14 Section... COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Computing an Employee Annuity § 226.14 Employee regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate payable to the employee is the total of the employee tier I...

  15. Supporting the Health of Low Socioeconomic Status Employees: Qualitative Perspectives from Employees and Large Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Amanda T; Hammerback, Kristen; Hannon, Peggy A; Mason, Caitlin; Wilkie, Michelle N; Harris, Jeffrey R

    2018-03-13

    The aim of this study was to identify alignments between wellness offerings low socioeconomic status (SES) employees need and those large companies can provide. Focus groups (employees); telephone interviews (large companies). Employees were low-SES, insured through their employers, and employed by large Washington State companies. Focus groups covered perceived barriers to healthy behaviors at work and potential support from companies. Interviews focused on priorities for employee health and challenges reaching low-SES employees. Seventy-seven employees participated in eight focus groups; 12 companies completed interviews. Employees identified facilitators and barriers to healthier work environments; companies expressed care for employees, concerns about employee obesity, and reluctance to discuss SES. Our findings combine low-SES employee and large company perspectives and indicate three ways workplaces could most effectively support low-SES employee health: create healthier workplace food environments; prioritize onsite physical activity facilities; use clearer health communications.

  16. 29 CFR 541.200 - General rule for administrative employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Administrative Employees § 541.200 General rule for administrative employees. (a...

  17. Improve employee engagement to retain your workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullar, Jessica M; Amick, Benjamin C; Brewer, Shelley; Diamond, Pamela M; Kelder, Steven H; Mikhail, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Turnover hurts patient care quality and is expensive to hospitals. Improved employee engagement could encourage employees to stay at their organization. The aim of the study was to test whether participants in an employee engagement program were less likely than nonparticipants to leave their job. Health care workers (primarily patient care technicians and assistants, n = 216) were recruited to participate in an engagement program that helps employees find meaning and connection in their work. Using human resources data, we created a longitudinal study to compare participating versus nonparticipating employees in the same job titles on retention time (i.e., termination risk). Participants were less likely to leave the hospital compared to nonparticipating employees (hazard ratio = 0.22, 95% CI [0.11, 0.84]). This finding remained significant after adjusting for covariates (hazard ratio = 0.37, 95% CI [0.17, 0.57]). Improving employee engagement resulted in employees staying longer at the hospital.

  18. Corporate Benefits of Employee Recreation Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Craig

    1984-01-01

    Employee recreation programs have been shown to reduce absenteeism, increase performance and productivity, reduce stress levels, and increase job satisfaction. Studies that present positive results of employee recreation are discussed. (DF)

  19. Work, Formal Participation, and Employee Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Donald V.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses a study of the effects of work and expanded employee participation in decision making on four employee outcomes: alienation, job satisfaction, life satisfaction, and commitment. (Author/JOW)

  20. Employee Sabbaticals: Who Benefits and Why.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Edmund L.; Connor, Joan M.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses benefits of employee sabbaticals including (1) continuing employee education; (2) avoiding technical obsolescence; (3) reducing job-related stress and burnout; (4) creating a more productive work force; and (5) stemming the tide of early retirement. (JOW)

  1. Quality assurance - how to involve the employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1996-01-01

    An overview of strategies for involvement of employees in quality assurance developement and implementation.......An overview of strategies for involvement of employees in quality assurance developement and implementation....

  2. Employee Capital:Resource or Reoccurring Nightmare

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2005-01-01

    Employee capital need not be a reoccurring nightmare for bar owners if they create a system for managing their employee capital which deals with recruitment, placement, training and development for all hospitality staff members.

  3. Educating Organizational Consumers about Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Provides an overview of the value of employee assistance programs (EAP) as mechanisms to solve organizational problems. The article is based on a field study of 480 EAPs in private sector organizations with 500 or more employees. (JOW)

  4. THE EFFECT OF THE ATTITUDE TOWARD BREASTFEEDING CONCEPT BASED COMIC ON THE ADOLESCENCE'S ATTITUDE TOWARD EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mekar dwi anggraeni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The earlier development of the attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding produces the longer exclusive breastfeeding duration. Considering the first marriage age among Indonesian, the attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding should be developed at the adolescence age. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the attitude toward breastfeeding concept based comic on the adolescent's attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding. Method: This was a quasy experimental posttest only with control group study. The respondents were provided an comic. The respondent's attitude toward exclusive breastfeeding was measured using The Breastfeeding Attitude Questionnaire. Data were analyzed using independent and dependent t test. Results: The majority of respondents were aged 17 years old in both intervention (70% and control grup (63%, first child in both intervention (23,3% and control grup (26,7%, and had a nuclear family in both intervention (80% and control grup (90%. The independent t test showed that there was a significant difference between post-test scores among the intervention and control groups (t = 5,602, p < 0,01. Conclusion and recommendation: Nurses may use the Attitude Toward Breastfeeding based comic to increase the Adolescence's attitude toward breastfeeding. Keywords: Comic, Attitudes Toward Exclusive Breastfeeding, Adolescence

  5. A Field Experiment in Motivating Employee Ideas

    OpenAIRE

    Susanne Neckermann; Michael Gibbs; Christoph Siemroth

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We study the effects of a field experiment designed to motivate employee ideas, at a large technology company. Employees were encouraged to submit ideas on process and product improvements via an online system. In the experiment, the company randomized 19 account teams into treatment and control groups. Employees in treatment teams received rewards if their ideas were approved. Nothing changed for employees in control teams. Our main finding is that rewards substa...

  6. Work Satisfaction Influence Toward Employee Prosperity

    OpenAIRE

    Indryawati, Rini; Widiyarsih, Widiyarsih

    2007-01-01

    Work satisfaction has an effect to employee wealthy at PT. Nagaraja Lestari in taking the policy and to motivate employee to enhancing the work performance in giving wages, salary, incentives, job promotion and employee healthy. This research is using qualitative approach and using observation and interview as tool research. Data collecting is in naration, description, story, written and unwritten documents. When employee has higher work satisfaction they will psychological wealthy fullfilness.

  7. Employee Engagement Factor for Organizational Excellence

    OpenAIRE

    Tzvetana Stoyanova; Ivaylo Iliev

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this publication is to identify ways to increase employee engagement in Bulgarian business organizations and identify how such employee engagement affects employee and company performance. Design/methodology/approach: Our research is based on the evaluation of employee engagement methodologies used by well-known companies such as Gallup HCM Advisory Group, Deloitte and Aon Hewitt. Based on these, we derive the fac...

  8. Accounting and tax aspects of employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Kudláčková, Kristýna

    2015-01-01

    The thesis is dedicated to the exploration and analysis of the implementation of employee benefits such as the types of benefits provided by employers to employees according to Czech accounting and tax regulations. In the theoretical part deals with the topic of employee motivation at the work and describes the best known motivational theories. It tries to highlight the interconnections of social policy, evaluation and remuneration system with the level of employee satisfaction and its impact...

  9. Employee commitment and performance of manufacturing firms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    445) between job satisfaction and employee organizational commitment. Multiple regression revealed that pay and job promotion are the important elements that influence employee commitment. It is recommended that manufacturing organizations should emphasize pay and job promotion to enhance higher employee ...

  10. Employee Engagement Factor for Organizational Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzvetana Stoyanova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this publication is to identify ways to increase employee engagement in Bulgarian business organizations and identify how such employee engagement affects employee and company performance. Design/methodology/approach: Our research is based on the evaluation of employee engagement methodologies used by well-known companies such as Gallup HCM Advisory Group, Deloitte and Aon Hewitt. Based on these, we derive the factors influencing employee engagement in Bulgarian companies. Findings: This work focuses on management, in recent years, aimed at retaining and developing the best employees, and their evolution into reliable potential leaders of the organization. This is undertaken to maintain and increase the number of those engaged in the business of company employees as well. The management of a successful leader is considered key to increasing employee engagement. Employee commitment implies something special, additional or atypical in the performance of tasks and job role. This is a behaviour that involves innovation, demonstrating initiative via proactive seeking of opportunities that contribute to the company and exceeding the expected standard of employee performance. The findings can strengthen the already-significant role of management. There is no universal way to increase employee engagement and motivation towards increased productivity, activity, and creativity. Research limitations/implications: The study has been undertaken for employees in Bulgaria.

  11. Added Value of Employee Financial Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poutsma, F.; Kaarsemaker, E.C.A.; Andresen, M.; Nowak, C.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter broadens our understanding of the added value of employee financial participation. Financial participation is a generic term for the participation of employees in profit and enterprise results including equity of their employing firm. In general, there are two forms of employee

  12. Stimulating Strategically Aligned Behaviour among Employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.B.M. van Riel (Cees); G.A.J.M. Berens (Guido); M. Dijkstra (Majorie)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractStrategically aligned behaviour (SAB), i.e., employee action that is consistent with the company’s strategy, is of vital importance to companies. This study provides insights into the way managers can promote such behaviour among employees by stimulating employee motivation and by

  13. 10 CFR 40.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected activities does not automatically render him or... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 40.7 Section 40.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL General Provisions § 40.7 Employee protection. (a...

  14. 10 CFR 71.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... An employee's engagement in protected activities does not automatically render him or her immune from... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 71.9 Section 71.9 Energy NUCLEAR... § 71.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, certificate holder, an...

  15. 10 CFR 76.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... An employee's engagement in protected activities does not automatically render him or her immune from... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 76.7 Section 76.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by the Corporation, a contractor, or a subcontractor of the...

  16. 30 CFR 57.18006 - New employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Surface and Underground § 57.18006 New employees. New employees shall be indoctrinated in safety rules and safe work procedures. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New employees. 57.18006 Section 57.18006...

  17. 30 CFR 56.18006 - New employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... New employees. New employees shall be indoctrinated in safety rules and safe work procedures. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New employees. 56.18006 Section 56.18006 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE...

  18. 49 CFR 1011.5 - Employee boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee boards. 1011.5 Section 1011.5... OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS BOARD ORGANIZATION; DELEGATIONS OF AUTHORITY § 1011.5 Employee boards. This section covers matters assigned to the Accounting Board, a board of employees of the...

  19. Why Employees Act the Way They Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Dora

    1995-01-01

    Offers advice for administrators on how six laws of human behavior affect employees. Laws discussed include: how employees recreate familial roles in the workplace, how persons constantly seek to gain or maintain control of their lives, how change in a person's environment can cause changes in behavior, and how employees covet tokens of approval.…

  20. 10 CFR 19.20 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 19.20 Section 19.20 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. Employment discrimination by a licensee, a holder of a certificate of compliance... as delineated in § 19.2(a), against an employee for engaging in protected activities under this part...

  1. 40 CFR 273.16 - Employee training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee training. 273.16 Section 273.16 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... Employee training. A small quantity handler of universal waste must inform all employees who handle or have...

  2. 22 CFR 901.17 - Charged employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Charged employee. 901.17 Section 901.17 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD GENERAL Meanings of Terms As Used in This Chapter § 901.17 Charged employee. Charged employee means a member of the Senior Foreign Service or a member of the Service assigned...

  3. 19 CFR 19.46 - Employee lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee lists. 19.46 Section 19.46 Customs Duties... Employee lists. A permit shall not be granted to an operator to transfer a container or containers to a... new employees. The operator shall, within 10 calendar days, advise the port director if the employment...

  4. 29 CFR 401.6 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 401.6 Section 401.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.6 Employee. Employee means any individual employed by an employer...

  5. 40 CFR 273.36 - Employee training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee training. 273.36 Section 273.36 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED... Employee training. A large quantity handler of universal waste must ensure that all employees are...

  6. 5 CFR 531.402 - Employee coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee coverage. 531.402 Section 531... GENERAL SCHEDULE Within-Grade Increases § 531.402 Employee coverage. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, this subpart applies to employees who— (1) Are classified and paid under the...

  7. 75 FR 5697 - Employee Protection Program; Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Part 314 RIN 2105-AD94 Employee... Employee Protection Program. These regulations are removed because the underlying program was repealed by... Employee Protection Program, to be administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Section 43 of the...

  8. Improving Employee Benefits: Doing the Right Thing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Joe

    1990-01-01

    With some exceptions, child care workers receive fewer employee benefits than workers in other occupations. The employer's and the employee's point of view on employee benefits are discussed. Also considers availability of benefits in child care and the obstacles to improved benefits for workers. (DG)

  9. 12 CFR 996.2 - Bank employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... RESOLUTION FUNDING CORPORATION § 996.2 Bank employees. Upon the request of the Directorate of the Resolution..., employees, or agents of the Banks are authorized to act for and on behalf of the Resolution Funding... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank employees. 996.2 Section 996.2 Banks and...

  10. 5 CFR 410.303 - Employee responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Establishing and Implementing Training Programs § 410.303 Employee responsibilities. Employees are responsible... training needed to improve individual and organizational performance and identify methods to meet those... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee responsibilities. 410.303...

  11. Business Performance, Employee Satisfaction, and Leadership Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashbrook, William B.

    1997-01-01

    The difficulty in finding a relationship between employee satisfaction and business performance results from how satisfaction is defined. A survey of 2000 employees determined that organizations, regardless of industry, could improve organizational performance by improving employee work unit satisfaction and that the work unit leader's actions may…

  12. 48 CFR 725.703 - Contractor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor employees. 725... SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS FOREIGN ACQUISITION Source, Origin, and Nationality 725.703 Contractor employees. (a... on employees or consultants of either contractors or subcontractors providing services under an USAID...

  13. 49 CFR 199.115 - Contractor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor employees. 199.115 Section 199.115... § 199.115 Contractor employees. With respect to those employees who are contractors or employed by a contractor, an operator may provide by contract that the drug testing, education, and training required by...

  14. 49 CFR 199.245 - Contractor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor employees. 199.245 Section 199.245... Prevention Program § 199.245 Contractor employees. (a) With respect to those covered employees who are contractors or employed by a contractor, an operator may provide by contract that the alcohol testing...

  15. Employee Ownership and Democracy in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, David J.

    1981-01-01

    Explains three American forms of employee-owned companies. The Mock Conventional firm models its legal structure after conventional enterprises, with shares held primarily by employees. The Employee Stock Ownership Plan regulates the shareholding patterns of ESOP firms. The Producer Cooperative guarantees each member an equal voice in corporate…

  16. Sexual Harassment: Experiences of University Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Megan P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined Central Michigan University employees' (N=449) sexual harassment experiences through employee survey. Found that (1) more women than men reported sexual harassment; (2) most common harassers cited were male co-workers, administrators, and maintenance employees; (3) harassment most frequently attributed to working conditions and hours; (4)…

  17. 45 CFR 1226.12 - Sponsor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sponsor employees. 1226.12 Section 1226.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.12 Sponsor employees...

