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Sample records for previously reported radiation

  1. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers: report of previous work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1984-01-01

    Progress over the course of the Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study is reported. The derivation of the study population, the gathering of health histories, the US Navy radiation protection program, and the determination of radiation exposures is described

  2. Radiation port cutaneous metastases: Reports of two patients whose recurrent visceral cancers presented as skin lesions at the site of previous radiation and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Spencer Hoyt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is associated with a variety of complications, including the development of primary skin cancers in the radiated region. However, it is rare for patients with visceral cancers who are treated with radiation therapy to subsequently develop cutaneous metastasis within the radiation port. We describe two patients with internal malignancies who developed cutaneous metastases within their radiation ports following radiotherapy. In addition, we used PubMed to perform an extensive literature review and identify additional reports of cutaneous metastasis within a radiation port. We excluded patients who developed melanoma or primary skin cancers in the radiation port. We also excluded patients with non-solid organ malignancies. Herein, we summarize the characteristics of 23 additional patients who experienced radiation port cutaneous metastases and explore possible mechanisms for the occurrence of radiation port cutaneous metastases.

  3. Validation of previously reported predictors for radiation-induced hypothyroidism in nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy, a post hoc analysis from a Phase III randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertbutsayanukul, Chawalit; Kitpanit, Sarin; Prayongrat, Anussara; Kannarunimit, Danita; Netsawang, Buntipa; Chakkabat, Chakkapong

    2018-05-10

    This study aimed to validate previously reported dosimetric parameters, including thyroid volume, mean dose, and percentage thyroid volume, receiving at least 40, 45 and 50 Gy (V40, V45 and V50), absolute thyroid volume spared (VS) from 45, 50 and 60 Gy (VS45, VS50 and VS60), and clinical factors affecting the development of radiation-induced hypothyroidism (RHT). A post hoc analysis was performed in 178 euthyroid nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients from a Phase III study comparing sequential versus simultaneous-integrated boost intensity-modulated radiation therapy. RHT was determined by increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with or without reduced free thyroxin, regardless of symptoms. The median follow-up time was 42.5 months. The 1-, 2- and 3-year freedom from RHT rates were 78.4%, 56.4% and 43.4%, respectively. The median latency period was 21 months. The thyroid gland received a median mean dose of 53.5 Gy. Female gender, smaller thyroid volume, higher pretreatment TSH level (≥1.55 μU/ml) and VS60 treatment planning.

  4. [Electronic cigarettes - effects on health. Previous reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierała, Marta; Kulza, Maksymilian; Wachowiak, Anna; Jabłecka, Katarzyna; Florek, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Currently very popular in the market of tobacco products have gained electronic cigarettes (ang. E-cigarettes). These products are considered to be potentially less harmful in compared to traditional tobacco products. However, current reports indicate that the statements of the producers regarding to the composition of the e- liquids not always are sufficient, and consumers often do not have reliable information on the quality of the product used by them. This paper contain a review of previous reports on the composition of e-cigarettes and their impact on health. Most of the observed health effects was related to symptoms of the respiratory tract, mouth, throat, neurological complications and sensory organs. Particularly hazardous effects of the e-cigarettes were: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, confusion, convulsions, hypotension, aspiration pneumonia, face second-degree burns, blindness, chest pain and rapid heartbeat. In the literature there is no information relating to passive exposure by the aerosols released during e-cigarette smoking. Furthermore, the information regarding to the use of these products in the long term are not also available.

  5. Safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancers previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy regimens: a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Y.C.; Wu, R.; Xu, Z.G.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wu, L.N.; Wang, Y.M.; Zheng, W.; Chen, X.D.; Chi, F.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Li, X.; Jin, X.Y.; Chen, W.; Wang, S.L.; Xiao, F.D.; Wang, E.Y.; Dong, X.Q.; Jia, M.X.; Li, Y.; Fan, G.L.; Hao, S.H.; Zhang, L.B.; Zhang, H.B.; Xia, H.H.X.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients with locoregional advanced laryngeal cancer (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) were included: group 1(control, n = 30)were not administered of sodium glycididazole; group 2 (test, n = 30) received sodium glycididazole at a dose of 700 mg/m2 intravenous infusion 30 minutes before radiotherapy three times a week. Surrogate end-points of efficacy were tumor and nodal size. Safety parameters were vomiting, nausea, mucositis, laryngeal edema, esophagus and skin reaction, dysphagia, dyspnea, neurological deficit. Patients were evaluated weekly during treatment for 7 weeks and thereafter monthly for 3 months. Results: In the test, the overall response rate was 88.89% (95% CI, 71.00-97.00%) at 7 weeks and 92.59% (95% CI, 76.00 to 99.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. In the control, the overall response rate was 62.5% (95% CI, 41.00 to 81.00%) at 7 weeks and 58.33% (95% CI, 37.00 to 78.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. The short-term locoregional response rate was better in the test group at 7 weeks (p = 0.027) and at 1 month (p = 0.005) of follow-up. The test group had significantly more nausea and vomiting in weeks 1 (p = 0.047), 2 (p = 0.007), and 3 (p = 0.01) of treatment. Conclusions: The study indicates sodium glycididazole is an effective radiation-enhancing agent that improves short-term locoregional control and is well tolerated in patients with loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancer. (authors)

  6. Delayed vaginal reconstruction in the fibrotic pelvis following radiation or previous reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berek, J.S.; Hacker, N.F.; Lagasse, L.D.; Smith, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Vaginal reconstruction was performed in 14 patients who had developed vaginal stenosis secondary to extensive pelvic fibrosis after pelvic radiation therapy (12 patients) or prior vaginal reconstruction (2 patients). Sixteen procedures were performed using a split-thickness skin graft. All patients had satisfactory vaginal restoration, and 12 patients reported good vaginal function. No fistula developed as a result of the operative procedure, but one patient later developed a rectovaginal fistula resulting from tumor recurrence. Successful vaginal reconstruction can be achieved even years after initial therapy in patients who develop an obliterated vagina from previous radiation or surgery

  7. Predicting Radiation Pneumonitis After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy in Patients Previously Treated With Conventional Thoracic Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy Y.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of and risk factors for radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) to the lung in patients who had previously undergone conventional thoracic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Seventy-two patients who had previously received conventionally fractionated radiation therapy to the thorax were treated with SABR (50 Gy in 4 fractions) for recurrent disease or secondary parenchymal lung cancer (T 10 and mean lung dose (MLD) of the previous plan and the V 10 -V 40 and MLD of the composite plan were also related to RP. Multivariate analysis revealed that ECOG PS scores of 2-3 before SABR (P=.009), FEV1 ≤65% before SABR (P=.012), V 20 ≥30% of the composite plan (P=.021), and an initial PTV in the bilateral mediastinum (P=.025) were all associated with RP. Conclusions: We found that severe RP was relatively common, occurring in 20.8% of patients, and could be predicted by an ECOG PS score of 2-3, an FEV1 ≤65%, a previous PTV spanning the bilateral mediastinum, and V 20 ≥30% on composite (previous RT+SABR) plans. Prospective studies are needed to validate these predictors and the scoring system on which they are based.

  8. Urethrotomy has a much lower success rate than previously reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santucci, Richard; Eisenberg, Lauren

    2010-05-01

    We evaluated the success rate of direct vision internal urethrotomy as a treatment for simple male urethral strictures. A retrospective chart review was performed on 136 patients who underwent urethrotomy from January 1994 through March 2009. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to analyze stricture-free probability after the first, second, third, fourth and fifth urethrotomy. Patients with complex strictures (36) were excluded from the study for reasons including previous urethroplasty, neophallus or previous radiation, and 24 patients were lost to followup. Data were available for 76 patients. The stricture-free rate after the first urethrotomy was 8% with a median time to recurrence of 7 months. For the second urethrotomy stricture-free rate was 6% with a median time to recurrence of 9 months. For the third urethrotomy stricture-free rate was 9% with a median time to recurrence of 3 months. For procedures 4 and 5 stricture-free rate was 0% with a median time to recurrence of 20 and 8 months, respectively. Urethrotomy is a popular treatment for male urethral strictures. However, the performance characteristics are poor. Success rates were no higher than 9% in this series for first or subsequent urethrotomy during the observation period. Most of the patients in this series will be expected to experience failure with longer followup and the expected long-term success rate from any (1 through 5) urethrotomy approach is 0%. Urethrotomy should be considered a temporizing measure until definitive curative reconstruction can be planned. 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    History Documents US Underground Nuclear Test History Reports NTPR Radiation Exposure Reports Enewetak Atoll Cleanup Documents TRAC About Who We Are Our Values History Locations Our Leadership Director Support Center Contact Us FAQ Sheet Links Success Stories Contracts Business Opportunities Current

  10. Radiation Hazard control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Miki, Ryota; Aoki, Yutaka; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Hutai, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Norihiko; Okazaki, Koji

    1992-01-01

    The results of radiation control for one year from April, 1991 to March, 1992 in the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University are reported. As for the persons engaging in radiation-related works as of April, 1991, 57 teachers in the Atomic Energy Research Institute and the Faculties of Science and Engineering, Pharmacology and Agriculture, 17 students of Department of Science and Engineering who utilize the reactor facility for graduation research, and 55 students of Department of Science and Engineering and others as the persons engaging in radiation-related works regarding the law on injury prevention, 129 persons in total became the object of radiation control. The state of operation of the nuclear reactor in fiscal year 1991 was the highest thermal output 1 W, the cumulative thermal output 362.62 Wh, and the total time of operation was 563.27 h. The operation of the neutron generator was carried out for 1.17 h because of the periodic inspection and the trial operation. In personal control, the abnormality due to radiation exposure was not found. The radiation control in laboratories and in fields are reported. (K.I.)

  11. Radiation hazard control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Hisanaga, Saemi; Miki, Ryota; Kawai, Hiroshi; Aoki, Yutaka; Sone, Koji; Okada, Hirokazu

    1990-01-01

    The report describes the radiation hazard control activities performed at the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University, Japan, during the one-year period from April 1989 to March 1990. Personal radiation hazard control is outlined first focusing on results of physical examination and data of personal exposure dose equivalent. Radiation control in laboratory is then described. Dose equivalent at various places is discussed on the basis of monthly total dose equivalent measured on film badges, measurements made by TLD, and observations made through a continuous radiations monitoring system. The concentration of radiations in air and water is discussed focusing on their measured concentrations in air at the air outlets of tracer/accelerator facilities, and radioactivity in waste water sampled in the reactor facilities and tracer/accelerator facilities. Another discussion is made on the surface contamination density over the floors, draft systems, sink surface, etc. Concerning outdoor radiation hazard control, furthermore, TLD measurements of environmental gamma-rays, data on total gamma-ray radioactivity in environmental samples, and analysis of gamma-ray emitting nuclides in environmental samples are described and discussed. (N.K.)

  12. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1997)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1998-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1997. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  13. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1997-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1996. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  14. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1998. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  15. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M [ed.

    1997-03-25

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1996. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group.

  16. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1998)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M [ed.

    1999-04-15

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1998. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group.

  17. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1997)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefert, M [ed.

    1998-04-10

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1997. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group.

  18. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1996-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1995. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  19. Radiation Practices. Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 1811 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2003. There were 1962 responsible parties engaged in licence-exempt dental X-ray practices, made notifiable to STUK. Regulatory control of the use of radiation was carried out through regular inspections performed at places of use, postal control, guidance, maintenance of a Dose Register and research intended to support the regulatory control. A total of 10 900 workers engaged in radiation work were subject to individual monitoring in 2003. 135 000 dose entries were made in the register maintained by STUK. In no case did the individual dose of any worker exceed the dose limits stipulated in the Radiation Decree. Regulatory control of natural radiation concentrated on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. At the end of 2003, 90 workplaces including a total of 141 work areas were subject to ongoing radon monitoring. A total of 2485 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. The DOS Laboratory of STO joined the international MRA agreement on the 'self declaration principle'. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation focused particularly on mobile phones and sun-beds. Mobile phone market control began by measuring the radiation produced by a range of 12 mobile phones of varying type. Spot check inspections were conducted at tanning facilities and a report was completed on radiation safety improvements at such establishments. A method of measurement based on commercial CCD spectroradiometers was developed for spectral measurements of UV phototherapy appliances and sunbeds. The said method is also suitable for measurements at places of use. A new type of magnetometer, which measures peak values over a wide frequency band weighted according to exposure limits, was developed for measuring low frequency magnetic fields. In

  20. Radiation monitor reporting requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, W.F.

    1993-01-01

    Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes

  1. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Soundouss

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. Case presentation A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. Conclusion We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  2. Radiation induced esophageal adenocarcinoma in a woman previously treated for breast cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raissouni, Soundouss; Raissouni, Ferdaous; Rais, Ghizlane; Aitelhaj, Meryem; Lkhoyaali, Siham; Latib, Rachida; Mohtaram, Amina; Rais, Fadoua; Mrabti, Hind; Kabbaj, Nawal; Amrani, Naima; Errihani, Hassan

    2012-08-09

    Secondary radiation-induced cancers are rare but well-documented as long-term side effects of radiation in large populations of breast cancer survivors. Multiple neoplasms are rare. We report a case of esophageal adenocarcinoma in a patient treated previously for breast cancer and clear cell carcinoma of the kidney. A 56 year-old non smoking woman, with no alcohol intake and no familial history of cancer; followed in the National Institute of Oncology of Rabat Morocco since 1999 for breast carcinoma, presented on consultation on January 2011 with dysphagia. Breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy, 6 courses of chemotherapy based on CMF regimen and radiotherapy to breast, inner mammary chain and to pelvis as castration. Less than a year later, a renal right mass was discovered incidentally. Enlarged nephrectomy realized and showed renal cell carcinoma. A local and metastatic breast cancer recurrence occurred in 2007. Patient had 2 lines of chemotherapy and 2 lines of hormonotherapy with Letrozole and Tamoxifen assuring a stable disease. On January 2011, the patient presented dysphagia. Oesogastric endoscopy showed middle esophagus stenosing mass. Biopsy revealed adenocarcinoma. No evidence of metastasis was noticed on computed tomography and breast disease was controlled. Palliative brachytherapy to esophagus was delivered. Patient presented dysphagia due to progressive disease 4 months later. Jejunostomy was proposed but the patient refused any treatment. She died on July 2011. We present here a multiple neoplasm in a patient with no known family history of cancers. Esophageal carcinoma is most likely induced by radiation. However the presence of a third malignancy suggests the presence of genetic disorders.

  3. Radiation control report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Masayo; Matsuda, Toshiro; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Yamamoto, Tomosada; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of radiation control during April 2013 and April 2014 at the Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University. The subjects of radiation control were totally 148 persons including teaching staff and students who engaged in radiation jobs at the Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Faculty of Science and Engineering, and the Faculty of Pharmacy. As for the operating conditions of the reactor, total operating time was 485.28 hours. Since new regulations came into force in accordance with the law revision in December 2013, this reactor became unable to operate since the regular inspection in February 2014, and the verification of compliance to the new regulatory standards has become necessary for the restart. In this paper, the following are described as the radiation management that was carried out on a regular basis in FY2013: (1) health diagnosis and individual exposure dose management, as personal management, (2) dose rate measurements in facilities and measurements of radioactive substance concentration in the air and water, as facility management, and (3) measurement data and analysis results of environmental γ-ray dose rate, total β radioactivity concentration in environmental samples, and γ-ray nuclide analysis of environmental samples, as field management. (A.O.)

