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Sample records for pride mango fruit

  1. Irradiation of Kensington Pride mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLauchlan, R.L.; Mitchell, G.E.; Johnson, G.I.; Wills, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Mangoes (cv. Kensington Pride) exhibited delayed ripening and increased external injury (lenticel damage) following irradiation at 300 or 600 Gy but not at 75 Gy. Altering the conditions of irradiation (lower temperature, nitrogen atmosphere, lower dose rate) had no effect in alleviating that injury. Some chemical constituents were also affected to minor degrees but eating quality was not. Irradiation of mature-green, preclimacteric mangoes at doses of 300 Gy or more is not recommended; doses of 75 Gy can be used without adversely affecting marketability. (author)

  2. PERUBAHAN KOMPOSISI VOLATIL DAGING BUAH MANGGA "KENSINGTON PRIDE" SELAMA PEMASAKAN [Changes in Volatile Compound Composition of Kensington Pride Mango Pulp During Fruit Ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herianus J.D Lalel

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Volatile compounds of ‘Kesington Pride’ mango produced from the pulp during fruit ripening were studied using headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME as a sampling method and gas chromatography with a flame ionisation detector (GC-FID and gas chromatography mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS for analysis. Ethylene production and respiration reached a peak on the second and third day of ripening, respectively. Seventy-eight volatile compounds were identified from the pulp of ‘Kesington Pride’ mango; however, only 73 volatile compounds were present in notable amount. The most abundant group of volatile compounds was monoterpenes, accounting for abaout 44% of the total identified compounds, followed by sesquiterpenes (19%, aldehydes (11%,esters (10% aromatics (8%, alcohol (2%, ketones (2%, alkanes (1% and norisoprenoid (1%. -Terpinolene was the major compound during ripening. Except for -pinene, 3,7-dimethl-1,3,7-octatriene, 4-methl-1 (1-methylethylidene-cyclohexene, p-mentha-1,5,8-triene, aloocimene, the concentration of all other monoterpenes increased for the first six or eight days and decreased afterwards. All sesquiteroenes, p-cymene, p-cymen-9-ol,2-ethyl-1,4-dimethl benzene also increased during ripening and peaked on day four, six or eight of ripening. Ketones, aldehydes alkane and cis-3-hexenol, on the other hand, decreased during ripening. Ethanol, esters and norisoprenoid increased quite sharply at the end of ripening period.

  3. Evaluation Of Growth And Development In Mango Fruits Cvs. Julie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation Of Growth And Development In Mango Fruits Cvs. Julie And Peter To Determine Maturity. ... Two mango cultivars viz., Julie and Peter, were studied for growth and development of fruits in 2001 and 2002 ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  4. Effects of composite mango ( Mangifera indica ) fruit reject meal on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of composite mango ( Mangifera indica ) fruit reject meal on growth performance, digestibility and economics of production of rabbits. ... The experiment was conducted to determine the effect of mango fruit reject ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  5. Production and characterization of wine from mango fruit ( Mangifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production and characterization of wine from mango fruit ( Mangifera indica ) varieties in Kenya. ... Six mature and unripe mango fruits were harvested three times from a farm in Katheka Kai Division, Machakos County ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  6. Infestation of fruit fly, Bactrocera (Diptera: Tephritidae) on mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infestation of fruit fly, Bactrocera (Diptera: Tephritidae) on mango ( Mangifera indica L.) in peninsular Malaysia. ... Abstract. A survey was carried out in mango orchards in Peninsular Malaysia with aimed to determine the ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  7. Weaver Ants to Control Fruit Fly Damage to Tanzanian Mangoes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina

    in Australia and West Africa. In this study, small scale farmers did not think weaver ants protected their mangoes from fruit flies. Observational studies confirmed the farmers’ views. No volatile compounds, likely to be responsible for the weaver ants’ deterrent effect, were identified. This study focused...... mangoes varied a lot with zero infestation in some fruits and more than 100 pupae emerging from other fruits, indicating that other factors than the presence of weaver ants affect the fruit flies’ decision on where to oviposit. It was not uncommon for farmers to place newly harvested mangoes below mango...... not shown to be effectively deterring fruit flies, there is no great motivation for farmers to adopt weaver ants. Assuming the weaver ants could be managed in a way that made weaver ants deter fruit flies effectively there are still some economic aspects which should be studied further. It is necessary...

  8. Automated mango fruit assessment using fuzzy logic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Suzanawati Abu; Kin, Teoh Yeong; Sauddin@Sa'duddin, Suraiya; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Othman, Mahmod; Mansor, Ab Razak; Parnabas, Vincent

    2014-06-01

    In term of value and volume of production, mango is the third most important fruit product next to pineapple and banana. Accurate size assessment of mango fruits during harvesting is vital to ensure that they are classified to the grade accordingly. However, the current practice in mango industry is grading the mango fruit manually using human graders. This method is inconsistent, inefficient and labor intensive. In this project, a new method of automated mango size and grade assessment is developed using RGB fiber optic sensor and fuzzy logic approach. The calculation of maximum, minimum and mean values based on RGB fiber optic sensor and the decision making development using minimum entropy formulation to analyse the data and make the classification for the mango fruit. This proposed method is capable to differentiate three different grades of mango fruit automatically with 77.78% of overall accuracy compared to human graders sorting. This method was found to be helpful for the application in the current agricultural industry.

  9. Optical properties, ethylene production and softening in mango fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eccher Zerbini, P.C.; Vanoli, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Grassi, M.; Meirelles de Azevedo Pementel, A.; Spinelli, L.; Torricelli, A.

    2015-01-01

    Firmness decay, chlorophyll breakdown and carotenoid accumulation, controlled by ethylene, are major ripening events in mango fruit. Pigment content and tissue structure affect the optical properties of the mesocarp, which can be measured nondestructively in the intact fruit by time-resolved

  10. Image Processing for Quality Inspection of Mango Fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Usman

    2002-01-01

    Indonesia has many kinds of tropical fruits, including mango, that can be exported besides to suplly the demand on the fruits in the country. To ensure the quality of mango, it is important to do sortation and grading on them, especially those for export, based on the quality requirement. In this case, the use of high technology such as image processing in necesary to put into practise with the aim to increase the consistance of sortation and grading processes as compare to the result of manu...

  11. Variation in fruit chilling injury among mango cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phakawatmongkol, W.; Ketsa, S.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2004-01-01

    Mango(Mangifera indica L.) fruit of six cultivars ('Kaew', 'Rad', 'Okrong', 'Tongdum', 'Nam Dok Mai' and 'Nungklangwun') were stored at 4, 8 and 12degreesC (85-90% RH) and randomly sampled every 5 days. Chilling injury was manifested initially as a gray to brown discoloration of the peel, followed

  12. Development and Utilization of Technology on Indian Mango Fruit Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenda A. Bronce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This project aimed to develop and utilize technology on Indian mango fruit processing. Chemical properties of matured unripe and ripe Indian mangoes were determined in terms of total sugar, reducing sugar, starch, titratable acidity and pH. Fermentation parameters investigated in the study were amount of sugar added (20 and 25% fermentation medium, acidity of fermentation medium (addition of 1.33 and 1.66 grams of citric acid for ripe and dilution of water for unripe, degree of ripening of Indian mango fruits (ripe and unripe and ageing period (3 and 4 months. Sixteen treatments were done in triplicates and a composite sample was taken from each treatment for sensory evaluation. Results of the preference test were subjected to statistical analysis. The physicochemical properties of Indian mango wine produced using best fermentation parameters were determined. Appropriate packaging material was selected and packaging design was developed for Indian mango wine. Project cooperators were selected and the technology was transferred through training and production runs. Results of preference test showed that the wine with best sensory properties was prepared using matured unripe Indian mango diluted with water and added with 25% sugar. According to the panel of sensory experts, the taste of Indian mango wine was strong with proper blending of sweetness and sourness, its mouth feel was smooth and good balance, aroma was hot pungent and its color and appearance was clear and light yellow. Its titratable acidity was 0.622%, pH was 5, alcohol content was 11% and brix was 5°.

  13. Transcriptome and proteomic analysis of mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong-xia; Jia, Hui-min; Ma, Xiao-wei; Wang, Song-biao; Yao, Quan-sheng; Xu, Wen-tian; Zhou, Yi-gang; Gao, Zhong-shan; Zhan, Ru-lin

    2014-06-13

    Here we used Illumina RNA-seq technology for transcriptome sequencing of a mixed fruit sample from 'Zill' mango (Mangifera indica Linn) fruit pericarp and pulp during the development and ripening stages. RNA-seq generated 68,419,722 sequence reads that were assembled into 54,207 transcripts with a mean length of 858bp, including 26,413 clusters and 27,794 singletons. A total of 42,515(78.43%) transcripts were annotated using public protein databases, with a cut-off E-value above 10(-5), of which 35,198 and 14,619 transcripts were assigned to gene ontology terms and clusters of orthologous groups respectively. Functional annotation against the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database identified 23,741(43.79%) transcripts which were mapped to 128 pathways. These pathways revealed many previously unknown transcripts. We also applied mass spectrometry-based transcriptome data to characterize the proteome of ripe fruit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the mango fruit proteome was using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) in an LTQ Orbitrap Velos (Thermo) coupled online to the HPLC. This approach enabled the identification of 7536 peptides that matched 2754 proteins. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of transcriptome during mango fruit development and the most comprehensive fruit proteome to date, which are useful for further genomics research and proteomic studies. Our study provides a comprehensive sequence for a systemic view of both the transcriptome and proteome of mango fruit, and a valuable reference for further research on gene expression and protein identification. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics of non-model organisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamics in the concentrations of health-promoting compounds: lupeol, mangiferin and different phenolic acids during postharvest ripening of mango fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithana, Mekhala Dk; Singh, Zora; Johnson, Stuart K

    2018-03-01

    Mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) is renowned for its pleasant taste and as a rich source of health beneficial compounds. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in concentrations of health-promoting compounds, namely ascorbic acid, carotenoids, antioxidants, lupeol, mangiferin, total phenols and individual phenolic acids, as well as ethylene production and respiration rates during climacteric ripening in 'Kensington Pride' and 'R2E2' mango fruit. The climacteric ethylene and respiration peaks were noted on the third day of the fruit ripening period. The concentrations of total carotenoids in the pulp, total antioxidants in both pulp and peel, and total phenols of the peel, lupeol and mangiferin were significantly elevated, whereas the concentration of ascorbic acid declined during post-climacteric ripening. Gallic, chlorogenic and vanillic acids were identified as the major phenolic acids in both pulp and peel of 'Kensington Pride' and 'R2E2' mangoes. The concentrations of phenolic acids (gallic, chlorogenic, vanillic, ferulic and caffeic acids) also increased during the post-climacteric phase. The concentrations of all phenolic compounds were several-fold higher in the peel than pulp. Mangoes at post-climacteric ripening phase offer the highest concentrations of health-promoting compounds. Peel, at this stage of fruit ripening, could be exploited as a good source for extraction of these compounds. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Rapid method for Detection of Irradiation Mango Fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Salhy, F.T.

    2011-01-01

    To detect mango fruits which have been exposed to low doses of gamma rays (0.5-3.0 kGy), three recommended methods by European Committee for Standardization (EN 1784:1996, EN 1785:1996 and EN 1787:2000) were used to study the possibility for identification of irradiated mango fruits (Ewais variety). Fresh mangoes were irradiated to different doses (0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 3.0 kGy). The first method for determining the volatile hydrocarbons (VHC) was carried out by using florisil column then identified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The major VHCs were C14:1, C15:0 and C17:1 at different doses which increased linearly with increasing doses either at low or high doses. The second one for determining the 2-alkyl cyclobutanone (2-DCB) was carried out using florisil chromatography method activated with 20% for separation and identified by GC-MS. 2-DCB bio marker specific for irradiated food proved its presence at the applied doses from 0.75-3.0 kGy but not at 0.5 kGy. All the mentioned compounds could not detected in non-irradiated samples, which mean that these radiolytic products (VHC and 2-DCB) can be used as a detection markers for irradiated mangoes even at low doses. The third one (EN 1787:2000) was conducted by electron spin resonance (ESR) on dried petioles of mangoes. The results proved that ESR was more sensitive for all applied doses.It could be concluded that using the three methods can be succeeded for detection of irradiated mangoes but the rapid one even at low doses with high accuracy was ESR.

  16. Physical properties of wild mango fruit and nut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehiem, J. C.; Simonyan, K. J.

    2012-02-01

    Physical properties of two wild mango varieties were studied at 81.9 and 24.5% moisture (w.b.) for the fruits and nuts, respectively. The shape and size of the fruit are the same while that of nuts differs at P = 0.05. The mass, density and bulk density of the fruits are statistically different at P = 0.05 but the volume is the same. The shape and size, volume and bulk density of the nuts are statistically the same at P = 0.05. The nuts of both varieties are also the same at P = 0.05 in terms of mass and density. The packing factor for both fruits and nut of the two varieties are the same at 0.95. The relevant data obtained for the two varieties would be useful for design and development of machines and equipment for processing and handling operations.

  17. Effect of different doses of gamma radiation on shelf life of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits cv. Dashehari

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghel, B.S.; Gupta, N.; Tiwari, R.

    2005-01-01

    The mango fruits cv. Dashehari irradiated with different doses of gamma radiation for extending their shelf life and for stabilizing the market demand, revealed that irradiation of mango fruits with 200 Gy gamma radiation increase the post harvest life of 93.75 percent mango fruits by 12 days over control (46.66 percent) and proved superior to maintain the considerable physico-chemical composition of mango fruits as compared to control and higher doses of gamma radiation. (author)

  18. Mango fruit aroma volatile production following quarantine hot water treatment and subsequent ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangos are an important tropical fruit crop worldwide that are appreciated for their attractive peel and flesh colors, juicy texture, sweetness, and unique aroma. Mangos exported to the U.S. receive quarantine hot water treatment (QHWT) at 46.1 °C for 65 to 110 min (depending on fruit shape and size...

  19. Stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) and HS-SPME-GCMS quantification of key aroma volatiles for fruit and sap of Australian mango cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San, Anh T; Joyce, Daryl C; Hofman, Peter J; Macnish, Andrew J; Webb, Richard I; Matovic, Nicolas J; Williams, Craig M; De Voss, James J; Wong, Siew H; Smyth, Heather E

    2017-04-15

    Reported herein is a high throughput method to quantify in a single analysis the key volatiles that contribute to the aroma of commercially significant mango cultivars grown in Australia. The method constitutes stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) in conjunction with headspace (HS) solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). Deuterium labelled analogues of the target analytes were either purchased commercially or synthesised for use as internal standards. Seven volatiles, hexanal, 3-carene, α-terpinene, p-cymene, limonene, α-terpinolene and ethyl octanoate, were targeted. The resulting calibration functions had determination coefficients (R 2 ) ranging from 0.93775 to 0.99741. High recovery efficiencies for spiked mango samples were also achieved. The method was applied to identify the key aroma volatile compounds produced by 'Kensington Pride' and 'B74' mango fruit and by 'Honey Gold' mango sap. This method represents a marked improvement over current methods for detecting and measuring concentrations of mango fruit and sap volatiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Processing of mixed fruit juice from mango, orange and pineapple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajeda Begam

    2018-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted to prepare mixed fruit juice by using mango pulp, pineapple and orange juices and the quality in terms of nutritional value, keeping quality, shelf life and consumers’ acceptability were investigated. Chemical analysis showed that TSS, acidity were increased slightly whereas vitamin C and pH were decreased gradually during the storage periods. Storage studies were carried out up to one month with an interval of one week and the result showed that all the samples were in good condition after one month, though little bit of faded color was found at the end of storage periods. Sample with 35% mango juice, 40% orange juice and 25% pineapple secured the highest score on sensory evaluation and showed the best consumer acceptance. This research reveals that perishable fruits can be converted to attractive mixed juice and thus increase the shelf-life, which increase value of the product. [Fundam Appl Agric 2018; 3(2.000: 440-445

  1. A sarabande of tropical fruit proteomics: Avocado, banana, and mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righetti, Pier Giorgio; Esteve, Clara; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Fasoli, Elisa; Luisa Marina, María; Concepción García, María

    2015-05-01

    The present review highlights the progress made in plant proteomics via the introduction of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries (CPLL) for detecting low-abundance species. Thanks to a novel approach to the CPLL methodology, namely, that of performing the capture both under native and denaturing conditions, identifying plant species in the order of thousands, rather than hundreds, is now possible. We report here data on a trio of tropical fruits, namely, banana, avocado, and mango. The first two are classified as "recalcitrant" tissues since minute amounts of proteins (in the order of 1%) are embedded on a very large matrix of plant-specific material (e.g., polysaccharides and other plant polymers). Yet, even under these adverse conditions we could report, in a single sweep, from 1000 to 3000 unique gene products. In the case of mango the investigation has been extended to the peel too, since this skin is popularly used to flavor dishes in Far East cuisine. Even in this tough peel 330 proteins could be identified, whereas in soft peels, such as in lemons, one thousand unique species could be detected. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Determination of mango fruit from binary image using randomized Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizon, Mohamed; Najihah Yusri, Nurul Ain; Abdul Kadir, Mohd Fadzil; bin Mamat, Abd. Rasid; Abd Aziz, Azim Zaliha; Nanaa, Kutiba

    2015-12-01

    A method of detecting mango fruit from RGB input image is proposed in this research. From the input image, the image is processed to obtain the binary image using the texture analysis and morphological operations (dilation and erosion). Later, the Randomized Hough Transform (RHT) method is used to find the best ellipse fits to each binary region. By using the texture analysis, the system can detect the mango fruit that is partially overlapped with each other and mango fruit that is partially occluded by the leaves. The combination of texture analysis and morphological operator can isolate the partially overlapped fruit and fruit that are partially occluded by leaves. The parameters derived from RHT method was used to calculate the center of the ellipse. The center of the ellipse acts as the gripping point for the fruit picking robot. As the results, the rate of detection was up to 95% for fruit that is partially overlapped and partially covered by leaves.

  3. The Effect of Dietary Inclusion of Mango (Magnifera indica L.) Fruit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to evaluate the effect of MFW on carcass yields. ... Key words: Mango Fruit Waste; Maize; Cobb-500 Broiler Chickens; Growth. Performance; Carcass Traits. Introduction. Poultry production plays a major role in bridging the protein gap in ...

  4. An FSPM approach for modeling fruit yield and quality in mango trees

    OpenAIRE

    Boudon , Frédéric; Persello , Severine; Jestin , Alexandra; Briand , Anne-Sarah; Fernique , Pierre; Guédon , Yann; Léchaudel , Mathieu; Grechi , Isabelle; Normand , Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Research focus-Mango (Mangifera indica L.), the fifth most cultivated fruit in the world, is mainly produced in tropical and subtropical regions. Its cultivation raises a number of issues: (i) mango yield is irregular across years, (ii) phenological asynchronisms within and between trees maintain long periods with phenological stages susceptible to pests and diseases, and (iii) fruit quality and maturity are heterogeneous at harvest. To address these issues, we develop...

  5. Sensitivity of Ceratitis capitata eggs irradiated in artificial diet and in mango fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raga, A.; Yasuoka, S.T.; Amorim, E.O.; Sato, M.E.; Suplicy Filho, N.; Faria, J.T. de

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish gamma radiation doses required to prevent emergence of Ceratitis capitata adults, from irradiated eggs in artificial diet and mango fruits. Six-, twelve-, twenty-four-, and forty-eight-hour-old eggs were used. Artificial infestation by C. capitata was carried out in mangoes of Haden, Tommy and Keith cultivars. An increase of radiation resistance of C. capitata eggs was observed as a function of the embryonic development and a Probit 9 of 24.67 Gy was estimated for 48-hour-old eggs in artificial diet. No significant influence of mango fruits was found on the efficacy of irradiation. (author)

  6. Fruit fly infestation in mango: A threat to the Horticultural sector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fruit flies (Diptera: Tephtritidae) are one of the most important insect pests to fruits worldwide. In Uganda, fruit flies have inflicted considerable yield losses especially in mangos (Mangifera indica L.), However, there has been no recent assessment of the associated economic damage impact despite the outcries from the ...

  7. Low-dose irradiation with modified atmosphere packaging for mango against the Oriental Fruit Fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irradiation and vapor–heating treatments are commonly used to disinfest the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera:Tephritidae), and other pests on mango fruits before export from Thailand to foreign markets. Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) used during export of mangoes create...

  8. Residues of acephate and its metabolite methamidophos in/on mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; Ahuja, A K; Deepa, M; Sharma, Debi

    2011-01-01

    Mango, the major fruit crop of India is affected by stone weevil, which can cause serious damage to the fruits. Acephate gives good control of mango stone weevil. Residues of acephate and its major metabolite, methamidophos were evaluated on mango fruits following repeated spray applications at the recommended dose (0.75 kg a.i. ha⁻¹) and double the recommended dose (1.5 kg a.i. ha⁻¹). Acephate residues mostly remained on the fruit peel which persisted up to 30 days. Movement of residues to the fruit pulp was detected after 1 day of application, increased to maximum of 0.14 and 0.26 mg kg⁻¹ after 3 days and reached to below detectable level (BDL) after 20 days. Methamidophos, a metabolite of acephate, was detected from 3rd day onwards in both peel and pulp and persisted up to 15 days. The residues (acephate + methamidophos) dissipated with the half-life of 5 days in peel and pulp. A safe pre-harvest interval of 30 days is recommended for consumption of mango fruits following treatment of acephate at the recommended dose of 0.75 kg a.i. ha⁻¹.

  9. Radiation preservation of foods of plant origin. III. Tropical fruits: bananas, mangoes, and papayas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.

    1986-01-01

    The current status of research on the use of ionizing radiation for shelf life improvement and disinfestation of fresh tropical fruits like bananas, mangoes, and papayas are reviewed. The aspects covered are influence of maturity and physiological state of the fruits on delayed ripening and tolerance to radiation; varietal responses; changes in chemical constituents, volatiles, respiration, and ethylene evolution; biochemical mechanisms of delayed ripening and browning of irradiated fruits; and organoleptic quality. The efficacy of the combination of hot water dip and radiation treatments for control of postharvest fungal diseases are considered. The immediate potential of radiation as a quarantine treatment, in place of the currently used chemical fumigants, for disinfestation of fruit flies and mango seed weevil are discussed. Future prospects for irradiation of tropical fruits are discussed in the light of experience gained from studies conducted in different countries.146 references

  10. Mango resistance to fruit flies. II - resistance of the alfa cultivar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossetto, C.J.; Bortoletto, N., E-mail: rossetto@iac.sp.gov.b [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA), Votuporanga, SP (Brazil). Polo Regional do Noroeste Paulista; Walder, J.M.M.; Mastrangelo, T. de A., E-mail: jmwalder@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, C.R.L.; Castro, J.V. de, E-mail: climonta@iac.sp.gov.b, E-mail: josalba@iac.sp.gov.b [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Pinto, A.C. de Q. [EMBRAPA, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Cortelazzo, A.L., E-mail: angelo@unicamp.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2006-07-01

    The percentage of infested mango fruits of five selected mango varieties was evaluated during three years under field conditions. Three varieties with field resistance to fruit flies had less then 10% of fruits infested. Tommy Atkins, the susceptible commercial check, had 42,9% and the susceptible check had 98.9 % of infested fruits. The three field resistant varieties plus the susceptible commercial check, Tommy Atkins, were further tested in laboratory, under caged conditions, with artificial infestation of Anastrepha obliqua. The attempts of oviposition and the number of pupae developed from each fruit were evaluated. Under caged conditions, the cultivar Alfa maintained its field resistance and Espada Stahl and IAC 111 lost the field resistance and were as susceptible as Tommy Atkins. The attempts of oviposition were positively and highly correlated with the number of pupae developed in the fruits. Non preference for oviposition was confirmed as the main mechanism of resistance of mango fruits to fruit flies. In the absence of a more susceptible variety (no choice test) the cultivar Alfa has kept the resistance (author)

  11. Mango resistance to fruit flies. II - resistance of the alfa cultivar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossetto, C.J.; Bortoletto, N.; Carvalho, C.R.L.; Castro, J.V. de; Pinto, A.C. de Q.; Cortelazzo, A.L.

    2006-01-01

    The percentage of infested mango fruits of five selected mango varieties was evaluated during three years under field conditions. Three varieties with field resistance to fruit flies had less then 10% of fruits infested. Tommy Atkins, the susceptible commercial check, had 42,9% and the susceptible check had 98.9 % of infested fruits. The three field resistant varieties plus the susceptible commercial check, Tommy Atkins, were further tested in laboratory, under caged conditions, with artificial infestation of Anastrepha obliqua. The attempts of oviposition and the number of pupae developed from each fruit were evaluated. Under caged conditions, the cultivar Alfa maintained its field resistance and Espada Stahl and IAC 111 lost the field resistance and were as susceptible as Tommy Atkins. The attempts of oviposition were positively and highly correlated with the number of pupae developed in the fruits. Non preference for oviposition was confirmed as the main mechanism of resistance of mango fruits to fruit flies. In the absence of a more susceptible variety (no choice test) the cultivar Alfa has kept the resistance (author)

  12. Indigenous weaver ants and fruit fly control in Tanzanian smallholder mango production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina; Offenberg, Hans Joachim; Msogoya, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of weaver ant colonies can reduce fruit fly oviposition in mango production and can be effective as a fruit fly control strategy. Patrolling ants may disturb landing flies and may also deposit repellent compounds on to the fruits. This control strategy is being applied to export...... temperatures to lethal levels for fruit fly eggs and larvae. Direct observations showed a small, but significant reduction in fly landings on fruits previously patrolled by ants, supporting the proposed role for persistent repellents. Gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy did not identify any compounds uniquely...

  13. Phytochemical extraction, characterisation and comparative distribution across four mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Jean T; Monteith, Gregory R; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Gidley, Michael J; Shaw, Paul N

    2014-04-15

    In this study we determined the qualitative composition and distribution of phytochemicals in peel and flesh of fruits from four different varieties of mango using mass spectrometry profiling following fractionation of methanol extracts by preparative HPLC. Gallic acid substituted compounds, of diverse core structure, were characteristic of the phytochemicals extracted using this approach. Other principal compounds identified were from the quercetin family, the hydrolysable tannins and fatty acids and their derivatives. This work provides additional information regarding mango fruit phytochemical composition and its potential contribution to human health and nutrition. Compounds present in mango peel and flesh are likely subject to genetic control and this will be the subject of future studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of gamma radiation and some growth regulators on ripening and senescence in mango fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Kady, S.M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken during the seasons of 1979 and 1980 to study the effect of gamma irradiation, some growth regulators, benlate and 'vaporgard' on ripening and senescence of 'Hindi Be - Sinnara' mango fruits during storage under room conditions and also to determine the optimum treatment for maximum extension in shelf - life

  15. Low-temperature conditioning induces chilling tolerance in stored mango fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengke; Zhu, Qinggang; Hu, Meijiao; Gao, Zhaoyin; An, Feng; Li, Min; Jiang, Yueming

    2017-03-15

    In this study, mango fruit were pre-treated with low-temperature conditioning (LTC) at 12°C for 24h, followed by refrigeration at 5°C for 25days before removal to ambient temperature (25°C) to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of LTC on chilling injury (CI). The results showed that LTC effectively suppressed the development of CI in mango fruit, accelerated softening, and increased the soluble solids and proline content. Furthermore, LTC reduced electrolyte leakage, and levels of malondialdehyde, O 2 - and H 2 O 2 , maintaining membrane integrity. To reveal the molecular regulation of LTC on chilling tolerance in mango fruit, a C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element binding factor (CBF) gene, MiCBF1, was identified and its expression in response to LTC was examined using RT-qPCR. LTC resulted in a higher MiCBF1 expression. These findings suggest that LTC enhances chilling tolerance in mango fruit by inducing a series of physiological and molecular responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of O-Methyltransferase from Mango Fruit (Mangifera indica cv. Alphonso).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidley, Hemangi G; Oak, Pranjali S; Deshpande, Ashish B; Pujari, Keshav H; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2016-05-01

    Flavour of ripe Alphonso mango is invariably dominated by the de novo appearance of lactones and furanones during ripening. Of these, furanones comprising furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone) are of particular importance due to their sweet, fruity caramel-like flavour characters and low odour detection thresholds. We isolated a 1056 bp complete open reading frame of a cDNA encoding S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent O-methyltransferase from Alphonso mango. The recombinantly expressed enzyme, MiOMTS showed substrate specificity towards furaneol and protocatechuic aldehyde synthesizing mesifuran and vanillin, respectively, in an in vitro assay reaction. A semi-quantitative PCR analysis showed fruit-specific expression of MiOMTS transcripts. Quantitative real-time PCR displayed ripening-related expression pattern of MiOMTS in both pulp and skin of Alphonso mango. Also, early and significantly enhanced accumulation of its transcripts was detected in pulp and skin of ethylene-treated fruits. Ripening-related and fruit-specific expression profile of MiOMTS and substrate specificity towards furaneol is a suggestive of its involvement in the synthesis of mesifuran in Alphonso mango. Moreover, a significant trigger in the expression of MiOMTS transcripts in ethylene-treated fruits point towards the transcriptional regulation of mesifuran biosynthesis by ethylene.

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Fruit Epidermal Peel to Identify Putative Cuticle-Associated Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafolla-Arellano, Julio C.; Zheng, Yi; Sun, Honghe; Jiao, Chen; Ruiz-May, Eliel; Hernández-Oñate, Miguel A.; González-León, Alberto; Báez-Sañudo, Reginaldo; Fei, Zhangjun; Domozych, David; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Tiznado-Hernández, Martín E.

    2017-04-01

    Mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) are highly perishable and have a limited shelf life, due to postharvest desiccation and senescence, which limits their global distribution. Recent studies of tomato fruit suggest that these traits are influenced by the expression of genes that are associated with cuticle metabolism. However, studies of these phenomena in mango fruit are limited by the lack of genome-scale data. In order to gain insight into the mango cuticle biogenesis and identify putative cuticle-associated genes, we analyzed the transcriptomes of peels from ripe and overripe mango fruit using RNA-Seq. Approximately 400 million reads were generated and de novo assembled into 107,744 unigenes, with a mean length of 1,717 bp and with this information an online Mango RNA-Seq Database (http://bioinfo.bti.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/mango/index.cgi) which is a valuable genomic resource for molecular research into the biology of mango fruit was created. RNA-Seq analysis suggested that the pathway leading to biosynthesis of the cuticle component, cutin, is up-regulated during overripening. This data was supported by analysis of the expression of several putative cuticle-associated genes and by gravimetric and microscopic studies of cuticle deposition, revealing a complex continuous pattern of cuticle deposition during fruit development and involving substantial accumulation during ripening/overripening.

  18. Morphological and organoleptic description of mango fruits (Mangifera indica L. cultivated in Jipijapa canton in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel-Ortega Julio

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2016, seventeen cultivars of mango (Mangifera indica L. were collected in local markets and farmers' field of Jipijapa Canton, Ecuador, with the aim of describing and analyzing mango fruits due to their morphological characteristics of sugars (°Brix and total solids. Collections were carried out by stu-dents and teachers of the Research Methodologies course of the Agricultural Engineering Career, of the Southern State University of Manabí (UNESUM. The fruits were characterized by using 16 qualitative and quantitative variables for fruit and seed recommended by UPOV and IPGRI. The percentage of total solids and Brix grades of each harvested crop were also analyzed in the UNESUM bromatology laboratory. Results showed that in the Jipijapa Canton, Ecuador, there is a great biodiversity of native mangoes, which were not characterized. Fruit shapes, pulp color and variable fiber contents were observed. The length of fruit was 6.33 to 12.50 cm, and the width was 5.27 to 8.50 cm, with a length/width ratio between 0.77 and 1.83 cm. The fruit weight was 63.3 to 500 g. No significant differences were observed in the sugars content (°Brix. Finally, it was observed that the range of consumable pulp was 63 to 94% in native cultivars and 86% to 97% in the improved ones.

  19. Salicylic Acid Induces Changes in Mango Fruit that Affect Oviposition Behavior and Development of the Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram

    Full Text Available The Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel is an important quarantine pest around the globe. Although measures for its control are implemented worldwide through IPM and male annihilation, there is little effect on their population. Hence, there is a need for new strategies to control this minacious pest. A strategy that has received negligible attention is the induction of 'natural plant defenses' by phytohormones. In this study, we investigated the effect of salicylic acid (SA treatment of mango fruit (cv. Totapuri on oviposition and larval development of B. dorsalis. In oviposition choice assays, gravid females laid significantly less eggs in SA treated compared to untreated fruit. Headspace volatiles collected from SA treated fruit were less attractive to gravid females compared to volatiles from untreated fruit. GC-MS analysis of the headspace volatiles from SA treated and untreated fruit showed noticeable changes in their chemical compositions. Cis-ocimene and 3-carene (attractants to B. dorsalis were reduced in the headspace volatiles of treated fruit. Further, reduced pupae formation and adult emergence was observed in treated fruit compared to control. Increased phenol and flavonoid content was recorded in treated fruit. We also observed differential expression of anti-oxidative enzymes namely catalase (CAT, polyphenoloxidase (PPO and peroxidase (POD. In summary, the results indicate that SA treatment reduced oviposition, larval development and adult emergence of B. dorsalis and suggest a role of SA in enhancing mango tolerance to B. dorsalis.

  20. Current status of tropical fruit breeding and genetics for three tropical fruit species cultivated in Japan: pineapple, mango, and papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tatsushi; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Shoda, Moriyuki; Urasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Tropical fruit crops are predominantly produced in tropical and subtropical developing countries, but some are now grown in southern Japan. Pineapple (Ananas comosus), mango (Mangifera indica) and papaya (Carica papaya) are major tropical fruits cultivated in Japan. Modern, well-organized breeding systems have not yet been developed for most tropical fruit species. Most parts of Japan are in the temperate climate zone, but some southern areas such as the Ryukyu Islands, which stretch from Kyushu to Taiwan, are at the northern limits for tropical fruit production without artificial heating. In this review, we describe the current status of tropical fruit breeding, genetics, genomics, and biotechnology of three main tropical fruits (pineapple, mango, and papaya) that are cultivated and consumed in Japan. More than ten new elite cultivars of pineapple have been released with improved fruit quality and suitability for consumption as fresh fruit. New challenges and perspectives for obtaining high fruit quality are discussed in the context of breeding programs for pineapple. PMID:27069392

  1. Evaluation of electron spin resonance technique for the detection of irradiated mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhushan, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Thomas, P.; Singh, B.B.

    1994-01-01

    The electron spin resonance (ESR) technique was examined as a method for the detection of irradiated mango fruits. A symmetric ESR signal at g = 1.988 was detected in the hard seed cover (endocarp), the dry epidermal layer (testa) surrounding the kernel, and the soft kernel portions of the seed from four mango cultivars. the amplitude of the signal in the epidermal layer and seed cover showed a dose-dependent increase over control values. Qualitatively, however, no new signal was observed following irradiation, except that line width increased by 50%. Methyl cellosolve washing greatly reduced the intensity of the endogenous and radiation (1.0 kGy)-induced ESR signals in the seed cover; results suggest phenolic substances as the source of free radicals. the similarity of naturally occurring ESR signals to that induced by irradiation seems to restrict the practical utility of this method in irradiated mangoes

  2. A new species of Procontarinia (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) damaging fruit of mango, Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae), in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Ke-Long; Wang, Hao; Wei, De-Wei; Mo, Jian-You; Wang, Yuan-Hong; Bu, Wen-Jun; Kolesik, Peter

    2018-04-23

    Larvae of a previously unknown species of gall midge were found feeding on young fruit of mango, Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae), in Guangxi Autonomous Region in southern China, causing severe damage to the crop. The new species is named Procontarinia fructiculi Jiao, Wang, Bu Kolesik, its morphology is described, the basic biology is given, and the Cytochrome Oxidase subunit I (COI) mitochondrial gene segment is sequenced and compared to other congeners. Procontarinia contains now 16 described species, each feeding on mango. All but three species cause variously shaped galls on leaves, while P. mangiferae (Felt) malforms inflorescence and young leaves, and two species feed on fruit - P. frugivora Gagné causing deep lesions and P. fructiculi sp. nov. tunnel-like holes. Of the two fruit-feeding species, P. frugivora is confined to the Philippines while the new species has thus far been recorded only from southern China.

  3. TRANSCRIPTOME DYNAMICS IN MANGO FRUIT PEEL REVEALS MECHANISMS OF CHILLING STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velu Sivankalyani

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cold storage is considered the most effective method for prolonging fresh produce storage. However, subtropical fruit is sensitive to cold. Symptoms of chilling injury in mango include red and black spots that start from discolored lenticels and develop into pitting. The response of ‘Keitt’ mango fruit to chilling stress was monitored by transcriptomic, physiological and microscopic analyses. Transcriptomic changes in the mango fruit peel were evaluated during optimal (12°C and suboptimal (5°C cold storage. Two days of chilling stress upregulated genes involved in the plant stress response, including those encoding transmembrane receptors, calcium-mediated signal transduction, NADPH oxidase, MAP kinases and WRKYs, which can lead to cell death. Indeed, cell death was observed around the discolored lenticels after 19 days of cold storage at 5°C. Localized cell death and cuticular opening in the lumen of discolored lenticels were correlated with increased general decay during shelf-life storage, possibly due to fungal penetration. We also observed increased phenolics accumulation around the discolored lenticels, which was correlated with the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids that were probably transported from the resin ducts. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed during chilling injury by both the biochemical malondialdehyde method and a new non-destructive luminescent technology, correlated to upregulation of the α-linolenic acid oxidation pathway. Genes involved in sugar metabolism were also induced, possibly to maintain osmotic balance. This analysis provides an in-depth characterization of mango fruit response to chilling stress and could lead to the development of new tools, treatments and strategies to prolong cold storage of subtropical fruit.

  4. Transcriptome Dynamics in Mango Fruit Peel Reveals Mechanisms of Chilling Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Sela, Noa; Feygenberg, Oleg; Zemach, Hanita; Maurer, Dalia; Alkan, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Cold storage is considered the most effective method for prolonging fresh produce storage. However, subtropical fruit is sensitive to cold. Symptoms of chilling injury (CI) in mango include red and black spots that start from discolored lenticels and develop into pitting. The response of ‘Keitt’ mango fruit to chilling stress was monitored by transcriptomic, physiological, and microscopic analyses. Transcriptomic changes in the mango fruit peel were evaluated during optimal (12°C) and suboptimal (5°C) cold storage. Two days of chilling stress upregulated genes involved in the plant stress response, including those encoding transmembrane receptors, calcium-mediated signal transduction, NADPH oxidase, MAP kinases, and WRKYs, which can lead to cell death. Indeed, cell death was observed around the discolored lenticels after 19 days of cold storage at 5°C. Localized cell death and cuticular opening in the lumen of discolored lenticels were correlated with increased general decay during shelf-life storage, possibly due to fungal penetration. We also observed increased phenolics accumulation around the discolored lenticels, which was correlated with the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids that were probably transported from the resin ducts. Increased lipid peroxidation was observed during CI by both the biochemical malondialdehyde method and a new non-destructive luminescent technology, correlated to upregulation of the α-linolenic acid oxidation pathway. Genes involved in sugar metabolism were also induced, possibly to maintain osmotic balance. This analysis provides an in-depth characterization of mango fruit response to chilling stress and could lead to the development of new tools, treatments and strategies to prolong cold storage of subtropical fruit. PMID:27812364

  5. Ameliorating effects of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit on plasma ethanol level in a mouse model assessed with 1H-NMR based metabolic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Hyun; K. Cho, Somi; Min, Tae-Sun; Kim, Yujin; Yang, Seung-Ok; Kim, Hee-Su; Hyun, Sun-Hee; Kim, Hana; Kim, Young-Suk; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2011-01-01

    The ameliorating effects of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) flesh and peel samples on plasma ethanol level were investigated using a mouse model. Mango fruit samples remarkably decreased mouse plasma ethanol levels and increased the activities of alcohol dehydrogenase and acetaldehyde dehydrogenase. The 1H-NMR-based metabolomic technique was employed to investigate the differences in metabolic profiles of mango fruits, and mouse plasma samples fed with mango fruit samples. The partial least squares-discriminate analysis of 1H-NMR spectral data of mouse plasma demonstrated that there were clear separations among plasma samples from mice fed with buffer, mango flesh and peel. A loading plot demonstrated that metabolites from mango fruit, such as fructose and aspartate, might stimulate alcohol degradation enzymes. This study suggests that mango flesh and peel could be used as resources for functional foods intended to decrease plasma ethanol level after ethanol uptake. PMID:21562641

  6. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Kent fruit mesocarp de novo transcriptome assembly identifies gene families important for ripening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit ripening is a physiological and biochemical process genetically programmed to regulate fruit quality parameters like firmness, flavor, odor and color, as well as production of ethylene in climacteric fruit. In this study, a transcriptomic analysis of mango (Mangifera indica L.) mesocarp cv. "K...

  7. Tree age affects physicochemical, functional quality and storability of Amrapali mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Nirmal Kumar; Asrey, Ram

    2017-12-12

    The effect of tree age on physicochemical quality attributes and storage behaviour of Amrapali mango fruit was evaluated. Physiologically mature fruits were harvested from 6-, 18- and 30-year-old trees and kept for ripening under ambient conditions (temperature 35 ± 3 °C, relative humidity 60 ± 5%). Observations were recorded at 3-day intervals. Highest total soluble solids and total sugars were found in the fruit sourced from 18-year-old trees. At the end of storage, least titratable acidity (0.17%) and higher carotenoids (10.86 mg 100 g -1 ) were found in 30-year-old tree fruits during the last day of storage. Highest total phenols (TP) (251.33 μg gallic acid g -1 ), antioxidant capacity (AC) (5.63 μmol Trolox g -1 ) and ascorbic acid (AA) (31.13 mg 100 g -1 ) were reported in fruits from younger trees of 6 years old. Maximum respiratory and ethylene evolution peak was observed in fruits obtained from oldest trees, whereas least activities of pectin methyl esterase (0.31 μmol min -1 g -1 fresh weight) and polygalacturonase (53.67 μg galacturonic acid g -1 h -1 ) were observed in 6-year-old tree fruits at the end of the 9-day storage period. Higher total soluble solids and total sugars were found in fruit harvested from middle-age-group (18-year-old) trees during the entire storage period of 9 days. Most of the functional parameters, such as TP, AC and AA, were observed to be higher in fruits from younger (6-year-old) trees. The obtained results revealed that produce from middle-age-group (18-year-old) Amrapali mango orchards suit consumers' and processors' requirements. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Evaluation of essential oil components from the fruit peelings of sindhri and langra varieties of mango (mangifera indica L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, F. S.; Tahir, S. S.; Jilani, N. S.; Khokhar, A. L.; Rajput, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate essential oil contents found in the fruit peelings of the two varieties of Mango (Mangifera indica L.), belonging to family Anacardiaceae which is commonly called Cashew family. Genus Mangifera has about forty species in S.E. Asia and Indo Malaya region. Several Mango varieties are cultivated in many areas of Pakistan. For this study GC-MS was used for the characterization of the extracted essential oil. Two Mango varieties namely, Sindhri and Langra were selected from Mirpurkhas district. Essential oil was extracted from Mango peelings by hydro distillation method. The total 34 essential oil components ranging between 0.16-49.4% identified from the Sindhri and Langra Mango varieties. Bicyclo [4.1.0] hept-3-ene, 3, 7, 7-trimethyl-, (1S) was found abundant in both varieties with 49.46% and 47.93%, respectively. Yield of essential oil was found to be 3.25% in fresh Mango fruit peelings of Sindhri, whereas 1.04% was present in Langra variety. Result of present study indicated that peelings of Mango varieties could be used as a source of many useful components. (author)

  9. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  10. Pre and post harvest IPM for the mango fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verghese, Abraham; Sreedevi, K.; Nagaraju, D.K., E-mail: avergis@iihr.ernet.i [Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Bangalore, Karnataka (India)

    2006-07-01

    The fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) is a major pest of mango in India. So, investigations were carried out to standardize an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) for fruit fly-free and residue-free mango fruits. The study required orchard and laboratory studies, which were conducted on the commercial variety Banganapalli, at the Indian Institute of Horticultural Research, Hessaraghatta Lake P.O., Bangalore, India, during 2004 and 2005. Results showed that a pre harvest IPM combination of male annihilation technique (MAT) (using methyl eugenol as a lure) + sanitation brought down B. dorsalis infestation to 5.00% from an infestation ranging from 17 to 66% in control in both years. An additional cover spray of Decamethrin 2.8EC 0.5ml/l (which is half the recommended dose) + Azadirachtin (0.03 %) 2ml/l (neem based botanical) gave 100% control in both the years. Post harvest treatments with hot water at 48 degree C for 60 and 75 min resulted in 100% control at both the time regimes in 2004 and 2005. The untreated fruits, which were also exposed to gravid females (but not treated in hot water) showed 30% and 5.5% infestations, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. (author)

  11. Fruit yield and root system distribution of 'Tommy Atkins' mango under different irrigation regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo R. dos Santos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the fruit yield and the distribution of 'Tommy Atkins' mango root system under different irrigation regimes in the semiarid region of Bahia. The experimental design was completely randomized with five treatments and three replicates: 1 - Irrigation supplying 100% of ETc in phases I, II and III; 2 - Regulated deficit irrigation (RDI supplying 50% of ETc in phase I (beginning of flowering to early fruit growth; 3 - RDI supplying 50% ETc in phase II (start of expansion until the beginning of physiological maturity; 4 - RDI supplying 50% ETc in phase III (physiological mature fruits; 5 - No irrigation during all three phases. The regulated deficit irrigation supplying 50% of the ETc during phase I and II provided larger root length density of 'Tommy Atkins' mango. Regardless of management strategy, the roots were developed in all evaluated soil volume and the highest density is concentrated from 0.50 to 1.50 m distance from the trunk and in 0.20 to 0.90 m depth in the soil, that suggests this region to be the best place for fertilizer application as well for soil water sensor placement. The application of RDI during fruit set does not influence either root distribution or production. Root system and crop production is significantly reduced under no irrigation conditions.

  12. Grower perception of the significance of weaver ants as a fruit fly deterrent in Tanzanian smallholder mango production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina; Msogoya, Theodosy; Offenberg, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Managed populations of weaver ants in mango trees have been used successfully in Australia, SE Asia and parts of Western Africa to deter fruit flies from ovipositing in ripening fruits. The presence of indigenous weaver ants in mango trees of smallholder growers in Tanzania offers the possibility...... of exploiting them as an affordable, environmentally -friendly method to improve marketable fruit yield and quality. In a preliminary interview study in a mango-growing region of rural Tanzania, the farmers were not convinced of any beneficial, deterrent effect attributable to the indigenous weaver ants...... the development of a significant proportion of any deposited eggs. Subsequent field studies supported the grower perceptions as they recorded only an erratic and limited deterrent effect....

  13. Biocontrol of Postharvest Anthracnose of Mango Fruit with Debaryomyces Nepalensis and Effects on Storage Quality and Postharvest Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shanshan; Wan, Bin; Feng, Shuhan; Shao, Yuanzhi

    2015-11-01

    Anthracnose is presently recognized as one of the most important postharvest disease of mango worldwide. To control the disease, chemical fungicides for a long time was widely used among fruit farmers, but recently found that pathogen had developed increasingly resistance to it. With people's growing desire of healthy and green food, finding new and environmentally friendly biological control approach was very necessary. In this paper, we provided a kind of new antagonistic yeast which enriched the strain resources and the efficacy of Debaryomyces nepalensis against postharvest anthracnose of mango fruit and the influence on quality parameters were investigated. The results showed that the decay incidence and lesion diameter of postharvest anthracnose of mango treated by D. nepalensis were significantly reduced compared with the control fruit stored at 25 °C for 30 d or at 15 °C for 40 d, and the higher concentration of D. nepalensis was, the better the efficacy of the biocontrol was. Study also found that 1 h was the best treatment duration and antagonistic yeast inoculated earlier had good biocontrol effect on anthracnose. Meanwhile, treatment by D. nepalensis could significantly reduce postharvest anthracnose of mango, delay the decrease in firmness, TSS, TA, and ascorbic acid value, and do not impair surface color during postharvest storage. Moreover, the increase in MDA (malondialdehyde) content and increase in cell membrane permeability of fruit treated by D. nepalensis was highly inhibited. The results suggested D. nepalensis treatment could not only maintain storage quality of mango fruit, but also decrease the decay incidence to anthracnose disease. All these results indicated that D. nepalensis has great potential for development of commercial formulations to control postharvest pathogens of mango fruit. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Chilling injury in mangoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arafat, L.A.E.T.

    2005-01-01

    At present, the value and production quantity of mango fruits are increasing worldwide. Many studies emphasize how chilling injury phenomena affect the quality of tropical fruits, such as mango, during postharvest handling, transport, and storage. Since mango is one of the most favored and popular

  15. Response of the physiological parameters of mango fruit (transpiration, water relations and antioxidant system) to its light and temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léchaudel, Mathieu; Lopez-Lauri, Félicie; Vidal, Véronique; Sallanon, Huguette; Joas, Jacques

    2013-04-15

    Depending on the position of the fruit in the tree, mango fruit may be exposed to high temperature and intense light conditions that may lead to metabolic and physiological disorders and affect yield and quality. The present study aimed to determine how mango fruit adapted its functioning in terms of fruit water relations, epicarp characteristics and the antioxidant defence system in peel, to environmental conditions. The effect of contrasted temperature and light conditions was evaluated under natural solar radiation and temperature by comparing well-exposed and shaded fruit at three stages of fruit development. The sun-exposed and shaded peels of the two sides of the well-exposed fruit were also compared. Depending on fruit position within the canopy and on the side of a well-exposed fruit, the temperature gradient over a day affected fruit characteristics such as transpiration, as revealed by the water potential gradient as a function of the treatments, and led to a significant decrease in water conductance for well-exposed fruits compared to fruits within the canopy. Changes in cuticle thickness according to fruit position were consistent with those of fruit water conductance. Osmotic potential was also affected by climatic environment and harvest stage. Environmental conditions that induced water stress and greater light exposure, like on the sunny side of well-exposed fruit, increased the hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde and total and reduced ascorbate contents, as well as SOD, APX and MDHAR activities, regardless of the maturity stage. The lowest values were measured in the peel of the shaded fruit, that of the shaded side of well-exposed fruit being intermediate. Mango fruits exposed to water-stress-induced conditions during growth adapt their functioning by reducing their transpiration. Moreover, oxidative stress was limited as a consequence of the increase in antioxidant content and enzyme activities. This adaptive response of mango fruit to its

  16. 75 FR 34422 - Notice of Availability of a Pest Risk Analysis for the Importation of Fresh Mango Fruit From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ...] Notice of Availability of a Pest Risk Analysis for the Importation of Fresh Mango Fruit From Pakistan...: Notice. SUMMARY: We are advising the public that we have prepared a pest risk analysis that evaluates the... phytosanitary measures will be sufficient to mitigate the pest risk. We are making the pest risk analysis...

  17. 75 FR 52712 - Notice of Decision To Issue Permits for the Importation of Fresh Mango Fruit From Pakistan Into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... continental United States of fresh mango fruit from Pakistan. Based on the findings of a pest risk analysis..., based on the findings of a pest risk analysis, can be safely imported subject to one or more of the... publishes a notice in the Federal Register announcing the availability of the pest risk analysis that...

  18. Host plant records of the Mango Fruit Fly, Bactrocera (Bactrocera) frauenfeldi (Schiner) (Diptera: Tephritidae), version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera (Bactrocera) frauenfeldi (Schiner, 1868), commonly known as the mango fruit fly, is regulated through the Plant Protection Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7701-7772) and relevant Parts and Subparts of the Code of Federal Regulations (7 CFR – Agriculture). Although, to date, the USDA PestID has no i...

  19. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment against the invader fruit fly (Bactrocera Invadens, Drew) in mangoes (Mangifera Indica L,)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odai, B.T.

    2010-06-01

    The detection of the African invader fly, Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta and White, in Ghana has led to limitations in the export of mango fruits from Ghana to other countries. The limitations ranging from increased control costs to outright rejection of exports has necessitated a study in the area of quarantine treatment. A study was conducted to ascertain the effectiveness of gamma radiation for control of Bactrocera invadens in fruit destined for export. Pupae were obtained from the incubation of mango fruits collected from various locations. Adults were reared and infestation levels were determined after fruits were exposed to 5, 10, 20 females in different cages. Late instar larvae in fruits were irradiated at 15, 25, 35, 45, 50, 60 and 75 Gy to determine an effective dose for B. invadens. The mortality of the fly was determined at the various doses to obtain a probit 9 figure of 68.06 Gy (rounded to 70 Gy). The confirmatory test for 3050 larvae endorsed the effective dose as the probit 9 dose. Non-infested mature green export grade mango fruits were irradiated with 0, 70 and 150 Gy to determine its effect on ascorbic acid and total acidity content, sweetness, colour, juiciness, sourness, aroma and firmness of the mango fruits. Ascorbic acid and total acidity were not irradiation dependent. Varietal differences (p 0.05) by irradiation. Varietal differences did not affect the acceptability of the sweetness, sourness and colour of the fruits (p>0.05). Storage days significantly affected (p<0.05) the acceptability of all the sensory attributes. (au)

  20. Application of 1-methylcyclopropene on mango fruit (Cv. Kesar): potential for shelf life enhancement and retention of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhale, B K; Gaikwad, S S; Chavan, R F

    2018-02-01

    The present investigation was carried out to study the effect of gaseous application of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) on quality and shelf life of mango fruits of Cv. Kesar. The freshly harvested matured mango fruits were washed, cleaned and treated with fungicide at 500 ppm concentration for 10 min. The fruits were then subjected to 1-MCP treatment at different concentrations (500, 1000, 1500, 2000 ppb) and exposed for 18 and 24 h at 20 °C temperature in an air tight chamber along with control sample. The results indicated that the ripening in the early stages of mango was delayed by 1-MCP and shelf life of the fruits was increased with increase in the concentration of 1-MCP, also the physico-chemical changes such as percent physiological loss in weight of fruit, total soluble solids and colour was slowly increased and ascorbic acid content was effectively reduced. 1-MCP treatment of 2000 ppb for 24 h exposure time gave the best results for percent physiological loss in weight of fruit from 6.1 to 13% and ascorbic acid content from 80.28 to 22.34 mg/100 g, total soluble solids increased from 7.3 to 16.23 °Brix and the colour was improved from 50.9 to 68.6 h with shelf life of 20 days.

  1. Evidence for potential of managing some african fruit fly species (Diptera: Tephritidae) using the mango fruit fly host-marking pheromone

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated conspecific and heterospecific oviposition host discrimination among four economically important fruit fly pests of mango in Africa (Ceratitis capitata, Wiedemann; C. fasciventris, Bezzi; C. rosa, Karsch, and C. cosyra, Walker) with regard to host-marking behavior and fecal matter aq...

  2. Heat unit accumulation and inflorescence and fruit development in ‘Ubá’ mango trees grown in Visconde do Rio Branco-MG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Moreira Carvalho Lemos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There are little information in the scientific literature on flowering and fruiting of ‘Ubá’ mango trees. These information enables to know the proportion of hermaphrodite flowers in inflorescence, fruit set percentage and developmental stages of the fruit. In this study evaluations on inflorescence and fruit development of the ‘Ubá’ mango tree (Mangifera indica L. were carried out, as well as the determination of the required number of heat units for full fruit development. Thirty branches whose terminal buds were swollen were selected from five mango trees. With the aid of a camera and a caliper, the panicle and fruit development were evaluated weekly until full fruit development. A digital thermometer was used to record ambient temperatures during fruit development in order to estimate the number of heat units required for complete development of the fruits. Male and hermaphrodite flowers of the panicles were also identified and counted. The developmental cycle of ‘Ubá’ mango from the beginning of apical bud swelling to commercial harvest of the fruit lasted 168 days in 2011 and 154 days in 2012. The number of hermaphrodite flowers and the percentage of fruit set in the inflorescence in 2011 were 32.3 and 0.066%, respectively; and 122.1 and 0.099% in 2012, respectively. There was accumulation of 3,173 heat units from flower bud swelling to full development of the ‘Ubá’ mangoes.

  3. Use of HPLC- and GC-QTOF to determine hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols in mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) and its by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Ana; Verardo, Vito; Diaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana M

    2017-10-01

    Mango industry processing generates high quantities of mango by-products such as peels and seeds (35%-60% of the fruit). Indeed, it is known that mango and its by-products contain different families of bioactive compounds that possess several health benefits. Thus, the aim of this study has been the determination of different families of phenolic derivatives (free and bound phenolic compounds and alk(en)ylresorcinols (ARs)) in mango edible part and its by-products (peel, seed and seed husk) from three different cultivars. This is the first study that evaluates the phenolic compounds and ARs in the four fractions of mango of three different cultivars. Special attention has been paid to the determination of anthocyanins and ARs, because these families of compounds had not been studied in depth in mango. In fact, petunidin rutinoside-(p-coumaric acid) gallate was found in mango pulp, peel, seed and seed husk of the three cultivars and, it had never been described in mango before. It is also important to highlight that this is the first time that the identification and quantification of ARs have been performed in mango seed and seed husk; besides, four and five out of eleven alk(en)ylresorcinols detected in peel and pulp, respectively, were identified for the first time in these mango fractions. Furthermore, antioxidant activity was measured by ABTS and FRAP assays. Seed free and bound phenolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  5. Antifungal activity of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) in postharvest mango fruit and its possible mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangbin; Lei, Huanhuan; Ma, Xiuyan; Lai, Tongfei; Song, Hongmiao; Shi, Xuequn; Li, Jiangkuo

    2017-01-16

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides is one of the most important postharvest diseases in mango fruit, often causing huge economic losses. In this study, the effect of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) against anthracnose in postharvest mango fruit and the mechanisms involved were investigated. 1-MCP induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, damaged the mitochondria and destroyed the integrity of plasma membrane of spores of C. gloeosporioides, significantly suppressing spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides. 1-MCP also decreased the decay incidence and lesion expansion of mango fruit caused by C. gloeosporioides. For the first time this study demonstrated that 1-MCP suppressed anthracnose of postharvest mango fruit by directly inhibiting spore germination and mycelial growth of C. gloeosporioides, thus providing a promising strategy for disease control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cloning and characterization of differentially expressed genes of internal breakdown in mango fruit (Mangifera indica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthaiah, Hemanth K N; Ravishankar, Kundapura V; Shivashankara, Kodthalu S; Anand, Lalitha; Narayanaswamy, Pappana; Mukunda, Gullarachikkanahalli; Prasad, Trichy G

    2006-04-01

    Internal breakdown in mango fruits has become a major concern in recent years. This disorder renders the fruits unfit for human consumption. The overall loss due to this disorder is about 35-55%. Environmental and physiological factors like high temperature, humidity, respiration and low transpiration rates have been attributed to cause spongy tissue due to reduced loss of heat from fruits. Biochemical studies have shown that there is a reduction in pH, total soluble solids, ascorbic acid, total sugars and carotenoids, low reducing and non-reducing sugar contents, lower amylase and invertase activities and high acid and starch content in spongy tissue affected pulp. There are no reports on molecular studies to determine changes in gene expression in these tissues. The present study was conducted using PCR based subtractive hybridization and RNA gel blot analysis of a few selected genes. The latter showed a higher expression of catalase, ubiquitin, alcohol dehydrogenase, coproporphyrinogen oxidase and keratin associated protein. A lower expression of ribosomal gene, fructose bisphosphate aldolase and cysthathionine gamma synthase was also noticed in spongy tissue. Biochemical studies indicated a lower amylase activity and a lower content of the total and reducing sugars in spongy tissue as compared to healthy tissue. Analyses of results indicate that oxidative stress may be one of the causes for formation of spongy tissue, which affects the expression of many genes. The role of these genes in spongy tissue formation is discussed.