  18. Employee Ownership and Perceptions of Work: The Effect of an Employee Stock Ownership Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, James; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A small company was studied before and after introduction of an employee stock ownership plan. Employees' commitment to the organization and job satisfaction were higher after plan implementation, while perceived worker influence levels did not change. Findings suggest that ownership changes employees' attitudes without changing employees'…

  19. Does Employee Stock Ownership Work?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Takao; Miyajima, Hideaki; Owan, Hideo

    studies, we focus on the effects of changes in varying attributes of existing ESO—the effects on the intensive margin. Our fixed effect estimates show that an increase in the strength of the existing ESO plans measured by stake per employee results in statistically significant productivity gains....... Furthermore, such productivity gains are found to lead to profitability gains since wage gains from ESO plans are statistically significant yet rather modest. Our analysis of Tobin's Q suggests that the market tends to view such gains from ESO plans as permanent. We further find that increasing the stake......This paper provides novel evidence on the effects of employee stock ownership (ESO), using new panel data on Japanese ESO plans for a highly representative sample of publicly-traded firms in Japan (covering more than 75% of all firms listed on Tokyo Stock Exchange) over 1989-2013. Unlike most prior...

  20. Employees in Total Quality Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Matlhape

    2002-12-01

    • affirmative action and divers ity management • skills shortages, training and development • low levels of employee well-being. Working with people requires fundamental understanding of the uniqueness of each individual with their own identity and set of preferences. It also requires an understanding of teams and the mechanisms of making a group of individuals work well or poorly together. This will assist managers to realise active participation, quality output from their workers through individualised, and team based motivational processes.

  1. Employee on Boarding Process Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Khushboo Nalband; Priyanka Jadhav; Geetanjali Salunke

    2017-01-01

    On boarding, also known as organizational socialization, plays a vital role in building the initial relationship between an organization and an employee. It also contributes to an employees’ satisfaction, better performance and greater organizational commitment thus increasing an employees’ effectiveness and productivity in his/her role. Therefore, it is essential that on boarding process of an organization is efficient and effective to improve new employees’ retention. Generally this on boar...

  2. Health Inequalities Among Korean Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunsuk Choi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social status might be a determinant of occupational health inequalities. This study analyzed the effects of social status on both work environments and health outcomes. Methods: The study sample consisted of 27,598 wage employees aged 15 years and older from among the Korean Working Condition Survey participants in 2011. Work environments included atypical work, physical risks, ergonomic risks, work demands, work autonomy, social supports, and job rewards. Health outcomes comprised general health, health and safety at risk because of work, the World Health Organization-5 Well-being Index, work-related musculoskeletal disease, and work-related injury. Multivariable logistic-regression models were used to identify the associations between social status and work environments and health outcomes. Results: Employees in the demographically vulnerable group had lower occupational status compared with their counterparts. Low social status was largely related to adverse work environments. Especially, precarious employment and manual labor occupation were associated with both adverse work environments and poor health outcomes. Conclusion: Precarious and manual workers should take precedence in occupational health equity policies and interventions. Their cumulative vulnerability, which is connected to demographics, occupational status, adverse work environments, or poor health outcomes, can be improved through a multilevel approach such as labor market, organizations, and individual goals. Keywords: employee health, health equity, social status

  3. Employees´ Job Satisfaction in Company

    OpenAIRE

    Václavková, Barbora

    2015-01-01

    This Master´s thesis Employees´ Job Satisfaction in Company is focused on job satisfaction of employees in a particular company. The aim of this thesis is to analyse the current level of employees´ satisfaction, factors that affect the degree of satisfaction and weak segments propose recommendations to increase the level of satisfaction among employees. The first part is theoretical and deals with the approach of the topic employees´ job satisfaction describe theoretical methods that are in p...

  4. Impact of ethical leadership on employee commitment in Nigeria- a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of ethical leadership on employee commitment in Nigeria- a study of ... result is that appropriate ethical leadership contributes to performance of the employees, ... situation and employees should get the best out of employee's integrity.

  5. 29 CFR 541.400 - General rule for computer employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Computer Employees § 541.400 General rule for computer employees. (a) Computer... computer employees whose primary duty consists of: (1) The application of systems analysis techniques and...

  6. Third European Company Survey – Direct and indirect employee participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Agnes; Sluiter, Roderick; Jansen, Giedo

    2015-01-01

    This report studies practices in EU establishments for direct and indirect employee participation in decision-making. Indirect employee participation is the involvement of employee representatives in decision-making processes, while direct employee participation describes direct interaction between

  7. Role of employee benefits in the motivation of employees at H1.cz

    OpenAIRE

    Hrubá, Markéta

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focusing on an employee benefits system and its functionality. Theoretical part of the thesis specifies the human resources field as a whole, and its particular aspects, considering mainly the employee remuneration and employee benefits system. It also expands on the relationship between motivation, employee benefits and employee remuneration. The established knowledge are used in a practical part of the thesis, which has been carried out in H1 s.r.o. The company is fi...

  8. Access to Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) for Employees of Certain Indian Tribal Employers. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    This final rule makes Federal employee health insurance accessible to employees of certain Indian tribal entities. Section 409 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act (codified at 25 U.S.C. 1647b) authorizes Indian tribes, tribal organizations, and urban Indian organizations that carry out certain programs to purchase coverage, rights, and benefits under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) Program for their employees. Tribal employers and tribal employees will be responsible for the full cost of benefits, plus an administrative fee.

  9. Multicultural Nursing: Providing Better Employee Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittle, Chad

    2015-12-01

    Living in an increasingly multicultural society, nurses are regularly required to care for employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds. An awareness of cultural differences focuses occupational health nurses on those differences and results in better employee care. This article explores the concept of culturally competent employee care, some of the non-verbal communication cues among cultural groups, models associated with completing a cultural assessment, and how health disparities in the workplace can affect delivery of employee care. Self-evaluation of the occupational health nurse for personal preferences and biases is also discussed. Development of cultural competency is a process, and occupational health nurses must develop these skills. By developing cultural competence, occupational health nurses can conduct complete cultural assessments, facilitate better communication with employees from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and improve employee health and compliance with care regimens. Tips and guidelines for facilitating communication between occupational health nurses and employees are also provided. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Job stress among Iranian prison employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, J; Akbari, R; Farasati, F; Mahaki, B

    2014-10-01

    Exposure to job stress causes deleterious effects on physical and mental health of employees and productivity of organizations. To study work-related stressors among employees of prisons of Ilam, western Iran. In a cross-sectional study conducted from July to October 2013, 177 employees of Ilam prisons and security-corrective measures organization were enrolled in this study. The UK Health and Safety Executive Organization 35-item questionnaire for assessment of occupational stress was used to determine job stress among the studied employees. Job stress was highest among employees of "correction and rehabilitation center" of Ilam province followed by "Dalab vocational training center." There was no significant relationship between occupational stress and age, work experience, level of education, marital status, sex of employees, and obesity. Employees of prisons, for their nature of job and work environment, are exposed to high level of occupational stress.

  11. Job Stress among Iranian Prison Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Akbari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure to job stress causes deleterious effects on physical and mental health of employees and productivity of organizations. Objective: To study work-related stressors among employees of prisons of Ilam, western Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted from July to October 2013, 177 employees of Ilam prisons and security-corrective measures organization were enrolled in this study. The UK Health and Safety Executive Organization 35-item questionnaire for assessment of occupational stress was used to determine job stress among the studied employees. Results: Job stress was highest among employees of “correction and rehabilitation center” of Ilam province followed by “Dalab vocational training center.” There was no significant relationship between occupational stress and age, work experience, level of education, marital status, sex of employees, and obesity. Conclusion: Employees of prisons, for their nature of job and work environment, are exposed to high level of occupational stress.

  12. 5 CFR 531.243 - Promotion of a GM employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Promotion of a GM employee. 531.243... Promotion of a GM employee. (a) Upon promotion, an employee's status as a GM employee ends, as provided in § 531.241(b). (b) When an employee loses status as a GM employee because of a temporary promotion and is...

  13. Employee retention: a customer service approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Richard F

    2002-01-01

    Employee retention is a huge problem. There are staff shortages in radiology because not enough people are entering the profession; too many people are leaving the profession for retirement, higher-paying jobs or jobs with less stress; and there are not enough opportunities for career advancement. Staff shortages are exacerbated by difficulty in retaining people who enter the profession. While much work has been focused on recruitment and getting more people "in the front door," I suggest that the bulk of future efforts be focused on employee retention and "closing the back door." Employee retention must be an ongoing process, not a program. Approaches to employee retention that focus on external things, i.e., things that the company can do to or for the employee, generally are not successful. The truth is that employee retention processes must focus on what the employee gets out of the job. The process must be a benefits-based approach that helps employees answer the question, "What's in it for me?" The retention processes must be ongoing and integrated into the daily culture of the company. The best way to keep your employees is to treat them like customers. Customer service works for external customers. We treat them nicely. We work to satisfy them. We help them achieve their goals. Why not do the same for our employees? If positive customer service policies and practices can satisfy and keep external customers, why not adapt these policies and practices for employees? And, there is a service/satisfaction link between employee retention and higher levels of customer satisfaction. Customers prefer dealing with the same employees over and over again. Employee turnover destroys a customer's confidence in the company. Just like a customer does not want to have to "train and educate" a new provider, they do not want to do the same for your "revolving door" employees. So, the key is to keep employees so they in turn will help you keep your customers. Because the

  14. Evaluating an employee wellness program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sankar; Wendel, Jeanne

    2013-12-01

    What criteria should be used to evaluate the impact of a new employee wellness program when the initial vendor contract expires? Published academic literature focuses on return-on-investment as the gold standard for wellness program evaluation, and a recent meta-analysis concludes that wellness programs can generate net savings after one or two years. In contrast, surveys indicate that fewer than half of these programs report net savings, and actuarial analysts argue that return-on-investment is an unrealistic metric for evaluating new programs. These analysts argue that evaluation of new programs should focus on contract management issues, such as the vendor's ability to: (i) recruit employees to participate and (ii) induce behavior change. We compute difference-in-difference propensity score matching estimates of the impact of a wellness program implemented by a mid-sized employer. The analysis includes one year of pre-implementation data and three years of post-implementation data. We find that the program successfully recruited a broad spectrum of employees to participate, and it successfully induced short-term behavior change, as manifested by increased preventive screening. However, the effects on health care expenditures are positive (but insignificant). If it is unrealistic to expect new programs to significantly reduce healthcare costs in a few years, then focusing on return-on-investment as the gold standard metric may lead to early termination of potentially useful wellness programs. Focusing short-term analysis of new programs on short-term measures may provide a more realistic evaluation strategy.

  15. EMPLOYEE LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT IN ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNOUČKOVÁ, Lucie

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of all organisations is efficiency of human resources. Therefore activities as HR controlling, performance management but also cutting costs are the main theme. Current organisations need to monitor human resources to keep their competitiveness. Thus paper describes the key factor of organisational efficiency - employee education, talent management and the necessity to retain skilled employees. The aim of the paper is to reveal the current approach in organisations to education and learning based on primary survey of employees. The data were collected using quantitative primary survey in Czech organisations across sectors. The questionnaire was compiled based on the theoretical background. The paper has been processed based on the analysis of secondary sources, outcome synthesis and the evaluation of results of a questionnaire survey. The data were analysed using descriptive statistic, correlation analysis and factor analysis. The SPSS programme was used for the analyses. The outcomes were categorized and the analyses revealed the main factors affecting organisational approach to employee learning and development. The results identify three possible approaches in organisations to employee learning and development. The first type of organisations educates employees by their own rules, second type does not support education of employees in any way, it is only an interest of employees themselves and thirdly knowledgeable employees were identified as those employees do as much as possible to learn and grow and they choose job position in order to develop constantly. The results can be taken into account in further analysis and in organisation of adult education.

  16. The Impact of Motivation on Employees Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Kušar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: How does Motivation Impact Employees Effectiveness? Purpose: The purpose of the study is to determine how motivation contributes to greater work efficiency. Method: Qualitative method was used, specifically, interviews with five individuals, two leaders and three employees in different organizations. Results: The research study provides findings on how motivation affects theeffective work of employees and how employees are encouraged to maximize work motivation. The results also present which demotivating factors are most present at work. Organization: The findings assist management staff to understand their rolein motivating their employees and how much it is important that leaders themselves should be the most motivated. Society: Results show that employee motivation is very important at the workplace. Because of this, employees have to take care of a good work climate within the organization and for good interpersonal relationships with fellow employees. Originality: Certain motivators were ranked differently in the review of literature, because many respondents in this study favored intangible motivating factors before tangible ones. Limitations/further research: The study is limited to employees of different ages, gender and years of service in various organizations. One of the limitations is the time determination, because I was interviewing employees at a specific time (now and not for the past.

  17. Nature Contacts: Employee Wellness in Healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trau, Deborah; Keenan, Kimberly A; Goforth, Meggan; Large, Vernon

    2016-04-01

    This study was designed to ascertain the amount of outdoor, indoor, and indirect nature contact exposures hospital employees have in a workweek. Hospital employees have been found particularly vulnerable to work-related stress. Increasing the nature contact exposure for hospital employees can reduce perceived stress; stress-related health behaviors; and stress-related health outcomes from outdoor, indoor, and indirect exposures to nature. Staff on the fourth floor postsurgical unit of a large hospital (N = 42) were ask to participate in an employee questionnaire "nature contact questionnaire". This 16-item nature environment questionnaire measures the amount and types of nature contact exposures employees have during a workweek. Majority of employees reported few, if any, nature contact exposures, specifically in the area of outdoor nature contacts with limited indoor and indirect contacts. These results indicated that employees on the fourth floor postsurgical floor have limited ability to reduce stress through nature contact exposures which could impact their perceived levels of work stress and stress-related behaviors and health outcomes. Nature contact exposures are both a relatively easy and an inexpensive way to improve employee stress. These findings indicate limitations to employees' exposure to nature contacts. Healthcare environments would benefit from a concerted effort to provide increased outdoor, indoor, and indirect nature contact exposures for employees. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. CSR: FOCUS ON EMPLOYEES. ITALIAN CASES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Gazzola

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to analyze the Corporate Social Responsibilitys (CSR influence on employees considering the fact that employees are primary stakeholders who directly contribute to the success of the company. CSR relates to employees helps to motivate the employees themselves. Job quality should be a key objective of any employer because the happy employees can create happy customers, which produce good business results. Research clearly indicates, with the help of statistical data and with the case study methodology, that committing to CSR boosts the morale and commitment of workers in a positive way. Employees who are satisfied with the organization s commitment to social and environmental responsibilities demonstrate more commitment, engagement and productivity. A conceptual framework is proposed based on literature. The author predominantly uses methods of qualitative research. In the research the case study methodology, which has been developed within the social sciences, is used. The paper starts with a concise introduction of CSR. In the first part the potential impact of CSR on employees is explained, considering why CSR may represent a special opportunity to positively influence employees’ and prospective employees’ perceptions of companies. In the second part the research considers three Italian companies that have distinguished themselves for their CSR strategy for employees: Luxottica, Brunello Cucinelli and Ferrero. A growing number of studies have been done regarding the benefits of CSR. However, most are concerned with the external view of shareholders and customer perspective. CSR research on the employee level is not well developed now. In order to better understand its effect on the employees, this study explore the impact of employees' perception of CSR on subsequent work attitudes and behaviors. CSR has a significant effect and it could improve employees' attitudes and behaviors, contribute to corporations' success

  19. The structure of agricultural employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Łabędzki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study the analysis of agricultural employees structure on the basis of data from 120 agricultural farms in Kąty Wrocławskie has been conducted. The research confirmed, that agricultural people maximum of time spend on work in their own farms. The maximum annual time of work begins at the end of last five years of working age. The men work relatively less, in agricultural farms in the case of small area farms. While the women, if better educated and in mobile working age work more. Then the biggest engagement of work outside agricultural farm concerns persons at age of 25 to 44.