  4. Severe radiation morbidity in carcinoma of the cervix: impact of pretherapy surgical staging and previous surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Bruce A.; Hempling, Ronald E.; Piver, M. Steven; Baker, Trudy R.; McAuley, Michael; Driscoll, Deborah

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to delineate the factors which (a) contribute to an increase in the severe, radiation induced complication rate and (b) have a significant effect on survival in patients with International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) Stage I-IVA cervical cancer undergoing pretherapy surgical staging. Methods and Materials: From 1971-1991, 189 patients underwent pretherapy surgical staging via a retroperitoneal approach (67) or transperitoneal approach (122). Seventy-nine patients had previously experienced a laparotomy. Patients subsequently received a median of 85 Gy to point A. In patients receiving paraaortic radiation, a median of 45 Gy was administered. One hundred and thirty-two (69.8%) patients received hydroxyurea as a radiation sensitizer. Results: Pretherapy surgical evaluation revealed that 21 of 89 (23.6%) Stage II patients and 32 of 85 (37.6%) Stage III patients had paraaortic lymph node metastases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis detailed the significant factors favorably influencing the radiation-induced complication rate to be a retroperitoneal approach of pretherapy surgical staging and no previous laparotomy. Survival was significantly prolonged in patients receiving hydroxyurea, evaluated via a retroperitoneal incision, with negative paraaortic lymph nodes, and with an early stage of disease. Conclusion: A retroperitoneal approach to pretherapy surgical staging and absence of previous surgery reduced the incidence of subsequent radiation-induced complications. Despite improvements in the detection of occult disease, prolonged survival is impaired when the therapeutic measures currently available are used

  5. Eighth annual occupational radiation exposure report, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1976-10-01

    This is a report by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the operation of the Commission's centralized repository of personnel occupational radiation exposure information. Annual reports were received from 387 covered licensees indicating that some 78,713 individuals, having an average exposure of 0.36 rems, were monitored for exposure to radiation during 1975 and that 21,601 individuals terminated their employment or work assignment with covered licensees in 1975. The number of personnel overexposures reported in 1975 decreased from previous years. The most significant overexposures which occurred in 1975 are summarized

  6. Radiation-induced cerebellar chondrosarcoma. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, M.; Perrin, R.G.; Platts, M.E.; Simpson, W.J.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report a case of chondrosarcoma arising in the cerebellum 16 years after treatment of a cerebellar malignant astrocytoma by subtotal resection and irradiation. It is thought that the chondrosarcoma arising within the intracranial cavity was a probable consequence of previous ionizing radiation

  7. Safety of {sup 90}Y Radioembolization in Patients Who Have Undergone Previous External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G.E.H. [Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands); Abdelmaksoud, Mohamed H.K. [Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Chang, Daniel T.; Eclov, Neville C.; Chung, Melody P.; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Louie, John D. [Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Previous external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is theoretically contraindicated for yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) radioembolization (RE) because the liver has a lifetime tolerance to radiation before becoming vulnerable to radiation-induced liver disease. We analyzed the safety of RE as salvage treatment in patients who had previously undergone EBRT. Methods and Materials: Between June 2004 and December 2010, a total of 31 patients who had previously undergone EBRT were treated with RE. Three-dimensional treatment planning with dose–volume histogram (DVH) analysis of the liver was used to calculate the EBRT liver dose. Liver-related toxicities including RE-induced liver disease (REILD) were reviewed and classified according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.02. Results: The mean EBRT and RE liver doses were 4.40 Gy (range, 0-23.13 Gy) and 57.9 Gy (range, 27.0-125.9 Gy), respectively. Patients who experienced hepatotoxicity (≥grade2; n=12) had higher EBRT mean liver doses (7.96 ± 8.55 Gy vs 1.62 ± 3.39 Gy; P=.037), the only independent predictor in multivariate analysis. DVH analysis showed that the fraction of liver exposed to ≥30 Gy (V30) was the strongest predictor of hepatotoxicity (10.14% ± 12.75% vs 0.84% ± 3.24%; P=.006). All patients with V30 >13% experienced hepatotoxicity. Fatal REILD (n=2) occurred at the 2 highest EBRT mean liver doses (20.9 Gy and 23.1 Gy) but also at the highest cumulative liver doses (91.8 Gy and 149 Gy). Conclusions: Prior exposure of the liver to EBRT may lead to increased liver toxicity after RE treatment, depending on fractional liver exposure and dose level. The V30 was the strongest predictor of toxicity. RE appears to be safe for the treatment of hepatic malignancies only in patients who have had limited hepatic exposure to prior EBRT.

  8. Radiation Practices. Annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2005-06-01

    A total of 1791 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2004. There were 1924 responsible parties engaged in licence-exempt dental X-ray practices, made notifiable to STUK. Regulatory control of the use of radiation was carried out through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of a Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted to support the regulatory control. In 2004, STUK conducted 438 inspections of licensed practices and 38 inspections of notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices. Restrictions were imposed on the use of five appliances. Repairs were ordered in 150 inspections and recommended in 85 inspections. No remarks were given in 229 inspections. A total of 11 082 workers engaged in radiation work were subject to individual monitoring in 2004. 135 000 dose entries were made in the register maintained by STUK. In no case did the individual dose of any worker exceed the dose limits stipulated in the Radiation Decree. Regulatory control of natural radiation concentrated on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. At the end of 2004, 55 workplaces including a total of 74 work areas were subject to radon monitoring. A total of 2540 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation focused particularly on mobile phones and sunbeds. Radiation safety assessments were also made for public broadcasting equipment, radars, 'artificial sun' aboard a cruise liner, UVC bactericide lamps in a bakery and show laser lights. A recommendation on radiation safety for sunbeds was prepared in association with other Nordic countries. Most research and development work was done in jointly financed research projects and

  9. Radiation practices. Annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2009-09-01

    1775 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2008. 1831 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. STUK conducted 424 inspections of licensed practices and 18 inspections of notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices in 2008. 209 repair orders and recommendations were issued. Use of one appliance was prohibited. A total of just over 11 500 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2008, and about 140 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 89 workplaces including a total of 201 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2008. Some 3700 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2008 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Ten mobile phone types and five baby monitors were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. 25 sunbed facilities were inspected and nine laser display inspections were performed. There were 22 abnormal incidents involving the use of radiation in 2008. Seventeen of these incidents concerned the use of radiation in industry, research or transportation, four concerned the use of radiation in health care, and one concerned the use of non-ionizing radiation. None of these incidents had serious consequences. (orig.)

  10. Radiation practices. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. (ed.)

    2012-09-15

    1791 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2011. 1702 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 575 inspections of licensed practices in 2011. 633 repair orders and recommendations were issued in the course of inspections. A total of nearly 11 700 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2011 and about 143 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 166 workplaces including a total of 288 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2011. Just over 3600 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK was involved in four ionizing radiation research projects, and also took part in an international expert group evaluation of STUK research activities. New alpha and beta sources were procured for metrological activities and a Co-60 irradiation device procured in 2010 was installed and taken into use. Calibration and testing services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2011 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Orders were issued to 5 responsible parties to discontinue the use of tattoo removal lasers. 7 sunbed facilities were inspected and 10 on-site laser display inspections were performed. Five mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. Non-ionizing radiation research activities were also subjected to the evaluation of STUK research activities

  11. Radiation practices. Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2010-08-01

    1 742 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2009. 1 820 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 414 inspections of licensed practices in 2009. 392 repair orders and recommendations were issued. A total of nearly 11 600 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2009. Just under 160 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 108 workplaces including a total of 219 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2009. 3655 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK took part in three major ionizing radiation research projects. An IAEA research project tested IAEA/WHO diagnostic dosimetry guidelines. The accuracy and reliability of internal and external radiotherapy dosimetric methods in modern radiotherapy technology was studied as part of a European metrology research programme. In metrological activities the calibration procedure for radiotherapy accelerator electron beam dosemeters was modified by changing from meter calibration in hospitals to laboratory calibration. Some irradiation appliances were also replaced. Calibration services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2009 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. Fifteen mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of wireless communication devices. 19 sunbed facilities were inspected and ten laser display inspections were

  12. Radiation practices. Annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantanen, E. (ed.)

    2011-07-01

    1760 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2010. 1789 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray activities. Use of radiation was controlled through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) conducted 384 inspections of licensed practices in 2010. 447 repair orders and recommendations were issued in the course of inspections. A total of nearly 12 100 workers were subject to individual monitoring in 2010. Just under 160 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register maintained by STUK. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 140 workplaces including a total of 348 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2010. 3428 cockpit and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. STUK took part in three major ionizing radiation research projects. An IAEA research project tested diagnostic dosimetry guidelines. The accuracy and reliability of internal and external radiotherapy dosimetric methods in modern radiotherapy technology were studied as part of a European metrology research programme. In metrological activities the dosemeter calibration procedure for radiotherapy accelerator electron beams was modified by changing from meter calibrations in hospitals to laboratory calibrations. Some irradiation appliances were also replaced. Calibration services continued as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2010 focused particularly on mobile phones, sunbeds and lasers. 16 sunbed facilities were inspected and 8 on-site laser display inspections were performed. Ten mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of

  13. Outcomes after radical prostatectomy in men receiving previous pelvic radiation for non-prostate malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, Timothy A; Wedmid, Alexei; Sandhu, Jaspreet S; Eastham, James A

    2009-08-01

    To report the perioperative and functional outcomes of nine patients treated at our institution who had radical prostatectomy (RP) after previous pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for non-prostate malignancies. From 1993 to 2007, nine patients had RP after external beam RT for testicular seminoma (six), anorectal cancer (two) and colon cancer (one). Clinical information was obtained from a prospective prostate cancer database. RP was completed with no identifiable injury to adjacent structures in all nine patients. Four patients had significant pelvic fibrosis, and three required bilateral neurovascular bundle (NVB) resection. The NVB was preserved in the remaining six patients, four with good preoperative erectile function. However, no patient recovered erectile function after RP at a median (range) follow-up of 75 (12-172) months. Of seven men continent before RP, four required one or fewer pads daily and three were completely dry, achieving complete urinary control at a median (range) time of 7.5 (2-20) months. Two patients developed an anastomotic stricture, one being associated with concomitant ureteric stricture. RP after pelvic RT for non-prostate malignancies was not associated with increased intraoperative morbidity. However, rates of anastomotic stricture, erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence appeared to be higher than those reported after RP in men with no previous RT, and comparable with those seen in the salvage RP setting.

  14. Radiation Practices. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2006-06-01

    1764 safety licences for the use of radiation were current at the end of 2005. 1907 responsible parties were engaged in notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices. Regulatory control of the use of radiation was performed through regular inspections performed at places of use, test packages sent by post to dental X-ray facilities and maintenance of the Dose Register. Radiation safety guides were also published and research was conducted in support of regulatory control. STUK conducted 458 inspections of licensed practices and 62 inspections of notifiable licence-exempt dental X-ray practices in 2005. 273 remedial orders and recommendations were issued. Use of one appliance was prohibited. A total of 11 698 workers engaged in radiation work were subject to individual monitoring in 2005. 137 000 dose entries were made in the Dose Register. In no case did the individual dose of any worker exceed the dose limits stipulated in the Radiation Decree. Regulatory control of natural radiation focused on radon at workplaces and exposure of aircrews to cosmic radiation. 90 workplaces including a total of 233 work areas were subject to radon monitoring during 2005. 2600 pilots and cabin crew members were monitored for exposure to cosmic radiation. Metrological activities continued with calibration and development work as in previous years. Regulatory control of the use of non-ionizing radiation in 2005 continued to focus particularly on mobile phones and sunbeds. 15 mobile phone types were tested in market surveillance of mobile phones. A total of 44 sunbed appliances were inspected at 36 sunbed facilities. Most research and development work took place within jointly financed research projects. This work focused especially on developing testing and measuring methods for determining exposure to electromagnetic fields caused by mobile phones and their base stations. There were 13 abnormal incidents involving the use of radiation in 2005. Eight of these incidents concerned

  15. Radiation recall cutaneous induced by chlorambucil. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei-Cas, Ignacio; Wright, Dolores; Rigo, Bettina; Cohen Sabban, Emilia; Lacasagne, Jorgelina; Pietropaolo, Nelida; Cabo, Horacio; Molina, Malena

    2005-01-01

    Radiation recall refers to a tissue reaction produced by the use of certain drugs, usually chemotherapeutic agents, in a previously irradiated area. We report a patient with cutaneous radiation recall associated with chlorambucil, drug previously unreported as a causative agent in the literature. (author) [es

  16. Radiation practices. Annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2003-06-01

    A total of 1820 safety licences granted for the use of radiation in Finland were current at the end of 2002. There were also 2037 undertakings for dental X-ray diagnostics (licencefree). The Safety Licence Register of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) listed 14 120 radiation devices and 262 radionuclide laboratories. In 2002, STUK performed 401 inspections of licensed practices and 25 inspections of licence-free dental X-ray practices. Restrictions were ordered on the use of one device. Repairs were ordered in 116 cases and recommended in 55 cases. No remarks were given in 254 cases. Imports of radioactive substances amounted to 110 157 GBq and exports totalled 22 359 GBq. Short-lived radionuclides produced in Finland amounted to 42 487 GBq. The STUK interim storage for radioactive wastes received 65 batches of low-level wastes. A total of 11 190 workers were individually monitored for radiation exposure at 1176 workplaces. Of these workers, some 32% were category A workers and 67% category B workers. In no case were annual dose limits exceeded. The total dose in the use of radiation and nuclear energy recorded in the STUK Dose Register was 6.35 Sv. The mean doses in typical diagnostic X-ray procedures based on phantom measurements were below the reference levels issued by the European Community, the IAEA and STUK. Accuracy of the therapeutic doses underlying good therapeutic results in radiotherapy has remained within acceptable limits, and no excessive doses jeopardizing the safety of therapy have occurred. In the regulatory control of natural radiation, inspection reports requesting performance of radon repairs or measurements of radon concentrations were sent to 145 enterprises. Underground radon inspections were performed in 4 mines and 7 excavation sites. The mean effective dose to aircraft crew caused by cosmic radiation was 1.6 mSv. Ministry of Social Affairs and Health Decree on the Limitation of Public Exposure to Non-Ionizing Radiation

  17. Bilateral superomedial hilar displacement: a unique sign of previous mediastinal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harnsberger, H.R.; Armstrong, J.D. II

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-two per cent of a group of patients with Hodgkin disease who had been treated with mantle field radiation and had no radiographic evidence of parenchymal radiation fibrosis showed a statistically significant amount of superomedial bilateral hilar elevation. Hilar height and medial displacement ratios were used to quantitate hilar movement

  18. Current status of biological indicators to detect and quantify previous exposures to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.; Eisele, G.; Burr, W. Jr.; Hubner, K.; Wachholz, B.

    1991-01-01

    As noted in the text of this paper, immunological concepts are in a state of rapid development, and it is possible that improved methods for applying immunologic procedures as biological indicators of radiation may be developed in the future. However, at the present time, immunological indicators are not useful, even in an early time period, for quantitating radiation dose after total-body irradiation. A semiquantitative effect is observable in the early phase after total-body irradiation over a period of days to weeks, but there is little data available to indicate whether any of the immunological parameters can be indicative of a dose when the test is applied several years after radiation exposure. More detailed information regarding immunological indicators for estimating irradiation dose has been summarized elsewhere

  19. Lack of Cetuximab induced skin toxicity in a previously irradiated field: case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Mutation, amplification or dysregulation of the EGFR family leads to uncontrolled division and predisposes to cancer. Inhibiting the EGFR represents a form of targeted cancer therapy. Case report We report the case of 79 year old gentlemen with a history of skin cancer involving the left ear who had radiation and surgical excision. He had presented with recurrent lymph node in the left upper neck. We treated him with radiation therapy concurrently with Cetuximab. He developed a skin rash over the face and neck area two weeks after starting Cetuximab, which however spared the previously irradiated area. Conclusion The etiology underlying the sparing of the previously irradiated skin maybe due to either decrease in the population of EGFR expressing cells or decrease in the EGFR expression. We raised the question that "Is it justifiable to use EGFR inhibitors for patients having recurrence in the previously irradiated field?" We may need further research to answer this question which may guide the physicians in choosing appropriate drug in this scenario. PMID:20478052

  20. Logic of Accounting: The Case of Reporting Previous Options in Norwegian Activation Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Janne

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the enactment of client resistance in Norwegian vocational rehabilitation encounters. More specific, a practice here called "reporting previous options" is analyzed by using the resources of ethnomethodological conversation analysis (CA) in five instances as doing some sort of accounting. In response to the…

  1. Value and reliability of findings from previous epidemiologic studies in the assessment of radiation-related cancer risks. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Martignoni, K.

    1990-01-01

    The theories put forward here are predominantly based on pooled data from previous studies in a number of cohorts made up by mostly non-average individuals. These studies were carried out by various researchers and differed in procedures and aims. Factors of major importance to the validity and reliability of the conclusions drawn from this study are pointed out. In one chapter some light is thrown on factors known to bear a relation to the incidence of radiation-induced cancer of the breast, even though at present this can only very vaguely be described on a quantitative basis. These factors include fractionated dose regimens, pregnancies and parturitions, menarche, menopause, synergisms as well as secondary cancer of the breast. The available body of evidence suggests that exposure of each of 1 million women to a dose of 10 mGy (rad) can be linked with approx. 3 additional cases of mammary cancer reported on an average per year after the latency period. The fact that there is some statistical scatter around this value is chiefly attributable to age-related causes at the beginning of exposure. Differences in ethnic and cultural characteristics between the populations investigated appeared to be less important here. (orig./MG) [de

  2. Risk Communication Strategies: Lessons Learned from Previous Disasters with a Focus on the Fukushima Radiation Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Erik R; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Tsuda, Toshihide; Guimaraes, Jean Remy Davee; Tondel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    It has been difficult to both mitigate the health consequences and effectively provide health risk information to the public affected by the Fukushima radiological disaster. Often, there are contrasting public health ethics within these activities which complicate risk communication. Although no risk communication strategy is perfect in such disasters, the ethical principles of risk communication provide good practical guidance. These discussions will be made in the context of similar lessons learned after radiation exposures in Goiania, Brazil, in 1987; the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, Ukraine, in 1986; and the attack at the World Trade Center, New York, USA, in 2001. Neither of the two strategies is perfect nor fatally flawed. Yet, this discussion and lessons from prior events should assist decision makers with navigating difficult risk communication strategies in similar environmental health disasters.