  7. PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF SELECTED MANGO (MANGIFERA INDICA L.) AND AVOCADO (PERSEA AMERICANA) FRUITS IN ILLU ABABOR ZONE, OROMIA REGIONAL STATE, ETHIOPIA

    OpenAIRE

    Lalisa Wakjira Duresa1*, Daniel Manaye2

    2017-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) and Avocado (Persea americana) fruits are rich in bioactive molecules that protect human cells against the detrimental effect of free radicals. The phytochemical analysis revealed the Presence of alkaloids, terpenoids, saponins, tannins, phenolics and flavonoids in both fruits. The free radical scavenging activity using total antioxidant capacity of the phosphomolybdenum method and hydrogen peroxide method were carried out on the water extracts of mango and avocado...

  8. Physiological attributes of fungi associated with stem end rot of mango (mangifera indica l.) cultivars in postharvest fruit losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maqsood, A.; Nafees, M.; Ashraf, I.; Qureshi, R.

    2014-01-01

    Stem end rot majorly contribute in post-harvest losses of mango during storage. Maximum disease incidence (70%) was recorded in Sindhari cultivar followed by Chaunsa (64%), Fajri (62.5%) and 50% in both Langra and Anwar ratol. In vitro studies were carried out to identifyfungal pathogens responsible for rotting and decaying mango fruits during storage along with isolation and testing their pathogencity on healthy fruits. Results revealed that all selected commercial mango varieties infected by stem end rot. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Lasidodiplodia theobromae, Alternaria alternate, Aspergillus niger, Dothiorella domonicana were identified from Sindhri mango fruits, in which of C. gloeosporioides was found the most prevalent. Phomopsis mangiferae, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Altrnaria spp. Aspergillus niger, A. flavis were found in Chaunsa and Phomopsis mangiferae was most prevalent, while Botryodiplodia theobromae caused infection to locally cosumed Fajri variety. Effect of abiotic factors like pH, temperature, light intensity and carbon sources were tested against these isolates. The most efficient carbon source was glucose, which supported the maximum growth of the P. mangiferae and L. Theobromae, while C. gloeosporioides had maximum growth on lactose. All fungi had maximum growth at pH range of 6-6.5 and temperature range of 25-30 degree C on PDA medium. Alternate cycles of 12hr light and 12 hr darkness resulted maximum mycelial growth as compared to the 24 hour continuous exposure to either dark or light. Susceptibility of fungi with cultivars and intensity of spread under specific abiotic conditions provides basic information in this paper to minimize stem end rot of mango in field and storage conditions. (author)

  9. A study of the distribution and uptake of boron in mango fruits using neutron-capture-radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loria, G.; Jimenez, R.; Gallardo, M.; Martini, F.; Thellier, M.

    1992-01-01

    The method of neutron-capture-radiography (NCR) was used to study the distribution of boron in mango fruit. There was a regular decrease of the concentration of natural boron from the skin (83.9 ppm, dry weight) to the interior of the fruit (2.4 ppm, dry weight, 5.6 mm deep in the fruit). When drops of a solution of ( 10 B)BO 3 H 3 were placed on the fruit surface, boron accumulated in restricted zones, within the fruit skin, which apparently corresponded to skin secretory-glands. The apparent coefficient of diffusion of boric acid from these zones of high boron accumulation to the interior of the fruit was of the order of 1.6 x 10 -12 m 2 s -1

  10. The chitosan affects severely the carbon metabolism in mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Palmer) fruit during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme Silva, Gláucia Michelle; Silva, Willian Batista; Medeiros, David B; Salvador, Acácio Rodrigues; Cordeiro, Maria Helena Menezes; da Silva, Natália Martins; Santana, Diederson Bortolini; Mizobutsi, Gisele Polete

    2017-12-15

    Mango is a highly perishable fruit with a short post-harvest time due to the intense metabolic activity after harvesting. In attempt to evaluate the effects of chitosan in mango fruits, it was treated with 0%, 1%, 2% or 3% of chitosan solutions, placed into plastic trays, and stored at room temperature. Changes in physical and chemical parameters were evaluated. Chitosan delayed the climacteric peak, water loss and firmness. Further, few changes in soluble solid content, titratable acidity, pH of the pulp as well as in sugar content and decreased starch degradation were observed. Altogether, our results suggest chitosan edible coating effectively prolongs the quality attributes, affecting basic mitochondrial respiration and starch degradation rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Water dynamics in mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit during the young and mature fruit seasons as measured by the stem heat balance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higuchi, H.; Sakuratani, T.

    2006-01-01

    Water flows in the stem and peduncle of mango fruit were monitored, and the surface transpiration from the fruit was measured during the fruit-growing season. The stem heat balance method was used on the peduncle to monitor the inward water flow during the nighttime, and the reverse water flow from the fruit during the daytime when the stem transpiration water flow increased. This diurnal fluctuation pattern in the water flow was more evident in mature fruit than in young fruit. In mature fruit, the daily water loss due to the reverse flow was estimated to be 3% of the fruit weight. The reverse flow water loss and transpired water loss were compensated for by nocturnal inward water flow, through the peduncle, of 30 g over 15 h. These results were well supported by measurements of fruit dimensions, which indicated a circadian rhythm of contraction and expansion. The reverse flow amounted to 80% of the water loss from the daytime contraction of the fruit, a much greater proportion than the fruit surface transpiration

  12. Yield and quality of pectins extractable from the peels of thai mango cultivars depending on fruit ripeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisakulwat, Suparat; Nagel, Andreas; Sruamsiri, Pittaya; Carle, Reinhold; Neidhart, Sybille

    2008-11-26

    Pectins, recovered from the peels of four mango ( Mangifera indica L.) cultivars by mimicking industrial techniques, were evaluated in terms of yield, composition, macromolecular properties, and technofunctional quality. Freeze-dried peels of mature-green fruits, after major mesocarp softening, and at full ripeness were extracted using hot acid. The pectins were precipitated in propan-2-ol and their crude yields quantified as alcohol-insoluble substance. Like apple pomace, the dried peels provided hardly acetylated (DAc implied by arabinose/galactose ratios of 8-15 and 33-56 mol/100 mol, respectively. Limited galacturonic acid contents made the mango peel pectins less valuable than commercial apple pectins with regard to gelling capacity and thickening properties. Whereas starch and matrix glycan fragments almost completely degraded during ripening, depolymerization of pectins and galactans was insignificant. Technofunctional properties, modulated by extraction at different pH values, were ascribed to structural differences influencing macromolecular entanglements.

  13. Carotenoid pixels characterization under color space tests and RGB formulas for mesocarp of mango's fruits cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammad, Ahmed Yahya; Kassim, Farid Saad Eid Saad

    2010-01-01

    This study experimented the pulp (mesocarp) of fourteen cultivars were healthy ripe of Mango fruits (Mangifera indica L.) selected after picking from Mango Spp. namely Taimour [Ta], Dabsha [Da], Aromanis [Ar], Zebda [Ze], Fagri Kelan [Fa], Alphonse [Al], Bulbek heart [Bu], Hindi- Sinnara [Hi], Compania [Co], Langra [La], Mestikawi [Me], Ewais [Ew], Montakhab El Kanater [Mo] and Mabroka [Ma] . Under seven color space tests included (RGB: Red, Green and Blue), (CMY: Cyan, Magenta and Yellow), (CMY: Cyan, Magenta and Yellow), (HSL: Hue, Saturation and Lightness), (CMYK%: Cyan%, Magenta%, Yellow% and Black%), (HSV: Hue, Saturation and Value), (HºSB%: Hueº, Saturation% and Brightness%) and (Lab). (CMY: Cyan, Magenta and Yellow), (HSL: Hue, Saturation and Lightness), (CMYK%: Cyan%, Magenta%, Yellow% and Black%), (HSV: Hue, Saturation and Value), (HºSB%: Hueº, Saturation% and Brightness%) and (Lab). Addition, nine formula of color space tests included (sRGB 0÷1, CMY, CMYK, XYZ, CIE-L*ab, CIE-L*CH, CIE-L*uv, Yxy and Hunter-Lab) and (RGB 0÷FF/hex triplet) and Carotenoid Pixels Scale. Utilizing digital color photographs as tool for obtainment the natural color information for each cultivar then the result expounded with chemical pigment estimations. Our location study in the visual yellow to orange color degrees from the visible color of electromagnetic spectrum in wavelength between (~570 to 620) nm and frequency between (~480 to 530) THz. The results found carotene very strong influence in band Red while chlorophyll (a & b) was very lower subsequently, the values in band Green was depressed. Meanwhile, the general ratios percentage for carotenoid pixels in bands Red, Green and Blue were 50%, 39% and 11% as orderliness opposite the ratios percentage for carotene, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b which were 63%, 22% and 16% approximately. According to that the pigments influence in all color space tests and RGB formulas. Band Yellow% in color test (CMYK%) as signature

  14. 2D-DIGE analysis of mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit reveals major proteomic changes associated with ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jonathan de Magalhães; Toledo, Tatiana Torres; Nogueira, Silvia Beserra; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana; Lajolo, Franco Maria; do Nascimento, João Roberto Oliveira

    2012-06-18

    A comparative proteomic investigation between the pre-climacteric and climacteric mango fruits (cv. Keitt) was performed to identify protein species with variable abundance during ripening. Proteins were phenol-extracted from fruits, cyanine-dye-labeled, and separated on 2D gels at pH 4-7. Total spot count of about 373 proteins spots was detected in each gel and forty-seven were consistently different between pre-climacteric and climacteric fruits and were subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. Functional classification revealed that protein species involved in carbon fixation and hormone biosynthesis decreased during ripening, whereas those related to catabolism and the stress-response, including oxidative stress and abiotic and pathogen defense factors, accumulated. In relation to fruit quality, protein species putatively involved in color development and pulp softening were also identified. This study on mango proteomics provides an overview of the biological processes that occur during ripening. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of nutritional and antioxidant properties of the tropical fruits banana, litchi, mango, papaya, passion fruit and pineapple cultivated in Réunion French Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Stanislas, Giovédie; Douraguia, Elisabeth; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-12-01

    Much attention is paid to the beneficial action of fruits against obesity-related oxidative stress. This study evaluated nutritional and antioxidant properties of banana, litchi, mango, papaya, passion fruit and pineapple from Réunion French Island. Results showed that total amounts of carbohydrates, vitamin C and carotenoids were 7.7-67.3g glucose equivalent, 4.7-84.9mg ascorbic acid equivalent and 26.6-3829.2μg β-carotene equivalent/100g fresh weight, respectively. Polyphenols were detected as the most abundant antioxidants (33.0-286.6mg gallic acid equivalent/100g fresh weight) with the highest content from passion fruit. UPLC-MS analysis led to identify epigallocatechin and quercetin derivatives from banana and litchi, ferulic, sinapic, syringic and gallic acids from pineapple and mango, and piceatannol from passion fruit. Polyphenol-rich extracts protected red blood cells and preadipose cells against oxidative stress. Altogether, these findings highlight nutritional benefits of French tropical fruits and their possible interest to improve antioxidant capacities of the body during obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative determination of allergenic 5-alk(en)ylresorcinols in mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel, pulp, and fruit products by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödler, Matthias; Reisenhauer, Katharina; Schieber, Andreas; Carle, Reinhold

    2009-05-13

    Despite a number of serious case reports of mango dermatitis, no attempts at the identification and quantification of allergenic 5-alk(en)ylresorcinols in mango fruits have so far been made. Therefore, total alk(en)ylresorcinol content and relative homologue composition in 13 mango peel samples and 7 samples of mango pulp were determined by HPLC and LC-MS/MS analyses. Furthermore, mango puree and nectar prepared on pilot plant scale were also analyzed and compared with commercially available thermally preserved products. Depending on cultivar, alk(en)ylresorcinol contents ranged from 79.3 to 1850.5 mg/kg of dry matter (DM) in mango peels and from 4.9 to 187.3 mg/kg of DM in samples of mango pulp. The profile of alk(en)ylresorcinols was found to be highly characteristic, with an average homologue composition of C15:0 (6.1%), C15:1 (1.7%), C17:0 (1.1%), C17:1 (52.5%), C17:2 (33.4%), C17:3 (2.4%), C19:1 (2.1%), and C19:2 (0.8%). Mango puree samples prepared from peeled and unpeeled fruits revealed contents of 3.8 and 12.3 mg/kg of fresh weight, respectively. Content and homologue composition were not significantly affected during puree processing and thermal preservation. In nectar samples prepared from peeled and unpeeled fruits, contents of 1.4 and 4.6 mg/L, respectively, were found.

  17. Quality and bioactive compounds in fruit of foreign accessions of mango conserved in an Active Germplasm Bank1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalita Passos Ribeiro

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterise the quality and levels of bioactive compounds in the fruit of 22 foreign accessions of the mango belonging to the Active Germplasm Bank of Embrapa Semiárido. Sixty fruits from each of the accessions: Florigon, Haden, 65, Irwin, M 13269, Momi-K, Scuper Many, Simmonds, Tommy Atkins, Van Dyke, Winter, Zill, Amrapali, Olour, Aplle DCG 406, Mon Amon DCG 407, Black Java, Kensington, Chené, Manila, Manzanillo and Maya, were harvested upon reaching physiological maturity, one half being analysed when harvested and the other half stored at ambient temperature (25.4 ± 2.9 ºC and 41 ± 9% RH until ripe. The experimental design was completely randomised in a 22 x 2 factorial (accession x maturity stage, with three replications of ten fruits. The accessions Chene, Momi-K and Van Dyke stood out for their physical attributes: weight, length, diameter and firmness of pulp, and for their good post-harvest conservation. The accession Amrapali was different because of its high levels of soluble solids, total soluble sugars, starch, ascorbic acid and carotenoids, suggesting a high potential for insertion into a breeding program aimed at the quality of the mango.

  18. Effect of the moisture content of forced hot air on the postharvest quality and bioactive compounds of mango fruit (Mangifera indica L. cv. Manila).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús; Yahia, Elhadi M

    2014-04-01

    The effectiveness of hot air treatments in controlling decay and insects in mango fruit has been demonstrated and has usually been assessed as a function of the temperature of the heated air and the duration of the treatment. However, the contribution of the moisture content of the heated air has received little attention, especially with regard to fruit quality. In this study, mango fruits (cv. Manila) at mature-green stage were treated with moist (95% relative humidity (RH)) or dry (50% RH) hot forced air (43 °C, at 2.5 m s(-1) for 220 min) and then held at 20 °C for 9 days and evaluated periodically. The heating rate was higher with moist air. Treatments with moist and dry air did not cause injury to the fruit. Treatment with moist air temporarily slowed down color development, softening, weight loss and β-carotene biosynthesis. This slowing down was clearly observed during the first 4-5 days at 20 °C. However, non-heated fruit and fruit heated with dry air showed similar quality at the end of storage. The moisture content of the heating air differentially modulated the postharvest ripening of 'Manila' mangoes. Moist air temporarily slowed down the ripening process of this mango cultivar. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Impact of fruit texture on the release and perception of aroma compounds during in vivo consumption using fresh and processed mango fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Adeline; Boulanger, Renaud; Lebrun, Marc; Maraval, Isabelle; Valette, Jérémy; Guichard, Élisabeth; Gunata, Ziya

    2018-01-15

    Two fresh (fresh cubic pieces, fresh puree) and two dried (dried cubic pieces, dried powder) products were prepared from a homogenous mango fruit batch to obtain four samples differing in texture. The aromatic profiles were determined by SAFE extraction technique and GC-MS analysis. VOCs released during consumption were trapped by a retronasal aroma-trapping device (RATD) and analysed by GC-MS. Twenty-one terpenes and one ester were identified from the exhaled nose-space. They were amongst the major mango volatile compounds, 10 of which were already reported as being potential key flavour compounds in mango. The in vivo release of aroma compounds was affected by the matrix texture. The intact samples (fresh and dried cubic pieces) released significantly more aroma compounds than disintegrated samples (fresh puree, dried powder). The sensory descriptive analysis findings were in close agreement with the in vivo aroma release data regarding fresh products, in contrast to the dried products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL QUALITY OF MANGO ‘Ubá’ (Mangifera indica L. FRUITS SUBMITTED TO IMPACT MECHANICAL DAMAGE AT HARVEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANÁLIA LÚCIA VIEIRA PACHECO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of ‘Ubá’ mango fruit submitted to mechanical damage. The fruits were harvested in the 2012/2013 harvest, and let to drop once on a flat, hard surface, simulating the harvesting process of ‘Ubá’ mango, which is to drop all the fruits of a plant when they are physiologically mature. Treatments consisted of different drop heights (zero, one, two, three, four and five meters, totaling six treatments. After the fall, the fruits were submitted to ripening, and then evaluated for fresh mass loss (FML, presence of external lesions (PEL, presence of internal lesions (PIL, soluble solids content (SS,titratable acidity (TA, pH, SS/TA ratio and vitamin C. There was no difference between fresh weight loss of the dropped fruits and control. Regarding the presence of external and internal lesions, damage in fruits due to drop height tends to increase. The fruits that were not dropped presented higher SS content than the others, while those that fell from a height of 5 m had the vitamin C content reduced by 27.78% compared to control. The decrease in SS content and vitamin C was influenced by damage caused by the impact. It is concluded that mechanical damage caused by the impact interferes in the main attributes of quality of fruits and pulp of “Ubá” mango.

  1. Grower Perception of the Significance of Weaver Ants as a Fruit Fly Deterrent in Tanzanian Smallholder Mango Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Nina; Msogoya, Theodosy; Offenberg, Hans Joachim

    2017-01-01

    of exploiting them as an affordable, environmentally -friendly method to improve marketable fruit yield and quality. In a preliminary interview study in a mango-growing region of rural Tanzania, the farmers were not convinced of any beneficial, deterrent effect attributable to the indigenous weaver ants...... in their trees and were sceptical of any likely value as a biological control technique. Additionally, fruit fly infestation was not seen as a priority problem and subsequent enquiry and investigation showed that, fortuitously, traditional, local practices for storage and enhancing ripening prevented...... the development of a significant proportion of any deposited eggs. Subsequent field studies supported the grower perceptions as they recorded only an erratic and limited deterrent effect....

  2. Isolation and identification of host cues from mango, Mangifera indica, that attract gravid female oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Pagadala D Kamala; Woodcock, Christine M; Caulfield, John; Birkett, Michael A; Bruce, Toby J A

    2012-04-01

    The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, is an economically damaging, polyphagous pest of fruit crops in South-East Asia and Hawaii, and a quarantine pest in other parts of the world. The objective of our study was to identify new attractants for B. dorsalis from overripe mango fruits. Headspace samples of volatiles were collected from two cultivars of mango, 'Alphonso' and 'Chausa', and a strong positive behavioral response was observed when female B. dorsalis were exposed to these volatiles in olfactometer bioassays. Coupled GC-EAG with female B. dorsalis revealed 7 compounds from 'Alphonso' headspace and 15 compounds from 'Chausa' headspace that elicited an EAG response. The EAG-active compounds, from 'Alphonso', were identified, using GC-MS, as heptane, myrcene, (Z)-ocimene, (E)-ocimene, allo-ocimene, (Z)-myroxide, and γ-octalactone, with the two ocimene isomers being the dominant compounds. The EAG-active compounds from 'Chausa' were 3-hydroxy-2-butanone, 3-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl butanoate, ethyl methacrylate, ethyl crotonate, ethyl tiglate, 1-octen-3-ol, ethyl hexanoate, 3-carene, p-cymene, ethyl sorbate, α-terpinolene, phenyl ethyl alcohol, ethyl octanoate, and benzothiazole. Individual compounds were significantly attractive when a standard dose (1 μg on filter paper) was tested in the olfactometer. Furthermore, synthetic blends with the same concentration and ratio of compounds as in the natural headspace samples were highly attractive (P < 0.001), and in a choice test, fruit flies did not show any preference for the natural samples over the synthetic blends. Results are discussed in relation to developing a lure for female B. dorsalis to bait traps with.

  3. MiSNPDb: a web-based genomic resources of tropical ecology fruit mango (Mangifera indica L.) for phylogeography and varietal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iquebal, M A; Jaiswal, Sarika; Mahato, Ajay Kumar; Jayaswal, Pawan K; Angadi, U B; Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Nimisha; Singh, Anand K; Srivastav, Manish; Prakash, Jai; Singh, S K; Khan, Kasim; Mishra, Rupesh K; Rajan, Shailendra; Bajpai, Anju; Sandhya, B S; Nischita, Puttaraju; Ravishankar, K V; Dinesh, M R; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh; Sharma, Tilak R; Singh, Nagendra K

    2017-11-02

    Mango is one of the most important fruits of tropical ecological region of the world, well known for its nutritive value, aroma and taste. Its world production is >45MT worth >200 billion US dollars. Genomic resources are required for improvement in productivity and management of mango germplasm. There is no web-based genomic resources available for mango. Hence rapid and cost-effective high throughput putative marker discovery is required to develop such resources. RAD-based marker discovery can cater this urgent need till whole genome sequence of mango becomes available. Using a panel of 84 mango varieties, a total of 28.6 Gb data was generated by ddRAD-Seq approach on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. A total of 1.25 million SNPs were discovered. Phylogenetic tree using 749 common SNPs across these varieties revealed three major lineages which was compared with geographical locations. A web genomic resources MiSNPDb, available at http://webtom.cabgrid.res.in/mangosnps/ is based on 3-tier architecture, developed using PHP, MySQL and Javascript. This web genomic resources can be of immense use in the development of high density linkage map, QTL discovery, varietal differentiation, traceability, genome finishing and SNP chip development for future GWAS in genomic selection program. We report here world's first web-based genomic resources for genetic improvement and germplasm management of mango.

  4. Optimization and pilot-scale testing of modified atmosphere packaging of irradiated fresh 'Carabao' mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaptenco, K. F.; Lacao, M.A.J.; Esguerra, E.B.; Serrano, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) for fresh 'Carabao' mango was optimized with respect to the number of pinholes needed for a fixed respiration rate, fill weight, oxygen transmission rate (OTR), and bag surface area. Computer simulations showed that 38-mm polyethylene or 20-mm Zeolite film with 52 or 44 pinholes, respectively, could be used for packing 5 kg of fruit in a bag with a surface area of approximately 0.80 sq m if held at 12.5 deg C. Subsequent laboratory trials using fruits irradiated at 150-250 Gy showed that 50 pinholes made with a 26-gauge cold needle could be used for both films; O2 levels during storage were close to the recommended levels of 3-5%. Pilot-scale trials using fruits harvested during the on and off-season show that both irradiation at 150-250 Gy and MAP could retard ripening and reduce softening. After 4 wk of storage at 12.5 deg C, MAP fruits were at a half-ripe and slightly-firm stage of ripeness, with minimal development of disease. Sensory tests at the table-ripe stage showed that irradiated MAP-stored fruits were acceptable

  5. Effects of an African weaver ant, Oecophylla longinoda, in controlling mango fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mele, Paul; Vayssières, Jean-François; Van Tellingen, Esther; Vrolijks, Jan

    2007-06-01

    Six mango, Mangifera indica L., plantations around Parakou, northern Benin, were sampled at 2-wk intervals for fruit fly damage from early April to late May in 2005. Mean damage ranged from 1 to 24% with a weaver ant, Oecophylla longinoda (Latreille), being either abundant or absent. The fruit fly complex is made up of Ceratitis spp. and Bactrocera invadens Drew et al., a new invasive species in West Africa. In 2006, Ceratitis spp. peaked twice in the late dry season in early April and early May, whereas B. invadens populations quickly increased at the onset of the rains, from mid-May onward. Exclusion experiments conducted in 2006 with 'Eldon', 'Kent', and 'Gouverneur' confirmed that at high ant abundance levels, Oecophylla significantly reduced fruit fly infestation. Although fruit fly control methods are still at an experimental stage in this part of the world, farmers who tolerated weaver ants in their orchard were rewarded by significantly better fruit quality. Conservation biological control with predatory ants such as Oecophylla in high-value tree crops has great potential for African and Asian farmers. Implications for international research for development at the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research level are discussed.

  6. Antioxidant Properties and Hyphenated HPLC-PDA-MS Profiling of Chilean Pica Mango Fruits (Mangifera indica L. Cv. piqueño

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier E. Ramirez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant capacities and polyphenolic contents of two mango cultivars from northern Chile, one of them endemic of an oasis in the Atacama Desert, were compared for the first time. Twenty one phenolic compounds were detected in peel and pulp of mango fruits varieties Pica and Tommy Atkins by HPLC-PDA-MS and tentatively characterized. Eighteen compounds were present in Pica pulp (ppu, 13 in Pica peel (ppe 11 in Tommy Atkins pulp (tpu and 12 in Tommy Atkins peel (tpe. Three procyanidin dimers (peaks 6, 9 and 10, seven acid derivatives (peaks 1–4, 11, 20 and 21 and four xanthones were identified, mainly mangiferin (peak 12 and mangiferin gallate, (peak 7, which were present in both peel and pulp of the two studied species from northern Chile. Homomangiferin (peak 13 was also present in both fruit pulps and dimethylmangiferin (peak 14 was present only in Tommy pulp. Pica fruits showed better antioxidant capacities and higher polyphenolic content (73.76/32.23 µg/mL in the DPPH assay and 32.49/72.01 mg GAE/100 g fresh material in the TPC assay, for edible pulp and peel, respectively than Tommy Atkins fruits (127.22/46.39 µg/mL in the DPPH assay and 25.03/72.01 mg GAE/100 g fresh material in the TPC assay for pulp and peel, respectively. The peel of Pica mangoes showed also the highest content of phenolics (66.02 mg/100 g FW measured by HPLC-PDA. The HPLC generated fingerprint can be used to authenticate Pica mango fruits and Pica mango food products.

  7. Antioxidant properties and hyphenated HPLC-PDA-MS profiling of Chilean Pica mango fruits (Mangifera indica L. Cv. piqueño).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Javier E; Zambrano, Ricardo; Sepúlveda, Beatriz; Simirgiotis, Mario J

    2013-12-31

    Antioxidant capacities and polyphenolic contents of two mango cultivars from northern Chile, one of them endemic of an oasis in the Atacama Desert, were compared for the first time. Twenty one phenolic compounds were detected in peel and pulp of mango fruits varieties Pica and Tommy Atkins by HPLC-PDA-MS and tentatively characterized. Eighteen compounds were present in Pica pulp (ppu), 13 in Pica peel (ppe) 11 in Tommy Atkins pulp (tpu) and 12 in Tommy Atkins peel (tpe). Three procyanidin dimers (peaks 6, 9 and 10), seven acid derivatives (peaks 1-4, 11, 20 and 21) and four xanthones were identified, mainly mangiferin (peak 12) and mangiferin gallate, (peak 7), which were present in both peel and pulp of the two studied species from northern Chile. Homomangiferin (peak 13) was also present in both fruit pulps and dimethylmangiferin (peak 14) was present only in Tommy pulp. Pica fruits showed better antioxidant capacities and higher polyphenolic content (73.76/32.23 µg/mL in the DPPH assay and 32.49/72.01 mg GAE/100 g fresh material in the TPC assay, for edible pulp and peel, respectively) than Tommy Atkins fruits (127.22/46.39 µg/mL in the DPPH assay and 25.03/72.01 mg GAE/100 g fresh material in the TPC assay for pulp and peel, respectively). The peel of Pica mangoes showed also the highest content of phenolics (66.02 mg/100 g FW) measured by HPLC-PDA. The HPLC generated fingerprint can be used to authenticate Pica mango fruits and Pica mango food products.

  8. Radiography and digital image processing for detection of internal breakdown in fruits of mango tree (Mangifera indica L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Rubemar de Souza

    2004-01-01

    This work proposes a methodology aimed to be an adviser system for detection of internal breakdown in mangoes during the post-harvest phase to packinghouses. It was arranged a set-up to product digital images from X-ray spectrum in the range of 18 and 20 keV, where the primary images acquired were tested by a digital image processing routine for differentiation of seed, pulp, peel and injured zones. The analysis ROC applied to a only cut on a sample of 114 primary images generated, showed that digital image processing routine was able to identify 88% of true-positive injuries and 7% of false-negatives. When tested against the absence of injuries, the DIP routine had identified 22 % of false-positives and 88% of true-negatives. Besides, a cognitive analysis was applied to a sample of 76 digital images of mangoes. Results showed that the images offer enough information for dichotomic interpretation about the main injuries in the fruit, including those of difficult diagnosis under destructive assay. Measurements of observer agreement, performed on the same group of readers showed themselves in the range of fair and substantial strength of agreement. (author)

  9. Irradiation of 'carabao' (Manila 'super') mangoes II. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation and the vapor heat treatment on fruit quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizada, M.C.C.; Esguerra, E.B.; Brena, S.R.; Fuentes, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    'Carabao' mango fruits subjected to gamma radiation at 100, 150 or 250 Gy resulted in fruits of an acceptable quality. In contrast to the vapor heat treatment, no internal breakdown was observed even in fruits irradiated at 350 Gy. At this dose a low but significant incidence of pulp discoloration was found, albeit in only one trial. Both the vapor heat treatment and gamma radiation need to be supplemented with hot water treatment for effective and more consistent disease control. Although irradiation appears to delay ripening, its effect seems to be largely on peel color development. The results of this study indicate that irradiation might be an appropriate quarantine treatment for the 'Carabao' mango. (Auth.). 7 tabs., 3 figs

  10. The combined effects of gamma radiation and low-temperature for the disinfestation of the Oriental fruit fly, Dacus dorsalis Hendel in mango and banana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, S.; Ugsunantwiwat, A.; Sutantawong, M.

    1971-01-01

    The Numdocmai mango and Homtong banana containing the 22-24-hour old eggs of the Oriental fruit fly were subjected to gamma rays at 2-20 krads. After irradiation, the infested fruits were stored at 27+-1 0 C, 20 0 C and 17 0 C with 80-90% relative humidity. The percentages of eggs failed to develop into larvae were calculated. When the storage temperature was 27+-1 0 C or 20 0 C, the LD 50 and LD 99 for eggs in mango was 5.9 and 29 krads respectively, in banana was 3.4 and 12 krads respectively. While the storage temperature was 17 0 C, the LD 50 and LD 99 for eggs in mango was 4.1 and 20 krads respectively; in banana was 3 and 10 krads respectively. The 8-day-old and 3-day-old pupae were also exposed to gamma rays and stored at different temperatures. The mortality of the irradiated pupae stored at 17 0 C was higher than when stored at 27+-1 0 C or 20 0 C. The storage temperature of 17 0 C led to higher mortality in the irradiated immature stages of the fruit fly. Studies would also be extended to investigate the effect of low-temperature in addition to radiation for the disinfestation of the Oriental fruit fly in other fruits

  11. Isolation and characterization of 9-lipoxygenase and epoxide hydrolase 2 genes: Insight into lactone biosynthesis in mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Ashish B; Chidley, Hemangi G; Oak, Pranjali S; Pujari, Keshav H; Giri, Ashok P; Gupta, Vidya S

    2017-06-01

    Uniqueness and diversity of mango flavour across various cultivars are well known. Among various flavour metabolites lactones form an important class of aroma volatiles in certain mango varieties due to their ripening specific appearance and lower odour detection threshold. In spite of their biological and biochemical importance, lactone biosynthetic pathway in plants remains elusive. Present study encompasses quantitative real-time analysis of 9-lipoxygenase (Mi9LOX), epoxide hydrolase 2 (MiEH2), peroxygenase, hydroperoxide lyase and acyl-CoA-oxidase genes during various developmental and ripening stages in fruit of Alphonso, Pairi and Kent cultivars with high, low and no lactone content and explains their variable lactone content. Study also covers isolation, recombinant protein characterization and transient over-expression of Mi9LOX and MiEH2 genes in mango fruits. Recombinant Mi9LOX utilized linoleic and linolenic acids, while MiEH2 utilized aromatic and fatty acid epoxides as their respective substrates depicting their role in fatty acid metabolism. Significant increase in concentration of δ-valerolactone and δ-decalactone upon Mi9LOX over-expression and that of δ-valerolactone, γ-hexalactone and δ-hexalactone upon MiEH2 over-expression further suggested probable involvement of these genes in lactone biosynthesis in mango. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of 1-MCP on texture, related enzymes, quality and their relative gene expression in 'Amrapali' mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S V R; Sharma, R R; Barthakur, S

    2017-11-01

    The mango fruits remain biologically active even after harvest as they continue respiration, transpiration and other bio-chemical processes. Being highly perishable, the fruit quality deteriorates fast under ambient conditions (30 ± 5 °C and 50 ± 5% RH), rendering them unmarketable within 5-6 days. In order to extend the shelf-life of 'Amrapali' mango fruits, we have treated them with three different concentrations (500, 750 and 1000 ppb) of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) @ 20 °C and stored at ambient conditions. Among all the treatments, 1000 ppb was found to be an effective in extending shelf-life till twelfth day with minimum physiological loss in weight (19.24%), maximum firmness (10.43 N), highest retention of quality parameters such as soluble solid concentrates (27.88 °B), ascorbic acid (28.49 mg 100 g -1 FW) and total antioxidant activity (675.41 µmol Trolox g -1 FW) compared to untreated mango fruits (21.79%, 5.45 N, 23.17 °B, 19.55 mg 100 g -1 FW and 265.41 µmol Trolox g -1 FW, respectively). Gene expression studies have revealed that the texture related gene expansin was significantly repressed till fifth day of storage with increasing concentrations of 1-MCP.

  13. Influence of Maturity States on Viscoelastic Properties of Tropical Fruits (Mango, Papaya y Plantain)

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Ramiro; Montes, Everaldo J; Pérez, Omar A; Andrade, Ricardo D

    2012-01-01

    En esta investigación se determinó la relación del estado de madurez con la viscoelasticidad, en mango de las variedades puerco y corazón , papaya de la variedad hawaiana y plátano. El estado de madurez se determinó por el color de la fruta visualmente, de acuerdo a una escala de maduración, y las propiedades viscoelásticas se determinaron por prueba de relajación y compresión del esfuerzo en un texturómetro. Dos modelos comunes, Maxwell generalizado y Peleg, se ajustaron a los datos experime...

  14. Field evalution of controling methods of mango fruit flies bactrocera zonata (Biptera:Tephritidae in the southern part of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khosravi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Bactrocera zonata (Diptera, Tephritidae, is considered as a dangerous pest of mango in the south of Iran, which its control is one of the main concerns of farmers who are facing numerous problems. To assay the different methods for controlling B. zonata, this study was carried out. Method: The treatments were, A spraying 7% methyl eugenol+7% technical malathion on trunk and tree branches, B soaking 8-10 layers of jute sacks with previous treatment that were attached to tree branches, C bucket trap along with chipboard that was saturated with 6 ml of methyl eugenol, D spraying 3% protein hydrolysate+3 ppm malathion (EC 57% on the trunk and tree branches, E spraying 3% sugar permit+3 ppm malathion on the trunk and tree branches, and F control (no treatment. The experiments were repeated at two consecutive years. Results: The results confirmed that the differences among treatments and the effect of the year on the treatments were significant (p>1%. The treatment D captured the highest numbers of fruit flies in both years of replications. The treatments had significant effect on percentage of fruit infestation. Conclusion: The findings confirmed that treatments C and B had the greatest impact on pest control.

  15. Sequence diversity and differential expression of major phenylpropanoid-flavonoid biosynthetic genes among three mango varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van L T; Innes, David J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Monteith, Gregory R; Gidley, Michael J; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2015-07-30

    Mango fruits contain a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds which impart potential health benefits; their biosynthesis is catalysed by enzymes in the phenylpropanoid-flavonoid (PF) pathway. The aim of this study was to reveal the variability in genes involved in the PF pathway in three different mango varieties Mangifera indica L., a member of the family Anacardiaceae: Kensington Pride (KP), Irwin (IW) and Nam Doc Mai (NDM) and to determine associations with gene expression and mango flavonoid profiles. A close evolutionary relationship between mango genes and those from the woody species poplar of the Salicaceae family (Populus trichocarpa) and grape of the Vitaceae family (Vitis vinifera), was revealed through phylogenetic analysis of PF pathway genes. We discovered 145 SNPs in total within coding sequences with an average frequency of one SNP every 316 bp. Variety IW had the highest SNP frequency (one SNP every 258 bp) while KP and NDM had similar frequencies (one SNP every 369 bp and 360 bp, respectively). The position in the PF pathway appeared to influence the extent of genetic diversity of the encoded enzymes. The entry point enzymes phenylalanine lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-mono-oxygenase (C4H) and chalcone synthase (CHS) had low levels of SNP diversity in their coding sequences, whereas anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) showed the highest SNP frequency followed by flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H). Quantitative PCR revealed characteristic patterns of gene expression that differed between mango peel and flesh, and between varieties. The combination of mango expressed sequence tags and availability of well-established reference PF biosynthetic genes from other plant species allowed the identification of coding sequences of genes that may lead to the formation of important flavonoid compounds in mango fruits and facilitated characterisation of single nucleotide polymorphisms between varieties. We discovered an association between the extent of sequence variation and

  16. Atraso no amadurecimento de atemoia cv. African Pride após tratamento pós-colheita com 1-metilciclopropeno Delay in ripening of African Pride atemoya fruits after postharvest treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Coêlho de Lima

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Atemoias cv. African Pride foram colhidas na maturidade fisiológica com o objetivo de avaliar a influência da aplicação de 1-metilciclopropeno (1-MCP sobre a maturação pós-colheita. Foram testados: doses de 1-MCP (0, 100, 200 e 400 nL.L-1; e tempo de armazenamento (0, 8 e 15 dias sob refrigeração, a 14,5 ± 2,0 ºC e 60 ± 6% de UR, seguidos de 2, 4 e 5 dias a 23,8 ± 2,0 ºC e 65 ± 5% UR. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em fatorial 4x 6 (dose de 1-MCPx tempo de armazenamento e quatro repetições. Apesar da interação estatisticamente significativa entre os fatores sobre a perda de massa, as diferenças entre tratamentos em cada avaliação não foram superiores a 1,3%. Os frutos tratados apresentaram-se mais firmes, com acidez titulável ligeiramente maior e atraso inicial no acúmulo de sólidos solúveis. A redução no conteúdo de pectina somente foi observada a partir do 15º dia, quando já havia ocorrido a maior taxa de amaciamento. A aparência também foi preservada pelo 1-MCP, verificando-se, nos frutos tratados, ausência de manchas e/ou microrganismos até o 17º dia. A dose de 200 nL.L-1 foi a mais eficiente, pois atrasou a perda de firmeza e manteve o teor de pectina ligeiramente maior.Atemoya fruits (cv. African Pride were harvested at physiological maturity stage with the objective of evaluating the influence of 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP application on postharvest maturation. The following parameters were analyzed: 1-MCP doses (0, 100, 200 and 400 nL.L-1 and time of storage (0, 8 and 15 days under refrigeration, at 14.5 ± 2.0 ºC and 60 ± 6% RH, followed by 2, 4, and 5 days at 23.8 ± 2.0 ºC and 65 ± 5% RH. The experimental design was completely randomized, in a 4x 5 (dose of 1-MCPx time of storage factorial with four replications. Besides the statistically significant interaction between the factors on weight loss, the differences among the treatments in each evaluation were not

  17. Genetic map of mango: a tool for mango breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica) is an economically and nutritionally important tropical/subtropical tree fruit crop, affectionately labeled the “King of Fruit”. Mango is an allotetraploid with 40 chromosomes and the size of the diploid genome is ~439 Mb. Most of the current commercial cultivars are select...

  18. Fruit fly infestation in mango: A threat to the Horticultural sector in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Southern and Eastern Lake Kyoga Basin (SELKB). Bugiri .... Flats, NWFWS = Northwestern Farmlands-Wooded Savannah. Figure 2. .... studies in Guinea where young fruits (less than 10 weeks .... Definition and determination of host status ...

  19. Pre-Harvest Application of a New Biocontrol Formulation Induces Resistance to Post-Harvest Anthracnose and Enhances Fruit Yield in Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vivekananthan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Pre-harvest application of biocontrol formulations consisting of 1. the two plant growth promoting rhizobacterial strains FP7 and Pf1 of Pseudomonas fluorescens; 2. a strain of Bacillus subtilis Bs-1; and 3. a strain (Sc-1 of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, given at fortnightly or monthly intervals and with or without a chitin amendment, were evaluated in two trials for their ability to reduce anthracnose in mango caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. Growth of C. gloeosporioides in vitro was significantly reduced by strain FP7 and in both field trials the bacterial strain in combination with chitin significantly reduced infection. Pre-harvest application of these formulations at fortnightly intervals also significantly improved flower initiation, yield parameters (mean number of fruits and fruit yield and fruit quality (total soluble solids, ascorbic acid, free acidity, total, reducing and non- reducing sugar content. The delay in latent symptom expression increased by 15 days under stored conditions. The highest levels of phenolic content, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase on mango leaves, flowers and fruits were achieved with FP7 +chitin.

  20. Multifaceted Health Benefits of Mangifera indica L. (Mango): The Inestimable Value of Orchards Recently Planted in Sicilian Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauricella, Marianna; Emanuele, Sonia; Calvaruso, Giuseppe; Giuliano, Michela; D'Anneo, Antonella

    2017-05-20

    Historically, Mangifera indica L. cultivations have been widely planted in tropical areas of India, Africa, Asia, and Central America. However, at least 20 years ago its spreading allowed the development of some cultivars in Sicily, an island to the south of Italy, where the favourable subtropical climate and adapted soils represent the perfect field to create new sources of production for the Sicilian agricultural supply chain. Currently, cultivations of Kensington Pride, Keitt, Glenn, Maya, and Tommy Atkins varieties are active in Sicily and their products meet the requirements of local and European markets. Mango plants produce fleshy stone fruits rich in phytochemicals with an undisputed nutritional value for its high content of polyphenolics and vitamins. This review provides an overview of the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer properties of mango, a fruit that should be included in everyone's diet for its multifaceted biochemical actions and health-enhancing properties.

  1. Effect of irradiation on the biochemical and organoleptic changes during the ripening of papaya and mango fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Bernard, L.; Jobin, M.; Milot, S.; Gagnon, M.

    1990-01-01

    Papaya and mango rot caused by fungi is a major problem during storage and marketing. Gamma irradiation treatment was used to determine its effect on the quality of papayas and mangoes irradiated at 0,5 to 0,95 kGy. The level of respiration, soluble solids, texture, vitamin C and the sensorial evaluation were effectuated. The results indicate that irradiation treatment reduces significantly (p≤0,001) weakens the texture of mangoes. The content of soluble solids and vitamin C are not significantly affected by the irradiation. The sensory evaluation indicates that up to 0,95 kGy the sensorial quality is not changed. (author)

  2. Insights into the Key Aroma Compounds in Mango (Mangifera indica L. 'Haden') Fruits by Stable Isotope Dilution Quantitation and Aroma Simulation Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafo, John P; Didzbalis, John; Schnell, Raymond J; Steinhaus, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-four aroma-active compounds, previously identified with high flavor dilution factors by application of an aroma extract dilution analysis, were quantified in tree-ripened fruits of mango (Mangifera indica L. 'Haden'). From the results, the odor activity value (OAV) was calculated for each compound as the ratio of its concentration in the mangoes to its odor threshold in water. OAVs > 1 were obtained for 24 compounds, among which ethyl 2-methylbutanoate (fruity; OAV 2100), (3E,5Z)-undeca-1,3,5-triene (pineapple-like; OAV 1900), ethyl 3-methylbutanoate (fruity; OAV 1600), and ethyl butanoate (fruity; OAV 980) were the most potent, followed by (2E,6Z)-nona-2,6-dienal (cucumber-like), ethyl 2-methylpropanoate (fruity), (E)-β-damascenone (cooked apple-like), ethyl hexanoate (fruity), 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (caramel-like), 3-methylbut-2-ene-1-thiol (sulfurous), γ-decalactone (peach-like), β-myrcene (terpeny), (3Z)-hex-3-enal (green), 4-methyl-4-sulfanylpentan-2-one (tropical fruit-like), and ethyl octanoate (fruity). Aroma simulation and omission experiments revealed that these 15 compounds, when combined in a model mixture in their natural concentrations, were able to mimic the aroma of the fruits.

  3. Mango Shake

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/recipe/mangoshake.html Mango Shake To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Prep time: 5 minutes Cook time: 0 minutes ... cup low-fat (1 percent) milk 4 Tbsp frozen mango juice (or 1 fresh pitted mango) 1 small ...

  4. Postharvest Ripening and Shelf Life of Mango ( Mangifera indica L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postharvest Ripening and Shelf Life of Mango ( Mangifera indica L.) Fruit as Influenced by ... evaluate the influence of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and polyethylene packaging (PP) on postharvest storage of mango. ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  5. Nature of mango anthracnose in Ghana: Implications for the control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nature of mango anthracnose in Ghana: Implications for the control of the disease. ... Mango anthracnose is a major disease hampering the production of quality fruits for export in Ghana. The nature of the disease and ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  6. Appraisal of biochemical and genetic diversity of mango cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Appraisal of biochemical and genetic diversity of mango cultivars using molecular markers. ... Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is one of the oldest fruit crops and is broadly cultivated worldwide. To determine the level of ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  7. Sensitivity of Ceratitis capitata eggs irradiated in artificial diet and in mango fruits; Sensibilidade de ovos de Ceratitis capitata (WIED.,1824) irradiados em dieta artificial e em frutos de manga (Mangifera indica L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raga, A.; Yasuoka, S.T.; Amorim, E.O.; Sato, M.E.; Suplicy Filho, N. [Instituto Biologico, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Faria, J.T. de [Delegacia Federal de Agricultura, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to establish gamma radiation doses required to prevent emergence of Ceratitis capitata adults, from irradiated eggs in artificial diet and mango fruits. Six-, twelve-, twenty-four-, and forty-eight-hour-old eggs were used. Artificial infestation by C. capitata was carried out in mangoes of Haden, Tommy and Keith cultivars. An increase of radiation resistance of C. capitata eggs was observed as a function of the embryonic development and a Probit 9 of 24.67 Gy was estimated for 48-hour-old eggs in artificial diet. No significant influence of mango fruits was found on the efficacy of irradiation. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Effect of irradiation on the biochemical and organoleptic changes during the ripening of papaya and mango fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, Monique; Bernard, Linda; Jobin, Michele; Milot, Sylvain; Gagnon, Marcel

    Papaya and mango rot caused by fungi is a major problem during storage and marketing. Gamma irradiation treatment was used to determine its effect on the quality of papayas and mangoes irradiated at 0,5 to 0,95 kGy. The level of respiration, soluble solids, texture, vitamin C and the sensorial evaluation were effectuated. The results indicate that irradiation treatment reduces significantly (p ⪕ 0,001) the level of respiration and significantly (p ⪕ 0,001) weakens the texture of mangoes. The content of soluble solids and vitamin C are not significantly affected by the irradiation. The sensory evaluation indicates that up to 0,95 kGy the sensorial quality is not changed.

  9. Susceptibility of 15 mango (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) cultivars to the attack by Anastrepha ludens and Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera:Tephritidae) and the role of underdeveloped fruit as pest reservoirs: management implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated the susceptibility of 15 mango cultivars to the attack of Anastrepha ludens and A. obliqua, the main Tephritid pests of this crop in Mexico. In a field experiment, bagged, fruit-bearing branches were exposed to gravid females of both fly species. Infestation rates, developmental time,...

  10. Genetic Map of Mango: A Tool for Mango Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Kuhn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mango (Mangifera indica is an economically and nutritionally important tropical/subtropical tree fruit crop. Most of the current commercial cultivars are selections rather than the products of breeding programs. To improve the efficiency of mango breeding, molecular markers have been used to create a consensus genetic map that identifies all 20 linkage groups in seven mapping populations. Polyembryony is an important mango trait, used for clonal propagation of cultivars and rootstocks. In polyembryonic mango cultivars, in addition to a zygotic embryo, several apomictic embryos develop from maternal tissue surrounding the fertilized egg cell. This trait has been associated with linkage group 8 in our consensus genetic map and has been validated in two of the seven mapping populations. In addition, we have observed a significant association between trait and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for the vegetative trait of branch habit and the fruit traits of bloom, ground skin color, blush intensity, beak shape, and pulp color.

  11. Preservation of mango and mango pulp by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swailam, H.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the following points: I- Effect of ionizing radiation alone (0-2 kGy) or in combination with hot water dip treatment (55 C/5 min.) on the shelf-life extension, chemical, microbiological, rheological and organoleptic properties of mango fruits (at mature green stage) stored at 12± 1 C. II - Effect of gamma radiation alone (0 -2 kGy) or with steam treatment (for 12 min.) on the chemical, microbiological, rheological and organoleptic properties of mango pulp stored at 3 ± 1 C. III- isolation , purification and identification of moulds associated with peel surface of mango fruits and yeasts associated with mango pulp as well as toxin production from some identified moulds

  12. Post harvest Quality of Mango (Mangifera Indica L.) Fruit Affected by Different Levels of Gibberellic Acid During Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.K.; Khan, M.Z.H.; Sarkar, M.A.R; Yeasmin, S.; Ali, M.K.; Uddin, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    The experiment consisted of two popular mango varieties in Bangladesh (viz., Langra and Khirshapat) and four different levels of Gibberellic acid (GA 3 ) solution, namely, control, 100, 200 and 400 ppm. The two factors experiment was assigned in randomized complete block design with three replicates. Data obtained from various biochemical analyses in terms of physicochemical properties and shelf life of post harvest mango, were recorded and statistically analyzed for comparison among the mean values using Duncan's Multiple Range Test (DMRT) and Least Significant Difference (LSD). The Khirshapat showed better performance in achieving higher quantity of moisture, progressively lost physiological weight, increased pulp pH, TSS after 6th day of storage, produced more quantity of sugar (total, reducing and non-reducing), as well as extended shelf life and delayed skin color changes than Langra at all the storage duration. Different levels of GA 3 solution subjected to the investigation demonstrated significant variation in most of the physicochemical properties and shelf life of mango at different days after storage. The results explored that some physicochemical properties viz., physiological weight loss, moisture content, pulp pH, TSS, sugar (total, reducing and non reducing), were rapidly increased from untreated mangoes. GA 3 at 400 ppm showed better performance in delaying the changes in physicochemical properties and extended shelf life. (author)

  13. 76 FR 65988 - Importation of Mangoes From Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ...), and (ii) The mangoes were inspected prior to export from Australia and found free of C. mangiferae, L.... APHIS-2011-0040] RIN 0579-AD52 Importation of Mangoes From Australia AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... concerning the importation of fruits and vegetables to allow the importation of fresh mangoes from Australia...

  14. Chemical aspects of irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1990-06-01

    Mango is an important and very popular tropical fruit. Because of its short shelf life, however, its use is restricted to the areas of production. Since mango is a climacteric fruit, it is possible to extend its shelf life by delaying the ripening process and senescence by irradiation. The ripening process is very complex: it appears that the radiation-induced delay in ripening may be mediated through the inhibition of the enzyme(s) involved in ethylene production. The dose required for shelf-life extension is ≤1.5 kGy. Higher doses can lead to scalding, flesh darkening and development of hollow pockets. This review focuses on the chemical aspects of radiation-induced shelf-life extension of mangoes. At the low irradiation doses required for this shelf-life extension (≤1.5 kGy), the chemical effects are negligible. Irradiation does not affect the carotenoid levels, and has only a minor effect on the vitamin C level in a few mango varieties. No significant differences in the free and total (hydrolyzed) amino acids, or the protein content of Kent mangoes, have been detected between irradiated and unirradiated samples. During ripening of the mangoes the reducing sugar and the total sugar levels increase, but in the majority of the mango varieties these levels remain very similar in irradiated and unirradiated samples. There are some differences in the volatile compounds between irradiated and unirradiated Kent mangoes; however, these differences have no apparent effect on the taste and flavor of the irradiated mangoes

  15. Effects of gamma radiation on mortality of oriental fruit fly Dacus Dorsalis Hendel when innoculated in Manila super mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoto, E.C.; Resilva, S.S.; Rosario, M.S.E. del; Casubha, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of radiation treatment showed that fruitfly eggs inoculated into export grade mature green mangoes were severely damaged with radiation dose of 350 and 400 Gy and no larvae survived the treatments. At 300 Gy, an average of 0.08 larvae was recovered when the insect was treated either as young or mature larvae. On the other hand, the young and mature larvae were more resistant to radiation effects than the eggs, although the differences observed were not significant between the young and older larvae. When the adult emergence was used as the criterion for survival, no adult fly was recovered at 100 Gy and above from approximately 2400 insects tested per treatment. Large scale irradiation for confirmation of the results using about 6000 test insects inoculated in mangoes showed 100% mortality of zero adult emergence after treatment with 100Gy. (Author). 1 fig.; 2 tabs.; 10 refs

  16. Non-Destructive Technique for Determining Mango Maturity

    OpenAIRE

    Salengke; Mursalim

    2013-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is an important tropical fruit that has great potential in international markets. Currently, major markets for mango include North America, Europe, and Japan. The acceptance of exported mango in destination countries depends largely on eating quality, which is affected by maturity at harvest. Mango maturity can be judged visually, based on skin color, or determined chemically based on soluble solids content, acid content, and solids:acid ratio....

  17. Avaliação do uso de inibidores de etileno sobre a produção de compostos voláteis e de mangiferina em manga Evaluation of the use of ethylene inhibitors on production of volatile compounds and mangiferin in mango fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirley Marques Canuto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of two ethylene inhibitors, 1-methylcylopropene (1-MCP and aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG, on production of volatile compounds and mangiferin (a bioactive xanthone in 'Tommy Atkins' mango fruit were investigated. Volatile composition and mangiferin content, in treated and untreated fruits at three maturity, stages were determined by SPME-GC-MS and HPLC, respectively. These chromatographical analysis revealed that the volatile profiles and mangiferin concentrations were not significantly different, suggesting that the use of ethylene inhibitors does not affect the mango aroma and functional properties relative to this xanthone. Moreover, a simple, precise and accurate HPLC method was developed for quantifying mangiferin in mango pulp.

  18. Occurrence of alk(en)ylresorcinols in the fruits of two mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars during on-tree maturation and postharvest storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienzle, Stefanie; Carle, Reinhold; Sruamsiri, Pittaya; Tosta, Carola; Neidhart, Sybille

    2014-01-08

    Regarding their relevance for the fungal resistance of mangoes in long supply chains, the alk(en)ylresorcinols (AR) were quantitated in peel and mesocarp throughout storage (27 days, 14 °C, ethylene absorption). The 12 'Chok Anan' and 11 'Nam Dokmai #4' lots picked between 83 and 115 days after full bloom (DAFB) had different harvest maturity indices. The development of dry matter and fruit growth indicated physiological maturity ∼100 DAFB. During storage, all fruits ripened slowly, mostly until over-ripeness and visible decay. The total AR contents always ranged at 73 ± 4.5 and 6.4 ± 0.7 mg hg(-1) of 'Chok Anan' and 'Nam Dokmai #4' peel dry weight, respectively, but only at 6.7 ± 0.7 and 0.9 ± 0.1 mg hg(-1) for the corresponding mesocarp (P ≤ 0.05). These narrow concentration ranges were contradictory to the decreasing fungal resistance. Accordingly, the alk(en)ylresorcinols have not been a deciding factor for the fungal resistance.

  19. FUZZY RIPENING MANGO INDEX USING RGB COLOUR SENSOR MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Ab Razak Mansor; Mahmod Othman; Mohd Nazari Abu Bakar; Khairul Adilah Ahmad; Tajul Rosli Razak

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the mango ripeness classification is determined manually by human graders according to a particular procedure. This method is inconsistent and subjective in nature because each grader has different techniques. Thus, it affects the quantity and quality of the mango fruit that can be marketed. In this project, a new model for classifying mango fruit is developed using the fuzzy logic RGB sensor colour model build in the MATLAB software. The grading system was programme...

  20. Pollination Services of Mango Flower Pollinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, A. Nurul; Salmah, M. R. Che; Hassan, A. Abu; Hamdan, A.; Razak, M. N. Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Measuring wild pollinator services in agricultural production is very important in the context of sustainable management. In this study, we estimated the contribution of native pollinators to mango fruit set production of two mango cultivars Mangifera indica (L). cv. ‘Sala’ and ‘Chok Anan’. Visitation rates of pollinators on mango flowers and number of pollen grains adhering to their bodies determined pollinator efficiency for reproductive success of the crop. Chok Anan failed to produce any fruit set in the absence of pollinators. In natural condition, we found that Sala produced 4.8% fruit set per hermaphrodite flower while Chok Anan produced 3.1% per flower. Hand pollination tremendously increased fruit set of naturally pollinated flower for Sala (>100%), but only 33% for Chok Anan. Pollinator contribution to mango fruit set was estimated at 53% of total fruit set production. Our results highlighted the importance of insect pollinations in mango production. Large size flies Eristalinus spp. and Chrysomya spp. were found to be effective pollen carriers and visited more mango flowers compared with other flower visitors. PMID:26246439

  1. Determination of gamma radiation dose as a post-harvest treatment in mangos infested with the South American fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alama, D.

    1999-01-01

    Efforts are being made to determine a gamma radiation dose for mortality of third-instar larvae of Anastrepha fraterculus which infest mangos of the Haden variety of 400 g weight. Four radiation treatments were tested: 0.4 kGy, 0.6 kGy, 0.8 kGy and 1.0 kGy. Using as a criterium for mortality the interruption of the biological cycle between larva and pupa, the following results were achieved: 49.61%, 63.33%, 74.86% and 90.72%. The percentages obtained have been corrected using the Abbot formula. When the criterium was based on no adult emergence, 100% mortality was achieved for the four treatments. (author)

  2. Preparation and Consumer Acceptance of Indian Mango Leather and Osmo - Dehyrated Indian Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril John A. Domingo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Indian mangoes are considered highly perishable products due to high moisture content which resulted in high postharvest losses in Pangasinan, Philippines. This study exploits the potential of underutilized indian mango to value - added products. The developed i ndian mango leather and osmo - dehyrated indian mango are deh ydrated fruit products can be eaten as snacks or desserts. Indian mango leathe r was prepared by mixing fruit puree and other additives like sugar, citric acid, and sodium met abisulphite and then dehydrated them at 55 °C for 15 hours under convective oven. Osmo - dehydrated indian mang o was prepared by immer sing h alves of deseeded and deskinned pulps in 50 % (w/w sucrose solution for 20 hours f ollowed by drying initially at 50 °C then aft er one hour at 60 °C for 15 hours. Thirty - three member untrained panels were involved in consumer a ccep tance evaluation . Panelists evaluated the colo r, sweetness, sourness, texture, and overall acceptability of the osmotically - treated indian mango and indian mango leather using seven - point h edonic scale . Over - all, the indian mango leather and osmo - dehy drated indian mango developed in this study seemed to be acceptable for all the sensory parameters as indicated by high scores of greater than five (>5 .

  3. Pride and Prejudice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Austen, Jane

    2005-01-01

    A tour de force of wit and sparkling dialogue, Pride and Prejudice shows how the headstrong Elizabeth Bennett and the aristocratic Mr Darcy must have their pride humbled and their prejudices dissolved before they can acknowledge their love for each other.

  4. MANGO PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud as well as the main asexual propagation methods their uses and practices. Finally, pattern and quality of graft mangos and their commercialization aspects will be discussed in this Chapter.