  20. The structure of agricultural employees

    OpenAIRE

    Henryk Łabędzki

    2009-01-01

    In the study the analysis of agricultural employees structure on the basis of data from 120 agricultural farms in Kąty Wrocławskie has been conducted. The research confirmed, that agricultural people maximum of time spend on work in their own farms. The maximum annual time of work begins at the end of last five years of working age. The men work relatively less, in agricultural farms in the case of small area farms. While the women, if better educated and in mobile working age work more. Then...

  1. Reducing suboptimal employee decisions can build the business case for employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Christopher; Cyboran, Steven F

    2013-01-01

    Suboptimal employee decisions are prevalent in employee benefit plans. Poor decisions have significant consequences for employees and employers. Improving participant decisions produces beneficial outcomes such as lower labor costs, higher productivity and better workforce management. The business case for employee benefits can be strengthened by applying lessons learned from the field of behavioral economics to employee benefit plan design and to workforce communication. This article explains the types of behavioral biases that influence suboptimal decisions and explores how enlightened employee benefit plan choice architecture and vivid behavioral messaging contribute to human and better organizational outcomes.

  2. Work Engagament of Older Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnė Gaurylienė

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aging of the labor force is observed in most developed and developing countries. The employment rate of older employees has been increasing every year and it appears to be not changed in the nearest future. The aging workforce is a serious challenge for organizations due to the prevailing stereotypical approach that older employees are less motivated, demonstrate lower labor productivity, they have more difficulties adopting new information, technologies and the lower ability to adapt to innovations. The aim of the paper is to investigate the impact of the work characteristics on the involvement in the work, the influence of employee’s characteristics on the work engagement, the influence of age and related factors on the involvement in the work and the relationship between age and achievements. The research is based on the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature, investigating to reveal the diversity of the concepts and methodologies and to systematize prevailing issues. The paper integrates the main researches in the field of older employees’ engagement and provides recommendations for future research.

  3. Responsibilities of Companies towards Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monray Marsellus Botha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Central to company law is the promotion of corporate governance. An important question in company law still today is in whose interest the company should be managed. Corporate governance needs to address the entire span of responsibilities to stakeholders of the company such as customers, employees, shareholders, suppliers and the community at large. The promotion of human rights in the application of company law must also take place. This is extremely important given the significant role of enterprises within the social and economic life of the nation. The interests of various stakeholder groups in the context of the corporation as a "social institution" should be enhanced and protected. Because corporations are part of society and the community, like all of us, it is required of them to be socially responsible and have greater accountability to all stakeholders of the company. Although directors must act in the best interests of shareholders collectively they must also consider the interests of other stakeholders. Sustainable relationships with all the relevant stakeholders are thus important. The advancement of social justice is thus important to corporations in that they should take note of the Constitution, labour legislation and company law legislation when social justice issues are dealt with. Employees have become very important stakeholders of companies and their needs should be taken into account in the bigger corporate governance and social responsibility framework.

  4. The Optimal Performance of Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pureber

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Revoz company set itself the following task: we will enable also our blue colllar workers to improve their ski lls and be promoted. So we started implementing a project of step-by-step education, The Optimal Performance of Employees. Improving the workers' knowledges and skills guarantees higher independence, responsibility, faster development of organisation structure and more trust between the employees because of better communication in bas ic working units. The Optimal Performance program offers blue collar workers a possibility to  improve their professional skills, to adapt themselves to changes in managing, organisation, technology and new approaches to their tasks. The program is based on the following principles: • voluntariness-every worker can participate; • adapted pedagogical approach - based on routine workers' activities, the rhythm of education is adapted to their abilities of absorbing new knowledges; • including of managerial structure - before, du ring and after education; • connection with working environment - the contents of education are linked to a specific working environment.

  5. How employee engagement matters for hospital performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Managers increasingly understand that employee engagement is a prerequisite for high performance. This article examines how job, work environment, management and organizational factors influence levels of engagement among healthcare employees. Original data come from the Ontario Hospital Association-NRC Picker Employee Experience Survey, involving over 10,000 employees in 16 Ontario hospitals. The article provides a clear definition and measure of engagement relevant to healthcare. In addition to identifying the main drivers of engagement, findings shows that a high level of employee engagement is related to retention, patient-centred care, patient safety culture and employees' positive assessments of the quality of care or services provided by their team. Implications of these findings for healthcare leaders are briefly considered.

  6. How Malaysian Managers Persuade Employees' Innovative Behaviour?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farid, Hadi; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Ismail, Mohd Nazari

    2017-01-01

    The intention of this paper was to examine the impact of six selected leaders' behaviours on employees' innovative behaviour through the mediating role of leader-member exchange (LMX). A total number of 155 pairs of employees and their immediate managers participated in this study. Employees rated...... their managers' behaviours and managers evaluated their subordinates' innovative behaviour. Both managers and employees answered to LMX measurement. Then, the agreements of employees' and managers' LMX rating were applied based on the results of within and between analysis (WABA). The obtained data were analysed...... through structural equation modelling-partial least square (SEM-PLS). The findings revealed the significance of mediating role of LMX in relationship between behaviour of recognising, taking risks for change and paternalistic with employees' innovative behaviour. Thus, this study has contributed...

  7. How Malaysian managers persuade employees' innovative behaviour?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farid, Hadi; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Ismail, Mohd Nazari

    2017-01-01

    The intention of this paper was to examine the impact of six selected leaders' behaviours on employees' innovative behaviour through the mediating role of leader-member exchange (LMX). A total number of 155 pairs of employees and their immediate managers participated in this study. Employees rated...... their managers' behaviours and managers evaluated their subordinates' innovative behaviour. Both managers and employees answered to LMX measurement. Then, the agreements of employees' and managers' LMX rating were applied based on the results of within and between analysis (WABA). The obtained data were analysed...... through structural equation modelling-partial least square (SEM-PLS). The findings revealed the significance of mediating role of LMX in relationship between behaviour of recognising, taking risks for change and paternalistic with employees' innovative behaviour. Thus, this study has contributed...

  8. Why training older employees is less effective

    OpenAIRE

    Zwick, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows that training of older employees is less effective. Training effectiveness is measured with respect to key dimensions such as career development, earnings, adoption of new skills, flexibility or job security. Older employees also pursue less ambitious goals with their training participation. An important reason for these differences during the life cycle might be that firms do not offer the “right” training forms and contents. Older employees get higher returns from informal ...

  9. BURNOUT DITINJAU DARI EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT PADA KARYAWAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresia Olga Vania Christianty

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan antara employee engagement dengan burnout. Hipotesis yang diajukan dalam penelitian ini adalah terdapat hubungan negatif antara employee engagement dengan burnout pada karyawan PT BPR Restu Group. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah dengan cara penelitian kuantitatif dan dengan menggunakan skala burnout dan employee engagement. Penelitian ini menggunakan teknik analisis korelasi product moment. Hasil nilai rxy= - 0,671 (p

  10. Analysis of employee satisfaction in the company

    OpenAIRE

    Baraćová, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    The thesis is focused on employee satisfaction. The goal of my work is to analyze employee satisfaction within the chosen organization to determine potential sources of dissatisfaction and suggest possible solutions that can increase job satisfaction of the company's employees. In the theoretical part I define the concept of job satisfaction and factors that have an influence on it. The next section describes the methodological approach and the method of data acquisition and processing proced...

  11. WORK / LIFE BALANCE REFLECTIONS ON EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Selvarani; Kamalanabhan; Sakthivel Rani

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze the relationship between employee satisfaction andwork/life balance. The construct used for this research consists of career opportunity, recognition,work tasks, payments, benefits, superior subordinate relationship, employee satisfaction, andwork/life balance. The study was conducted on a total of 210 respondents working in IT organization.This study makes a contribution to join two distinct research streams, namely employee satisfaction,and work/life b...

  12. Employee and customer satisfaction in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Todd; Wood, Ben D

    2010-01-01

    There were multiple factors identified in a literature review that have a relationship to customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, employee satisfaction, and links between employee and customer satisfaction. Some of the factors identified were communication, wait times, perceived value, trust, dissatisfaction with management, changes in the workplace, vision,and fun at work. Managers must identify these topics to ensure customer satisfaction, customer loyalty,and employee satisfaction which will ultimately have a positive impact on their organizations.

  13. Employee satisfaction: code red in the workplace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Eldon L

    2002-09-01

    Concerns about employee satisfaction are just as critical in the health care industry as they are in other business sectors. This article highlights the commonality of employee opinion survey questions (from 3 sources) that most highly correlate with employee satisfaction. A visual coaching tool for managers will be introduced that enables managers to facilitate constructive work group conversations about their experience of workplace satisfaction and generate ideas they can implement for improvement.

  14. Job Stress among Iranian Prison Employees

    OpenAIRE

    J Akbari; R Akbari; F Farasati; B Mahaki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to job stress causes deleterious effects on physical and mental health of employees and productivity of organizations. Objective: To study work-related stressors among employees of prisons of Ilam, western Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional study conducted from July to October 2013, 177 employees of Ilam prisons and security-corrective measures organization were enrolled in this study. The UK Health and Safety Executive Organization 35-item questionnaire for asse...

  15. Vape Shop Employees: Public Health Advocates?

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Joy L; Walker, Kandi L; Sears, Clara G; Lee, Alexander S; Smith, Courteney; Siu, Allison; Keith, Rachel; Ridner, S. Lee

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION E-cigarettes have increased in popularity and given rise to a new type of sales outlet?the vape shop. Expanding on work examining vape shop employee e-cigarette and tobacco attitudes and behaviors 1 , this study examined key messages that vape shop employees communicate to customers. METHODS Using informal interviews, observations, and a cross-sectional survey, we examined vape shop employees? (n=16) perceptions and e-cigarette use. Data were collected in nine vape shops in Louis...

  16. Employee Benefits in a Selected Company

    OpenAIRE

    RODOVÁ, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the analysis of employee benefits and proposes the possible changes in selected organization. The characteristics of thecompany are described in the introduction of practical part. Subsequently, the current situations of benefits in selected companies are provided through questionnaire surveys, where the employee satisfactions with benefits are verified. The obtained information from questionnaires solves the particular employee satisfaction with engagement level and...

  17. Evaluation by employees of employee management on large US dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durst, Phillip T; Moore, Stanley J; Ritter, Caroline; Barkema, Herman W

    2018-05-23

    Employees, many of whom are not native English speakers, perform the majority of work on large US dairy farms. Although management of employees is a critical role of dairy owners and managers, factors that improve employee engagement and retention are not well known. Objectives were to (1) identify key dairy farm employee management issues based on employee perceptions, (2) evaluate strengths and weaknesses of farms based on employee responses, (3) investigate differences between Latino and English-speaking employees, and (4) investigate differences in perception between employers and employees. Employees from 12 US dairy farms (each with a minimum of 10 employees) were interviewed by phone following a questionnaire provided. Employees provided their responses to 21 Likert scale questions and 8 open-ended questions. There was a wide range in employee turnover among farms (100%). Latino employees had much shorter tenure and were more often employed in milking and livestock care than English-speaking employees. Employee perceptions differed among farms regarding whether they would recommend their farm as a place to work, teamwork within the dairy, whether rules were fairly applied, availability of tools and equipment, clear lines of supervision, and recognition for good work in the previous 15 d. Latino employees (n = 91) were more positive in many of these measures than their English-speaking counterparts (n = 77) but less often provided ideas to their employer on how to improve the business. Employers, surveyed on how they thought their employees would answer, underestimated employee responses on several questions, particularly the interest of employees in learning about dairy. When asked to cite 3 goals of the operation, there were differences among owners, managers, and employees. Although employees rated their commitment to the farm and their interest in learning as high, based on turnover, there was an obvious disparity between reality and ideal employee

  18. Entrepreneurial behavior among employees. Pilot study: Employees from Bucharest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionuţ Constantin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many objective or subjective factors influence the decision to open a business. The most important factors are: the existence of an adequate opportunity or a market, perception that starting a business could be difficult because of bureaucracy, financial barriers or the need to acquire new skills, a lack of money, etc. Also, entrepreneurial behavior is generally influenced by socio-economic status of the family of origin [1]. Thus, children from wealthy families have the “competitive advantage” to receive an education appropriate for managing a business and of course have the necessary financial resources and its start [2]. However, abilities of every individual can “correct’’ these benefits are completely eliminated/reduced exogenous barriers [3]. In this article I will present the results of a pilot study conducted in 2014 at Bucharest employees to observe their entrepreneurial behavior.

  19. Diagnosis of employee engagement in metallurgical enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the theoretical part of the publication an overview of the definitions of employee engagement was conducted together with the analysis of the methods and techniques which influence the professional activity of the employees in the metallurgical enterprise. The practical part discusses the results of diagnosis of engagement in steelworks. Presented theories, as well as the research, fill the information gap concerning the engagement of the employees in metallurgical enterprises. This notion is important due to the fact that modern conditions of human resources management require the engagement of the employees as something commonly accepted and a designation of manufacturing enterprises.

  20. The remuneration system and motivation of employees

    OpenAIRE

    MATEJOVÁ, Petra

    2013-01-01

    The remuneration system and motivation of employees are very important part of every company. It is very resisting in how the system is adjusted and if it works not only for company, but for employees as well. The remuneration system together with motivation of employees are better matching with all the processes in company, which are in progress in the company, the final result can be taken for the employees as bigger motivation for the work and they will be worked more effectively, which is...