  3. Investigating physiological methods to determine previous exposure of immature insects to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of gamma radiation on phenoloxidase activity in codling moth, Cydia pomonella L., larvae was investigated. Phenoloxidase activity was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring the increase in optical density at 490 nm, or by observing the degree of melanization in larvae killed by freezing. Results showed that, in unirradiated larvae, phenoloxidase activity could be detected in 7 day old larvae and activity continued to increase throughout the larval stage. This increase was not observed when larvae were irradiated with a minimum dose of 50 Gy during the 1st week of their development. However, irradiating larvae in which enzyme activity was already high (24 week old) did not eliminate the activity but reduced further increase. Larval melanization studies were in general agreement with the results of the phenoloxidase assay. (author)

  4. Erysipelothrix endocarditis with previous cutaneous lesion: report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion P. Rocha

    1989-08-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the first documented case of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae endocarditis in Latin America. The patient was a 51-years-old male, moderate alcoholic, with a previous history of aortic failure. He was used to fishing and cooking as a hobby and had his left hand wounded by a fish-bone. The disease began with erysipeloid form and developed to septicemia and endocarditis. He was treated with antibiotics and surgery for aortic valve replacement. There are only 46 cases of E. rhusiopathiae endocarditis reported to date. The authors wonder if several other cases might go unreported for lack of microbiological laboratorial diagnosis.

  5. Radiation protection programme progress report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The progress report of the radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out in 1988 under contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. Results of more than 350 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: Radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; Behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; Nonstochastic effects of ionizing radiation; Radiation carcinogenesis; Genetic effects of ionizing radiation; Evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure a safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  6. Current status of biological indicators to detect and quantify previous exposures to radiation. Biological Indicators Working Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lushbaugh, C.; Eisele, G.; Burr, W. Jr.; Hubner, K.; Wachholz, B.

    1991-01-01

    Hematologic changes following whole-body exposure to gamma or x-ray radiation have been used to estimate dose. The usefulness of this biological indicator is limited because of the recovery of these cells with time, thus making it unsuitable for estimation of dose years after exposure. The same is true for spermatogenic indicators; recovery and restoration of sperm numbers and fertility makes this biological indicator impractical for assessing radiation dose decades after radiation exposure. As noted in the text of the report, immunological concepts are in a state of rapid development, and it is possible that improved methods for applying immunologic procedures as biological indicators of radiation may be developed in the future. However, at the time, immunological indicators are not useful, even in an early time period, for quantitating radiation dose after total-body irradiation. A semiquantitative effect is observable in the early phase after total-body irradiation over a period of days to weeks, but there is little data available to indicate whether any of the immunological parameters can be indicative of a dose when the test is applied several years after radiation exposure. More detailed information regarding immunological indicators for estimating irradiation dose has been summarized elsewhere (Wasserman 1986). There is good agreement that ionizing radiation causes biochemical changes in the body; however, attempts to apply these changes to provide a reliable biological dosimetry system have not been particularly successful. The status of this research has been summarized by Gerber (1986). One of the difficulties has been the problem of establishing clear dose-effect relationships in humans. The lack of specificity in the response for radiation is another problem

  7. Granulomatous lobular mastitis: report of a case with previously undescribed histopathological abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, R A; Reasbeck, P

    1988-10-01

    A 41-yr-old multiparous woman presented with a discrete breast lump which proved histologically to be an example of granulomatous lobular mastitis. The clinical and histological features were similar to those noted in previous reports. Additional histological features in the present case were an intense mononuclear cell infiltration of lobular and ductal epithelium, associated with nuclear fragments morphologically suggestive of apoptosis. These appearances, which have not previously been described, are illustrated, together with the more classical features of the condition well demonstrated by the present case. The novel histological features noted here suggest that the development of granulomatous lobular mastitis may be at least in part immunologically mediated, and that the cellular infiltrates seen may be a manifestation of cell-mediated destruction of mammary epithelium.

  8. Philippine country report on radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalfin, E.G.

    1993-01-01

    This report was presented during the First National Coordinators Meeting for Radiation Technology, held in Takasaki, Japan, 6-9 September 1993. The report was about the active involvement of Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) in research and development on the application of radiation technology. Activities were on mutation breeding, food irradiation, radiation sterilization, wood-plastic combinations and radiation chemistry. The transfer of technology in the Philippines was supported and assisted by the UNDP/IAEA Industrial Project. With these technologies, many industries were interested in radiation processing

  9. Radiation chemistry of plastic crystals. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klingen, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the research done under this contract over the past twelve years. Since it is manifestly impossible to provide all the details involved in this work in this report only the primary results of these studies are discussed. The detailed radiolytic mechanisms and kinetics, as well as other detailed information on the systems studied have previously been reported in the annual reports, ORO-3781-1 through 14 and in the journal articles listed in the Contract Publications section of this report. The initial purpose of this work was to study the gamma-ray induced polymerization of organo-substituted carboranes in the solid state. With time this purpose changed to understanding in detail the effects plastic crystallinity had on the overall radiolysis of materials in this type of mesomorphic state. This work included the effects of phase, charge transfer, organic substituent and the ability of the carboranes to act as electron scavengers. For clarity of presentation, the work in the various areas which was performed under this contract is reported in four separate sections: plastic crystallinity, radiation chemistry, electrooptical properties, and thermal oligomerization

  10. Eikenella corrodens endocarditis and liver abscess in a previously healthy male, a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anne Christine; Vøgg, Ruth Ottilia Birgitta; Permin, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eikenella corrodens is one of the HACEK bacteria constituting part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, however, still an uncommon pathogen. We report a case of a large Eikenella corrodens liver abscess with simultaneously endocarditis in a previously healthy male. CASE PRESENTATION...... on pneumonia treatment, a PET-CT scan was performed, which showed a large multiloculated abscess in the liver. The abscess was drained using ultrasound guidance. Culture demonstrated Eikenella corrodens. Transesophageal echocardiography revealed aortic endocarditis. The patient was treated with antibiotics...... corrodens concurrent liver abscess and endocarditis. The case report highlights that Eikenella corrodens should be considered as a cause of liver abscess. Empirical treatment of pyogenic liver abscess will most often cover Eikenella corrodens, but the recommended treatment is a third generation...

  11. A previously unreported variant of the synostotic sagittal suture: Case report and review of salient literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Budinich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sagittal synostosis is a rare congenital disease caused by the premature fusion of the sagittal suture. Craniosynostosis occurs for a variety of reasons, different for every case, and often the etiology is unclear but the anomaly can frequently be seen as part of Crouzon's or Apert's syndromes. Herein, we discuss a rare case of craniosynostosis where the patient presented with a, to our knowledge, a previously undescribed variant of sagittal synostosis. Case report: A 3-month-old female infant presented to a craniofacial clinic for a consultation regarding an abnormal head shape. Images of the skull were performed, demonstrating that the patient had craniosynostosis. The patient displayed no other significant symptoms besides abnormalities in head shape. The sagittal suture was found to extend into the occipital bone where it was synostotic. Conclusion: To our knowledge, a synostotic sagittal suture has not been reported that extended posteriorly it involve the occipital bone. Those who interpret imaging or operate on this part of the skull should consider such a variation. Keywords: Anatomy, Craniosynostosis, Skull, Malformation, Pediatrics

  12. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  13. Evaluation of different doses of gamma radiation on conservation of the physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of previously fried potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, Frederico Scarin do; Sanches, Maria Angelica Santos Fernandes; Arthur, Valter

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work was to study the effect of different doses of gamma radiation on the physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of previously fried potatoes, conserved under temperature of refrigeration from 7 to 10 deg C. The irradiation process aims to discharge the refrigeration that increases the cost of the product and the useful life and decreases the microbial load. The previously fried potatoes were in the commerce of Piracicaba City and led to CENA - a laboratory of Food Irradiation. The potatoes were defrosted and stored in plastic packages and irradiated. They were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source type Gammacell-220 (dose rate of 698 Gy/hour), with doses of 2,0 kGy, 4,0 kGy and 6,0 kGy. The loss of fresh weight was analyzed as well as smell and color (factors L, a, b), after 1, 4 and 6 days of radiation. The experimental delineation used was entirely at random with six repetitions. The irradiated previously fried potatoes presented more significant variations in relation to those not irradiated in relation to their color and smell. The potatoes were darkened and there was alteration of smell (rancidity) more intense in the samples with doses of irradiation of 4,0 and 6,0 kGy. The smell alteration caused by the irradiation of 4,0 and 6,0 kGy. The smell alteration caused by the irradiation happens because of the state of rancidity of the oil used in the previous-fried process. In the sample of 2,0 kGy there was no alteration of color and smell. The colorimetric rates: L, a, b, did not present statistically - coherent results. However it was visually noted in the irradiated samples with doses of 4,0 and 6,0 kGy the loss of the characteristic coloration of the previously fried potato, predominating an opaque color (gray) because of the degradation of pigments (betacarotenoids, etc). It is also an consequence of the irradiation. By analyzing the results it was concluded that the irradiated sample with doses of 2,0 kGy was the sample that maintained

  14. Evaluation of different doses of gamma radiation on conservation of the physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of previously fried potatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, Frederico Scarin do; Sanches, Maria Angelica Santos Fernandes [Fundacao Educacional de Fernandopolis FEF-SP, Fernandopolis, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: maengal@yahoo.com.br; frescarin@yahoo.com.br; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura CENA, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia]. E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    The goal of this work was to study the effect of different doses of gamma radiation on the physicochemical and sensorial characteristics of previously fried potatoes, conserved under temperature of refrigeration from 7 to 10 deg C. The irradiation process aims to discharge the refrigeration that increases the cost of the product and the useful life and decreases the microbial load. The previously fried potatoes were in the commerce of Piracicaba City and led to CENA - a laboratory of Food Irradiation. The potatoes were defrosted and stored in plastic packages and irradiated. They were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source type Gammacell-220 (dose rate of 698 Gy/hour), with doses of 2,0 kGy, 4,0 kGy and 6,0 kGy. The loss of fresh weight was analyzed as well as smell and color (factors L, a, b), after 1, 4 and 6 days of radiation. The experimental delineation used was entirely at random with six repetitions. The irradiated previously fried potatoes presented more significant variations in relation to those not irradiated in relation to their color and smell. The potatoes were darkened and there was alteration of smell (rancidity) more intense in the samples with doses of irradiation of 4,0 and 6,0 kGy. The smell alteration caused by the irradiation of 4,0 and 6,0 kGy. The smell alteration caused by the irradiation happens because of the state of rancidity of the oil used in the previous-fried process. In the sample of 2,0 kGy there was no alteration of color and smell. The colorimetric rates: L, a, b, did not present statistically - coherent results. However it was visually noted in the irradiated samples with doses of 4,0 and 6,0 kGy the loss of the characteristic coloration of the previously fried potato, predominating an opaque color (gray) because of the degradation of pigments (betacarotenoids, etc). It is also an consequence of the irradiation. By analyzing the results it was concluded that the irradiated sample with doses of 2,0 kGy was the sample that maintained

  15. Radiation Protection Institute - Annual Report 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to provide the scientific and technical support for executing the operational functions of the Radiation Protection Board. The operational activities of the Institute are listed. Also included in the report are the various research projects, training programmes and publications for the year 2015.

  16. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer. A.; Nielsen, S.P.

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  17. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) and infantile autism: Absence of previously reported point mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fon, E.A.; Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Autism is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric syndrome of unknown etiology. There is evidence that a deficiency in the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), essential for de novo purine biosynthesis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of certain cases. A point mutation in the ADSL gene, resulting in a predicted serine-to-proline substitution and conferring structural instability to the mutant enzyme, has been reported previously in 3 affected siblings. In order to determine the prevalence of the mutation, we PCR-amplified the exon spanning the site of this mutation from the genomic DNA of patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for autistic disorder. None of the 119 patients tested were found to have this mutation. Furthermore, on preliminary screening using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), no novel mutations were detected in the coding sequence of four ADSL exons, spanning approximately 50% of the cDNA. In light of these findings, it appears that mutations in the ADSL gene represent a distinctly uncommon cause of autism. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, Benny; Damkjær, A.; Nielsen, Sven Poul

    2004-01-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. List of publications, committee memberships andstaff members are included....

  19. Radiation Research Department annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2004-06-01

    This report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2003. The main research areas were dosimetry, nuclear emergency preparedness, radioecology, and radioanalytical techniques. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  20. Homologous tracheal transplantation with grafts previously exposed to high doses of gamma radiation in dogs without immunosuppressive agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Inui, Kenji; Kure, Toshio; Wada, Hiromi; Itomi, Shigeki

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine whether previous high doses irradiation of gamma radiation would contribute to tracheal transplantation with no use of immunosuppressive agents. Twenty mongrel dogs were used as experimental animals. Five rings of thoracic tracheas, which were extracted from recipients, were exposed to 20000, 50000, or 100000 cGy in each 5 dogs. Five other non-irradiated dogs served as controls. Irradiated tracheal grafts were transplanted and covered with pedicled omentum. After transplantation, no immunosuppressive agents were given to dogs. All dogs in the control group died of tracheal stenosis due to graft-host rejection within one month. All but one long-term survivor died of tracheal stenosis, as well, in both the 20000 cGy and 50000 cGy groups. In the 100000 cGy group, grafts became viable in 4 dogs, and three of these survived one year or more. In conclusion, previous irradiation with high doses of 100000 cGy allowed homologous tracheal transplantation even when no immunosuppressive agents are given. (N.K.)

  1. 21 CFR 1002.20 - Reporting of accidental radiation occurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...: Accidental Radiation Occurrence Reports (HFZ-240), Office of Communication, Education, and Radiation Programs, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850, and the reports and their envelopes shall be distinctly...

  2. Rulison: radiation contamination clearance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-06-01

    Under contract with Austral Oil Company, Eberline Instrument Corporation provided supervision and technicians to radiologically support the well plugging and site abandonment activities at the Project Rulison site during the period September 1, 1976 through October 12, 1976. The purpose of the support was to identify and prepare for removal of all radioactively contaminated materials remaining on site. The emplacement and reentry wells were successfully plugged without a serious radiological incident. There was no measurable radiation exposure above natural background to participating personnel. Decontamination and monitoring procedures assured that no equipment or material was improperly released to unrestricted use. A review of the history of project operations, the conduct of comprehensive sampling programs, and an extensive final survey, ensures that the extent of radioactivity on the site is identified and that such activity is well below established guide lines. Except for appropriate restrictions regarding deep drilling, the radiological condition of the Project Rulison site permits its return to unrestricted use

  3. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    possible using third generation light sources and will promise us a considerable progress in the studies of nano-structure materials and real time observation of phase transitions and of chemical reactions at catalytic surfaces, etc. The accelerator group of SRL has started to collaborate with Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) to develop a new accelerator system, an energy recovering linac (ERL). The ERL prototype are considered to be constructed in KEK near future, and will be used as a light source in VSX region. The 2.5 GeV storage ring of the Photon Factory (PF) has stopped its operation from June 2004 to September, 2005. The long period of shut down was used to improve the light source by installing new magnet system and elongating straight sections for future installation of undulators. As a result, the beamtime for the users was reduced less than 50% comparing with previous years. The renovation of the accelerator was successfully done and user beamtime became available from October, 2006. Along with the renovation, the spectroscopy group of SRL reformed some parts of the beamlines and experimental apparatuses to keep their productivities. This report contains the latest results of scientific activities achieved by SRL. The activities of the accelerator group are described in Chap. 2, following to the present status of the three beamlines in PF. Chapter 3 includes scientific activities achieved by users as well as by in-house staffs of SRL. The 5 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Report on radiation protection in Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragan, K.; Svilicic, N.; Novakovic, M.; Franic, Z.

    2001-01-01

    The Ministry of Health in the Republic of Croatia is in charge of radiation protection, and the new Ionizing Radiation Protection Act defines the responsibilities of the different organizations and institutions. The report explains the existing national system of notification and registration in Croatia and some of the main provisions of the above referred Act. Reference is made to the national provisions for the management of disused sources, recovery or control of orphan sources, and to the national inventory of radiation sources in the country with the data collected during 1998 and 1999. (author)

  5. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  6. Report upon inquiry into radiation apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In this report the committee has provided its assessment of the need and justification for the law to provide for the control of the provision of radiation apparatus, the planning needs for the provision of diagnostic and therapeutic facilities, the location of such facilities, the appropriateness or otherwise of existing legislation, the necessity for any further legislative needs and the criteria governing the provision of such radiation apparatus

  7. Radiation Research Department annual report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majborn, B.; Damkjaer, A.; Nielsen, S.P. (eds.)