  5. Effect of gamma radiation on the bioactivity of Peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) infesting mango, Mangifera indica L. in the North-Western part of Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M. Aftab.; Wadud, M. A.; Khan, Shakil A.; Islam, M. Saidul.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on the bioactivity of peach fruit fly, Bactrocera zonata (Saunders) infesting mango, Mangifera indica L. in the north-western parts of Bangladesh was evaluated. It was noted that the bioactivity of the fly decreased as eggs and larval age of the fly increased. The egg stage was observed to be more sensitive to radiation than the larval stage. The LD 50 value of gamma radiation was 2.2703, 3.6097, 7.5065 and 8.9729 Gy against 6, 12, 18 and 24 h old eggs respectively. No egg was hatched at dosages of 10, 15, 15 and 20 Gy for 6, 12, 18 and 24 h old, accordingly. The LD 50 value of gamma radiation was 26.7042, 41.3821, 65.5292, 111.1554, 170.1583 and 233.9226 Gy against 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 days old larvae respectively. No adult emerged in 40, 60, 100, 150, 225 and 350 Gy for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 days old larvae accordingly.(author)

  6. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey

    2007-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  7. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: paulabroisler@hotmail.com; juliananc@ig.com.br; sfsabato@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  8. Nutritional aspects of irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, H.

    1990-06-01

    Mangoes, like most other fruits, constitute a small but very important part of human diet in tropical countries. Their carbohydrate content is a source of energy; however, their main importance is as a rich source of vitamins, particularly vitamins A and C. Increasing the shelf life of mangoes is desirable, since on ripening they become highly perishable and have a very short shelf life. Low-dose irradiation is considered to be a good method for extending their shelf life. This literature review examines the effect of radiation processing on the nutrients in mangoes. In general, irradiation has little effect on the main nutrients, vitamin C, carotenoids and carbohydrates. There is a significant loss of vitamin C only in a few varieties of mangoes, while in the others the vitamin C level is unaffected. The extension of shelf life also depends on the storage conditions, particularly temperature. While low-temperature storage followed by ripening at room temperature leads to high vitamin C levels, it reduces the carotenoid levels in some varieties. Thus, the storage and the ripening temperatures should be optimized for each variety to obtain the maximum benefit of irradiation. Long-term, multi-generation rat feeding studies to assess the wholesomeness of irradiated mangoes have shown no adverse effects

  9. MANGO PROPAGATION

    OpenAIRE

    ALBERTO CARLOS DE QUEIROZ PINTO; VICTOR GALÁN SAÚCO; SISIR KUMAR MITRA; FRANCISCO RICARDO FERREIRA

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT This Chapter has the objectives to search, through the review of the available literature, important informations on the evolution of mango propagation regarding theoretical and practical aspects from cellular base of sexual propagation, nursery structures and organizations, substrate compositions and uses, importance of rootstock and scion selections, also it will be described the preparation and transport of the grafts (stem and bud) as well as the main asexual propagation methods...

  10. Study and application of neutron activation analysis and related methods for determination of content of Na, K, Cu, Co, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Zn in a lot of speciality fruits of Vietnam (banana, orange, longan, dragon and mango)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Van Minh; Le Thi Ngoc Trinh; Le Thai Dung; Ta Thi Tuyet Nhung; Nguyen Dang Khoa; Nguyen Tien Dat; Nguyen Thi Hong Tham; Cao Dong Vu

    2007-01-01

    To study the content of trace elements Na, K, Cu, Co, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Zn in the speciality fruits is necessary and very important. We collected the studying samples in four Cities such as: Dalat, NhaTrang, HoChiMinh and BinhDuong. The studying samples are: Banana, Orange, Longan, Dragon and Mango. These samples were dried in the Deepfreezer at -40 o C. We analyzed Na, K, Cu, Co, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn by neutron activation analysis (INAA, RNAA) and after irradiation measured total β for P. The studying results were shown in the tables. (author)

  11. Study and application of neutron activation analysis and related methods for determination of content of Na, K, Cu, Co, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Zn in a lot of speciality fruits of Vietnam (banana, orange, longan, dragon and mango)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minh, Nguyen Van; Ngoc Trinh, Le Thi; Dung, Le Thai; Tuyet Nhung, Ta Thi; Khoa, Nguyen Dang; Dat, Nguyen Tien; Hong Tham, Nguyen Thi; Vu, Cao Dong [Center for Analytical Techniques, Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    2007-12-15

    To study the content of trace elements Na, K, Cu, Co, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe, P and Zn in the speciality fruits is necessary and very important. We collected the studying samples in four Cities such as: Dalat, NhaTrang, HoChiMinh and BinhDuong. The studying samples are: Banana, Orange, Longan, Dragon and Mango. These samples were dried in the Deepfreezer at -40{sup o}C. We analyzed Na, K, Cu, Co, Mn, Ca, Mg, Fe and Zn by neutron activation analysis (INAA, RNAA) and after irradiation measured total {beta} for P. The studying results were shown in the tables. (author)

  12. Advances in research and development of mango industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S. E. Bally

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available World mango production is spread over 100 countries that produce over 34.3 million tons of fruit annually. Eighty percent of this production is based in the top nine producing nations that also consume upward of 90% of their production domestically. One to 2 percent of fruit is traded internationally in to markets in the European Community, USA, Arabian Peninsula and Asia. This paper outlines some of the recent research and development advances in mango breeding and genomics, rootstock development, disease management and harvest technologies that are influencing the production and quality of mango fruit traded domestically and internationally.

  13. Reducing post-harvest losses in South Asia's mango orchards ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-29

    Apr 29, 2016 ... Spraying a small concentration of hexanal in mango orchards has been found to delay the ripening of the fruit by an extra three weeks, enabling farmers to earn up to 15% more for their crop. Once the crop is harvested, hexanal-sprayed mangoes also have a much longer shelf life—up to 26 days in cold ...

  14. Physical and chemical characteristics of off vine ripened mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The need to develop the best off vine mango ripening technique for both consumption and processing was investigated. Some physical and chemical measurements were performed on mature Green Dodo mangoes before and during a 3-day and 6-day ripening period by smoked pit ripening (SPR), ethylene (fruit ...

  15. Production of ethanol from mango ( Mangifera indica L.) peel by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mango fruit processing industries generate two types of waste, including solid waste (peel and stones) and liquid waste (juice and wash ... Direct fermentation of mango peel extract gave only 5.13% (w/v) of ethanol. ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  16. Physico-chemical evaluation of the “Casturi” Mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangifera casturi “Casturi” mango is a tropical fruit tree about 10–30 m tall which is endemic to very small area around Banjarmasin in Southern Borneo (Indonesia). The casturi mango is believed to be first introduced to Florida by Richard Campbell in early 2000 as part of the germplasm conservat...

  17. Disinfestation of mangoes by irradiation; Desinfestacion de mango por irradiacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustos R, M E

    1992-05-15

    The mango is a fruit-bearing very important in the mexican economy. Mexico is between the first positions of the world like country producing with an average export volume of 40,000 annual tons in the last years. For this reason it was decided to make this investigation, which was developed according to the investigation protocols proposed by the Agricultural Research Service of the USA (ARS - US DOA). The objective is to account with the technical and scientific necessary bases to propose to the US DOA the regulation of the irradiation process like quarantine treatment for Mexican export mango. The goals are: to determine in the laboratory the minimum dose (Dmin.) to inhibit the emergency of adults of the species of the fruit flies of more importance for Mexico. To confirm the least radiation dose Dmin. for quarantine treatment based on the safety value Probit-9. To evaluate the mango quality irradiated to 2 and 2.5 times the Dmin. proposal for quarantine treatment. According to information provided by the General Direction of Vegetable Sanity, it was determined that the fly species of the fruit of more economic importance for Mexico are of the genus Anastrepha ludens, Anastrepha serpentina, Anastrepha obliqua and Ceratitis capitata. (Author)

  18. Residues of 14C-prochloraz in irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Maria A.; Tornisielo, Valdemar L.

    2000-01-01

    The Brazilian crops mangoes has expanding in the last years. However, tropical fruits crops are susceptible to infection that harms the crop yield. The control of these diseases is made through fungicides such as Prochloraz which possesses protecting eradicating action by controlling antracnose in mangoes. Agrochemicals are of great importance in the agriculture considering the of relationship cost/benefit. However they may cause a series of problems in the ecosystem, being the levels of agrochemicals residues in fruits one of these factors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the Prochloraz levels in mangoes treated in the post harvest. In the treatment of the mangoes, the interaction, fungicide with the gamma radiation with of 1,0 kGy dose, was used to induce Prochloraz degradation. Treated post-harvest mangoes were stored, at 12 deg C during 21 days. The results showed that the Prochloraz did not present reduction in the residual levels of the mangoes after 21 days storage, that is the safe period established by the Brazilian legislation on agrochemicals, in treated mangoes. The refrigerated storage (12 deg C) and the gamma radiation also did not contribute to the degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. In average the concentration of the fungicide Prochloraz in the peels (mean = 1,64 μg/g) was higher than in the mangoes pulp (mean = 0,06 μg/g), which allows the consumption of this fruit, since the peel is always discarded. The degradation product, formed in peels of mangoes in fruits treated in the post-harvest was the metabolite BTS 44596. The metabolite was found in very low levels, confirming that occurs degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. (author)

  19. Pride Versus Humility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birhanu Olana Dirbaba

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the first national and multilingual survey of Ethiopian journalists, resulting in, first, a comprehensive demographic profile of Ethiopian journalists; second, the overwhelming evidence of antipathy between government-employed and private-sector journalists that undermines the possibility of a collective identity or cooperative relations among Ethiopian journalists; third, the discovery of an apparent paradox between Ethiopian journalists’ pride in their country’s history as a sovereign nation and their regret at the lack of strong press traditions which is a by-product of this history and, finally, the tension that emerges in the data between Ethiopian journalists’ pride in and embarrassment about their chosen profession.

  20. Disinfestation of mangoes by irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos R, M.E.

    1992-05-01

    The mango is a fruit-bearing very important in the mexican economy. Mexico is between the first positions of the world like country producing with an average export volume of 40,000 annual tons in the last years. For this reason it was decided to make this investigation, which was developed according to the investigation protocols proposed by the Agricultural Research Service of the USA (ARS - US DOA). The objective is to account with the technical and scientific necessary bases to propose to the US DOA the regulation of the irradiation process like quarantine treatment for Mexican export mango. The goals are: to determine in the laboratory the minimum dose (Dmin.) to inhibit the emergency of adults of the species of the fruit flies of more importance for Mexico. To confirm the least radiation dose Dmin. for quarantine treatment based on the safety value Probit-9. To evaluate the mango quality irradiated to 2 and 2.5 times the Dmin. proposal for quarantine treatment. According to information provided by the General Direction of Vegetable Sanity, it was determined that the fly species of the fruit of more economic importance for Mexico are of the genus Anastrepha ludens, Anastrepha serpentina, Anastrepha obliqua and Ceratitis capitata. (Author)

  1. Phenoloxidase and melanization test for mango seed weevil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heather, N.W.

    1999-01-01

    This project was initiated to determine whether the phenoloxidase test successfully developed for fruit flies would be applicable to mango seed weevil, Sternochetus mangiferae (Fabricius). Mango seed weevil represents a quarantine impediment to the entry of mangoes to mainland USA and some other countries. It is not a destructive pest and rarely causes fruit damage even in late maturing varieties in which adults can emerge from ripe fruit. The main problem with the weevils come from nursery propagators who are concerned about possible effects on germination. It is questionable whether this is adequate justification for the level of quarantine importance with which this pest is currently regarded. It should not be confused with the mango pulp weevil Sternochetus frigidus Fabricius which does damage all infested fruit. (author)

  2. Influencia de la temperatura y el tiempo de almacenamiento en la conservación del fruto de mango (Manifera indica L. variedad Van Dyke Influence of temperature and storage time on quality of mango fruit (Mangifera indica l. variety Van Dyke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvis Jesús A.

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Mangos (Mangifera índica L. Variedad Van Dyke en grado de madurez fisiológica, se almacenaron en tres temperaturas de refrigeración (12, 10 Y 7°C y H. R del 85 - 90%, por tiempos de 10, 20 y 30 días. Adicionalmente se almacenaron mangos a 18°C por 15 días, los cuales fueron tomados como testigo. Los mangos fueron cosechados de la finca Frutol, localizada
    en el municipio de El Espinal, departamento del Tolima.
    Temperatura media 29°C, altitud 431 m.s.n.m, humedad
    relativa del 70%, precipitación promedio anual 1368
    mm. Durante el almacenamiento se evaluaron características
    fisicas como porcentaje de pérdidas de peso, dureza del
    fruto y de la pulpa. Además se evaluaron algunos cambios
    químicos y bioquímicos como la variación de los °Brix, el pH, el porcentaje de acidez, el contenido de sacarosa, glucosa y fructosa y de ácidos (cítrico, málico, succínico y ascórbico. Finalmente se evaluaron los cambios de color de la corteza.
    Del estudio se concluyó que la mejor temperatura de
    almacenamiento fue 12°C, en la cual el fruto maduró
    hasta alcanzar la madurez organoléptica en el día 30, lo
    cual equivale al doble del tiempo de conservación respecto
    a los mangos almacenados a 18°C. El mango resultó ser sensible a las temperaturas de 10 y 7°C, la cual se caracterizó por la interrupción del proceso de maduración siendo más graves los daños por frío en la temperatura de 7°C. En la temperatura de 10°C, se presentó evolución de los cambios que caracterizan la maduración hasta el día 20, pero entre el día 21 y el día 30 los cambios fueron interrumpidos, lo que indica que los daños por frío se hicieron irreversibles a partir del día 21.Mangos variety Van Dyke harvested at physiologic maturity were stored at low temperatures (12, 10 and 7°C, 85% RH, for 10, 20 and 30 days. Control mangos were stored at 18°C by 15 days. The fruits were harvested in the Frutol

  3. Radiography and digital image processing for detection of internal breakdown in fruits of mango tree (Mangifera indica L.); Radiografia e processamento de imagens na deteccao de disturbios fisiologicos internos em frutos da mangueira (Mangifera indica L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Rubemar de Souza

    2004-01-15

    This work proposes a methodology aimed to be an adviser system for detection of internal breakdown in mangoes during the post-harvest phase to packinghouses. It was arranged a set-up to product digital images from X-ray spectrum in the range of 18 and 20 keV, where the primary images acquired were tested by a digital image processing routine for differentiation of seed, pulp, peel and injured zones. The analysis ROC applied to a only cut on a sample of 114 primary images generated, showed that digital image processing routine was able to identify 88% of true-positive injuries and 7% of false-negatives. When tested against the absence of injuries, the DIP routine had identified 22 % of false-positives and 88% of true-negatives. Besides, a cognitive analysis was applied to a sample of 76 digital images of mangoes. Results showed that the images offer enough information for dichotomic interpretation about the main injuries in the fruit, including those of difficult diagnosis under destructive assay. Measurements of observer agreement, performed on the same group of readers showed themselves in the range of fair and substantial strength of agreement. (author)

  4. Fungal pathogen complexes associated with rambutan, longan and mango diseases in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Different fungi have been associated with diseased inflorescences, leaves, and fruits of mango, rambutan and longan. During a fungal disease survey conducted between 2008 and 2013 at six orchards of rambutan and longan, and one orchard of mango in Puerto Rico, symptoms such as fruit rot, infloresc...

  5. Decay control of carabao mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabastro, E.F.; Pineda, A.S.; Pangan, A.C.; Valle, M.J. del

    1978-01-01

    'Carabao' mangoes were irradiated at the dry gamma room of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission. They were exposed for the predetermined length of time to absorb 15, 30 and 45 kr at a dose rate of 15 kr/hr. One hundred fruits were divided into two lots for each treatment and for each radiation dose. Actual absorbed doses were determined by Fricke dosimetry. After irradiation, the fruits were stored in clean, screened cabinets at room conditions (30 +- 2 0 C, 80-R.H.). Occurence of specific type of spoilage were noted. In inoculated fruits, only the site of inoculation was observed. Results were analyzed by the analysis of variance method. The organisms isolated and found to be spoilage causing were species of Colletotrichum, Diplodia and Aspergillus rot, respectively. Irradiation of mangoes at 15, 30 and 45 kr was found to be effective in delaying spoilage. However, the difference in effect between doses was not statistically significant. No adverse effects of irradiation were observed and the irradiated fruits were found to ripen at a slower rate than the control

  6. Efeito da aplicação do cloreto de cálcio nos frutos da manga 'Tommy Atkins' tratados hidrotermicamente Effect of calcium chloride application on mango fruit cv. Tommy Atkins hydrothermally treated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murillo Freire Júnior

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi estudar os efeitos da aplicação de cloreto de cálcio, associado ao tratamento hidrotérmico em frutos de manga (Mangifera indica L.. Verificou-se que a associação do tratamento hidrotérmico à aplicação de cloreto de cálcio é viável, e que existe uma correlação positiva entre o Ca aplicado e a quantidade deste elemento na casca, porém com pouca penetração para a polpa do fruto, o que demonstra que o Ca age positivamente na diminuição dos sintomas da antracnose. Pelo contraste apresentado na aparência externa dos frutos, a aplicação de cloreto de cálcio a 4% mostrou melhores resultados, porém sem garantir a qualidade final exigida para a exportação dos frutos. A aplicação de cloreto de cálcio não se mostrou efetiva no aumento do período de conservação dos frutos.The aim of this work was to study the effects of the application of calcium chloride associated with hydrothermal treatment on post-harvest preservation of mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.. The Ca absorption by mango peel and flesh was investigated using the same conditions usually employed for the fruit exportation to the american market. It was verified that the association of heat treatment to Ca application was viable. There was a positive correlation between the amount of Ca applied and the amount of this element presented in the peel, although low penetration toward the flesh was observed. It was demonstrated that Ca reduces anthracnose symptoms. It was also verified, by observing the external appearance of the fruits, that the best results were obtained when 4% of calcium chloride was used, although such concentration did not guarantee the required quality for the fruit exportation. The calcium chloride application was not effective to increase the shelf-life of the fruits.

  7. SAP buran injury management of mangoes (mangifera indica L.) in sri lanka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnapillai, N.

    2016-01-01

    Sap burn injury is one of the major postharvest disorders that causes postharvest losses of mangoes. Popular dessert mango fruits from northern Sri Lanka were selected for this study. Mature mango fruits - Willard, Karuthakolumban, Chembaddan and Ambalavi - were harvested carefully with 5cm stalk for different treatments to minimize sap burn injury. Stalks were removed and fruits were dipped in GRAS compounds of 1 and 5% sodium chloride (Table salt) and 0.5 and 1% calcium hydroxide separately for 5 minutes. De-stemming and dipping fruits in 5% sodium chloride and 1% calcium hydroxide were effective in reducing sap burn injury in Karuthakolumban. However, 1% table salt and 0.5% calcium hydroxide successfully reduced sap burn injury in Willard, Chembaddan and Ambalavi mangoes. Fruit quality was measured in terms of pH, Total Soluble Solids (TSS) and marketability. Quality parameters of treated fruits were not significantly different (P=0.05) from non chemical treated good quality mango fruits. Sap management dynamics was very useful in controlling sap burn in Chembaddan and Ambalavi mangoes. No latex exudation was observed in these mangoes when stalk was broken by next day after harvesting. These results suggest that low cost environmentally friendly methods could be used to reduce sap burn injury in mangoes. (author)

  8. An irradiation marker for mango seed weevil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heather, N.W.; Lescano, H.G.; Congdon, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to look for a method to determine whether live mango seed weevil, Sternochetus mangifera (Fabricius) present in fruit had been irradiated at a quarantine dose or lower. We looked specifically for anatomical effects on the supra-oesophageal ganglion of larvae and tested a biochemical method for detection of the effects of irradiation on the protein profile of pupae. Neither method was successful. However, because for most international export markets mangoes need only be found free of the pest at inspection sourcing from pest-free production orchards and quality control systems incorporating requisite pest management components could prove practicable and satisfy most markets. (author)

  9. Mango suprise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, I.

    1987-01-01

    Recent reports on food irradiation by the National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Consumers' Association are discussed. The key questions are the cost of the treatment and whether overseas countries would accept irradiated fruit. The author suggests that some caution in reviewing the issue is now indicated, despite the appeals from those wishing to implement the technology without proper public debate

  10. Interaction of post harvest disease control treatments and gamma irradiation on mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.I.; Cooke, A.W. (Department of Primary Industries, Indooroopilly (Australia)); Boag, T.S. (Riverina-Murray Inst. of Higher Education, Wagga Wagga (Australia). School of Agriculture); Izard, M. (Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights (Australia)); Panitz, M. (Committee of Direction of Fruit Marketing, Brisbane Markets (Australia)); Sangchote, S. (Kasetsart Univ., Bangkok (Thailand))

    1990-04-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation and disease control treatments on disease severity and post harvest quality of several mango cultivars were investigated. In mangoes cv. Kensington Pride, irradiation doses ranging from 300-1200 Gy reduced disease, but the level of control was not commercially acceptable. Hot benomyl immediately followed by irradiation provided effective control of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) and stem end rot (Dothiorella dominicana) during short-term storage (15 days at 20degC). The effects of the two treatments were additive. Satisfactory disease control was achieved during long-term controlled atmosphere storage when mangoes were treated with hot benomyl followed by prochloraz and then irradiated. Effects of fungicide treatment and irradiation were additive. Fungicide, or irradiation treatments alone, were unsatisfactory. Irradiation of cv. Kensington Pride at doses in excess of 600 Gy caused unacceptable surface damage. (author).

  11. Interaction of post harvest disease control treatments and gamma irradiation on mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.I.; Cooke, A.W.; Boag, T.S.; Panitz, M.; Sangchote, S.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation and disease control treatments on disease severity and post harvest quality of several mango cultivars were investigated. In mangoes cv. Kensington Pride, irradiation doses ranging from 300-1200 Gy reduced disease, but the level of control was not commercially acceptable. Hot benomyl immediately followed by irradiation provided effective control of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) and stem end rot (Dothiorella dominicana) during short-term storage (15 days at 20degC). The effects of the two treatments were additive. Satisfactory disease control was achieved during long-term controlled atmosphere storage when mangoes were treated with hot benomyl followed by prochloraz and then irradiated. Effects of fungicide treatment and irradiation were additive. Fungicide, or irradiation treatments alone, were unsatisfactory. Irradiation of cv. Kensington Pride at doses in excess of 600 Gy caused unacceptable surface damage. (author)

  12. Application of irradiated chitosan for fruit preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, K.N. [Post-harvest Technology Institute, 4, Ngo Quyen-Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Lam, N.D. [Ha Noi Radiation Center, VAEC, 5T-160, Nghiado, Tuliem, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Kume, Tamikazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2000-03-01

    Preliminary test of mango (Mangifera indica) preservation by irradiated chitosan coating has been investigated. The coating by using irradiated chitosan in 1.5% solution has extended the shelf life of mango from 7 to 15 days. At the 15th day mango coated by irradiated chitosan has been keeping good color, natural ripening, without spoilage, weight loss 10%, whereas the mango without coating was spoiled completely and the coating of fruit with unirradiated chitosan inhibited the ripening. (author)

  13. Application of irradiated chitosan for fruit preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, K.N.; Lam, N.D.; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary test of mango (Mangifera indica) preservation by irradiated chitosan coating has been investigated. The coating by using irradiated chitosan in 1.5% solution has extended the shelf life of mango from 7 to 15 days. At the 15th day mango coated by irradiated chitosan has been keeping good color, natural ripening, without spoilage, weight loss 10%, whereas the mango without coating was spoiled completely and the coating of fruit with unirradiated chitosan inhibited the ripening. (author)

  14. Quality parameters of mango and potential of non-destructive techniques for their measurement- a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, S.N.; Narsaiah, K.; Sharma, A.D.; Singh, M.; Bansal, S.; Kumar, R.

    2010-01-01

    The king of fruits 'Mango' (Mangifera indica L.) is very nutritious and rich in carotenes. India produces about 50% of the total world's mango. Many researchers have reported the maturity indices and quality parameters for determination of harvesting time and eating quality. The methods currently used for determination of quality of mango are mostly based on the biochemical analysis, which leads to destruction of the fruits. Numerous works are being carried out to explore some non-destructive methods such as Near Infrared (NIR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), X-ray and Computed Tomography (CT), electronic nose, machine vision and ultrasound for quality determination of fruits. This paper deals with some recent work reported on quality parameters, harvesting and post-harvest treatments in relation to quality of mango fruits and reviews on some of the potential non-destructive techniques that can be explored for quality determination of mango cultivars. (author)

  15. Effect of heat treatment and shelf life on chilling injury of mango cv. Nam Dok Mai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apiradee Muangdech

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the effect of heat treatment and shelf life on chilling injury of mango cv.Nam Dok Mai.The heat treatment of mango pulp during storage were determined by hot air oven set at 34 and 38°C for three intervals, as 24, 48, and 72 hours, then they were subsequently stored at 5°C for 10, 20, and 30 days to determine the appropriate shelf life. The findings showed that the symptom of mango fruit after chilling injury appeared within the 30th day of storage at 5°C. Several symptoms of mango fruit after chilling injury treatment were observed, i.e., pitting, browning on the skin, water soaking, and rapid rotting of the fruits that resulted in shorter shelf life. It was found that chilling injury mangoes had lower level of total soluble solid, higher disease incidence, and lower quality of fruit when compared with normal ripe-mango fruits at 25°C. Mango fruits treated at 34°C for either 24 or 48 hours, and at 38°C for 24 hours prior to cold storage at 5°C for 10 and 20 days showed a significant reduction in the chilling injury (CI index when compared to that of non-heated fruits. On the other hand, the heat treatment did not affect fruit weight loss, firmness, color changes, and water soaking at 5°C.

  16. Transport simulation of mangoes irradiated for exportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe

    2007-01-01

    It had been studied the effect of the ionizing radiation (gamma) in mangoes for exportation, simulating the stage of preservation of the fruit during its transport, through the refrigeration in cold chamber. In a first stage they had been analyzed through loss of weight, pH, treatable acidity, soluble solid, texture and decomposition. Later, sensorial analyses had been become fulfilled (alterations of color, odor, flavor, texture). The assays had been carried through in two stadiums of maturation of the fruits, that is, 2 and 3, with the intention of studying optimum point of harvest for the best dosage of irradiation. The results disclose together that the treatment of the mangoes Tommy Atkins in the dose of 0,75 kGy was significant, with the fruit in stadium 2, for the retardation of the matureness and consequent profit of time for the exportation. (author)

  17. INFESTAÇÃO DE MOSCAS-DAS-FRUTAS EM VARIEDADES DE MANGA (Mangifera indica L. NO ESTADO DE GOIÁS INFESTATION OF FRUIT FLY IN VARIETIES OF MANGO IN THE STATE OF GOIÁS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juracy Rocha Braga Filho

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    A mangueira (Mangifera indica L. é a principal espécie frutífera da família Anacardiaceae cultivada no Brasil. A expansão dessa cultura nos últimos anos, tanto para o consumo in natura como para a exportação, é limitada por diversas pragas, principalmente pelas moscas-das-frutas. No período de setembro de 1999 a fevereiro de 2000 foi estudado o nível de infestação natural de moscas-das-frutas em dez variedades de manga, em três municípios do Estado de Goiás. Foram obtidos 1.195 pupários, dos quais emergiram 484 adultos de Anastrepha (80% dos insetos identificados, 104 lonqueídeos (17,2 % e 17 braconídeos (2,8%. Das fêmeas identificadas, 77,9% pertenciam ao gênero Anastrepha e 22,08%, a Neosilba. As espécies identificadas foram: A. obliqua (48,78%, A. fraterculus (47,97%, A. sororcula (2,03% e A. turpiniae (1,22%, referida pela primeira vez em frutos de manga no Estado. O parasitóide Doryctobracon areolatus foi encontrado em larvas/pupas de moscas-das-frutas, nas variedades Imperial e Tommy Atkins. As variedades com maiores índices de infestação foram Imperial (15,3 pupários/fruto e 73,611 pupários/kg de frutos, em Goiânia, e Tommy Atkins (7,0 pupários/fruto e 17,503 pupários/kg de frutos, no município de Orizona. Em Goiânia, a variedade Bourbon não foi infestada, e a Sabina apresentou um índice de infestação de 0,076 pupários/fruto e 0,363 pupários/ kg de frutos.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Insecta; Diptera; Tephritoidea; avaliação de danos; parasitóides.

    Mango (Mangifera indica L. production has expanded greatly in Brazil but several pests, especially fruit flies, have limited both fresh fruit consumption and

  18. Development of Rhagoletis pomonella and Rhagoletis indifferens (Diptera: Tephritidae)in mango and other tropical and temperate fruit in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperate fruit flies in the genus Rhagoletis (Diptera: Tephritidae) have narrow host ranges relative to those of tropical fruit flies, suggesting they will not attack or are incapable of developing in most novel fruit. Here we tested the hypothesis that apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Wals...

  19. Unidades fototérmicas e temperatura-base inferior de frutos de Mangueira Alfa, na Baixada Cuiabana Photothermal units and lower base temperature for alfa mango fruit on the Baixada Cuiabana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Paes de Barros

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a temperatura-base inferior (Tb a partir da unidade fototérmica (UF para o cultivo experimental de manga Alfa sob condições de cerrado. Foram utilizados dados diários da temperatura do ar disponibilizados pela Estação Agrometeorológica Padre Ricardo Remetter, localizada em Santo Antônio do Leverger-MT (15,8° S e 56,1° W, 140 m, e avaliação sensorial do estádio de maturação dos frutos de manga. A Tb foi determinada pelo método da menor variabilidade das unidades fototérmicas (UF acumuladas do período da floração à colheita dos frutos, variabilidade avaliada pelo coeficiente de variação (cv simulado para diferentes valores da Tb. De julho a novembro de 2007, em três plantas de um pomar demonstrativo irrigado, foram identificados 82 frutos para o acompanhamento do crescimento e maturação. Entre esses frutos, em meados de dezembro de 2007, foi possível identificar 13 frutos que atingiram a maturidade fisiológica, após um período médio de observação de 112 dias. Para exigência fototérmica de 1.878.166,1 UF, encontrou-se Tb de 10 °C, valor consistente com os apresentados na literatura para a cultivar de manga, o que comprova a eficiência do método que combina a ação da temperatura e do fotoperíodo sobre a maturação dos frutos e que confere um caráter mais racional que o método tradicional da soma térmica.In this study was to determine the lower base temperature (Tb for Alfa mango fruit, using the photothermal units (PTU method in cerrado conditions. The meteorological data for the study were acquired from "Padre Ricardo Remetter" meteorological station located at Santo Antonio do Leverger, MT, Brazil (15,8° S and 56,1° W, 140 m, and the fruit data was acquired by sensorial evaluation of mango fruit maturation state. The Tb was determined by less variability of the coefficient of variation (cv method applied to the PTU sum, from flowering to harvest, simulated for

  20. Efeito dos compostos naturais bioativos na conservação pós-colheita de frutos de mangueira cv. Tommy Atkins Effects of bioactive natural compounds on the postharvest conservation of mango fruits cv. Tommy Atkins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Julia da Silva Cruz

    2010-04-01

    (Mangífera mandica cv. Tommy Atkins treated with sodium bicarbonate diluted in distilled water, concentration of 3% (v/v, through immersion. For the treatment, the essential oils of Origanum majorana, Citrus sinensis, Cymbopogon citratus and Eucalyptus citriodora were used through fumigation, in the dosage of 1000 μL and distilled water through fumigation; all for 3 minutes. Mango fruits of the Unity CEASA-Maringá/PR, selected, weighed in a semi-analytical scale, disinfected by immersion of 3 minutes in a solution of sodium hypochlorite to 0.5% (v/v; rinsed in running water and dried. They were submitted to the treatments under ambient conditions (26 ± 2ºC and RH 90 ± 5%. Except for the treatment of Citrus sinensis, that resulted in a pH larger than the witness, significantly differing from the treatments that elevate the variable. There was reduction of the acidity in all of the treatments and increment of TSS in the fruits and with sodium bicarbonate provided 14.42 º Brix. The number of fruits with anthracnose was smaller in those treated with Citrus sinensis and this differed from the others, proving the effect of Citrus as fungitoxic. The use of essential oils such as that obtained from Citrus sinensis controlled the anthracnose and maintained the quality of the fruits.

  1. Incidence of chilling injury in fresh-cut 'Kent' mangoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The preferred storage temperature for fresh-cut fruits in terms of visual quality retention is around 5 °C, which is considered to be a chilling temperature for chilling sensitive tropical fruits like mango (Mangifera indica L.). Changes in visual and compositional quality factors, aroma volatile pr...

  2. Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mango ginger (Curcuma amada Roxb.) is a unique spice having morphological resemblance with ginger but imparts a raw mango flavour. The main use of mango ginger rhizome is in the manufacture of pickles and culinary preparations. Ayurveda and Unani medicinal systems have given much importance to mango ginger ...

  3. Frutas estruturadas de umidade intermediária obtidas de polpas concentradas de abacaxi, manga e mamão Restructured fruits of intermediate moisture from concentrated pineapple, mango and papaya pulps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Kitagawa Grizotto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estabelecer procedimento tecnológico para produção de fruta estruturada com elevados teores (450 a 700 g/kg de polpas concentradas de abacaxi (39ºBrix, manga (35ºBrix e mamão (16ºBrix, e quantidade mínima de sacarose, utilizando alginato ou pectina baixamente metoxilada. Glicose ou glicerol foi utilizado como supressor de atividade de água. Valores de firmeza de 240 g para géis de alginato e 1300 g para géis de pectina, determinados em Analisador de Textura TA.XT2, podem ser utilizados como indicadores para a estruturação, baseando-se nas propriedades de corte das frutas estruturadas. O processo de estruturação compreende a mistura sob vácuo (88 kPa da polpa concentrada previamente aquecida a 60ºC e o hidrocolóide disperso em açúcar. Soluções de CaHPO e Glucona-Delta-Lactona foram adicionadas à mistura para favorecer a formação do gel. Os resultados mostraram a importância de elevar o pH de polpas de abacaxi e manga para 4,00 com NaOH. O alginato produziu 4 géis mais firmes e o glicerol foi o supressor de atividade de água mais eficiente. As frutas estruturadas de mamão com alginato apresentaram maior firmeza (acima de 3 kg. Os géis de abacaxi com alginato não puderam ser cortados com a faca, embora os géis de manga puderam ser cortados, eles aderiram à faca.The objective of this research was to establish a technological procedure for the production of restructured fruits with high contents (450 to 700 g/kg of concentrated pineapple (39ºBrix, mango (35ºBrix and papaya (16ºBrix pulps, and minimal amounts of sucrose using alginate or low methoxy pectin. Glycerol or glucose was used to suppress the water activity. Firmness values of 240 g for alginate gels or 1300 g for pectin gels, measured using the TA.XT2 Texture Analyser, can be used as indicators for structuring based on the cutting properties of the structured fruits. The structuring process includes the mixing under vacuum (88

  4. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  5. Influence of irrigation during the growth stage on yield and quality in mango (Mangifera indica L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Junya; Liu, Guoyin; Liu, Debing; Chen, Yeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Although being one of the few drought-tolerant plants, mango trees are irrigated to ensure optimum and consistent productivity in China. In order to better understand the effects of soil water content on mango yield and fruit quality at fruit growth stage, irrigation experiments were investigated and the object was to determine the soil water content criteria at which growth and quality of mango would be optimal based on soil water measured by RHD-JS water-saving irrigation system through micro-sprinkling irrigation. Five soil water content treatments (relative to the percentage of field water capacity) for irrigation (T1:79%-82%, T2:75%-78%, T3:71%-74%, T4: 65%-70%, T5:63%-66%) were compared in 2013. Amount of applied irrigation water for different treatments varied from 2.93m3 to 1.08 m3. The results showed that mango fruit production and quality at fruit growth stage were significantly affected under different irrigation water amounts. Variation in soil water content not only had effects on fruit size, but also on fruit yield. The highest fruit yield and irrigation water use efficiency were obtained from the T4 treatment. Irrigation water amount also affected fruit quality parameters like fruit total soluble solids, soluble sugar, starch, titratable acid and vitamin C content. Comprehensive evaluation of the effect of indexs of correlation on irrigation treatment by subordinate function showed that when the soil moisture content were controlled at about 65-70% of the field water moisture capacity, water demand in the growth and development of mango could be ensured, and maximum production efficiency of irrigation and the best quality of fruit could be achieved. In conclusion, treatment T4 was the optimum irrigation schedule for growing mango, thus achieving efficient production of mango in consideration of the compromise among mango yield, fruit quality and water use efficiency.

  6. Design of the PRIDE Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Gil Sung; Choung, Won Myung; Lee, Eun Pyo; Cho, Il Je; Kwon, Kie Chan; Hong, Dong Hee; Lee, Won Kyung; Ku, Jeong Hoe

    2009-01-01

    From 2007, KAERI is developing a PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration facility (the PRIDE facility). The maximum annual treatment capacity of this facility will be a 10 ton-HM. The process will use a natural uranium feed material or a natural uranium mixed with some surrogate material for a simulation of a spent fuel. KAERI has also another plan to construct a demonstration facility which can treat a real spent fuel by pyroprocessing. This facility is called by ESPF, Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility. The ESPF will have the same treatment capability of spent fuel with the PRIDE facility. The only difference between the PRIDE and the ESPF is a radiation shielding capability. From the PRIDE facility designing works and demonstration with a simulated spent fuel after construction, it will be able to obtain the basic facility requirements, remote operability, interrelation properties between process equipment for designing of the ESPF. The flow sheet of the PRIDE processes is composed of five main processes, such as a decladding and voloxidation, an electro-reduction, an electrorefining, an electro-winning, and a salt waste treatment. The final products from the PRIDE facility are a simulated TRU metal and U metal ingot

  7. Mangifera indica L. (the mango plant) of Anacardiaceae is a large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mangifera indica L. (the mango plant) of Anacardiaceae is a large spreading evergreen tree with simple leaves and small reddish white or yellowish green flowers borne on much-branched inflorescences. More than 500 varieties of mango are cultivated in Indiafor their large, sweet, edible fruits which are of high economic ...

  8. Field Note: A Disease Specific Expert System for the Indian Mango Crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Dilip Kumar; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2007-01-01

    Mango ("Mangifera indica") is a popular fruit and an important cash crop of southeast Asia. The mango malformation disease has been responsible for the degraded yield of the crop now for a long time (Kumar and Chakrabarti, 1997). The disease is difficult to cure and often takes the shape of an epidemic. Though much study has been done…

  9. Phylogeny and pathogenicity of Lasiodiplodia species associated with dieback of mango in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez-Gálvez, Edgar; Guerrero, Pakita; Barradas, Carla; Crous, Pedro W.; Alves, Artur

    Abstract Mango, which is an important tropical fruit crop in the region of Piura (Peru), is known to be prone to a range of diseases caused by Lasiodiplodia spp. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of mango dieback in the region of Piura, and to identify the species of

  10. 78 FR 57467 - Importation of Mangoes From Australia Into the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ..., Hawaii, California, and Texas and produced primarily for local markets. While U.S. mango production is... noteworthy decrease in mango prices or otherwise substantially affect the market, especially given the... Coordinator, at (301) 851-2908. List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 319 Coffee, Cotton, Fruits, Imports, Logs...

  11. Integrated studies on irradiated Philippine mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, J.A.; Legaspi, E.; Quarteros, R.; Grimares, L.; Escano, L.; Marzan, A.; Lanuza, A.; Singson, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of the fruitfly, Dacus dorsalis Hendel, has restricted export of Philippine mangoes to Japan and other countries with strict quarantine requirements. The anticipated banning of the ethylene dibromide (EDB) as fumigant necessitated studies to find a suitable replacement. Based on the encouraging results of previous disinfestation experiments further studies utilizing irradiation and its combination with a hot water dip were undertaken. The objective of the studies was to interrelate the effects of the disinfestation method to fruit maturity, storage temperature, and some related processes, including shipping, on the shelf-life, chemical, and sensory attributes of the carabao mango. Results show that the combination treatment of 0.65 kGy and a hot water dip at 50 deg. C for 5 minutes can be a good alternative for ethylene dibromide with the added benefit of shelf life extension. The chemical, nutritive and sensory characteristics of the fruit also are retained. 32 refs, 19 tabs

  12. Natural field infestation of Mangifera casturi and M.lalijiwa by oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Mangifera indica, is a crop cultivated pantropically. There are, however, many other Mangifera spp. (“mango relatives”) which have much more restricted distributions and are poorly known, but have potential to produce mango-like fruits in areas where mangoes do not grow well or could be tapp...

  13. Utilization of physicochemical variables developed from changes in sensory attributes and consumer acceptability to predict the shelf life of fresh-cut mango fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Hernández, Rosa María; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A; Tiznado-Hernández, Martín Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Sensory evaluation is the ideal tool for shelf-life determination. With the objective to develop an easy shelf-life indicator, color (L*, a*, b*, chroma and hue angle), total soluble solids (TSS), firmness (F), pH, acidity, and the sensory attributes of appearance, brightness, browning, odor, flavor, texture, color, acidity and sweetness were evaluated in fresh cut mangoes (FCM) stored at 5, 10, 15 and 20 °C. Overall acceptability was evaluated by consumers. Correlation analysis between sensory attributes and physicochemical variables was carried out. Physicochemical cut-off points based on sensory attributes and consumer acceptability was obtained by regression analysis and utilized to estimate FCM shelf-life by kinetic models fitted to each variable. The validation of the model was done by comparing the shelf life estimated by kinetic models and consumers. It was recorded large correlations between appearance, brightness, and color with L*; appearance and color with chroma and hue angle; sweetness and flavor with TSS, and between F and texture. The shelf life estimated based on consumer using a 9 point hedonic scale was in the range of 10-12, 2.3-2.6, 1.3-1.5 and 1.0-1.1 days for 5, 10, 15 and 20 °C. It was recorded large correlation coefficients between the shelf life estimated by consumer acceptability scores and physicochemical variables. Kinetic models based on physicochemical variables showed a tendency to overestimate the shelf life as compared with the models bases on the sensory attributes. It was concluded that physicochemical variables can be used as a tool to estimate the FCM shelf life.

  14. Transportation and storage studies on irradiated Alphonso mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, J.; Dharkar, S.D.; Sreenivasan, A.

    1972-01-01

    Control as well as skin coated (6% ''Myvacet'') and/or irradiated (25 to 35 krad) mangoes were packed in baskets in dry paddy straw and shipped by rail. After a storage at a temperature of 25 to 32 0 C for a period of 8 days, the baskets were shipped back. After receipt in the laboratory the fruits were kept under observation for 5 more days and then scored for ripening and marketability as assessed by appearance, skin gloss and typical flavour. 100 per cent of fruits skin-coated and irradiated were marketable at the end of the experiment. None of the unirradiated control fruits were saleable by this time, while 66%, of the irradiated fruits were in acceptable condition. In further experiments one dozen mangoes each from control, irradiated and skin-coated and irradiated groups were wrapped individually in tissue paper and packed tightly in a plyweed box. This consignment was air-lifted from Bombay to Budapest, a distance of about 5600 kilometers. The time interval between irradiation and their receipt in Hungary was 4 days. The mangoes were assessed for their storage characteristics by various parameters that included physiological loss in weight, puncture resistance of the skin, pulp texture, carotenoids, acidity and organoleptic attributes, at various periods during storage. It was found that ripening and senescence are strikingly delayed in mangoes by skin-coating and radiation treatment. The treated mangoes retained their skin-resistance while the disappearance of chlorophyl and formation of carotenoids were substantially delayed. Weight loss in storage was lower and reduction of acidity and formation of sugars in the fruit flesh took place later. Organoleptically, the fruits subjected to the combination treatment were good. These studies point to the feasibility of the combination treatment in prolonging the shelf life of fruits significantly to enable their transport to distant countries. (F.G.)

  15. Mass rearing methods for fruit fly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Gordillo, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The most common rearing methods used for mass rearing of fruit flies, with emphasis on those of economic importance in Mexico such as Anastrepha ludens (the Mexican fruit fly). Anastrepha obliqua (the mango and plum fruit fly) and the exotic fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (the Mediterranean fruit fly) are described here. (author)

  16. "Pride and Prejudice". [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Alisa

    Based on Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice," this lesson plan presents activities designed to help students understand that classics are those pieces of literature that continue to be popular long after they were written; classics tend to have universal themes; and Austen's writing has been updated and dramatized and, most likely, will…

  17. Pride, Shame and Group Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eSalice

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does?This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject group-identifies with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being a member of a group – the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong.By looking into the way in which the notion of group identification can allow for an account of hetero-induced shame and pride, this paper attempts to achieve a sort of mutual enlightenment that brings to light not only an important and generally neglected form of self-conscious emotions, but also relevant features of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject’s conative states like desires or intentions.

  18. Pride, Shame, and Group Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sánchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Self-conscious emotions such as shame and pride are emotions that typically focus on the self of the person who feels them. In other words, the intentional object of these emotions is assumed to be the subject that experiences them. Many reasons speak in its favor and yet this account seems to leave a question open: how to cash out those cases in which one genuinely feels ashamed or proud of what someone else does? This paper contends that such cases do not necessarily challenge the idea that shame and pride are about the emoting subject. Rather, we claim that some of the most paradigmatic scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject "group-identifies" with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being) a member of a group - the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong. By looking into the way in which the notion of group identification can allow for an account of hetero-induced shame and pride, this paper attempts to achieve a sort of mutual enlightenment that brings to light not only an important and generally neglected form of self-conscious emotions, but also relevant features of group identification. In particular, it generates evidence for the idea that group identification is a psychological process that the subject does not have to carry out intentionally in the sense that it is not necessarily triggered by the subject's conative states like desires or intentions.

  19. In-Line Sorting of Harumanis Mango Based on External Quality Using Visible Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Firdaus Ibrahim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The conventional method of grading Harumanis mango is time-consuming, costly and affected by human bias. In this research, an in-line system was developed to classify Harumanis mango using computer vision. The system was able to identify the irregularity of mango shape and its estimated mass. A group of images of mangoes of different size and shape was used as database set. Some important features such as length, height, centroid and parameter were extracted from each image. Fourier descriptor and size-shape parameters were used to describe the mango shape while the disk method was used to estimate the mass of the mango. Four features have been selected by stepwise discriminant analysis which was effective in sorting regular and misshapen mango. The volume from water displacement method was compared with the volume estimated by image processing using paired t-test and Bland-Altman method. The result between both measurements was not significantly different (P > 0.05. The average correct classification for shape classification was 98% for a training set composed of 180 mangoes. The data was validated with another testing set consist of 140 mangoes which have the success rate of 92%. The same set was used for evaluating the performance of mass estimation. The average success rate of the classification for grading based on its mass was 94%. The results indicate that the in-line sorting system using machine vision has a great potential in automatic fruit sorting according to its shape and mass.

  20. In-Line Sorting of Harumanis Mango Based on External Quality Using Visible Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Firdaus; Ahmad Sa'ad, Fathinul Syahir; Zakaria, Ammar; Md Shakaff, Ali Yeon

    2016-10-27

    The conventional method of grading Harumanis mango is time-consuming, costly and affected by human bias. In this research, an in-line system was developed to classify Harumanis mango using computer vision. The system was able to identify the irregularity of mango shape and its estimated mass. A group of images of mangoes of different size and shape was used as database set. Some important features such as length, height, centroid and parameter were extracted from each image. Fourier descriptor and size-shape parameters were used to describe the mango shape while the disk method was used to estimate the mass of the mango. Four features have been selected by stepwise discriminant analysis which was effective in sorting regular and misshapen mango. The volume from water displacement method was compared with the volume estimated by image processing using paired t -test and Bland-Altman method. The result between both measurements was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The average correct classification for shape classification was 98% for a training set composed of 180 mangoes. The data was validated with another testing set consist of 140 mangoes which have the success rate of 92%. The same set was used for evaluating the performance of mass estimation. The average success rate of the classification for grading based on its mass was 94%. The results indicate that the in-line sorting system using machine vision has a great potential in automatic fruit sorting according to its shape and mass.

  1. In-Line Sorting of Harumanis Mango Based on External Quality Using Visible Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Firdaus; Ahmad Sa’ad, Fathinul Syahir; Zakaria, Ammar; Md Shakaff, Ali Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The conventional method of grading Harumanis mango is time-consuming, costly and affected by human bias. In this research, an in-line system was developed to classify Harumanis mango using computer vision. The system was able to identify the irregularity of mango shape and its estimated mass. A group of images of mangoes of different size and shape was used as database set. Some important features such as length, height, centroid and parameter were extracted from each image. Fourier descriptor and size-shape parameters were used to describe the mango shape while the disk method was used to estimate the mass of the mango. Four features have been selected by stepwise discriminant analysis which was effective in sorting regular and misshapen mango. The volume from water displacement method was compared with the volume estimated by image processing using paired t-test and Bland-Altman method. The result between both measurements was not significantly different (P > 0.05). The average correct classification for shape classification was 98% for a training set composed of 180 mangoes. The data was validated with another testing set consist of 140 mangoes which have the success rate of 92%. The same set was used for evaluating the performance of mass estimation. The average success rate of the classification for grading based on its mass was 94%. The results indicate that the in-line sorting system using machine vision has a great potential in automatic fruit sorting according to its shape and mass. PMID:27801799

  2. Postharvest Ripening and Shelf Life of Mango (Mangifera indica L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a climacteric and highly perishable fruit that requires specialized postharvest handling to extend its storage life. The study was undertaken at Melkassa Agricultural Research Center (MARC) to evaluate the influence of 1-Methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) and polyethylene packaging (PP) on ...

  3. Pride, Shame and Group Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salice, Alessandro; Montes Sanchez, Alba

    2016-01-01

    into the way in which the notion of group identification can allow for an account of hetero-induced shame and pride, this paper attempts to achieve a sort of mutual enlightenment that brings to light not only an important and generally neglected form of self-conscious emotions, but also relevant features...... scenarios of shame and pride induced by others can be accommodated by taking seriously the consideration that, in such cases, the subject “group-identifies” with the other. This is the idea that, in feeling these forms of shame or pride, the subject is conceiving of herself as a member of the same group...... as the subject acting shamefully or in an admirable way. In other words, these peculiar emotive responses are elicited in the subject insofar as, and to the extent that, she is (or sees herself as being) a member of a group – the group to which those who act shamefully or admirably also belong. By looking...

  4. White Mango Scale, Aulacaspis tubercularis , Distribution and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    White Mango Scale, Aulacaspis tubercularis , Distribution and Severity Status in East and West Wollega Zones, ... Among the insect pests attacking mango plant, white mango scale is the most devastating insect pest. ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  5. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) by-products and their valuable components: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahurul, M H A; Zaidul, I S M; Ghafoor, Kashif; Al-Juhaimi, Fahad Y; Nyam, Kar-Lin; Norulaini, N A N; Sahena, F; Mohd Omar, A K

    2015-09-15

    The large amount of waste produced by the food industries causes serious environmental problems and also results in economic losses if not utilized effectively. Different research reports have revealed that food industry by-products can be good sources of potentially valuable bioactive compounds. As such, the mango juice industry uses only the edible portions of the mangoes, and a considerable amount of peels and seeds are discarded as industrial waste. These mango by-products come from the tropical or subtropical fruit processing industries. Mango by-products, especially seeds and peels, are considered to be cheap sources of valuable food and nutraceutical ingredients. The main uses of natural food ingredients derived from mango by-products are presented and discussed, and the mainstream sectors of application for these by-products, such as in the food, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic industries, are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. mango (mangifera i

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    21: 542-544. Joshi PR and Shiralkar ND 1977. Polyphenolases of a local variety of mango J. Food Sci. and Technol. 14: 77-. 79. Kahn V 1997 Some biochemical properties of polyphenoloxidase from two avocado varieties differing in their browning rates. J. Food Sci. 42: 38–43. Klein JD 1987 Relationship of harvest date,.

  7. Saving Mango Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, Katie

    2012-01-01

    The author first learned about cultural diversity and racial justice in Mr. Sanderson's middle school English class. They read a book called "The House on Mango Street" by Sandra Cisneros and learned about a different culture, but also about a community with striking similarities to their own. The main character in the novel, Esperanza,…

  8. Effect of Resin Ducts and Sap Content on Infestation and Development of Immature Stages of Anastrepha obliqua and Anastrepha ludens (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Four Mango (Sapindales: Anacardiaceae) Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, Larissa; Adaime, Ricardo; Birke, Andrea; Velázquez, Olinda; Angeles, Guillermo; Ortega, Fernando; Ruíz, Eliel; Aluja, Martín

    2017-04-01

    We determined the influence of resin ducts, sap content, and fruit physicochemical features of four mango cultivars (Criollo, Manila, Ataulfo, and Tommy Atkins) on their susceptibility to the attack of the two most pestiferous fruit fly species infesting mangoes in Mexico: Anastrepha ludens (Loew) and Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart). We performed three studies: 1) analysis of resin ducts in mango fruit exocarp to determine the density and area occupied by resin ducts in each mango cultivar, 2) assessment of mango physicochemical features including fruit sap content, and 3) a forced infestation trial under field conditions using enclosed fruit-bearing branches to expose mangoes to gravid A. ludens or A. obliqua females. Infestation rates, development time from egg to prepupae and pupae, pupal weight, and percent of adult emergence, were assessed. 'Ataulfo' and 'Tommy Atkins' cultivars exhibited the highest resin duct density and sap content, the lowest infestation rate, and had a negative effect on immature development and pupal weight. In sharp contrast, 'Manila' and 'Criollo' cultivars, with the lowest resin duct density and sap content, were highly susceptible to A. ludens and A. obliqua attack. We conclude that sap content and the number, size, and distribution of resin ducts as well as firmness in mango fruit exocarp are all involved in the resistance of mango to A. ludens and A. obliqua attack. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effects on storage life and quality of irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pongsuwan, Dara; Therapawa, Wallapa; Akawassapong, Pakinee; Jattanajet, Jumlong.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations on the effect of irradiation at 50 Krad, hot water treatment at 55 degC 5 min and hot water treatment followed by irradiation were carried out on the mature green Keaw mango to eradicate anthracnose disease development and delay ripening. Before introducing all treatments, mangoes were inoculated by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. All samples were determined after stored at 10 +- 2 degC and at 85% RH for 3 weeks. No difference in disease control between untreated and irradiated batches, but fruits treated with hot water followed by irradiation were significantly different from untreated ones. All treatments were effective in delaying ripening. Higher dosage of irradiation with a combination of hot water treatment was studied on colour break Pimsen Prure mango and 75 Krad after hot water treatment proved to be promising. Further study is being conducted

  10. Natural Field Infestation of Mangifera casturi and Mangifera lalijiwa by Oriental Fruit Fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuate, Grant T; Sylva, Charmaine D; Liquido, Nicanor J

    2017-01-01

    Mango, Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae), is a crop cultivated pantropically. There are, however, many other Mangifera spp (“mango relatives”) which have much more restricted distributions and are poorly known but have potential to produce mango-like fruits in areas where mangoes do not grow well or could be tapped in mango breeding programs. Because of the restricted distribution of many of the Mangifera spp, there has also been limited data collected on susceptibility of their fruits to infestation by tephritid fruit flies which is important to know for concerns both for quality of production and for quarantine security of fruit exports. Here, we report on natural field infestation by the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), of two mango relatives native to Indonesia: Mangifera casturi and Mangifera lalijiwa. Rates of infestation of fruits of these two Mangifera spp by tephritid fruit flies have not previously been reported. PMID:28890657

  11. IMPACT INJURY DIAGNOSIS IN MANGO THROUGH STARCH DEGRADATION INDEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO DE ASSIS DE SOUSA

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the use of starch degradation index (SDI in the diagnosis of areas of impact injuries in 'Tommy Atkins' mango, in different maturation stages. The experiment layout was a fully randomized factorial design (5 x 2, represented by five maturation stages and two handlings, with and without impact, with four replicates. SDI was determined through a subjective scale of scores indicating mango pulp darkened areas by reaction with iodine-potassium iodide solution. Subsequently, these scores were correlated with physicochemical quality variables. The results showed no influence of impact on fruit quality, in any of the studied maturation stages. Moreover, soluble solid contents increased throughout maturation stages, regardless of whether the fruits suffered impact or not. As a result, SDI is unsuitable to indicate fruit impact injury. However, there is a good correlation between SDI and pulp color, vitamin C, pH, titratable acidity, soluble solids, SS/ TA ratio and non-reducing sugars.

  12. Is pride a prosocial emotion? Interpersonal effects of authentic and hubristic pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wubben, Maarten J J; De Cremer, David; van Dijk, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Pride is associated with both prosocial and antisocial behaviour. Do others also infer such behaviours when pride is expressed and does this affect their own prosocial behaviour? We expected that authentic pride (i.e., confidence, accomplishment) would signal and elicit more prosocial behaviour than hubristic pride (i.e., arrogance, conceit). In a first laboratory experiment, a target in a public-good dilemma was inferred to have acted less prosocially when displaying a nonverbal expression of pride versus no emotion. As predicted, inferences of hubristic pride-but not authentic pride-mediated this effect. Participants themselves also responded less prosocially. A second laboratory experiment where a target verbally expressed authentic pride, hubristic pride, or no emotion replicated the effects of hubristic pride and showed that authentically proud targets were assumed to have acted prosocially, but especially by perceivers with a dispositional tendency to take the perspective of others. We conclude that authentic pride is generally perceived as a more prosocial emotion than hubristic pride.

  13. Evolução de indicadores do ponto de colheita em manga 'Tommy Atkins' durante o crescimento e a maturação, nas condições do vale do São Francisco, Brasil Evolution of harvest time indicators on 'Tommy Atkins' mango fruit during growth and maturation at São Francisco River Valley conditions, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Auxiliadora Coêlho de Lima

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, neste trabalho, caracterizar a evolução dos principais indicadores do ponto de colheita sugeridos para a manga (Mangifera indica L., durante o crescimento e a maturação de frutos da cultivar Tommy Atkins, nas condições do Vale do São Francisco. Por ocasião da frutificação, foram selecionadas quarenta e oito plantas, distribuídas uniformemente em quatro fileiras de plantio de um pomar comercial. Nessas plantas, foram marcados seiscentos frutos, no estádio de desenvolvimento denominado "ovo" (40 mm de diâmetro, o que foi verificado aos 52 dias após a frutificação (daf. Periodicamente, até o completo amadurecimento na planta, foram coletadas amostras desses frutos, correspondentes à idade, aos 52, 64, 72, 83, 92, 99, 106, 113, 120, 125, 128, 133 e 139 daf. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, com 13 tratamentos (idade dos frutos e quatro repetições constituídas por dez frutos. As mudanças ocorridas na coloração a partir de 99 daf e na firmeza da polpa foram os indicadores que melhor delimitaram o início da maturação das mangas, devendo ser acompanhados por meio de amostragem da área. As mudanças na acidez titulável e nos teores de sólidos solúveis (SS e de carotenóides totais da polpa também foram indicativas da evolução da maturação. A polpa da manga madura apresentou o máximo teor de SS e teores de ácido ascórbico e de carotenóides totais inferiores aos dos frutos no início da maturação.The aim of this study was to characterize the evolution of the main harvest time indicators suggested to mango fruit (Mangifera indica L., during growth and maturation, at the São Francisco River Valley conditions. At the fruit set stage, forty-eight plants uniformly distributed on four rows were selected from a commercial orchard. From these plants, six hundred fruits were selected at the development stage known as "egg" (40 mm of diameter, which were verified at 52 days after fruit

  14. Potential contribution of mangoes to reduction of vitamin A deficiency in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muoki, Penina N; Makokha, Anselimo O; Onyango, Christine A; Ojijo, Nelson K O

    2009-01-01

    The β-carotene content of fresh and dried mangoes commonly consumed in Kenya was evaluated and converted to retinol equivalent (RE). Mango fruits of varieties Ngowe, Apple, and Tommy Atkins were harvested at mature green, partially ripe, and ripe stages and their β-carotene content analyzed. The stability of β-carotene in sun dried mangoes was also studied over 6 months under usual marketing conditions used in Kenya. The effect of using simple pretreatment methods prior to drying of mango slices on retention of β-carotene was as well evaluated. In amounts acceptable to children and women, fresh and dried mangoes can supply 50% or more of the daily required retinol equivalent for children and women. Stage of ripeness, variety, postharvest holding temperature, method of drying, and storage time of dried mango slices affected β-carotene content and consequently vitamin A value of the fruits. Apple variety grown in Machakos had the highest β-carotene. It exceeded the daily RE requirements by 11.8% and 21.5% for women and children respectively. Fresh or dried mangoes are a significant provitamin A source and should be included in food-based approaches aiming to reduce vitamin A deficiency.