  1. General employee training: Initial needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.; Copenhaver, E.D.

    1987-01-01

    US Department of Energy Orders, including those for Emergency Preparedness, require that DOE facility employees receive a preparatory course on certain basic work practices and employee responsibilities before receiving any job-specific training. Most of this general information is required for employees to either prevent or to handle emergency situations that may arise in the workplace. While the categories are general, the information should be given at both Laboratory and individual-site levels, if possible. A simple checklist developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory proved beneficial when assessing its general employee orientation compliance status. The checklist includes subject areas covered, organizational identities and responsibilities, and documentation needs

  2. Financial Participation of Employees in Lithuania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darskuviené, Valdoné; Hanisch, Stefan; Mygind, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Participation of employees in decision-making in Lithuanian companies has its roots in trade union movement as well as in the practice of managing companies under Soviet rule. After Lithuania regained independence, employee ownership was used to facilitate privatization. A notable success...... as participation in decision-making - is not well developed and does not provide for stronger incentives. The solution of current employment and social problems by the Government, ruling parties as well as social partners is not associated with a higher level of participation of employees. Financial participation...... is viewed mainly as a way of employee motivation as initiated by managers and current owners of companies....

  3. Financial Participation of Employees in Latvia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauberg, Theis; Muravska, Tatyana; Mygind, Niels

    2006-01-01

    This report outlines main trends in employees' financial participation in Latvia including historical, socioeconomic and legal background. A special emphasis is placed on privatization during the transition period which shaped an environment for employees' financial participation and influenced...... the current state of employee share ownership and profit-sharing. Attitudes of social partners and the government will be addressed. The report will show why the transition process lead to a low level of employees' financial participation and the indifference and ignorance of policy makers concerning...... the development of financial participation....

  4. Employee benefits in terms of accounting and taxation system

    OpenAIRE

    ŠÍMA, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    The theme of this bachelor thesis is Employee benefits in terms of accounting and taxation system. Some companies also include non-monetary bonuses as a way of rewarding their employees. Employee benefits substantially affect satisfaction, loyalty and motivation of all employees. The popularity of employee benefits is also supported by the effort of the companies to optimise taxes, which is the outcome of employee benefits. The main goal was to characterise employee benefits and to explain it...

  5. The gift of employee dissatisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Roberta M

    2002-01-01

    Through an employee survey administered at Kaweah Delta Health Care District (KDHCD) in Visalia, Calif., several sources of dissatisfaction were noted, including communication, equipment, staffing and rapid growth. Perceiving no real movement toward resolving these issues, employees vented their frustrations to administration. As director of imaging services, I enlisted the help of two inside consultants, KDHCD's director of education and the director of the Employee Assistance Program (EAP). We initiated a process that is ongoing, to move the department toward working together as a team to solve problems within their control. We three directors decided to work with a leadership group to: assess the history of the department clarify the current reality create a vision of the future learn the Covey Habit 4, "Think Win-Win" capture agreements that lead staff and managers to work in self-motivated, self-directed work teams have the director of education present the work to the staff at large, and encourage the leadership team to continue to learn tools that would help the group to improve. The two inside consultants held a series of training meetings with the leadership group of 15, which included a staff member from each modality, site and support service. Participation was optional, and all who were asked agreed to participate. The meetings were held weekly for four weeks for two hours before regular work hours. At the conclusion of the training, the group agreed to continue to meet weekly. After the first four meetings, a summary of the training was presented at a meeting of the full imaging staff plus the vice president of professional services at KDHCD. Through this program, imaging services staff members at KDHCD have achieved an increased sense of cohesion in the group, learned that we have control over some things and not others, and are learning to hold each other accountable with kindness. We are giving each other the benefit of the doubt. We have not

  6. A Proposal to Increase Employee Performance Through Employee Engagement Survey in PT KBI

    OpenAIRE

    Harvid, Albertus; Gustomo, Aurik

    2013-01-01

    PT. Karunia Berca Indonesia (KBI) is one of the best steel galvanizing factory in Indonesia. KBI have some problems like lack of willingness to train, lack of employee development program, and lack of facilities. That 3 factors are performance indicator. Low on employee performance will decrease the revenue. With root cause analysis can be found the main problem in PT KBI is lack of performance. To increase employee performance, KBI must determine the engagement for the employee using employe...

  7. Employee responses to health insurance premium increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dana P; Leibowitz, Arleen A; Robalino, David A

    2004-01-01

    To determine the sensitivity of employees' health insurance decisions--including the decision to not choose health maintenance organization or fee-for-service coverage--during periods of rapidly escalating healthcare costs. A retrospective cohort study of employee plan choices at a single large firm with a "cafeteria-style" benefits plan wherein employees paid all the additional cost of purchasing more generous insurance. We modeled the probability that an employee would drop coverage or switch plans in response to employee premium increases using data from a single large US company with employees across 47 states during the 3-year period of 1989 through 1991, a time of large premium increases within and across plans. Premium increases induced substantial plan switching. Single employees were more likely to respond to premium increases by dropping coverage, whereas families tended to switch to another plan. Premium increases of 10% induced 7% of single employees to drop or severely cut back on coverage; 13% to switch to another plan; and 80% to remain in their existing plan. Similar figures for those with family coverage were 11%, 12%, and 77%, respectively. Simulation results that control for known covariates show similar increases. When faced with a dramatic increase in premiums--on the order of 20%--nearly one fifth of the single employees dropped coverage compared with 10% of those with family coverage. Employee coverage decisions are sensitive to rapidly increasing premiums, and single employees may be likely to drop coverage. This finding suggests that sustained premium increases could induce substantial increases in the number of uninsured individuals.

  8. Role of Leadership and Employee Engagement towards Individual Performance of Pharmacy Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susi A. Rahayu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Employees dissatisfaction to the head of the hospital pharmacy will decrease employees performance and unsatisfied customers. To solve the problems, employees should be based on performance as customer expectations in providing services. One of the ways to improve the performance of the employees, they must feel engage to the work. One of the factors to improve employee engagement is the leadership factor. Therefore, it is necessary to study the impact of leadership on individual performance employee in hospital pharmacy and also the influence of employee engagement as a mediator. A total of 79 employees from the pharmacy in two private hospitals in Bandung became the participants. This study used the technique of partial least squares to test the hypothesized relationships. The results showed that there were significant between leadership to employee engagement (t value (12,84 > t-table (1.64, the significance of employee engagement on individual performance (t value (3.83 > t-table (1.64. In contrast, there was no influence and significance in leadership on individual performance (t value (0.45 < t-table (1.64. Employee engagement fully mediated the relationship between leadership and individual performance. Therefore, improving pharmacy services is a set of actions and involvement of pharmacy employees who are consistent, sustainable and clear.

  9. Individual Differences among Employees Management Communication Style and Employee Satisfaction: Replication and Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCroskey, James C.; And Others

    Portions of three earlier studies relating differences in employees to employee satisfaction and one study relating management communication style (MCS) to employee satisfaction were replicated across four organizational contexts. Major findings supported the generalizability of the results revealed in the earlier research. The role of…

  10. Employee Retention: Organisational and Personal Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip; Michielsen, Maya; Moeyaert, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    In this continuously changing contemporary economy, companies have to be able to anticipate technological innovations and to compete with other companies worldwide. This need makes important a company's ability to evolve through its employees' learning and through continuous development. Securing and retaining skilled employees plays an important…

  11. Catalyzing Employee Change with Transformative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Businesses, organizations, and government agencies have invested heavily in employee training. The American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) reports these costs as 2.15% of payroll (ASTD, 2008). A large amount of this investment is directed at improving employee knowledge and skills. Although most organizations are good at this, often a…

  12. Employee Recognition and Performance: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Bradler (Christiane); A.J. Dur (Robert); S. Neckermann (Susanne); J.A. Non (Arjan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper reports the results from a controlled field experiment designed to investigate the causal effect of public recognition on employee performance. We hired more than 300 employees to work on a three-hour data-entry task. In a random sample of work groups, workers unexpectedly

  13. Employee recognition and performance: A field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bradler, C.; Dur, R.; Neckermann, S.; Non, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results from a controlled field experiment designed to investigate the causal effect of public recognition on employee performance. We hired more than 300 employees to work on a three-hour data-entry task. In a random sample of work groups, workers unexpectedly received

  14. Why Employee Motivation Has Declined in America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Philip C.

    1982-01-01

    Examines possible reasons for declining employee motivation: greater instability and diversity of values; more guaranteed rewards; inability of rewards to satisfy emerging needs; disappearing work ethic; reduced costs of failure; rising income and progressive taxation; more group production and problem solving; decreased employee loyalty; less…

  15. A Model for Employee Motivation and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Philip C.

    1979-01-01

    To increase an employee's motivation, an employee must perceive that s/he will achieve higher satisfaction for greater effort. To generate such perception, rewards must clearly be contingent on effort and the cost of increased effort must grow at a slower rate than the increase in reward. (Author/IRT)

  16. Organisational Learning and Employees' Intrinsic Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remedios, Richard; Boreham, Nick

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of organisational learning initiatives on employee motivation. Four initiatives consistent with theories of organisational learning were a priori ranked in terms of concepts that underpin intrinsic-motivation theory. Eighteen employees in a UK petrochemical company were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of…

  17. Raising Employee Engagement through Workplace Financial Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitt, Lois A.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses shifts in hiring and benefits that changed the employment landscape, offering a historical look at workplace financial education, and arguing that educating employees to adjust to new financial realities is a win-win for employers and employees.

  18. Schools Shape Up with Employee Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldy, Joanne

    1985-01-01

    Increasingly, schools are beginning employee wellness programs, which encourage employees to make personal commitments to life-style changes that will increase their productivity and generally improve their health. This article provides an introduction to wellness programs, lists advantages, and tells how to start one and make it work. (DCS)

  19. New European policy toward chronically ill employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopnina, H.; Haafkens, J.; Elling, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current policies related to the chronically ill employees in the Netherlands. Different levels of policy are discussed: those formulated at the European, Dutch and organizational levels. A significantg percentage of Dutch employees suffer from longstanding

  20. Searching for Solutions: Supervising Student Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Alberta Davis

    2003-01-01

    Lending services units at Indiana State University's Cunningham Memorial Library depend heavily on student employees to fulfill their specific missions. Problems attributed to poor communication and lack of motivation among student employees were causing negative impacts on the units' abilities to function well. To resolve these problems,…

  1. Outsourcing of Training and Development of Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Mihulková, Dana

    2008-01-01

    This work defines the concept, advantages and risks of outsourcing of training and development of employees. The practical part of this work is a case study which goal is to choose a supplier for long-term development of employees of Prague company in English language.

  2. Predicting Employee Turnover from Communication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, Thomas H.; Barnett, George A.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates three social network models of employee turnover: a structural equivalence model, a social influence model, and an erosion model. Administers a communication network questionnaire to all 170 employees of an organization. Finds support for all three models of turnover, with the erosion model explaining more of the variance than do the…

  3. Job Insecurity and Employee Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Robert J.; Kuhnert, Karl W.

    This study explored the consequences of perceived job security and insecurity on the psychological and physical health of employees. Data were gathered from employees of a large midwestern manufacturing organization that produced products for material removal applications. Surveys were sent through company mail to a stratified random sample of 442…

  4. Employee Assistance Programs in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Aimee T.; Ashbaugh, Donald L.

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of employee assistance programs for faculty and other college personnel looks at the rationale for such programs, their goals, associated administrative problems and issues, and evaluation of their effectiveness. It is concluded that colleges have a responsibility for employee well-being and personal and professional development. (MSE)

  5. Employee Assistance Programmes in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Robert W.

    1982-01-01

    The author describes what American organizations are doing with respect to employees with alcohol, drug, mental, and personality problems and other emotional difficulties affecting job performance. Specifically, this article is devoted to a more thorough description of American employee assistance programs and a discussion of factors that are…

  6. Corporate Employee-Engagement and Merger Outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, H.; Renneboog, Luc

    2017-01-01

    Extending the theories of employee incentives and inalienability of human capital, we investigate the link between a firm’s engagement in employee issues and the returns to shareholders around mergers and acquisitions (M&As) and analyze an international sample of 4,565 M&A deals from 48 countries.

  7. Public Sector Employees: Risk Averse and Altruistic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W.J.M. Buurman (Margaretha); A.J. Dur (Robert); S. Bossche, van den (Seth)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe assess whether public sector employees have a stronger inclination to serve others and are more risk averse than employees in the private sector. A unique feature of our study is that we use revealed rather than stated preferences data. Respondents of a large-scale survey were offered

  8. Public sector employees: risk averse and altruistic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, M.; Delfgaauw, J.; Dur, R.; Bossche, S.N.J. van den

    2012-01-01

    We assess whether public sector employees have a stronger inclination to serve others and are more risk averse than employees in the private sector. A unique feature of our study is that we use revealed rather than stated preferences data. Respondents of a large-scale survey were offered a

  9. Public sector employees: risk averse and altruistic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, M.; Dur, R.; Bossche, S.N.J. van den

    2009-01-01

    We assess whether public sector employees have a stronger inclination to serve others and are more risk averse than employees in the private sector. A unique feature of our study is that we use revealed rather than stated preferences data. Respondents of a large-scale survey were offered a

  10. 9 CFR 416.5 - Employee hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee hygiene. 416.5 Section 416.5 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATORY... Employee hygiene. (a) Cleanliness. All persons working in contact with product, food-contact surfaces, and...

  11. A Field Experiment in Motivating Employee Ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gibbs (Michael); S. Neckermann (Susanne); C. Siemroth (Christoph)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We study the effects of a field experiment designed to motivate employee ideas, at a large technology company. Employees were encouraged to submit ideas on process and product improvements via an online system. In the experiment, the company randomized 19 account

  12. Saving money through employee motivation and participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Participation by employees at an industrial plant in an energy conserving program is important. People motivation - the key to a successful energy conservation program - is discussed. The following topics are discussed: support from the top, building a dynamic team, motivating through measurement, involving all employees, and making conservation second nature.

  13. Effective Retention Strategies for Diverse Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Linda R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses methods to determine why employees leave or stay, based on experiences at Pennsylvania State University libraries. Considers retention tools that work best to retain diverse employees, including mentoring, networking, career and learning opportunities, balance between work and home life, a welcoming climate, and support for research.…

  14. Employee Housing: A Time for Reassessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Louis R.

    1987-01-01

    One provision of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 states that when a tenant pays rent that is less than 5 percent of the appraised value of a property, the difference is considered taxable income for the employee. This provision is forcing colleges to reassess their employee housing policies. (MLW)

  15. Predicting the Salary Satisfaction of Exempt Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, George F.

    1981-01-01

    Examined the degree to which salary satisfaction can be predicted using company-maintained information. Studying managerial, professional, and technical employees, results suggest that without inclusion of a variety of employee perceptions, only a small proportion of pay satisfaction could be accounted for, with salary and sex as primary objective…

  16. 31 CFR 0.107 - Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees. 0.107 Section 0.107 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EMPLOYEE... report such information to the Inspector General. (b) The confidentiality of the source of the...

  17. Employee Retention Strategies And Organizational Performance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implication of the results for practice is that any organization that fails to put in place adequate employee retention strategies is not likely to retain competent and motivated workforce in its employment and hence experience frequent labour turnover and poor organizational performance. Keywords: Employees, Retention ...