    2003-06-01

    The report presents a summary of the work of the Radiation Research Department in 2002. The departments research and development activities are organized in two research programmes: 'Radiation Physics' and 'Radioecology and Tracer Studies'. In addition the department is responsible for the task 'Dosimetry'. Lists of publications, committee memberships and staff members are included. (au)

  8. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K; Krustrup, P; Hölmich, P; Wedderkopp, N; Andersen, L L; Christensen, K B; Møller, M; Thorborg, K

    2016-08-01

    Knee injuries are common in adolescent female football. Self-reported previous knee injury and low Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) are proposed to predict future knee injuries, but evidence regarding this in adolescent female football is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale score as risk factors for future knee injuries in adolescent female football. A sample of 326 adolescent female football players, aged 15-18, without knee injury at baseline, were included. Data on self-reported previous knee injury and KOOS questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (female football. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Radiation Retinopathy: Case report and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Lorna

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular damage from radiation treatment is a well established phenomenon. Many factors are now known to influence the incidence of radiation retinopathy, including total dosage and daily fraction size. Patients who are diabetic, hypertensive or received previous chemotherapy are more susceptible to radiation retinopathy. Case Presentation A 55 year old male was referred from the oncology department with epiphora. His medical history included Type 2 Insulin treated Diabetes Mellitus and hypertension. One year prior to presentation he had undergone a total rhinectomy with a 4 week course of post-operative radiotherapy for an aggressive sqaumous cell carcinoma of the nose. On examination the visual acuity was noted to be 6/36 left eye and 6/9 right eye. Posterior segment examination revealed marked retinal ischaemia present in the posterior pole and macular region of both eyes. The appearance was not thought to be typical of diabetic changes, radiation retinopathy being the more likely diagnosis especially in view of his history. Over the next four months the vision in both eyes rapidly deteriorated to 3/60 left eye and 1/60 right eye. Bilateral pan retinal photocoagulation was thought to be appropriate treatment at this point. Conclusion This case highlights the importance for ophthalmologists and oncologists to be aware of the close relationship between diabetes and radiation treatment and the profound rapid impact this combination of factors may have on visual function. Radiation is being used with increasing frequency for ocular and orbital disease, because of this more cases of radiation retinopathy may become prevalent. Factors which may potentiate radiation retinopathy should be well known including, increased radiation dosage, increased fraction size, concomitant systemic vascular disease and use of chemotherapy. Counselling should be offered in all cases at risk of visual loss. As no effective treatment currently exists

  10. A case report: mixed thrombus formation in a previously sutured right atrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunfei, Ling; Dongxu, Li; Shuhua, Luo; Yabo, Wang; San, Deep; Changping, Gan; Ke, Lin; Qi, An

    2014-08-01

    We describe the case of a 19-year-old Chinese woman who nine months prior underwent repair of an atrial septal defect and came to our hospital with a right atrial mass attached to the anterior wall of the right atrium on transthoracic echocardiography. Pathologic examination revealed the mass was a mixed-type thrombosis with some unusual organization, which previously was not described in literature.

  11. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L.; Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R.

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs

  12. Safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancers previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy regimens: a preliminary report; Tolerance et effet radiosensibilisateur du sodium glycididazole chez des patients atteints de cancer du larynx localement evolue ayant prealablement recu une chimiotherapie a base de cisplatine: rapport preliminaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Y.C.; Wu, R.; Xu, Z.G.; Zhang, X.Y.; Wu, L.N.; Wang, Y.M.; Zheng, W.; Chen, X.D.; Chi, F.; Zhang, Z.Y.; Li, X.; Jin, X.Y.; Chen, W.; Wang, S.L.; Xiao, F.D.; Wang, E.Y.; Dong, X.Q.; Jia, M.X.; Li, Y. [China Medical Univ., Dept. of Medical Oncology, Shengjing Hospital, Shenyang, PR (China); Fan, G.L. [Harbin First Hospital, Dept. of Otorhinolaryngology, PR (China); Hao, S.H.; Zhang, L.B.; Zhang, H.B. [General Hospital of Shenyang Military Region, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Shenyang, PR (China); Xia, H.H.X. [Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine the safety and radiation-enhancing effect of sodium glycididazole in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) with conventional radiotherapy. Patients and methods: Patients with locoregional advanced laryngeal cancer (stage T3-4,N0-3,M0) were included: group 1(control, n = 30)were not administered of sodium glycididazole; group 2 (test, n = 30) received sodium glycididazole at a dose of 700 mg/m2 intravenous infusion 30 minutes before radiotherapy three times a week. Surrogate end-points of efficacy were tumor and nodal size. Safety parameters were vomiting, nausea, mucositis, laryngeal edema, esophagus and skin reaction, dysphagia, dyspnea, neurological deficit. Patients were evaluated weekly during treatment for 7 weeks and thereafter monthly for 3 months. Results: In the test, the overall response rate was 88.89% (95% CI, 71.00-97.00%) at 7 weeks and 92.59% (95% CI, 76.00 to 99.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. In the control, the overall response rate was 62.5% (95% CI, 41.00 to 81.00%) at 7 weeks and 58.33% (95% CI, 37.00 to 78.00%) at 1 month of follow-up. The short-term locoregional response rate was better in the test group at 7 weeks (p = 0.027) and at 1 month (p = 0.005) of follow-up. The test group had significantly more nausea and vomiting in weeks 1 (p = 0.047), 2 (p = 0.007), and 3 (p = 0.01) of treatment. Conclusions: The study indicates sodium glycididazole is an effective radiation-enhancing agent that improves short-term locoregional control and is well tolerated in patients with loco regionally advanced laryngeal cancer. (authors)

  13. Absence of psilocybin in species of fungi previously reported to contain psilocybin and related tryptamine derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Stijve, T.; Kuyper, Th.W.

    1988-01-01

    Seven taxa of agarics reported in literature to contain psilocybin (viz. Psathyrella candolleana, Gymnopilus spectabilis, G. fulgens, Hygrocybe psittacina var. psittacina and var. californica, Rickenella fibula, R. swartzii) have been analysed for psilocybin and related tryptamines with negative results.

  14. Absence of psilocybin in species of fungi previously reported to contain psilocybin and related tryptamine derivatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijve, T.; Kuyper, Th.W.

    1988-01-01

    Seven taxa of agarics reported in literature to contain psilocybin (viz. Psathyrella candolleana, Gymnopilus spectabilis, G. fulgens, Hygrocybe psittacina var. psittacina and var. californica, Rickenella fibula, R. swartzii) have been analysed for psilocybin and related tryptamines with negative

  15. Groin Problems in Male Soccer Players Are More Common Than Previously Reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harøy, Joar; Clarsen, Ben; Thorborg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    surveillance method developed to capture acute and overuse problems. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: We registered groin problems during a 6-week period of match congestion using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Overuse Injury Questionnaire. A total of 240 players from 15 teams......BACKGROUND: The majority of surveillance studies in soccer have used a time-loss injury definition, and many groin problems result from overuse, leading to gradually increasing pain and/or reduced performance without necessarily causing an absence from soccer training or match play. Thus......, the magnitude of groin problems in soccer has probably been underestimated in previous studies based on traditional injury surveillance methods. PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence of groin problems among soccer players of both sexes and among male soccer players at different levels of play through a new...

  16. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  17. Research report on radiation protection 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    In this research report on radiation protection the results achieved in 1981 of the research and development projects assisted by the Federal Minister of the Interior are made accessible above all to the scientists and engineers participating in this research program as well as to the research institutions on the field of radiation protection, to the members of the commission on radiological protection and of the commission for reactor safety and to the supervising and licensing authorities. The report is a compilation of individual reports, which are composed by the consignees respectively the recipients of the allowances themselves as a documentation of the progress of their works. Each individual report contains informations concerning the objectives of the project, works carried out, results achieved and further work planned. (orig.) [de

  18. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  19. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2003 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2003-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  20. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  1. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  2. Occupational radiation exposure. Annual report No. 11 for 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.; McDonald, S.; Richardson, E.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes the information reported for calendar year 1978 by all NRC licensees to the Commission's centralized repository of personnel occupational radiation exposure information. The bulk of the information in the report is derived from annual reports that were required to be submitted by all NRC licensees pursuant to 10CFR 20.407. Previously only certain categories - commercial nuclear power reactors, industrial radiographers, fuel fabricators and processors and commercial distributors of byproduct materials - of NRC licensees had submitted such reports. The requirement of 10CFR 20.408 for the submission of termination reports continued to apply to only these four categories, and some analysis of the data contained in these reports is also presented. A brief description of personnel overexposures reported by NRC licensees is included as well

  3. ADVANCED RADIATION THEORY SUPPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2002, FINAL REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIS, J.; APRUZESE, J.; CHONG, Y.; CLARK, R.; DASGUPTA, A.; GIULIANI, J.; KEPPLE, P.; TERRY, R.; THORNHILL, J.; VELIKOVICH, A.

    2003-01-01

    Z-PINCH PHYSICS RADIATION FROM WIRE ARRAYS. This report describes the theory support of DTRA's Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) program carried out by NRL's Radiation Hydrodynamics Branch (Code 6720) in FY 2002. Included is work called for in DTRA MIPR 02-2045M - ''Plasma Radiation Theory Support'' and in DOE's Interagency Agreement DE-AI03-02SF22562 - ''Spectroscopic and Plasma Theory Support for Sandia National Laboratories High Energy Density Physics Campaign''. Some of this year's work was presented at the Dense Z-Pinches 5th International Conference held June 23-28 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A common theme of many of these presentations was a demonstration of the importance of correctly treating the radiation physics for simulating Plasma Radiation Source (PRS) load behavior and diagnosing load properties, e.g, stagnation temperatures and densities. These presentations are published in the AIP Conference Proceedings and, for reference, they are included in Section 1 of this report. Rather than describe each of these papers in the Executive Summary, they refer to the abstracts that accompany each paper. As a testament to the level of involvement and expertise that the Branch brings to DTRA as well as the general Z-Pinch community, eight first-authored presentations were contributed at this conference as well as a Plenary and an Invited Talk. The remaining four sections of this report discuss subjects either not presented at the conference or requiring more space than allotted in the Proceedings

  4. Alveolar nerve repositioning with rescue implants for management of previous treatment. A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amet, Edward M; Uehlein, Chris

    2013-12-01

    The goal of modern implant dentistry is to return patients to oral health in a rapid and predictable fashion, following a diagnostically driven treatment plan. If only a limited number of implants can be placed, or some fail and the prosthetic phase of implant dentistry is chosen to complete the patient's treatment, the final outcome may result in partial patient satisfaction and is commonly referred to as a "compromise." Previous All-on-4 implant treatment for the patient presented here resulted in a compromise, with an inadequate support system for the mandibular prosthesis and a maxillary complete denture with poor esthetics. The patient was unable to function adequately and also was disappointed with the resulting appearance. Correction of the compromised treatment consisted of bilateral inferior alveolar nerve elevation and repositioning without bone removal for lateral transposition, to gain room for rescue implants for a totally implant-supported and stabilized prosthesis. Treatment time to return the patient to satisfactory comfort, function, facial esthetics, and speech was approximately 2 weeks. The definitive mandibular prosthesis was designed for total implant support and stability with patient retrievability. Adequate space between the mandibular bar system and the soft tissue created a high water bridge effect for self-cleansing. Following a short interim mandibular healing period, the maxillary sinuses were bilaterally grafted to compensate for bone inadequacies and deficiencies for future maxillary implant reconstruction. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. [Lessons from abroad. Current and previous crisis in other countries. SESPAS report 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadeneyra-Sicilia, Ana; Minué Lorenzo, Sergio; Artundo Purroy, Carlos; Márquez Calderón, Soledad

    2014-06-01

    The evidence available on the impact of previous crises on health reveals different patterns attributable to study designs, the characteristics of each crisis, and other factors related to the socioeconomic and political context. There is greater consensus on the mediating role of government policy responses to financial crises. These responses may magnify or mitigate the adverse effects of crises on population health. Some studies have shown a significant deterioration in some health indicators in the context of the current crisis, mainly in relation to mental health and communicable diseases. Alcohol and tobacco use have also declined in some European countries. In addition, this crisis is being used by some governments to push reforms aimed at privatizing health services, thereby restricting the right to health and healthcare. Specifically, action is being taken on the three axes that determine health system financing: the population covered, the scope of services, and the share of the costs covered. These measures are often arbitrarily implemented based on ideological decisions rather than on the available evidence and therefore adverse consequences are to be expected in terms of financial protection, efficiency, and equity. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased Symptom Reporting in Young Athletes Based on History of Previous Concussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rosemarie Scolaro; Schatz, Philip

    2017-01-01

    Research documents increased symptoms in adolescents with a history of two or more concussions. This study examined baseline evaluations of 2,526 younger athletes, ages 10 to 14. Between-groups analyses examined Post Concussion Symptom Scale symptoms by concussion history group (None, One, Two+) and clusters of Physical, Cognitive, Emotional, and Sleep symptoms. Healthy younger athletes with a concussion history reported greater physical, emotional, and sleep-related symptoms than those with no history of concussion, with a greater endorsement in physical/sleep symptom clusters. Findings suggest younger athletes with a history of multiple concussions may experience residual symptoms.

  7. Radiation Protection Institute Annual Report for 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The report covers the activities of the Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2013. The report is grouped under the following headings: establishment, vision and mission; personnel and organization; major activities and research projects; IAEA, Technical Cooperation and AFRA projects; ongoing research projects and programs; income and expenditure statements, physical development and human resource development, training courses, meetings and conferences. (A. B.)

  8. Final Report for Radiation Resistant Magnets II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. F. Zeller

    2005-01-01

    Report on techniques for the fabrication of radiation resistant magnets for the RIA Fragment Separator. The development of magnet designs capable of reasonable life times in high-radiation environments and having reasonable performance is of paramount importance for RIA as well as other high-intensity projects under consideration, such as the Neutrino Factory and FAIR project at GSI. Several approaches were evaluated for radiation resistant superconducting magnets. One approach was to simply use a more radiation resistant epoxy for the coil fabrication. Another approach for cryostable magnets, like the S800 Spectrograph dipole, is the use of all-inorganic materials. The final approach was the development of radiation resistant Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC) like that used in fusion magnets; though these are not radiation resistant because an organic insulator is used. Simulations have shown that the nuclear radiation heating of the first quadrupoles in the RIA Fragment Separator will be so large that cold mass minimization will be necessary with the magnet iron being at room temperature. Three different types of conductor for radiation resistant superconducting magnets have been built and successfully tested. The cyanate ester potted coils will work nicely for magnets where the lifetime dose is a factor of 20 less than the end of life of the superconductor and the rate of energy deposition is below the heat-removal limit of the coil. The all-inorganic cryostable coil and the metal oxide insulated CICC will provide conductor that will work up to the life of the superconductor and have the ability to remove large quantities of nuclear heating. Obviously, more work needs to be done on the CICC to increase the current density and to develop different insulations; and on the cyanate esters to increase the heat transfer

  9. Leiomyosarcoma of the Prostate: Case Report and Review of 54 Previously Published Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimos P. Vandoros

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate leiomyosarcoma is an extremely rare and highly aggressive neoplasm that accounts for less than 0.1% of primary prostate malignancies. We present a patient with primary leiomyosarcoma of the prostate and review 54 cases reported in the literature to discuss the clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of this uncommon tumor. Median survival was estimated at 17 months (95% C.I. 20.7–43.7 months and the 1-, 3-, and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 68%, 34%, and 26%, respectively. The only factors predictive of long-term survival were negative surgical margins and absence of metastatic disease at presentation. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary for appropriate management of this dire entity.

  10. Occupational radiation exposure. Twelfth annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.; McDonald, S.; Richardson, E.

    1982-08-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that is maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Radiation Exposure Information and Reports System (REIRS). This report is usually published on an annual basis and is available at all NRC public document rooms. The bulk of the information contained in the report was extracted from annual statistical reports submitted by all NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.407. Four categories of licensees - operating nuclear power reactors, fuel fabricators and reprocessors, industrial radiographers, and manufacturers and distributors of specified quantities of byproduct materials - also submit personal identification and exposure information for terminating employees pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408, and some analysis of this data is also presented in this report

  11. Ruptured Rudimentary Horn Pregnancy at 25 Weeks with Previous Vaginal Delivery: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa V. Kanagal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unicornuate uterus with rudimentary horn occurs due to failure of complete development of one of the Mullerian ducts and incomplete fusion with the contralateral side. Pregnancy in a noncommunicating rudimentary horn is extremely rare and usually terminates in rupture during first or second trimester of pregnancy. Diagnosis of rudimentary horn pregnancy and its rupture in a woman with prior vaginal delivery is difficult. It can be missed in routine ultrasound scan and in majority of cases it is detected after rupture. It requires a high index of suspicion. We report a case of G2PlL1 with rupture rudimentary horn pregnancy at 25 weeks of gestation which was misdiagnosed as intrauterine pregnancy with fetal demise by ultrasound, and termination was attempted and the case was later referred to our hospital after the patient developed hemoperitoneum and shock with a diagnosis of rupture uterus. Laparotomy revealed rupture of right rudimentary horn pregnancy with massive hemoperitoneum. Timely laparotomy, excision of the horn, and blood transfusion saved the patient.