  15. Improvement of shelf-life and quality of mangoes by gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Paul; Padwal Desai, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Results of the studies on low dose gamma irradiation of mangoes in the dose range 10 to 200 krad alone or in combination with other physical and chemical treatments (i.e. hot water dipping and skin coating with 9 percent emulsion of acetylated monoglyceride) show that physiological, pathological and entomological factors can be controlled to extend the shelf-life of mangoes by one to two weeks. Organoleptic qualities of treated fruits are found to be comparable to those of unirradiated control mangoes. Texture qualities of the treated fruits are also retained at the end of 15 days after their transport over long distance. Irradiated fruits have the added advantage of disinfestation and reduction of stem end rot and anthracnose during ripening. Doses exceeding 75 krad are, however, found to be injurious to the fruits. (M.G.B.)

  16. Gamma irradiation: an answer to the mango grower's prayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.C.

    1975-11-01

    Problems of shipping and marketing mangoes grown in South Africa are described. Severe losses are caused by the mango weevil, Sternochetus mangiferae, and the fungus diseases, anthracnose and soft brown rot. Effects of 50 to 200 krad of gamma radiation on the weevils and fungal diseases were studied. Synergistic effects of hot water on the fungi were also studied. Organoleptic properties of the fruit were not affected by radiation treatment. Shipping studies indicated that irradiated fruit was in a marketable condition up to four days, as compared to only one day for unirradiated fruit. Cost estimation studies showed that the radiation treatment is commercially feasible. (HLW)

  17. Flutuação populacional de moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritidae associadas a variedades de manga no município de José de Freitas-Piauí Population dynamics of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae associated to mango varieties in the city of Jose de Freitas - Piauí - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sávio Silveira Feitosa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available O Piauí possui uma área considerável de manga, sendo um grande produtor dessa fruta no Brasil. Contudo, a presença de pragas, como as moscas-das-frutas, tem provocado grandes impactos na cadeia produtiva, pois estes insetos fazem parte de um grupo responsável por grandes prejuízos econômicos na cultura da mangueira. O conhecimento da flutuação populacional e a época de maior ocorrência de uma determinada espécie de inseto de importância econômica são requisitos indispensáveis para o estabelecimento de um controle eficiente e racional. O presente trabalho visou registrar a flutuação populacional das espécies de moscas-das-frutas associadas a variedades de manga, bem como correlacionar a ocorrência das moscas com as médias mensais de temperatura, precipitação e umidade relativa, e também avaliar os atrativos alimentares utilizados na captura dos insetos. A pesquisa foi conduzida de junho de 2004 a maio de 2005, em pomar comercial de manga (Mangifera indica L.-Anacardiaceae, das variedades Tommy Atkins, Keitt, Kent e Palmer, localizado no município de José de Freitas-Piauí-Brasil, na latitude 04º50'S e longitude 42º41'W. Anastrepha obliqua e Anastrepha serpentina são as espécies de tephritídeos predominantes na cultura da manga.Piaui has a considerable mango area, being a great producer of this fruit. However, the presence of plagues like the fruit flies has provoked great impacts in the production chain, so these insects are part of a responsible group of great economic damages in mango tree culture. The knowledge of the population dynamics and the highest occurrence period of specific insect species of economic importance are indispensable requirement to establish an efficient and rational control. The purpose of the present work was to register the population dynamics of the fruit fly species associated to the mango varieties, as well as correlating the fly occurrence with the monthly averages of temperature

  18. Hendersonia Creberrima, the cause of soft brown rot of mango in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodrick, H.T.; Van der westhuizen, G.C.A.

    1976-01-01

    A soft brown rot of mangoes in South Africa, is especially severe in export fruit kept in cold storage for prolonged periods. At present mangoes can be exported most economically by sea. This involves storage at 11 0 C for approximately 21 days. Unfortunately, these appear to be ideal conditions for the development of soft brown rot. Losses as high as 80% were recorded. The South African fungus agrees in morphology and cultural characters with Hendersonia Creberrima

  19. Mangifera Indica (Mango)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K. A.; Patel, M. B.; Patel, R. J.; Parmar, P. K.

    2010-01-01

    Mangifera indica, commonly used herb in ayurvedic medicine. Although review articles on this plant are already published, but this review article is presented to compile all the updated information on its phytochemical and pharmacological activities, which were performed widely by different methods. Studies indicate mango possesses antidiabetic, anti-oxidant, anti-viral, cardiotonic, hypotensive, anti-inflammatory properties. Various effects like antibacterial, anti fungal, anthelmintic, anti parasitic, anti tumor, anti HIV, antibone resorption, antispasmodic, antipyretic, antidiarrhoeal, antiallergic, immunomodulation, hypolipidemic, anti microbial, hepatoprotective, gastroprotective have also been studied. These studies are very encouraging and indicate this herb should be studied more extensively to confirm these results and reveal other potential therapeutic effects. Clinical trials using mango for a variety of conditions should also be conducted. PMID:22228940

  20. Gamma irradiation of fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyers, M.

    1983-08-01

    At a Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on Food Irradiation (JECFI) meeting held in 1976, recommendations were made to rationalize the unnecessarily elaborate wholesomeness evaluation procedures for irradiated foodstuffs. Irradiation at the commercially recommended doses did not adversely affect the constituents of mangoes, papayas, litchis and strawberries at the edible-ripe stage. These favourable radiation-chemical results justified the development of a theoretical model mango which could be used for extrapolation of wholesomeness data from an individual fruit species to all others within the same diet class. Several mathematical models of varying orders of sophistication were evolved. In all of them, it was assumed that the radiant energy entering the system reacted solely with water. The extent of the reaction of the other components of the model fruit with the primary water radicals was then determined. No matter which mathematical treatment was employed, it was concluded that the only components which would undergo significant modification would be the sugars. In order to extrapolate these data from the mango to other fruits, mathematical models of three fruits containing less sugar than the mango, viz. the strawberry, tomato and lemon, were compiled. With these models, the conclusion was reached that the theoretical degradation spectra of these fruits were qualitatively similar to the degradation pattern of the model mango. Theory was again substantiated by the practical demonstration of the protective effect of the sugars in the tomato and lemon. The decrease in radiation damage was enhanced by the mutual protection of the components of the whole synthetic fruits with ultimate protection being afforded by the biological systems of the real fruits

  1. Haiti Start-Up mission design cold chain mango-avocado

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostewechel, René; Régis, Yves-Laurent; Brouwers, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This report shares the findings of the first start-up mission to Haiti, exploring all relevant elements pertaining to the design of the mango and avocado cold chain for fruit export to the USA, with the possibility to extend logistics services to other fruits like pineapple. Findings of the mission

  2. Measurement of mango firmness by non-destructive limited compression technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penchaiya, P.; Uthairatanakij, A.; Srilaong, V.; Kanlayanarat, S.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Tansakul, A.

    2015-01-01

    Thai mango 'Nam Dok Mai Si-Thong' has an attractive golden yellow skin colour even in immature fruit, not ready for consumption. Firmness becomes an important quality attribute to assess the ripening stage of the fruit during storage. In this study, the possibility of a non-destructive method

  3. Ocorrência de moscas-das-frutas (Diptera: Tephritidae em mangueiras (Mangifera indica L. em Boa Vista, Roraima = The occurrence of fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae in mango (Mangifera indica L. in Boa Vista, Roraima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Bezerra Lima

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo foi conduzido no período de junho de 2007 a janeiro de 2008, em pomares comerciais de manga das variedades: Tommy Atkins, Haden e Palmer sendo 3 ha de cada cultivar, localizado na região do Bom Intento no Município de Boa Vista. Os espécimes de moscas-das-frutas foram coletados, por meio de armadilhas, confeccionadas com garrafas pet, que foram penduradas na copa das árvores a 1,60 m de altura. Como atrativo alimentar foi utilizado 200 mL de suco de maracujá a 30%. Foram utilizadas nove armadilhas, sendo uma armadilha por hectare. Semanalmente as armadilhas eram examinadas, ocasião em que se substituía o atrativo e os insetos capturados retirados e colocados em frascos de vidro devidamente etiquetados e transportados ao Laboratório de Entomologia do Centro de Ciências Agrárias da Universidade Federal de Roraima. As identificações dos espécimes foram feitas no Instituto Nacional de Pesquisa da Amazônia - INPA. No período de oito meses foram coletados 24 espécimes adultos do gênero Anastrepha (nove fêmeas e 15 machos. Quatro espécies foram identificadas: A. serpentina, A. striata, A. obliqua e A. turpinae. A maior frequência foi A. serpentina (44,44%, seguida de A. striata e A. obliqua ambas com 22,22% e A. turpinae com 11,11%. Os meses de maior ocorrência de Anastrepha spp. foram junho, julho e agosto. Este é o primeiro registro da espécie Anastrepha turpinae Stone, 1942, em Roraima. The study was done during th period of June 2007 to January of 2008, in commercial mango orchards having: 3 ha of cv. Tommy Atkins, 3 ha of cv. Haden. and 3 ha of cv. Palmer, located at Bom Intento in the municipal district of Boa Vista - RR. The specimens of fruit flies were collected, by trapping, made with transparent bottles pet, which were hung in the cup of the trees at 1.60 m of height. 200 mL of passion fruit juice (30% was used as an attractant feed; 9 traps were used, being one trap for hectare. Weekly The traps were

  4. Comparism of the Properties and Yield of Bioethanol from Mango and Orange Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Maina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The excessive consumption of fossil fuel particularly in urban areas due to transportation and industrial activities has greatly contributed to generation of high levels of pollution; therefore, a renewable eco-friendly energy source is required. The production of bioethanol from sugar extracted from waste fruit peels as an energy supply is renewable as the non-fossil carbon source used is readily replenished. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the chemical composition of fruit wastes of orange and Mango in order to explore their potential application in bio-ethanol production. Experimental production of Bioethanol from waste fruits of mango and orange was carried out after dilute acid pretreatment followed by enzymatic saccharification using saccharomyces cerevisiae for the fermentation process. Three samples of (mango waste fruit, orange waste fruit and mixture of mango and orange waste fruit 100g each was used for the same method of bio-ethanol extraction. A one factor factorial design involving fruit type was used to statistically analyze the fuel properties of the ethanol produced from the fruits waste. Analysis of variance (ANOVA shows that the observed difference were not significant for all the properties except that of the flash point which showed that the flash point of the produced bioethanol differ from that of the standard ethanol, which may be due to percentage of moisture present in the samples used. The highest yield of ethanol from sample A (mango waste was 19.98%, sample B (orange waste produced 19.17% while least yield of ethanol was from sample C (mango and orange waste which produced 17.38%.

  5. Disinfestation by irradiation of mangoes (Manguifera Indica L.) Kent and oranges (Citrus sinensis O.) Valencia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos Ramirez, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives in this work were to determine the minimum dose for radiation disinfestation of mangoes and oranges infested with Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens Loew) and to evaluate the quality of the fruits by organoleptic, chemical and physiological analysis of mangoes irradiated to 0.3, 0.6 and 1.0 kGy and storaged at 12 0 C during 15 days and oranges irradiated to 0.25, 0.6 and 1.0 kGy and storaged at 15 0 C during 21 days. To inhibit the development of larvaes in mangoes the minimum dose was 0.3 kGy and for oranges the dose was 0.45 kGy. The dose for the probit 9 security test were 0.43 kGy for mangoes and 0.63 kGy for oranges. The results of sensorial analysis in mangoes, indicated that there are no significative differences for the two panels: consumers or trained judges. The differences in the physiological and chemical analysis are greater for storage fruits than for the irradiated ones. At the end of the storage period the appearance of the irradiated mangoes was better than for the control. The observed differences in irradiated oranges were the presence of dark zones on the oranges peel which affect their quality. This effect is due to the irradiation in oranges not completely ripen. (author)

  6. Behavior of beta cyfluthrin and imidacloprid in/on mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Soudamini; Deepa, M; Jagadish, G K

    2011-08-01

    Residue persistence of beta cyfluthrin and imidacloprid on mango was carried out after giving spray application of the combination formulation, beta cyfluthrin 9% + imidacloprid 21% (Solomon 300 OD) 3 times at the fruit formation stage. The treatments were, untreated control, standard dose of 75 g a.i. ha(-1) and double dose of 150 g a.i. ha(-1). Initial residues of beta cyfluthrin on mango fruits were 0.04 and 0.12 mg kg(-1) from treatments at the standard and double doses, respectively. The residues dissipated with the half-life of 2.4 and 2.6 days and persisted for 5 days only. Initial residues of imidacloprid on mango fruits were 0.14 and 0.18 mg kg(-1) from treatments at the standard and double doses, respectively. Imidacloprid residues degraded with the half-life of 3.06 and 4.16 days, respectively and persisted for 10 days. Mature mango fruits at harvest were free from residues of both insecticides. A safe pre-harvest interval of 8 days is recommended for consumption of mango fruits after treatment of the combination formulation.

  7. Experiences with the Mango Chain Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, S.A.; Zuñiga-Arias, G.; Sterrenburg, S.

    2005-01-01

    The mango chain game is a simulation game used for research purposes. It facilitated studying the bargaining power of Costa Rican mango producers in international supply chains of mango. The game simulates a simplified mango export chain in which real world local producers can play the role of

  8. Control of the mango weevil with the emphasis on radurisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, I.B.

    1979-01-01

    The mango weevil is one of the most important mango insect pests. Although it is of lesser importance in the case of early maturing cultivars, it is of greater significance in late maturing cultivars. In these cultivars most of the insects are in die adult beetle stage at harvesting. The beetles are then inclined to leave the seed and tunnel through the edible portion of the fruit, leaving an unsightly scar on the outside of the fruit. This also serves as a suitable site for secondary fungal development. By spraying the mango trees during the winter, or early spring, the beetle population may be significantly reduced. Orchard sanitation and the destruction of the pips which are usually scattered over the farm, also contributes markedly to the reduction of the beetle population. Radurisation of matured, i.e. marketable fruit, protects it from damage in that it prevents the emergence of the weevil. The most effective dosages ranged from 0,5 to 0,85 kGy. Dosages in excess of 0,85 kGy tended to be phytotoxic to the fruit. It is hoped that this research will lead to commercial radurisation treatments [af

  9. Irradiation of mangoes as a quarantine treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bustos R, M E; Enkerlin H, W; Toledo A, J; Reyes F, J; Casimiro G, A

    1991-06-15

    This research project was conducted following guidelines of research protocols for post-harvest treatments developed by the United States Department of Agriculture CUSA. Laboratory bioassays included the irradiation of mangoes infested with third instar larvae of Anastrepha serpentina (Wied), A. ludens (Loew), A. obliqua (Macquart) and Ceratitis capitata (Wied) , at doses from 10 to 250 Gy. Irradiation doses were applied using a Co-60 AECL Model JS-7400 irradiator. The design was chosen to obtain a maximum to minimum ratio equal to, or less than, 1.025. C. capitata was the species most tolerant to irradiation. A dose of 60 Gy applied to third instar fruit fly larvae sterilized this species and prevented emergence of adults of the other three species. A dose of 250 Gy was required to prevent emergence of C. capitata. In fertility tests using emerged adults of A . Iudens, and A. obliqua a dose of 30 Gy gave 45 % and 27 % fertility, respectively. Adults of A. serpentina that emerged, died before reaching sexual maturity. The confirmatory tests, at probit-9 security level, were done at 100 Gy for the three species of Anastrepha and at 150 Gy for C. capitata. The quality of mangoes irradiated up to 1000 Gy was evaluated by chemical, physiological, and sensorial tests. The determination of vitamin C indicated that there was no loss of the nutritive value of the fruit. It also was observed that fruit metabolism was not accelerated since no significant increase in respiration or transpiration was registered and consumers accepted both treated and untreated fruit in the same way. (Author)

  10. Irradiation of mangoes as a quarantine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos R, M.E.; Enkerlin H, W.; Toledo A, J.; Reyes F, J.; Casimiro G, A.

    1991-06-01

    This research project was conducted following guidelines of research protocols for post-harvest treatments developed by the United States Department of Agriculture CUSA. Laboratory bioassays included the irradiation of mangoes infested with third instar larvae of Anastrepha serpentina (Wied), A. ludens (Loew), A. obliqua (Macquart) and Ceratitis capitata (Wied) , at doses from 10 to 250 Gy. Irradiation doses were applied using a Co-60 AECL Model JS-7400 irradiator. The design was chosen to obtain a maximum to minimum ratio equal to, or less than, 1.025. C. capitata was the species most tolerant to irradiation. A dose of 60 Gy applied to third instar fruit fly larvae sterilized this species and prevented emergence of adults of the other three species. A dose of 250 Gy was required to prevent emergence of C. capitata. In fertility tests using emerged adults of A . Iudens, and A. obliqua a dose of 30 Gy gave 45 % and 27 % fertility, respectively. Adults of A. serpentina that emerged, died before reaching sexual maturity. The confirmatory tests, at probit-9 security level, were done at 100 Gy for the three species of Anastrepha and at 150 Gy for C. capitata. The quality of mangoes irradiated up to 1000 Gy was evaluated by chemical, physiological, and sensorial tests. The determination of vitamin C indicated that there was no loss of the nutritive value of the fruit. It also was observed that fruit metabolism was not accelerated since no significant increase in respiration or transpiration was registered and consumers accepted both treated and untreated fruit in the same way. (Author)

  11. Extended storage of gamma-irradiated mango at tropical ambient temperature by film wrap packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janave, Machhindra T.; Sharma, A.

    2005-01-01

    Low dose gamma-irradiation of pre-climacteric mango (Mangifera indica L var.'Alphonso') fruits at 100 Gy extended the shelf-life at ambient temperature (28-32 degC) by 5-6 days. The extension of shelf-life was dose dependent, maximum being at 200 Gy by about 8-10 days. Wrapping the fruits in food grade Klin Wrap film resulted in more number of fruits remaining in semiripe condition after 21 days of storage as revealed by colour of the fruits, texture, TSS, pH, acidity and vitamin C content. The fruits retained about 40% of chlorophyll however, unwrapped fruits were complete yellow. Physiological weight loss (PWL) was reduced by 50% in Klin film wrapped fruits as compared to that in unwrapped fruits. More than 70-80% fruits remained as marketable fruits at the end of experiment when control fruits were slightly overripe. The shelf-life in Klin film wrapped irradiated mangoes was extended by about 10-15 days over irradiated unwrapped fruits resulting in total shelf-life of about 25-30 days at room temperature. In mangoes of variety 'Dasheri', gamma-irradiation extended the shelf-life by 4-5 days, which could be increased further, by another 7-10 days by Klin wrap packaging. These fruits also remained green at the end of experiment, confirming the observations with 'Alphonso' mango. These results show that low dose gamma-irradiation in combination with Klin film packaging delayed ripening as indicated by higher retention of fruit colour and reduction of PWL. (author)

  12. Irradiation of fresh Cavendish bananas (Musa cavendishii) and mangoes (Mangifera indica Linn. var. carabao). The microbiological aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabastro, E.F.; Pineda, A.S.; Pangan, A.C.; Valle, M.J. del

    1978-01-01

    Spoilage-causing organisms of Cavendish bananas and Carabao mangoes were isolated by subculturing spoiled fruit tissues and their pathogenicity determined by subsequent inoculation of the organisms into healthy fruits. Isolated from bananas were species of Colletotrichum and two types of Fusarium and Thielaviopsis and from mangoes species of Colletotrichum, Diplodia and Aspergillus. Results of in vitro radiation-resistance studies on two spoilage organisms of mangoes showed that the Colletotrichum sp., with D 10 of 54krad, is more radiation-resistant than the Aspergillus sp., which has a D 10 of 25krad. Bananas exposed to radiation doses ranging from 5 to 37krad developed darkening of peel, softening of texture and acceleration of spoilage with increasing dose. Doses of 16 to 28krad applied to mangoes delayed the rate of appearance of spoilage organisms and had no adverse effect on the general appearance of the fruit. (author)

  13. A comparative study of the effect on irradiation and chemical preservatives on fresh-cut mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasu, E.K.

    2011-01-01

    The quest for ready-to-eat fruits has resulted in cut-fruits such as pawpaw, watermelon and pineapple in the local market. However the safety and quality these products cannot be guaranteed due to the mode of preparation and packaging. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruits are consumed, among other reasons, for their pleasant flavour. They are rich sources of vitamins A, B6 and C. Mango fruits are being increasingly processed into ready-to-eat products such as fresh-cut mango slices. These products have longer shelf life when properly preserved and, therefore, assure all year round availability of mango in different forms. In order to produce fresh-cut mango slices of acceptable quality, determination of the most appropriate stage of ripening of fruits for fresh-cut slices production should be known. This study determined the effects of irradiation and chemical preservatives on the safety and shelf life quality of fresh-cut mango products. The effects of gamma irradiation and chemical preservatives on physicochemical, microbiological and sensory qualities of fresh-cut mango products were evaluated. Questionnaires were administered to evaluate public perception of cut-fruits and irradiated foods. Well matured half-ripe with peel of green and a little yellow intact fruits were sampled for laboratory analysis using 2x2x5 factorial experiment. The fruits were sanitized, peeled and sliced into cubes and packaged in two sets of 30 PET jars. One set was subjected to various radiation dose levels (1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5) kGy and a control. The second set was chemically preserved with various chemicals (sucrose, citric acid, sodium benzoate and a combination of these chemicals in equal proportions. The treated cut-mangoes were stored at 6 degrees Celsius and 10 degrees Celsius for 15 days and samples taken at 3 days interval for analysis. The pH, titratable acidity (TTA), vitamins C content, total soluble solids (TSS), microbial quality and sensory evaluations were carried out

  14. Efeito da aplicação de etileno no pH, acidez, índice refratométrico e açúcares totais de frutos de manga, colhidos em estágio pré-climatérico Effect of ethylene application on pH, acidity, refratometric index and total sugar of mango fruits, harvested in the pre-climateric stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.C. Coneglian

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo o estudo da ação do etileno no amadurecimento de frutos de manga, tentando contribuir para o conhecimento da fisiologia do amadurecimento destes frutos. Foram utilizadas mangas (Mangifera indica L., variedade Keitt, colhidas em estágio pré-climatérico. Estes frutos receberam tratamento com ethrel (500 e 1.000 ppm, com exceção da testemunha e foram submetidos às seguintes determinações: pH, acidez, índice refratométrico e açúcares totais. A análise e interpretação dos resultados mostrou a inexistência de diferença estatística entre esses 3 tratamentos, indicando que a aplicação de ethrel não trouxe nenhuma vantagem na melhoria de qualidade dos frutos.Ethylene action on mango fruits was studied in relation to the ripening physiology of these fruits. Mango (Mangifera indica L., Keitt variety, were harvested in the pre-climateric stage. These fruits, after receiving Ethrel treatment (500 e 1,000 ppni, except for control, were analized for pH, acidity, refratometric index and total sugars. The analysis and interpretation of the results showed no statistical differences among treatments, showing that ethrel didn't improve the fruits quality.

  15. Variations of total phenol, carotenoid, in vitro antioxidant contents, and phenolic profiles of the pulp of five commercial varieties of mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit crop grown worldwide with widely attributed nutritional and health-promoting properties. Extensive studies have been made of the high concentrations of phenolic antioxidants in the peel, seeds, and leaves of mango, yet less is known about the phenolic ...

  16. Variations of total phenol, carotenoid, in vitro antioxidant contents, and phenolic profiles of the pulp of five commercial varieties of mango (Mangifera indica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit crop grown worldwide with widely attributed nutritional and health-promoting properties. Extensive studies have been made of the high concentrations of phenolic antioxidants in mango peel, seeds, and leaves, yet less is known about the phenolic antioxi...

  17. Volatile components from mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pino, Jorge A; Mesa, Judith; Muñoz, Yamilie; Martí, M Pilar; Marbot, Rolando

    2005-03-23

    The volatile components of 20 mango cultivars were investigated by means of simultaneous distillation-extraction, GC, and GC-MS. Three hundred and seventy-two compounds were identified, of which 180 were found for the first time in mango fruit. The total concentration of volatiles was approximately 18-123 mg/kg of fresh fruit. Terpene hydrocarbons were the major volatiles of all cultivars, the dominant terpenes being delta-3-carene (cvs. Haden, Manga amarilla, Macho, Manga blanca, San Diego, Manzano, Smith, Florida, Keitt, and Kent), limonene (cvs. Delicioso, Super Haden, Ordonez, Filipino, and La Paz), both terpenes (cv. Delicia), terpinolene (cvs. Obispo, Corazon, and Huevo de toro), and alpha-phellandrene (cv. Minin). Other qualitative and quantitative differences among the cultivars could be demonstrated.

  18. Induction of mutation in mango (Mangifera indica L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, D.K.; Majumder, P.K.; Singh, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Studies on evolving of improved plant types through physical and chemical mutagens are, in general, lacking in tree fruits, more particularly in Mango. The present study showed that the LD 50 values (γ-irradiation) for the mango cultivars Neelum, Dashehari and Mallika were 3.9, 2.9 and 2.4 Krad, respectively. The effective dosages of EMS and NMU for the cvs Dashehari and Neelum were 1.50 and 0.05 per cent, respectively. Primary effects of both physical and chemical mutagens were found to be more or less the same. Some interesting changes in vegetative characters have also been stabilised. Out of these a few plants appeared to be promising for dwarfness whereas in some others, fruit quality improved. (author)

  19. Introducing the PRIDE Archive RESTful web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisinger, Florian; del-Toro, Noemi; Ternent, Tobias; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-07-01

    The PRIDE (PRoteomics IDEntifications) database is one of the world-leading public repositories of mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics data and it is a founding member of the ProteomeXchange Consortium of proteomics resources. In the original PRIDE database system, users could access data programmatically by accessing the web services provided by the PRIDE BioMart interface. New REST (REpresentational State Transfer) web services have been developed to serve the most popular functionality provided by BioMart (now discontinued due to data scalability issues) and address the data access requirements of the newly developed PRIDE Archive. Using the API (Application Programming Interface) it is now possible to programmatically query for and retrieve peptide and protein identifications, project and assay metadata and the originally submitted files. Searching and filtering is also possible by metadata information, such as sample details (e.g. species and tissues), instrumentation (mass spectrometer), keywords and other provided annotations. The PRIDE Archive web services were first made available in April 2014. The API has already been adopted by a few applications and standalone tools such as PeptideShaker, PRIDE Inspector, the Unipept web application and the Python-based BioServices package. This application is free and open to all users with no login requirement and can be accessed at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/ws/archive/. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Chemical profile of mango (Mangifera indica L.) using electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Bruno G; Costa, Helber B; Ventura, José A; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Barroso, Maria E S; Correia, Radigya M; Pimentel, Elisângela F; Pinto, Fernanda E; Endringer, Denise C; Romão, Wanderson

    2016-08-01

    Mangifera indica L., mango fruit, is consumed as a dietary supplement with purported health benefits; it is widely used in the food industry. Herein, the chemical profile of the Ubá mango at four distinct maturation stages was evaluated during the process of growth and maturity using negative-ion mode electrospray ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI(-)FT-ICR MS) and physicochemical characterisation analysis (total titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), TSS/TA ratio, and total polyphenolic content). Primary (organic acids and sugars) and secondary metabolites (polyphenolic compounds) were mostly identified in the third maturation stage, thus indicating the best stage for harvesting and consuming the fruit. In addition, the potential cancer chemoprevention of the secondary metabolites (phenolic extracts obtained from mango samples) was evaluated using the induction of quinone reductase activity, concluding that fruit polyphenols have the potential for cancer chemoprevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Describing Quality and Sensory Attributes of 3 Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Cultivars at 3 Ripeness Stages Based on Firmness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassur, Rita de Cássia Mirela Resende; González-Moscoso, Sara; Crisosto, Gayle M; Lima, Luiz Carlos de Oliveira; Vilas Boas, Eduardo Valério de Barros; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2015-09-01

    To determine the ideal ripening stage for consumption of the mango cultivars, "Ataulfo," "Haden," and "Tommy Atkins"; fruits at 3 flesh firmness levels (ripeness stages) were evaluated by a trained panel using descriptive analysis after instrumental measurements were made. After harvest, all fruits were ripened to allow softening and quality and sensory attribute changes. Ripening changes during softening of Ataulfo mangos were expressed by a characteristic increase in the perception of "tropical fruit" and "peach" aromas, an increase in "juiciness," "sweetness," and "tropical fruit" flavor, while "fibrousness," "chewiness," and "sourness" decreased. Similar desirable sensory changes were also detected during softening of Haden mangos; an increase in tropical fruit and peach aromas, sweetness and tropical fruit flavor, and a decrease in chewiness, sourness, and bitterness. Softening of Tommy Atkins mangos was followed by reduced chewiness and sourness and increased peach aroma. Softening of all cultivars was followed by decreased sourness and titratable acidity (TA) and increased soluble solids concentration (SSC) and SSC:TA ratio. The results indicate that mango ripening leads to increased expression of sensory attributes such as tropical fruit and peach aromas, tropical flavor, and sweetness that have been related to improved eating quality and these final changes in sensory quality attributes are specific for each cultivar. For example, Ataulfo and Haden mangos had greater improvement in quality and sensory attributes related to fruit eating quality during ripening-softening than Tommy Atkins. In our consumer test, these quality-sensory attributes expressed during ripening that were perceived by the trained panel were also validated, supporting the need for a controlled ripening protocol in mangos. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Radiation technology enabled market access to Indian mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Arun

    2009-01-01

    International trade in agricultural produce is subject to quarantine barriers imposed by importing countries to limit the entry of exotic pests and pathogens. Radiation technology provides an effective alternative to fumigants which are being gradually phased out. The technology has enabled market access to Indian mangoes in the US market after a gap of 18 years. The technology provides opportunity for export of other fruits and vegetables as well to countries like US, Australia and New Zealand. (author)

  3. Of Pride and Pencils: Deconstructing the Role of Ethnic Pride in Hmong Adolescent Identity Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Nguyen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the ways that Hmong adolescents describe ethnic pride and how their descriptions are informed by perceptions of collective and social identities. Data from semi-structured interviews with 25 Hmong adolescents age 12-18 were thematically analyzed with attention to affective versus behavioral aspects of ethnic pride and the role of collective or social group identities in adolescent pride perceptions or expressions. Results indicate that Hmong adolescents view affective and behavioral components of ethnic pride as distinct and evaluated self and peer pride along these two dimensions. Moreover, pride was found to be defined as both an individual characteristic and a social construct, and the perception and expression of the term was informed by Hmong adolescent peer groups and collective identities.

  4. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment of 'Carabao' ('Manila Super') mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manoto, E.C.; Resilva, S.S.; Del Rosario, Ma.S.; Casubha, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    Researches using gamma radiation for disinfestation of Oriental fruit fly in 'Carabao' ('Manila Super') mangoes were undertaken using the Probit 9 or 99.9968% mortality test. The results showed that the mature larvae of the fruit fly are the most tolerant stage of this insect to irradiation with the eggs as the most sensitive. On treating more than 100,000 mature larvae in mangoes, a minimum dose of 100 Gy was found to prevent emergence of adult fruit flies and maintain quarantine security or a complete elimination of the possibility of introducing this pest into the importing country. Therefore, the use of 100-Gy irradiation as a quarantine treatment against Oriental fruit fly in the mature green Philippine 'carabao' mango fruits is recommended

  5. Determining Sala mango qualities with the use of RGB images captured by a mobile phone camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Ommi Kalsom Mardziah; Jafri, Mohd Zubir Mat; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz

    2015-04-01

    Sala mango (Mangifera indicia) is one of the Malaysia's most popular tropical fruits that are widely marketed within the country. The degrees of ripeness of mangoes have conventionally been evaluated manually on the basis of color parameters, but a simple non-destructive technique using the Samsung Galaxy Note 1 mobile phone camera is introduced to replace the destructive technique. In this research, color parameters in terms of RGB values acquired using the ENVI software system were linked to detect Sala mango quality parameters. The features of mango were extracted from the acquired images and then used to classify of fruit skin color, which relates to the stages of ripening. A multivariate analysis method, multiple linear regression, was employed with the purpose of using RGB color parameters to estimate the pH, soluble solids content (SSC), and firmness. The relationship between these qualities parameters of Sala mango and its mean pixel values in the RGB system is analyzed. Findings show that pH yields the highest accuracy with a correlation coefficient R = 0.913 and root mean square of error RMSE = 0.166 pH. Meanwhile, firmness has R = 0.875 and RMSE = 1.392 kgf, whereas soluble solid content has the lowest accuracy with R = 0.814 and RMSE = 1.218°Brix with the correlation between color parameters. Therefore, this non-invasive method can be used to determine the quality attributes of mangoes.

  6. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) germplasm diversity based on single nucleotide polymorphisms derived from the transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Amir; Rubinstein, Mor; Eshed, Ravit; Benita, Miri; Ish-Shalom, Mazal; Sharabi-Schwager, Michal; Rozen, Ada; Saada, David; Cohen, Yuval; Ophir, Ron

    2015-11-14

    Germplasm collections are an important source for plant breeding, especially in fruit trees which have a long duration of juvenile period. Thus, efforts have been made to study the diversity of fruit tree collections. Even though mango is an economically important crop, most of the studies on diversity in mango collections have been conducted with a small number of genetic markers. We describe a de novo transcriptome assembly from mango cultivar 'Keitt'. Variation discovery was performed using Illumina resequencing of 'Keitt' and 'Tommy Atkins' cultivars identified 332,016 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1903 simple-sequence repeats (SSRs). Most of the SSRs (70.1%) were of trinucleotide with the preponderance of motif (GGA/AAG)n and only 23.5% were di-nucleotide SSRs with the mostly of (AT/AT)n motif. Further investigation of the diversity in the Israeli mango collection was performed based on a subset of 293 SNPs. Those markers have divided the Israeli mango collection into two major groups: one group included mostly mango accessions from Southeast Asia (Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia) and India and the other with mainly of Floridian and Israeli mango cultivars. The latter group was more polymorphic (FS=-0.1 on the average) and was more of an admixture than the former group. A slight population differentiation was detected (FST=0.03), suggesting that if the mango accessions of the western world apparently was originated from Southeast Asia, as has been previously suggested, the duration of cultivation was not long enough to develop a distinct genetic background. Whole-transcriptome reconstruction was used to significantly broaden the mango's genetic variation resources, i.e., SNPs and SSRs. The set of SNP markers described in this study is novel. A subset of SNPs was sampled to explore the Israeli mango collection and most of them were polymorphic in many mango accessions. Therefore, we believe that these SNPs will be valuable as they recapitulate and

  7. Fast Measurement of Soluble Solid Content in Mango Based on Visible and Infrared Spectroscopy Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiajia; He, Yong

    Mango is a kind of popular tropical fruit, and the soluble solid content is an important in this study visible and short-wave near-infrared spectroscopy (VIS/SWNIR) technique was applied. For sake of investigating the feasibility of using VIS/SWNIR spectroscopy to measure the soluble solid content in mango, and validating the performance of selected sensitive bands, for the calibration set was formed by 135 mango samples, while the remaining 45 mango samples for the prediction set. The combination of partial least squares and backpropagation artificial neural networks (PLS-BP) was used to calculate the prediction model based on raw spectrum data. Based on PLS-BP, the determination coefficient for prediction (Rp) was 0.757 and root mean square and the process is simple and easy to operate. Compared with the Partial least squares (PLS) result, the performance of PLS-BP is better.

  8. Effect of 'oxygen and carbon-dioxide' on the post-harvest management in tree-ripe mango storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, H.; Ahmad, S.; Anwar, R.; Noor-un-Nisa; Nafees, M.; Thompson, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing niche market demand for tree-ripe mango fruit due to their pleasant level of sweetness and flavour than artificially ripened fruits. However, tree-ripe mango fruits normally have a short storage life therefore, some time these fruits can not be reached to the ultimate consumers and heavy losses occurred. To avoid this problem growers try to harvest the mangoes at early stage of maturity which directly affect the physico-chemical constituents of fruit. Research was carried out to investigate the Controlled atmosphere (CA) storage feasibility and optimum storage conditions for tree-ripe cv. Chaunsa mangoes in order to extend their shelf life without compromising their quality. Tree ripe mangoes were stored in 1, 3, or 5% O/sub 2/ combined with 3, 6, and 9 % CO/sub 2/ at 10 deg. C for two weeks and compared with those stored in 21% O/sub 2/ and 0% CO/sub 2/ as control. It was found that the rate of fruit weight loss decreased with an increase of CO/sub 2/ in the storage atmosphere. Higher acidity was found in the fruit which were stored at lower concentration of O/sub 2/ and higher concentration of CO/sub 2/ which might be due to the accumulation of higher concentration of CO/sub 2/ in the fruit tissues. CA storage showed better retention of Ascorbic acid but did not show any systematic trend regarding citric acid, tartaric acid and malic acid. Fruits stored under controlled atmosphere showed better retention of freshness, colour, firmness, total soluble solids and flavour in comparison with the fruit stored in air (control). Mangoes stored in 3% O/sub 2/ with 6% CO/sub 2/ were highly acceptable by the panellists due to their better sweetness, flavour as compared to others. (author

  9. Post harvest management of mango for export with a special reference to radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilip Babu, J.; Shankariah, V.; Chaturvedi, Anurag

    2006-01-01

    Mango cultivator Baneshan is grown in large area in Andhra Pradesh, India. The fruit is carefully harvested, disapped and fungicide treatment is given with beveryl 500 ppm in combination with hot water for 3 minutes. The fruits are then packed, palletized, precooled (11.5 deg C) and stored at 12.5 deg C for further onward transit. The radiation processing at 0.25 to 0.50 k.gy would be able to replace the fungicide treatment and further enhance the shelf life. This is also in line with the requirement of Quarantine treatment of mangoes for export to U.S

  10. Addition of dried 'Ataulfo' mango (Mangifera indica L) by-products as a source of dietary fiber and polyphenols in starch-molded mango snacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing demand of healthier foods favors the consumption of natural bioactive compounds such as antioxidants and dietary fiber (DF) that confers protection against cardiovascular diseases and other degenerative diseases. On the industrial processing of mango, 35-60 % of this fruit is discarde...

  11. Healthful and nutritional components in select Florida tropical fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourteen tropical fruits from south Florida (red guava, white guava, carambola, red pitaya (red dragon), white pitaya (white dragon), mamey, sapodilla, lychee, longan, green mango, ripe mango, green papaya and ripe papaya) were evaluated for phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid (v...

  12. Residues of 14C-paclobutrazol in mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Maria A.; Tornisielo, Valdemar L.; Castanho, Giuliane M.

    2009-01-01

    Paclobutrazol (PBZ) is a growth regulator used in agricultural systems whose purpose is the control of vegetative growth, stimulating the reproductive capacity of plants. This growth regulator remains active in soil for a long time and its half-life varies with the type of soil and climatic conditions, can severely affect the development of crops. This work aimed to study the residues / metabolites of 14 C-PBZ in mango pulp Tommy Atkins. The tests were performed with mangoes grown in pots stainless steel and application of 14 C-PBZ was performed by the soil projection of the crown, and the mangoes tested in two periods, one year and two years after application. To evaluate the levels of residues of 14 C-PBZ was realize the burning of 200 mg of pulp on biological oxidized and detached 14 CO 2 was detected by liquid scintillation spectrophotometer. The results were 1.65 % of residue of PBZ on fruit collected after two years of application and 4.30 % of residue of PBZ collected on fruit after a year of application and also can see that the product remained in the soil for more than one year, is translocated to the plant and reach the edible part, the pulp fruit. The identification of residual 14 C- PBZ/metabolites by thin-layer chromatography did not reveal any pattern of PBZ / metabolites due to the low activity detected in the samples. Therefore, another procedure was performed for extraction and then analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for detection of metabolites in the PBZ of mango pulp. (author)

  13. Residues of {sup 14}C-paclobutrazol in mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Maria A.; Tornisielo, Valdemar L.; Castanho, Giuliane M., E-mail: macosta@cena.usp.b [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Ecotoxicologia

    2009-07-01

    Paclobutrazol (PBZ) is a growth regulator used in agricultural systems whose purpose is the control of vegetative growth, stimulating the reproductive capacity of plants. This growth regulator remains active in soil for a long time and its half-life varies with the type of soil and climatic conditions, can severely affect the development of crops. This work aimed to study the residues / metabolites of {sup 14}C-PBZ in mango pulp Tommy Atkins. The tests were performed with mangoes grown in pots stainless steel and application of {sup 14}C-PBZ was performed by the soil projection of the crown, and the mangoes tested in two periods, one year and two years after application. To evaluate the levels of residues of {sup 14}C-PBZ was realize the burning of 200 mg of pulp on biological oxidized and detached {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was detected by liquid scintillation spectrophotometer. The results were 1.65 % of residue of PBZ on fruit collected after two years of application and 4.30 % of residue of PBZ collected on fruit after a year of application and also can see that the product remained in the soil for more than one year, is translocated to the plant and reach the edible part, the pulp fruit. The identification of residual {sup 14}C- PBZ/metabolites by thin-layer chromatography did not reveal any pattern of PBZ / metabolites due to the low activity detected in the samples. Therefore, another procedure was performed for extraction and then analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for detection of metabolites in the PBZ of mango pulp. (author)

  14. Effect of gamma irradiation on the carotene content of mangos and red capsicums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, G.E.; McLauchlan, R.L.; Beattie, T.R.; Banos, C.; Gillen, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of red capsicums (cv. Five Star) at 75 and 300 Gy had no significant effects on the carotene level of unstored red capsicums or red capsicums stored at 5 degrees C for 3 wk. Gamma irradiation of mangos (cv. Kensington Pride) at 75, 300 and 600 Gy had no significant effects on the carotene content. Altering the conditions of irradiation (lower temperature nitrogen atmosphere, lower dose rate) resulted in slightly higher carotene levels than those associated with irradiation under normal ambient conditions

  15. Evaluation of the 14C-prochloraz residue levels in irradiated mangoes (Mangifera indica) and apples (Malus domestica)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Maria Aparecida

    1998-01-01

    The Brazilian crops mangoes and apples has expanding in the last years. However, tropical fruits crops are susceptible to infection that harms the crop yield. The control of these diseases is made through fungicides such as prochloraz which possesses protecting eradicating action by controlling anthracnose in mangoes and scabies in apples. Agrochemicals are of great importance in the agriculture considering the of relationship cost/benefit. However they may cause a series of problems in the ecosystem, being the levels of agrochemicals residues in fruits one of these factors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prochloraz levels in mangoes treated in both stages of pre and post harvest, and in apples treated in the pre harvest. In the treatment of the mangoes, the interaction, fungicide with the gamma radiation with dose of 1,0 kGy, was used to induce prochloraz degradation. Treated post harvest mangoes were stored, at 12 deg C during 21 days. The results showed that the prochloraz did not present reduction in the residual levels of the mangoes after 21 day storage, that is the safe period established by the Brazilian legislation on agrochemicals, in treated mangoes. The refrigerated storage (12 deg C) and the gamma radiation also did not contribute to the degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. In average the concentration of the fungicide prochloraz in the peels (bar X = 1,64 mug/g) was higher than in the mangoes pulp (bar x = 0,06 mug/g), which allows the consumption of this fruit, since the peel is always discarded. The degradation product, formed in peels of mangoes in fruits treated in the pre and post harvest was the metabolite BIS 44596; for mangoes treated in the pre-post harvest the metabolite formed was the BIS 445186. Both metabolites were found in very low levels, confirming that occurs degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. In apples treated with the prochloraz, reduction of 500/0 in the levels. (author)

  16. The efficiency of ionizing radiation on the disinfestation of fresh mangoes (Carabao variety)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    Mangoes, Carabao variety, were irradiated with doses found effective for fruit fly disinfestation, namely 60, 70 and 80 krad and stored at either 30deg C or 7deg C until subjection to various analyses. Parts of the fruit of varying sizes and maturity, both irradiated and non-irradiated, were exposed to varying ages and numbers of Oriental fruit fly (Dacus dorsalis) to study the degree of infestation. Analyses of physical, chemical and organoleptic properties of irradiated mangoes were carried out at appropriate intervals. Extension of shelf-life of mangoes irradiated with doses mentioned above could not be achieved when the fruits were stored at 30deg C. A study of factors considered important in measuring the effectiveness of radiation disinfestation showed that the degree of fruit fly infestation was significantly influenced by size and maturity of the fruits, and by the number of age of the infesting flies. Direct irradiation of different developmental stages of the fly showed that the low dose of 5 krad applied to eggs, larvae, and pupae prevented adult emergence and produced sterility in adults. A dose of 15 krad shortened survival time of adult fruit flies to 10 days. The 60 - 80 krad doses applied were found effective to extend the shelf-life of mangoes and could be used for insect disinfestation also. No significant changes in pH, texture, carotine, sugar, pectin and ascorbic acid contents were found in mangoes exposed at these dose levels. They were also found generally acceptable to judges. No significant differences between appearance, texture, odour, and flavour were found between controls and the irradiated samples by 8-10 trained judges using the Hedonic Scale

  17. Brain activation associated with pride and shame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lilian; Kaffenberger, Tina; Herwig, Uwe; Brühl, Annette B

    2014-01-01

    Self-referential emotions such as shame/guilt and pride provide evaluative information about persons themselves. In addition to emotional aspects, social and self-referential processes play a role in self-referential emotions. Prior studies have rather focused on comparing self-referential and other-referential processes of one valence, triggered mostly by external stimuli. In the current study, we aimed at investigating the valence-specific neural correlates of shame/guilt and pride, evoked by the remembrance of a corresponding autobiographical event during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 25 healthy volunteers were studied. The task comprised a negative (shame/guilt), a positive (pride) and a neutral condition (expecting the distractor). Each condition was initiated by a simple cue, followed by the remembrance and finished by a distracting picture. Pride and shame/guilt conditions both activated typical emotion-processing circuits including the amygdala, insula and ventral striatum, as well as self-referential brain regions such as the bilateral dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Comparing the two emotional conditions, emotion-processing circuits were more activated by pride than by shame, possibly due to either hedonic experiences or stronger involvement of the participants in positive self-referential emotions due to a self-positivity bias. However, the ventral striatum was similarly activated by pride and shame/guilt. In the whole-brain analysis, both self-referential emotion conditions activated medial prefrontal and posterior cingulate regions, corresponding to the self-referential aspect and the autobiographical evocation of the respective emotions. Autobiographically evoked self-referential emotions activated basic emotional as well as self-referential circuits. Except for the ventral striatum, emotional circuits were more active with pride than with shame.

  18. Preharvest bagging with wavelength-selective materials enhances development and quality of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Nam Dok Mai #4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonhenchob, Vanee; Kamhangwong, Damrongpol; Kruenate, Jittiporn; Khongrat, Krittaphat; Tangchantra, Nantavat; Wichai, Uthai; Singh, S Paul

    2011-03-15

    Preharvest bagging has been shown to improve development and quality of fruits. Different light transmittance bags showed different effects on fruit quality. This study presents the benefits of using newly developed plastic bagging materials with different wavelength-selective characteristics for mangoes (cv. Nam Dok Mai #4). Mangoes were bagged at 45 days after full bloom (DAFB) and randomly harvested at 65, 75, 85, 95, and 105 DAFB. The bags were removed on the harvest days. The wavelength-selective bags (no pigment, yellow, red, blue/violet, blue) were compared with the Kraft paper bag with black paper liner, which is currently used commercially for several fruits, and with non-bagging as a control. Bagging significantly (p⩽0.05) reduced diseases and blemishes. Mango weight at 95 DAFB was increased approximately 15% by VM and V plastic bagging, as compared to paper bagging and control. Plastic bagging accelerated mango ripening as well as growth. Plastic-bagged mangoes reached maturity stage at 95 DAFB, while non-bagged mangoes reached maturity stage at 105 DAFB. Paper bagging resulted in a pale-yellow peel beginning at 65 DAFB, while plastic bagging improved peel glossiness. Preharvest bagging with different wavelength-selective materials affected mango development and quality. Bagging mangoes with VM and V materials could reduce peel defects and diseases, increase weight, size, and sphericity, improve peel appearance, and shorten the development periods of mangoes. The results suggest a favorable practice using the newly developed VM and V plastic bags in the production of mangoes, and possibly other fruits as well. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Evaluation of lactoperoxidase system treatment to reduce anthracnose, stem-end rot, and bacterial black spot development during storage of mangoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Nguyen, Doan Duy; Ducamp, Marie-Noelle; Dornier, Manuel; Montet, Didier; Reynes, Max; Loiseau, Gérard

    2005-08-01

    The lactoperoxidase system (LPS) was evaluated for the prevention of postharvest diseases caused by Xanthomonas campestris, Botryodiplodia theobromae, and Colletotrichum gloeosporioides in 'Keitt' and 'Kent' mangoes. The LPS treatment significantly reduced the disease development on both cultivars after storage at 12 degrees C for 2 weeks, which was followed by a ripening at 25 degrees C. The LPS treatment did not alter the sensory quality of mango fruits (color, firmness, titrable acidity, and total soluble solids) when compared to untreated fruits. The LPS thus presents good potential alternative to the chemical fungicides traditionally used to improve the shelf life of mangoes.

  20. Comportamento de forrageamento de abelhas e outros insetos nas panículas da mangueira (Mangifera indica L. e produção de frutos = Forage behaviour of bees and other insects on mango flowers (Mangifera indica L. and fruit production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darclet Terezinha Malerbo-Souza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido com o objetivo de se estudar a frequência,constância, o tipo de coleta (néctar e/ou pólen e comportamento de forrageamento dos insetos visitantes às flores da mangueira (Mangifera indica L. e seu efeito na produção de frutos. A frequência e o tipo de coleta dos insetos nas flores foram obtidos durante os primeiros 10 min. em cada horário, das 7 às 18h, com três repetições em cada ano. O teste de polinização foi realizado, utilizando-se dois tratamentos: panículas cobertas para se impedir a visita dos insetos e panículas descobertas (controle nas quais foi permitida a visita dos insetos. Os insetos da ordem Diptera, a abelha Tetragonisca angustula e o coleóptero Diabrotica speciosa foram espécies constantes nas panículas da mangueira, e os dípteros foramos mais frequentes. A porcentagem de frutificação foi maior nas flores visitadas pelos insetos.This research was carried out to study the frequency and constancy of visitors on mango inflorescence (Mangifera indica L. as well ascollection type (nectar and pollen, its forage behaviour and these effects on fruit production. The frequency and collection type by insects on flowers were obtained in the first ten minutes of each hour between 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., with three replications in two years. The pollination test was performed with two treatments: overed flowers and uncovered flowers with free insect visits. Diptera order insects, stingless bees Tetragonisca angustula and Diabrotica speciosa were constant species on mango flowers, and Diptera insectswere the more frequent visitors. Fruition percentage was higher in flowers visited by insects.

  1. Induced somatic mutation in mango, mangifera indica L. cv. Langra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Dormant buds of mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Langra) exposed to acute gamma-irradiation dosages of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 kiloroentgens (kR), were grafted on to one-year-old seedling stock. Dosages of 2.0 and 3.0 kR were found satisfactory for the purpose, as measured by bud lethality and scion growth. A bud graft from 3.0 kR bore fruits of excellent quality. Compared with the control, the fruits were heavier, larger and had more creamish-yellow pulp. None of the other morphological changes expressed by the mutant fruits, observed over three fruiting seasons, were disadvantageous. The tree habit is being further investigated before the mutant can be considered for release as an improved cultivar. (author)

  2. Biological fixation and nitrogen transfer by three legume species in mango and soursop organic orchards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulino, Gleicia Miranda; Barroso, Deborah Guerra

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and the N transfer derived from BNF of the legume species - Gliricidia sepium (gliricidia), Crotalaria juncea (sunnhemp) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) - for an intercropped organic orchard with mango and soursop, through the 15 N natural abundance method. The following inter cropping systems were evaluated: mango and soursop with gliricidia; mango and soursop with sunnhemp; mango and soursop with pigeon pea; and mango and soursop as control. Gliricidia showed the highest BNF potential (80%) , followed by sunnhemp (64.5%) and pigeon pea (45%). After two sunnhemp prunes, 149.5 kg ha -1 of N per year were supplied, with 96.5 kg derived from BNF. After three annual prunes, gliricidia supplied 56.4 and 80.3 kg ha -1 of N per year, with 45 and 64 kg derived from BNF, in two consecutive years. The quantity of N supplied to the system was higher than the mango and soursop requirements. Variations in the natural abundance of 15 N were found only in soursop leaves. Gliricidia and sunnhemp were prominent in N transfer, with approximately 22.5 and 40% respectively. Green manuring using gliricidia permits fractioning of the N supply, which is an advantage in N obtention by the fruit trees (author)

  3. Osmotic Drying and Nutrient Infusion of Fruits and Vegetables

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cohen, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    .... Initially, six commercial fruit products were chosen for long-term storage. Two representative products, mango-flavored apple cubes and cherries, were then prepared with infused vitamins and minerals...

  4. The effect of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) on the size and weight of mangos (Mangifera indica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqqash, Muhammad Nadir; Saeed, Qamar; Ghouri, Fozia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pollination has a great effect on the yield of fruit trees. Blow flies are considered as an effective pollinator compared to hand pollination in fruit orchards. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of different pollination methods in mango orchards. Methodology: The impact of pollination on quantity and quality of mango yield by blow flies was estimated by using three treatments, i.e., open pollinated trees, trees were covered by a net in the presence of blow flies for pollination, and trees were covered with a net but without insects. Results: The maximum number of flowers was recorded in irregular types of inflorescence, i.e., 434.80 flowers/inflorescence. Fruit setting (bud) was higher in open pollinated mango trees (i.e. 37.00/inflorescence) than enclosed pollination by blow flies (i.e. 22.34/inflorescence). The size of the mango fruit was the highest (5.06 mm) in open pollinated tree than those pollinated by blow flies (3.93 mm) and followed by without any pollinator (3.18 mm) at marble stage. We found that the maximum weight of mango fruit (201.19 g) was in open pollinated trees. Discussion: The results demonstrated that blow flies can be used as effective mango pollinators along with other flies and bees. The blow flies have shown a positive impact on the quality and quantity of mango. This study will be helpful in future and also applicable at farm level to use blow flies as pollinators that are cheap and easy to rear. PMID:27441107

  5. Evaluation of processed green and ripe mango peel and pulp flours (Mangifera indica var. Chokanan) in terms of chemical composition, antioxidant compounds and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Noor Aziah; Wong, Lee Min; Bhat, Rajeev; Cheng, Lai Hoong

    2012-02-01

    Mango is a highly perishable seasonal fruit and large quantities are wasted during the peak season as a result of poor postharvest handling procedures. Processing surplus mango fruits into flour to be used as a functional ingredient appears to be a good preservation method to ensure its extended consumption. In the present study, the chemical composition, bioactive/antioxidant compounds and functional properties of green and ripe mango (Mangifera indica var. Chokanan) peel and pulp flours were evaluated. Compared to commercial wheat flour, mango flours were significantly low in moisture and protein, but were high in crude fiber, fat and ash content. Mango flour showed a balance between soluble and insoluble dietary fiber proportions, with total dietary fiber content ranging from 3.2 to 5.94 g kg⁻¹. Mango flours exhibited high values for bioactive/antioxidant compounds compared to wheat flour. The water absorption capacity and oil absorption capacity of mango flours ranged from 0.36 to 0.87 g kg⁻¹ and from 0.18 to 0.22 g kg⁻¹, respectively. Results of this study showed mango peel flour to be a rich source of dietary fiber with good antioxidant and functional properties, which could be a useful ingredient for new functional food formulations. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) peel extract fractions from different cultivars differentially affect lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taing, Meng-Wong; Pierson, Jean-Thomas; Shaw, Paul N; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J; Gidley, Michael J; Monteith, Gregory R

    2013-02-26

    Plant phytochemicals are increasingly recognised as sources of bioactive molecules which may have potential benefit in many health conditions. In mangoes, peel extracts from different cultivars exhibit varying effects on adipogenesis in the 3T3-L1 adipocyte cell line. In this study, the effects of preparative HPLC fractions of methanol peel extracts from Irwin, Nam Doc Mai and Kensington Pride mangoes were evaluated. Fraction 1 contained the most hydrophilic components while subsequent fractions contained increasingly more hydrophobic components. High content imaging was used to assess mango peel fraction effects on lipid accumulation, nuclei count and nuclear area in differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. For all three mango cultivars, the more hydrophilic peel fractions 1-3 inhibited lipid accumulation with greater potency than the more hydrophobic peel fractions 4. For all three cultivars, the more lipophilic fraction 4 had concentrations that enhanced lipid accumulation greater than fractions 1-3 as assessed by lipid droplet integrated intensity. The potency of this fraction 4 varied significantly between cultivars. Using mass spectrometry, five long chain free fatty acids were detected in fraction 4; these were not present in any other peel extract fractions. Total levels varied between cultivars, with Irwin fraction 4 containing the highest levels of these free fatty acids. Lipophilic components appear to be responsible for the lipid accumulation promoting effects of some mango extracts and are the likely cause of the diverse effects of peel extracts from different mango cultivars on lipid accumulation.

  7. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on the physiology of Manila mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Ortiz, M A; De la Cruz-Medina, J; de Los Monteros, J J Espinosa; Oliart-Ros, R M; Rebolledo-Martinez, A; Ramírez, J A; García, H S

    2013-06-01

    Manila mangoes (Mangifera indica L.) have sensory characteristics that make them attractive for consumption as a fresh fruit. A large portion of the annual yield of this fruit is infested by the Mexican fruit fly (Anastrepha ludens), adversely impacting the quality of the crop. Hence, it is necessary to develop economically viable postharvest treatments to reduce the damage caused by this insect. Currently, high hydrostatic pressures are used to guarantee the safety of many processed foods. The objective of this work was to assess the effects of high hydrostatic pressure on mangoes at their physiological maturity. High hydrostatic pressures were applied to mangoes at three levels: 50, 100 and 200 megapascals applied for four different time periods (0, 5, 10 and 20 min). Physiologically mature mangoes were more resistant to changes in response to the pressure of 50 MPa. Reduction of physiological activity by application of high hydrostatic pressure opens a new avenue for the research on treatments intended to enhance preservation of whole fresh fruit.

  8. Social capital and mango marketing in Odo-oba and Fiditi markets of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the role of social capital in marketing of mango fruits in order to improve the marketing services and efficiency of the marketers in Oyo State, Nigeria. Primary data for the study were collected using structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and least square regression were used to analyze ...

  9. Reproductive biology of a pride of lions on Karongwe Game ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive biology of a pride of lions on Karongwe Game Reserve, South Africa. ... biology of a pride of lions (Panthera leo) was studied on the 8500 ha Karongwe Game Reserve from 1999 to 2005. Over this ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  10. Event seeking for sponsors: Case Helsinki Pride

    OpenAIRE

    Jaakkola, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This thesis was done for HeSeTa Ry (Helsingin seudun seksuaalinen tasavertaisuus ry) and the goal was to find out how Helsinki Pride could get sponsors more efficiently and how the co-operation could be made more long lasting with the current sponsors. Helsinki Pride is an event organized in Helsinki each year in June. It is also the biggest LGBT event organized in Finland. The biggest event of the week is the Gay Parade and the Party in the Park. In 2014 only these events had over 20 000 par...