  18. EMPLOYEE MORALE IN THE NATIONAL ELECTRIC POWER ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employee morale is a very important and sensitive phenomenon in work ... desire to do the best possible job or to exert the maximum effort to perform assigned tasks”. (Gomez ... past experience, practice in the task, and motivation”. .... Table 5: Average Responses of Male and Female NEPA Employees on How They are.

  19. Human Capital Development Policies: Enhancing Employees Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hooi Lan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the human capital development (HCD) policies that enhance employee satisfaction. A salient focus of the study is to assess whether employees in globalised foreign-owned MNCs are likely to be more satisfied with the HCD policies than with the practices employed by locally owned MNCs.…

  20. Studying employee well-being : Moving forward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilies, R.; Pluut, Helen; Aw, S.S.Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate the commentaries to our position paper on intra-individual models of employee well-being (EWB; Ilies, R., Aw, S. S. Y., & Pluut, H. (2015). Intraindividual models of employee well-being: What have we learned and where do we go from here? European Journal of

  1. Insights on Employee Representation on Danish Boards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neville, Mette; Gregoric, Aleksandra; Poulsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Since 1973 the Danish Companies Act has contained rules on codetermination. Employees in public or private limited companies with at least 35 employees in average over a 3-year period have a right but not a duty to appoint representatives on board of directors. In 1973 the rules were seen...

  2. Linkage between psychological contract and employee retention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... initiating organizational culture that promotes transparency on policies and procedures that effect employees and creating a humane work environment that accommodates cooperation, consensus and employees' participation. This is necessary if organizations need to maintain their vibrant and resourceful workforce that ...

  3. Probability weighting and employee stock options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spalt, O.G.

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents that riskier firms with higher idiosyncratic volatility grant more stock options to nonexecutive employees. Standard models in the literature cannot easily explain this pattern; a model in which a risk-neutral firm and an employee with prospect theory preferences bargain over

  4. 27 CFR 10.22 - Employee associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee associations. 10.22 Section 10.22 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS COMMERCIAL BRIBERY Commercial Bribery § 10.22 Employee associations. Gifts...

  5. The role of employees in quality development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Hvid, Helge

    1999-01-01

    A framework is developed for research on the role of employees in quality development in companies seen as formed thorugh the interaction between management, employees and the external relations to customers and suppliers. The impact of quality assurance on working life is discussed....

  6. 29 CFR 1904.35 - Employee involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... employees, you may not record the employee's name on the OSHA 300 Log for certain “privacy concern cases... about the case.” You must remove all other information from the copy of the OSHA 301 Incident Report or... RECORDING AND REPORTING OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES AND ILLNESSES Other OSHA Injury and Illness Recordkeeping...

  7. Client-Centered Employee Assistance Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Darryl Lee

    This paper addresses delivery aspects and benefits of client-centered Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services through a review of the literature and research. EAP services are described as educational and mental health services utilized to assist employees and their families to respond constructively to job, personal, interpersonal or…

  8. Strategies and Policies in Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Amie

    This document describes and examines effective policies that companies have adopted in developing Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) to address personal problems of employees, with a specific focus on substance abuse. Chapter 1 introduces the topic, states the problem, indicates the purpose of the study, denotes the limitations, defines important…

  9. Incorporating Health Education into Employee Assistance Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard E.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of aligning health education with the goals and functions of employee assistance programs are discussed. The role of the health educator in developing these programs is explained in a description of employee assistance program service standards and specific sub-tasks. (DF)

  10. Workplace deviance: strategies for modifying employee behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulich, Marcia; Tourigny, Louise

    2004-01-01

    More than ever, today's health care employees must perform their jobs as efficiently and effectively as possible. Job performance must integrate both technical and necessary soft skills. Workplace deviant behaviors are counterproductive to good job performance. Various deviant behaviors are examined. Areas and strategies of managerial intervention are reviewed which will enable the prevention or modification of undesired employee behaviors.

  11. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  12. Financial Participation of Employees in Estonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eamets, Raul; Mygind, Niels; Spitsa, Natalia

    2006-01-01

    Presently, legal regulation of participation of employees - financial participation as well as participation in decision-making - is not well developed in Estonia. On the one hand, it is due to the fact that no tradition of employee participation could have been formed after Estonia became...

  13. 20 CFR 609.20 - Information to Federal civilian employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION FOR FEDERAL CIVILIAN EMPLOYEES Responsibilities of Federal Agencies § 609.20 Information to Federal civilian employees. Each Federal agency shall: (a) Furnish information to its employees... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Information to Federal civilian employees...

  14. 20 CFR 404.1007 - Common-law employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Common-law employee. 404.1007 Section 404... Common-law employee. (a) General. The common-law rules on employer-employee status are the basic test for.... Even though you are considered self-employed under the common-law rules, you may still be an employee...

  15. 20 CFR 222.4 - Homicide of employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Homicide of employee. 222.4 Section 222.4... RELATIONSHIPS General § 222.4 Homicide of employee. No person convicted of the felonious and intentional homicide of an employee can be entitled to an annuity or lump-sum payment based on the employee's earnings...

  16. 45 CFR 7.0 - Who are employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who are employees. 7.0 Section 7.0 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.0 Who are employees. As used in this part, the term Government employee means any officer or employee, civilian or...

  17. 49 CFR 199.113 - Employee assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TESTING Drug Testing § 199.113 Employee assistance program. (a) Each operator shall provide an employee assistance program (EAP) for its employees and supervisory personnel who will determine whether an employee... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee assistance program. 199.113 Section 199...

  18. 5 CFR 838.303 - Expressly dividing employee annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expressly dividing employee annuity. 838... Employee Annuities § 838.303 Expressly dividing employee annuity. (a) A court order directed at employee annuity is not a court order acceptable for processing unless it expressly divides the employee annuity as...

  19. APPROACHES TO EMPLOYEE DEVELOPMENT IN CZECH ORGANISATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VNOUČKOVÁ, Lucie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Education, development, knowledge management, career development and talent management are currently often discussed themes regarding strategic management of organisations. Those concepts are strategically important. Therefore the aim of the article is to evaluate possibilities of employee education and development and identify main approaches to employee development in Czech organizations. The results are based on a quantitative survey by questionnaire data collection. The results shows that 70% of respondents have possibility of development; 86% uses their skills and abilities and 63% stated that their employer support their development. On the contrary, 27% do not feel any possibility to grow and that may lead to disaffection, loss of production or even to employee turnover. Based on the results of the analysis, employees, who miss adequate level of development are usually key and knowledge employees; it is necessary to support their career plans and development to retain them in organisation.

  20. Composite Index of Local Government Employees Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefmański Bartłomiej

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a structure of a composite Index of Local Government Employees Satisfaction (ESI in Poland. The index provides a based on four sub-indices synthetic assessment of the level of employee satisfaction with the employment in local government offices. The sub-indices have been constructed using an exploratory factor analysis with the VARIMAX one. The ESI and sub-indices values have been normalized in the range of [0–100%], wherein higher ESI values indicate higher employee satisfaction. The proposed approach is used to assess the level of employee satisfaction with the employment in some local government units in the West Pomerania province. The analysis was based on the results of the measurements made in 2009–2010 by comparing the results of two groups of employees separated on the basis of a criterion of their place of employment.

  1. Employee recognition: a key to motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, M

    1981-02-01

    Productivity--why it's low and how to enhance it--is on everyone's mind these days. A major component of productivity is employee satisfaction. If an employee is dissatisfied, feels unappreciated or under-compensated, that employee will not perform to the best of his or her ability. How is the personnel administrator to address this pressing problem? One answer that emerges is employee recognition programs. In many cases, properly run recognition programs can boost awareness of the organization, build employee pride, raise morale and, ultimately, increase productivity. As some of our respondents observed, higher salary is not the best answer. While a larger paycheck is always appreciated, everyone's pride is boosted by a public demonstration of appreciation.

  2. Employee perceptions of managers' leadership over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Kristina; Ullström, Susanne; Sandahl, Christer; Bergman, David

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to explore if and how employees in a healthcare organisation perceive changes in their managers' leadership behaviour over time. An interview study was conducted with employees whose managers had participated in a two-year leadership development programme offered by their employer, Healthcare Provision Stockholm County. Qualitative content analysis was applied, and the interview discussions focused on areas in which the majority of the informants perceived that a change had occurred over time and their answers were relatively consistent. The majority of employees did discern changes in their managers' leadership over time, and, with very few exceptions, these changes were described as improvements. The knowledge that employees perceived changes in their managers' leadership supports investments in leadership development through courses, programmes or other initiatives. The present findings contribute to a deeper empirical understanding of leadership as it is practised over time in everyday contexts among employees in healthcare organisations.

  3. Improving employee productivity through improved health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca J; Ozminkowski, Ronald J; Serxner, Seth

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate productivity-related savings associated with employee participation in health promotion programs. Propensity score weighting and multiple regression techniques were used to estimate savings. These techniques were adjusted for demographic and health status differences between participants who engaged in one or more telephonic health management programs and nonparticipants who were eligible for but did not engage in these programs. Employees who participated in a program and successfully improved their health care or lifestyle showed significant improvements in lost work time. These employees saved an average of $353 per person per year. This reflects about 10.3 hours in additional productive time annually, compared with similar, but nonparticipating employees. Participating in health promotion programs can help improve productivity levels among employees and save money for their employers.

  4. A fuzzy AHP approach for employee recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Varmazyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human resource management plays an essential role on development of any business organization. Selection of employee normally depends on various criteria such as employee commitment, necessary skills, etc. Therefore, a good strategy to hire appropriate employee is a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM specially the ones, which could handle uncertainty, properly. In this paper, we present a method to use MCDM techniques for hiring employees. In fact, the present work proposes a Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP as one of the most popular multi-criteria decision making techniques. A computer application is developed where it receives the configuration of the employee selection problem, evaluates the candidates and ranks them using the appropriate voting system.

  5. Marketing health care to employees: the structure of employee health care plan satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, O A

    1993-01-01

    Providing cost-contained comprehensive quality health care to maintain healthy and productive employees is a challenging problem for all employers. Using a representative panel of metropolitan employees, the author investigates the internal and external structure of employee satisfaction with company-sponsored health care plans. Employee satisfaction is differentiated into four meaningful groups of health care benefits, whereas its external structure is supported by the traditional satisfaction paradigms of expectation-disconfirmation, attribution, and equity. Despite negative disconfirmation, employees register sufficiently high health care satisfaction levels, which suggests some useful strategies that employers may consider implementing.

  6. Employees' views on outsourcing and its impact on employee turnover: A phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybelinski, Steven A.

    Increasing use of outsourcing gives employees concern about personal job security. Using a modified van Kaam approach, this qualitative phenomenological study examined perceptions and experiences of 12 employees' on the influence outsourcing had on employee turnover. Five themes describing employee perceptions emerged: (a) preparation---education gives job security, (b) plausibility---all believed job loss plausible, (c) emotional influence---feelings of stress, threat, betrayal, and not being valued, (d) environment---value of communication and interaction with leaders, and (e) confidence---gained from increased education, skills, and knowledge protected from outsourcing. Significance of this study to leadership is the identification of employee perceptions of outsourcing and motivating factors influencing employee turnover during times of outsourcing. Findings might present new information and assist leaders with employee retention concerns for future outsourcing activities.

  7. An analysis of the relation between employee-organization value congruence and employee attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Elizabeth A; Weathington, Bart L

    2008-11-01

    Researchers have examined the fit or match between a person and an organization extensively in the empirical literature. Overall findings have supported the existence of a positive relation between the congruence of employee and organizational values with employee attitudes toward the organization. However, this relation is not fully understood, and more research is needed to understand the relation between the congruence of different value dimensions and multiple employee attitudes. Therefore, the authors aimed to analyze value congruence across 7 dimensions and its relation to (a) job satisfaction, (b) organizational commitment, (c) satisfaction with the organization as a whole, and (d) turnover intentions. The results suggest that the perceived congruence of employee-organizational values by employees is positively associated with satisfaction with the job and organization as a whole and employee commitment to the organization. The results also support a negative relation between value congruence and employee turnover intentions.

  8. 19 CFR 200.735-123 - Effect of employees' and special Government employees' statements on other requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Effect of employees' and special Government... Employment and Financial Interests § 200.735-123 Effect of employees' and special Government employees... statements required of employees and special Government employees are in addition to, and not in substitution...

  9. Occupational health hazards among quarry employees in Ebonyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occupational health hazards among quarry employees in Ebonyi state, ... how these problems affect the conditions of employees in such industries in Ebonyi State. ... the level of compliance of safety and protective devices among employees.

  10. Impact of Incentive Schemes on Employee Performance: A Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impact of Incentive Schemes on Employee Performance: A Case Study of ... several factors like motivation, absenteeism, employee turnover, production and productivity, ... conditions, team work, rewarding and work satisfaction of employees.

  11. 29 CFR 541.100 - General rule for executive employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Executive Employees § 541.100 General rule for executive employees. (a) The term...

  12. Employee participation in corporate governance: implications for company resilience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinknecht, R.H.

    2015-01-01

    How do works councils and employee board-level representation affect company performance? Research on employee participation provides mixed and sometimes contradictory findings. This article argues that the performance effects of employee participation depend on the business cycle. Specifically, the

  13. 10 CFR 707.6 - Employee assistance, education, and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....6 Employee assistance, education, and training. Contractor programs shall include the following or appropriate alternatives: (a) Employee assistance programs emphasizing preventive services, education, short... provided by the contractor's employee assistance program, except as provided for in the contractor's...

  14. Employee engagement: a prescription for organizational transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Ivanitskaya, Glazer, and Erofeev (2009) suggest that "the most fundamental element of any organization that helps the organization to survive is the individual person" (p. 109). It is the motivation of human capital that makes a health-care organization come to life. Health-care is a unique industry; its accomplishments are directly dependent upon the competencies and technical skills of its employees. "When people in the workplace fulfill their organizational roles, then the organization thrives" (Ivanitskaya et al., 2009, p. 110). Health-care systems will require organizations that thrive and exhibit characteristics of continuous growth, expressing excessive levels of energy and an immense capacity for flourishing. Anticipating the challenges of the next decade, health-care organizations must achieve a higher degree of employee engagement to enhance organizational performance and profitability. The data analyzed for this chapter indicate that employees who are engaged are more enthusiastic and aspired to achieve both individual and organizational success. The chapter concludes by suggesting five operating practices to establish an employee engagement culture--defining the employee's role in fulfilling the organization's purpose, selecting employees with capability and passion, supporting and valuing the employee, creating sustainable reward systems, and developing feedback and reinforcement mechanisms.