  12. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation was established in April, 1975, as a private nonprofit Japanese Foundation supported equally by the Government of Japan through the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and the Government of the United States through the National Academy of Sciences under contract with the Energy Research and Development Administration. First, the messages from the chairman and the vice-chairman are described. In the annual report, the review of ABCC-RERF studies of atomic bomb survivors, the summary of research activities, the research projects, the technical report abstracts, the research papers published in Japanese and foreign journals, and the oral presentation and lectures, all from April 1, 1978, to March 31, 1979, are reported. Also the report from the Secretariat and the appendixes are given. The surveys and researches carried out in Hiroshima and Nagasaki have offered very valuable informations to the atomic bomb survivors. Many fears were eliminated, medical interests were given to the serious effects of the exposure to atomic bombs, and many things concerning the cancer induced by radiation were elucidated. The knowledges obtained will save many human lives in future by utilizing them for setting up the health and safety standard in the case of handling ionizing radiation. The progress in researches such as life span study, adult health study, pathology study, genetics program, special cancer program and so on is reported. (Kako, I.)

  13. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Induced by Carbamazepine Treatment in a Patient Who Previously Had Carbamazepine Induced Pruritus - A Case Report -

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Hyun Min; Park, Yoo Jung; Kim, Young Hoon; Moon, Dong Eon

    2013-01-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) is a rare but life-threatening skin reaction disease and carbamazepine is one of its most common causes. We report a case of SJS secondary to carbamazepine in a patient with previous pruritus due to carbamazepine which was given for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. We would like to caution all providers that carbamazepine readministration should be avoided in the patient with a previous history of SJS or adverse skin reaction. In addition, we strongly recommen...

  14. Reported Radiation Overexposure Accidents Worldwide, 1980-2013: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeytaux, Karen; Bey, Eric; Christensen, Doran; Glassman, Erik S.; Murdock, Becky; Doucet, Christelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Radiation overexposure accidents are rare but can have severe long-term health consequences. Although underreporting can be an issue, some extensive literature reviews of reported radiation overexposures have been performed and constitute a sound basis for conclusions on general trends. Building further on this work, we performed a systematic review that completes previous reviews and provides new information on characteristics and trends of reported radiation accidents. Methods We searched publications and reports from MEDLINE, EMBASE, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the International Radiation Protection Association, the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site radiation accident registry over 1980-2013. We retrieved the reported overexposure cases, systematically extracted selected information, and performed a descriptive analysis. Results 297 out of 5189 publications and reports and 194 records from the REAC/TS registry met our eligibility criteria. From these, 634 reported radiation accidents were retrieved, involving 2390 overexposed people, of whom 190 died from their overexposure. The number of reported cases has decreased for all types of radiation use, but the medical one. 64% of retrieved overexposure cases occurred with the use of radiation therapy and fluoroscopy. Additionally, the types of reported accidents differed significantly across regions. Conclusions This review provides an updated and broader view of reported radiation overexposures. It suggests an overall decline in reported radiation overexposures over 1980-2013. The greatest share of reported overexposures occurred in the medical fields using radiation therapy and fluoroscopy; this larger number of reported overexposures accidents indicates the potential need for enhanced quality assurance programs. Our data also highlights

  15. Synchrotron radiation research facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A report is presented to define, in general outline, the extent and proportions, the type of construction, the schedule for accomplishment, and the estimated cost for a new Synchrotron Radiation Facility, as proposed to the Energy Research and Development Administration by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The report is concerned only indirectly with the scientific and technological justification for undertaking this project; the latter is addressed explicitly in separate documents. The report does consider user requirements, however, in order to establish a basis for design development. Preliminary drawings, outline specifications, estimated cost data, and other descriptive material are included as supporting documentation on the current status of the project in this preconstruction phase

  16. Radiation risk assessment: the 1982 UNSCEAR report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1955 the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has reported yearly to the General Assembly and at irregular intervals has submitted more comprehensive reports with detailed scientific annexes. In 1982, the eighth in the series of such substantive reports was published. It consists of a summary and a main text outlining the conclusions reached in the Committee's discussions and 12 scientific annexes reviewing in considerable detail the procedures and the scientific information on which such conclusions rest. The Summary of the main conclusions of the Committee is reprinted in this paper

  17. Report on promotion of utilization of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report presents results of studies made by the Atomic Energy Commission concerning research and development activities to be carried out in future to promote the utilization of radiation. First, the current state of radiation utilization is described, centering on practical applications, research and development activities (for practical and advanced applications), and international cooperation (with developing and advanced nations). The second part deals with activities required in future to promote practical utilization of radiation, research and development of advanced techniques, and cooperation to be offered to developing countries. Third, specific measures to be carried out for effective radiation utilization are described. For γ-rays and electron beams, which are widely in use at present, there are some economic and social problems remaining to be solved. For advanced utilization of radiation beams, further efforts should be focused on basic research on π-meson and μ-particle beams and their application to canser treatment and nuclear fusion; research on monochromatic neutron beams; application of RI beams to the development of new materials and new analysis techniques, application of epithermal neutron beams to elementary radiography and CT; etc. The utilization, application and development of tracers are also described. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Radiation Protection Institute Annual Report for 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The report covers the activities of the Radiation Protection Institute (RPI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2012. It is grouped under the following topics: vision and mission; personnel, major activities, research projects, IAEA Technical Cooperation and AFRA projects; ongoing research projects and programs. Also included are income and expenditure statements, physical and human resource development; IAEA training courses, national and IAEA training courses and meetings hosted; and publications. (A. B.)

  19. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  20. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ''As Low As Reasonably Achievable'' (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources

  1. Surveillance of environmental radiation in Finland. Annual Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of the surveillance of environmental radioactivity is to be always aware of the levels of radiation to which the public is exposed. Another goal is to detect all remarkable changes in the levels of environmental radiation and radioactivity. Compliance with the basic safety standards laid down for protection of the general public against dangers arising from ionising radiation can be ensured with environmental radiation surveillance. Running of surveillance programmes on a continuous basis also maintains and develops competence and readiness to respond to radiological emergencies. Surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Finland is one of the official obligations of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). This obligation is based on both national and EU legislation. The Finnish radiation protection legislation appoints STUK as the national authority responsible for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity, and the Euratom Treaty assumes continuous monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the air, water and soil in the Member States. In Finland, the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and the Defence Forces also monitor environmental radiation at their own stations. This report summarises the results of environmental radiation surveillance in 2002. The report also contains some comparisons with results from the previous years. The results are obtained from the monitoring programmes of STUK, FMI and the Defence Forces Research Institute of Technology. Nuclear power plant licensees are responsible for environmental surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Finland. These results are reported elsewhere. STUK's partners in the surveillance of environmental radioactivity collect and deliver environmental samples for laboratory analyses, or participate in whole-body counting. STUK would like to express its gratitude to the following institutions for successful co-operation: The Finnish Defence Forces, the Finnish

  2. Surveillance of environmental radiation in Finland. Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.

    2002-01-01

    The main goal of the surveillance of environmental radioactivity is to be always aware of levels of radiation to which the public is exposed. Another goal is to detect all remarkable changes in levels of environmental radiation and radioactivity. Compliance with the basic safety standards laid down for protection of health of the general public against dangers arising from ionising radiation can be ensured with environmental radiation surveillance. Running of surveillance programmes on continuous basis also maintains and develops competence and readiness to respond to radiological emergencies. Surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Finland is one of the official obligations of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). This obligation is based on the national and the European Communities' legislation. The Finnish radiation protection legislation appoints STUK as the national authority responsible for surveillance of environmental radioactivity, and the Euratom Treaty assumes continuous monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the air, water and soil in the Member States. In Finland, also the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and the Defence Forces are monitoring environmental radiation at their own stations. This report summarises the results of environmental radiation surveillance in 2001. The report also contains some comparisons with results from the previous years. The results are collected from monitoring programmes of STUK, FMI and the Defence Forces Research Institute of Technology. Nuclear power plant licensees are responsible for environmental surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Finland. Those results are reported elsewhere. STUK's partners in surveillance of environmental radioactivity are collecting and delivering environmental samples for laboratory analyses, or are participating in whole-body counting. STUK would like to express its gratitude to the following institutions for the successful co-operation: Defence

  3. Surveillance of environmental radiation in Finland. Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of the surveillance of environmental radioactivity is to be always aware of the levels of radiation to which the public is exposed. Another goal is to detect all remarkable changes in the levels of environmental radiation and radioactivity. Compliance with the basic safety standards laid down for protection of the general public against dangers arising from ionising radiation can be ensured with environmental radiation surveillance. Running of surveillance programmes on a continuous basis also maintains and develops competence and readiness to respond to radiological emergencies. Surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Finland is one of the official obligations of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). This obligation is based on both national and EU legislation. The Finnish radiation protection legislation appoints STUK as the national authority responsible for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity, and the Euratom Treaty assumes continuous monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the air, water and soil in the Member States. In Finland, the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and the Defence Forces also monitor environmental radiation at their own stations. This report summarises the results of environmental radiation surveillance in 2003. The report also contains some comparisons with results from the previous years. The results are obtained from the monitoring programmes of STUK, FMI and the Defence Forces Research Institute of Technology. Nuclear power plant licensees are responsible for environmental surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Finland. These results are reported elsewhere. STUK's partners in the surveillance of environmental radioactivity collect and deliver environmental samples for laboratory analyses, or participate in whole-body counting. STUK would like to express its gratitude to the following institutions for successful co- operation: The Finnish Defence Forces, the Finnish

  4. Incidence of thyroid cancer in women in relation to previous exposure to radiation therapy and history of thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McTiernan, A.M.; Weiss, N.S.; Daling, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Female residents of 13 counties of Western Washington, in whom papillary, follicular, or mixed papillary-follicular thyroid carcinomas had been diagnosed between 1974 and 1979 were interviewed regarding their medical and reproductive histories and past exposure to radiation treatments. For comparison, a random sample of women from the same population was interviewed. Women who had received radiation treatments to the head or neck prior to 5 years before interview were 16.5 times (95% confidence interval . 8.1-33.5) more likely than unexposed women to develop cancer. The relative risk (RR) was highest for papillary cancer (19.4) but also was elevated substantially for follicular and mixed papillary-follicular tumors. Women first irradiated at age 19 years or younger had a much higher RR than did women irradiated at age 20 or older. Regardless of prior radiation exposure, women who ever had had a goiter were at increased risk of developing thyroid cancer. Women who had ever developed a goiter had 17 times the risk of developing follicular cancer and almost 7 times the risk of developing papillary cancer as compared with women who never had had a goiter. Risk of thyroid cancer was elevated even among women who had had a history of goiter many years prior to diagnosis. A history of thyroid nodules was also a risk factor for papillary and mixed thyroid cancer. Neither a history of hypothyroidism nor hyperthyroidism was found to increase the risk of thyroid cancer

  5. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  6. Surveillance of environmental radiation in Finland. Annual Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.

    2005-07-01

    The main goal of the surveillance of environmental radioactivity is to be always aware of levels of artificial radiation in the environment to which the public is exposed. Another goal is to detect all remarkable changes in levels of environmental radiation and radioactivity. Compliance with the basic safety standards laid down for protection of health of the general public against dangers arising from ionising radiation can be ensured with environmental radiation surveillance. Running of surveillance programmes on continuous basis also maintains and develops competence and readiness to respond to radiological emergencies. Surveillance of environmental radiation contains surveillance of artificial radiation and artificial radioactive elements in the environment. Natural radiation and natural radioactive elements are not associated with the surveillance programme, although the greater part of the public exposure to radiation is caused by natural radiation. Exposure to natural radiation is controlled separately if there is reason to suspect that natural radioactive elements cause unusual high exposure to the public (e.g. indoor radon and natural radionuclides in drinking water). Surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Finland is one of the official obligations of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). This obligation is based on the national and the European Communities' legislation. The Finnish radiation protection legislation appoints STUK as the national authority responsible for surveillance of environmental radioactivity, and the Euratom Treaty assumes continuous monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the air, water and soil in the Member States. In Finland, also the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and the Defence Forces are monitoring environmental radiation at their own stations. This report summarises the results of environmental radiation surveillance in 2004. The report also contains some comparisons with results from the

  7. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard-Stroel, Claudia; Hachenburger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Peter, Josef

    2013-07-01

    The annual report 2011 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following issues: Part A: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. Part B; Current data and their evaluation: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. The Appendix includes Explanations of terms, radiation doses and related units, external and internal radiation exposure, stochastic and deterministic radiation effects, genetic radiation effects, induction of malignant neoplasm, risk assessment, physical units and glossary, laws, ordinances, guidelines, recommendations and other regulations concerning radiation protection, list of selected radionuclides.

  8. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mikkel Bek; Tang, L; Zebis, M K

    2016-01-01

    with low KOOS subscale scores (Sport/Recreational (RR: 2.2) and Quality of Life (RR: 3.0) (P time-loss knee...... questionnaires were collected at baseline. Time-loss knee injuries and football exposures were reported weekly by answers to standardized text-message questions, followed by injury telephone interviews. A priori, self-reported previous knee injury and low KOOS subscale scores (... as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P time-loss knee injury was also significantly increased in players...

  9. Biophysical Aspects of Radiation Quality. Second Panel Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    If a living system is exposed to ionizing radiation a sequence of events follows. It starts with the absorption and dissipation of radiation energy, and continues through various physico-chemical and biochemical reactions up to the final biological end point observed. One of the aims of research in quantitative radiation biology is to understand the mechanism of this sequence of actions and to explore the differences in quality of different kinds of radiations. Because of its complexity, progress in this work requires the combined efforts of physicists, biochemists, biologists and physicians. It should, however, be done in very close collaboration rather than in following isolated lines in any one direction. For this reason, and because of the growing importance of the field for almost all applications of ionizing radiations, it was felt desirable to bring together a group of scientists engaged in research on radiation quality who represented a wide range of interests. The first panel on Biophysical Aspects of Radiation Quality, convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna and held from 29 March to 2 April 1965, proved to be a successful beginning, stimulating a useful exchange of ideas and information. By this meeting, and the resulting collection of papers, published in 1966 as No. 58 of the Agency's Technical Reports Series, the importance of research on radiation quality was highlighted and the field itself became more clearly defined. The Agency held a second Panel on the same subject in Vienna from 14 to 18 April 1967. This meeting was attended by 18 experts from 10 countries, and representatives from Euratom and WHO. The Czechoslovak Socialist Republic, France, India and Poland were represented for the first time. Fourteen papers were presented and discussed in some detail. It became evident that much progress had been made since the previous meeting in certain areas such as microdosimetry, the dependence of the oxygen effect on radiation

  10. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard-Stroel, Claudia; Hachenburger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Peter, Josef

    2010-12-01

    The annual report on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure 2009 consists of two parts. Part A: General information: natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. Part B includes current data and their evaluation for natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation.

  11. Report on emergency exposure to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W.M.

    1960-01-01

    The Medical Research Council has continued a study of the effects on the health of persons in the neighbourhood of atomic energy installations should there be a release of radioactive material as a result of fires or other incidents. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations has already reported (Medical Research Council, 1959) on the maximum permissible dietary contamination for iodine 131, strontium 89, strontium 90 and caesium. 137, since it was considered that for the members of the public normally resident in the area affected ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident and that intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances The present report deals with the problem of exposure from the exterior, namely, from external sources of beta and gamma radiation. This exposure might be derived from two sources, one of relatively short duration from the passage of a cloud of radioactive material, the other of longer duration from deposited material

  12. HMI Radiation Chemistry Department. Scientific report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Results of the R and D activities of the Radiation Chemistry Department, Hahn-Meitner-Institut, are reported, primarily dealing with the following subjects: a) Interface processes and energy conversion; b) Pulsed radiolysis and kinematics; c) Insulating materials and polymers. Activities belonging to group (a) above include the development of photosensitive materials for energy conversion, photovoltaic solar cells, light-induced hydrogen liberation, and inclusion reactions, model experiments studying photoactive interfaces, rapid kinematic measurements at interfaces after laser-induced excitation, surface preparation of amorphous silicon and its effects on electronic properties, photochemical reactions and catalysts. Work performed in group (b) above included studies into various chemical reactions involving radicals, and on interactions between atoms, ions, molecules and molecular clusters induced by low-energy collisions. Group (c) above all performed studies into the physical and chemical elementary processes induced by high-energy radiation, light and UV light, especially in electronegative gases. Further activities in this group included photochemical and radiation chemical investigations on polymers. The report lists publications and lectures prepared by H.M.I. members and guest scientists in the year 1985. (RB) [de

  13. Report on emergency exposure to external radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pochin, E E; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W M [Medical Research Council, Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations, London (United Kingdom); and others

    1960-12-01

    The Medical Research Council has continued a study of the effects on the health of persons in the neighbourhood of atomic energy installations should there be a release of radioactive material as a result of fires or other incidents. The Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations has already reported (Medical Research Council, 1959) on the maximum permissible dietary contamination for iodine 131, strontium 89, strontium 90 and caesium. 137, since it was considered that for the members of the public normally resident in the area affected ingestion of contaminated food would generally be the limiting source of hazard after any such accident and that intake by inhalation, or radiation from the exterior, would become of importance only in rather special circumstances The present report deals with the problem of exposure from the exterior, namely, from external sources of beta and gamma radiation. This exposure might be derived from two sources, one of relatively short duration from the passage of a cloud of radioactive material, the other of longer duration from deposited material.