  11. Effect of osmotic dehydration and vacuum-frying parameters to produce high-quality mango chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Yolanda; Moreira, Rosana G

    2009-09-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a fruit rich in flavor and nutritional values, which is an excellent candidate for producing chips. The objective of this study was to develop high-quality mango chips using vacuum frying. Mango ("Tommy Atkins") slices were pretreated with different maltodextrin concentrations (40, 50, and 65, w/v), osmotic dehydration times (45, 60, and 70 min), and solution temperatures (22 and 40 degrees C). Pretreated slices were vacuum fried at 120, 130, and 138 degrees C and product quality attributes (oil content, texture, color, carotenoid content) determined. The effect of frying temperatures at optimum osmotic dehydration times (65 [w/v] at 40 degrees C) was assessed. All samples were acceptable (scores > 5) to consumer panelists. The best mango chips were those pretreated with 65 (w/v) concentration for 60 min and vacuum fried at 120 degrees C. Mango chips under atmospheric frying had less carotenoid retention (32%) than those under vacuum frying (up to 65%). These results may help further optimize vacuum-frying processing of high-quality fruit-based snacks.

  12. Isolation and evaluation of biocontrol agents in controlling anthracnose disease of mango in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungjindamai Nattawut

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The agricultural based economy is a core business in Thailand and food export is one of the main sources of income for the Thai population. However, pesticides are overused and misused. As a result there is an urgent need to reduce the use of synthetic chemicals. Biological control offers an alternative to the use of pesticides. Mango (Mangifera indica L. is widely planted in Thailand and is one of the major cash crops for international export. However, mango suffers from various diseases especially anthracnose, a fungal disease caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. One hundred and twelve isolates of epiphytic microbes were isolated from healthy leaves and fruits of mangoes; this included 93 and 19 isolates of epiphytic bacteria and yeasts, respectively. They were screened for bioactivity against a pathogenic strain of C. gloeosporioides isolated from diseased mangoes using a dual culture technique. Out of 112 isolates, eight isolates exhibited at least 60% inhibition. These isolates were further screened for their inhibition on mango using fruit inoculation. Two isolates reduced the lesion sizes caused by C. gloeosporioides compared to control treatment. These two isolates, based on phenotypical and biochemical tests, were identified as Bacillus sp. MB61 and Bacillus sp. LB72.

  13. Influences of harvest date and location on the levels of ß-carotene, ascorbic acid, total phenols, in vitro antioxidant capacity, and phenolic profiles of five commercial varieties of mango (Mangifera indica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit crop grown worldwide with widely attributed nutritional and health-promoting properties. Extensive studies have been made of the high concentrations of phenolic antioxidants in the peel, seeds, and leaves of mango, yet less is known about the phenolic ...

  14. The self and others in the experience of pride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Y.M.J.; Zeelenberg, M.; Breugelmans, S.M.

    2018-01-01

    Pride is seen as both a self-conscious emotion as well as a social emotion. These categories are not mutually exclusive, but have brought forth different ideas about pride as either revolving around the self or as revolving around one’s relationship with others. Current measures of pride do not

  15. Characterization of Brazilian mango kernel fat before and after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aquino, Fabiana da Silva; Ramos, Clecio Souza, E-mail: fasiaquino@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: clecio@dcm.ufrpe.br [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Aquino, Katia Aparecida da Silva, E-mail: aquino@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Mangifera indica Linn (family of Anacardiaceae) is a tree indigenous to India, whose both unripe and ripe fruits (mangoes) are widely used by the local population. After consumption or industrial processing of the fruits, considerable amounts of mango seeds are discarded as waste. The kernel inside the seed represents from 45% to 75% of the seed and about 20% of the whole fruit and lipid composition of mango seed kernels has attracted the attention of researches because of their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Our study showed that fat of the mango kernel obtained by Soxhlet extraction with hexane had a solid consistency at environmental temperature (27 deg C) because it is rich in saturated acid. The fat contents of the seed of Mangifera indica was calculated to 10% and are comparable to the ones for commercial vegetable oils like soybean (11-25%). One problem found in the storage of fast and oils is the attack by microorganisms and the sterilization process becomes necessary. Samples of kernel fat were irradiated with gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co) at room temperature and air atmosphere at 5 and 10 kGy (sterilization doses). The data of GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of four major fatty acids in the sample of mango kernel examined and that the chemical profile of the sample not altered after being irradiated. Moreover, analysis of Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR H{sup 1}) was used to obtain the mango kernel fat parameters before and after gamma irradiation. The data interpretation of RMN H{sup 1} indicated that there are significant differences in the acidity and saponification indexes of fat. However, it was found an increase of 14% in iodine index of fat after irradiation. This result means that some double bonds were formed on the irradiation process of the fat. (author)

  16. Characterization of Brazilian mango kernel fat before and after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquino, Fabiana da Silva; Ramos, Clecio Souza; Aquino, Katia Aparecida da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Mangifera indica Linn (family of Anacardiaceae) is a tree indigenous to India, whose both unripe and ripe fruits (mangoes) are widely used by the local population. After consumption or industrial processing of the fruits, considerable amounts of mango seeds are discarded as waste. The kernel inside the seed represents from 45% to 75% of the seed and about 20% of the whole fruit and lipid composition of mango seed kernels has attracted the attention of researches because of their unique physical and chemical characteristics. Our study showed that fat of the mango kernel obtained by Soxhlet extraction with hexane had a solid consistency at environmental temperature (27 deg C) because it is rich in saturated acid. The fat contents of the seed of Mangifera indica was calculated to 10% and are comparable to the ones for commercial vegetable oils like soybean (11-25%). One problem found in the storage of fast and oils is the attack by microorganisms and the sterilization process becomes necessary. Samples of kernel fat were irradiated with gamma radiation ( 60 Co) at room temperature and air atmosphere at 5 and 10 kGy (sterilization doses). The data of GC-MS analysis revealed the presence of four major fatty acids in the sample of mango kernel examined and that the chemical profile of the sample not altered after being irradiated. Moreover, analysis of Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR H 1 ) was used to obtain the mango kernel fat parameters before and after gamma irradiation. The data interpretation of RMN H 1 indicated that there are significant differences in the acidity and saponification indexes of fat. However, it was found an increase of 14% in iodine index of fat after irradiation. This result means that some double bonds were formed on the irradiation process of the fat. (author)

  17. Stem heat balance method to estimate transpiration of young orange and mango plants

    OpenAIRE

    Vellame,Lucas M.; Coelho Filho,Maurício A.; Paz,Vital P. S.; Coelho,Eugênio F.

    2010-01-01

    The present study had as its main objective the evaluation of the heat balance method in young orange and mango plants under protected environment. The work was carried out at Embrapa Cassava and Tropical Fruits, Cruz das Almas, BA. Later on, estimates of sap flow were conducted for two mango plants cultivated in pots of 15 and 50 L installed on weighting platforms of 45 and 140 kg; sap flow was determined in three orange plants, two of which were also installed on weighing platforms. The val...

  18. Audits contribute to pride, productivity and profit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Q.

    1984-01-01

    The object of this writing is to demonstrate that audits (in general) when used as a ''management tool' can contribute to pride, productivity, and profit. The goal of ''pride'' achievement is demonstrated through the use of techniques developed from behavioral sciences. Discussed is dealing with people and their basic needs. This is intended to point out the fact that satisfying individual needs and concerns is the first step to achieving the goals of pride, productivity, and profit. Also discussed are the basic needs of safety (security), social, ego/esteem, and self-fulfillment as well as providing some basic techniques of auditing which will help assure general satisfaction of these needs. Also noted are reporting methods. The goal of ''productivity'' is approached by demonstrating that objectives must be clear and workable. Objectives must be translated into specific action and that action must be compatible with the overall company objectives. All objectives must be known and understood by those affected. Consideration must be given to men, money, and machines (present technology). All of the objectives must also be weighed against external constraints. The goal of ''profit'' then becomes the product of a combination of ''pride'' and ''productivity''. Audits must be cost conscious. Value engineer the problem, the cause, and the solution. Discussion continues with quality cost programs briefly indicating that ''Q'' costs could be considered a type of audit. Identifying deficiencies and weaknesses, then correcting them, contributes to profit. Increased pride and productivity contributes to profit. Consider the employee's awareness and commitment for doing a good job when auditing

  19. Phenolics, Antiradical Assay and Cytotoxicity of Processed Mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenolics, Antiradical Assay and Cytotoxicity of Processed Mango ( Mangifera indica ) and Bush Mango ( Irvingia gabonensis ) Kernels. ... Nigerian Food Journal ... Phenolic constituents (total phenols, flavonoids, tannins, and anthocyanins), comparative antiradical potency and cytotoxicity of processed mango (Mangifera ...

  20. Effect of postharvest ultraviolet-C treatment on the proteome changes in fresh cut mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. Chokanan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Dominic Soloman; Razali, Zuliana; Santhirasegaram, Vicknesha; Somasundram, Chandran

    2016-06-01

    Postharvest treatments of fruits using techniques such as ultraviolet-C have been linked with maintenance of the fruit quality as well as shelf-life extension. However, the effects of this treatment on the quality of fruits on a proteomic level remain unclear. This study was conducted in order to understand the response of mango fruit to postharvest UV-C irradiation. Approximately 380 reproducible spots were detected following two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Through gel analysis, 24 spots were observed to be differentially expressed in UV-C treated fruits and 20 were successfully identified via LCMS/MS. Postharvest UV-C treatment resulted in degradative effects on these identified proteins of which 40% were related to stress response, 45% to energy and metabolism and 15% to ripening and senescence. In addition, quality and shelf-life analysis of control and irradiated mangoes was evaluated. UV-C was found to be successful in retention of quality and extension of shelf-life up to 15 days. Furthermore, UV-C was also successful in increasing antioxidants (total flavonoid, reducing power and ABTS scavenging activity) in mangoes. This study provides an overview of the effects of UV-C treatment on the quality of mango on a proteomic level as well as the potential of this treatment in shelf-life extension of fresh-cut fruits. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Persistence behavior of imidacloprid and carbosulfan in mango (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacherjee, A K

    2013-02-01

    Imidacloprid was sprayed on mango cv. Dashehari at 0.3 mL L(-1) of water during pre-bloom stage with 6-8 cm panicle size (first week of March) to control hopper and carbosulfan was sprayed at 2.0 mL L(-1) of water in the trees of mango hybrid (H-1000) during fruit development stage (first week of May) to control leaf webber. Residues of both the insecticides were analysed in peel, pulp and fruit at different stages of fruit development and maturity. The initial residues of imidacloprid, after 30 days of spraying, were 1.21, 0.56 and 1.77 mg kg(-1) in peel, pulp and whole fruit, respectively. The residues persisted in peel for 60 days and in pulp for 50 days and dissipated with a half-life of 38 days. Mature Dashehari fruits at harvest (after 85 days of spraying) were free from imidacloprid residues. Carbosulfan in mango peel dissipated from 5.30 mg kg(-1) (after 1 h of spraying) to 0.05 mg kg(-1) at the time of harvest (after 45 days of spraying). Carbosulfan residue in pulp was very low (0.08 mg kg(-1)) after 1 h of spraying, which increased gradually to 0.90 mg kg(-1) after 10 days and finally came down to 0.04 mg kg(-1) after 26 days of spraying. The insecticide residue was not detected in the pulp at the time of harvest. The residues persisted in pulp for 26 days and in peel for 45 days and degraded with a half-life of 7 days. The dissipation of both imidacloprid and carbosulfan followed first order rate kinetics in whole fruit (peel + pulp). Therefore, the safe pre-harvest intervals were suggested to be 55 days for imidacloprid and 46 days for carbosulfan before consumption of mango fruits after spraying of these insecticides.

  2. Soil salinity and yield of mango fertigated with potassium sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio A. Carneiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Irrigated fruit crops have an important role in the economic and social aspects in the region of the Sub-middle São Francisco River Valley. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate soil salinity and the productive aspects of the mango crop, cv. Tommy Atkins, fertigated with doses of potassium chloride (KCl and potassium sulfate (K2SO4 during two crop cycles (from January to March 2014 and from January to March 2015. The experiment was carried out in a strip-split-plot design and five potassium doses (50, 75, 100, 125 and 150% of the recommended dose as plots and two potassium sources (KCl and K2SO4 as subplots, with four replicates. Soil electrical conductivity (EC, exchangeable sodium (Na+ and potassium (K+ contents and pH were evaluated. In addition, the number of commercial fruits and yield were determined. The fertilization with KCl resulted in higher soil EC compared with K2SO4 fertigation. Soil Na+ and K+ contents increased with increasing doses of fertilizers. K2SO4 was more efficient for the production per plant and yield than KCl. Thus, under the conditions of this study, the K2SO4 dose of 174.24 g plant-1 (24.89 kg ha-1 or 96.8% of recommendation, spacing of 10 x 7 m was recommended for a yield of 23.1 t ha-1 of mango fruits, cv. Tommy Atkins.

  3. Characterisation of the casual agent of mango anthracnose disease in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honger, Joseph Okani

    2014-05-01

    This research work was carried out to update information on the nature, the identity of the causal agent and the importance of mango anthracnose disease in Ghana. It was also to determine the effect of the disease on the juice quality of fruits and come up with appropriate control measures in the country. A field survey was carried out in 12 administrative districts of Ghana in 2010 and 2011 to assess the disease incidence and severity. The effect of the disease on yield/fruit quality was assessed in a commercial farm by determining the percentage of fruits that dropped or could not be marketed due to the disease. The pathogen causing the disease was isolated from the diseased lesions and characterised using cultural, morphological, biochemical and molecular approaches. The total soluble solids and acidity content of infected fruits were measured as means of determining the effect of the disease on juice quality of the fruits. The susceptibility of the different strains of the pathogen to fungicides available in Ghana was assessed using PDA amended with the fungicides after which efficacy of fungicides was evaluated in the field. The results show that two different symptoms, a sunken dark lesion and cracked skins were observable in Ghana. The disease was not found in the field in 5 out of the 12 districts surveyed and the incidence ranged from 0% in the Hohoe, Berekum, Kintampo, Savelungu/Nanton and Tolon/Kumbungu districts to 100% in the Kwaebibrem and Kumasi metro districts in both the 2010 and 2011 major mango growing seasons. The severity index of the disease on a scale of 0-5 ranged from 0 to 3.8 in 2010 and 0 to 3.7 in 2011. The disease was found to cause shriveling of fruit panicles and blemishes on skin of fruits resulting in yield loss of 4.5% in the major season and 29.9% in the minor season in a mango orchard in the Yilo Krobo district. Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. sensu lato was confirmed as the causal agent of the disease. From a total of 45

  4. Estimating rapidly and precisely the concentration of beta carotene in mango homogenates by measuring the amplitude of optothermal signals, values of chromaticity indices and the intensities of Raman peaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bicanic, D.D.; Dimitrovski, D.; Luterotti, S.; Tiwisk, van C.; Buijnsters, J.G.; Doka, O.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid, quantitative information about the micronutrients (including beta carotene) in mango fruit is often desired. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and spectrophotometry (SP), the two widely used methods in practice to quantify carotenoids, both require a time consuming and expensive

  5. Regulation and physiological role of silicon in alleviating drought stress of mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helaly, Mohamed Naser; El-Hoseiny, Hanan; El-Sheery, Nabil Ibrahim; Rastogi, Anshu; Kalaji, Hazem M

    2017-09-01

    Improvement of drought stress of mango plants requires intensive research that focuses on physiological processes. In three successive seasons (2014, 2015and 2016) field experiments with four different strains of mango were subjected to two water regimes. The growth and physiological parameters of possible relevance for drought stress tolerances in mango were investigated. Yield and its components were also evaluated. The data showed that all growth and physiological parameters were increased under K 2 SiO 3 (Si) supplement and were followed by the interaction treatment (Si treatment and its combination with drought stress) compared to that of the controlled condition. Drought stress decreased the concentration of auxins (IAA), gibberellins (GA) and cytokinins (CK) in the three mango cultivars leaves, whereas, it increased the concentration of abscisic acid (ABA). On the contrary, IAA, GA, and CK (promoters) endogenous levels were improved by supplementing Si, in contrary ABA was decreased. Drought stress increased the activity of peroxidase (POX), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the leaves of all mango cultivars grown during three experimental seasons. However, Si supplementation reduced the levels of all these antioxidative enzymes, especially the concentration of SOD when compared to that of control leaves. Fruit quality was improved in three successive seasons when Si was applied. Our results clearly show that the increment in drought tolerance was associated with an increase in antioxidative enzyme activity, allowing mango plants to cope better with drought stress. Si possesses an efficient system for scavenging reactive oxygen species, which protects the plant against destructive oxidative reactions, thereby improving the ability of the mango trees to withstand environmental stress in arid regions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Transport simulation of mangoes irradiated for exportation; Simulacao do transporte de mangas irradiadas para exportacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe

    2007-07-01

    It had been studied the effect of the ionizing radiation (gamma) in mangoes for exportation, simulating the stage of preservation of the fruit during its transport, through the refrigeration in cold chamber. In a first stage they had been analyzed through loss of weight, pH, treatable acidity, soluble solid, texture and decomposition. Later, sensorial analyses had been become fulfilled (alterations of color, odor, flavor, texture). The assays had been carried through in two stadiums of maturation of the fruits, that is, 2 and 3, with the intention of studying optimum point of harvest for the best dosage of irradiation. The results disclose together that the treatment of the mangoes Tommy Atkins in the dose of 0,75 kGy was significant, with the fruit in stadium 2, for the retardation of the matureness and consequent profit of time for the exportation. (author)

  7. Detection and Management of Mango Dieback Disease in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Esam Eldin; Sham, Arjun; A. Al Shurafa, Khawla; S. Al Naqbi, Tahra; Iratni, Rabah; El-Tarabily, Khaled; F. AbuQamar, Synan

    2017-01-01

    Mango is affected by different decline disorders causing significant losses to mango growers. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the pathogen was isolated from all tissues sampled from diseased trees affected by Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Symptoms at early stages of the disease included general wilting appearance of mango trees, and dieback of twigs. In advanced stages, the disease symptoms were also characterized by the curling and drying of leaves, leading to complete defoliation of the tree and discolouration of vascular regions of the stems and branches. To substantially reduce the devastating impact of dieback disease on mango, the fungus was first identified based on its morphological and cultural characteristics. Target regions of 5.8S rRNA (ITS) and elongation factor 1-α (EF1-α) genes of the pathogen were amplified and sequenced. We also found that the systemic chemical fungicides, Score®, Cidely® Top, and Penthiopyrad®, significantly inhibited the mycelial growth of L. theobromae both in vitro and in the greenhouse. Cidely® Top proved to be a highly effective fungicide against L. theobromae dieback disease also under field conditions. Altogether, the morphology of the fruiting structures, molecular identification and pathogenicity tests confirm that the causal agent of the mango dieback disease in the UAE is L. theobromae. PMID:29053600

  8. Effects of nisin-incorporated films on the microbiological and physicochemical quality of minimally processed mangoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Ana Andréa Teixeira; Silva de Araújo, Hyrla Grazielle; Matos, Patrícia Nogueira; Carnelossi, Marcelo Augusto Guitierrez; Almeida de Castro, Alessandra

    2013-06-17

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nisin-incorporated cellulose films on the physicochemical and microbiological qualities of minimally processed mangoes. The use of antimicrobial films did not affect the physicochemical characteristics of mangoes and showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris and Bacillus cereus. The mango slices were inoculated with S. aureus and L. monocytogenes (10(7)CFU/g), and the viable cell numbers remained at 10(5) and 10(6)CFU/g, respectively, after 12days. In samples packed with antimicrobial films, the viable number of L. monocytogenes cells was reduced below the detection level after 4days. After 6days, a reduction of six log units was observed for S. aureus. In conclusion, nisin showed antimicrobial activity in mangoes without interfering with the organoleptic characteristics of the fruit. This result suggests that nisin could potentially be used in active packing to improve the safety of minimally processed mangoes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain activation associated with pride and shame

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, Lilian; Kaffenberger, Tina; Herwig, Uwe; Brühl, Annette Beatrix

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-referential emotions such as shame/guilt and pride provide evaluative information about persons themselves. In addition to emotional aspects, social and self-referential processes play a role in self-referential emotions. Prior studies have rather focused on comparing self-referential and other-referential processes of one valence, triggered mostly by external stimuli. In the current study, we aimed at investigating the valence-specific neural correlates of shame/guilt and pr...

  10. Optimization of fruit punch using mixture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S Bharath; Ravi, R; Saraswathi, G

    2010-01-01

    A highly acceptable dehydrated fruit punch was developed with selected fruits, namely lemon, orange, and mango, using a mixture design and optimization technique. The fruit juices were freeze dried, powdered, and used in the reconstitution studies. Fruit punches were prepared according to the experimental design combinations (total 10) based on a mixture design and then subjected to sensory evaluation for acceptability. Response surfaces of sensory attributes were also generated as a function of fruit juices. Analysis of data revealed that the fruit punch prepared using 66% of mango, 33% of orange, and 1% of lemon had highly desirable sensory scores for color (6.00), body (5.92), sweetness (5.68), and pleasantness (5.94). The aroma pattern of individual as well as combinations of fruit juices were also analyzed by electronic nose. The electronic nose could discriminate the aroma patterns of individual as well as fruit juice combinations by mixture design. The results provide information on the sensory quality of best fruit punch formulations liked by the consumer panel based on lemon, orange, and mango.

  11. Levels of b-carotene, ascorbic acid and total phenols in the pulp of five commercial varieties of mango (Mangifera indica L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five varieties of mangoes from four countries were evaluated with multiple harvests over a year to compare the ß-carotene, total phenol, and ascorbic acid levels of the fruit pulp. Only soft fruit (0.5 to 1 N compression) with a minimum of 10% soluble solids were used for these measurements to minim...

  12. Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Polyphenols Ameliorate Functional Constipation Symptoms in Humans Beyond Equivalent Amount of Fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P Venancio, Vinicius; Kim, Hyemee; A Sirven, Maritza; D Tekwe, Carmen; Honvoh, Gilson; T Talcott, Stephen; U Mertens-Talcott, Susanne

    2018-05-07

    Chronic constipation is a common gastrointestinal condition associated with intestinal inflammation and considerably impaired quality of life, affecting about 20% of Americans. Dietary fiber and laxatives aid in its treatment but do not fully address all symptoms, such as intestinal inflammation. Mango (Mangifera indica L.), a fiber- and polyphenol-rich fruit may provide anti-inflammatory effects in constipation. The 4-week consumption of mango fruit (300 g) or the equivalent amount of fiber was investigated in otherwise healthy human volunteers with chronic constipation that were randomly assigned to either group. Blood and fecal samples and digestive wellness questionnaires were collected at the beginning and end of the study. Results show that mango consumption significantly improved constipation status (stool frequency, consistency, and shape) and increased gastrin levels and fecal concentrations of short chain fatty acid (valeric acid) while lowering endotoxin and interleukin 6 concentrations in plasma. In this pilot study, the consumption of mango improves symptoms and associated biomarkers of constipation beyond an equivalent amount of fiber. Larger follow-up studies would need to investigate biomarkers for intestinal inflammation in more detail. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of quarantine treatments on the carbohydrate and organic acid content of mangoes (cv. Tommy Atkins)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J. N.; Soares, C. A.; Fabbri, A. D. T.; Cordenunsi, B. R.; Sabato, S. F.

    2012-08-01

    Brazil is one of the largest mango producers and the third largest mango exporter worldwide. Irradiation treatment and its commercial feasibility have been studied in our country to make it possible to develop new markets and, consequently, to compete with the major exporters of mangoes, Mexico and India. This work was designed to compare irradiation treatment with the hot water dip treatment in mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins for export and to verify that the main attributes for acceptance, color and texture, as well as carbohydrate and organic acid contents, were maintained. In this study, the fruit was divided into groups: control, hot water dip-treated (46 °C for 90 min), and irradiation-treated at doses of 0.4 kGy and 1.0 kGy. The fruit was stored at low temperature (11 °C±2) for 14 days and then at room temperature (23 °C±2) until the end of the study. The results indicated that the fruit given a dose of 1.0 kGy remained in a less advanced stage of ripening (stage 3) throughout the storage period, but experienced a greater loss of texture in the beginning of the experiment. It was noted that only the control group had higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid on the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the total sugar content between any treatment groups. Gamma radiation can be used as a quarantine treatment and does not interfere negatively with the quality attributes of mangoes.

  14. Molecular identification of Mango, Mangifera indica L.var. totupura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Sankar; G, Rosaiah; Kurapati, Ravi Kumar; Pinnamaneni, Rajasekhar

    2011-01-01

    Mango (>Mangifera indica) belonging to Anacardiaceae family is a fruit that grows in tropical regions. It is considered as the King of fruits. The present work was taken up to identify a tool in identifying the mango species at the molecular level. The chloroplast trnL-F region was amplified from extracted total genomic DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced. Sequence of the dominant DGGE band revealed that Mangifera indica in tested leaves was Mangifera indica (100% similarity to the ITS sequences of Mangifera indica). This sequence was deposited in NCBI with the accession no. GQ927757. Abbreviations AFLP - Amplified fragment length polymorphism , cpDNA - Chloroplast DNA, DDGE - Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, DNA - Deoxyribo nucleic acid, EDTA - Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, HCl - Hydrochloric acid, ISSR - Inter simple sequence repeats, ITS - Internal transcribed spacer, MATAB - Methyl Ammonium Bromide, Na2SO3 - Sodium sulphite, NaCl - Sodium chloride, NCBI - National Centre for Biotechnology Information, PCR - Polymerase chain reaction, PEG - Polyethylene glycol, RAPD - Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, trnL-F - Transfer RNA genes start codon- termination codon. PMID:21423885

  15. Leaf Transcriptome Sequencing for Identifying Genic-SSR Markers and SNP Heterozygosity in Crossbred Mango Variety 'Amrapali' (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Nimisha; Singh, Akshay; Srivastav, Manish; Jaiprakash; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Singh, Anand Kumar; Sharma, Tilak Raj; Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is called "king of fruits" due to its sweetness, richness of taste, diversity, large production volume and a variety of end usage. Despite its huge economic importance genomic resources in mango are scarce and genetics of useful horticultural traits are poorly understood. Here we generated deep coverage leaf RNA sequence data for mango parental varieties 'Neelam', 'Dashehari' and their hybrid 'Amrapali' using next generation sequencing technologies. De-novo sequence assembly generated 27,528, 20,771 and 35,182 transcripts for the three genotypes, respectively. The transcripts were further assembled into a non-redundant set of 70,057 unigenes that were used for SSR and SNP identification and annotation. Total 5,465 SSR loci were identified in 4,912 unigenes with 288 type I SSR (n ≥ 20 bp). One hundred type I SSR markers were randomly selected of which 43 yielded PCR amplicons of expected size in the first round of validation and were designated as validated genic-SSR markers. Further, 22,306 SNPs were identified by aligning high quality sequence reads of the three mango varieties to the reference unigene set, revealing significantly enhanced SNP heterozygosity in the hybrid Amrapali. The present study on leaf RNA sequencing of mango varieties and their hybrid provides useful genomic resource for genetic improvement of mango.

  16. The self and others in the experience of pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Osch, Yvette; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Breugelmans, Seger M

    2018-03-01

    Pride is seen as both a self-conscious emotion as well as a social emotion. These categories are not mutually exclusive, but have brought forth different ideas about pride as either revolving around the self or as revolving around one's relationship with others. Current measures of pride do not include intrapersonal elements of pride experiences. Social comparisons, which often cause experiences of pride, contain three elements: the self, the relationship between the self and another person, and the other person. From the literature on pride, we distilled three related elements; perceptions and feelings of self-inflation, other-distancing, and other-devaluation. In four studies, we explored whether these elements were present in pride experiences. We did so at an implicit (Experiment 1; N = 218) and explicit level (Experiment 2; N = 125), in an academic setting with in vivo (Experiment 3; N = 203) and imagined pride experiences (Experiment 4; N = 126). The data consistently revealed that the experience of pride is characterised by self-inflation, not by other-distancing nor other-devaluation.

  17. Handling of ‘Tommy Atkins’ mango (Mangifera indica L.) for ripe and ready to eat markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, demand for ripe and ready to eat mango (RRTEM) has increased, offering an interesting possibility for Mexican producers because of geographic closeness from the production sites to the USA markets. The objectives were to determine the optimum fruit ripening stage at harvest and to delimit ...

  18. A mathematical model of 'Pride and Prejudice'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Sergio; Rossa, Fabio Della; Landi, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    A mathematical model is proposed for interpreting the love story between Elizabeth and Darcy portrayed by Jane Austen in the popular novel Pride and Prejudice. The analysis shows that the story is characterized by a sudden explosion of sentimental involvements, revealed by the existence of a saddle-node bifurcation in the model. The paper is interesting not only because it deals for the first time with catastrophic bifurcations in romantic relation-ships, but also because it enriches the list of examples in which love stories are described through ordinary differential equations.

  19. The role of pride in women with anorexia nervosa: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faija, Cintia L; Tierney, Stephanie; Gooding, Patricia A; Peters, Sarah; Fox, John R E

    2017-12-01

    Theory and clinical literature suggest that pride may play an important role in the maintenance of restrictive eating disorders. A grounded theory study explored experiences of, and reflections on, pride among women with a current or past diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. This is a qualitative study using grounded theory. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 21 women recruited from an eating disorder unit in England, and from a UK self-help organization. Grounded theory from a constructivist lens was used. Analysis involved coding, constant comparison, and memo-writing. Pride evolves over the course of anorexia nervosa. Two overarching conceptual categories were identified: 'pride becoming intertwined with anorexia' and 'pride during the journey towards recovery'. These categories encompassed different forms of pride: 'alluring pride', 'toxic pride', 'pathological pride', 'anorexia pride', 'shameful pride', 'recovery pride', and 'resilient pride'. Initially, pride contributed to self-enhancement and buffered negative emotions. As the condition progressed, pride became a challenge to health and interfered with motivation to change. During recovery, perceptions of pride altered as a healthy approach to living ensued. The evolving nature of pride plays a central role in development, maintenance, and treatment of anorexia nervosa. Understanding of pride and its role in psychotherapeutic work with this client group may increase motivation to change and promote recovery. Future work should investigate whether tackling pride in eating disorders increases treatment efficacy and reduces the risk of relapsing. Pride associated with anorexia appeared to evolve in nature. During early stages of the eating disorder, it stopped people from seeking help. Later on, it prevented them from seeing pride in healthy domains of life (outside anorexia). Over time, pride in anorexia became an overwhelming emotion that interfered with motivation to change. It is important for

  20. Attributions for Pride, Anger, and Guilt among Incarcerated Minority Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudley-Paul, Cynthia A.

    Two studies investigate causal attributions among minority adolescents. The first investigates attributions for the emotions of anger, pride, and guilt among 26 incarcerated male adolescents. Relatively few causes are found for anger and guilt, and a larger variety of causes are cited for pride. A follow-up study then compares causal attributions…

  1. The Adaptive Consequences of Pride in Personal Selling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem); F.D. Belschak (Frank); R.P. Bagozzi (Richard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractStudy 1 investigates the beneficial effects of experiencing pride. Pride was found to have two different effects. First, it increases salespersons' performance-related motivations. Specifically, it promotes adaptive selling strategies, greater effort, and self-efficacy. Secondly, it

  2. Remote handling systems for the Pride application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.; Lee, J.; Lee, H.; Kim, S.; Kim, H.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper is described the development of remote handling systems for use in the pyro processing technology development. Remote handling systems mainly include a BDSM (Bridge transported Dual arm Servo-Manipulator) and a simulator, all of which will be applied to the Pride (Pyro process integrated inactive demonstration facility) that is under construction at KAERI. BDMS that will traverse the length of the ceiling is designed to have two pairs of master-slave manipulators of which each pair of master-slave manipulators has a kinematic similarity and a force reflection. A simulator is also designed to provide an efficient means for simulating and verifying the conceptual design, developments, arrangements, and rehearsal of the pyro processing equipment and relevant devices from the viewpoint of remote operation and maintenance. In our research is presented activities and progress made in developing remote handling systems to be used for the remote operation and maintenance of the pyro processing equipment and relevant devices in the Pride. (Author)

  3. Temporal analysis and fungicide management strategies to control mango anthracnose epidemics in Guerrero, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Monteon Ojeda, Abraham; Mora Aguilera, José Antonio; Villegas Monter, Ángel; Nava Diaz, Cristian; Hernández Castro, Elías; Otero-Colina, Gabriel; Hernández Morales, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The temporal progress of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) epidemics was studied in mango (Mangifera indica) orchards treated with fungicides from different chemical groups, mode of action, and application sequences in two regions of contrasting climates (sub-humid and dry tropics) in Guerrero, Mexico. Full flowering, initial setting, and 8-15mm Ø fruits were identified as critical stages for infection. Epidemics started 20-26 days after swollen buds, and maximum severity was attai...

  4. Identification of colletotrichum species causing anthracnose on tahiti lime, tree tomato and mango

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, Erika P.; Hío, Juan C.; Osorio1, Jairo A.; Torres, María F.

    2009-01-01

    In Colombia, citrus, tree tomato and mango crops are likely to suffer considerable losses from anthracnose caused by several Colletotrichum species, which were identified by the present study on infected organs of the three fruit crops, sampled in different regions of the country. Identification was based on their morphological and molecular characteristics, as well as on fungicide (benomyl and copper hydroxide) sensitivity and pathogenicity tests. The latter assessed infectivity on both the ...

  5. Effect of quarantine treatments on the carbohydrate and organic acid content of mangoes (cv. Tommy Atkins)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, J.N.; Soares, C.A.; Fabbri, A.D.T.; Cordenunsi, B.R.; Sabato, S.F.

    2012-01-01

    Brazil is one of the largest mango producers and the third largest mango exporter worldwide. Irradiation treatment and its commercial feasibility have been studied in our country to make it possible to develop new markets and, consequently, to compete with the major exporters of mangoes, Mexico and India. This work was designed to compare irradiation treatment with the hot water dip treatment in mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins for export and to verify that the main attributes for acceptance, color and texture, as well as carbohydrate and organic acid contents, were maintained. In this study, the fruit was divided into groups: control, hot water dip-treated (46 °C for 90 min), and irradiation-treated at doses of 0.4 kGy and 1.0 kGy. The fruit was stored at low temperature (11 °C±2) for 14 days and then at room temperature (23 °C±2) until the end of the study. The results indicated that the fruit given a dose of 1.0 kGy remained in a less advanced stage of ripening (stage 3) throughout the storage period, but experienced a greater loss of texture in the beginning of the experiment. It was noted that only the control group had higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid on the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in the total sugar content between any treatment groups. Gamma radiation can be used as a quarantine treatment and does not interfere negatively with the quality attributes of mangoes. - Highlights: ► In Brazil, one of the largest producers and exporters of mangoes, tropical fruits are routinely treated with a hot water dip. ► Results from this study demonstrate that irradiation is a good alternative to this conventional quarantine treatment. ► Carbohydrate and organic acid results are presented for irradiation and hot water dip treatments. ► Texture measurements are shown as a function of storage time for each of these treatments.

  6. An oxidoreductase from 'Alphonso' mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ram; Chidley, Hemangi; Deshpande, Ashish; Schmidt, Axel; Pujari, Keshav; Giri, Ashok; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Gupta, Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (72% identity). The complete open reading frame was expressed in E. coli and the (his)6-tagged recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The purified protein assayed with NADH as a reducing agent converted D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate into furaneol, the immediate precursor of mesifuran. The enzyme was also able to convert two highly reactive carbonyls, 3-buten-2-one and 1-penten-3-one, produced by lipid peroxidation in plants, into their saturated derivatives. Expression profiling in various ripening stages of Alphonso fruits depicted an expression maxima at 10 days after harvest stage, shortly before the appearance of the maximum amount of furanones (completely ripe stage, 15 days after harvest). Although no furanones were detected at the 0 day after harvest stage, significant expression of this gene was detected in the fruits at this stage. Overall, the results suggest that this oxidoreductase plays important roles in Alphonso mango fruits.

  7. Evaluation of quality of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins radiated with greater degree of maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Josenilda M. da, E-mail: jmnilda@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Marilia C.G. dos; Maciel, Maria Ines S., E-mail: marines@ufrpe.br [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Villar, Heldio P., E-mail: hpvillar@cnen.gov.br [Escola Politecnica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation at doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy were evaluated in mango cultivar Tommy Atkins when harvested at maturation stage showing yellow flesh and skin color more red than green, representing four degree of maturation at commercial scale. The fruits were stored for 21 days at 12 degree C and sensory evaluated after that period as its external appearance, internal appearance, acidic taste, sweet taste, mellow flavor, aroma, texture and succulence of the flesh, by a team of ten trained judges. Physic chemical analysis of the main characteristics of fruits quality were also performed in the pulp at the end of storage. The results of sensory analysis revealed that the doses used did not damaged the sensory characteristics of mango fruit and that they received a dose of 0.5 kGy showed higher acceptance for most sensory attributes evaluated. The physic chemical characteristics showed no significant differences between the doses, except the amount of ascorbic acid that decreased progressively with increasing doses. Application of this method is viable for mango cultivar Tommy Atkins when taken with a higher degree of maturity and was safe for the external market and sensory acceptable. (author)

  8. Evaluation of quality of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins radiated with greater degree of maturity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Josenilda M. da; Santos, Marilia C.G. dos; Maciel, Maria Ines S.; Villar, Heldio P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of ionizing radiation at doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy were evaluated in mango cultivar Tommy Atkins when harvested at maturation stage showing yellow flesh and skin color more red than green, representing four degree of maturation at commercial scale. The fruits were stored for 21 days at 12 degree C and sensory evaluated after that period as its external appearance, internal appearance, acidic taste, sweet taste, mellow flavor, aroma, texture and succulence of the flesh, by a team of ten trained judges. Physic chemical analysis of the main characteristics of fruits quality were also performed in the pulp at the end of storage. The results of sensory analysis revealed that the doses used did not damaged the sensory characteristics of mango fruit and that they received a dose of 0.5 kGy showed higher acceptance for most sensory attributes evaluated. The physic chemical characteristics showed no significant differences between the doses, except the amount of ascorbic acid that decreased progressively with increasing doses. Application of this method is viable for mango cultivar Tommy Atkins when taken with a higher degree of maturity and was safe for the external market and sensory acceptable. (author)

  9. Verkkokaupan arkkitehtuuri ja toteutus : Case: Mango Hotel

    OpenAIRE

    Ketolainen, Jari

    2010-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön toimeksiantajana toimi tamperelainen hotellialan yritys Mango Hotel. Yrityksellä oli ollut käytössä valmis verkkokaupparatkaisu vaatteiden, tavaroiden ja asusteiden myyntiin, mutta sovellus osoittautui vaikeakäyttöiseksi, huonosti Mango Hotellin tarpeisiin mukautuvaksi ja sitä oli ylläpitäjän hankala päivittää. Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli suunnitella ja toteuttaa aivan uusi verkkokauppasovellus Mango Hotellin käyttöön käyttämättä tai muokkaamatta mitään valmista verkkoka...

  10. Comportamento de forrageamento de abelhas e outros insetos nas panículas da mangueira (Mangifera indica L. e produção de frutos - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v31i3.6678 Forage behaviour of bees and other insects on mango flowers (Mangifera indica L. and fruit production - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v31i3.6678

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Halak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available O experimento foi conduzido com o objetivo de se estudar a frequência, constância, o tipo de coleta (néctar e/ou pólen e comportamento de forrageamento dos insetos visitantes às flores da mangueira (Mangifera indica L. e seu efeito na produção de frutos. A frequência e o tipo de coleta dos insetos nas flores foram obtidos durante os primeiros 10 min. em cada horário, das 7 às 18h, com três repetições em cada ano. O teste de polinização foi realizado, utilizando-se dois tratamentos: panículas cobertas para se impedir a visita dos insetos e panículas descobertas (controle nas quais foi permitida a visita dos insetos. Os insetos da ordem Diptera, a abelha Tetragonisca angustula e o coleóptero Diabrotica speciosa foram espécies constantes nas panículas da mangueira, e os dípteros foram os mais frequentes. A porcentagem de frutificação foi maior nas flores visitadas pelos insetos.This research was carried out to study the frequency and constancy of visitors on mango inflorescence (Mangifera indica L. as well as collection type (nectar and pollen, its forage behaviour and these effects on fruit production. The frequency and collection type by insects on flowers were obtained in the first ten minutes of each hour between 7:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m., with three replications in two years. The pollination test was performed with two treatments: covered flowers and uncovered flowers with free insect visits. Diptera order insects, stingless bees Tetragonisca angustula and Diabrotica speciosa were constant species on mango flowers, and Diptera insects were the more frequent visitors. Fruition percentage was higher in flowers visited by insects.

  11. Integrated studies of irradiated Philippine mangoes. Part of coordinated programme in Asian Regional Cooperative Project on Food Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manalo, J.A.

    1985-09-01

    Effects of combined treatment of hot water dip (50 deg. C for 5 min.) and irradiation (0.65 kGy) on technological and sensory qualities of Carabao mangoes were investigated. Mangoes that ripen to the yellow green stage during transport may be subjected to irradiation of combined hot water dip at 50 deg. C for 5 minutes and irradiation at 0.65 kGy. When stored at the low temperature of 12-15 deg. C, shelf life is extended further. Time interval between hot water dip and irradiation must be as short as possible and fruits must be stored at ambient temperature prior to irradiation to prevent discoloration. Shelf life studies show that green fruits subjected to combined treatment and stored at ambient temperature extended shelf life by 6 days, 50% of yellow green mangoes subjected to combined treatment exhibited shelf life extension by four days. Mangoes stored at cold temperature, whether immediately after irradiation or after ripening showed considerable reduction in bacterial decay, regardless of fruit maturity, thus extending their shelf life considerably. Results of sensory evaluation showed no marked differences in color, aroma, appearance, and acceptability were observed by the taste panelists and although controls were always rated higher than the treated samples, scores higher than 5 given to the treated samples showed that they were also generally acceptable

  12. Tolerance of mango cv. ´Ataulfo' to irradiation with Co-60 vs. hydrothermal phytosanitary treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Simuta, Y.; Hernández, Emilio; Aceituno-Medina, Marysol; Liedo, Pablo; Escobar-López, Arseny; Montoya, Pablo; Bravo, Bigail; Hallman, Guy J.; Bustos, M. Emilia; Toledo, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    The use of ionizing irradiation or the use of hot water treatment (HWT) has been demonstrated as a successful commercial phytosanitary treatment during the past two decades. Several countries currently use this technology for commercial treatments to meet plant quarantine requirements. However, hydrothermal treatment has been found to significantly affect the firmness of ;Ataulfo; mango fruit, the susceptibility to damage by cold and it also accelerates their maturation. In this study, we focused on the effect of irradiation doses on the sensorial quality and the physiochemical properties of mango cv ;Ataulfo; compared with the traditional hot water treatment. We found that doses of 150 Gy and 300 Gy of gamma radiation can be applied successfully as well as the hot water treatment. There was no significant difference in between irradiation treatments in terms of weight loss, external and internal color, pH, soluble solids, titratable acidity and firmness, and consumer's acceptance. There was no adverse effect of color appearance, odor and flavor, indicating that consumers will have the willingness to buy and consume irradiated mangoes. Irradiation of mangoes can be a successful post-harvest treatment as an alternative to the hot water treatment.

  13. Pathogenic characterization of lasiodplodia causing stem end rot of mango and its control using botanicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, S. F.; Hussain, Y.; Iram, S.

    2017-01-01

    Two widely cultivated mango fruit varieties White chounsa and Sindhri were collected from two major mango growing areas of Punjab and Sindh Provinces of Pakistan. This study was focused on pathological characterization of predominant postharvest diseases such as stem end rot of mango (Mangifera indica) caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae, and evaluation of bio-control activity by different plant extracts. L. theobromae aggressiveness of isolates was tested by artificial inoculations under controlled conditions, all isolates proved pathogenic in varying degree of aggressiveness on (Sindhri and White chounsa) with reference to control. Calculated standard error mean varied in lesion area produced by pathogens 6-63cm/sup 2/ (Sindhri) and 60-170 cm/sup 2/ (White chounsa). Re-isolation of respective fungi verified the Koch's postulates. Plant extract of Datura stramonium, Aloe-vera, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, were used to control the radial growth of L. theobromae. Comparative analysis showed D. Stramonium and E. camaldulensis extracts most efficiently reduced the growth of Lasiodiplodia isolates, in comparison to Aloe-vera extract, restrict the 15-20% growth. All pathological results and treatments were significant at p<0.05 through ANOVA. This study emphasizes the behavior of pathogens which could be helpful in mango breeding to introduce resistance toward Lasiodiplodia and referred plants provide the best alternative of chemical fungicides. (author)

  14. Pulsed electric field and combination processing of mango nectar: effect on volatile compounds and HMF formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Bawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mango nectar is a commercially familiar and preferred product. The traditional processing of mango nectar has been by thermal processing which resulted in the alteration of the flavour of the product due to the effect of high temperature. The thermal processing of the nectar also resulted in the production of byproducts of non-enzymatic browning such as 5- hydroxy methyl furfural (HMF. These process induced effects, affect both the nutritive and sensory attributes of the fruit product, making it less preferable. With the growing interest and awareness about the benefits of alternative non-thermal technologies, such as pulsed electric field (PEF, the present work was proposed to use PEF to minimize the loss of volatiles and formation of HMF. The study involves thermal (96 ºC for 300 s and 600 s, PEF (24 µs, 120 Hz and 38 kV/cm and combination processing (PEF + Thermal (96 ºC for 90 s of mango nectar. The effect of these treatments on the volatile composition of mango nectar has been analysed using GC-MS technique. The reduction in the volatile compounds was significant (p 0.05 different from unprocessed sample, proving the fresh-like character of the product.

  15. Modelling and experimental validation of thin layer indirect solar drying of mango slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissa, A.O.; Bathiebo, J.; Kam, S.; Koulidiati, J. [Laboratoire de Physique et de Chimie de l' Environnement (LPCE), Unite de Formation et de Recherche en Sciences Exactes et Appliquee (UFR/SEA), Universite de Ouagadougou, Avenue Charles de Gaulle, BP 7021 Kadiogo (Burkina Faso); Savadogo, P.W. [Laboratoire Sol Eau Plante, Institut de l' Environnement et de Recherches Agricoles, 01 BP 476, Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso); Desmorieux, H. [Laboratoire d' Automatisme et de Genie des Procedes (LAGEP), UCBL1-CNRS UMR 5007-CPE Lyon, Bat.308G, 43 bd du 11 Nov. 1918 Villeurbanne, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Lyon (France)

    2009-04-15

    The thin layer solar drying of mango slices of 8 mm thick was simulated and experimented using a solar dryer designed and constructed in laboratory. Under meteorological conditions of harvest period of mangoes, the results showed that 3 'typical days' of drying were necessary to reach the range of preservation water contents. During these 3 days of solar drying, 50%, 40% and 5% of unbound water were eliminated, respectively, at the first, second and the third day. The final water content obtained was about 16 {+-} 1.33% d.b. (13.79% w.b.). This final water content and the corresponding water activity (0.6 {+-} 0.02) were in accordance with previous work. The drying rates with correction for shrinkage and the critical water content were experimentally determined. The critical water content was close to 70% of the initial water content and the drying rates were reduced almost at 6% of their maximum value at night. The thin layer drying model made it possible to simulate suitably the solar drying kinetics of mango slices with a correlation coefficient of r{sup 2} = 0.990. This study thus contributed to the setting of solar drying time of mango and to the establishment of solar drying rates' curves of this fruit. (author)

  16. Optimizing Microwave-assisted Crude Butter Extraction from Carabao Mango (Mangifera indica Kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgardo V. Casas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carabao mangoes are among the highly produced fruit crops in the Philippines. The processing and consumption of carabao mangoes leave a significant amount of waste seeds. Mango kernel butter extracted from waste seed kernels is a potential additive to cosmetic products or as a cocoa butter substitute. This study determined the pretreatment conditions that produce optimum yield prior to the mechanical extraction of the crude butter. Moreover, this study provided a general sensory evaluation of the finished product. Microwave power (160, 500, and 850 W, microwave exposure time (2.0, 3.5, and 5.0 min, and size levels (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 mm were tested for their effects on the yield of the mechanically extracted crude butter in wet basis percentage. The optimization procedures resulted to optimum pretreatment conditions of 160 W, 4.25 min, and 1.5 mm. Size level was the most significant factor in the crude butter yield. Sensory evaluation of the crude butter extracted at optimum pretreatment conditions through acceptance test by a test panel resulted to below neutral scores in visual appearance and odor, and above neutral score in texture, indicating the potential of mango butter as a good substitute to cocoa butter in cosmetic products.

  17. Cross-cultural regularities in the cognitive architecture of pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznycer, Daniel; Al-Shawaf, Laith; Bereby-Meyer, Yoella; Curry, Oliver Scott; De Smet, Delphine; Ermer, Elsa; Kim, Sangin; Kim, Sunhwa; Li, Norman P; Lopez Seal, Maria Florencia; McClung, Jennifer; O, Jiaqing; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Quillien, Tadeg; Schaub, Max; Sell, Aaron; van Leeuwen, Florian; Cosmides, Leda; Tooby, John

    2017-02-21

    Pride occurs in every known culture, appears early in development, is reliably triggered by achievements and formidability, and causes a characteristic display that is recognized everywhere. Here, we evaluate the theory that pride evolved to guide decisions relevant to pursuing actions that enhance valuation and respect for a person in the minds of others. By hypothesis, pride is a neurocomputational program tailored by selection to orchestrate cognition and behavior in the service of: ( i ) motivating the cost-effective pursuit of courses of action that would increase others' valuations and respect of the individual, ( ii ) motivating the advertisement of acts or characteristics whose recognition by others would lead them to enhance their evaluations of the individual, and ( iii ) mobilizing the individual to take advantage of the resulting enhanced social landscape. To modulate how much to invest in actions that might lead to enhanced evaluations by others, the pride system must forecast the magnitude of the evaluations the action would evoke in the audience and calibrate its activation proportionally. We tested this prediction in 16 countries across 4 continents ( n = 2,085), for 25 acts and traits. As predicted, the pride intensity for a given act or trait closely tracks the valuations of audiences, local (mean r = +0.82) and foreign (mean r = +0.75). This relationship is specific to pride and does not generalize to other positive emotions that coactivate with pride but lack its audience-recalibrating function.

  18. Pride displays communicate self-interest and support for meritocracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horberg, E J; Kraus, Michael W; Keltner, Dacher

    2013-07-01

    The present studies examined how observers infer moral attributes and beliefs from nonverbal pride displays. Pride is a self-focused positive emotion triggered by appraisals of the self's success, status, and competence. We hypothesized that when a target emits nonverbal cues of pride, he or she will be viewed by observers as higher in self-interest and therefore more likely to endorse ideologies that would benefit the self-specifically, merit-based resource distributions (meritocracy) as opposed to equality-based resource distributions (egalitarianism). Across studies, experimentally manipulated pride displays (Studies 1 and 3) and naturally occurring expressions of pride (Study 4) led observers to infer heightened support for meritocracy as opposed to egalitarianism. Analyses also revealed that people intuitively associate higher self-interest with enhanced support for meritocracy as opposed to egalitarianism (Study 2), and this association mediates the pathway from pride displays to inferences of heightened support for meritocracy and reduced support for egalitarianism (Studies 3 and 4). Across studies, we compare pride to expressions of joy or no emotion and demonstrate these effects using thin slices as well as static images. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of quarantine treatments on skin and pulp color of mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Caruso, Marcel Wilke; Sabato, Susy Frey

    2009-01-01

    The mango (Mangifera indica L.) has shown the highest growth rates among the fruit exported by Brazil. This exportation implies specific treatments to attend phytosanitary requirements to attend USA and Europe market. Among them there are thermal treatments (hot water dip or vapor treatment) or irradiation witch it has ability to promote disinfestations and delaying the ripening of the mango. The main objective of this paper was to report the color behavior among treatments covering irradiation alone, thermal treatment combined with irradiation and control. The mangoes were irradiated in a Multipurpose Gamma Source from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP and divided in four groups - the control (C) , dose 0,75 KGy (I), dose 0,75 KGy with hot water dip (46 deg C during 70 min) (2A) and dose 0,75KGy with hot water dip (52 deg C during 5 min) (2B). All fruits were stored at 11 deg C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days, after this period the fruits were kept at environmental conditions (25 deg C) during more 14 days. The results showed that the group 2A had the color of the skin delayed by treatment, not reaching stage 4 on the 26th. This group showed significant difference compared to groups C (p ≤ 0.05) however there was no difference among the others groups (2B and I). In general, these results indicate that the group 2A showed satisfactory results, concluding that combined treatment was beneficial for the mango, prolonging the process of development of its color. (author)

  20. Comparison of quarantine treatments on skin and pulp color of mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Caruso, Marcel Wilke; Sabato, Susy Frey, E-mail: juliananc@ig.com.b, E-mail: macaruso_98@hotmail.co, E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The mango (Mangifera indica L.) has shown the highest growth rates among the fruit exported by Brazil. This exportation implies specific treatments to attend phytosanitary requirements to attend USA and Europe market. Among them there are thermal treatments (hot water dip or vapor treatment) or irradiation witch it has ability to promote disinfestations and delaying the ripening of the mango. The main objective of this paper was to report the color behavior among treatments covering irradiation alone, thermal treatment combined with irradiation and control. The mangoes were irradiated in a Multipurpose Gamma Source from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP and divided in four groups - the control (C) , dose 0,75 KGy (I), dose 0,75 KGy with hot water dip (46 deg C during 70 min) (2A) and dose 0,75KGy with hot water dip (52 deg C during 5 min) (2B). All fruits were stored at 11 deg C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days, after this period the fruits were kept at environmental conditions (25 deg C) during more 14 days. The results showed that the group 2A had the color of the skin delayed by treatment, not reaching stage 4 on the 26th. This group showed significant difference compared to groups C (p <= 0.05) however there was no difference among the others groups (2B and I). In general, these results indicate that the group 2A showed satisfactory results, concluding that combined treatment was beneficial for the mango, prolonging the process of development of its color. (author)

  1. Study of the action of 60Co gamma radiation on Salmonella poona, Escherichia coli and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in mango pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Marco Antonio dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    The application of non-thermal treatments has proven effective in inhibiting bacteria such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Mango is a fruit of national consumption with a great exportation potential. Meanwhile, outbreaks of food borne disease related to mango consumption caused mistrust on the degree of food security offered by the product. The objective of this work was to establish the radioresistance of bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella Poona and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris on the mango pulp by the calculation of the D10 values and to know the radiation effect on the sensory characteristics of the fruit pulp. The microbiological profile of frozen mango pulp available at the local market was also established using conventional methods of plating and Most Probable Number (MPN). The pulps experimentally inoculated with the bacteria listed above were irradiated with doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5kGy in a 60 Co source. The sensory analysis was performed using a dose of 5 kGy, using the triangular test and the test of acceptance with hedonic scale. The results of this study show that the quality of mango pulp sell in the local market is not satisfactory in accordance with the standards established by the Brazilian law and the literature, showing the need of using other tools to achieve acceptable levels of quality. The D10 values obtained are in the range of 1.01 and 1.09kGy for E. coli ATCC 8739, 0.60 and 0.98kGy for S. poona and 0.72 e 0.88kGy for A. acidoterrestris respectively. The triangular test showed that a 5kGy radiation dose changed the sensory characteristics of mango pulp. Nevertheless, sensory analysis of a food product prepared with the irradiated pulp obtained good acceptance in the attributes of global appearance, flavor and aroma. (author)

  2. Study of the action of 60Co gamma radiation on Salmonella poona, Escherichia coli and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris in mango pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Marco Antonio dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    The application of non-thermal treatments has proven effective in inhibiting bacteria such as Salmonella and Escherichia coli. Mango is a fruit of national consumption with a great exportation potential. Meanwhile, outbreaks of foodborne disease related to mango consumption caused mistrust on the degree of food security offered by the product. The objective of this work was to establish the radioresistance of bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella Poona and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris on the mango pulp by the calculation of the D10 values and to know the radiation effect on the sensory characteristics of the fruit pulp. The microbiological profile of frozen mango pulp available at the local market was also established using conventional methods of plating and Most Probable Number (MPN). The pulps experimentally inoculated with the bacteria listed above were irradiated with doses of 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 kGy in a 60 Co source. The sensory analysis was performed using a dose of 5 kGy, using the triangular test and the test of acceptance with hedonic scale. The results of this study show that the quality of mango pulp sell in the local market is not satisfactory in accordance with the standards established by the Brazilian law and the literature, showing the need of using other tools to achieve acceptable levels of quality. The D10 values obtained are in the range of 1.01 and 1.09 kGy for E. coli ATCC 8739, 0.60 and 0.98 kGy for S. poona and 0.72 and 0.88 kGy for A. acidoterrestris respectively. The triangular test showed that a 5 kGy radiation dose changed the sensory characteristics of mango pulp. Nevertheless, sensory analysis of a food product prepared with the irradiated pulp obtained good acceptance in the attributes of global appearance, flavor and aroma. (author)

  3. Avaliação da qualidade de manga 'palmer' tratada com 1-metilciclopropeno e armazenada sob refrigeração e condição ambiente Evaluation of quality of 'palmer' mangoes fruit treated with 1-methylcyclopropene and stored under refrigeration and environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Toews Dollhojo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a qualidade de mangas da cv. Palmer tratadas com 1-metilciclopropeno (1-MCP mantidas sob armazenamento refrigerado e sob armazenamento refrigerado associado à exposição à temperatura ambiente por quatro dias. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em fatorial 3 x 6, sendo 3 níveis do fator dose de 1-MCP (0 -testemunha, 100 nL.L-1 e 150 nL.L-1 e 6 níveis do fator tempo de armazenamento (0; 7; 14; 21; 28 e 35 dias de armazenamento refrigerado, no experimento 1, e 0; 7 + 4; 14 + 4; 21 + 4; 28 + 4 e 35 dias de armazenamento refrigerado + 4 dias sob condição ambiente, no experimento 2, com 3 repetições. Cada parcela experimental foi composta por 2 frutos. O uso de 1-MCP em mangas 'Palmer' mantidas sob refrigeração reduz as perdas de massa e ácido ascórbico, retardando, mas não impedindo o amadurecimento. O tratamento com 150 nL.L-1 não é mais eficiente que o com 100 nL.L-1, pelas características químicas analisadas. As mangas 'Palmer' expostas à condição ambiente por quatro dias apresentam expressivo murchamento e perda de qualidade, com base nas análises de sólidos solúveis, açúcares solúveis e acidez titulável.The objective of this work was to verify the behavior of mangoes cv. Palmer treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP stored under refrigeration and under refrigeration associate in exposure for four days at room temperature. The experiment was carried out in a completely randomly design, 3 x 6 factorial, with 3 levels of the factor concentration of 1-methylcyclopropene (0 nL.L-1- witness, 100 nL.L-1 and 150 nL.L-1 and 6 levels of the factor period of storage (0, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days of cool storage, on the set up 1, and 0, 7 + 4, 14 + 4, 21 + 4, 28 + 4 and 35 days of cool storage + 4 days of room storage, on the set up 2, with 3 replicates. The experimental units were built up with 2 fruits. The use of 1-methylcyclopropene on the fruit kept under

  4. Expressed Sequence Tag-Simple Sequence Repeat (EST-SSR Marker Resources for Diversity Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie L. Dillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a collection of 24,840 expressed sequence tags (ESTs generated from five mango (Mangifera indica L. cDNA libraries was mined for EST-based simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. Over 1,000 ESTs with SSR motifs were detected from more than 24,000 EST sequences with di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant. Of these, 25 EST-SSRs in genes involved in plant development, stress response, and fruit color and flavor development pathways were selected, developed into PCR markers and characterized in a population of 32 mango selections including M. indica varieties, and related Mangifera species. Twenty-four of the 25 EST-SSR markers exhibited polymorphisms, identifying a total of 86 alleles with an average of 5.38 alleles per locus, and distinguished between all Mangifera selections. Private alleles were identified for Mangifera species. These newly developed EST-SSR markers enhance the current 11 SSR mango genetic identity panel utilized by the Australian Mango Breeding Program. The current panel has been used to identify progeny and parents for selection and the application of this extended panel will further improve and help to design mango hybridization strategies for increased breeding efficiency.