  15. Creating a culture where employee engagement Thrives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Groover, C.S.P. [Behavioral Science Technology, Ojai, CA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Safety leaders across industries face a critical challenge: engaging employees. While engagement of a few people may be easy in short-term projects, it is significantly more difficult with long-term processes. In this session we show leaders how they can create a culture where workers are more open and even eager to be involved in safety efforts. Our experience with safety leaders in the nuclear industry has verified that when the factors that drive organizational functioning are understood, leaders are enabled to augment employee engagement and attain significant improvement in safety outcomes. The underlying factors that influence employee engagement, performance, outcomes, and organizational culture are the same the world over. We will also show how safety is capable, by its intrinsic value, of winning profound support and direct engagement of employees. In this session, we will examine how leaders can leverage their decisions and actions to win over employees to safety and support them in their endeavors to promote it. Using the safety leadership best practices Vision, Credibility, Accountability, Communication, Collaboration, Action Orientation, and Recognition and Feedback, leaders increase their impact on their organization in favor of a culture that supports safety and employee engagement. Leaders that create a climate and culture where employee engagement thrives, realize better safety results. Leadership is not exclusively an inborn talent; it can be developed and enhanced. To this end, we will also show the advantages of transformational leadership style by comparing it to more classical transactional leadership.

  16. Employee retention tools: looking beyond radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snuttjer, D

    2001-01-01

    In an era of low unemployment rates, companies are not only struggling to recruit talented employees, but they are straining to keep the ones they have. The purpose of this literature review is to look at companies, including many outside of the healthcare industry, and learn how they use incentives to retain employees. A review of a recently published book lists the following reasons why people stay with companies: Career growth, learning and development, exciting work challenges Meaningful work, making a difference and a contribution Great people Being part of a team Good boss, inspiring leadership Recognition for a job well done Fun on the job Autonomy, a sense of control over work and job security Flexibility Fair pay and benefits Great work environment and location Pride in the organization, it's mission and quality of product Family friendly Companies have to change with the times to retain a good work force. To survive, companies should ask employees what would keep them committed, look at all the possibilities, and then create an environment that makes employees want to stay because it provides the life balance they are looking for. There is risk in asking employees what would keep them from looking elsewhere. Employers need to weigh the risk of losing employees with the possibility of raising expectations by asking employees directly what they want. In the current climate, that may be a necessary risk.

  17. Creating a culture where employee engagement Thrives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Don Groover, C.S.P.

    2007-01-01

    Safety leaders across industries face a critical challenge: engaging employees. While engagement of a few people may be easy in short-term projects, it is significantly more difficult with long-term processes. In this session we show leaders how they can create a culture where workers are more open and even eager to be involved in safety efforts. Our experience with safety leaders in the nuclear industry has verified that when the factors that drive organizational functioning are understood, leaders are enabled to augment employee engagement and attain significant improvement in safety outcomes. The underlying factors that influence employee engagement, performance, outcomes, and organizational culture are the same the world over. We will also show how safety is capable, by its intrinsic value, of winning profound support and direct engagement of employees. In this session, we will examine how leaders can leverage their decisions and actions to win over employees to safety and support them in their endeavors to promote it. Using the safety leadership best practices Vision, Credibility, Accountability, Communication, Collaboration, Action Orientation, and Recognition and Feedback, leaders increase their impact on their organization in favor of a culture that supports safety and employee engagement. Leaders that create a climate and culture where employee engagement thrives, realize better safety results. Leadership is not exclusively an inborn talent; it can be developed and enhanced. To this end, we will also show the advantages of transformational leadership style by comparing it to more classical transactional leadership

  18. Employee influenza vaccination in residential care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apenteng, Bettye A; Opoku, Samuel T

    2014-03-01

    The organizational literature on infection control in residential care facilities is limited. Using a nationally representative dataset, we examined the organizational factors associated with implementing at least 1 influenza-related employee vaccination policy/program, as well as the effect of vaccination policies on health care worker (HCW) influenza vaccine uptake in residential care facilities. The study was a cross-sectional study using data from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to address the study's objectives. Facility size, director's educational attainment, and having a written influenza pandemic preparedness plan were significantly associated with the implementation of at least 1 influenza-related employee vaccination policy/program, after controlling for other facility-level factors. Recommending vaccination to employees, providing vaccination on site, providing vaccinations to employees at no cost, and requiring vaccination as a condition of employment were associated with higher employee influenza vaccination rates. Residential care facilities can improve vaccination rates among employees by adopting effective employee vaccination policies. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Employee assistance program treats personal problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, R J; Featherston, H J

    1984-03-01

    Though the concept of employee assistance programs (EAPs) is widely accepted throughout business and industry, few hospitals have established similar channels for dealing with workers whose personal problems cause work-related problems. Among the reasons for the health care profession's lack of involvement in this area are: lack of information about costs and benefits of EAPs; the hospital's multidisciplinary environment in which standards of employee competence and behavior are set by persons from many disciplines; hospital working hours; and health care workers' attitudes about their vulnerability to illness. St. Benedict's Hospital, Ogden, UT, however, has confronted the question of how to demonstrate Christian concern for its employees. St. Benedict's EAP, the Helping Hand, which was created in 1979, combines progressive disciplinary action with the opportunity for early intervention in and treatment of employees' personal problems. When a worker with personal problems is referred to the EAP coordinator, he or she is matched with the appropriate community or hospital resource for treatment. Supervisors are trained to identify employee problems and to focus on employee job performance rather than on attempting to diagnose the problem. St. Benedict's records during the program's first three years illustrate the human benefits as well as the cost savings of an EAP. Of 92 hospital employees who took part in the EAP, 72 improved their situations or resolved their problems. The hospital's turnover rates declined from 36 percent to 20 percent, and approximately $40,800 in turnover and replacement costs were saved.

  20. The cure for employee malaise--motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K M; Dawson, S N

    1991-01-01

    Although working conditions, hours, pay, and advancement opportunities are better now than in the 1950s--the "golden age" of American business--today's workers are significantly less satisfied. Why? The authors believe the cause of this malaise is lack of motivation. This article examines several techniques to cure employee malaise and discusses the long-term benefits of these techniques, which include empowerment, recognition, career development, the Pygmalion effect, incentives, and rewards. By making a commitment to these motivational techniques, managers will boost the morale and enthusiasm of their employees and their organization. This motivational process is not quick and easy; developing your employees is an ongoing process.

  1. Recent developments in employee benefits law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jonathan G; Adler, Adam

    2005-01-01

    The first part of this article highlights important judicial developments involving employee benefits and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 ("ERISA"), as amended, during the latter part of 2003 and the first part of 2004, including the most significant U.S. Supreme Court and federal circuit court decisions. The second part covers recent legislative and regulatory developments in employee benefits law. This article is not meant to be exhaustive, but discusses the more important developments during 2003-2004, with particular focus on issues of concern to the insurance industry.

  2. WORK / LIFE BALANCE REFLECTIONS ON EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvarani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to analyze the relationship between employee satisfaction andwork/life balance. The construct used for this research consists of career opportunity, recognition,work tasks, payments, benefits, superior subordinate relationship, employee satisfaction, andwork/life balance. The study was conducted on a total of 210 respondents working in IT organization.This study makes a contribution to join two distinct research streams, namely employee satisfaction,and work/life balance. Findings suggest that high correlation exists between work task and employeesatisfaction with a mediator variable namely work-life balance.

  3. New developments in employee assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, R K; McDuff, D R; Schwartz, R P; Tiegel, S A; Judge, C P

    1996-04-01

    Employee assistance programs have developed from alcoholism assessment and referral centers to specialized behavioral health programs. Comprehensive employee assistance programs are defined by six major components: identification of problems based on job performance, consultation with supervisors, constructive confrontation, evaluation and referral, liaison with treatment providers, and substance abuse expertise. Other services have been added as enhancements to the basic model and include managed behavioral health activities and professional assistance committees, which provide services for impaired professionals and executives. Recent developments in the field are illustrated through examples from the experience of the employee assistance program at the University of Maryland Medical System in Baltimore.

  4. Employee assistance programs: history and program description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, B

    1994-10-01

    1. The history and development of Employee Assistance Programs (EAPs) can be traced back to the 1800s. There are currently over 10,000 EAPs in the United States. 2. Standards for program accreditation and counselor certification have been established for EAPs. The "core technology of Employee Assistance Programs" includes identification of behavioural problems based on job performance issues, expert consultation with supervisors, appropriate use of constructive confrontation, microlinkages with treatment providers and resources, macrolinkages between providers, resources, and work organizations, focus on substance abuse, and evaluation of employee success based on job performance. 3. Some EAPs take a broad brush approach, and incorporate health promotion and managed care functions.

  5. Analysis of Employee Benefits in Organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Smilnická, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of bachelor's work is to characterize and to sum up the system of employee benefits in ČSOB, a.s.. In the first part of the work are generally described forms of remuneration, characterized employee benefits, aims and forms how they are provided, options of their classification and current trends in this area. The second part introduces the company and its system of employee benefits. By the help of questionnaire survey realized in the company was analysed the system of benefits and s...

  6. 29 CFR 541.402 - Executive and administrative computer employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Computer Employees § 541.402 Executive and administrative computer...

  7. Alternative Work Schedules Increase Employee Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, John R.; Cohen, Stanley L.

    1983-01-01

    Facets of alternative work schedules (AWS) are discussed: importance of employee control, possible negative consequences, AWS handbook, time monitoring systems, and treatment of exceptions. AWS' effect on productivity and motivation is examined. (SK)

  8. Internal communications : transforming employees into brand ambassadors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C [Bruce Power Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    Bruce Power Inc.'s internal communications policy was outlined in this presentation. The policy is intended to develop and align employee communication strategies and tactics with overall corporate communication strategies. The importance of all employees contributing to the company business plan was emphasized, as well as the importance of involving senior managers to support and lead initiatives. The company's use of different media to communicate with a variety of audiences include intranet; newsletters; employee information boards; meetings; voice messages; videos; electronic signage; billboards; and training. The importance of safety days and safety meetings was emphasized, as well as ensuring that employees understand current issues and are able to contribute positively to change. In addition, it was suggested that there are significant benefits in informing and educating staff on the potential impact of government regulations as well as the policies, objectives and culture of the organization. Issues concerning the evaluation procedures of internal communications were also discussed. refs., tabs., figs.

  9. Manager, Employee and Labour Relations | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Develop high-level presentations to senior management on strategic labour ... Plan, IDRC Annual Report, Corporate Dashboard and other reporting obligations by ... complex employee relations cases by supporting the HR Business Solutions ...

  10. Employees' Stimulation for the Perception of Innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tаtiana V. Peregudova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article justifies the approach to the encouragement of employees of the organization to the perception of innovative activity products. At the core of this process there is an estimation of their activity regarding contribution to this process by group examination with point scoring of each employee on the selected criteria.The principles of formation and distribution of the bonus fund, which it is proposed to establish on the basis of proportion of the sum of average scores which the employee received in total, are given. 20% of employees with the low rates are not paid the bonus.Such approach to the stimulation of innovation implementation in the organization will create a positive institutional environment and reduce implementation time.

  11. Characteristics and Pay of Federal Civilian Employees

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ...) examined the attributes of a subset of the government's civilian workforce: the roughly 1.4 million salaried workers not including employees of the Postal Service who fill full-time permanent positions in the executive branch...

  12. Kodak Employees and Teachers Change Places.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, Mary C.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a teacher exchange program which enables vocational educators to switch jobs with Kodak employees for weeks at a time to give both Kodak and the school district a better grasp of how to prepare students for industry. (CT)

  13. Empowerment Perceptions of Employees in Hotel Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol ÇAVUŞ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of empowerment, which is applicable for any social group that the person belongs to, is an essential phenomenon for continuity and success of the organization. The main purpose of this study is to determine the empowerment perceptions of employees in hotel industry. The research was conducted in four and five star hotels that operate in the city of Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and 170 employees were reached at those hotels. Empowerment perceptions of the employees were measured using the scales “Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II, CWEQ-II” and “Psychological Empowerment Scale, PES”. As a result of factor analysis made on the scales, it was observed that structural empowerment and psychological empowerment perceptions were grouped into three sub-dimensions. And in comparisons based on demographic factors; it was ob served that perceptions of empowerment have clearly differentiated according to level of education, level of income, hotel class, tourism education position, employee position.

  14. Empowerment Perceptions of Employees in Hotel Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenol Çavuş

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of empowerment, which is applicable for any social group that the person belongs to, is an essential phenomenon for continuity and success of the organization. The main purpose of this study is to determine the empowerment perceptions of employees in hotel industry. The research was conducted in four and five star hotels that operate in the city of Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and 170 employees were reached at those hotels. Empowerment perceptions of the employees were measured using the scales “Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire-II, CWEQ-II”and “Psychological Empowerment Scale, PES”. As a result of factor analysis made on the scales, it was observed that structural empowerment and psychological empowerment perceptions were grouped into three sub- dimensions. And in comparisons based on demographic factors; it was ob served that perceptions of empowerment have clearly differentiated according to level of education, level of income, hotel class, tourism education position, employee position

  15. Employee Lounge Attendant | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Job Summary Under the direction of the Chief, Conference Management, the Employee Lounge Attendant is responsible to prepare coffee, beverages, and ... The incumbent also assists with food preparation for daily meals as well as ensure ...

  16. Acknowledging and Accounting for Employee Benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina MOISESCU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Employee benefits are all forms of counter services granted by anentity in return to services given by the employees. This category includes onlythe benefits covered by the entity, not those from the state or the employee onthe payroll. The employer counting and presenting all the benefits of theemployees, including those provided on the basis of official programs or otherofficial contracts between the entity and the individual employees, groups ofemployees or their representatives, those established on the basis of legalprovisions or by contracts at the level of activity sector, through which theentities are required to contribute to national programs, as well as thoseresulting from unofficial practices give rise to an implicit obligation.Acknowledging and especially assessing these benefits are issues demandingspecial attention.

  17. National Archives and Records Administration Employee Locator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Archives and Records Administration — The National Archives and Records Administration Employee Locator is an online system that provides the name, office symbol, location, room, telephone number, and...

  18. Employee Learning Theories and Their Organizational Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussalaam Iyanda Ismail

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Empirical evidence identifies that organizational success hinges on employees with the required knowledge, skills, and abilities and that employees’ effectiveness at learning new skills and knowledge is connected with the kind of learning technique the organization adopts. Given this, this work explored employee learning theories and their organizational applications. Using far reaching literature survey and extensive theoretical and logical argument and exposition. This paper revealed that cognitive-based approaches, non-cognitive approach and need-based approaches play vital roles in shrinking the occurrence of unwanted behaviors and upturning the occurrence of desired behaviors in the organization. Proper application of the theories can induce positive employee behaviors such as task performance and organizational citizenship behavior and consequently enhance both individual and organizational performance. This work has hopefully contributed to the enrichment of the existing relevant literature and served as a useful guide for stakeholders on how they can stimulate positive employee behaviors and the consequent enhanced organizational performance.

  19. Employees' Political Skill and Job Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zettler, Ingo; Lang, Jonas W.B.