  14. Surveillance of environmental radiation in Finland. Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, R.

    2001-01-01

    The main goal of the surveillance of environmental radioactivity is to be always aware of levels of radiation to which the public is exposed. Another goal is to detect all remarkable changes in levels of environmental radiation and radioactivity. Compliance with the basic safety standards laid down for protection of the health of the general public against dangers arising from ionising radiation can be ensured with environmental radiation surveillance. Running of surveillance programmes on continuous basis also maintains and develops competence and readiness to respond to radiological emergencies. Surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Finland is one of the official obligations of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). This obligation is based on the national and the European Communities' legislation. The Finnish radiation protection legislation appoints STUK as the national authority responsible for surveillance of environmental radioactivity, and the Euratom Treaty assumes continuous monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the air, water and soil in the Member States. In Finland, also the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) and the Defence Forces are monitoring environmental radiation at their own stations. This report summarises the results of environmental radiation surveillance in 2000. The report also contains some comparisons with results from the previous years. The results are collected from monitoring programmes of STUK, FMI and the Defence Forces Research Institute of Technology. Nuclear power plant licensees are responsible for environmental surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Finland. Those results are reported elsewhere. STUK's partners in surveillance of environmental radioactivity are collecting and delivering samples for laboratory analyses, or are participating in whole-body counting. STUK would like to express its gratitude to the following institutions for the successful co-operation: Defence Forces

  15. State of the art on dose prescription, reporting and recording in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (ICRU report No. 83)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, V.; Mackie, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report No. 83 provides the information necessary to standardize techniques and procedures and to harmonize the prescribing, recording, and reporting of intensity modulated radiation therapy. Applicable concepts and recommendations in previous ICRU reports concerning radiation therapy were adopted, and new concepts were elaborated. In particular, additional recommendations were given on the selection and delineation of the targets volumes and the organs at risk; concepts of dose prescription and dose-volume reporting have also been refined. (authors)

  16. Radiation quantities and units. ICRU report 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    This report supersedes ICRU Report 19. Since ICRU Report 19 was published, a number of discussions have taken place between members of the Report Committee on Fundamental Quantities and Units and other workers in the field. Some of these discussions have resulted in the acceptance of certain modifications in the material set out in Report 19 and these modifications are incorporated in the current report. In addition, there has been some expansion and rearrangement of the material in the earlier report. It is recommended that energy state be inserted into the definition of activity and that the word transformation be replaced by transition. These modifications have now been incorporated into the current definition. Helpful comments on the previous quantities and units report have resulted in clarification of several points in the present Report. In line with providing more didactic material and useful source material for other ICRU reports, the general considerations in subsection I.A of Report 19 have been expanded and placed in a separate subsection. The additional material includes discussions of four terms that are used in this document - quantity, unit, stochastic, and non-stochastic - along with a brief discussion of the mathematical formalism used in ICRU reports. 11 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Radiation Protection Group Annual Report 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Silari, M

    2004-01-01

    The RP Annual Report summarises the activities carried out by CERN’s Radiation Protection Group in the year 2003. It includes contribution from the EN section of the TIS/IE Group on environmental monitoring. Chapter 1 reports on the measurements and estimations of the impact on the environment and public exposure due to the Organisation’s activities. Chapter 2 provides the results of the monitoring of CERN’s staff, users and contractors to occupational exposure. Chapter 3 deals with operational radiation protection around the accelerators and in the experimental areas. Chapter 4 reports on RP design studies for the LHC and CNGS projects. Chapter 5 addresses the various services provided by the RP Group to other Groups and Divisions at CERN, which include managing radioactive waste, high-level dosimetry, lending radioactive test sources and shipping radioactive materials. Chapter 6 describes activities other than the routine and service tasks, i.e. development work in the field of instrumentation and res...

  18. Reirradiation of Prostate Cancer Local Failures After Previous Curative Radiation Therapy: Long-Term Outcome and Tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilli, Thomas; Benz, Eileen; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Rouzaud, Michel; Miralbell, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety, feasibility, side-effect profile, and proof of concept of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without a brachytherapy (BT) boost for salvage of exclusive local failure after primary EBRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients with presumed exclusive local recurrence after primary EBRT with or without BT were considered eligible for reirradiation. The median normalized total dose in 2-Gy fractions (NTD_2_G_y, α/β ratio = 1.5 Gy) was 74 Gy (range, 66-98.4 Gy) at first irradiation. Median time between the first irradiation and the reirradiation was 6.1 years (range, 4.7-10.2 years). Results: Between 2003 and 2008 salvage treatment was delivered with a median NTD_2_G_y of 85.1 Gy (range, 70-93.4) to the prostate with EBRT with (n=10) or without (n=4) BT. Androgen deprivation was given to 12 patients (median time of 12 months). No grade ≥3 toxicity was observed during and within 6 weeks after RT. After a median follow-up of 94 months (range, 48-172 months) after salvage RT, 5-year grade ≥3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity-free survival figures were 77.9% ± 11.3% and 57.1% ± 13.2%, respectively. Four patients presented with combined grade 4 genitourinary/gastrointestinal toxicity. The 5-year biochemical relapse-free, local relapse-free, distant metastasis-free, and cancer-specific survival rates were 35.7% ± 12.8%, 50.0% ± 13.4%, 85.7% ± 9.4%, and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Salvage whole-gland reirradiation for patients with a suspicion of exclusive local recurrence after initial RT may be associated with a high rate of severe radiation-induced side effects and poor long-term biochemical and local control.

  19. Investigating physiological methods to determine previous exposure of immature insects to ionizing radiation and estimating the exposure dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.

    1998-10-01

    Effects of gamma radiation on pupation and adult emergence in mature (diapausing and non-diapausing) codling moth, Cydia pomonella L., larvae and on phenoloxidase activity in larvae killed by freezing were investigated. Results showed that, a dose of 50 Gy reduced adult emergence (and pupation) significantly and 200 Gy completely prevented it. Diapausing larvae were more susceptible to irradiation that non-diapausing larvae and female moths were more susceptible to irradiation injury than males. Phenoloxidase activity in codling moth larvae was determined spectrophotometrically by measuring the increase in optical density at 490 nm, or by observing the degree of melanization in larvae killed by freezing. Results showed that, in un-irradiated larvae, phenoloxidase activity can be detected in 7 day old larvae and activity continued to accumulate throughout the larval stage. This accumulation was not observed when larvae were irradiated with a minimum dose of 50 Gy during the 1st week of their development. However, irradiating larvae in which enzyme activity was already high (2-3 week old) did not remove activity but only reduced further accumulation. Larval melanization studies were in agreement with results of the phenoloxidase assay. (author)

  20. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuthrick, Evan J.; Curran, Walter J.; Camphausen, Kevin; Lin, Alexander; Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W.; Axelrod, Rita; Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Haacke, E. Mark; Hillman, Gilda G.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival

  1. A Pilot Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy and Sunitinib in Previously Irradiated Patients With Recurrent High-Grade Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuthrick, Evan J., E-mail: evan.wuthrick@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Camphausen, Kevin [Department of Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Lin, Alexander [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Glass, Jon; Evans, James; Andrews, David W. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Axelrod, Rita [Department of Medical Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Shi, Wenyin; Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haacke, E. Mark [Department of Radiology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Hillman, Gilda G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): Angiogenic blockade with irradiation may enhance the therapeutic ratio of radiation therapy (RT) through vascular normalization. We sought to determine the safety and toxicity profile of continuous daily-dosed sunitinib when combined with hypofractionated stereotactic RT (fSRT) for recurrent high-grade gliomas (rHGG). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had malignant high-grade glioma that recurred or progressed after primary surgery and RT. All patients received a minimum of a 10-day course of fSRT, had World Health Organization performance status of 0 to 1, and a life expectancy of >3 months. During fSRT, sunitinib was administered at 37.5 mg daily. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity, and response was assessed via serial magnetic resonance imaging. Results: Eleven patients with rHGG were enrolled. The fSRT doses delivered ranged from 30 to 42 Gy in 2.5- to 3.75-Gy fractions. The median follow-up time was 40 months. Common acute toxicities included hematologic disorders, fatigue, hypertension, and elevated liver transaminases. Sunitinib and fSRT were well tolerated. One grade 4 mucositis toxicity occurred, and no grade 4 or 5 hypertensive events or intracerebral hemorrhages occurred. One patient had a nearly complete response, and 4 patients had stable disease for >9 months. Two patients (18%) remain alive and progression-free >3 years from enrollment. The 6-month progression-free survival was 45%. Conclusions: Sunitinib at a daily dose of 37.5 mg given concurrently with hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation for rHGG yields acceptable toxicities and an encouraging 6-month progression-free survival.

  2. Studies of radiation and chemical toxicity. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Annual report for the Studies of Radiation and Chemical Toxicity Program at the University of Rochester is presented. Progress is reported on four projects: Neurobehavorial Toxicity of Organometallic Fuel Additives, Mechanisms of Permanent and Delayed Pathologic Effects of Ionizing Radiation, Solid State Radiation Chemistry of the DNA Backbone, and Pulmonary Biochemistry

  3. Shielding of Medical Radiation Facilities - National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Reports No. 147 and No. 151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KASE, K.R.

    2008-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements of the United States (NCRP) has issued two reports in the past 18 months that provide methods and data for designing shielding for diagnostic radiological imaging and radiation therapy facilities. These reports update previous publications on this subject with revised methods that take into account new technologies, results from measurements and new data that have been published in the last 30 years. This paper gives a brief summary of the contents of these reports, the methods recommended for determining the shielding required and the data provided to aid in the calculations

  4. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials

  5. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  6. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1984-November 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, H.H.

    1985-07-01

    This is the annual progress report for the Radiological Research Laboratory, Department of Radiology, Columbia University. The report consists of 17 individual reports plus an overall summary. Reports survey research results in neutron dosimetry, microdosimetry of electron beams and x-radiation, development of theoretical models for biological radiation effects and induction of oncogenic transformations. Individual abstracts were also prepared for each paper

  7. Late toxicity after conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Impact of previous surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odrazka, K.; Dolezel, M.; Vanasek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively compare late toxicity of conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 340 patients with T1-3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (n=228) and IMRT (n=112). The median follow-up time was 5.9 years and 3.0 years, respectively. The prescription dose was 70 Gy for 3D-CRT and 78 Gy for IMRT. Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were graded according to the Fox Chase modification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT in the incidence of GI and GU toxicity at 3 years. On multivariate analysis, transurethral resection of prostate/open transvesical prostatectomy (TURP/TVPE) for benign prostatic hyperplasia, carried out before radiotherapy, significantly increased the risk of Grade ≥2 GU toxicity (risk ratio 1.88). Among patients who experienced TURP/TVPE, the 5-year actuarial likelihood of Grade 2-3 urinary incontinence was 23%, compared with 9% for those without prostate surgery (P=0.01). Tolerance of 3D-CRT and IMRT was similar, despite the use of high radiation dose with IMRT. Previous TURP/TVPE increased the risk of GU toxicity. (author)

  8. Radiation damage in natural and synthetic halite. Progress report January 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Celma, A.

    1993-12-01

    This report complements the information presented in the report of December 1992 regarding the research performed at the ECN on radiation damage in salt. It consists of two parts. The first part regards the amount of stored energy which can be developed by gamma-irradiation on different types of halite and considers both the effect of low dose rates in developing radiation damage, and the possible saturation level of radiation damage in natural halite. The second part presents a model to simulate radiation damage development which incorporates some extensions in the Jain-Lidiard model. Due to malfunction of the Small Angle Neutron Scattering installation, neither the previously reported results nor the newly obtained can be trusted and therefore are not reported here. These results regard the shape, size and size distribution of radiation damage defects. (orig.)

  9. Shunt malfunction causing acute neurological deterioration in 2 patients with previously asymptomatic Chiari malformation Type I. Report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Robert; Kalhorn, Stephen; Pacione, Donato; Weiner, Howard; Wisoff, Jeffrey; Harter, David

    2009-08-01

    Patients with symptomatic Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) typically exhibit a chronic, slowly progressive disease course with evolution of symptoms. However, some authors have reported acute neurological deterioration in the setting of CM-I and acquired Chiari malformations. Although brainstem dysfunction has been documented in patients with CM-II and hydrocephalus or shunt malfunction, to the authors' knowledge only 1 report describing ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt malfunction causing neurological deterioration in a patient with CM-I exists. The authors report on their experience with the treatment of previously asymptomatic CM-I in 2 children who experienced quite different manifestations of acute neurological deterioration secondary to VP shunt malfunction. Presumably, VP shunt malfunction created a positive rostral pressure gradient across a stenotic foramen magnum, resulting in tetraparesis from foramen magnum syndrome in 1 patient and acute ataxia and cranial nerve deficits from syringobulbia in the other. Although urgent shunt revisions yielded partial recovery of neurological function in both patients, marked improvement occurred only after posterior fossa decompression.

  10. Project Radiation protection, Annual report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.M.

    1994-12-01

    According to the action plan for the period 1991-1995, the main objective of this project during 1994 was to provide operational basis, methods and procedures for solving the radiation protection problems that might appear under routine working conditions and handling of radiation sources. The aim was also to provide special methods for action in case of accidents that could affect the employed staff and the population. Overall activity was directed to maintaining and providing personnel, instrumentation, and methods for the following special radiation protection measures: operational control of the radiation field and contamination; calibration of the radiation and dosimetry instruments-secondary dosimetry metrology laboratory; instrumentation and measuring systems for radiation protection; control of environmental transfer of radioactive material; medical radiation protection [sr

  11. Placenta Percreta Invading Broad Ligament and Parametrium in a Woman with Two Previous Cesarean Sections: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Vahdat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of placenta accreta has dramatically increased due to increasing caesarean section rate all over the world. Placenta percreta is the most severe form of placenta accretes. It frequently results in maternal morbidity and mortality mainly caused by massive obstetric hemorrhage or emergency hysterectomy. Percreta invading into the broad ligament has rarely been previously reported. Case presenting. We presented a case of placenta percreta invading left broad ligament and parametrium in a woman with two previous cesarean sections, which led to massive intraoperative hemorrhage during hysterectomy and transient ischemic encephalopathy. Conclusion. In cases of parametrial involvement, it would be more difficult to decide whether to remove placenta or leave it in site. In surgical removal neither local excision of placental bed and uterine repair nor traditional hysterectomy is adequate if parametrium invaded by placenta. We suggest delayed elective hysterectomy in such cases. So, pregnancy-induced pelvic congestion would be decreased, we can gather an expert team of gynecologists, urologists, and vascular surgeons, we could get plenty of blood products, and we may have the chance to administer methotrexate.

  12. [Double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager with hereditary multiple exostoses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Cozar, Mónica; Grinberg, Daniel; Balcells, Susana; Asteggiano, Carla G; Martínez-Domenech, Gustavo; Bracho, Ana; Sánchez, Yanira; Stock, Frances; Delgado-Luengo, Wilmer; Zara-Chirinos, Carmen; Chacín, José Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Hereditary forms of multiple exostoses, now called EXT1/EXT2-CDG within Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation, are the most common benign bone tumors in humans and clinical description consists of the formation of several cartilage-capped bone tumors, usually benign and localized in the juxta-epiphyseal region of long bones, although wide body dissemination in severe cases is not uncommon. Onset of the disease is variable ranging from 2-3 years up to 13-15 years with an estimated incidence ranging from 1/18,000 to 1/50,000 cases in European countries. We present a double mutant alleles in the EXT1 gene not previously reported in a teenager and her family with hereditary multiple exostoses.

  13. Radiation transport: Progress report, July 1, 1987-September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.; Nagy, A.