  5. Evaluation of the {sup 14}C-prochloraz residue levels in irradiated mangoes (Mangifera indica) and apples (Malus domestica).; Avaliacao dos niveis de residuos de {sup 14}C-prochloraz em mangas (Mangigera indica) irradiadas e em macas (Malus domestica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Maria Aparecida

    1998-07-01

    The Brazilian crops mangoes and apples has expanding in the last years. However, tropical fruits crops are susceptible to infection that harms the crop yield. The control of these diseases is made through fungicides such as prochloraz which possesses protecting eradicating action by controlling anthracnose in mangoes and scabies in apples. Agrochemicals are of great importance in the agriculture considering the of relationship cost/benefit. However they may cause a series of problems in the ecosystem, being the levels of agrochemicals residues in fruits one of these factors. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prochloraz levels in mangoes treated in both stages of pre and post harvest, and in apples treated in the pre harvest. In the treatment of the mangoes, the interaction, fungicide with the gamma radiation with dose of 1,0 kGy, was used to induce prochloraz degradation. Treated post harvest mangoes were stored, at 12 deg C during 21 days. The results showed that the prochloraz did not present reduction in the residual levels of the mangoes after 21 day storage, that is the safe period established by the Brazilian legislation on agrochemicals, in treated mangoes. The refrigerated storage (12 deg C) and the gamma radiation also did not contribute to the degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. In average the concentration of the fungicide prochloraz in the peels (bar X = 1,64 mug/g) was higher than in the mangoes pulp (bar x = 0,06 mug/g), which allows the consumption of this fruit, since the peel is always discarded. The degradation product, formed in peels of mangoes in fruits treated in the pre and post harvest was the metabolite BIS 44596; for mangoes treated in the pre-post harvest the metabolite formed was the BIS 445186. Both metabolites were found in very low levels, confirming that occurs degradation of the fungicide in mangoes. In apples treated with the prochloraz, reduction of 500/0 in the levels. (author)

  6. Antioxidant and enzymatic responses to oxidative stress induced by pre-harvest water supply reduction and ripening on mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. 'Cogshall') in relation to carotenoid content

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalie , Rémy; Joas , Jacques; Deytieux-Belleau , Christelle; Vulcain , Emmanuelle; Payet , Bertrand; Dufossé , Laurent; Léchaudel , Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The effects of a reduction in water supply during fruit development and postharvest fruit ripening on the oxidative status and the antioxidant defense system were studied in the mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Cogshall. Changes in non-enzymatic (ascorbate) and enzymatic (SOD, CAT, APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR) antioxidants, as well as oxidative parameters (H 2 O 2 and MDA) and major carotenoids, were measured in unripe and ripe fruits from well-irrigated and non-irrig...

  7. Study of influence on harvesting point in Brazilian Tommy Atkins mangoes submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Cruz, J.N.; Rela, P.R.; Broisler, P.O.

    2009-01-01

    Brazil is a great producer of tropical fruits including mangoes. Among several purposes gamma radiation can be applied as phytosanitary treatment. This is well studied in scientific papers and more recently demonstrated through commercial advances like bilateral protocols established between India and USA. The whole experiment evolved two parts where each of them used fruits from different maturity stages (stages 2 and 3). This experiment was carried out with around 300 fruits in each part of the study. The main objective was to get the experience close to commercial conditions. The irradiation was realized in Multipurpose Cobalt-60 source belonging to IPEN-CNEN/SP (developed in house by own technology). The absorbed doses were 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75 kGy. After irradiation all fruits were kept at 12 o C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days. After this period the fruits were brought to environmental conditions (25 deg. C) for around 14 more days of duration. These conditions were established to simulate the exportation conditions from Brazil to distant countries. Physical-chemical analysis (pH, titrable acidity, total soluble solids ( o Brix) and texture) as well as visual observation (mass loss, rotting, internal and skin color) were evaluated. The results from this experiment could demonstrate that the characteristics of the mangoes are more dependent on time and temperature storage rather than irradiation.

  8. Study of influence on harvesting point in Brazilian Tommy Atkins mangoes submitted to gamma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabato, S. F.; Cruz, J. N.; Rela, P. R.; Broisler, P. O.

    2009-07-01

    Brazil is a great producer of tropical fruits including mangoes. Among several purposes gamma radiation can be applied as phytosanitary treatment. This is well studied in scientific papers and more recently demonstrated through commercial advances like bilateral protocols established between India and USA. The whole experiment evolved two parts where each of them used fruits from different maturity stages (stages 2 and 3). This experiment was carried out with around 300 fruits in each part of the study. The main objective was to get the experience close to commercial conditions. The irradiation was realized in Multipurpose Cobalt-60 source belonging to IPEN-CNEN/SP (developed in house by own technology). The absorbed doses were 0.2, 0.5 and 0.75 kGy. After irradiation all fruits were kept at 12 °C in acclimatized chamber during 14 days. After this period the fruits were brought to environmental conditions (25 °C) for around 14 more days of duration. These conditions were established to simulate the exportation conditions from Brazil to distant countries. Physical-chemical analysis (pH, titrable acidity, total soluble solids (°Brix) and texture) as well as visual observation (mass loss, rotting, internal and skin color) were evaluated. The results from this experiment could demonstrate that the characteristics of the mangoes are more dependent on time and temperature storage rather than irradiation.

  9. assessment of invasive fruit fly fruit infestation and damage in cabo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    039o50.352' E and 246 masl), where B. invadensis widespread and well established (Cugala et al.,. 2011). Niuje and Koma-koma are well organised fruit production areas and Mahipa is a major mango and cashew production area in Cabo Delgado. Province. The choice of these host species was due to their abundance, ...

  10. Analysis of genetic diversity in mango ( Mangifera indica L.) using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of genetic diversity in mango ( Mangifera indica L.) using isozymetic polymorphism. ... All the isozymes, used in the present study showed polymorphism for mango. A total of 25 different electrophoretic ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Cocoa, Mango, Banana and Yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular Characterization of Cocoa, Mango, Banana and Yam Isolates of Botryodiplodia theobromae in Ghana. ... A total of 25 fungal isolates were sampled from cocoa, mango, banana and yam within four ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  12. Influence of differently processed mango seed kernel meal on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of differently processed mango seed kernel meal on performance response of west African ... and TD( consisted spear grass and parboiled mango seed kernel meal with concentrate diet in a ratio of 35:30:35). ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  13. Influence of mango mesocarp flour supplement to micronutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of mango mesocarp flour supplement to micronutrient, physical and organoleptic qualities of wheat-based bread. ... Mango mesocarp flour was incorporated into wheat flour at 15, 20 and 30% levels to ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  14. A Patient Developed Painful Muscle Cramps due to Overeating Mangos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Abe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old woman had a habit to eat a mango every night before sleep and experienced muscle cramps during sleep. Her muscle cramps may be resulted from potassium overload due to overeating mangos.

  15. Study of quarantine treatment in mango (Mangifera indica L.) for export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Juliana Nunes da

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify and compare the chemical and physical-chemical behaviour of mango cv. Tommy Atkins subjected to hydrothermal treatment and irradiation at doses 0.4 and 1.0 kGy, to complement the studies by SABATO et al (2009) in the real transport of irradiated mangoes from Brazil to Canada. These studies allowed to compare the performance of irradiation with heat treatment on the preservation of the characteristics of mango for export. For these reason fruits were divided into groups: control, heat bath (46 degree C for 90 min), at dose 0.4 kGy and at dose 1.0 kGy. The fruits were stored at low temperature (11 degree C ± 2) for 14 days, and then at room temperature (23 degree C ± 2) until the end of its useful life. During the period of cold storage the analysis were performed at intervals of 7 days and every 3 days when kept at room temperature. The results indicated that the dose of 1.0 kGy was the only group that kept the fruit with the skin color on stage 3 throughout the experimental period, but provided a greater loss of texture degradation and the levels of total acidity in the fruits with green skin. It was noted that only the control group showed higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid in the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in soluble solids, total sugars and evaluation of weight in relation to treatments. The analysis of visual observation indicated that the heat bath group was the one with the highest number of fruit drop by decomposition with approximately 55%. It was concluded that irradiation is more effective in preserving the quality of mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins, reducing the appearance of rot or shriveling in relation to heat treatment. However, the preservation of the skin of fruit is not concurrently influenced by its intrinsic nature, since, internally, the fruits continue their normal maturation, independent of the applied dose. (author)

  16. Tocopherol levels in different mango varieties correlate with MiHPPD expression and its over-expression elevates tocopherols in transgenic Arabidopsis and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh K; Chaurasia, Akhilesh K; Bari, Rupesh; Sane, Vidhu A

    2017-10-01

    Mango fruit tocopherol levels vary in different varieties during ripening. This study shows that tocopherol accumulation is highly correlated with its p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase ( MiHPPD ) gene expression during ripening. MiHPPD transcript is ethylene induced and differentially expressed in four mango varieties used in this study. Higher/lower accumulation of tocopherol (mainly α-tocopherol) was achieved by heterologous expression of MiHPPD in Arabidopsis and tomato. The results suggest that tocopherol accumulation in mango fruit is correlated to MiHPPD gene expression. Over-expression of MiHPPD gene channelizes the flux towards tocophreol biosynthesis and could be used as a potential tool for metabolic engineering.

  17. Volunteering for charity: pride, respect, and the commitment of volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boezeman, Edwin J; Ellemers, Naomi

    2007-05-01

    This study builds upon and extends the social-identity-based model of cooperation with the organization (T. R. Tyler, 1999; T. R. Tyler & S. L. Blader, 2000) to examine commitment and cooperative intent among fundraising volunteers. In Study 1, structural equation modeling indicated that pride and respect related to the intent to remain a volunteer with an organization, and that this relation was mediated primarily by normative organizational commitment. In Study 2, structural equation modeling indicated that the perceived importance of volunteer work was related to pride, that perceived organizational support related to the experience of respect, and that pride and respect mediated the relation between perceived importance and support on the one hand and organizational commitment on the other. Overall, the results suggest that volunteer organizations may do well to implement pride and respect in their volunteer policy, for instance to address the reliability problem (J. L. Pearce, 1993). 2007 APA, all rights reserved

  18. When dynamic, the head and face alone can express pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nicole L; Russell, James A

    2011-08-01

    Prior research suggested that pride is recognized only when a head and facial expression (e.g., tilted head with a slight smile) is combined with a postural expression (e.g., expanded body and arm gestures). However, these studies used static photographs. In the present research, participants labeled the emotion conveyed by four dynamic cues to pride, presented as video clips: head and face alone, body posture alone, voice alone, and an expression in which head and face, body posture, and voice were presented simultaneously. Participants attributed pride to the head and face alone, even when postural or vocal information was absent. Pride can be conveyed without body posture or voice. 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Guilt and pride are heartfelt, but not equally so.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourie, Melike M; Rauch, Henri G L; Morgan, Barak E; Ellis, George F R; Jordaan, Esmè R; Thomas, Kevin G F

    2011-07-01

    We examined the cardiovascular physiology of guilt and pride to elucidate physiological substrates underpinning the behavioral motivations of these moral emotions. Although both emotions motivate prosocial behavior, guilt typically inhibits ongoing behavior, whereas pride reinforces current behavior. To succeed in eliciting real emotions, we used a novel social interaction task. We found dissociable sympathetic activation during guilt and pride; specifically, Guilt participants experienced prolonged cardiac sympathetic arousal as measured by preejection period (PEP), whereas Pride participants experienced transient non-cardiac somatic arousal and a shift to low frequency (LF) power in the cardiac spectrogram. This dissociation supports their distinctive motivational functions. Higher self-reported Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS) sensitivity was furthermore uniquely associated with guilt, supporting its function as a punishment cue. Copyright © 2010 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. Stakeholder Analysis for Farmer inclusive Value chain Development in Mango

    OpenAIRE

    Nadhika K; Jayasree Krishnankutty

    2017-01-01

    Mango is being cultivated over a substantial area in Palakkad District of Kerala state. Being one of the significant agricultural commodity value chains existing in Kerala, the mango value chain of Palakkad district needs urgent attention to improve its performance. The study highlights the stakeholder analysis and SWOC matrix analysis of the mango sector. Stakeholders were asked to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges in the mango sector. Based on the highest scor...

  1. The Use of Microorganism for Biological Control of Anthracnose in Nam Dok Mai Mango for Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piadiang, Nattaya

    2006-09-01

    Antagonist were tested inhibition of mycelial growth of Collectorichum gloeosporioides, a causal agent of anthracnose on potato dextrose agar (PDA) revealed that 46 isolated that 46 isolate inhibited the growth of mycelia by 40.01-60.00 5. The selected four isolates inhibit the growth of fungal nycelia by 47.01-50.00 % including YFm1, YFm2, Y18 and AC2-1 were test for the potential reduce anthracnose lesion development on detected Nam Dok Mai mango by application of antagonistic microorganism before inoculation of C. gloeosporioides. This result slow that four isolate antagonistic reduced sized of lesion on Nam Dok Mai mango by 89.23, 75.38, 58.46 and 33.85 %, respectively as compare the control. Five isolate of antagonist including YFm1, YFm2, Y18, CLY35 and CLY23 could inhibited the growth of mycelia on PDA by 44.01-50.00 % were test the potential reduce anthracnose lesion development on detected Nam Dok Mai mango by application of antagonistic microorganism after inoculation of C. gloeosporioides. It was found that this application could not inhibit anthracnose on fruit mango as compare to the control. YFm1 were test for the potential inhibition anthracnose disease under field condition. It was found that YFm1 could control of C. gloeosporioides within 7 and 14 day after spraying antagonistic suspension. The efficiency test of YFm1 for anthracnose controlling on mango was followed by export treatment Azoxystrobin, ET-fon and showed 55.55%, 77.77 % and 88.88 % anthracnose infection and/or spoilage respectively

  2. Optimization of soymilk, mango nectar and sucrose solution mixes for better quality of soymilk based beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getu, Rahel; Tola, Yetenayet B; Neela, Satheesh

    2017-01-01

    Soy milk-based beverages play an important role as a healthy food alternative for human consumption. However, the ‘beany’ flavor and chalky mouth feel of soy milk often makes it unpalatable to consumers. The objective of the present study is to optimize a blend of soy milk, mango nectar and sucrose solution for the best quality soy milk-based beverage. This study was designed to develop a soy milk blended beverage, with mango nectar and sucrose solutions, with the best physicochemical and sensory properties. Fourteen combinations of formulations were determined by D-optimal mixture simplex lattice design, by using Design expert. The blended beverages were prepared by mixing the three basic ingredients with the range of 60−100% soy milk, 0–25% mango nectar and 0–15% sucrose solution. The prepared blended beverage was analyzed for selected physicochemical and sensory properties. The statistical significance of the terms in the regression equations were examined by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for each response and the significance test level was set at 5% (p nectar and sucrose solution increased, total color change, total soluble solid, gross energy, titratable acidity, and beta-carotene contents increased but with a decrease in moisture , ash, protein, ether extract, minerals and phytic acid contents was observed. Fi- nally, numerical optimization determined that 81% soy milk, 16% Mango nectar and 3% sugar solution will give by a soy milk blended beverage with the best physicochemical and sensory properties, with a desirability of 0.564. Blending soy milk with fruit juice such as mango is beneficial, as it improves sensory as well as selected nutritional parameters.

  3. Effect of irradiation and storage temperature on quality parameters of Kesar mango (Mangifera indica L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, M.K.; Patel, N.L.; Patel, S.R.

    2013-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to study the effect of irradiation and storage temperatures on quality parameters in Kesar mango fruits. The fruits were exposed to gamma radiation of different doses i.e. 0.00, 0.20, 0.40 and 0.60 kGy) from 60 Co source and stored at various storage environment viz., ambient temperature 27 ± 2℃ and RH 60-70 %; temperature 9℃ and RH 90 %; 12℃ and RH 90 % and control atmospheric (CA) storage at 12℃, O 2 2 %, CO 2 3 % and RH 90 %. The data indicated that highest total soluble solids, total and reducing sugars and ascorbic acid contend and minimum acidity were noted in 0.40 kGy gamma rays irradiated fruits stored at 12℃ compared to unirradiated fruits stored at ambient condition at ripening stage. (author)

  4. A Review on Ethnopharmacological Applications, Pharmacological Activities, and Bioactive Compounds of Mangifera indica (Mango)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Mangifera indica (family Anacardiaceae), commonly known as mango, is a pharmacologically, ethnomedically, and phytochemically diverse plant. Various parts of M. indica tree have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of different ailments, and a number of bioactive phytochemical constituents of M. indica have been reported, namely, polyphenols, terpenes, sterols, carotenoids, vitamins, and amino acids, and so forth. Several studies have proven the pharmacological potential of different parts of mango trees such as leaves, bark, fruit peel and flesh, roots, and flowers as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic, gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, immunomodulatory, antiplasmodial, and antihyperlipemic. In the present review, a comprehensive study on ethnopharmacological applications, pharmacological activities, and bioactive compounds of M. indica has been described. PMID:29456572

  5. A Review on Ethnopharmacological Applications, Pharmacological Activities, and Bioactive Compounds of Mangifera indica (Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meran Keshawa Ediriweera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mangifera indica (family Anacardiaceae, commonly known as mango, is a pharmacologically, ethnomedically, and phytochemically diverse plant. Various parts of M. indica tree have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of different ailments, and a number of bioactive phytochemical constituents of M. indica have been reported, namely, polyphenols, terpenes, sterols, carotenoids, vitamins, and amino acids, and so forth. Several studies have proven the pharmacological potential of different parts of mango trees such as leaves, bark, fruit peel and flesh, roots, and flowers as anticancer, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, anthelmintic, gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, immunomodulatory, antiplasmodial, and antihyperlipemic. In the present review, a comprehensive study on ethnopharmacological applications, pharmacological activities, and bioactive compounds of M. indica has been described.

  6. Containment barrier at Pride Park, Derby, England

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, P.; Esnault, A.; Braithwaite, P.

    1997-01-01

    The Pride Park site at Derby occupies 96ha of derelict land close to the city centre. Approximately one third of the site was a closed landfill with a further third being an old gas works site. The remainder comprised former heavy engineering works and gravel pit workings. The River Derwent bounds the site on two sides. The objectives of the remediation strategy for the site included minimising off-site disposal of contaminated soils and ensuring that contaminants do not migrate into the adjacent river. The eastern part of the site, including the landfill and gasworks sites, was therefore contained by a 600mm wide bentonite cement vertical cut-off wall, with HDPE membrane, sealed by 1m into the underlying mudstone. The cut-off wall is some 3km long and a maximum 10m deep. The works were complicated by the need to construct the wall around 36 existing underground services. The paper briefly covers the background to the remediation of the site, describes the construction process and discusses design considerations in relation to the durability requirements of the containment barrier in the potentially aggressive environment

  7. Mutation breeding in Philippine fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espino, R.R.C.

    1987-09-01

    Studies were made to establish standard conditions for mutation induction by gamma-irradiation to be performed in combination with in-vitro culture for banana and citrus spp. Besides this, radio-sensitivity of seeds and/or plantlets of mango, sugar apple, soursop, lanzones and Jack fruit was investigated and primary observation on the occurrence of mutation was made. For the mutagenesis of banana shoot tip cultures, radio-sensitivity of plantlets derived from the culture as well as fresh-cultured shoots was examined and phenotypes indicative of mutation, such as chlorophyl streaking, slow growth, pigmentation and varied bunch orientation were recorded. Isozyme analysis for mutated protein structure was not conclusive. In the in-vitro culture of Citrus spp., seeds placed on fresh media as well as germinating seeds and two-leaf stage seedlings in test tubes were examined for their radio-sensitivity. Irradiated materials were propagated for further observation. In these two crops, basic methodology for mutation induction with combined use of in-vitro culture and gamma-irradiation was established. In mango, sugar apple, soursop, lanzones and Jack fruit, basic data on radiosensitivity were obtained. In mango, leaf abnormalities were observed after the treatment of scions

  8. Effect of postharvest UV-C treatment on the bacterial diversity of Ataulfo mangoes by PCR-DGGE, survival of E. coli and antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, Rocío; Ramírez-Villatoro, Guadalupe; Díaz-Ruiz, Gloria; Eslava, Carlos; Calderón, Montserrat; Navarro-Ocaña, Arturo; Trejo-Márquez, Andrea; Wacher, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Since Mexico is the second largest exporter of mangoes, its safety assurance is essential. Research in microbial ecology and knowledge of complex interactions among microbes must be better understood to achieve maximal control of pathogens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of UV-C treatments on bacterial diversity of the Ataulfo mangoes surface using PCR-DGGE analysis of variable region V3 of 16S rRNA genes, and the survival of E. coli, by plate counting. The UV-C irradiation reduced the microbial load on the surface of mangoes immediately after treatment and the structure of bacterial communities was modified during storage. We identified the key members of the bacterial communities on the surface of fruits, predominating Enterobacter genus. Genera as Lactococcus and Pantoea were only detected on the surface of non-treated (control) mangoes. This could indicate that these genera were affected by the UV-C treatment. On the other hand, the treatment did not have a significant effect on survival of E. coli. However, genera that have been recognized as antagonists against foodborne pathogens were identified in the bands patterns. Also, phenolic compounds were determined by HPLC and antimicrobial activity was assayed according to the agar diffusion method. The main phenolic compounds were chlorogenic, gallic, and caffeic acids. Mango peel methanol extracts (UV-C treated and control mangoes) showed antimicrobial activity against strains previously isolated from mango, detecting significant differences (P < 0.05) among treated and control mangoes after 4 and 12 days of storage. Ps. fluorescens and Ps. stutszeri were the most sensitive. PMID:23761788

  9. First report of Fusarium decemcellulare causing inflorescence wilt, vascular and flower necrosis of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), longan (Dimocarpus longan) and mango (Mangifera indica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longan, mango and rambutan are very important fruit crops in Puerto Rico. During a disease survey in Puerto Rico conducted from 2008 to 2010, 50% of the inflorescences were affected with inflorescence wilt, flower and vascular necrosis at 70% of the fields of rambutan and longan at the USDA-ARS Rese...

  10. Cross-cultural evidence for the two-facet structure of pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Chung, Joanne M; Cheng, Joey T; Tracy, Jessica L; Robins, Richard W; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Across six studies conducted in Mainland China and South Korea, the present research extended prior findings showing that pride is comprised of two distinct conceptual and experiential facets in the U.S.: a pro-social, achievement-oriented "authentic pride", and an arrogant, self-aggrandizing "hubristic pride". This same two-facet structure emerged in Chinese participants' semantic conceptualizations of pride (Study 1), Chinese and Koreans' dispositional tendencies to experience pride (Studies 2, 3a, and 3b), Chinese and Koreans' momentary pride experiences (Studies 3a, 3b, and 5), and Americans' pride experiences using descriptors derived indigenously in Korea (Study 4). Together, these studies provide the first evidence that the two-facet structure of pride generalizes to cultures with highly divergent views of pride and self-enhancement processes from North America.

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation and storage temperature on carotenoids and ascorbic acid content of mangoes on ripening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Janave, M.T.

    1975-01-01

    Synthesis and accumulation of carotenoids in the flesh of Alphonso mangoes on ripening was found to be maximal in fruits stored at tropical ambient temperatures (28 0 to 32 0 C). Gamma irradiation of preclimacteric fruits at 25 krad did not affect the formation of carotenoids. Storage of preclimacteric fruits either irradiated or unirradiated at 7 to 20 0 C for 16 to 43 days caused a substantial reduction in carotenoid formation even when these fruits were subsequently ripened under optimal conditions. Regardless of storage temperature, carotenes always exceeded xanthophylls in the ripe fruits and, in general, irradiated fruits showed higher levels of carotenes in comparison with unirradiated samples. Ascorbic acid loss during ripening was maximum at ambient temperatures while lengthy storage at low temperatures caused a net increase in ascorbic acid levels. Irradiation seemed to accentuate the loss in ascorbic acid during ripening. (author)

  12. Rearing Fopius arisanus (Sonan) (Hymenoptera:Braconidae) on Mediterranean fruit fly and its introduction into Senegal against Oriental fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis(Hendel)(aka B.invadens Drew, Tsuruta, and White) was first reported in Africa in 2003 and has since spread to over 27 countries. It has become a serious tree fruit pest, particularly in mango (Mangifera indica L.). Because of uncertainty as to the exact status...

  13. Biological Control of Mango Dieback Disease Caused by Lasiodiplodia theobromae Using Streptomycete and Non-streptomycete Actinobacteria in the United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, Fatima H.; Saeed, Esam E.; El-Tarabily, Khaled A.; AbuQamar, Synan F.

    2018-01-01

    Dieback caused by the fungus Lasiodiplodia theobromae is an important disease on mango plantations in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). In this study, 53 actinobacterial isolates were obtained from mango rhizosphere soil in the UAE, of which 35 (66%) were classified as streptomycetes (SA) and 18 (34%) as non-streptomycetes (NSA). Among these isolates, 19 (12 SA and 7 NSA) showed antagonistic activities against L. theobromae associated with either the production of diffusible antifungal metabolites, extracellular cell-wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs), or both. Using a “novel” mango fruit bioassay, all isolates were screened in vivo for their abilities to reduce lesion severity on fruits inoculated with L. theobromae. Three isolates, two belonging to Streptomyces and one to Micromonospora spp., showed the strongest inhibitory effect against this pathogen in vitro and were therefore selected for tests on mango seedlings. Our results revealed that the antifungal action of S. samsunensis UAE1 was related to antibiosis, and the production of CWDEs (i.e., chitinase) and siderophores; whilst S. cavourensis UAE1 and M. tulbaghiae UAE1 were considered to be associated with antibiotic- and CWDE-production, respectively. Pre-inoculation in greenhouse experiments with the most promising actinobacterial isolates resulted in very high levels of disease protection in mango seedlings subsequently inoculated with the pathogen. This was evident by the dramatic reduction in the estimated disease severity indices of the mango dieback of individual biocontrol agent (BCA) applications compared with the pathogen alone, confirming their potential in the management of mango dieback disease. L. theobromae-infected mango seedlings treated with S. samsunensis showed significantly reduced number of defoliated leaves and conidia counts of L. theobromae by 2- and 4-fold, respectively, in comparison to the other two BCA applications. This indicates that the synergistic antifungal effects of S

  14. Radiation preservation of subtropical fruits in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodrick, H.T.; Thomas, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations on the radiation treatment of subtropical fruits were conducted over several seasons at the Atomic Energy Board in conjunction with the Citrus and Subtropical Fruit Research Institute, Nelspruit. In the case of mangoes irradiation, in combination with hot-water or heated-fungicide treatment, by controlling fungal and insect attack, makes possible the transport of fruits to Europe by sea and, with the additional advantage od delayed ripening, a marked improvement in national distribution is also achieved. A commercial feasibility study for mango processing is summarized and a pilot-plant operation for mangoes is also described. Promising results have also been obtained with respect to disease control and delayed senescence in papayas, and similar benefits to those described for mangoes can be achieved under local-market and export conditions. In the case of litchis, although work is in an early stage, effective disease control has been obtained with irradiation treatment. With regard to avocados, a greatly reduced dose with a mild heat treatment produced delayed ripening without significant adverse effects, and resulted in a shelf-life extension of several days. The results given in the report show that the irradiation of subtropical fruits holds considerable promise in terms of reduced losses, improved fruit quality, better distribution and large-scale exports. With the possibility of international clearances within the foreseeable future, commercialization of the process should follow in due course. (author)

  15. ESR study of free radicals in mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammad S.; Morishita, Norio; Ukai, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2010-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mangoes was performed. Mangoes in the fresh state were irradiated with γ-rays, lyophilized and then crushed into a powder. The ESR spectrum of the powder showed a strong main peak at g = 2.004 and a pair of peaks centered at the main peak. The main peak was detected from both flesh and skin specimens. This peak height gradually decreased during storage following irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose-response relationship even at 9 days post-irradiation. The side peaks therefore provide a useful means to define the irradiation of fresh mangoes.

  16. Evaluation of extraction methods for preparative scale obtention of mangiferin and lupeol from mango peels (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Montañez, G; Ragazzo-Sánchez, J A; Calderón-Santoyo, M; Velázquez-de la Cruz, G; de León, J A Ramírez; Navarro-Ocaña, A

    2014-09-15

    Bioactive compounds have become very important in the food and pharmaceutical markets leading research interests seeking efficient methods for extracting these bioactive substances. The objective of this research is to implement preparative scale obtention of mangiferin and lupeol from mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) of autochthonous and Ataulfo varieties grown in Nayarit, using emerging extraction techniques. Five extraction techniques were evaluated: maceration, Soxhlet, sonication (UAE), microwave (MAE) and high hydrostatic pressures (HHP). Two maturity stages (physiological and consumption) as well as peel and fruit pulp were evaluated for preparative scale implementation. Peels from Ataulfo mango at consumption maturity stage can be considered as a source of mangiferin and lupeol using the UEA method as it improves extraction efficiency by increasing yield and shortening time. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Population Dynamic Observation And Mass Trapping Of Fruit Fly Bactrocera Carambolae (Drew and Hancock)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuswadi, Achmad Nasroh; Indarwatmi, Murni; Nasution, Indah A.; Darwani; Himawan, Toto

    2000-01-01

    In connection with the control of B. carambolae, major pest of mango fruit in Indonesia using sterile insect technique, population monitoring with methyl eugenol attractant baited traps, absolute population measurement with release and recapture techniques, and mass trapping to reduce population of the pest in mango orchards were conducted. Based on the number of the male fly trapped it was know that the fly population was always low when no mature mango fruit found on the orchard, and it strated to increase in October, the middle time, of mango harvest until some time after the end of harvesting time. In August, when the population was low, about 4000 flies/hectare or 600 flies/hectare were found in the extensive and intensive culture orchards respectively. Mass trapping with 4 trapps per hectare was able to kill about 620 and 240 male flies per hectare of the extensive and intensive culture orchards respectively

  18. Irradiation of carabao mangoes for decay control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabastro, E.F.; Pineda, A.S.; Pangan, A.C.; Valle, M.J. del.

    Control of postharvest diseases of carabao mangoes by gamma radiation has been the subject of several local studies, notably that of Herrera and Valencia (1964) and Pablo et al (1971) which showed dose levels of 16.6 Kr. and 60 Kr. respectively, to be effective in extending the market life. The wide range of resorted effective dose levels for mangoes prompted this investigation which aimed to establish the pre-dominant spoilage-causing micro-organisms and the effectivity of irradiation in controlling or delaying the growth of these micro-organisms. (author)

  19. Planeamiento estratégico del mango

    OpenAIRE

    Alegre Dextre, Victor Hugo; Arias Mamani, Dashiell Dettmar; Bustillos Roque, Jesús Augusto; Canaza Mollehuanca, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    xxi, 280 h. : il. ; 30 cm. El mango se ha convertido en el fruto tropical más valorado por sus beneficios nutricionales y características organolépticas. Por ello, se ha creado una oportunidad de negocio, debido al incremento de la demanda a nivel mundial por el consumo de frutas y vegetales. Dentro de este contexto, las exportaciones de mango peruano se vienen incrementando en los últimos años, lo cual beneficia a productores y exportadores peruanos, así como también a los ...

  20. Application of irradiated chitosan for fruit preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieu N. Lan [Post Harvest Technology Inst. of Vietnam (Viet Nam)

    2000-09-01

    Application of irradiated chitosan has been investigated for coating of fruit preservation. Anti-fungal activity of chitosan was induced by {gamma}-ray irradiation in dry condition at 25 kGy. The irradiated chitosan can suppress the growth of Aspergillus. spp. and Fusarium. spp. isolated from Vietnam mango. Fusarium. spp. was sensitive for irradiated chitosan than the other strains. The coating from irradiated chitosan solution at dose 31 kGy has prolonged the storage life of mango from 7 to 15 days. At the 15th day mango keeps good colour, natural ripening, without spoilage, weight loss 10%, whereas the control is spoiled completely and the sample of fruit with unirradiated chitosan coating could not ripe. The effect is due to the anti-fungal activity and change in physico-chemical properties of chitosan by irradiation. Radiation causes the decrease in viscosity affecting the gas permeability of coating film. The irradiated chitosan coating has positive effect on mango that is susceptible to chilling injury at low storage temperature. (author)

  1. Application of irradiated chitosan for fruit preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieu N, Lan; Nguyen D, Lam; Yoshii, Fumio; Kume, Tamikazu

    2000-01-01

    Application of irradiated chitosan has been investigated for coating of fruit preservation. Anti-fungal activity of chitosan was induced by γ-ray irradiation in dry condition at 25 kGy. The irradiated chitosan can suppress the growth of Aspergillus. spp. and Fusarium. spp. isolated from Vietnam mango. Fusarium. spp. was sensitive for irradiated chitosan than the other strains. The coating from irradiated chitosan solution at dose 31 kGy has prolonged the storage life of mango from 7 to 15 days. At the 15th day mango keeps good colour, natural ripening, without spoilage, weight loss 10%, whereas the control is spoiled completely and the sample of fruit with unirradiated chitosan coating could not ripe. The effect is due to the anti-fungal activity and change in physico-chemical properties of chitosan by irradiation. Radiation causes the decrease in viscosity affecting the gas permeability of coating film. The irradiated chitosan coating has positive effect on mango that is susceptible to chilling injury at low storage temperature. (author)

  2. Postharvest Application of Spermidine Polyamine on the Storage Quality and Vase Life of Mango (Mangifera indica L. in Dipped Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Sadat Hosseini

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mango (Mangifera indica is a tropical fruit native to India whose global production in 2014 reached nearly 45 million tones. Mango is a commercially important fruit and improvement in its storage is of special importance. Mango is a Climacteric fruit whose ripening is done by exogenous or endogenous ethylene. In plants, Polyamines such as spermine, spermidine, and putrescine contradict ethylene because of a common precursor (s-adenosyl methionine (SAM. During ripening, different qualitative and nutritional changes occur in the fruit, e. g. changes in color, tissue softening, accumulation of sugars and organic acids, and great changes in taste, flavor, aroma and plant biochemical materials. Fruit ripening is a complicated process, complementary to fruit development, and a start to its senescence. In general, senescence of a fruit is related to loss of membrane lipids, destabilization of membrane matrix, and lipid peroxidation. Recently, naturally active biological products are applied in a large amount for increasing the storage life and quality of the fruits and delaying their senescence.This study was carried out to investigate the effect of different concentrations of spermidine on the quality and vase life of a local mango variety of Minab. Materials and Methods: Healthy fruits, uniform in size, shape, color, and degree of maturity were selected from a mango orchard in Minab and their original physical and chemical characteristics on the first day were measured after washing with water and drying. Statistical analysis of data was done by a general linear model (GLM with SAS (version 9.1 and mean comparisons were performed using Duncan's multiple range test. Treatment solution in the rate of 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 mM spermidine (SIGMA was made and its pH was set to 5 using NaOH. One liter of distilled water was used in the control treatment. The treated samples were immersed in solutions of different concentrations of spermidine just

  3. Effect of tropical fruit juices on dentine permeability and erosive ability in removing the smear layer: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanittha Kijsamanmith

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that tropical fruit juices, especially green mango and lime, increase dentine permeability and have a strong erosive ability to remove the smear layer, which causes dentine hypersensitivity.

  4. Study of mango endogenous pectinases as a tool to engineer mango purée consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamsazzadeh Kermani, Zahra; Shpigelman, Avi; Houben, Ken; ten Geuzendam, Belinda; Van Loey, Ann M; Hendrickx, Marc E

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the possibility of using mango endogenous pectinases to change the viscosity of mango purée. Hereto, the structure of pectic polysaccharide and the presence of sufficiently active endogenous enzymes of ripe mango were determined. Pectin of mango flesh had a high molecular weight and was highly methoxylated. Pectin methylesterase showed a negligible activity which is related to the confirmed presence of a pectin methylesterase inhibitor. Pectin contained relatively high amounts of galactose and considerable β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity was observed. The possibility of stimulating β-Gal activity during processing (temperature/pressure, time) was investigated. β-Gal of mango was rather temperature labile but pressure stable relatively to the temperature and pressure levels used to inactivate destructive enzymes in industry. Creating processing conditions allowing endogenous β-Gal activity did not substantially change the consistency of mango purée. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Distribution and Frequency of the Terms "Pride" and "Prejudice" in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Dromnes

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we examine the title terms of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice (1813 with particular attention to their distribution and frequency in the text. Our method is to connect the statistical material gathered on frequency and distribution to a narratological analysis of the terms, with special emphasis on whether they occur within the focalization of the external narrator, or that of character-focalizers. In order to approach this task, we have availed ourselves of the narratological theories of Mieke Bal. We conclude that there is a differentiation among types of focalization in the novel that enhances the thematic structure of match-making. Although Jane Austen wrote and published her major works two centuries ago, they continue to fascinate literary scholars and general readers alike.

  6. Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging on Postharvest Quality of Mango cvs. Sindhri and Sufaid Chaunsa During Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Hafeez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP technology is gaining popularity worldwide for its potential of extending shelf life of fresh produce with better fruit quality. Effect of MAP (using Xtend® bags, was investigated on postharvest storage life and quality of mango cvs Sindhri and Sufaid Chaunsa stored at 11°C with 80-85% RH for 4 and 5 weeks respectively, in comparison with un-bagged (control fruit. Uniform physiological mature fruit of Sindhri and Sufaid Chaunsa were harvested from a commercial mango orchard along with 4-5 cm long pedicel and were de-sapped in 0.5% lime solution (to avoid sap burn injury. Later on fruit were given cold water fungicidal dip (Sportak @ 0.5ml/L, Active Ingredient: Prochloraz followed by hot water treatment (52°C; 5 min. After shade drying and pre-cooling (11°C; 10-12 hours, fruit were packed according to the treatment combination and stored at 11°C. Fruit of both varieties were removed after 2, 3 and 4 weeks of storage followed by ripening at 24±2°C with an additional removal after 5 weeks for Sufaid Chaunsa only. Fruit quality was evaluated for various bio-chemical, organoleptic and physical parameters at two stages of ripening (at removal day and at final ripening day. Fruit of both varieties stored in MAP exhibited better firmness and retained green colour as compared to un-bagged fruit. Quality of fruit subjected to postharvest fungicidal application and hot water treatments and stored under MAP at 11°C showed better peel colour development and less disease development. Moreover, storage durations and post storage ripening stages significantly affected fruit peel colour, textural softness and disease development. Further, cv. Sindhri showed better storage potential with lower disease incidence as compared to cv. Sufaid Chaunsa which warrants further studies on disease control aspects.

  7. Gestion agro-écologique des mouches de fruits de manguier dans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    Bissau ... to test the efficacy of an agro-ecological system for sustainable management of mango fruit flies. ... fruit is effective, it requires much time and labor, including land-fillings and black plastic trash bags (80 x 50cm) that are ...

  8. The current status of mango farming business in Ghana: A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current status of mango farming business in Ghana: A case study of mango farming in the Dangme West District. ... Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a crop which is assuming great economic importance in Ghana. ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  9. Screening of tomato varieties for fruit tree based Agroforestry system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hossain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted with four tomato varieties under a six year old orchard was accomplished at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU research farm during October 2011 to April 2012. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with three replications. Four tomato varieties (BARI Tomato 2, BARI Tomato 8, BARI Tomato 14 and BARI Tomato 15 were grown under guava, mango, olive and control. Results showed that light availability in control plot (999.75 μ mol m-2s-1 was remarkably higher over fruit tree based agroforestry systems and it was 58.8, 43.9 and 31.5% of the control for guava, mango and olive based systems, respectively. The shortest tomato plant was observed in olive based system (54.91 cm, while the tallest plant was observed in mango based system (60.09 cm. The highest SPAD value and number of primary branches per plant was recorded in control plot. Fruit length, fruit girth was found lowest in olive based system. The highest yield (34.06 t ha-1 was recorded in control plot while the lowest yield (10.26 t ha-1 was recorded in olive based system. The economic performance of fruit tree based tomato production system showed that both the net return and BCR of mango and guava based system was higher over control and olive based system. The contents of organic carbon, nitrogen, available phosphorus, potassium and sulfur of before experimentation soil were slightly higher in fruit tree based agroforestry systems than the control. After experimentation, nutrient elements in soil were found increased slightly than initial soils. Fruit tree based agroforestry systems could be ranked based on the economic performance as mango> guava> control> olive based system with BARI Tomato 15, BARI Tomato 2, BARI Tomato 14 and BARI Tomato 8, respectively.

  10. Assessing the Harvest Maturity of Brazilian Mangoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pereira, T.; Tijskens, L.M.M.; Vanoli, M.; Rizzolo, A.; Eccher Zerbini, P.C.; Torricelli, A.; Filgueiras, H.; Spinelli, L.

    2010-01-01

    No clear criterion exists to determine the optimum time to harvest mango. Some empirical relations are used to assess maturity, such as shoulder development. Moreover, as a result of the typical growing conditions in tropical climates, a huge variation in maturity and ripeness exists, seriously

  11. Treatment efficacy with ultraviolet light on the development of anthracnose (Colletotrichum gloeosporioides) and mango postharvest quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mata Hidalgo, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    The Laboratorio de Tecnologia Poscosecha and the Laboratorio de Microbiologia Agricola of the Centro de Investigaciones Agronomicas, of the Universidad de Costa Rica have initiated an mango investigation Tommy Atkins with export quality. The first trial has involved in the exposure of the fruit from the Liberia and Guanacaste area, to UV-C light at different times: 0,5,10,15,20 minutes doses corresponding to 0 kJ/m 2 -3,28 kJ/m 2 -6,57 kJ/m 2 -9,86 kJ/m 2 -13,15 kJ/m 2 . For the generation of radiation has been used a lamp 30-watts General Electric G30T8 (253,7 nm), at a distance of 15 cm above the surface of the fruit. The prochloraz fungicide commercial treatment is included (1mL/L), more hot water at 53 degrees Celsius and immersion for 3 minutes. The fruit has stored in a cold chamber at a temperature of 13 degrees Celsius ± 1 degree Celsius and a humidity of 85% for two weeks.The mango is then passed to an ambient temperature (20-22 degrees Celsius). For the second test has used mangoes of the Atenas area; the same processes are applied but with two best treatments (associated with the least damage of darkening of the skin on) observed in the first trial (5 to 10 minutes of exposure to UV-C light) in combination with wax. The evaluations and comparisons of the 2 trials were analyzed, looking at the incidence and severity of anthracnose, weight loss variables, external and internal color, Brix, acidity, firmness, incidence of damage on the shell caused by exposure to radiation and application of treatments [es

  12. Consumptive water use associated with food waste: case study of fresh mango in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridoutt, B. G.; Juliano, P.; Sanguansri, P.; Sellahewa, J.

    2009-07-01

    In many parts of the world, freshwater is already a scarce and overexploited natural resource, raising concerns about global food security and damage to freshwater ecosystems. This situation is expected to intensify with the FAO estimating that world food production must double by 2050. Food chains must therefore become much more efficient in terms of consumptive water use. For the small and geographically well-defined Australian mango industry, having an average annual production of 44 692 t of marketable fresh fruit, the average virtual water content (sum of green, blue and gray water) at orchard gate was 2298 l kg-1. However, due to wastage in the distribution and consumption stages of the product life cycle, the average virtual water content of one kg of Australian-grown fresh mango consumed by an Australian household was 5218 l. This latter figure compares to an Australian-equivalent water footprint of 217 l kg-1, which is the volume of direct water use by an Australian household having an equivalent potential to contribute to water scarcity. Nationally, distribution and consumption waste in the food chain of Australian-grown fresh mango to Australian households represented an annual waste of 26.7 Gl of green water and 16.6 Gl of blue water. These findings suggest that interventions to reduce food chain waste will likely have as great or even greater impact on freshwater resource availability as other water use efficiency measures in agriculture and food production.

  13. Control of browning of minimally processed mangoes subjected to ultraviolet radiation pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Aline Ellen Duarte; Fonseca, Kelem Silva; da Silva Gomes, Wilny Karen; Monteiro da Silva, Ana Priscila; de Oliveira Silva, Ebenézer; Puschmann, Rolf

    2017-01-01

    The pulsed ultraviolet radiation (UV P ) has been used as an alternative strategy for the control of microorganisms in food. However, its application causes the browning of minimally processed fruits and vegetables. In order to control the browning of the 'Tommy Atkins' minimally processed mango and treated with UV P (5.7 J cm -2 ) it was used 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) (0.5 μL L -1 ), an ethylene action blocker in separate stages, comprising five treatments: control, UV P (U), 1-MCP + UV P (M + U), UV P  + 1-MCP (U + M) e 1-MCP + UV P  + 1-MCP (M + U + M). At the 1st, 7th and 14th days of storage at 12 °C, we evaluated the color (L* and b*), electrolyte leakage, polyphenol oxidase, total extractable polyphenols, vitamin C and total antioxidant activity. The 1-MCP, when applied before UV P , prevented the loss of vitamin C and when applied in a double dose, retained the yellow color (b*) of the cubes. However, the 1-MCP reduced lightness (L*) of independent mango cubes whatever applied before and/or after the UV P . Thus, the application of 1-MCP did not control, but intensified the browning of minimally processed mangoes irradiated with UV P .

  14. Quality of mango nectar processed by high-pressure homogenization with optimized heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribst, Alline Artigiani Lima; Franchi, Mark Alexandrow; de Massaguer, Pilar Rodriguez; Cristianini, Marcelo

    2011-03-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the effect of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) with heat shock on Aspergillus niger, vitamin C, and color of mango nectar. The nectar was processed at 200 MPa followed by heat shock, which was optimized by response surface methodology by using mango nectar ratio (45 to 70), heat time (10 to 20), and temperature (60 to 85 °C) as variables. The color of mango nectar and vitamin C retention were evaluated at the optimized treatments, that is, 200 MPa + 61.5 °C/20 min or 73.5 °C/10 min. The mathematical model indicates that heat shock time and temperature showed a positive effect in the mould inactivation, whereas increasing ratio resulted in a protective effect on A. niger. The optimized treatments did not increase the retention of vitamin C, but had positive effect for the nectar color, in particular for samples treated at 200 MPa + 61.5 °C/20 min. The results obtained in this study show that the conidia can be inactivated by applying HPH with heat shock, particularly to apply HPH as an option to pasteurize fruit nectar for industries.

  15. Identification of Colletotrichum species causing anthracnose on Tahiti lime, tree tomato and mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez Erika P.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available

    In Colombia, citrus, tree tomato and mango crops are likely to suffer considerable losses from anthracnose caused by several Colletotrichum species, which were identified by the present study on infected organs of the three fruit crops, sampled in different regions of the country. Identification was based on their morphological and molecular characteristics, as well as on fungicide (benomyl and copper hydroxide sensitivity and pathogenicity tests. The latter assessed infectivity on both the original hosting crop and the other two crops (crossed infection, by putting the fungi in contact with organs taken from the three fruit crops. Molecular identification of the Colletotrichum species was carried out through amplification of rDNA ITS regions by means of C. gloeosporioides (CgInt and C. acutatum (CaInt2 specific primer PCR combining the use of ITS4 universal primer. The results indicate that C. acutatum is the infectious agent in Tahiti lime and tree tomato, and so is C. gloeosporioides in mango. Although C. acutatum is the infectious agent in two diferent fruit species, the strains proved to be specific of their original hosts.

  16. Nitrogen fertilization in mango, var. Tommy Atkins, at Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, E. V.; Molina, E.

    1999-01-01

    Nitrogen fertilization in mango, var. Tommy Atkins, at Guanacaste, Costa Rica. At Carrillo, Guancaste, a field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of nitrogen fertilization on the mango variety Tommy Atkins. Five rates of nitrogen: 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 kg/ha/year were evaluated. A base fertilization of P and K were applied at rates of 30 kg/ha of P 2 O 5 and K 2 O respectively. Three harvest times (1995, 1996 and 1997) were evaluated. A split-plot design was used, where the whole plot was nitrogen rate and the subplot was harvest time. Fresh weight of commercial and non-commercial fruit in each harvest was determined. The analysis of the variance of the yield parameter indicated a significant (P≤0.05) and highly significant (P≤0.01) response to harvest time in the commercial and total yield. In the first year, the best yield was obtained with 80 kg/ha of N, with a fresh weight of 2197 kg/ha of fruits. In the next harvests, the rates of 60 kg/ha of N produced yields of 3087 kg/ha in 1997. A regression analysis of the three years indicated that a rate of 66 kg/ha of N (r=0.74) would be the best for commercial fruits yields. (Author) [es

  17. Nanotech extends shelf life of fresh fruit | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Image. Mango growers in India's Tamil Nadu state. IDRC / Vijay Kutty ... Spraying orchards with a low concentration of the compound slowed fruit ripening ... with it, within 48 hours it's all gone — you can't find even a trace using a microscope.

  18. Effective chemical control of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) pests in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective chemical control of fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) pests in mango orchards in northern Côte-d'Ivoire. OR N'depo, N Hala, A N'da Adopo, F Coulibaly, PK Kouassi, JF Vayssieres, M de Meyer ...

  19. Mango: multiple alignment with N gapped oligos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Li, Ming

    2008-06-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a classical and challenging task. The problem is NP-hard. The full dynamic programming takes too much time. The progressive alignment heuristics adopted by most state-of-the-art works suffer from the "once a gap, always a gap" phenomenon. Is there a radically new way to do multiple sequence alignment? In this paper, we introduce a novel and orthogonal multiple sequence alignment method, using both multiple optimized spaced seeds and new algorithms to handle these seeds efficiently. Our new algorithm processes information of all sequences as a whole and tries to build the alignment vertically, avoiding problems caused by the popular progressive approaches. Because the optimized spaced seeds have proved significantly more sensitive than the consecutive k-mers, the new approach promises to be more accurate and reliable. To validate our new approach, we have implemented MANGO: Multiple Alignment with N Gapped Oligos. Experiments were carried out on large 16S RNA benchmarks, showing that MANGO compares favorably, in both accuracy and speed, against state-of-the-art multiple sequence alignment methods, including ClustalW 1.83, MUSCLE 3.6, MAFFT 5.861, ProbConsRNA 1.11, Dialign 2.2.1, DIALIGN-T 0.2.1, T-Coffee 4.85, POA 2.0, and Kalign 2.0. We have further demonstrated the scalability of MANGO on very large datasets of repeat elements. MANGO can be downloaded at http://www.bioinfo.org.cn/mango/ and is free for academic usage.

  20. Effect of soaking in noni (Morinda citrifolia) juice on the microbiological and color behavior of Haden minimally processed mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, José Armando; González Tapia, Noemí T; Rosas Ulloa, Petra; Ramírez Ramírez, José Carmen; Ulloa Rangel, Blanca E

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of soaking in noni juice on the microbiological and color behavior of minimally processed mango. Two batches of Haden mango cubes were treated by immersion in noni juice for 2.5 or 5.0 min. Each batch was packed in polypropylene boxes and stored at 6 °C for up to 15 days; in addition, a control group of mango cubes was prepared by immersion in sterile water for the same duration. According to the results, the soaking of mango cubes in noni juice had an antimicrobial effect on mesophilic aerobic bacteria, molds and yeasts during storage at 6 °C for 15 days, without significantly (P < 0.05) affecting the CIE L*, a*, b*, chroma and hue angle values, in comparison with the control after 12 days of storage. The noni juice soaking treatment was demonstrated to be a potentially valuable technology for decontamination of fresh-cut fruit surfaces.

  1. Physico-chemical and sensory profiling of promising mango cultivars grown in peri-urban areas of multan, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naz, S.; Anjum, M.A.; Chohan, S.; Akhtar, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the present scenario, Pakistani mango is facing serious apprehension about production decline and export, consequently present study was planned to categorize the paramount mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivar in relation to its physical, chemical and sensorial attributes. Physiologically fully mature fruits of eight mango cultivars were picked and subjected for physical and proximate analysis. Among the eight cultivars, Fajri produced the maximum green and ripe fruit weight, fruit length and perimeter and physiological weight loss (453.0g, 403.0g, 13.80 cm, 21.57cm and 10.97%), respectively. The higher softness values were noticed in Aman Dusahri. The mark variations were observed among all the cultivars for proximate composition. There is an increase in pH values (5.47, 5.40 and 5.33) among Samar Bahisht Chaunsa, Aman Dusahri and Anwar Ratual, respectively with a progressive decrease in ascorbic acid and titrable acidity during ripening period. Likewise, maximum moisture and ash contents were observed in the mango pulp of Fajri and Sindhri (92.20% and 0.78%, respectively). Whereas appreciably higher total sugar contents were observed in pulp of Langra, Samar Bahisht Chaunsa and Anwar Ratual (20.67%, 20.43% and 20.33%, respectively. 19.83% TSS and 0.64% protein contents were recorded in Langra while the Fajri contained higher fat contents. The sensorial attributes varied significantly according to cultivars. Out of eight cultivars Langra obtained higher scores, while Anwar Ratual found to be highly satisfactory followed by Samar Bahisht Chunsa for flavor and taste. Both of these cultivars were equally acceptable for overall acceptability. However non of the cultivar is rejected by the panelists regarding the sensory evaluation. (author)

  2. Irradiation in perspective - the significance for the mango industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodrick, H.T.; Thord-Gray, R.

    1982-01-01

    The paper briefly describes the progress made with the irradiation of mangoes intended for sea shipment to overseas markets, over the past seven years. Highlights are given on mango radurization experiments for the period 1975-1981. Combination treatment for food preservation is discussed. This includes data on the effect of hot water plus irradiation, heated fungicide and ethylene treatments on decay development and insect damage in cold-stored sensation mangoes

  3. Total phenolics, carotenoids, ascorbic acid, and antioxidant properties of fresh-cut mango (Mangifera indica L., cv. Tommy Atkin) as affected by infrared heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogi, D S; Siddiq, M; Roidoung, S; Dolan, K D

    2012-11-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a major tropical fruit that has not been exploited for fresh-cut or minimally processed products on a scale similar to apples, pineapples, or melons. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of infrared (IR) treatment on total phenolics, carotenoids, ascorbic acid, and antioxidant properties of fresh-cut cubes from 'Tommy Atkin' mangoes. Mango cubes were IR treated (5, 10, 15 min) and evaluated at 4-d intervals during 16-d storage at 4 ± 1 °C. Total phenolics, carotenoids, and ascorbic acid content in fresh-cut control mango cubes were 43.33, 1.37, and 15.97 mg/100 g FW, respectively. IR treatments increased total phenolics (59.23 to 71.16 mg/100 g FW) and decreased ascorbic acid (12.14 to 15.38 mg/100 g, FW). Total carotenoids showed a mixed trend (1.13 to 1.66 mg/100 g, FW). The IR treatment showed a significant positive impact on antioxidant properties (μM TE/100 g, FW) of mango cubes, as assayed by ABTS (261.5 compared with 338.0 to 416.4), DPPH (270.5 compared with 289.4 to 360.5), and ORAC (6686 compared with 8450 to 12230). Total phenolics, carotenoids, ascorbic acid, and antioxidant capacity decreased over 16-d storage. However, IR treated samples had consistently higher ABTS, DPPH, and total phenolics during storage. It was demonstrated that IR treatment can be effectively used in improving antioxidant properties of fresh-cut mangoes with minimal effect on the visual appearance. Various methods/treatments are in use for extending the quality of fresh-cut fruits, including mild heat treatment. This study explored the application of infrared (IR) heat for processing fresh-cut mango cubes and evaluated its effect on vitamin C and antioxidant capacity during 16-d storage. This is the first study reporting on the use of IR heat in fresh-cut fruits. IR treatment was shown to be effective in retaining antioxidant properties of fresh-cut mango cubes with minimal effect on the visual appearance. © 2012 Institute

  4. Interjections in the Performance of Jane Austen's "Pride and Prejudice"

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Daniel C.; Kowal, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    Three data sets of primary and secondary interjections were compared: (1) the original interjections written into the text of Jane Austen's (1813/1994) novel "Pride and prejudice"; (2) the interjections read aloud in commercial recordings by six professional readers of the entire text of the novel; (3) the interjections spoken by actresses and…

  5. An Analysis of the Emotional Contradiction in Pride and Prejudice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓倩

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to reveal Jane Austen’s creative style of realism through an analysis of the emotional contradiction in Pride and Prejudice,which develops as the only clue of a love story.Its essence as an entanglement of"rationality"and"emotionality" embodies the author’s view of love and the voice of women’s liberation.

  6. An Analysis of the Emotional Contradiction in Pride and Prejudice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓倩

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to reveal Jane Austen' s creative style of realism through an analysis of the emotional contradiction in Pride and Prejudice, which develops as the only clue of a love story. Its essence as an entanglement of "rationality" and "emotionality"embodies the author' s view of love and the voice of women' s liberation.

  7. The relation between ethnic classroom composition and adolescents’ ethnic pride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leszczensky, Lars; Flache, Andreas; Stark, Tobias H.; Munniksma, Anke

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how students? ethnic pride was related to variation in ethnic composition between classrooms as well as within the same classroom over time. Predictions derived from optimal distinctiveness theory (ODT) were tested among 13- to 14-year-old ethnic majority and minority

  8. Museums And Young People: The Heritage Of Pride | Onyebinama ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the origin of museum, its brief history in Nigeria , its meaning, types, need for museums and the relationship between museums and libraries. It specifically addresses the issue of young people and museum which is the heritage of their pride. The paper also discusses factors/problems which may ...

  9. Lagerstroemia reginae Roxb., (Pride of India), a beautiful-looking ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lagerstroemia reginae Roxb., (Pride of India), a beautiful-looking tree that grows in almost all parts of. India and bears light purple flowers in large bunches in late stummer- or early rainy season. It is largely cultivated as an ornamental tree. The wood, which is extremely hard, is used for making such articles as ploughs and ...

  10. Between pride and shame. Media narratives on "Belgrade Pride Parade" in contemporary Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the position of the key social and political actors in contemporary Serbia, referring to the broadly accepted concept defined as “European values”. The article focuses on the so-called “Belgrade Pride Parade”, a highly contested event in the Serbian public, which is at the same time considered as the essential part of the EU accession process. Through the analysis of the media discourses related to the “Pride” events in 2010 and 2014, the paper shows the complex relation between the officially proclaimed politics of “European integration” and still very strong nationalist discourses, inherited from the 1990s. The aim of the article is to analyse the present hegemonic struggles between the political forces defending “traditional”, conservative values and the political agents that promote “dangerous”, liberal “European” ideas, such as protecting the rights of sexual minorities. The comparative analysis of the media representation of two events in 2010 and 2014 shows the changes in the public narrative. I argue that the violent clashes that occurred in 2010 Belgrade Pride Parade between the police and the members of right wing organisations were mostly the result of the lack of the political will among the Serbian elites, followed by ambivalent media representations, promoting at the same time the necessity of accepting “European values” and justification of violence. On the other hand, the absence of violent events in 2014 shows the will of the state apparatus to secure the “Pride”. However, the media reports on the event, as well as the public statements made by Serbian officials, still remain ambivalent towards the very nature of the “Pride”, justifying it only by the pressure made by the EU and the protection of constitutional rights. Moreover, the presence of new narratives in the media, discussing the high price of organizing such event, shows the shift in the public discourse from

  11. Irradiation and storage effects on sensorial and physical characteristics of Keitt mangoes (Mangifera indica L.), quality of irradiated mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, M.; Jobin, M.; Gagnon, M.