    2015-01-01

    skill received higher job performance ratings compared to those with lower and higher levels, respectively. In addition, the nature of the relationships between employees and their raters was found to moderate this curvilinear effect. Specifically, besides the fact that employees who had close working......During the past decade, the construct of political skill has attracted a lot of attention. In particular, its relation to job performance has been examined. With regard to this link, it is typically proposed that political skill affects job performance in a positive linear manner. However......, in this article it is suggested that intermediate levels of employees' political skill yield the highest job performance, implying that this association is in fact represented by an inverted U-shape. Findings from two field studies (N = 178, N = 115 employee-supervisor-colleague triads) that incorporated...

  20. Linkage between Psychological Contract and Employee Retention

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    strengthened by clearly stating expectations during recruitment and ... Impact of psychological contract in a work environment vis-à-vis employee retention, ..... psychological contract that will incite a faithful, fruitful and fulfilled work team.

  1. Combat Systems Department Employee Recognition System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    This handbook contains two types of information: guidelines and instructions. The guidelines provide a foundation of purpose, assumptions, principles, expectations and attributes the Employee Recognition System is designed to reflect...

  2. Responsibilities of companies towards employees | Botha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Responsibilities of companies towards employees. ... in the best interests of shareholders collectively they must also consider the interests of other stakeholders. ... The advancement of social justice is thus important to corporations in that they ...

  3. Employee Travel Data (Non-Local)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — ‘This dataset provides information regarding the total approved actual expenses incurred by Montgomery County government employees traveling non-locally (over 75...

  4. Employee Participation--A Practical Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Despite the benefits of employee participation in decision making, it is not widespread. Making it work requires commitment, job security, training, access to information, communication channels, goal setting, flat organizational structures, and financial reinforcement. (SK)

  5. Information Management and Employee Assistance Program Imperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerton, Richard

    1987-01-01

    The ALMACA Clearinghouse for Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Information collects and disseminates EAP-specific data to provide subscribers with information to maintain their own competence and to improve upon the understanding and use of EAP practices and procedures. (JOW)

  6. The Evaluation of an Employee Assistance Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gam, John; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Presents the results of an evaluative study of an employee assistance program sponsored by the Russell Corporation, an apparel manufacturing firm. Results suggested that the program is beneficial in terms of both productivity enhancement and humanitarianism. (Author)

  7. Employee assistance programs in the hospital industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J C; Szczerbacki, D

    1988-01-01

    The health care literature describes the industry's need for employee assistance programs (EAPs). New research results show the degree to which EAPs are used in the industry and ways to determine their success.

  8. Employee retention: Organisational and personal perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip; Michielsen, Maya; Moeyaert, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    In this continuously changing contemporary economy, companies have to be able to anticipate technological innovations and to compete with other companies worldwide. This need makes important a company’s ability to evolve through its employees’ learning and through continuous development. Securing and retaining skilled employees plays an important role in this process, because employees’ knowledge and skills are central to companies’ ability to be economically competitive. Given that employee ...

  9. Employee Recognition and Performance: A Field Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Bradler, Christiane; Dur, Robert; Neckermann, Susanne; Non, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    This discussion paper led to a publication in 'Management Science' . This paper reports the results from a controlled field experiment designed to investigate the causal effect of unannounced, public recognition on employee performance. We hired more than 300 employees to work on a three-hour data-entry task. In a random sample of work groups, workers unexpectedly received recognition after two hours of work. We find that recognition increases subsequent performance substantially, and particu...

  10. Are Employees Concerned About Corporate Social Responsibility?

    OpenAIRE

    Caner Dincer; Banu Dincer

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on organizational commitment of internal publics especially employees. More precisely, we seek to examine the effect of CSR practices on different dimensions of organizational commitment focusing on the employee level. The study uses a web-based survey research method and employs hierarchical multiple regression analysis to explore the predictive ability of four dimensions of CSR on three dimensions of organizationa...

  11. A Study on Employee Retention Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Savarimuthu, Dr. A; Hemalatha, N.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of perusing this study is to assess the level of satisfaction of employee retention techniques at GB Engineering Enterprises PVT Limited., Trichy.This study gains significance because of employee retention techniques can be approached from various angles. It is desirable state of existence involving retention strategies generally fall in to one of four categories salary, working conditions, job enrichment and education. These four elements together constitute. The structure of e...

  12. Employee Responses to Health Insurance Premium Increases

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, Dana; Leibowitz, Arleen; Robalino, David

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the sensitivity of employees’ health insurance decisions—including the decision to not choose health maintenance organization or fee-for-service coverage—during periods of rapidly escalating healthcare costs. Study Design: A retrospective cohort study of employee plan choices at a single large firm with a “cafeteria-style” benefits plan wherein employees paid all the additional cost of purchasing more generous insurance. Methods: We modeled the probabil...

  13. EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT: THE KEY SUCCESS FACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Upasana Dhanda

    2017-01-01

    An organization’s success and profitability depends upon the performance of its employees. Business leaders know that a high-performing workforce is essential for the achievement of strategic business goals. Therefore, it is important that the employees are fully committed towards the organization’s goals and are motivated to give their best efforts for achievement of these goals. Today, the companies have to survive the cut-throat competition and beat their competitors. Therefore, the physic...

  14. Service orientation of the restaurant employees

    OpenAIRE

    Gagić, Snježana; Vuković-Jovičić, Ana; Petrović, Marko D.

    2017-01-01

    The service orientation program developed for restaurant employees can be a competitive advantage for a restaurant operation. Service orientation has been characterized as the disposition of employees to be helpful, thoughtful, considerate, and co-operative towards customers. Customer-oriented behaviors include: helping customers; helping customers to assess their needs; offering service that will satisfy those needs; describing services accurately; avoiding deceptive manipulations; and avoid...

  15. Analysis of employee satisfaction with benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Málková, Eliška

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on an issue of providing employee benefits. The first part describes the benefits from a theoretical point of view, here is also mentioned a research about the benefits and an impact of the economic crisis on providing the benefits. The second part is focused on describing the benefits of a particular company, KOMIX Inc., an analysis of an employee satisfaction with the benefits with using a questionnaire survey and suggestion of ways to improve the current sys...

  16. Confidentiality and the employee assistance program professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistretta, E F; Inlow, L B

    1991-02-01

    During the last two decades EAPs have offered employees confidential assessment, counseling, and referral. Many occupational health nurses have taken on the role of EAP professional or function as the liaison between the EAP counselor and the employee. The occupational health nurse involved in any EAP issue must adhere to the standards of confidentiality. The federal and state laws, company policy, and professional codes of ethics regarding these clients must be clearly understood, especially related to the issue of confidentiality.

  17. Legal implications of employee assistance programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, R I; Middlebrooks, D J

    1986-01-01

    Employers who offer EAPs should be aware of their rights as well as the rights of employees. Appropriate steps should be taken to assure that employees are fully informed of the conditions of participating in a program prior to volunteering for treatment. An issue that must be considered is the confidentiality of information arising during the course of treatment. Several court cases involving the physician-patient relationship offer guidelines in this area.

  18. Benefits for employees with children with ADHD: findings from the Collaborative Employee Benefit Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, James M; Fluet, Chris; Kuhlthau, Karen A; Anderson, Betsy; Wells, Nora; Epstein, Susan; Allen, Debby; Tobias, Carol

    2005-02-01

    Parents of most children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are employed. Employers have interest in decreasing employee absenteeism and improving workplace productivity, partly through employee benefits. The authors interviewed employers to (1) determine how they view the needs of employees with children with ADHD and (2) identify benefits that might help employees with children with ADHD. The authors carried out a systematic interview study of mainly family-friendly, large employers in four U.S. urban markets (Boston, Cleveland, Miami, Seattle). Multidisciplinary interview teams used a protocol to gather basic company information, benefit philosophy, current insurance and other employee benefits, and knowledge of ADHD and its impacts on employees. Initially, the interview team and then the larger project team reviewed all protocols for common themes. The authors interviewed staff of 41 employers (human resource managers, work/life program directors, benefits directors). Only 15 of 41 interviewees knew about ADHD, its prevalence, or its effects on parents. They had little knowledge of how differences in managed behavioral health may affect families' access to diagnostic and treatment services for ADHD, although most had experience with primary care management of depression among employees. Employers offer a variety of other benefits, including work/life and employee assistance programs, occasionally providing employees help with caring for a child with a mental health condition, on-site parent training programs, or assistance with child care. Other potentially useful employee benefits include flexible work and leave policies and information and referral services that can link parents with community programs. Although employers have limited awareness of ADHD and its potential effect on employees' work, this study identified opportunities to improve both health insurance and other benefits for employees with children with ADHD.

  19. The influence of workplace condition and employee satisfaction on employee committee in South African Companies

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Chinomona; Tebogo Mofokeng

    2015-01-01

    Developing and maintaining a relationship with employees has become an imperative thing to do for businesses to be competitive in today’s dynamic environment. Workplace conditions tends to have either a positive or negative impact on employees’ behaviour and output. Satisfied employees are likely to be more productive and involved in organisational activities. Committed employees are more likely to facilitate the provision of superior service quality. Despite the increase in research focusing...

  20. The impact of Privatisation and Employee Share-Ownership on Employee Commitment and Citizen Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Dermot; Reeves, Eoin; Turner, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Based on a survey of employees in a large telecommunications company, we examine the means through which privatisation, accompanied by an Employee Share-Ownership Plan (ESOP), impact on employee commitment and organisational citizenship behaviour. Findings show that although the ESOP has in some way moderated outcomes, privatisation has had negative consequences for commitment. Despite this, 50 percent of respondents report an increased level of citizenship behaviour. In determining changes i...

  1. Stereotypes of older employees compared to younger employees in Slovenian companies

    OpenAIRE

    Rožman, Maja; Treven, Sonja; Čančer, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Human resource management has an important impact on age diversity in companies. Age diversity in the workplace is growing and older employees are staying longer in the workforce, therefore it is important that employers can create a positive environment for age diverse employees. This paper introduces the difference in stereotypes in the workplace between older and younger employees in Slovenian companies. The main goal of this paper is to present the importance of age diversity and their ag...

  2. Relationship Between Employee Motivation And Performance Of The Employees Working In Retail Sector In Jaipur

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Neha Sharma; Ms. Avni Sharma

    2017-01-01

    The success and the failure of any business as a matter of fact depend largely on the employees: thus human resources are very essential to the organization as they are the key to prosperity, productivity and performance. How employees are perceived, treated and how they feel about themselves and ultimately their output directly and indirectly has an impact on their performance and development of the organization. De motivated employees under no circumstances will churn out decreased performa...

  3. Promoting Influenza Vaccination to Restaurant Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Meredith C; Harris, Jeffrey R; Hannon, Peggy A; Hammerback, Kristen; Parrish, Amanda T; Ahmed, Faruque; Zhou, Chuan; Allen, Claire L

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate an evidence-based workplace approach to increasing adult influenza vaccination levels applied in the restaurant setting We implemented an intervention and conducted a pre/post analysis to determine effect on vaccination. Eleven Seattle-area restaurants. Restaurants with 25+ employees speaking English or Spanish and over 18 years. Restaurants received influenza vaccination promotion materials, assistance arranging on-site vaccination events, and free influenza vaccinations for employees. Pre/post employee surveys of vaccination status with direct observation and employer interviews to evaluate implementation. We conducted descriptive analysis of employee survey data and performed qualitative analysis of implementation data. To assess intervention effect, we used a mixed-effects logistic regression model with a restaurant-specific random effect. Vaccination levels increased from 26% to 46% (adjusted odds ratio 2.33, 95% confidence interval 1.69, 3.22), with 428 employees surveyed preintervention, 305 surveyed postintervention, and response rates of 73% and 55%, respectively. The intervention was effective across subgroups, but there were restaurant-level differences. An access-based workplace intervention can increase influenza vaccination levels in restaurant employees, but restaurant-level factors may influence success. © 2016 by American Journal of Health Promotion, Inc.

  4. The Impact of Employee Job Satisfaction Towards Employee Job Performance at PT.Y

    OpenAIRE

    Sutjitra, Devilan

    2015-01-01

    This research is done to analyze The Impact of Employee Job Satisfaction towards Employee Job Performance at PT.Y. The decreasing in employee job performance for the past 3 years has indicated the author to analyze the impact of employee job satisfaction towards job performance. The elements that used are 9 job satisfactions to measure the impact of satisfaction at PT.Y. The author got 100 respondents from PT.Y and use simple random sampling method.The analysis technique that used in this res...

  5. 29 CFR 1405.11 - Effect on employee benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to coverage under the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance and Federal Employees Health Benefits Programs. The Government contribution for health insurance of eligible part-time employees will be prorated... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect on employee benefits. 1405.11 Section 1405.11 Labor...

  6. Analysis of employee benefits in a certain company

    OpenAIRE

    Valderová, Lenka

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this bachelor's thesismis to present motivation, the employee benefits and possibilities of providing them by the employer. Next there will follow analysis of the provided employee benefits in a chosen company. The analysis should reveal if the company applies theoretical knowledge in providing the employee benefits into practical life to meet its employees satisfaction.

  7. 48 CFR 22.1019 - Additional classes of service employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... regarding the agreement or disagreement of the employees' representative or the employees themselves... service employees. 22.1019 Section 22.1019 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... of 1965, as Amended 22.1019 Additional classes of service employees. (a) If the contracting officer...

  8. Two Profiles of the Dutch High Performing Employee

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waal, A. A.; Oudshoorn, Michella

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore the profile of an ideal employee, to be more precise the behavioral characteristics of the Dutch high-performing employee (HPE). Organizational performance depends for a large part on the commitment of employees. Employees provide their knowledge, skills, experiences and creativity to the…

  9. 29 CFR 825.105 - Counting employees for determining coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... limitations of the employer-employee relationship under the Act; and that determination of the relation cannot... later return to active employment. If there is no employer/employee relationship (as when an employee is... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Counting employees for determining coverage. 825.105...

  10. 5 CFR 630.303 - Part-time employees; earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Part-time employees; earnings. 630.303... AND LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.303 Part-time employees; earnings. A part-time employee for whom there... workweek, and a part-time employee on a flexible work schedule for whom there has been established only a...

  11. 29 CFR 70.54 - Employee Benefits Security Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Employee Benefits Security Administration. 70.54 Section 70... Records and Filings § 70.54 Employee Benefits Security Administration. (a) The annual financial reports (Form 5500) and attachments/schedules as filed by employee benefit plans under the Employee Retirement...

  12. 76 FR 66637 - Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employee Benefits Security Administration 29 CFR Part 2570 RIN 1210-AB49 Prohibited Transaction Exemption Procedures; Employee Benefit Plans AGENCY: Employee Benefits Security... Determinations, Employee Benefits Security Administration, Room N-5700, U.S. Department of Labor, Washington, DC...

  13. 29 CFR 541.300 - General rule for professional employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Professional Employees § 541.300 General rule for professional employees. (a) The... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false General rule for professional employees. 541.300 Section...