    1988-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group S-6 for the fourth quarter of FY 87 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Deterministic Radiation Transport, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics. 23 refs., 9 figs

  14. Synergism between diabetic and radiation retinotherapy: case report and review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viebahn, M.; Barricks, M.E.; Osterloh, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    It is suspected that radiation retinopathy is more likely to develop in an eye with preexisting diabetic retinopathy than in a normal eye. However, there is only one report of this occurring, at a radiation dose of 4500 rads. We present a woman with minimal diabetic retinopathy who had breast carcinoma which was treated with chemotherapy but metastasised to the choroid. Within nine months of external beam radiation (3000 rads in fractions of 200 rads) a fulminant retinopathy evolved in that eye, while the non-radiated eye showed no change. The histopathology of radiation and diabetic retinopathy and causes for possible synergism are discussed. As this case report shows, radiation oncologists and ophthalmologists need to be aware of the risk that patients with minimal diabetic retinopathy who have undergone chemotherapy may suffer a dramatic visual loss from radiation therapy despite a radiation dose which is considered adequate, safe, and properly fractionated. (author)

  15. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    After moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus in the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the High-brilliance Light Source project, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. In May of 2001, the project has met with a dramatic progress. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture organized the Advisory Board and started to discuss the future synchrotron radiation facilities in EUV and SX regime in Japan. Based on extensive discussion, they proposed the new facility consisting of a 1.8 GeV storage ring of 3rd generation type. The University of Tokyo approved to construct the proposed facility in the Kashiwa campus. The plan is supported not only by researchers in academic institutions but also bio- and chemical-industries. We strongly hope the plan will be realized in near future. On the other hand, SRL maintains a branch laboratory in the Photon Factory (PF) High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba with a Revolver undulator, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B), which are and fully opened to the outside users. In the fiscal year of 2001, the operation time of the beamlines was more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was about 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport, magnetic and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron microscopy. The accelerator group of SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the new light source project. This report contains the activities of the staff members of SRL and users of the three beamlines in FY2001. The status of

  16. An initial report of polaprezinc suppositories to radiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Hiroshi; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Although radiation proctitis is one of popular adverse effects, standard treatments are not established. We reported 5 cases with the administration of polaprezinc suppositories to radiation proctitis. We made polaprezinc suppositories and administered to 5 patients with radiation proctitis. It was possible to administer it safely. 3 cases have the improvement of the symptoms. And one case had endoscopic findings improved significantly. Polaprezinc may be one of the treatments to radiation proctitis. (author)

  17. Workshop Report on Managing Solar Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Lee (Compiler); Caldeira, Ken (Compiler); Chatfield, Robert (Compiler); Langhoff, Stephanie (Compiler)

    2007-01-01

    The basic concept of managing Earth's radiation budget is to reduce the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by the Earth so as to counterbalance the heating of the Earth that would otherwise result from the accumulation of greenhouse gases. The workshop did not seek to decide whether or under what circumstances solar radiation management should be deployed or which strategies or technologies might be best, if it were deployed. Rather, the workshop focused on defining what kinds of information might be most valuable in allowing policy makers more knowledgeably to address the various options for solar radiation management.

  18. Radiation Protection Research Needs Workshop: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, Shaheen A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Davis, Jason [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hertel, Nolan E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abelquist, Eric [Oak Ridge Associated Univ., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-09-01

    In order to protect humans and the environment when using ionizing radiation for the advancement and benefit of society, accurately quantifying radiation and its potential effects remains the driver for ensuring the safety and secure use of nuclear and radiological applications of technology. In the realm of radiation protection and its various applications with the nuclear fuel cycle, (nuclear) medicine, emergency response, national defense, and space exploration, the scientific and research needs to support state and federal radiation protection needs in the United States in each of these areas are still deficient.

  19. Radiation dermatitis after spinal arteriovenous malformation embolization: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carstens, G.J.; Horowitz, M.B.; Purdy, P.D.; Pandya, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    Few cases of radiation injury related to lengthy interventional neuroradiologic procedures have been reported, although concern has been heightened, as evidenced by a 1994 FDA Public Health Advisory. We report a case of radiation-induced dermatitis in a patient undergoing multiple diagnostic and embolization procedures for treatment of a spinal arteriovenous malformation. (orig.). With 2 figs

  20. Pushing the boundaries in liver graft utilisation in transplantation: Case report of a donor with previous bile duct injury repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Asma; Powell, James J; Oniscu, Gabriel C

    2017-01-01

    Liver transplantation is a recognised treatment for extensive bile duct injuries with secondary biliary cirrhosis or recurring sepsis. However, there have been no reports of successful liver transplantation from a donor who sustained a previous bile duct injury. Here we discuss the case of a liver transplant from a 51-year-old brain dead donor who had suffered a Strasberg E1 bile duct injury and had undergone a Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy 24 years prior to donation. The liver was successfully recovered and transplanted into a 56-year-old male recipient with end stage liver disease consequent to alpha 1 antitrypsin deficiency. The graft continues to function well 36 months post-transplant, with normal liver function tests and imaging revealing a patent hepaticojejunostomy. The potential associated vascular injuries should be identified during bench preparation whilst the management of biliary reconstruction at the time of transplant should follow the principles of biliary reconstruction in cases with biliary injuries, extending the hilar opening into the left duct. This case highlights the successful utilisation of a post bile duct injury repair liver, employing an experienced procurement team and careful bench assessment and reconstruction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references

  2. Chemical protection against ionizing radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey, J.C.; Reed, D.J.; Adamson, L.F.

    1984-08-01

    The scientific literature on radiation-protective drugs is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms involved in determining the sensitivity of biological material to ionizing radiation and mechanisms of chemical radioprotection. In Section I, the types of radiation are described and the effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems are reviewed. The effects of ionizing radiation are briefly contrasted with the effects of non-ionizing radiation. Section II reviews the contributions of various natural factors which influence the inherent radiosensitivity of biological systems. Inlcuded in the list of these factors are water, oxygen, thiols, vitamins and antioxidants. Brief attention is given to the model describing competition between oxygen and natural radioprotective substances (principally, thiols) in determining the net cellular radiosensitivity. Several theories of the mechanism(s) of action of radioprotective drugs are described in Section III. These mechanisms include the production of hypoxia, detoxication of radiochemical reactive species, stabilization of the radiobiological target and the enhancement of damage repair processes. Section IV describes the current strategies for the treatment of radiation injury. Likely areas in which fruitful research might be performed are described in Section V. 495 references.

  3. [Reports from Scientific Review Committees on Recommendations for Radiation Protection]. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A brief annual report is presented for work on recommendations dealing with management of radionuclides produced in nuclear power generation, radiation associated with medical examinations, radiation received by radiation employees, experimental verification of internal dosimetry calculations, internal emitter standards, radionuclides in the environment, biological effects of magnetic fields, and radiation exposure and potentially related injury

  4. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well

  5. A report on radiation-induced gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.; Artico, M.; Caruso, R.; Rocchi, G.; Orlando, E.R.; Nucci, F.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation-induced gliomas are uncommon, with only 73 cases on record to date. The disease that most frequently occasioned radiation therapy has been acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Three more cases are added here, two after irradiation for ALL and one after irradiation for tinea capitis. In a review of the relevant literature, the authors stress the possibility that the ALL-glioma and the retinoblastoma-glioma links point to syndromes in their own right that may occur without radiation therapy.56 references

  6. Radiation dermatitis : report of 3 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sei Chul; Bahk, Yong Whee; Shinn, Kyung Sub; Kim, Choon Yul; Cho, Baek Kee; Wee, Sung Shin

    1986-01-01

    It has just passed 90 years since the discovery of X-ray by W.C. Roentgen in 1895. Not only in the medicine but also in the industry, have great utilization of ionizing radiation increased since the beginning of this century. There were also many known its hazards in spite of astonishable profits and contributions for mankind's welfare. Authors experienced 3 cases of radiation dermatitis which developed during gamma radiograms for nondestructive testing of pipelines with Ir-192. We tried to calculate the supposed exposure doses in each case, discuss the working situation and review of literatures to see the systemic and local effects of radiation.

  7. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

  8. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE's performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace

  9. Solar radiation alert system : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    The Solar Radiation Alert (SRA) system continuously evaluates measurements of high-energy protons made by instruments on GOES satellites. If the measurements indicate a substantial elevation of effective dose rates at aircraft flight altitudes, the C...

  10. Environmental Radiation Data: Report 47, July-September 1986. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report is compiled and distributed quarterly by the Office of Radiation Programs' Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility (EERF), Montgomery, Alabama, and contains data from the Enviromental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS). Data from similar networks operated by contributing States, Canada, Mexico, and the Pan American Health Organization are reported in the ERD when available

  11. A diagnostic dilemma: Left-sided appendicitis in a 10 year old boy with previously undiagnosed intestinal malrotation. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvini Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Left sided acute appendicitis is a diagnostic dilemma, thus often leading to management delays. It is pertinent to remember that malrotation of the gut is more common than previously thought, and not just a disease of infancy. It is advisable to consider imaging studies while balancing the risk-benefit-ratio of radiation exposure, especially in paediatric cases to cinch the diagnosis.

  12. Radiation Protection Services Division: progress report for 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massand, O.P.; Murthy, B.K.S.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Radiation Protection Services Division during 1993, for implementation of radiation safety in all institutions in India using radiation sources in medical, industrial and research applications. It gives information about personnel monitoring using photographic film and TLD badges, neutron monitoring badges, advisory and licensing services, regulation, transport of radioactive materials and periodic protection survey. About 33 publications by the staff of the Division are also listed. (author). 4 tabs

  13. Project Radiation protection East. Status Report, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snihs, J.O.; Sundewall, H.; Grapengiesser, S. [STEGRA Consultants (Sweden); Bennerstedt, T. [TeknoTelje (Sweden)

    1997-12-01

    Project Radiation Protection East is a Swedish program for radiation protection work in Central and Eastern Europe. The projects are assessed, planned and performed in close cooperation with partner organizations in the East. Since 1994 radiation protection cooperation concerning the former Soviet Navy training reactors in Paldiski, Estonia, is included in the project. This report presents a summary over some 140 projects, their status, allocated funds and their distribution over countries and project areas. 12 tabs.

  14. External cephalic version among women with a previous cesarean delivery: report on 36 cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abenhaim, Haim A; Varin, Jocelyne; Boucher, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Whether or not women with a previous cesarean section should be considered for an external cephalic version remains unclear. In our study, we sought to examine the relationship between a history of previous cesarean section and outcomes of external cephalic version for pregnancies at 36 completed weeks of gestation or more. Data on obstetrical history and on external cephalic version outcomes was obtained from the C.H.U. Sainte-Justine External Cephalic Version Database. Baseline clinical characteristics were compared among women with and without a history of previous cesarean section. We used logistic regression analysis to evaluate the effect of previous cesarean section on success of external cephalic version while adjusting for parity, maternal body mass index, gestational age, estimated fetal weight, and amniotic fluid index. Over a 15-year period, 1425 external cephalic versions were attempted of which 36 (2.5%) were performed on women with a previous cesarean section. Although women with a history of previous cesarean section were more likely to be older and para >2 (38.93% vs. 15.0%), there were no difference in gestational age, estimated fetal weight, and amniotic fluid index. Women with a prior cesarean section had a success rate similar to women without [50.0% vs. 51.6%, adjusted OR: 1.31 (0.48-3.59)]. Women with a previous cesarean section who undergo an external cephalic version have similar success rates than do women without. Concern about procedural success in women with a previous cesarean section is unwarranted and should not deter attempting an external cephalic version.

  15. Monitoring of radiation exposure. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rantanen, E.

    2001-03-01

    At the end of 2000, there were 1,779 valid safety licenses in Finland for the use of radiation. In addition, there were 2,038 responsible parties for dental x-ray diagnostics. The registry Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) listed 13,754 radiation sources and 270 radionuclide laboratories. In the year 2000 360 inspections were made concerning the safety licences and 53 concerning dental x-ray diagnostics. The import of radioactive substances amounted to 175,836 GBq and export to 74,420 GBq. Short-lived radionuclides produced in Finland amounted to 55,527 GBq. In the year 2000 there were 10,846 workers monitored for radiation exposure at 1,171 work sites. Of these employees, 27% received an annual dose exceeding the recording level. The annual effective dose limit was not exceeded. The total dose recorded in the dose registry(sum of the individual dosemeter readings) was 6.5 Sv in 2000

  16. Progress report: 1996 Radiation Safety Systems Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, A.M.; Sharma, D.N.; Abani, M.C.; Mehta, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The activities of Radiation Safety Systems Division include (i) development of specialised monitoring systems and radiation safety information network, (ii) radiation hazards control at the nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the radioisotope programmes at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) and for the accelerators programme at BARC and Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. The systems on which development and upgradation work was carried out during the year included aerial gamma spectrometer, automated environment monitor using railway network, radioisotope package monitor and air monitors for tritium and alpha active aerosols. Other R and D efforts at the division included assessment of risk for radiation exposures and evaluation of ICRP 60 recommendations in the Indian context, shielding evaluation and dosimetry for the new upcoming accelerator facilities and solid state nuclear track detector techniques for neutron measurements. The expertise of the divisional members was provided for 36 safety committees of BARC and Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB). Twenty three publications were brought out during the year 1996. (author)

  17. Development of delayed radiation necrosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohara, ShigFeki; Takagi, Terumasa [Meitetsu Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Shibata, Taichiro; Nagai, Hajime

    1983-04-01

    The authors discussed the developing process of delayed radiation necrosis of the brain from the case of a 42-year-old female who developed intracranial hypertension and left hemiparesis 5 and a half years after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The initial sign of radiation necrosis was from a CT scan taken 3 and a half years after radiotherapy showing an irregular low density lesion in the right temporal lobe. CT scan 2 years later demonstrated displacement of the midline structures to the left and a larger low density lesion with partially high density in the right MCA territory that was enhanced with intravenous contrast medium. Recovery after a right temporal lobectomy and administration of steroid hormone were uneventful. Eight months later there were no signs of raised intracranial pressure nor of neurological deficits. Tissues obtained from the right temporal lobe at lobectomy revealed the characteristic changes of delayed radiation necrosis; a mixture of fresh, recent, and old vascular lesions in the same specimen. From these findings, it was speculated that delayed radiation necrosis might initially occur within several years after radiotherapy and might gradually take a progressive and extended course, even in cases whose clinical symptoms develop much later.

  18. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma following radiation therapy of fibrous dysplasia: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, R.; Ling, R. [Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    Malignant fibrous histiocytoma commonly occurs spontaneously. In some cases it follows previous therapeutic or incidental irradiation, or miscellaneous pre-existing osseous conditions. Recently, it has been associated with total hip arthroplasty. We report a case of malignant fibrous histocytoma following radiation therapy of fibrous dysplasia and review literature. (author).

  19. Radiation transport. Progress report, April 1-December 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-10-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the last nine months of CY 83 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics

  20. Calibration of solar radiation measuring instruments. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahm, R J; Nakos, J C

    1979-11-01

    A review of solar radiation measurement of instruments and some types of errors is given; and procedures for calibrating solar radiation measuring instruments are detailed. An appendix contains a description of various agencies who perform calibration of solar instruments and a description of the methods they used at the time this report was prepared. (WHK)

  1. IV Bach conference on radiation chemistry. Abstracts of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    IV Bach conference on radiation chemistry was conducted in the framework of the conference Physico-chemical foundations of new technologies of XXI century. Problems of radiolysis of modern polymeric materials, post-irradiation examination of different organic and inorganic compounds treated with ionizing radiation, equipment used for these examinations, application of data obtained in these researches were represented in reports [ru

  2. The Natural History of Juvenile or Subacute GM2 Gangliosidosis: 21 New Cases and Literature Review of 134 Previously Reported

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegawa, Gustavo H. B.; Stockley, Tracy; Tropak, Michael; Banwell, Brenda; Blaser, Susan; Kok, Fernando; Giugliani, Roberto; Mahuran, Don; Clarke, Joe T. R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis is a group of inherited neurodegenerative diseases caused by deficiency of lysosomal β-hexosaminidase resulting in GM2 ganglioside accumulation in brain. The purpose of this study was to delineate the natural history of the condition and identify genotype-phenotype correlations that might be helpful in predicting the course of the disease in individual patients. METHODS A cohort of 21 patients with juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis, 15 with the Tay-Sachs variant and 6 with the Sandhoff variant, was studied prospectively in 2 centers. Our experience was compared with previously published reports on 134 patients. Information about clinical features, β-hexosaminidase enzyme activity, and mutation analysis was collected. RESULTS In our cohort of patients, the mean (±SD) age of onset of symptoms was 5.3 ± 4.1 years, with a mean follow-up time of 8.4 years. The most common symptoms at onset were gait disturbances (66.7%), incoordination (52.4%), speech problems (28.6%), and developmental delay (28.6%). The age of onset of gait disturbances was 7.1 ± 5.6 years. The mean time for progression to becoming wheelchair-bound was 6.2 ± 5.5 years. The mean age of onset of speech problems was 7.0 ± 5.6 years, with a mean time of progression to anarthria of 5.6 ± 5.3 years. Muscle wasting (10.6 ± 7.4 years), proximal weakness (11.1 ± 7.7 years), and incontinence of sphincters (14.6 ± 9.7 years) appeared later in the course of the disease. Psychiatric disturbances and neuropathy were more prevalent in patients with the Sandhoff variant than in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. However, dysphagia, sphincter incontinence, and sleep problems occurred earlier in those with the Tay-Sachs variant. Cerebellar atrophy was the most common finding on brain MRI (52.9%). The median survival time among the studied and reviewed patients was 14.5 years. The genotype-phenotype correlation revealed that in patients with the Tay-Sachs variant, the presence

  3. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  4. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  5. Radiation protection programme progress report 1985-89. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The final report of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out during the whole contractual period under all contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. More than 700 scientists collaborated on this programme. Results of more than 440 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation; radiation carcinogenesis; genetic effects of ionizing radiation; evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  6. Radiation protection programme progress report 1985-89. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The final report of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out during the whole contractual period under all contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. More than 700 scientists collaborated on this programme. Results of more than 440 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation; radiation carcinogenesis; genetic effects of ionizing radiation; evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  7. Radiation protection programme progress report 1985-89. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The final report of the 1985-89 radiation protection programme outlines the research work carried out during the whole contractual period under all contracts between the Commission of the European Communities and research groups in the Member States. More than 700 scientists collaborated on this programme. Results of more than 440 projects are reported. They are grouped into six sectors: radiation dosimetry and its interpretation; behaviour and control of radionuclides in the environment; non-stochastic effects of ionizing radiation; radiation carcinogenesis; genetic effects of ionizing radiation; evaluation of radiation risks and optimization of protection. Within the framework programme, the aim of this scientific research is to improve the conditions of life with respect to work and protection of man and his environment and to assure safe production of energy, i.e.: (i) to improve methods necessary to protect workers and the population by updating the scientific basis for appropriate standards; (ii) to prevent and counteract harmful effects of radiation; (iii) to assess radiation risks and provide methods to cope with the consequences of radiation accidents

  8. Analysis of over 10,000 Cases finds no association between previously reported candidate polymorphisms and ovarian cancer outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    White, Kristin L; Vierkant, Robert A; Fogarty, Zachary C

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death among women. In an effort to understand contributors to disease outcome, we evaluated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) previously associated with ovarian cancer recurrence or survival, specifically in angiogenesis, inflammation, mitosis...