    1992-01-01

    Mango rot caused by fungi is a major problem during storage and marketing. Gamma irradiation was used to determine its effect on the quality of U.S. mangoes irradiated in Canada with 60Co at a minimum dose of 0.60 and a maximum of 0.90 kGy. The sensory evaluation, the texture, the colour and total soluble solids content were assessed during 15 days storage period. Initially, the appearance of irradiated whole mangoes was preferred, but at the end of the storage period the reverse was observed. Although, the irradiation did not extend the shelf-life of mangoes, the pulp of irradiated mangoes was perferred for its colour, odour, taste and texture until day 9. The panelists preferred darker orange colour, fragrant, sweeter and soften mangoes

  12. White light emitting diode as potential replacement of tungsten-halogen lamp for visible spectroscopy system: a case study in the measurement of mango qualities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiong, W. L.; Omar, A. F.

    2017-07-01

    Non-destructive technique based on visible (VIS) spectroscopy using light emitting diode (LED) as lighting was used for evaluation of the internal quality of mango fruit. The objective of this study was to investigate feasibility of white LED as lighting in spectroscopic instrumentation to predict the acidity and soluble solids content of intact Sala Mango. The reflectance spectra of the mango samples were obtained and measured in the visible range (400-700 nm) using VIS spectroscopy illuminated under different white LEDs and tungsten-halogen lamp (pro lamp). Regression models were developed by multiple linear regression to establish the relationship between spectra and internal quality. Direct calibration transfer procedure was then applied between master and slave lighting to check on the acidity prediction results after transfer. Determination of mango acidity under white LED lighting was successfully performed through VIS spectroscopy using multiple linear regression but otherwise for soluble solids content. Satisfactory results were obtained for calibration transfer between LEDs with different correlated colour temperature indicated this technique was successfully used in spectroscopy measurement between two similar light sources in prediction of internal quality of mango.

  13. White light emitting diode as potential replacement of tungsten-halogen lamp for visible spectroscopy system: a case study in the measurement of mango qualities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiong, W.L.; Omar, A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Non-destructive technique based on visible (VIS) spectroscopy using light emitting diode (LED) as lighting was used for evaluation of the internal quality of mango fruit. The objective of this study was to investigate feasibility of white LED as lighting in spectroscopic instrumentation to predict the acidity and soluble solids content of intact Sala Mango. The reflectance spectra of the mango samples were obtained and measured in the visible range (400–700 nm) using VIS spectroscopy illuminated under different white LEDs and tungsten-halogen lamp (pro lamp). Regression models were developed by multiple linear regression to establish the relationship between spectra and internal quality. Direct calibration transfer procedure was then applied between master and slave lighting to check on the acidity prediction results after transfer. Determination of mango acidity under white LED lighting was successfully performed through VIS spectroscopy using multiple linear regression but otherwise for soluble solids content. Satisfactory results were obtained for calibration transfer between LEDs with different correlated colour temperature indicated this technique was successfully used in spectroscopy measurement between two similar light sources in prediction of internal quality of mango.

  14. Stakeholder Analysis for Farmer inclusive Value chain Development in Mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadhika K

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mango is being cultivated over a substantial area in Palakkad District of Kerala state. Being one of the significant agricultural commodity value chains existing in Kerala, the mango value chain of Palakkad district needs urgent attention to improve its performance. The study highlights the stakeholder analysis and SWOC matrix analysis of the mango sector. Stakeholders were asked to identify the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges in the mango sector. Based on the highest score obtained, four strategic options viz., enhancing value addition and product development, promotion of branding, educating the farmers on building competitiveness and increasing export potential by addressing quality parameters were identified.

  15. Model-assisted analysis of spatial and temporal variations in fruit temperature and transpiration highlighting the role of fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordey, Thibault; Léchaudel, Mathieu; Saudreau, Marc; Joas, Jacques; Génard, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Fruit physiology is strongly affected by both fruit temperature and water losses through transpiration. Fruit temperature and its transpiration vary with environmental factors and fruit characteristics. In line with previous studies, measurements of physical and thermal fruit properties were found to significantly vary between fruit tissues and maturity stages. To study the impact of these variations on fruit temperature and transpiration, a modelling approach was used. A physical model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal variations of fruit temperature and transpiration according to the spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and thermal and physical fruit properties. Model predictions compared well to temperature measurements on mango fruits, making it possible to accurately simulate the daily temperature variations of the sunny and shaded sides of fruits. Model simulations indicated that fruit development induced an increase in both the temperature gradient within the fruit and fruit water losses, mainly due to fruit expansion. However, the evolution of fruit characteristics has only a very slight impact on the average temperature and the transpiration per surface unit. The importance of temperature and transpiration gradients highlighted in this study made it necessary to take spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and fruit characteristics into account to model fruit physiology.

  16. Model-assisted analysis of spatial and temporal variations in fruit temperature and transpiration highlighting the role of fruit development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Nordey

    Full Text Available Fruit physiology is strongly affected by both fruit temperature and water losses through transpiration. Fruit temperature and its transpiration vary with environmental factors and fruit characteristics. In line with previous studies, measurements of physical and thermal fruit properties were found to significantly vary between fruit tissues and maturity stages. To study the impact of these variations on fruit temperature and transpiration, a modelling approach was used. A physical model was developed to predict the spatial and temporal variations of fruit temperature and transpiration according to the spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and thermal and physical fruit properties. Model predictions compared well to temperature measurements on mango fruits, making it possible to accurately simulate the daily temperature variations of the sunny and shaded sides of fruits. Model simulations indicated that fruit development induced an increase in both the temperature gradient within the fruit and fruit water losses, mainly due to fruit expansion. However, the evolution of fruit characteristics has only a very slight impact on the average temperature and the transpiration per surface unit. The importance of temperature and transpiration gradients highlighted in this study made it necessary to take spatial and temporal variations of environmental factors and fruit characteristics into account to model fruit physiology.

  17. UN PROTOTIPO MECÁNICO PARA LA AUTOMATIZACIÓN DEL PROCESO DE SELECCIÓN DEL MANGO TIPO EXPORTACIÓN A MECHANICAL PROTOTYPE FOR EXPORT-TYPE MANGO SELECTION PROCESS AUTOMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Moreno Bermúdez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En Colombia la industria de la exportación de frutas tropicales, en particular la del mango de azúcar, se caracteriza por el tratamiento manual en cada una de las etapas previas a su comercialización, particularmente, la aplicación de los procedimientos de clasificación acordes con los criterios estandarizados nacionales de calidad (NTC-5139. En este artículo de investigación se presenta el diseño de un prototipo mecánico para automatizar el proceso de clasificación del mango de azúcar (Mangifera Indica L tipo exportación. Este prototipo está constituido por un sistema de bandas que permite transportar y rotar el fruto para que un sistema de adquisición capture diferente caras de este. Las imágenes obtenidas se analizaron mediante técnicas computacionales que permiten obtener una aproximación tridimensional, lo que posibilita la estimación del volumen de cada fruto. Los resultados de la operación del mecanismo, y la aplicación de los métodos mostraron una precisión superior al 90%.In Colombia, tropical fruit export industry, specifically ''mango de azúcar'' (sweet mango, is characterized for the manual treatment in each stage prior to commercialization, specially application of classification procedures according to local quality standardized criteria (NTC-5139. This research article describes the design of a mechanical prototype for automating the export-type ''mango de azúcar'' (Mangifera Indica L classification process. This prototype consists of a band system which allows conveying and rotating the fruit so that an acquisition system captures several faces of the fruit. Images obtained were analyzed through computational techniques which allow obtaining a 3-D approach, and this makes estimation of each fruit volume possible. Results of the operation of this mechanisms and the application of methods showed an accuracy over 90%.

  18. Effects of thermosonication on the fate of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis in mango juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, W-S; Bhat, R; Rosma, A; Cheng, L-H

    2013-04-01

    In this study, the effects of thermosonication and thermal treatment on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis in mango juice were investigated at 50 and 60°C. Besides, nonlethal injury of Salm. Enteritidis after both treatments was also examined. The highest inactivation was attained with thermosonication at 60°C. The inactivation rate was different for both pathogens, and Salm. Enteritidis was found to be more sensitive to thermosonication than E. coli O157:H7. Salmonella Enteritidis was recovered in all treated samples, except those subjected to more than 5-min thermosonication at 60°C. It was found that the introduction of high-intensity ultrasound enhanced the inactivation of pathogens compared to thermal treatment alone. On the other hand, Salm. Enteritidis was detected in a number of samples following incubation in universal pre-enrichment broth, but no growth was detected after incubation in mango juice. Fruit juices are commonly heat treated to inactivate micro-organisms and enzymes. However, excessive heat treatments may result in undesirable changes in juice quality. Treatment by power ultrasound, a nonthermal technology, may be an alternative processing technique to pasteurize fruit juices. This study highlights the effectiveness of thermosonication in inactivating Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella Enteritidis in mango juice. © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Cross-cultural evidence for the two-facet structure of pride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Chung, Joanne M.; Cheng, Joey T.; Tracy, Jessica L.; Robins, Richard W.; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Across six studies conducted in Mainland China and South Korea, the present research extended prior findings showing that pride is comprised of two distinct conceptual and experiential facets in the U.S.: a pro-social, achievement-oriented “authentic pride”, and an arrogant, self-aggrandizing “hubristic pride”. This same two-facet structure emerged in Chinese participants’ semantic conceptualizations of pride (Study 1), Chinese and Koreans’ dispositional tendencies to experience pride (Studies 2, 3a, and 3b), Chinese and Koreans’ momentary pride experiences (Studies 3a, 3b, and 5), and Americans’ pride experiences using descriptors derived indigenously in Korea (Study 4). Together, these studies provide the first evidence that the two-facet structure of pride generalizes to cultures with highly divergent views of pride and self-enhancement processes from North America. PMID:27158171

  20. Effect of freeze-drying on the antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of selected tropical fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofian, Norshahida Mohamad; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Osman, Azizah; Saari, Nazamid; Anwar, Farooq; Dek, Mohd Sabri Pak; Hairuddin, Muhammad Redzuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of freeze-drying on antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of five tropical fruits, namely starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.), mango (Mangifera indica L.), papaya (Carica papaya L.), muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), and watermelon Citruluss lanatus (Thunb.) were investigated. Significant (p dried fruit samples, except muskmelon. There was no significant (p > 0.05) change, however, observed in the ascorbic acid content of the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Similarly, freeze-drying did not exert any considerable effect on β-carotene concentration of fruits, except for mango and watermelon, where significantly (p dried fruits. Overall, in comparison to β-carotene and ascorbic acid, a good correlation was established between the result of TPC and antioxidant assays, indicating that phenolics might have been the dominant compounds contributing towards the antioxidant activity of the fruits tested.

  1. Structure of the cell wall of mango after application of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Josenilda M.; Villar, Heldio P.; Pimentel, Rejane M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cells of the mesocarp of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM to evaluate the effects of doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy applied immediately after the fruit and after storage for twenty days at a temperature of 12 °C followed by 5 days of simulated marketing at a temperature of 21 °C. No alteration was found in the structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and plasma membrane of fruits when analyzed immediately after application of doses. The mesocarp cell structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and the plasma membrane did however undergo changes after storage. Fruits that received a dose of 0.5 kGy displayed slight changes in cell wall structure and slight disintegration of the middle lamella. Fruits that received a dose of 1.0 kGy displayed more severe changes in the structure of the cell wall, greater middle lamella degradation, and displacement of the plasma membrane. - Highlights: ► Mesocarp cells were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM. ► No change in cell wall structure, middle lamella and plasma membrane was found in fruits immediately after irradiation. ► Changes in cell wall structure, middle lamella and plasma membrane happened after storage. ► Fruits subjected to 0.5 kGy showed smaller cell wall change.

  2. Comparison of efficiency of distance measurement methodologies in mango (Mangifera indica) progenies based on physicochemical descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E O S; Cerqueira-Silva, C B M; Souza, A M; Santos, C A F; Lima Neto, F P; Corrêa, R X

    2012-03-14

    We investigated seven distance measures in a set of observations of physicochemical variables of mango (Mangifera indica) submitted to multivariate analyses (distance, projection and grouping). To estimate the distance measurements, five mango progeny (total of 25 genotypes) were analyzed, using six fruit physicochemical descriptors (fruit weight, equatorial diameter, longitudinal diameter, total soluble solids in °Brix, total titratable acidity, and pH). The distance measurements were compared by the Spearman correlation test, projection in two-dimensional space and grouping efficiency. The Spearman correlation coefficients between the seven distance measurements were, except for the Mahalanobis' generalized distance (0.41 ≤ rs ≤ 0.63), high and significant (rs ≥ 0.91; P < 0.001). Regardless of the origin of the distance matrix, the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean grouping method proved to be the most adequate. The various distance measurements and grouping methods gave different values for distortion (-116.5 ≤ D ≤ 74.5), cophenetic correlation (0.26 ≤ rc ≤ 0.76) and stress (-1.9 ≤ S ≤ 58.9). Choice of distance measurement and analysis methods influence the.

  3. Establishment of the west indian fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae) parasitoid Doryctobracon areolatus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    The West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), infests numerous fruit species, particularly Anacardiaceae and most importantly mango (Mangifera indica L.). Widespread in the Neotropics, it was first reported in Hispaniola nearly 70 years ago. Continental populations are attacked by the op...

  4. Biological fixation and nitrogen transfer by three legume species in mango and soursop organic orchards;Fixacao biologica e transferencia de nitrogenio por leguminosas em pomar organico de mangueira e gravioleira

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulino, Gleicia Miranda; Barroso, Deborah Guerra, E-mail: gleiciamiranda@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: deborah@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fitotecnia; Alves, Bruno Jose Rodrigues; Urquiaga, Segundo; Espindola, Jose Antonio Azevedo, E-mail: bruno@cnpab.embrapa.b, E-mail: urquiaga@cnpab.embrapa.b, E-mail: jose@cnpab.embrapa.b [EMBRAPA Agrobiologia, Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-15

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) and the N transfer derived from BNF of the legume species - Gliricidia sepium (gliricidia), Crotalaria juncea (sunnhemp) and Cajanus cajan (pigeon pea) - for an intercropped organic orchard with mango and soursop, through the {sup 15}N natural abundance method. The following inter cropping systems were evaluated: mango and soursop with gliricidia; mango and soursop with sunnhemp; mango and soursop with pigeon pea; and mango and soursop as control. Gliricidia showed the highest BNF potential (80%) , followed by sunnhemp (64.5%) and pigeon pea (45%). After two sunnhemp prunes, 149.5 kg ha{sup -1} of N per year were supplied, with 96.5 kg derived from BNF. After three annual prunes, gliricidia supplied 56.4 and 80.3 kg ha{sup -1} of N per year, with 45 and 64 kg derived from BNF, in two consecutive years. The quantity of N supplied to the system was higher than the mango and soursop requirements. Variations in the natural abundance of {sup 15}N were found only in soursop leaves. Gliricidia and sunnhemp were prominent in N transfer, with approximately 22.5 and 40% respectively. Green manuring using gliricidia permits fractioning of the N supply, which is an advantage in N obtention by the fruit trees (author)

  5. Mapping global potential risk of mango sudden decline disease caused by fungus Ceratocystis fimbriata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango Sudden Decline (MSD), sometimes referred to as mango wilt, is an important disease of mango caused by one of the most significant fungal species causing disease in woody plants, Ceratocystis fimbriata. This species is mainly disseminated by the mango bark beetle, Hypocryphalus mangiferae (Steb...

  6. 76 FR 13530 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1206 [Doc No. AMS-FV-10-0092] Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service.... In accordance with the Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order), which is authorized...

  7. Characterisation of Neofusicoccum species causing mango dieback in Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.; Cirvilleri, G.; Lombard, L.; Crous, P.W.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Polizzi, G.

    2013-01-01

    Species of Botryosphaeriaceae are important fungal pathogens of mango worldwide. A survey of 11 mango orchards located in the provinces of Catania, Messina, Palermo and Ragusa (Sicily, southern Italy), resulted in the isolation of a large number (76) of Neofusicoccum isolates associated with decline

  8. Two new promising cultivars of mango for Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango cultivars are mostly the result of random selections from open pollinated chance seedlings of indigenous or introduced germplasm. The National Germplasm Repository (genebank) at the Subtropical Horticulture Research Station (SHRS) in Miami, Florida is an important mango germplasm repository an...

  9. Detection of irradiated cheese and exotic fruits by a simple routine control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg, A.; Schulzki, G.; Helle, N.; Boegl, K.W.; Schreiber, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    The results demonstrate very clearly that Florisil chromatography is a suitable routine method to detect irradiation treatment in Camembert, mango seeds and avocado flesh. Inspite of excluding 1-14:1 as marker for irradiation treatment on account of fat attendant flavour compounds in fruits, an unequivocal revelation of irradiated samples was possible because the most important radiation-induced hydrocarbons 1,7-26:2 and 8-14:1 (arising from oleic acid) could be clearly detected in both fruits. In addition, high amounts of 1-16:1 from stearic acid are present in irradiated mango and 6,9-17:2 from linoleic acid in avocado. (orig.)

  10. Marketing and economic analysis of mango irradiation processing in egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhateeb, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work is to examine the marketing and economic feasibility of a project for mango irradiation in Egypt. The Egyptian market was analyzed considering the production size and cultivated area distributed over several years,the percentage of the total loss of mango that can be avoided by irradiation, the market tests in Egypt and other countries was presented and the normal distribution channels of mango when using radiation technology. The financial and economic analysis of the establishment of pallet carrier unite for the irradiation of mango was also carried out. The following investment criteria were utilized for the commercial evaluation: benefit-cost ratio, pay back period, average rate of return and net present value. The results of this analysis showed that the installation of a unit for the irradiation of mango in Egypt would be economically viable. The unit cost of irradiation would decline if the irradiator is be used as a multipurpose facility

  11. Children and wives of deceased veterans--pride and suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruden, V; Gruden, Z; Gruden, V

    1999-06-01

    A widow is a women who lost her partner, Separation is what happened to her. Every separation is a big trauma and a possible source of psychopathology. The widow's children have experienced trauma as well, with all known consequences of separation. Admixture of pride partially reduces the intensity of frustration. However, this pride will soon lead to the sense of guilt and auto-aggressive component becomes dominant. Eighty nine widows, members of the Club "April 3, 1992" in Valpovo, were examined by the means of a questionnaire. Due to the widow's anxiety, depression and thinking about their own death and children's psychosomatic disturbances there is the imperative of the long-term psychotherapeutic work with them which is aimed at the correction of possible psychopathology.

  12. Processing fluency and impressions of joy and pride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravchenko Yu.E.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mere exposure effect consists in the increasing of affective preference (sympathy/ liking for a previously encountered stimulus. Many researches connect it with processing fluency and effort savings (hedonic marking hypothesis [17]. The present study investigates, whether processing fluency connects with other positive emotions. We supposed higher processing fluency correlates with grater intensity of pride and joy. In 1 Experiment participants (n = 98 recognize 10 well-known proverbs in guessing game. Then they marked proverbs about that they would brag to their friends and ranked all proverbs from the most to the lest pleasant. In 2 Experiment 4 groups each of that concluded 24 different complicated joy statements were pairwise compared. Participants (n = 55 chosen most funny and marked unfunny statements. Results shows most sympathy is connect with higher processing fluency, but pride and joy appear more often in connection with more complicated stimuli required lower processing fluency.

  13. Deciphering the Costs of Reproduction in Mango – Vegetative Growth Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Mathilde; Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Normand, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Irregular fruit production across successive years is a major issue that limits the profitability of most temperate and tropical fruit crops. It is particularly affected by the reciprocal relationships between vegetative and reproductive growth. The concept of the costs of reproduction is defined in terms of losses in the potential future reproductive success caused by current investment in reproduction. This concept, developed in ecology and evolutionary biology, could provide a methodological framework to analyze irregular bearing in fruit crops, especially in relation to the spatial scale at which studies are done. The objective of this study was to investigate the direct effects of reproduction during a growing cycle on reproduction during the following growing cycle and the indirect effects through vegetative growth between these two reproductive events, for four mango cultivars and during two growing cycles. Two spatial scales were considered: the growth unit (GU) and the scaffold branch. Costs of reproduction were detected between two successive reproductive events and between reproduction and vegetative growth. These costs were scale-dependent, generally detected at the GU scale and infrequently at the scaffold branch scale, suggesting partial branch autonomy with respect to processes underlying the effects of reproduction on vegetative growth. In contrast, the relationships between vegetative growth and reproduction were positive at the GU scale and at the scaffold branch scale in most cases, suggesting branch autonomy for the processes, mainly local, underlying flowering and fruiting. The negative effect of reproduction on vegetative growth prevailed over the positive effect of vegetative growth on the subsequent reproduction. The costs of reproduction were also cultivar-dependent. Those revealed at the GU scale were related to the bearing behavior of each cultivar. Our results put forward the crucial role of vegetative growth occurring between two

  14. Residents’ Support in Major Local Events: Leeds Pride.

    OpenAIRE

    Pappas, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which community participation and perceived impacts have an influence on residents' support of major events, more specifically, the Leeds Pride celebration. The research examines the perspectives of 400 Leeds permanent residents. The study tests a structural equation model, which has its theoretical basis in social exchange theory. It examines the constructs of community participation, perceived positive and negative impacts, and community support, includin...

  15. Characterization of mango (Mangifera indica L.) transcriptome and chloroplast genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, M Kamran; Khan, Ishtaiq A; Zhang, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We characterized mango leaf transcriptome and chloroplast genome using next generation DNA sequencing. The RNA-seq output of mango transcriptome generated >12 million reads (total nucleotides sequenced >1 Gb). De novo transcriptome assembly generated 30,509 unigenes with lengths in the range of 300 to ≥3,000 nt and 67× depth of coverage. Blast searching against nonredundant nucleotide databases and several Viridiplantae genomic datasets annotated 24,593 mango unigenes (80% of total) and identified Citrus sinensis as closest neighbor of mango with 9,141 (37%) matched sequences. The annotation with gene ontology and Clusters of Orthologous Group terms categorized unigene sequences into 57 and 25 classes, respectively. More than 13,500 unigenes were assigned to 293 KEGG pathways. Besides major plant biology related pathways, KEGG based gene annotation pointed out active presence of an array of biochemical pathways involved in (a) biosynthesis of bioactive flavonoids, flavones and flavonols, (b) biosynthesis of terpenoids and lignins and (c) plant hormone signal transduction. The mango transcriptome sequences revealed 235 proteases belonging to five catalytic classes of proteolytic enzymes. The draft genome of mango chloroplast (cp) was obtained by a combination of Sanger and next generation sequencing. The draft mango cp genome size is 151,173 bp with a pair of inverted repeats of 27,093 bp separated by small and large single copy regions, respectively. Out of 139 genes in mango cp genome, 91 found to be protein coding. Sequence analysis revealed cp genome of C. sinensis as closest neighbor of mango. We found 51 short repeats in mango cp genome supposed to be associated with extensive rearrangements. This is the first report of transcriptome and chloroplast genome analysis of any Anacardiaceae family member.

  16. Iranians and Their Pride: Modalities of Political Sovereignty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaddel, Mansoor

    In 2000, we asked a nationally representative sample of 2,532 Iranian adults "which of the following best describes you: I am an Iranian, above all; I am a Muslim, above all; I am an Arab, a Kurd, a Turk, a Baluch, etc., above all?" We also asked them how proud they are to be Iranian; (1) very proud, (2) proud, (3) not proud, and (4) not proud at all. In the 2005 survey of a nationally representative sample of 2,667 Iranian adults, we asked these questions again. The first question was intended to measure national identity and the second national pride. The results showed that between the two surveys the percent of Iranians who defined themselves as "Iranians, above all" went up significantly-from 35% in 2000 to 42% in 2005. Those who said that they were very proud to be Iranian, on the other hand, went down considerably-from 89% in 2000 to 64% in 2005. What is more, national identity and national pride displayed opposing relationships with the norms and values that were rigorously promoted by Iran's religious regime and these relationships grew stronger between 2000 and 2005. The feeling of national pride was positively linked to attitudes toward gender inequality, religiosity, and religious intolerance, but negatively to attitudes toward the West, while national identity had just the opposite relationships with these variables.

  17. Pride and Purpose as Antidotes to Black Homicidal Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    The incidence of black male homicide is a major public menace. The lowest incidence of black male homicide was when the black power movement was visible and flourishing. Psychohistorical data support the contention that racial pride is an effective means for regulating intragroup tensions. In the absence of an Afrocentric orientation that promotes community power and self-determination, the need for self-reliance is eroded by value illnesses. The value orientation of the black movement supplied the pride used to obtain academic success, to reduce juvenile delinquency, and to help Afro-Americans to structure their lives for personal satisfactions. Blackness has always been about personal power and social control, but society does not allow much access to either for Afro-Americans. As a consequence, stress from racism is severe, asymptomatic, and multi-faceted. The best antidote to black homicidal violence comes from a pro-social effort based upon a self-image that gives a feeling of positive accomplishment and appreciation. Afrocentric pride promotes or enhances pro-social behavior. PMID:3560242

  18. Development of electrowinner and salt regenerator for PRIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, S. W.; Lee, H. S.; Hur, J. M. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2011-11-15

    A scope of this study includes an manufacturing an electrowinning equipment of LCC(Liquid Cadmium Cathode) to recover actinides such as uranium and TRU(Np, Pu, Am, Cm) remained in the molten salt(LiCl-KCl) transferred after an electrorefining process which collects uranium of high purity and an salt regeneration equipment to remove RE(Rare Earth) from the remaining salt after electrowinning process by oxidation and precipitation. The design capacity to recover actinide metals for PRIDE electrowinner was determined to 1 kg/batch and the amount of cadmium and LiCl-KCl eutectic salt were 10 kg and 50 kg, respectively. The equipment was designed based on the operation experiences of lab-scale LCC apparatus but the concepts of remote operation were introduced. PRIDE scale oxidative precipitation precipitation apparatus whose maximum batch size is 20kg-salt/batch was designed and installed. It consists of four parts: oxidation reactor, oxygen sparing unit, flange moving device and crucible unit. To avoid a severe corrosion problem due to a high temperature, oxygen and chloride salt atmosphere, the oxidation reaction is conducted in an 100% Ta crucible. A 3D test was conducted to review the possibility of the remote operation for the equipment and the test results were applied to the design improvement. The mock-up equipment were prepared on the basis of 3D test results and after the test of remote operation, the final equipment for PRIDE were manufactured.

  19. Study of visual, sensorial and physicochemical characteristics of tommy atkins mangoes submitted to ionizing radiation as a method of post-harvest conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Josenilda M.; Correia, Lidia C.S.A.; Maciel, Maria Ines S.; Villar, Heldio P.

    2007-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating the effect of ionising radiation on the main characteristics of post-harvest quality of mango, fruits of the variety Tommy Atkins have been irradiated with a Co-60 source at dose levels of 200, 400 and 600 Gy. The fruits were later stored in a refrigeration chamber at 11,5 deg C for fifteen days, to simulate transport conditions for an external market. Visual analysis of the fruits was carried out every five days. After that the fruits were kept stored under a temperature of 21 deg C for nine days, to simulate shelf-life conditions. During this period, visual, sensorial and physicochemical analyses were performed after three, six and nine days. Results of the visual analyses along the 24-day storage period have shown that irradiated fruits displayed greater firmness of the pulp and greener rind when compared with control. However, the presence of dark dots on the surface of the rind was detrimental to their overall appearance. Sensorial analyses have shown significant differences between the different applied doses, with a better index of acceptability for control fruits, certainly due to the dark dots on the irradiated mango. On the other hand, physicochemical analyses showed best results for irradiated fruits. (author)

  20. Literature and cinema: images of femininity in pride and prejudice Literature and cinema: images of femininity in pride and prejudice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Guardini T. Vasconcelos

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available By comparing the novel Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen with an American filmic version from 1940, the article draws attention to the shift in the focus of the two narratives. While the novel provides alternative possibilities for the stories of the female characters, the filmic version chooses to reinforce an idealized image of social harmony. Ao comparar o romance Pride and Prejudice de Jane Austen com uma versão fílmica americana de 1940, o artigo chama atenção para a mudança de enfoque das duas narrativas. Enquanto o romance fornece possibilidades alternativas para as estórias das personagens femininas, a versão fílmica opta por reforçar uma imagem idealizada de harmonia social.

  1. Pride and prejudice: how feelings about the self influence judgments of others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton-James, Claire E; Tracy, Jessica L

    2012-04-01

    The present research demonstrates that pride has divergent effects on prejudice, exacerbating or attenuating evaluative biases against stigmatized groups, depending on the form of pride experienced. Specifically, three experiments found that hubristic pride--associated with arrogance and self-aggrandizement--promotes prejudice and discrimination, whereas authentic pride--associated with self-confidence and accomplishment--promotes more positive attitudes toward outgroups and stigmatized individuals. Findings generalized to discriminatory judgments (Experiment 2) and were found to be mediated by empathic concern for the evaluative target. Together, these experiments suggest that pride may be a cause of everyday prejudice and discrimination but that these social consequences depend on whether hubristic or authentic pride is experienced, and the degree to which empathic concern is subsequently aroused.

  2. X-ray imaging for non-destructive testing of internal disorders in fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Paul

    1998-01-01

    A physiological disorder known as spongy tissue involving damage of the mesocarp (flesh) affects 20 to 30 percent of mango fruits, particularly Alphonso, the leading commercial variety of India. Large sized fruits and those more advanced in maturity or harvested when ripe show increased incidence of spongy tissue. The mango processing industry is also facing quality control problems and economic loss as weevil-infested fruits can contaminate the processed pulp as well as the processing machinery with insect, fecal and feed remnants. Studies undertaken in the Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai with assistance from Radiation Standards Section, Radiological Unit, BARC Hospital and ECIL, Hyderabad, have shown that both spongy tissue affected and seed weevil infested mango fruits can be detected by x-ray transmittance. The resulting image can be used to detect affected fruits. An automated system for detecting and rejecting mangoes with spongy tissue or seed weevil infestation is under development in collaboration with the Electronic Systems Division, BARC. (author)

  3. The influence of anticipated pride and guilt on pro-environmental decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Claudia R.; Zaval, Lisa; Weber, Elke U.; Markowitz, Ezra M.

    2017-01-01

    The present research explores the relationship between anticipated emotions and pro-environmental decision making comparing two differently valenced emotions: anticipated pride and guilt. In an experimental design, we examined the causal effects of anticipated pride versus guilt on pro-environmental decision making and behavioral intentions by making anticipated emotions (i.e. pride and guilt) salient just prior to asking participants to make a series of environmental decisions. We find evide...

  4. Mediální obraz Prague Pride v letech 2011 a 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Tomašková, Karolína

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the diploma thesis Media image Prague Pride in 2011 and 2013 is to analyze the representation of LGBT community in the media, define the basic concepts, historical context and media stereotypes associated with it. The carrier backbone of this work is a media image analysis - of the first and third year of Prague Pride festival, which for the queer community meant a crucial milestone. Prague Pride is interesting for more points of view. Although a minor topic, the gay pride has attr...

  5. Molecular identification and characterization of Colletotrichum spp isolates from tahiti lime, tamarillo, and mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Sanabria

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose is a very limiting disease affecting production, as well as postharvest quality of numerous fruit crops in Colombia. The current management practices for this disease are partially effective due to limited information about the etiology, the inoculum sources, population structure and variation of the pathogen. A total of 293 Colletotrichum isolates were obtained from symptomatic tissues collected from Tahiti lime, tamarillo and mango orchards. To determine the Colletotrichum species causing the symptoms, amplification, and PCR product analysis for intergenic regions of the ribosomal DNA were conducted. Genetic diversity of the fungal population was assessed with Random Amplified Microsatellites (RAMS. Results of this study indicated that anthracnose in Tahiti lime and tamarillo are caused by Colletotrichun acutatum whereas symptoms on mango were induced by the species Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, which was also fund in few citrus samples. RAMS data analysis indicated the existence of two distinct species groups, with a low similarity index (35%. RAM profiles also showed a clear host differentiation of isolates. The C. acutatum population originated from tamarillo exhibited a narrow and homogeneous genetic base, while the C. acutatum population from Tahiti lime was more heterogeneous and genetically complex, as determined by the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and of Ni-Li coefficient. The C. gloeosporioides population originated from mango and Tahiti lime was heterogeneous and highly diverse, with clear host differentiation according to RAM profiles. Collectively, the results from this study provide new insight into the general characteristics of Colletotrichum populations on various hosts; this type of knowledge will prove useful in designing more effective management practices.

  6. Simple models for predicting leaf area of mango (Mangifera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghoreishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mango (Mangifera indica L., one of the most popular tropical fruits, is cultivated in a considerable part of southern Iran. Leaf area is a valuable parameter in mango research, especially plant physiological and nutrition field. Most of available methods for estimating plant leaf area are difficult to apply, expensive and destructive which could in turn destroy the canopy and consequently make it difficult to perform further tests on the same plant. Therefore, a non-destructive method which is simple, inexpensive, and could yield an accurate estimation of leaf area will be a great benefit to researchers. A regression analysis was performed in order to determine the relationship between the leaf area and leaf width, leaf length, dry and fresh weight. For this purpose 50 mango seedlings of local selections were randomly took from a nursery in the Hormozgan province, and different parts of plants were separated in laboratory. Leaf area was measured by different method included leaf area meter, planimeter, ruler (length and width and the fresh and dry weight of leaves were also measured. The best regression models were statistically selected using Determination Coefficient, Maximum Error, Model Efficiency, Root Mean Square Error and Coefficient of Residual Mass. Overall, based on regression equation, a satisfactory estimation of leaf area was obtained by measuring the non-destructive parameters, i.e. number of leaf per seedling, length of the longest and width of widest leaf (R2 = 0.88 and also destructive parameters, i.e. dry weight (R2 = 0.94 and fresh weight (R2= 0.94 of leaves.

  7. Expression and enzymatic activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase in mango (Mangifera indica 'Ataulfo') during ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palafox-Carlos, H; Contreras-Vergara, C A; Muhlia-Almazán, A; Islas-Osuna, M A; González-Aguilar, G A

    2014-05-16

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) are key enzymes in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The relative expression of PAL and C3H was evaluated in mango fruit cultivar 'Ataulfo' in four ripening stages (RS1, RS2, RS3, and RS4) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, enzyme activity of PAL and C3H was determined in mango fruits during ripening. The PAL levels were downregulated at the RS2 and RS3 stages, while C3H levels were upregulated in fruits only at RS3. The enzyme activity of PAL followed a pattern that was different from that of the PAL expression, thus suggesting regulation at several levels. For C3H, a regulation at the transcriptional level is suggested because a similar pattern was revealed by its activity and transcript level. In this study, the complexity of secondary metabolite biosynthesis regulation is emphasized because PAL and C3H enzymes are involved in the biosynthesis of several secondary metabolites that are active during all mango ripening stages.

  8. An ESR study of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mango

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Hussain, Mohammed S.; Morishita, Norio; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2009-01-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopic study was performed on the radicals induced irradiated fresh mangoes. Fresh Philippine mangoes were irradiated by the γ-rays, lyophilized and powdered. The ESR spectrum of the dry specimen showed a strong main peak at g=2.004 and a pair of peaks at both magnetic fields of the main peak. The main peak detected from flesh and skin specimens faded away in a few days after the irradiation. On the other hand, the side peaks showed a well-defined dose response even 9 days after the irradiation. The side-peak is a useful mean to define the irradiation on fresh mangoes. (author)

  9. Physiological age at harvest regulates the variability in postharvest ripening, sensory and nutritional characteristics of mango (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Coghshall due to growing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joas, Jacques; Vulcain, Emmanuelle; Desvignes, Claire; Morales, Emeline; Léchaudel, Mathieu

    2012-04-01

    Climacteric fruits are harvested at the green-mature stage and ripen during their marketing cycle. However, growing conditions induce variability into the maturity stage of mangoes at harvest, with an impact on their final quality. Assuming that the physiological age can be correctly evaluated by a criterion based on the variable chlorophyll fluorescence of the skin (F(v)) and that differences in physiological age depend on growing conditions, controlled stress experiments were carried out on mango fruit by manipulating either the leaf/fruit ratio or the light environment. Delays from 9 to 30 days were observed, depending on stress level and harvest stage, to obtain the same F(v) value. For moderate stress, fruit composition after ripening was partially compensated for, with little or no difference in sugar, dry matter, carotenoid and aroma contents. For more pronounced stress, the major metabolites were not particularly affected, but the synthesis capacity of carotenoids and aromas was lower after maturity. The ripening ability of a fruit is acquired on the tree and defines its postharvest changes. Control of the physiological age at harvest can minimise the variability observed under natural conditions and guarantee fruit batches whose postharvest changes will be relatively homogeneous. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Comparative Assessment of Phenolic Content and in Vitro Antioxidant Capacity in the Pulp and Peel of Mango Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Guo, Xinbo; Fu, Xiong; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Youngsheng; Zhu, Yong; Yan, Huaifeng; Liu, Rui Hai

    2015-01-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.), also called “the king of fruits”, is one of the most popular fruits in tropical regions. Pulp and peel samples of mango cultivars were analyzed to estimate total phenolic, total flavonoid and total anthocyanin contents. Phenolic acids, hydrophilic peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (hydro-PSC) and oxygen radical scavenging capacity (ORAC) in vitro were also determined. Total phenolics and flavonoid contents were found maximum in the peel of Xiao Tainang and Da Tainang cultivars, respectively, whereas Xiao Tainang also exhibited significant antioxidant capacity. Noteworthy, concentrations of gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid and caffeic acids at 79.15, 64.33, 33.75, 27.19 and 13.62 mg/100 g fresh weight (FW) were quantified for Da Tainang, Xiao Tainang and of Jidan cultivars, respectively. Comparatively, a higher level of phenolics and significant antioxidant capacity in mango peel indicated that it might be useful as a functional food and value-added ingredient to promote human health. PMID:26075869

  11. Profiling of volatile fragrant components in a mini-core collection of mango germplasms from seven countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Aroma is important in assessing the quality of fresh fruit and their processed products, and could provide good indicators for the development of local cultivars in the mango industry. In this study, the volatile diversity of 25 mango cultivars from China, America, Thailand, India, Cuba, Indonesia, and the Philippines was investigated. The volatile compositions, their relative contents, and the intervarietal differences were detected with headspace solid phase microextraction tandem gas chromatography-mass spectrometer methods. The similarities were also evaluated with a cluster analysis and correlation analysis of the volatiles. The differences in mango volatiles in different districts are also discussed. Our results show significant differences in the volatile compositions and their relative contents among the individual cultivars and regions. In total, 127 volatiles were found in all the cultivars, belonging to various chemical classes. The highest and lowest qualitative abundances of volatiles were detected in 'Zihua' and 'Mallika' cultivars, respectively. Based on the cumulative occurrence of members of the classes of volatiles, the cultivars were grouped into monoterpenes (16 cultivars, proportion and balanced (eight cultivars, and nonterpene groups (one cultivars. Terpene hydrocarbons were the major volatiles in these cultivars, with terpinolene, 3-carene, caryophyllene and α-Pinene the dominant components depending on the cultivars. Monoterpenes, some of the primary volatile components, were the most abundant aroma compounds, whereas aldehydes were the least abundant in the mango pulp. β-Myrcene, a major terpene, accounted for 58.93% of the total flavor volatile compounds in 'Xiaofei' (Philippens. γ-Octanoic lactone was the only ester in the total flavor volatile compounds, with its highest concentration in 'Guiya' (China. Hexamethyl cyclotrisiloxane was the most abundant volatile compound in 'Magovar' (India, accounting for 46.66% of

  12. WATER REQUIREMENT ESTIMATE FOR THE REPRODUCTIVE PERIOD OF MANGO ORCHADS IN THE NORTHEAST OF THE STATE OF PARÁ, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO JORGE DE OLIVEIRA PONTE DE SOUZA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to estimate the water consumption in mango orchard during its phenological stages in the northeastern of the State of Pará, Brazil. For this purpose, it was installed and instrumented a micrometeorological tower in a mango orchard, cv. Tommy Atkins, of 22 years old, with data collected during the crops of 2010/2011 and of 2011/2012. The actual crop evapotranspiration was estimated from the energy balance using the Bowen ratio technique. The crops were subjected to different weather conditions, consequently, some differences in the Bowen ration values were observed. The evapotranspiration suffered influences of meteorological conditions during the period. The actual crop evapotranspiration during its reproductive period ranged between 402.9 and 420 mm with a mean daily water consumption of 3.8 mm at flowering, of 4.25 mm at fruit fall, of 3.56 mm at fruit formation, of 3.0 mm at fruit maturation and of 3.73 mm for the whole period.

  13. Pride and Prejudice – Identity and Collaboration in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Based on an 18 month ethnographic case study of a construction partnering project, the paper adopts practice based theory for understanding the identity formation and practices of collaboration in construction. Drawing upon practice based theory in general and actor network theory and communities...... of practice in particular, the construction project is interpreted as configuration of networked practices characterized by strong professional practices (e.g. architects and contractors) and locally negotiated collaboration practices. During the construction project, actors gain experiences in relation...... practices – enabling and inhibiting collaboration. Pride and prejudice are thus central constitutive elements of present construction practices in the formation of identity and development of collaboration processes....

  14. Sibling jealousy and aesthetic ambiguity in Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Margaret Ann Fitzpatrick

    2009-04-01

    Jane Austen's most popular novel, Pride and Prejudice (1813), illuminates and is illuminated by psychoanalytic aesthetics. When Austen dramatizes unconscious oedipal/sibling rivalries, irony acts as a type of aesthetic ambiguity (E. Kris 1952). A psychoanalytic perspective shows that Austen uses a grammar of negatives (negation, denial, minimization) to achieve the dual meanings of irony, engaging the reader's unconscious instinctual satisfactions, while at the same time protecting the reader from unpleasant affects. Austen's plot, which portrays regressions driven by sibling jealousy, reveals that a new tolerance of remorse and depression in her heroine and hero leads to psychic growth.

  15. The effects of irrigation management on floral induction of ‘Tommy Atkins' mango in bahia semiarid

    OpenAIRE

    Faria,Leandro N.; Soares In memoriam,Antônio A.; Donato,Sérgio L. R.; Santos,Marcelo R. dos; Castro,Luciana G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate reduction strategies of irrigation for proper management of floral induction and production of 'Tommy Atkins' mangoes, in the semiarid region of the Bahia state, Brazil. Five treatments with reduced irrigation levels based on crop evapotranspiration (ETc) were applied in two development stages, FI - flowering and FII – fruiting. Water depths were T1 - 0% of ETc in FI and 100% in FII; T2 - 25% of ETc in FI and 100% in FII; T3 - 50% of ETc in FI and 1...

  16. Structure of the cell wall of mango after application of ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Josenilda M.; Villar, Heldio P.; Pimentel, Rejane M. M.

    2012-11-01

    Cells of the mesocarp of mango cultivar Tommy Atkins were analyzed by Transmission Electron Microscope—TEM to evaluate the effects of doses of 0.5 and 1.0 kGy applied immediately after the fruit and after storage for twenty days at a temperature of 12 °C followed by 5 days of simulated marketing at a temperature of 21 °C. No alteration was found in the structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and plasma membrane of fruits when analyzed immediately after application of doses. The mesocarp cell structure of the cell wall, middle lamella, and the plasma membrane did however undergo changes after storage. Fruits that received a dose of 0.5 kGy displayed slight changes in cell wall structure and slight disintegration of the middle lamella. Fruits that received a dose of 1.0 kGy displayed more severe changes in the structure of the cell wall, greater middle lamella degradation, and displacement of the plasma membrane.

  17. Disability pride protects self-esteem through the rejection-identification model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Kathleen R; Lund, Emily M; Rottenstein, Adena

    2018-02-01

    The rejection-identification model (RIM) argues that the negative impacts of stigma, such as decreased self-esteem, may be mitigated when members of the stigmatized group choose to identify with each other rather than with the majority culture. A previously unstudied potential RIM stigma-reduction mechanism is disability pride, which views disability as a source of valuable, enriching, and positive experience. Impairment, personal, and environmental factors based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) predict whether people will categorize themselves as disabled, but predictors of pride have received little examination. The purpose of this study was to (a) explore whether ICF factors predict disability pride, and (b) assess whether disability pride mediates a relationship between stigma and self-esteem, supporting RIM. Research Method/Design: Participants completed an Internet-based survey assessing pride, self-esteem, and ICF factors. Disability was not mentioned in recruitment materials to prevent selection biases. People who reported at least 1 impairment (n = 710) were included in analyses. ICF personal and environmental factors (stigma, social support, and being a person of color), but not impairment factors, predicted disability pride. Supporting RIM, disability pride partially mediated the relationship between stigma and self-esteem. Disability pride is a promising way to protect self-esteem against stigma. Disability pride is still a rare phenomenon. Given that pride is associated with social support, stigma, and, to a lesser extent, ethnicity, but not impairment characteristics, interventions might focus on personal and environmental factors like these to promote pride. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Technology for production of shelf stable fruit cubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, B.B.; Jain, M.P.; Sharma, A.

    2009-01-01

    A technology has been developed for the production of intermediate moisture fruit cubes using a combination of osmotic dehydration and infrared drying. Fruits like pineapple, papaya, mango, banana and apple can be successfully converted into intermediate moisture products in the form of fruit cubes using this technology. The fruit cubes can blend very well as natural nutritious supplements with breakfast cereals and in certain food preparations like ice creams, milk shakes, jellies and custards. The product is microbiologically safe for consumption and can be stored at ambient storage condition for more than six months. This technology is an effective alternative for post harvest processing and preservation of ripened fruits. Fruit jam is an additional by-product generated by the process. This technology has been transferred to TT and CD, BARC

  19. Low doses of gamma radiation in the management of postharvest Lasiodiplodia theobromae in mangos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Maria Gonçalves Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The postharvest life of mango is limited by the development of pathogens, especially fungi that cause rot, among which stands out the Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Several control methods have been employed to minimize the damages caused by this fungus, chemical control can leave residues to man and nature; physical control by the use of gamma radiation in combination with modified atmosphere and cold storage. The use of gamma radiation helps to reduce the severity of the pathogen assist in the ripening process of fruits, even at low doses (0.25, 0.35 and 0.45 kGy chemical properties such as pH, soluble solids, acid ascorbic, titratable acidity and also the quality parameters of the pulp showed no damage that are ideal for trade and consumption of mangoes. This treatment can be extended for use in the management of diseases such as natural infections for penducular rot complex that has as one of L. theobroma pathogens involved.

  20. Simplified optical fiber RGB system in evaluating intrinsic quality of Sala mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Ommi Kalsom Mardziah; Jafri, Mohd. Zubir Mat; Aziz, Azlan Abdul; Omar, Ahmad Fairuz

    2015-06-01

    This study presents an alternative approach for the nondestructive assessment of fruit quality parameters with the use of a simplified optical fiber red-green-blue system (OF-RGB). The optical sensor system presented in this work is designed to rapidly measure the firmness, acidity, and soluble solid content of an intact Sala mango on the basis of color properties. The system consists of three light-emitting diodes with peak emission at 635 (red), 525 (green), and 470 nm (blue), as well as a single photodetector capable of sensing visible light. The measurements were conducted using the reflectance technique. The analyses were conducted by comparing the results obtained through the proposed system with those measured using two commercial spectrometers, namely, QE65000 and FieldSpec 3. The developed RGB system showed satisfactory accuracy in the measurement of acidity (R2=0.795) and firmness (R2=0.761), but a relatively lower accuracy in the measurement of soluble solid content (R2=0.593) of intact mangoes. The results obtained through OF-RGB are comparable with those measured by QE65000 and FieldSpec 3. This system is a promising new technology with rapid response, easy operation, and low cost with potential applications in the nondestructive assessment of quality attributes.

  1. Appearance and characterization of fruit image textures for quality sorting using wavelet transform and genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoje, Suchitra

    2018-02-01

    Images of four qualities of mangoes and guavas are evaluated for color and textural features to characterize and classify them, and to model the fruit appearance grading. The paper discusses three approaches to identify most discriminating texture features of both the fruits. In the first approach, fruit's color and texture features are selected using Mahalanobis distance. A total of 20 color features and 40 textural features are extracted for analysis. Using Mahalanobis distance and feature intercorrelation analyses, one best color feature (mean of a* [L*a*b* color space]) and two textural features (energy a*, contrast of H*) are selected as features for Guava while two best color features (R std, H std) and one textural features (energy b*) are selected as features for mangoes with the highest discriminate power. The second approach studies some common wavelet families for searching the best classification model for fruit quality grading. The wavelet features extracted from five basic mother wavelets (db, bior, rbior, Coif, Sym) are explored to characterize fruits texture appearance. In third approach, genetic algorithm is used to select only those color and wavelet texture features that are relevant to the separation of the class, from a large universe of features. The study shows that image color and texture features which were identified using a genetic algorithm can distinguish between various qualities classes of fruits. The experimental results showed that support vector machine classifier is elected for Guava grading with an accuracy of 97.61% and artificial neural network is elected from Mango grading with an accuracy of 95.65%. The proposed method is nondestructive fruit quality assessment method. The experimental results has proven that Genetic algorithm along with wavelet textures feature has potential to discriminate fruit quality. Finally, it can be concluded that discussed method is an accurate, reliable, and objective tool to determine fruit

  2. Evaluation of different morphotypes of mango (mangifera indica l ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of different morphotypes of mango (mangifera indica l.) ... Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... 2006/2007 wet season at the teaching and research farm of Faculty of Agriculture, Bayero University, Kano (110 58'N and 80 ...

  3. Effect of fermentation on the chemical composition of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-08-20

    Aug 20, 2007 ... Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Technology, P.M.B. 704, Akure Nigeria. E-mail ... analysis revealed that there was an increase in the protein content of the ripe mango peels .... some tropical leafy vegetables.

  4. Development of process control for the irradiation of fresh mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabalfin, E G; Lanuza, L G; Maningas, A L; Solomon, H M; Madera, G G; Pares, F A [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2001-03-01

    Dose distribution studies in mangoes contained in boxes used in commercial trade for export, were done using the multipurpose irradiation facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The mangoes were irradiated at a target dose of 100 Gy, the dose required for quarantine treatment of fresh mangoes against fruitflies. Positions of minimum dose and maximum dose were identified and dose uniformity ratio was determined. Fricke and Gammachrome YR dosimeters were used for the dose distribution studies. The performance of STERIN threshold indicators was evaluated by irradiating them at different doses. STERIN 125 indicators were also attached to the surface of the mango boxes during the dose distribution studies. STERIN indicators can be useful to differentiate between irradiated and unirradiated products. (author)

  5. Development of process control for the irradiation of fresh mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalfin, E.G.; Lanuza, L.G.; Maningas, A.L.; Solomon, H.M.; Madera, G.G.; Pares, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dose distribution studies in mangoes contained in boxes used in commercial trade for export, were done using the multipurpose irradiation facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The mangoes were irradiated at a target dose of 100 Gy, the dose required for quarantine treatment of fresh mangoes against fruitflies. Positions of minimum dose and maximum dose were identified and dose uniformity ratio was determined. Fricke and Gammachrome YR dosimeters were used for the dose distribution studies. The performance of STERIN threshold indicators was evaluated by irradiating them at different doses. STERIN 125 indicators were also attached to the surface of the mango boxes during the dose distribution studies. STERIN indicators can be useful to differentiate between irradiated and unirradiated products. (author)

  6. Mango conservation, Mangifera indica L., haden variety by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domarco, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    This paper evaluates the chemical characteristics and the mangoes sensorial quality after treatments with different doses of gamma radiation and during a period of storage, with constant conditions of temperature and relative humidity. (author)

  7. Phytochemical profiling of the ripening of Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars by real-time monitoring using UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS and its potential benefits as prebiotic ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kai; Dars, Abdul Ghani; Liu, Qiudou; Xie, Bijun; Sun, Zhida

    2018-08-01

    Maturity has important effects on the phytochemical and biochemical characteristics of fruits. It affects the quality, nutritional value, harvest time and commercial operations. In this study, Keitt, Sensation and Xiangya mango cultivars in four distinct stages from southwest China were evaluated for their phytochemical profiling and antioxidant activities in real time. Furthermore, the biochemical characteristics indices polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and pectin methylesterase (PME) activities were determined. Antioxidant compounds such as vitamin C, total phenolic, total flavonoid and total carotenoid content were also analysed. A total of 34 phenolic compounds were identified and quantitatively monitored by UPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS. Consecutive degradation of phenolic acids and its derivatives were observed upon maturity. We found that in addition to carotenoids, phenolic acids could also be used as a measurement index of maturity in mango. Mango juices and its phenolic extracts may be used as potential prebiotics for modulating probiotic proliferation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. The MANGO FET-HPC Project: an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Flich Cardo, José; Agosta, Giovanni; Ampletzer, Philipp; Atienza Alonso, David; Cilardo, Alessandro; Fornaciari, William; Kovac, Mario; Roudet, Fabrice; Zoni, Davide

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works. In this paper, we provide an overview of the MANGO project and its goal. The MANGO project aims at address...

  9. Ionizing energy treatment of fruit and vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigney, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of ionising energy treatment of fresh fruit and vegetables may be considered within four major use areas. The shelf life of such fruits as bananas, mangoes and pawpaws can be extended by a direct physiological effect on the fruit. This treatment renders the fruit less sensitive to ethylene, a natural senescence-promoting chemical, and retards the onset of the climactric rise in respiration which is associated with fruit ripening. Postharvest decay caused by radio-sensitive organisms can also be controlled by low irradiation treatments, although this is only applicable in cases where the host fruit is less sensitive to the treatment than the decay causing organism. The sprouting of onions and potatoes can be controlled by a single low dose treatment which has a direct effect on the meristematic tissue. By killing insects of quarantine significance the interstate and export marketing of Australian fresh fruit may be expanded, with a consequent expansion of these horticultural industries. Ionising energy treatment of fruit and vegetables is therefore a valuable postharvest tool to improve the quality of fresh produce on local and export markets

  10. Technological feasibility studies on combination treatments for subtropical fruits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodrick, H.T.; Linde, H.J. van der

    1981-01-01

    Research with subtropical fruits such as papayas and mangoes had advanced beyond the experimental stage in South Africa. This may be attributed to the potential economic benefits likely to be obtained from the combination of heat and irradiation treatments. The outcome of recent marketing trials, however, revealed several problem areas which need further investigation. Some of these problems were studied in greater detail and are reported in this presentation. The effect of time delays between hot-water and irradiation treatments on the efficacy in disease control in the fruit, has received particular attention in the investigations. Efforts have also been made to correlate these results with those obtained in fungal studies in the laboratory. These and other factors relating to the technological feasibility in the use of combined treatments for the preservation of mangoes and papayas are discussed and recommendations or guidelines for future studies are given in this paper. (author)

  11. Antioxidant and enzymatic responses to oxidative stress induced by pre-harvest water supply reduction and ripening on mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. 'Cogshall') in relation to carotenoid content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosalie, Rémy; Joas, Jacques; Deytieux-Belleau, Christelle; Vulcain, Emmanuelle; Payet, Bertrand; Dufossé, Laurent; Léchaudel, Mathieu

    2015-07-20

    The effects of a reduction in water supply during fruit development and postharvest fruit ripening on the oxidative status and the antioxidant defense system were studied in the mango fruit (Mangifera indica L.) cv. Cogshall. Changes in non-enzymatic (ascorbate) and enzymatic (SOD, CAT, APX, MDHAR, DHAR and GR) antioxidants, as well as oxidative parameters (H2O2 and MDA) and major carotenoids, were measured in unripe and ripe fruits from well-irrigated and non-irrigated trees. Under non-limiting water supply conditions, ripening induced oxidation as a result of the production of ROS and decreased ascorbate content. Antioxidant enzymatic systems were activated to protect fruit tissues and to regenerate the ascorbate pool. The carotenoid pool, mainly represented by β-carotene and esterified violaxanthine isomers, accumulated naturally during mango ripening. The suppression of irrigation decreased fruit size and induced accumulation of ABA and of its storage form, ABA-GE, in fruit pulp from the earliest harvest. It also increased oxidation, which was observable by the high levels of ascorbate measured at the early stages at harvest, and by the delay in the time it took to reach the pseudo constant carotene-to-xanthophyll ratio in ripe fruits. Nevertheless, differences between the irrigation treatments on the antioxidant system in ripe fruits were not significant, mainly because of the drastic changes in this system during ripening. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. On the context dependence of emotion displays : Perceptions of gold medalists’ expressions of pride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Yvette; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Breugelmans, Seger M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of various claims for cross-cultural differences in the experience of pride, studies on the expression of pride have revealed few cross-cultural differences. Five studies using archival data from Olympic and national championships do show cross-cultural differences in the expression of

  13. On the context dependence of emotion displays : Perceptions of gold medalists' expressions of pride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Y.M.J.; Zeelenberg, M.; Breugelmans, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of various claims for cross-cultural differences in the experience of pride, studies on the expression of pride have revealed few cross-cultural differences. Five studies using archival data from Olympic and national championships do show cross-cultural differences in the expression of

  14. Tracking the trajectory of shame, guilt, and pride across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Ulrich; Robins, Richard W; Soto, Christopher J

    2010-12-01

    The authors examined age differences in shame, guilt, and 2 forms of pride (authentic and hubristic) from age 13 years to age 89 years, using cross-sectional data from 2,611 individuals. Shame decreased from adolescence into middle adulthood, reaching a nadir around age 50 years, and then increased in old age. Guilt increased from adolescence into old age, reaching a plateau at about age 70 years. Authentic pride increased from adolescence into old age, whereas hubristic pride decreased from adolescence into middle adulthood, reaching a minimum around age 65 years, and then increased in old age. On average, women reported experiencing more shame and guilt; Blacks reported experiencing less shame and Asians more hubristic pride than other ethnicities. Across the life span, shame and hubristic pride tended to be negatively related to psychological well-being, and shame-free guilt and authentic pride showed positive relations with well-being. Overall, the findings support the maturity principle of personality development and suggest that as people age they become more prone to experiencing psychologically adaptive self-conscious emotions, such as guilt and authentic pride, and less prone to experiencing psychologically maladaptive ones, such as shame and hubristic pride. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Consumer Pride and Consumption-Based Family Rituals: A Field Study in Zagreb, Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sredl, Katherine Christina

    2009-01-01

    Consumer emotions are rarely examined from a phenomenological perspective, with few exceptions. Moreover, consumer pride is overlooked as an influence on the marketplace practices of consumers. In spite of the lack of theoretical development on consumer pride, it clearly drives consumption: take, for instance, consumers who use goods to…

  16. Cross-cultural evidence that the nonverbal expression of pride is an automatic status signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jessica L; Shariff, Azim F; Zhao, Wanying; Henrich, Joseph

    2013-02-01

    To test whether the pride expression is an implicit, reliably developing signal of high social status in humans, the authors conducted a series of experiments that measured implicit and explicit cognitive associations between pride displays and high-status concepts in two culturally disparate populations--North American undergraduates and Fijian villagers living in a traditional, small-scale society. In both groups, pride displays produced strong implicit associations with high status, despite Fijian social norms discouraging overt displays of pride. Also in both groups, implicit and explicit associations between emotion expressions and status were dissociated; despite the cross-cultural implicit association between pride displays and high status, happy displays were, cross-culturally, the more powerful status indicator at an explicit level, and among Fijians, happy and pride displays were equally strongly implicitly associated with status. Finally, a cultural difference emerged: Fijians viewed happy displays as more deserving of high status than did North Americans, both implicitly and explicitly. Together, these findings suggest that the display and recognition of pride may be part of a suite of adaptations for negotiating status relationships, but that the high-status message of pride is largely communicated through implicit cognitive processes. 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  17. Of saints and sinners: How collective pride and guilt affect outgroup helping.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; van Dijk, W.W.; Kaynak, Ü

    2013-01-01

    We examined how appeals to collective guilt and pride can motivate people to help members of a disadvantaged outgroup. Results from two experiments supported the prediction that appeals to collective pride are more effective than appeals to collective guilt in prompting high identifying group

  18. Cross-Cultural Evidence that the Nonverbal Expression of Pride Is an Automatic Status Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Jessica L.; Shariff, Azim F.; Zhao, Wanying; Henrich, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    To test whether the pride expression is an implicit, reliably developing signal of high social status in humans, the authors conducted a series of experiments that measured implicit and explicit cognitive associations between pride displays and high-status concepts in two culturally disparate populations--North American undergraduates and Fijian…

  19. How to Influence National Pride? The Olympic Medal Index as a Unifying Narrative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hilvoorde, I.M.; Elling, A.; Stokvis, R.