  14. Job Stressors, Organizational Innovation Climate, and Employees' Innovative Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Feifei; Zhang, Jinghuan

    2015-01-01

    This study attempted to examine the influence of job stressors and organizational innovation climate on employees' innovative behavior. Data were obtained from 282 employees in 4 cities of China. Results indicated that the nature of stressors matters in predicting employees' idea generation. Specifically, stressors that employees tend to appraise…

  15. 49 CFR 805.735-10 - Member and employee indebtedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT § 805.735-10 Member and employee indebtedness. Members and employees shall pay each just financial obligation in a proper and timely manner, especially... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Member and employee indebtedness. 805.735-10...

  16. 49 CFR 805.735-18 - Interests of employees' relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT § 805.735-18 Interests of employees' relatives. The interest of a spouse, minor child, or other members of an employee's immediate household is... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interests of employees' relatives. 805.735-18...

  17. 21 CFR 1301.92 - Illicit activities by employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTORS, AND DISPENSERS OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Employee Screening-Non-Practitioners § 1301.92 Illicit activities by employees. It is the position of DEA that employees who possess, sell, use... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Illicit activities by employees. 1301.92 Section...

  18. 45 CFR 7.7 - Notice to employee of determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice to employee of determination. 7.7 Section 7.7 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.7 Notice to employee of determination. The employee-inventor shall be notified in writing of the...

  19. 45 CFR 7.8 - Employee's right of appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee's right of appeal. 7.8 Section 7.8 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION EMPLOYEE INVENTIONS § 7.8 Employee's right of appeal. An employee who is aggrieved by a determination of the Department may appeal to...

  20. 46 CFR 16.401 - Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee Assistance Program (EAP). 16.401 Section 16.401... Employee Assistance Programs § 16.401 Employee Assistance Program (EAP). The employer shall provide an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) for all crewmembers. The employer may establish the EAP as a part of its...

  1. 20 CFR 228.20 - Reduction for an employee annuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reduction for an employee annuity. 228.20... COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.20 Reduction for an employee annuity. (a) General. If an individual is entitled to an annuity as a survivor, and is also entitled to an employee...

  2. Workplace breastfeeding support for hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodgson, Joan E; Chee, Yuet-Oi; Yap, Tian Sew

    2004-07-01

    Breastfeeding initiation rates have been steadily rising in Hong Kong, but most employed women wean prior to returning to work. While health care providers promote breastfeeding, women receive little support from employers. A few health care facilities offer some workplace breastfeeding support, but little is known about the specific types and amount of support that are offered. This paper reports a study whose aim was to describe workplace supports available to breastfeeding women employed by hospitals that provide maternity services in Hong Kong, and to determine if differences in workplace supports exist based on the hospitals' numbers of employees or funding source. In late 2001, a cross-sectional survey was completed by nurse managers or lactation consultants most knowledgeable about supports to breastfeeding employees in 19 hospitals. The number of workplace breastfeeding supports or Breastfeeding Support Score (M = 7.47; sd = 3.37) varied considerably. Mean Breastfeeding Support Score for government-funded hospitals was significantly higher (t = 2.31; P = 0.03) than for private hospitals. Of the 14 hospitals that had a designated space for using a breast pump, only five (26.3%) had a private room with a door that locked. Only two hospitals (11.1%) allowed employees to take breaks as needed to use a pump; employees in 10 (55.6%) had to use their meal and regular break times. Hospitals having a hospital-wide committee that addressed workplace breastfeeding issues had a more supportive environment for breastfeeding employees. Although all surveyed hospitals returned the questionnaire, the sample size was small. It was difficult to ensure accuracy and to differentiate subtle variations in the services provided using a self-report survey. Facilitating continued breastfeeding after employees' return to work requires that employers understand the needs of breastfeeding employees. Policy at the level of the employer and government is an essential component of

  3. Quality of working life: an antecedent to employee turnover intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the level of quality of work life (QWL) among hospital employees in Iran. Additionally, it aimed to identify the factors that are critical to employees' QWL. It also aimed to test a theoretical model of the relationship between employees' QWL and their intention to leave the organization. A survey study was conducted based on a sample of 608 hospital employees using a validated questionnaire. Face, content and construct validity were conducted on the survey instrument. Hospital employees reported low QWL. Employees were least satisfied with pay, benefits, job promotion, and management support. The most important predictor of QWL was management support, followed by job proud, job security and job stress. An inverse relationship was found between employees QWL and their turnover intention. This study empirically examined the relationships between employees' QWL and their turnover intention. Managers can take appropriate actions to improve employees' QWL and subsequently reduce employees' turnover.

  4. How to Keep Gen X Employees from Becoming X-Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, Will

    2000-01-01

    Examines the marketing influences (robust economy, low unemployment, young employees, changes in work arrangements) that are converging to create the recruiting and retention challenges that companies face. Offers suggestions such as marketing a business as a brand and seeking continuous feedback from employees. (JOW)

  5. Employee Characteristics as Predictors of Turnover among Female Clerical Employees in Two Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowday, Richard T.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Female clerical employees (N=314) in two regional offices of a large insurance company were administered Jackson's Personality Research Form. Turnover data were collected up to eight months following administration of the questionnaire. Relationships were found between employee characteristics and turnover in both samples. (Author)

  6. 77 FR 67743 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program Coverage for Certain Intermittent Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... employees who work on intermittent schedules eligible to be enrolled in a health benefits plan under the... put their health and safety at risk in order to assist those who have been affected by the storm... health insurance coverage based on the potentially diverse work schedules of intermittent employees...

  7. Educating the Employee Assistance Professional: Cornell University's Employee Assistance Education and Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, R. C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Outlines Cornell University's Employee Assistance Education and Research Program, which uses an academic curriculum and field experience to further develop the Employee Assistance Program (EAP) profession. Addresses the dilemma of personnel executives in ensuring quality in EAP programs and staff. (JOW)

  8. Analysis of Employee Engagement in a Chosen Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Kapcátová, Katarína

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to highlight the importance of employee engagement and deeply investigate employee engagement among selected employees in medium size organization, which operates in Liptovský Mikuláš. Besides finding out the total employee engagement, author examines the level of cognitive, physical, and emotional engagement too. Results are then compared to other studies provided by Gallup and CIPD research centers. Thesis further introduces the link between employee engageme...

  9. Employee engagement and job satisfaction in the information technology industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalanabhan, T J; Sai, L Prakash; Mayuri, Duggirala

    2009-12-01

    Employee engagement has been identified as being important to employee productivity and performance. Measures of employee engagement and job satisfaction in the context of information technology (IT) were developed to explore how employee engagement affects perceived job satisfaction. In a sample of IT professionals (N = 159), controlling for age, sex, job tenure, and marital status, employee engagement had a significant and positive correlation with job satisfaction.

  10. The Role of Employees in Training Decisions in Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Kapsalis, Constantine

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this article is not to question the need to provide more employee education and training or to encourage employers to invest more in employee development. Rather, it is to show that the decisions of employees themselves have as much to do with employee education and training as do those of employers. Consequently, the promotion of training requires addressing all workplace partners, not just employers, but also employees themselves, as well as governments, unions and educ...

  11. KORELASI ANTARA EMPLOYEES INVOLVEMENT, TURNOVER SERTA PENGARUHNYA TERHADAP PRODUKTIVITAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purnawan Adi Wicaksono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Praktek yang berkembang menyatakan bahwa employee involvement memiliki efek positif terhadap kinerja organisasi. Perubahan pada kultur organisasi dapat menimbulkan dampak berkurangnya absen, turnover, pengambilan keputusan yang lebih baik dan sebagainya. Sehingga menarik untuk diteliti apakah ada korelasi antara aplikasi perubahan organisasi yaitu employee involvement, turnover serta produktivitas Berdasarkan studi literatur didapatkan hubungan antara employee involvement dengan level turnover, serta hubungan turnover dengan produktivitas. Sehingga employee involvement dapat digunakan sebagai salah satu aspek menghitung produktivitas Keyword : employee involvement, turnover, produktivitas

  12. The Role of Performance Appraisals in Motivating Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Jurjen J.A. Kamphorst; Otto H. Swank

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIn many organizations, reward decisions depend on subjective performance evaluations. However, evaluating an employee's performance is often difficult. In this paper, we develop a model in which the employee is uncertain about his own performance and about the manager's ability to assess him. The manager gives an employee a performance appraisal with a view of affecting the employee's self perception, and the employee's perception of the manager's ability to assess performance. We...

  13. Employee Representation and Board Size in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Steen; Rose, Caspar; Kronborg, Dorte

    2016-01-01

    Several European countries have mandatory employee representation on company boards, but the consequences for corporate governance are debated. We use employee representation rules in the otherwise quite similar Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) to elicit information...... on shareholder preferences for employee representation and board size. We find that shareholders tend to choose board structures that minimize the proportion of employee representatives. In Denmark and Norway employee representation depends on board size, and shareholders choose board sizes that minimize...

  14. An Analysis of the Factors Impacting Employee's Specific Investment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ai-hua; GE Wen-lei

    2008-01-01

    The amount of specific investment from employees is limited, and the reasons of the under-investment from employees are analyzed in this paper. Based on the relationship of the specific investment and the employee demission, an empirical study has been conducted focusing on the factors influencing the employee turnover and the specific investment. A theoretical model of the factors influencing employee's specific investment is given.

  15. Disordered gambling among Chinese casino employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anise M S; Wong, Eva M W

    2008-06-01

    A previous study suggests that casino employees are at higher risk for disordered gambling than non-casino employees. The present study examined the cognitive correlates of the gambling involvement of Chinese casino employees. These potential cognitive correlates included attitudes toward the gaming industry and gambling activities, perceived job meaningfulness, and job stress. One hundred and nineteen Chinese respondents (M = 57; F = 62) working as dealers in Macao casinos were recruited through convenience sampling to fill out a questionnaire. The results revealed that about 7% of the respondents scored 10 or more on the South Oaks Gambling Screen and engaged in disordered gambling. Path analysis showed that attitude toward the gaming industry had a positive impact on job meaningfulness, which largely explained variances of job stress among casino employees. Job stress had a significant, but weak, direct impact on disordered gambling. Though causality between variables cannot be confirmed, this study provided insights into the impacts of cognitive factors on gambling involvement among Chinese front-line employees in the gaming industry. Implications of the findings were also discussed.

  16. Promotion and resignation in employee networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia; Zhang, Qian-Ming; Gao, Jian; Zhang, Linyan; Wan, Xue-Song; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Enterprises have put more and more emphasis on data analysis so as to obtain effective management advices. Managers and researchers are trying to dig out the major factors that lead to employees' promotion and resignation. Most previous analyses are based on questionnaire survey, which usually consists of a small fraction of samples and contains biases caused by psychological defense. In this paper, we successfully collect a data set consisting of all the employees' work-related interactions (action network, AN for short) and online social connections (social network, SN for short) of a company, which inspires us to reveal the correlations between structural features and employees' career development, namely promotion and resignation. Through statistical analysis, we show that the structural features of both AN and SN are correlated and predictive to employees' promotion and resignation, and the AN has higher correlation and predictability. More specifically, the in-degree in AN is the most relevant indicator for promotion, while the k-shell index in AN and in-degree in SN are both very predictive to resignation. Our results provide a novel and actionable understanding of enterprise management and suggest that to enhance the interplays among employees, no matter work-related or social interplays, can be helpful to reduce staffs' turnover risk.

  17. Standards of conduct for NASA employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    'Standards of Conduct' for employees (14 CFR Part 1207) is set forth in this handbook and is hereby incorporated in the NASA Directives System. This handbook incorporates, for the convenience of NASA employees, the regulations now in effect prescribing standards of conduct for NASA employees. These regulations set forth the high ethical standards of conduct required of NASA employees in carrying out their duties and responsibilities. These regulations have been approved by the Office of Government Ethics, Office of Personnel Management. The regulations incorporated in this handbook were first published in the Federal Register on October 21, 1967 (32 FR 14648-14659); Part B concerning the acceptance of gifts, gratuities, or entertainment was extensively revised on January 19, 1976 (41 FR 2631-2633) to clarify and generally to restrict the exceptions to the general rule against the acceptance by a NASA employee from persons or firms doing or seeking business with NASA. Those regulations were updated on January 29, 1985 (50 FR 3887) to ensure conformity to the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 regarding the public financial disclosure statement. These regulations were published in the Federal Register on June 16, 1987 (52 FR 22755-764) and a correction was printed on Sept. 28, 1987 (52 FR 36234).

  18. The Impact of Job Satisfaction and Employee Education on Employee Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. C. De Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Against a backdrop of continuing discussion on the challenges faced by the apparel industry in Sri Lanka, the human involvement is yet to be considered as a significant organizational element. Therefore this study empirically examined the impact of job satisfaction and employee education on employee efficiency in the apparel industry with reference to the Gampaha district. The study was aimed to examine the problem “Is there an impact of job satisfaction and employee education on employee efficiency?”This study was conducted from a randomly selected sample of 90 respondents from an Apparel organization by administrating a structured questionnaire, which consisted of 37 questions that featured a 6 point scale. The sample of the study only consisted of machine operators. For the purpose of analyzing both descriptive and dummy variables regression was used. Descriptive analysis was used to clarify the basic features of the sample. In order to examine the relationship employee efficiency has with job satisfaction and employee education, an ANOVA model was constructed. The constructed ANOVA model for the study is as follows. EF = â0+ â1D1 + â2D2 +â3D3 + U The findings of the research revealed that there was no positive relationship between employee efficiency, job satisfaction and education and it was statistically confirmed by rejecting the two hypotheses. According to the study, the researcher observed that employee efficiency neither relates to employee job satisfaction nor the level of education of employees since they work to achieve their day to day targets.

  19. The Impact of Employee Empowerment on Employee Satisfaction and Service Quality: Empirical Evidence from Financial Enterprizes in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Minhajul Islam Ukil

    2016-01-01

    Organizations face immense challenges in improving their performance and productivity in the present changing and competitive business world. Experts view employee empowerment as an effective tool that fosters organizational performance, employee satisfaction and service quality. The present study intends to identify the influence of employee empowerment on employee satisfaction and service quality, and the impact of employee satisfaction on service quality. Fourteen dimensions and 52 item st...

  20. Employee motivation: quality versus business concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, R A; Kazemek, E A

    1986-03-01

    The traditional factors that influence employee motivation and morale remain important in healthcare organizations. However, the nursing staff tends to be more self-motivated than many employees in other occupations because of values that are intrinsic to the nursing profession. When the humanist values of the nursing profession conflict or compete with business values, erosion of nursing morale and motivation may result with attendant employee "burnout" that undermines the organization's business objectives. There are several steps that both management and nursing educators can take to lessen the cultural conflict and avert motivational breakdowns. The future may teach us that an ideal blend of business and humanist values may result in a situation where good business decisions are good humanist decisions, and vice versa.