    2010-01-01

    Elite sport is often regarded as one of the main vehicles for articulating national pride and stimulating national cohesion. In this article, we explore a variety of different notions of pride and nationality as related to success in elite sport. We present the results of a public survey, which

  20. Pectin-honey coating as novel dehydrating bioactive agent for cut fruit: Enhancement of the functional properties of coated dried fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Gabriella; Mallardo, Salvatore; Fasulo, Gabriella; Lavermicocca, Paola; Valerio, Francesca; Di Biase, Mariaelena; Di Stasio, Michele; Malinconico, Mario; Volpe, Maria Grazia

    2018-08-30

    In this paper, a novel and sustainable process for the fruit dehydration was described. Specifically, edible coatings based on pectin and honey were prepared and used as dehydrating and antimicrobial agents of cut fruit samples, in this way promoting the fruit preservation from irreversible deteriorative processes. Pectin-honey coating was tested on apple, cantaloupe melon, mango and pineapple. The analysis were performed also on uncoated dehydrated fruits (control). The coated fruit evidenced enhanced dehydration percentage, enriched polyphenol and vitamin C contents, improved antioxidant activity and volatile molecules profile. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas and Escherichia coli was assessed. Finally, morphological analysis performed on fruit fractured surface, highlighted the formation of a non-sticky and homogeneous thin layer. These outcomes suggested that the novel fruit dehydration process, performed by using pectin-honey coating, was able to both preserve the safety and quality of dehydrated fruits, and enhance their authenticity and naturalness. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. On the context dependence of emotion displays: Perceptions of gold medalists' expressions of pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Osch, Yvette; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Breugelmans, Seger M

    2016-11-01

    In spite of various claims for cross-cultural differences in the experience of pride, studies on the expression of pride have revealed few cross-cultural differences. Five studies using archival data from Olympic and national championships do show cross-cultural differences in the expression of pride and other positive emotions in pride-eliciting contexts, contingent on the social context of the expression, notably the in-group or out-group status of the audience. Chinese gold medalists were perceived to express less pride than American medalists when outperforming in-group competitors; when outperforming out-group members, however, no or smaller cross-cultural differences were observed. These findings are important because they indicate that cultural norms about emotion expression may be activated only in situations in which they serve a function in coordinating people's behaviour.

  2. Induced mutation in tropical fruit trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-05-15

    This publication is based on an FAO/IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) and provides insight into the application of induced mutation and in vitro techniques for the improvement of well known fruit trees such as citrus, mango, avocado and papaya, as well as more exotic fruit trees such as litchi, annona, jujube, carambola, pitanga and jaboticaba. The latter are of particular importance due to their adaptation to harsh environments and their high potential as basic food and micronutrient providers for populations in poorer and more remote regions. The findings of the CRP show that application of radiation induced mutation techniques in tropical and subtropical fruit trees can contribute to improving nutritional balance food security, and to enhancing the economic status of growers.

  3. Induced mutation in tropical fruit trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This publication is based on an FAO/IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) and provides insight into the application of induced mutation and in vitro techniques for the improvement of well known fruit trees such as citrus, mango, avocado and papaya, as well as more exotic fruit trees such as litchi, annona, jujube, carambola, pitanga and jaboticaba. The latter are of particular importance due to their adaptation to harsh environments and their high potential as basic food and micronutrient providers for populations in poorer and more remote regions. The findings of the CRP show that application of radiation induced mutation techniques in tropical and subtropical fruit trees can contribute to improving nutritional balance food security, and to enhancing the economic status of growers

  4. The effect of gamma irradiation on the degree of ripening of mango by comparing the parameter of colour index, texture firmness and pH value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Hafiz Hanafi

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of low dose gamma irradiation on the ripening degree of cv Chokanan mangoes through the comparison of colour index changes, texture firmness and pH value. Harvested mature mango was studied through the storage period for 14 days. Dose level used were 0.00 kGy (control), 0.25 kGy, 0.50 kGy, 0.75 kGy and 1.00 kGy of gamma cell 220. All fruits were wrapped using plastic after irradiated. There was no change in 0 day. However, there are changes in colour index, firmness and pH value of fruits in after 3 days. Dose of 0.75 kGy and 1.00 kGy gave positive effect to storage extension period and rate deceleration compared to 0.00 kGy (control), 0.25 kGy and 0.50 kGy. After 10 days storage, 0.00, 0.25 and 0.50 kGy of fruits became rot which affects quality of organoleptic. Whereas 0.75 and 1.00 kGy still retained organoleptic quality . When the ripening rate of fruit was fast, this would lead to faster of the colour change. The firmness value of fruit became decrease and the value of pH was increase. (author)

  5. Analysis of the irradiation and thermal treatment combined effect in the quality of mangoes for exportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, Marcel Wilke

    2009-01-01

    In this research the effect of the hydrothermal treatment and irradiation as a combined method of food conservation and disinfestation was studied, searching to optimize the impact over the final product desired characteristics. Tommy Atkins mangoes from Brazil were submitted to a combined treatment: thermal treatment (46 deg C, 70 min and 52 deg C, 5 min) and gamma irradiation treatment (doses 0,3 and 0,75 kGy). The fruits were stored at 11 deg C during 14 days and kept at an environmental condition for more 12 days, where their physical chemical and sensorial properties were evaluated. As predicted by Oliveira (1998) the combined method of irradiation and thermal treatment showed better results then the individual methods in increasing the shelf-life. (author)

  6. Salt stress change chlorophyll fluorescence in mango

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicero Cartaxo de Lucena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the tolerance of mango cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins' and 'Uba' grafted on rootstock 'Imbú' to salt stress using chlorophyll fluorescence. Plants were grown in modified Hoagland solution containing 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. At 97 days the parameters of the chlorophyll fluorescence (F0, Fm, Fv, F0/Fm, Fv/Fm, Fv'/Fm', ΦPSII = [(Fm'-Fs/(Fm'], D = (1- Fv'/Fm' and ETR = (ΦPSII×PPF×0,84×0,5 were determined. At 100 days, the leaf emission and leaf area, toxicity and leaf abscission indexes were determined. In all cultivars evaluated, in different degree, there were decreases in photochemical efficiency of photosystem II, enhanced concentrations from 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. The decreases in the potential quantum yield of photosystem II (Fv/Fm were 27.9, 18.7, 20.5, and 27.4%, for cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Uba', respectively, when grown in 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. It was found decreases in leaf emission and mean leaf area in all cultivars from 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. There were increases in leaf toxicity of 33.0, 67.5, 41.6 and 80.8% and in leaf abscission of 71.8, 29.2, 32.5, and 67.9% for the cultivars 'Haden', 'Palmer', 'Tommy Atkins', and 'Uba' respectively, when grown in 45 mmol L-1 NaCl. Leaf toxicity and leaf abscission were not observed in 15 mmol L-1 NaCl. The decrease in Fv/Fm ratio were accompanied by decreasing in leaf emission and increased leaf toxicity index, showing, therefore, the potential of chlorophyll fluorescence in the early detection of salt stress in mango tree.

  7. At Lunch with a Killer: The Effect of Weaver Ants on Host-Parasitoid Interactions on Mango.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Migani

    Full Text Available Predator-prey interactions can affect the behaviour of the species involved, with consequences for population distribution and competitive interactions. Under predation pressure, potential prey may adopt evasive strategies. These responses can be costly and could impact population growth. As some prey species may be more affected than others, predation pressure could also alter the dynamics among species within communities. In field cages and small observation cages, we studied the interactions between a generalist predator, the African weaver ant, Oecophylla longinoda, two species of fruit flies that are primary pests of mango fruits, Ceratitis cosyra and Bactrocera dorsalis, and their two exotic parasitoids, Fopius arisanus and Diachasmimorpha longicaudata. In all experiments, either a single individual (observation cage experiments or groups of individuals (field cage experiments of a single species were exposed to foraging in the presence or absence of weaver ants. Weaver ant presence reduced the number of eggs laid by 75 and 50 percent in B. dorsalis and C. cosyra respectively. Similarly, parasitoid reproductive success was negatively affected by ant presence, with success of parasitism reduced by around 50 percent for both F. arisanus and D. longicaudata. The negative effect of weaver ants on both flies and parasitoids was mainly due to indirect predation effects. Encounters with weaver ant workers increased the leaving tendency in flies and parasitoids, thus reduced the time spent foraging on mango fruits. Parasitoids were impacted more strongly than fruit flies. We discuss how weaver ant predation pressure may affect the population dynamics of the fruit flies, and, in turn, how the alteration of host dynamics could impact parasitoid foraging behaviour and success.

  8. a comparative study of direct and indirect solar drying of mango

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BARTH EKWUEME

    appropriate to a family scale traditional mango drying. ... before its marketing. Also, direct ..... measured using a digital probe thermohygrometer of ...... Comparison of direct and indirect solar drying kinetics Amelie and Brooks mango varieties.

  9. A comparative study of direct and indirect solar drying of mango ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative study of direct and indirect solar drying of mango. ... Thus, indirect solar dryer was found to be suitable for industrial or semi industrial mango drying, whereas direct solar dryer was appropriate to a family ... HOW TO USE AJOL.

  10. Physiological and biochemical characterization of mango tree with paclobutrazol application via irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Alves de Souza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Paclobutrazol application in mango tree floral induction is followed by changes in the hormonal balance and carbohydrates production. This study aimed at evaluating the physiological and biochemical variables of mango tree (Palmer cultivar by applying paclobutrazol doses via irrigation. The experimental design was randomized blocks, with five paclobutrazol doses (0.7 g, 1.0 g, 1.3 g, 1.6 g and 1.9 g of a.i. per linear meter of canopy and one additional treatment, with one dose in the conventional form of application (1.9 g of a.i. per linear meter of canopy, and four replicates. The variables analyzed were: photosynthesis rate; stomatal conductance; transpiration; leaf temperature; CO2 ratio; total protein content; reducing, non-reducing and total soluble sugars in leaf tissue and fruit; and nitrate reductase enzyme. The lowest values for photosynthesis rate and stomatal conductance were obtained with paclobutrazol applied via irrigation. The highest values for gas exchange were obtained with the lowest paclobutrazol doses applied via irrigation, showing that this kind of application is efficient and that it is possible to reduce the application dose via irrigation system. The highest carbohydrate contents in the leaf tissue were observed for the doses of 1.06 g and 1.09 g of a.i. per linear meter of canopy, applied via irrigation. The carbohydrate contents in fruits decreased in response to the paclobutrazol dose. The application methods and doses applied via irrigation did not influence the nitrate reductase activity.

  11. Study of quarantine treatment in mango (Mangifera indica L.) for export; Estudo de tratamentos fitossanitarios na manga (Mangifera indica L.) para exportacao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Juliana Nunes da

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to verify and compare the chemical and physical-chemical behaviour of mango cv. Tommy Atkins subjected to hydrothermal treatment and irradiation at doses 0.4 and 1.0 kGy, to complement the studies by SABATO et al (2009) in the real transport of irradiated mangoes from Brazil to Canada. These studies allowed to compare the performance of irradiation with heat treatment on the preservation of the characteristics of mango for export. For these reason fruits were divided into groups: control, heat bath (46 degree C for 90 min), at dose 0.4 kGy and at dose 1.0 kGy. The fruits were stored at low temperature (11 degree C {+-} 2) for 14 days, and then at room temperature (23 degree C {+-} 2) until the end of its useful life. During the period of cold storage the analysis were performed at intervals of 7 days and every 3 days when kept at room temperature. The results indicated that the dose of 1.0 kGy was the only group that kept the fruit with the skin color on stage 3 throughout the experimental period, but provided a greater loss of texture degradation and the levels of total acidity in the fruits with green skin. It was noted that only the control group showed higher levels of citric acid and succinic acid in the last day of the experiment. There were no significant differences in soluble solids, total sugars and evaluation of weight in relation to treatments. The analysis of visual observation indicated that the heat bath group was the one with the highest number of fruit drop by decomposition with approximately 55%. It was concluded that irradiation is more effective in preserving the quality of mangoes cv. Tommy Atkins, reducing the appearance of rot or shriveling in relation to heat treatment. However, the preservation of the skin of fruit is not concurrently influenced by its intrinsic nature, since, internally, the fruits continue their normal maturation, independent of the applied dose. (author)

  12. The Export Supply Response ofMangoes: A Cointegration and Causality Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Ghafoor; Khalid Mushtaq; Abedullah

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of major factors on the export of mangoes from Pakistan. We use a cointegration approach and error correction mechanism applied to data for the period 1970–2005. Mango exports are regressed against the index of relative prices of mango exports (2000 = 100), the quantity of domestic mango production, real agricultural gross domestic product (GDP), the length of all-weather roads, and international standardization, i.e., the impact of the World Trade Organization ...

  13. The effect of combination treatment of gamma irradiation with refrigeration or with hot water treatment on the storage life and organoleptic properties of carabao mangoes and lacatan bananas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barruel, D.S.

    1976-03-01

    This study aims to determine the best combination of irradiation-hot water and irradiation-low temperature storage as treatments to help achieve longer shelf-life extension of fruits with export value such as bananas and mangoes. Results have shown the combined irradiation and hot water treatment as a better treatment for mangoes over that of combined irradiation (50kr) and low temperature storage (15 0 C) or of single treatments with irradiation, refrigeration or hot water. A much lower dose of 30 krad was found to give the longest extension in shelf-life in mangoes subjected to irradiation and hot (55 0 C) water treatment. No significant differences in the organoleptic properties were found in the samples given the combination treatment when compared to samples given no treatment at all. The extension in shelf-life may be attributed to the synergistic effect of the treatments, which could have affected the senescence of the fruit and likewise controlled the growth of rot-causing microorganisms. Similar work was also done on bananas but the results are still preliminary

  14. Diurnal activity of four species of thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and efficiencies of three nondestructive sampling techniques for thrips in mango inflorescences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbarpour, H; Rawi, Che Salmah Md

    2010-06-01

    Thrips cause considerable economic loss to mango, Mangifera indica L., in Penang, Malaysia. Three nondestructive sampling techniques--shaking mango panicles over a moist plastic tray, washing the panicles with ethanol, and immobilization of thrips by using CO2--were evaluated for their precision to determine the most effective technique to capture mango flower thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in an orchard located at Balik Pulau, Penang, Malaysia, during two flowering seasons from December 2008 to February 2009 and from August to September 2009. The efficiency of each of the three sampling techniques was compared with absolute population counts on whole panicles as a reference. Diurnal flight activity of thrips species was assessed using yellow sticky traps. All three sampling methods and sticky traps were used at two hourly intervals from 0800 to 1800 hours to get insight into diurnal periodicity of thrips abundance in the orchard. Based on pooled data for the two seasons, the CO2 method was the most efficient procedure extracting 80.7% adults and 74.5% larvae. The CO2 method had the lowest relative variation and was the most accurate procedure compared with the absolute method as shown by regression analysis. All collection techniques showed that the numbers of all thrips species in mango panicles increased after 0800 hours, reaching a peak between 1200 and 1400 hours. Adults thrips captured on the sticky traps were the most abundant between 0800-1000 and 1400-1600 hours. According to results of this study, the CO2 method is recommended for sampling of thrips in the field. It is a nondestructive sampling procedure that neither damages flowers nor diminishes fruit production. Management of thrips populations in mango orchards with insecticides would be more effectively carried out during their peak population abundance on the flower panicles at midday to 1400 hours.

  15. Effect of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera Indica on basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle: role of muscarinic receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Noureddini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mango belongs to the Anacardiaceae and the extracts from its stems, leaves, fruit and kernel are reported to affect smooth muscle contractility. We studied the role of cholinergic muscarinic receptors for the effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel (Mangifera indica on the basal activity of virgin rat uterine smooth muscle. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, mid-sections (n=24 of the uterine of healthy virgin rats were placed in an organ bath containing carbonated Tyrode’s solution under 1 g tension. The cumulative effects of the aqueous extracts of mango kernel (0.002, 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20, 200, and 2000 μg/mL or extract vehicle (Tyrode’s solution in the presence or absence of atropine were examined by isometric method using the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle. Results: The cumulative concentrations (0.002-20 µg/ml of mango kernel aqueous extract was significantly decreased the strength, frequency and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but the contractile activity was returned to the basal level at the concentrations of 200 and 2000 µg/ml. Atropine (1 µM could not significantly change the effects of cumulative use of extract on the strength and contractile activity of uterine smooth muscle, but it significantly enhanced the contractile frequency at low concentrations. Conclusion: The effects of aqueous extract of mango kernel on the activity of the uterine smooth muscle might not be through cholinergic muscarinic receptors and atropine could enhance the effects of the extract on frequency through other receptors.

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among Egyptian mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivers grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hassan; Mekki, Laila E; Hussein, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) markers have been used extensively to study genetic diversity and relationships in a number of fruit crops. In this study, 10 (7 commercial mango cultivars and 3 accessions) mango genotypes traditionally grown in Suez Canal and Sinai region of Egypt, were selected to assess genetic diversity and relatedness. Total genomic DNA was extracted and subjected to RAPD analysis using 30 arbitrary 10-mer primers. Of these, eleven primers were selected which gave 92 clear and bright fragments. A total of 72 polymorphic RAPD bands were detected out of 92 bands, generating 78% polymorphisms. The mean PIC values scores for all loci were of 0.85. This reflects a high level of discriminatory power of a marker and most of these primers produced unique band pattern for each cultivar. A dendrogram based on Nei's Genetic distance co-efficient implied a moderate degree of genetic diversity among the cultivars used for experimentation, with some differences. The hybrid which had derived from cultivar as female parent was placed together. In the cluster, the cultivars and accessions formed separate groups according to bearing habit and type of embryo and the members in each group were very closely linked. Cluster analysis clearly showed two main groups, the first consisting of indigenous to the Delta of Egypt cultivars and the second consisting of indigenous to the Suez Canal and Sinai region. From the analysis of results, it appears the majority of mango cultivars originated from a local mango genepool and were domesticated later. The results indicated the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and management of mango germplasm for breeding purposes.

  17. Effect of Freeze-Drying on the Antioxidant Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Selected Tropical Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Redzuan Hairuddin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of freeze-drying on antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of five tropical fruits, namely starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L., mango (Mangifera indica L., papaya (Carica papaya L., muskmelon (Cucumis melo L., and watermelon Citruluss lanatus (Thunb. were investigated. Significant (p < 0.05 differences, for the amounts of total phenolic compounds (TPC, were found between the fresh and freeze-dried fruit samples, except muskmelon. There was no significant (p > 0.05 change, however, observed in the ascorbic acid content of the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Similarly, freeze-drying did not exert any considerable effect on β-carotene concentration of fruits, except for mango and watermelon, where significantly (p < 0.05 higher levels were detected in the fresh samples. The results of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging and reducing power assays revealed that fresh samples of starfruit and mango had relatively higher antioxidant activity. In case of linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition measurement, a significant (p < 0.05 but random variation was recorded between the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Overall, in comparison to β-carotene and ascorbic acid, a good correlation was established between the result of TPC and antioxidant assays, indicating that phenolics might have been the dominant compounds contributing towards the antioxidant activity of the fruits tested.

  18. [Nutrition value of tropical and subtropical fruits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubtsov, G G; Bessonov, V V; Baĭkov, V G; Makhova, N N; Sheviakova, L V; Bogachuk, M N; Baĭgarin, E K; Iao Bru, Lazar

    2013-01-01

    The article is devoted to the study of the chemical composition of tropical and subtropical fruit (avocado, papaya and mango), which are now in great numbers are on the appeared on the Russian market. Due to use technology tropical and subtropical fruits can be implemented in almost all areas and regions of the country. Relatively low cost makes these products quite popular among the people. In domestic scientific literature there are no systematic data describing the chemical composition of these tropical and subtropical fruits sold in the domestic market, while the information needed to calculate food and energy value of diets and culinary products derived from tropical and subtropical fruit. Avocado fruits are sources of insoluble dietary fiber content of which was equal to 12.2%, as well as minerals. The study of the fatty acid composition of lipids avocados showed high content of oleic acid fruit, which accounts for 53.2% of total fatty acids in these fruits. Which makes them a valuable source of unsaturated fatty acids.

  19. EVALUATION OF INSECTICIDES FOR PEST CONTROL IN MANGO (Mangifera indica L. IN TIERRA CALIENTE, GUERRERO, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuridia Duran

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The mango crop is attacked by various pests, in Arcelia, Tierra Caliente, Guerrero, Mexico. Scale insects (Hemiptera and thrips (Thysanoptera were identified, the pesticides imidacloprid, spinosad, sulfur and mineral oil were tested against them, as well as their effect on fruit quality, using pest action thresholds. The thrips Frankliniella invasor appeared in the highest populations, but F. difficilis, F. occidentalis, F. fortissima, F. cephalica, Leptothrips macconnelli, L. bifurcatus and L. theobromae were also found. It was observed that mineral oil maintained the lowest populations and least damage in fruit; thrips species did not cause significant damage because they were seasonal pests that only occur when soft tissue is available in plants and once this tissue becomes unavailable populations diminish without the need of insecticides.  The mite Cisaberoptus kenyae was identified, which in high populations can cause crop damage; for its control sulfur yielded better results. The scale Milviscutulus mangiferae was present in very low populations. Treatment with mineral oil resulted in the highest quality fruits.

  20. Structure Analysis of the Graphic Simulator for the PRIDE Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Park, Byung Suk; Lee, Jong Kwang; Lee, Hyo Jik; Kim, Ki Ho

    2010-12-01

    Simulation technology based on the computer graphics is able to minimize the trial and error and reduce the development cost and period dramatically at the design stage of the pyroprocessing facility construction and the equipment development. For this purpose, the 3D graphic simulation program named HotCell has been developed. HotCell has continuously updated for the functional addition and the bug fix, and now it reaches version third. The Digital mockup of PRIDE is furnished with the MSM(matster-slave manipulator), BDSM(bridge transported dual arm servo manipulator) and Crane in order to remote handling the processing equipment. HotCell program can be interface with the 3D mouse, the haptic device and the joystick for the realistic operation of above device. The posture of MSM can be recorded with the simple keyboard operation in order to reproduce the behavior of the MSM

  1. Reactivity feedback coefficients Pakistan research reactor-1 using PRIDE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansoor, Ali; Ahmed, Siraj-ul-Islam; Khan, Rustam [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Inam-ul-Haq [Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics

    2017-05-15

    Results of the analyses performed for fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients for the first high power core configuration of Pakistan Research Reactor - 1 (PARR-1) are summarized. For this purpose, a validated three dimensional model of PARR-1 core was developed and confirmed against the reference results for reactivity calculations. The ''Program for Reactor In-Core Analysis using Diffusion Equation'' (PRIDE) code was used for development of global (3-dimensional) model in conjunction with WIMSD4 for lattice cell modeling. Values for isothermal fuel, moderator and void's temperature feedback reactivity coefficients have been calculated. Additionally, flux profiles for the five energy groups were also generated.

  2. Improvements in Thermal Performance of Mango Hot-water Treatment Equipments: Data Analysis, Mathematical Modelling and Numerical-computational Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder M. Mendoza Orbegoso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mango is one of the most popular and best paid tropical fruits in worldwide markets, its exportation is regulated within a phytosanitary quality control for killing the “fruit fly”. Thus, mangoes must be subject to hot-water treatment process that involves their immersion in hot water over a period of time. In this work, field measurements, analytical and simulation studies are developed on available hot-water treatment equipment called “Original” that only complies with United States phytosanitary protocols. These approaches are made to characterize the fluid-dynamic and thermal behaviours that occur during the mangoes’ hot-water treatment process. Then, analytical model and Computational fluid dynamics simulations are developed for designing new hot-water treatment equipment called “Hybrid” that simultaneously meets with both United States and Japan phytosanitary certifications. Comparisons of analytical results with data field measurements demonstrate that “Hybrid” equipment offers a better fluid-dynamic and thermal performance than “Original” ones.

  3. Activation of ethylene-responsive p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase leads to increased tocopherol levels during ripening in mango

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh K.; Ali, Sharique A.; Nath, Pravendra; Sane, Vidhu A.

    2011-01-01

    Mango is characterized by high tocopherol and carotenoid content during ripening. From a cDNA screen of differentially expressing genes during mango ripening, a full-length p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (MiHPPD) gene homologue was isolated that encodes a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of tocopherols. The gene encoded a 432-amino-acid protein. Transcript analysis during different stages of ripening revealed that the gene is ripening related and rapidly induced by ethylene. The increase in MiHPPD transcript accumulation was followed by an increase in tocopherol levels during ripening. The ripening-related increase in MiHPPD expression was also seen in response to abscisic acid and to alesser extent to indole-3-acetic acid. The expression of MiHPPD was not restricted to fruits but was also seen in other tissues such as leaves particularly during senescence. The strong ethylene induction of MiHPPD was also seen in young leaves indicating that ethylene induction of MiHPPD is tissue independent. Promoter analysis of MiHPPD gene in tomato discs and leaves of stable transgenic lines of Arabidopsis showed that the cis elements for ripening-related, ethylene-responsive, and senescence-related expression resided within the 1590 nt region upstream of the ATG codon. Functionality of the gene was demonstrated by the ability of the expressed protein in bacteria to convert p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate to homogentisate. These results provide the first evidence for HPPD expression during ripening of a climacteric fruit. PMID:21430290

  4. Expressing pride: Effects on perceived agency, communality, and stereotype-based gender disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosi, Prisca; Spörrle, Matthias; Welpe, Isabell M; Heilman, Madeline E

    2016-09-01

    Two experimental studies were conducted to investigate how the expression of pride shapes agency-related and communality-related judgments, and how those judgments differ when the pride expresser is a man or a woman. Results indicated that the expression of pride (as compared to the expression of happiness) had positive effects on perceptions of agency and inferences about task-oriented leadership competence, and negative effects on perceptions of communality and inferences about people-oriented leadership competence. Pride expression also elevated ascriptions of interpersonal hostility. For agency-related judgments and ascriptions of interpersonal hostility, these effects were consistently stronger when the pride expresser was a woman than a man. Moreover, the expression of pride was found to affect disparities in judgments about men and women, eliminating the stereotype-consistent differences that were evident when happiness was expressed. With a display of pride women were not seen as any more deficient in agency-related attributes and competencies, nor were they seen as any more exceptional in communality-related attributes and competencies, than were men. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. PRIDE and "Database on Demand" as valuable tools for computational proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Reisinger, Florian; Côté, Richard; Martens, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The Proteomics Identifications Database (PRIDE, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride ) provides users with the ability to explore and compare mass spectrometry-based proteomics experiments that reveal details of the protein expression found in a broad range of taxonomic groups, tissues, and disease states. A PRIDE experiment typically includes identifications of proteins, peptides, and protein modifications. Additionally, many of the submitted experiments also include the mass spectra that provide the evidence for these identifications. Finally, one of the strongest advantages of PRIDE in comparison with other proteomics repositories is the amount of metadata it contains, a key point to put the above-mentioned data in biological and/or technical context. Several informatics tools have been developed in support of the PRIDE database. The most recent one is called "Database on Demand" (DoD), which allows custom sequence databases to be built in order to optimize the results from search engines. We describe the use of DoD in this chapter. Additionally, in order to show the potential of PRIDE as a source for data mining, we also explore complex queries using federated BioMart queries to integrate PRIDE data with other resources, such as Ensembl, Reactome, or UniProt.

  6. Local Fruit Wastes as a Potential Source of Natural Antioxidant: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, U. K.; Kamarrudin, N.; Suzihaque, M. U. H.; Hashib, S. Abd

    2017-06-01

    Food industry in Malaysia which used fruits as one of the raw material such as the production of fruit juices, concentrates, jams and dried fruits, the main wastes of the production are the peel and the seed of the fruit. Nowadays, people have shown the interests to study the antioxidant content in the fruit wastes. All kind of fruits are believed to contain high amount of natural antioxidant properties such as vitamins, phenol, flavonoid and carotenoid. Thus, this paper presented the work done by researcher on antioxidant activity in the peel especially on local fruit such as mango peel, watermelon rind, banana peel and mangosteen pericarp. The review shows that the peel of the fruit is a good source of antioxidant and other bioactive compounds which have many benefits especially towards human health.

  7. Mesocarp RNASeq analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.) identify quarantine post-harvest treatment effects on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States is the world’s largest importer of mangos. Before mangos can enter the US, they must be hot water treated to eliminate the eggs of an insect pest. The National Mango Board, a USDA supported commodity group, as well as mango exporters, importers and wholesale and retail distributo...

  8. Quantification and Purification of Mangiferin from Chinese Mango (Mangifera indica L.) Cultivars and Its Protective Effect on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells under H2O2-induced Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fenglei; Lv, Qiang; Zhao, Yuqin; Hu, Guibing; Huang, Guodi; Zhang, Jiukai; Sun, Chongde; Li, Xian; Chen, Kunsong

    2012-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural xanthonoid with various biological activities. Quantification of mangiferin in fruit peel, pulp, and seed kernel was carried out in 11 Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars. The highest mangiferin content was found in the peel of Lvpimang (LPM) fruit (7.49 mg/g DW). Efficient purification of mangiferin from mango fruit peel was then established for the first time by combination of macroporous HPD100 resin chromatography with optimized high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). Purified mangiferin was identified by both HPLC and LC-MS, and it showed higher DPPH• free-radical scavenging capacities and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) than by l-ascorbic acid (Vc) or Trolox. In addition, it showed significant protective effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) under H2O2-induced stress. Cells treated with mangiferin resulted in significant enhanced cell survival under of H2O2 stress. Therefore, mangiferin from mango fruit provides a promising perspective for the prevention of oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:23109851

  9. Quantification and purification of mangiferin from Chinese Mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars and its protective effect on human umbilical vein endothelial cells under H(2)O(2)-induced stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fenglei; Lv, Qiang; Zhao, Yuqin; Hu, Guibing; Huang, Guodi; Zhang, Jiukai; Sun, Chongde; Li, Xian; Chen, Kunsong

    2012-01-01

    Mangiferin is a natural xanthonoid with various biological activities. Quantification of mangiferin in fruit peel, pulp, and seed kernel was carried out in 11 Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L.) cultivars. The highest mangiferin content was found in the peel of Lvpimang (LPM) fruit (7.49 mg/g DW). Efficient purification of mangiferin from mango fruit peel was then established for the first time by combination of macroporous HPD100 resin chromatography with optimized high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC). Purified mangiferin was identified by both HPLC and LC-MS, and it showed higher DPPH(•) free-radical scavenging capacities and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) than by l-ascorbic acid (Vc) or Trolox. In addition, it showed significant protective effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) under H(2)O(2)-induced stress. Cells treated with mangiferin resulted in significant enhanced cell survival under of H(2)O(2) stress. Therefore, mangiferin from mango fruit provides a promising perspective for the prevention of oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  10. Quantification and Purification of Mangiferin from Chinese Mango (Mangifera indica L. Cultivars and Its Protective Effect on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells under H2O2-induced Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunsong Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mangiferin is a natural xanthonoid with various biological activities. Quantification of mangiferin in fruit peel, pulp, and seed kernel was carried out in 11 Chinese mango (Mangifera indica L. cultivars. The highest mangiferin content was found in the peel of Lvpimang (LPM fruit (7.49 mg/g DW. Efficient purification of mangiferin from mango fruit peel was then established for the first time by combination of macroporous HPD100 resin chromatography with optimized high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC. Purified mangiferin was identified by both HPLC and LC-MS, and it showed higher DPPH free-radical scavenging capacities and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP than by l-ascorbic acid (Vc or Trolox. In addition, it showed significant protective effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC under H2O2-induced stress. Cells treated with mangiferin resulted in significant enhanced cell survival under of H2O2 stress. Therefore, mangiferin from mango fruit provides a promising perspective for the prevention of oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  11. The Application of Tamarind Kernel Powder in the Mango Sauce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    koosamart Wayu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tamarind seed has been well-known as a perfect source of xyloglucan that has functional properties that can be applied in food products. In this research, the tamarind seeds were processed to be tamarind kernel powder (TKP and then it was added into the mango sauce as the stabilizer. The aim was to study the effects of using TKP as the stabilizer on the quality of mango sauce in comparison with the application of xanthan gum that is the common stabilizer of sauce. The mango sauce samples were determined their water activity, consistency, viscosity, color and sensorial quality. The result indicated that the addition of either TKP or xanthan gum at 0.25-0.5 %w/w could raise the viscosity and diminish consistency of mango sauce significantly whereas the water activity values were insignificantly different among samples. Furthermore, it appeared that the samples added with xanthan gum obtained less consistency values but more viscosity and sensorial scores than that of TKP. The color values of samples with TKP were significantly different from those with xanthan gum. The samples added xanthan gum became darker than the addition of TKP. Although the TKP caused the less preference in characteristics of mango sauce when comparing with xanthan gum, the better result might be achieved if TKP was processed to be more purified xyloglucan. The outcome of this work showed the possibility of utilizing the tamarind seed that is commonly by-product to be a valuable food additive for food industry.

  12. Effeet of ealeium ehloride in the storage of mango (mangifera indica ev. tommy atkins Influencia del cloruro de calcio en la conservación del mango (Mangifera indica L. variedad Tommy atkins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvis V. Antonio

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available In our country, it exists a lot of postharvest losses caused by inadequate handling of perishable products. The mango, a very important fruit for exportation, has similar problems and it is necessary to solve them. This study was carry out in order to determine the incidence of CaCl2 in the maintenance of the mango variety Tommy Atkinsstored at 1O°C and 90% R.H. lt was lound  that the fruit treated with a solution of 15% of
    CaCl2 reached the best devolpement of its phycochemical characteristics of pH, brix and acidity and its madurity process was complete.En la actualidad, existen numerosas pérdidas en la poscosecha de productos perecederos, debidas, principalmente, al manejo inadecuado de éstos y a la poca atención que se les suministra después de su recolección. El mango, una de las frutas de mayor importancia para el
    mercado internacional, no escapa a esta situación; por lo cual, se hacen necesarios estudios que permitan su conservación después de la recolección. Por ésto, en el presente estudio, se empleó en la conservación del mango
    variedad Tommy Atkins un retardante de maduración, el cloruro de calcio (CaCl2 a baja temperatura (10°C, con 90% de humedad relativa (H. R., encontrándose que la inmersión de la fruta en una solución de concentración del 15% de CaCl2 permite su conservación por un espacio
    de 38 días con un buen comportamiento de las características lisicoquímicas de °Brix, acidez y pH del producto y alcanzado su completa madurez fisiológica.

  13. Mango: an online GUI development tool for the Tango control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangolino, G.; Scafuri, C.

    2012-01-01

    Mango is an online tool based on QTango that allows easy development of graphical panels ready to run without need to be compiled. Developing with Mango is easy and fast because widgets are dragged from a widget catalogue and dropped into the Mango container. Widgets are then connected to the control system variables by choosing them from a Tango device list or by dragging them from any other running application built with the QTango library. Mango has also been successfully used during the FERMI-Elettra commissioning both by machine physicists and technicians: about 10 control panels have been designed and run with Mango

  14. Mango seed uses: thermal behaviour of mango seed almond fat and its mixtures with cocoa butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solís-Fuentes, J A; Durán-de-Bazúa, M C

    2004-03-01

    This paper deals with the physicochemical characterization, including thermal behaviour, by differential scanning calorimetry of mango seed almond fat (MAF), alone and in mixtures with cocoa butter (CB). Results showed that mango almond seeds contain about 5.28-11.26% (dw) of fat. The refraction index is 1.466, the saponification index 189.0 and the iodine index 41.76. Fatty acids found in MAF are oleic, stearic, and palmitic acids (40.81%, 39.07% and 9.29% (w/w), respectively) as well as smaller amounts of linoleic, with arachidic, behenic, lignoceric, and linolenic acids, among others. Calorimetric analysis showed that MAF crystallizes between 14.6 and -24.27 degrees C with a DeltaHc of 56.06 J/g and melts between -17.1 and 53.8 degrees C, with fusion maxima at 18.54 degrees C and 40.0 degrees C for the alpha and beta polymorphic forms. Their fusion enthalpies are 70.12 and 115.7 J/g. The MAF solids content profile is very similar to that of CB, both in stabilized and non-stabilized samples. The mixing compatibility was analyzed using isosolids curves of mixtures of different compositions.

  15. The relaxation phenomena of radicals induced in irradiated fresh mangoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Masahiro; Morishita, Norio; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Ogawa, Hideyuki; Shimoyama, Yuhei; Ukai, Mitsuko

    2009-01-01

    Using the γ-irradiated fresh mangoes followed by freeze-drying and powderization, electron spin resonance spectrometry of specimens was performed. As a result, a strong single peak in the flesh, the pericarp and the seed was observed at g=2.004 and attributed to organic free radicals. When relaxation times of the peak was calculated using the method of Lund et al., T 2 showed dose responses according to increasing doses while T 1 was almost constant. Dose responsibility of the relaxation time T 2 obtained from flesh specimens of the mangoes could be measured regardless of the preservation period of 1 to 9 days following γ-irradiation. Therefore, there might be possible to detect the irradiation treatment of fresh mangoes using relaxation time T 2 . (author)

  16. Quality changes and nutrient retention in fresh-cut versus whole fruits during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, María I; Aguayo, Encarna; Kader, Adel A

    2006-06-14

    The influences of processing and storage on the quality indices and nutritional content of fresh-cut fruits were evaluated in comparison to whole fruits stored for the same duration but prepared on the day of sampling. Fresh-cut pineapples, mangoes, cantaloupes, watermelons, strawberries, and kiwifruits and whole fruits were stored for up to 9 days in air at 5 degrees C. The postcutting life based on visual appearance was shorter than 6 days for fresh-cut kiwifruit and shorter than 9 days for fresh-cut pineapple, cantaloupe, and strawberry. On the other hand, fresh-cut watermelon and mango pieces were still marketable after 9 days at 5 degrees C. Losses in vitamin C after 6 days at 5 degrees C were spoil before any significant nutrient loss occurs.

  17. Current trends of tropical fruit waste utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheok, Choon Yoong; Mohd Adzahan, Noranizan; Abdul Rahman, Russly; Zainal Abedin, Nur Hanani; Hussain, Norhayati; Sulaiman, Rabiha; Chong, Gun Hean

    2018-02-11

    Recent rapid growth of the world's population has increased food demands. This phenomenon poses a great challenge for food manufacturers in maximizing the existing food or plant resources. Nowadays, the recovery of health benefit bioactive compounds from fruit wastes is a research trend not only to help minimize the waste burden, but also to meet the intensive demand from the public for phenolic compounds which are believed to have protective effects against chronic diseases. This review is focused on polyphenolic compounds recovery from tropical fruit wastes and its current trend of utilization. The tropical fruit wastes include in discussion are durian (Durio zibethinus), mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.), rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum), mango (Mangifera indica L.), jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), papaya (Carica papaya), passion fruit (Passiflora edulis), dragon fruit (Hylocereus spp), and pineapple (Ananas comosus). Highlights of bioactive compounds in different parts of a tropical fruit are targeted primarily for food industries as pragmatic references to create novel innovative health enhancement food products. This information is intended to inspire further research ideas in areas that are still under-explored and for food processing manufacturers who would like to minimize wastes as the norm of present day industry (design) objective.

  18. Pesticide bioconcentration modelling for fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraíba, Lourival Costa

    2007-01-01

    The model presented allows simulating the pesticide concentration evolution in fruit trees and estimating the pesticide bioconcentration factor in fruits. Pesticides are non-ionic organic compounds that are degraded in soils cropped with woody species, fruit trees and other perennials. The model allows estimating the pesticide uptake by plants through the water transpiration stream and also the time in which maximum pesticide concentration occur in the fruits. The equation proposed presents the relationships between bioconcentration factor (BCF) and the following variables: plant water transpiration volume (Q), pesticide transpiration stream concentration factor (TSCF), pesticide stem-water partition coefficient (K(Wood,W)), stem dry biomass (M) and pesticide dissipation rate in the soil-plant system (k(EGS)). The modeling started and was developed from a previous model "Fruit Tree Model" (FTM), reported by Trapp and collaborators in 2003, to which was added the hypothesis that the pesticide degradation in the soil follows a first order kinetic equation. The FTM model for pesticides (FTM-p) was applied to a hypothetic mango plant cropping (Mangifera indica) treated with paclobutrazol (growth regulator) added to the soil. The model fitness was evaluated through the sensitivity analysis of the pesticide BCF values in fruits with respect to the model entry data variability.

  19. Effect of Freeze-Drying on the Antioxidant Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Selected Tropical Fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofian, Norshahida Mohamad; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Osman, Azizah; Saari, Nazamid; Anwar, Farooq; Dek, Mohd Sabri Pak; Hairuddin, Muhammad Redzuan

    2011-01-01

    The effects of freeze-drying on antioxidant compounds and antioxidant activity of five tropical fruits, namely starfruit (Averrhoa carambola L.), mango (Mangifera indica L.), papaya (Carica papaya L.), muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.), and watermelon Citruluss lanatus (Thunb.) were investigated. Significant (p 0.05) change, however, observed in the ascorbic acid content of the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Similarly, freeze-drying did not exert any considerable effect on β-carotene concentration of fruits, except for mango and watermelon, where significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels were detected in the fresh samples. The results of DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging and reducing power assays revealed that fresh samples of starfruit and mango had relatively higher antioxidant activity. In case of linoleic acid peroxidation inhibition measurement, a significant (p < 0.05) but random variation was recorded between the fresh and freeze-dried fruits. Overall, in comparison to β-carotene and ascorbic acid, a good correlation was established between the result of TPC and antioxidant assays, indicating that phenolics might have been the dominant compounds contributing towards the antioxidant activity of the fruits tested. PMID:21845104

  20. The influence of anticipated pride and guilt on pro-environmental decision making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R Schneider

    Full Text Available The present research explores the relationship between anticipated emotions and pro-environmental decision making comparing two differently valenced emotions: anticipated pride and guilt. In an experimental design, we examined the causal effects of anticipated pride versus guilt on pro-environmental decision making and behavioral intentions by making anticipated emotions (i.e. pride and guilt salient just prior to asking participants to make a series of environmental decisions. We find evidence that anticipating one's positive future emotional state from green action just prior to making an environmental decision leads to higher pro-environmental behavioral intentions compared to anticipating one's negative emotional state from inaction. This finding suggests a rethinking in the domain of environmental and climate change messaging, which has traditionally favored inducing negative emotions such as guilt to promote pro-environmental action. Furthermore, exploratory results comparing anticipated pride and guilt inductions to baseline behavior point toward a reactance eliciting effect of anticipated guilt.

  1. The influence of anticipated pride and guilt on pro-environmental decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Claudia R; Zaval, Lisa; Weber, Elke U; Markowitz, Ezra M

    2017-01-01

    The present research explores the relationship between anticipated emotions and pro-environmental decision making comparing two differently valenced emotions: anticipated pride and guilt. In an experimental design, we examined the causal effects of anticipated pride versus guilt on pro-environmental decision making and behavioral intentions by making anticipated emotions (i.e. pride and guilt) salient just prior to asking participants to make a series of environmental decisions. We find evidence that anticipating one's positive future emotional state from green action just prior to making an environmental decision leads to higher pro-environmental behavioral intentions compared to anticipating one's negative emotional state from inaction. This finding suggests a rethinking in the domain of environmental and climate change messaging, which has traditionally favored inducing negative emotions such as guilt to promote pro-environmental action. Furthermore, exploratory results comparing anticipated pride and guilt inductions to baseline behavior point toward a reactance eliciting effect of anticipated guilt.

  2. Austen's "Pride and Prejudice": Comic Vision and the Teaching of Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the teachable qualities of Jane Austen's novel "Pride and Prejudice." Examines the vigorous diction, plausible characterization, and comic vision that make the novel so effective in stimulating students' thought. (SR)

  3. Identification of irradiated mangoes by means of ESR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, M.E.; Romero, M.E.; Gutierrez, A.; Azorin, J.

    1996-01-01

    Samples of mango varieties Tommy Atkins, Haiden and Ataulfo were irradiated with 60 Co gamma radiation at doses in the range 0.15-1.0 kGy, and stored at room temperature for lapses of time up to 72 h. They were then studied by ESR spectrometry. Results show that the ESR signal of the irradiated samples is higher than that of the unirradiated samples, and this is found even at the minimum radiation dose of 0.15 kGy. The ESR signal remained stable during the storage time. The ESR signals obtained for hydroheated mangoes show insignificant differences with respect to the control samples. (author)

  4. Social network usage, shame, guilt and pride among high school students: Model testing

    OpenAIRE

    Doğan, Uğur; Çelik, Eyüp; Karakaş, Yahya

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at testing a model which applies structural equation modeling (SEM) to explain social networking sites (SNS) usage. Performing SEM with a sample of 500 high school students (40% male, 60% female), the model examined the relationships among shame, guilt and pride on SNS, such Facebook and Twitter. It was hypothesized that SNS usage was predicted directly by shame and indirectly by pride and guilt. The SEM showed that shame affected SNS usage directly and positively, while ...

  5. An fMRI study of caring vs self-focus during induced compassion and pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Thomas, Emiliana R; Godzik, Jakub; Castle, Elizabeth; Antonenko, Olga; Ponz, Aurelie; Kogan, Aleksander; Keltner, Dacher J

    2012-08-01

    This study examined neural activation during the experience of compassion, an emotion that orients people toward vulnerable others and prompts caregiving, and pride, a self-focused emotion that signals individual strength and heightened status. Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) were acquired as participants viewed 55 s continuous sequences of slides to induce either compassion or pride, presented in alternation with sequences of neutral slides. Emotion self-report data were collected after each slide condition within the fMRI scanner. Compassion induction was associated with activation in the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG), a region that is activated during pain and the perception of others' pain, and that has been implicated in parental nurturance behaviors. Pride induction engaged the posterior medial cortex, a region that has been associated with self-referent processing. Self-reports of compassion experience were correlated with increased activation in a region near the PAG, and in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). Self-reports of pride experience, in contrast, were correlated with reduced activation in the IFG and the anterior insula. These results provide preliminary evidence towards understanding the neural correlates of important interpersonal dimensions of compassion and pride. Caring (compassion) and self-focus (pride) may represent core appraisals that differentiate the response profiles of many emotions.

  6. Body-related pride in young adults: an exploration of the triggers, contexts, outcomes and attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Andree L; Gilchrist, Jenna D; Mack, Diane E; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2013-06-01

    This study explored body-related emotional experiences of pride in young adult males (n=138) and females (n=165). Data were collected using a relived emotion task and analyzed using inductive content analysis. Thirty-nine codes were identified and grouped into six categories (triggers, contexts, cognitive attributions, and affective, cognitive, and behavioral outcomes) for each of two themes (hubristic and authentic pride). Hubristic pride triggers included evaluating appearance/fitness as superior. Cognitions centered on feelings of superiority. Behaviors included strategies to show off. Triggers for authentic pride were personal improvements/maintenance in appearance and meeting or exceeding goals. Feeling accomplished was a cognitive outcome, and physical activity was a behavioral strategy. Contexts for the experience of both facets of pride primarily involved sports settings, swimming/beach, and clothes shopping. These findings provide theoretical support for models of pride as it applies to body image, and advances conceptual understanding of positive body image. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiresidue levels of pesticides in selected fruits in Ghana; a preliminary study in the Yilo and Lower Manya Krobo Districts of the Eastern Region of Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krokroko, W.

    2011-01-01

    Locally produced fruits (mango, pineapple and banana) were sampled and purchased from farms and markets with the Yilo and Lower Manya Krobo districts and analyzed for pesticide residues by gas chromatography equipped with an Electron Capture Detector (GC-ECD). In all, 80 samples made up of 40 mango samples and 20 samples each of pineapples and bananas were extracted and analyzed for mainly organochlorine residues (γ-HCH, δ-HCH, aldrin, dieldein, heptachlor, γ-chlordane, endosulfan s, p, p'-DDE etc.) and synthetic pyrethroid residues (allethrin, bifenthrin, fenpropathrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, etc.). Analysis indicates that about 88% of the mangoes sampled from the farms contained one or more of these pesticide residues. 75% and 65% of the pineapples and bananas respectively from farms and markets had one or more of the analyzed pesticide residues. The data revealed that about 6.2% of the fruit samples analyzed contained organochlorine pesticide residues of γ-HCH (0.013mg/kg and 0.038mg/kg respectively in mangoes and pineapples); δ-HCH [0.014mg/kg (mango) and 0.024mg/kg (pineapple)]; methoxychlor [0.027 mg/kg (mango) and 0.048mg/kg (pineapple)]. Synthetic pyrethoid residues of cyfluthrin [0.078mg/kg (mango) and 0.059 mg/kg (pineapple) and fenvalerate [0.025 mg/kg and 0.028 mg/kg respectively for mango and pineapple] were also found above their respective maximum residue limits (Table 4.8) whereas 78.2% of detected pesticide residues were below the MRLs. Nonetheless, the continuous consumption of these fruits with even the modest pesticide levels can result in accumulation that could result in deadly chronic effects. In assessing the consumers' perception of pesticide residues in fruits, about 69% of the respondents were aware of pesticide residues in fruits and the corresponding adverse effect on human health. Some have experienced pesticide poising after fruit consumption. Thus many wish pesticide usage in fruit and crop cultivation in general is curbed or

  8. PRODUCTION AND PARTIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PECTINASES FROM MANGO PEELS BY Aspergillus tamarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tivkaa Amande

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Pectinases are a group of enzymes that are able to breakdown or transform pectin. Sources of pectinase comprise a wide variety of bacteria, yeast and filamentous fungi, especially Aspergillus sp. In this study pectinases (polygalacturonase and pectin lyase were produced from mango peels by Aspergillus tamarii in solid state fermentation and a fraction of the crude enzyme solution obtained by ultracentrifugation was used for partial characterization assay. The maximum polygalacturonase production was 141.0095 U/g at day 3, 6 and 9 of incubation while the maximum pectin lyase production was 5670.50 U/g obtained at day 6. The optimum temperature and pH for polygalacturonase activity was between 40 – 70oC and 5.0 respectively while that of pectin lyase was 60oC and 7.5 respectively. The polygalacturonase produced was stable between pH 3.6 – 10.0 and at a temperature range of 30 – 70oC while the pectin lyase was stable between pH 7.0 – 8.5 and at 40oC. Na+, Mn+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ caused a significant increase in the activity of polygalacturonase whereas Fe2+ and Mg2+ caused a significant decrease in its activity (P≤0.05. The activity of pectin lyase was significantly increased by Fe2+, Mn+ and Zn2+ but significantly decreased by Cu2+, Mg2+ and Na+ (P≤0.05. Mango peel is a cheap, available and valuable substrate for pectinase production which could be useful for industrial applications especially in the food industry for processing fruit juices.

  9. Survey of quality indicators in commercial dehydrated fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megías-Pérez, Roberto; Gamboa-Santos, Juliana; Soria, Ana Cristina; Villamiel, Mar; Montilla, Antonia

    2014-05-01

    Physical and chemical quality parameters (dry matter, aw, protein, carbohydrates, vitamin C, 2-furoylmethyl amino acids, rehydration ratio and leaching loss) have been determined in 30 commercial dehydrated fruits (strawberry, blueberry, raspberry, cranberry, cherry, apple, grapefruit, mango, kiwifruit, pineapple, melon, coconut, banana and papaya). For comparison purposes, strawberry samples processed in the laboratory by freeze-drying and by convective drying were used as control samples. Overall quality of dehydrated fruits seemed to be greatly dependent on processing conditions and, in a cluster analysis, samples which were presumably subjected to osmotic dehydration were separated from the rest of fruits. These samples presented the lowest concentration of vitamin C and the highest evolution of Maillard reaction, as evidenced by its high concentration of 2-furoylmethyl amino acids. This is the first study on the usefulness of this combination of chemical and physical indicators to assess the overall quality of commercial dehydrated fruits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. CONSUMERS'ACCEPTANCE OF FRESH AND COMBINED METHODS PROCESSED MELON, MANGO AND CASHEW APPLE ACEITAÇÃO DO CONSUMIDOR DE MELÃO, MANGA E CAJU IN NATURA E PROCESSADOS POR MÉTODOS COMBINADOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA TIEKO NASSU

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Fresh and combined methods processed Cantaloupe melons, mangoes and cashew apples were submitted to consumers' acceptance and scored on a nine-point hedonic scale. Fruits were osmotically treated in sucrose syrup with two different concentrations of SO2. Overall acceptance, appearance, aroma, flavor and texture were evaluated. Fresh cashew apples received lower scores for acceptance than processed cashew apples while fresh mangoes were more acceptable than processed mangoes. Acceptance of fresh melons and processed melons was similar. Treatments of the tropical fruits with two different concentrations of SO2 did not demonstrate significant differences between the fruits tested.Melões 'Cantaloupe', mangas e pedúnculos de caju in natura e processados por métodos combinados foram submetidos a testes de aceitação, utilizando-se de escala hedônica de nove pontos. As frutas sofreram tratamento osmótico em um xarope de sacarose com duas diferentes concentrações de SO2. Foram avaliados aceitação global, aparência, aroma, sabor e textura. Pedúnculos de caju in natura obtiveram notas menores para aceitação se comparados aos processados, enquanto mangas in natura foram mais aceitas do que as processadas. A aceitação de melões in natura e processados foi similar. Tratamentos com diferentes concentrações de SO2 não apresentaram diferenças significativas entre os frutos estudados.

  11. Evaluation of lubricity of methanolic extract of mango (Mangifera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methanolic extract of mango seed oil (Mangifera Indica) was evaluated for suitability as lubricant for machini-ng mild steel at various speeds, feeds and depths of cut. The coefficient of friction between the tool and chip in- dicated that the methanolic extract reduced friction between the tool and work piece. The oil also ...

  12. Packetizing OCP Transactions in the MANGO Network-on-Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Tobias; Sparsø, Jens

    2006-01-01

    facilitating IP reuse by standard socket access points. Two types of services are available: connection-less best-effort routing and connection-oriented guaranteed service (GS) routing. This paper presents the core-centric programming model for establishing and using GS connections in MANGO. We show how OCP...

  13. 76 FR 36281 - Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-22

    ... Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Reapportionment AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA... the Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order (Order), which is authorized under the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (Act), a review of the composition of the Board must be...

  14. Colour behaviour on mango ( Mangifera indica ) slices self ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the syrup composition on behaviour colour of self stabilized mango slices in glass jars by hurdle technology during 180 days of storage was studied through 26-2 fractional factorial design. L* (lightness), a* (redness and greenness), and b* (yellowness and blueness) values were measured with a colorimeter ...

  15. APPLE MANGO VALUE CHAIN IN NORTHERN ETHIOPIA: CASE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... This study, conducted in Mereb-Leke district of Tigray, Northern ... development agencies, donors and NGOs are ... Apple Mango Value Chain in Northern Ethiopia: Case Study of Mereb-Leke District. 17 ... of the districts in the Tigray Regional State of ... city, Axum and Rama town, respectively and 5 and.

  16. Botryosphaeriaceae associated with diseases of mango (Mangifera indica)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trakunyingcharoen, T.; Cheewangkoon, R.; To-anun, C.; Crous, P.W.; Niekerk, van J.M.; Lombard, L.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal species of Botryosphaeriaceae have a cosmopolitan distribution and are important pathogens of a wide range of plant hosts. This study aims to use phylogenetic inference to review the geographical distribution of botryosphaeriacous species that have been associated with diseases of mango

  17. Reducing post-harvest losses in mango in South Asia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    to poor processing and preservation facilities, can be as high as 30-35%. ... and 139 mango growers in Sri Lanka (over 20% women). Group members have been ... After. Before. Percentage. 0. 10. 20. 30. 40. 50. 60. 70. 80. Choice of crops.

  18. Economic incentives for improving mango quality in Costa Rica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuniga Arias, G.; Ruben, R.; Verkerk, R.; Boekel, van T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose

    – The purpose of the paper is to present an integrated methodology for identifying effective economic incentives to enhance quality performance by mango producers in Costa Rica.

    Design/methodology/approach

    – The study analyses the relationship between intrinsic

  19. Phytochemical composition and effects of commercial enzymes on the hydrolysis of gallic acid glycosides in mango (Mangifera indica L. cv. 'Keitt') pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenek, Kimberly A; Barnes, Ryan C; Talcott, Stephen T

    2014-10-01

    A detailed characterization of mango pulp polyphenols and other minor phytochemicals was accomplished for the first time in the cultivar 'Keitt' whereby the identification and semiquantification of five hydroxybenzoic acids, four cinnamic acids, two flavonoids, and six apocarotenoids was accomplished. Among the most abundant compounds were two monogalloyl glucosides (MGG) identified as having an ester- or ether-linked glucose, with the ester-linked moiety present in the highest concentration among nontannin polyphenolics. Additionally, the impact of side activities of three commercial cell-wall degrading enzymes during 'Keitt' mango pulp processing was evaluated to determine their role on the hydrolysis of ester- and ether-linked phenolic acids. The use of Crystalzyme 200XL reduced the concentration of ester-linked MGG by 66%, and the use of Rapidase AR 2000 and Validase TRL completely hydrolyzed ether-linked MGG after 4 h of treatment at 50 °C. Fruit quality, in vivo absorption rate, and bioactivity of mango phytochemicals rely on their chemical characterization, and characterizing changes in composition is critical for a complete understanding of in vivo mechanisms.

  20. Uni-dimensional double development HPTLC-densitometry method for simultaneous analysis of mangiferin and lupeol content in mango (Mangifera indica) pulp and peel during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyotshna; Srivastava, Pooja; Killadi, Bharti; Shanker, Karuna

    2015-06-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica) fruit is one of the important commercial fruit crops of India. Similar to other tropical fruits it is also highly perishable in nature. During storage/ripening, changes in its physico-chemical quality parameters viz. firmness, titrable acidity, total soluble solid content (TSSC), carotenoids content, and other biochemicals are inevitable. A uni-dimensional double-development high-performance thin-layer chromatography (UDDD-HPTLC) method was developed for the real-time monitoring of mangiferin and lupeol in mango pulp and peel during storage. The quantitative determination of both compounds of different classes was achieved by densitometric HPTLC method. Silica gel 60F254 HPTLC plates and two solvent systems viz. toluene/EtOAC/MeOH and EtOAC/MeOH, respectively were used for optimum separation and selective evaluation. Densitometric quantitation of mangiferin was performed at 390nm, while lupeol at 610nm after post chromatographic derivatization. Validated method was used to real-time monitoring of mangiferin and lupeol content during storage in four Indian cultivars, e.g. Bombay green (Bgreen), Dashehari, Langra, and Chausa. Significant correlations (pacidity and TSSC with mangiferin and lupeol in pulp and peel during storage were also observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.