  9. Rib cage deformity during two-stage tissue expander breast reconstruction in patient with previous radiotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Porčnik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing two-stage breast reconstruction with tissue expander and a history of previous irradiation are predisposed to a various chest-wall deformations more than non-irradiated patients. If chest-wall depression with/without rib fracture is found intra-operatively, bigger implant should be used, with a subsequent radiologic evaluation. In the future, the development of a new, modified expander with a harder base could minimise such complications.

  10. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers in this progress report which deal with radiobiological physics, the biological effects of ionizing radiations, and the modification of these effects by chemical and pharmacological agents

  11. Radiation quantities, units and measurements. Final report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Allisy, A.; Caswell, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of human exposure to radiation and radioactivity, whether arising from environmental exposures, medical practice or industrial activities, requires a fundamental set of quantities and units with which exposures can be specified and the means and ability to make measurements which yield results in terms of these quantities and units. Radiation protection then, as well as effective use of radiation in medical applications, requires the capability to accurately quantify the characteristics and extent of radiation exposure, so that appropriate and useful assessments of the potential health consequences and risks, whether for protection of the public and workers or for diagnosis and treatment of disease, can be formulated. The work carried out via this concerted action on ''Radiation quantities, units and measurements'' has addressed these needs. Measurement of radiation is a complex subject and is a science in itself. Yet many users of radiation who need to make radiation measurements cannot be expected to become experts in this particular field. They need authoritative guidance on how to deal with the measurement problems connected with their particular use of radiation. The work carried out pursuant to this concerted action has resulted in publications that meet this need. Important achievements include the publication of seven new ICRU reports, the completion of all but the printing of three other ICRU reports, completion of the drafting work on two other reports, the development of many others reports and the initiation of seven new activities that will result in ICRU reports representing important future contribution to the needs identified in this project. (orig.)

  12. A Case Report of Salmonella muenchen Enteritis Causing Rhabdomyolysis and Myocarditis in a Previously Healthy 26-Year-Old Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Will; Martell, Jon; Wilson, Joy S; Matsuura, Don T

    2017-04-01

    This case report examines an unusual presentation of a non-typhoidal Salmonella serovar with limited prevalence in the literature. This is the first case report to associate specifically the Salmonella muenchen serovar with rhabdomyolysis and myocarditis. This case report reviews the diagnostic criteria for myocarditis and explores the diagnostic dilemma of troponin elevation in the setting of rhabdomyolysis. It demonstrates that Salmonella muenchen has the ability to present in a broad range of individuals with complications extending beyond classical gastrointestinal symptoms. This report also concludes that diagnosis of the many possible complications from non-typhoidal Salmonella infections can be difficult due to patient comorbidities, variability in the severity of the illnesses, laboratory test limitations, and imaging limitations. When a patient presents with elevated troponins in the setting of rhabdomyolysis a careful workup should be done to evaluate for ischemic causes, myocarditis, or false elevation secondary to rhabdomyolysis.

  13. Continuation of the summarizing interim report on previous results of the Gorleben site survey as of May 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    In addition to results from the 1983 interim report, this report contains, in order to supplement the surface explorations, seismic reflection measurements, hydrogeologic and seismologic investigations, sorption experiments, and studies of glacial development in the site region and of long-term safety of final waste repositories in salt domes. The site's high grade of suitability for becoming a final radioactive waste repository, the legal basis as well as quality assurance are evaluated. (orig.) [de

  14. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack, E-mail: gabiortegacoelho@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Costa, Andrea da; Rodrigues, Jaqueline Pollizeli; Galisteo Júnior, Andrés Jimenez; Andrade Júnior, Heitor Franco de, E-mail: hfandrad@usp.br, E-mail: raquelaires@itpacporto.com.br [Universidade de São Paulo (USP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil). Laboratório de Protozoologia; Seibert, Carla Simone, E-mail: seibertcs@uft.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  15. Previous 60-Co radiation from Paratrygon aiereba mucus induces the production of highly responsive antibodies and a better immune response in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomazi, Gabriela Ortega Coelho; Alves, Glaucie Jussilane; Turíbio, Thompson de Oliveira; Rocha, André Moreira; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Jácome, Larissa Barros Silvestre; Spencer, Patrick Jack

    2017-01-01

    Wounds from stinging freshwater stingrays are painful, difficult to heal and cause extensive necrosis and systemic phenomena. The treatment is symptomatic, of low efficiency and there is no therapy, which causes more suffering to the injured. This study aimed to evaluate the immune response induced by the native or irradiated by 60-Co gamma from Paratrygon aiereba mucus. IPEN’s Committee on Ethics in the Use of Animals (n.º126/2013) and lanes captured under license from the Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation (n.º6781-1/2014) approved this research. For the assays, sera from Swiss mice previously immunized against native or irradiated mucus were used. The proliferation of splenic B cells in response to mucus was evaluated by the In Vitro Induced Antibody Production method and serum and splenic cytokines were also quantified. Our data demonstrate that the irradiated mucus of P. aiereba induces greater production of antibodies and more immunological memory in the mice. Spleen cells from animals immunized against irradiated mucus produced IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10, and serum TNF-α (immunized group against irradiated mucus) and IL-6 and IL-17 (immunized group against native mucus). The results corroborate the use of ionizing radiation, with production of highly responsive antibodies and better immune response, besides proving that Paratrygon aiereba mucus is capable of stimulating cellular and humoral adaptive immune response, contributing to the continuity of associated investigations. (author)

  16. Report on the Radiation Effects Testing of the Infrared and Optical Transition Radiation Camera Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Presented in this report are the results tests performed at Argonne National Lab in collaboration with Los Alamos National Lab to assess the reliability of the critical 99Mo production facility beam monitoring diagnostics. The main components of the beam monitoring systems are two cameras that will be exposed to radiation during accelerator operation. The purpose of this test is to assess the reliability of the cameras and related optical components when exposed to operational radiation levels. Both X-ray and neutron radiation could potentially damage camera electronics as well as the optical components such as lenses and windows. This report covers results of the testing of component reliability when exposed to X-ray radiation. With the information from this study we provide recommendations for implementing protective measures for the camera systems in order to minimize the occurrence of radiation-induced failure within a ten month production run cycle.

  17. Australian regulatory framework and reporting entities are hindering the lessons to be learned from adverse radiation events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, G.

    2016-01-01

    When adverse radiation events occur in the medical radiation science profession in Australia they are reported to the relevant state or territory authority. The details and cause of the incident are forwarded to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) to be included in the Australian Radiation Incident Register. The aim of any error reporting system is to learn from previous errors and to prevent them occurring again. The information obtained from past errors is one of the most invaluable tools to prevent future adverse events. This article examines the current regulatory framework, reporting systems and radiation protection authorities in Australia and their effectiveness at improving patient safety. Several obstacles must be overcome if the systems and organisations responsible for radiation safety are to meet the expectations of both the community and the medical radiation science profession. - Highlights: • Adverse radiation events in Australia are reported to state and territory authorities. • Adverse radiation events are included in the Australian Radiation Incident Register State and territory radiation authorities have failed to implement changes agreed upon in 1999. • The Australian Radiation Incident Register requires reforms if it is to operate as an effective learning system.

  18. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, Michael V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations

  19. Chemical and radiation carcinogenesis. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Gamma radiation, as a quantitative perturbation reference, has been related to oxygen toxicity as the unavoidable background risk due to living in an oxygen atmosphere. The basic mechanisms shared by gamma irradiation and oxygen toxicity have been studied. The response to these two perturbations has been characterized at the molecular level through DNA chemistry and monoclonal antibodies, and by cellular biological responses. The investigation of cellular responses is being extended to the molecular level through a study of alteration of gene arrangement and gene expression. Concentration has been on the study of the involvement of the evolutionally conserved repetitive DNA sequences shared by hamster and man. Such sequences were found and some have been isolated in plasmids. Two cellular systems were chosen for investigation, the embryonic/adult mesenchymal system and the hematopoietic tissues system. Concentration has been on the isolation, properties, and response to perturbation of the progenitor cells and the stem cell populations

  20. Radiation Sources Working Group Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.

    1999-01-01

    The Radiation Sources Working Group addressed advanced concepts for the generation of RF energy to power advanced accelerators. The focus of the working group included advanced sources and technologies above 17 GHz. The topics discussed included RF sources above 17 GHz, pulse compression techniques to achieve extreme peak power levels, component technology, technology limitations and physical limits, and other advanced concepts. RF sources included gyroklystrons, magnicons, free-electron masers, two beam accelerators, and gyroharmonic and traveling wave devices. Technology components discussed included advanced cathodes and electron guns, high temperature superconductors for producing magnetic fields, RF breakdown physics and mitigarion, and phenomena that impact source design such as fatigue in resonant structures due to pulsed RF heating. New approaches for RF source diagnostics located internal to the source were discussed for detecting plasma and beam phenomena existing in high energy density electrodynamic systems in order to help elucidate the reasons for performance limitations. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  1. 24 CFR 1710.558 - Previously accepted state filings-notice of revocation rights on property report cover page.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... will give the purchaser written notification of purchaser's default or breach of contract and the... purchaser loses rights and interest in the lot because of the purchaser's default or breach of contract... Report prior to signing a contract or agreement, you may cancel your contract or agreement by giving...

  2. Leptotrichia endocarditis: report of two cases from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis (ICE) database and review of previous cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caram, L. B.; Linefsky, J. P.; Read, K. M.; Murdoch, D. R.; Lalani, T.; Woods, C. W.; Reller, L. B.; Kanj, S. S.; Premru, M. M.; Ryan, S.; Al-Hegelan, M.; Donnio, P. Y.; Orezzi, C.; Paiva, M. G.; Tribouilloy, C.; Watkin, R.; Harris, O.; Eisen, D. P.; Corey, G. R.; Cabell, C. H.; Petti, C. A.; Gordon, David; Devi, Uma; Spelman, Denis; van der Meer, Jan T. M.; Kauffman, Carol; Bradley, Suzanne; Armstrong, William; Giannitsioti, Efthymia; Giamarellou, Helen; Lerakis, Stamatios; del Rio, Ana; Moreno, Asuncion; Mestres, Carlos A.; Paré, Carlos; de la Maria, Cristina Garcia; de Lazzario, Elisa; Marco, Francesc; Gatell, Jose M.; Miró, José M.; Almela, Manel; Azqueta, Manuel; Jiménez-Expósito, Maria Jesús; de Benito, Natividad; Perez, Noel; Almirante, Benito; Fernandez-Hidalgo, Nuria; de Vera, Pablo Rodriguez; Tornos, Pilar; Falcó, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    Leptotrichia species typically colonize the oral cavity and genitourinary tract. We report the first two cases of endocarditis secondary to L. goodfellowii sp. nov. Both cases were identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Review of the English literature revealed only two other cases of

  3. Case report of electronic cigarettes possibly associated with eosinophilic pneumonitis in a previously healthy active-duty sailor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Darshan; Latham, Emi

    2014-07-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are a technology that has been touted as a safe and effective alternative to traditional cigarettes. There is, however, a paucity of literature showing the adverse outcomes of e-cigarettes and a correlation with acute eosinophilic pneumonia (AEP). To present a possible association between e-cigarettes and AEP. A 20-year-old previously healthy man was found to develop AEP after smoking an e-cigarette. He was treated with antibiotics and steroids and his symptoms improved. Though an alternative to traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes can have unpredictable and potentially serious adverse effects. More research needs to be conducted to determine their safety. If seeing a patient in the ED with pulmonary symptoms after use of e-cigarettes, AEP should be considered in the differential. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Eleventh annual report of radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    In 1968, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established a program for reporting certain occupationa radiation exposure information to a central radiation records repository maintained at the Union Carbide Computing Technology Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Annual summaries (WASH-1350-R1 through WASH-1350-R6) were reported for the years 1968-1973 and included data on AEC contracter employees as well as employees of companies in the private sector licensed by the AEC. In January 1975, the operational functions of the AEC, including the maintenance of records on the occupational radiation exposure on contractor employees, were transferred to the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the AEC's regulatory functions, including the reporting of information on the occupational radiation exposure of licenses, were transferred to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Previous AEC licenses then reported to NRC while the contractors reported to ERDA. On October 1, 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) was formed and assumed the responsibilities of ERDA. This report contains the 1978 radiation exposure data for DOE and DOE contractors

  5. Central posterior capsule pigmentation in a patient with pigment dispersion and previous ocular trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mezaine, Hani S

    2010-01-01

    We report a 55-year-old man with unusually dense, unilateral central posterior capsule pigmentation associated with the characteristic clinical features of pigment dispersion syndrome, including a Krukenberg's spindle and dense trabecular pigmentation in both eyes. A history of an old blunt ocular trauma probably caused separation of the anterior hyaloid from the back of the lens, thereby creating an avenue by which pigment could reach the potential space of Berger's from the posterior chamber.

  6. Central posterior capsule pigmentation in a patient with pigment dispersion and previous ocular trauma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mezaine Hani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 55-year-old man with unusually dense, unilateral central posterior capsule pigmentation associated with the characteristic clinical features of pigment dispersion syndrome, including a Krukenberg′s spindle and dense trabecular pigmentation in both eyes. A history of an old blunt ocular trauma probably caused separation of the anterior hyaloid from the back of the lens, thereby creating an avenue by which pigment could reach the potential space of Berger′s from the posterior chamber.

  7. Radiation Protection Board. Annual report for the year 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-05-01

    The annual report of the Radiation Protection Board (RPB) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 1998 is presented. The report presents a summary of the RPB's activities grouped under the following headings: regulatory activities; technical services; income and expenditure frame work; research and publications; education and training; problems and conclusion

  8. Report on nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovincic, D.

    2000-09-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has prepared Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in Slovenia in 1999. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia.

  9. Radiation-induced spindle cell sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mubeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has been known to induce malignant transformation in human beings. Radiation-induced sarcomas are a late sequel of radiation therapy. Most sarcomas have been reported to occur after exposure to a radiation dose of 55 Gray (Gy and above, with a dose ranging from 16 to 112 Gys. Spindle cell sarcomas, arising after radiotherapy given to treat the carcinoma of head and neck region is a very uncommon sequel. This is a rare case report of spindle cell sarcoma of left maxilla, in a 24-year-old male, occurring as a late complication of radiotherapy with Cobalt-60 given for the treatment of retinoblastoma of the left eye 21 years back.

  10. Two case reports of a cerebrovascular disorder after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Jiro; Mimaki, Takashi; Tagawa, Tetsuzo

    1985-01-01

    The use of radiation therapy has significantly improved the prognosis of certain brain tumors. However, a few patients have been reported who developed cerebrovasculopathy accompanying transient ischemic attacks several months to several years after radiation therapy. The present report described cerebrovascular disorders after radiation therapy for brain tumors. The first case was an 8-year-6-month-old boy treated with a total dose of 5,200 rads after partial removal of a right periventricular astrocytoma extending into the thalamus. Two years and 7 months after completion of the radiation therapy, he showed transient ischemic attacks of numbness in the right upper limb and right hemiparesis. Arteriography revealed stenosis or occlusion of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Preoperative arteriography did not show occlusion nor narrowing of the cerebral arteries. The second case was a 2-year-8-month-old boy diagnosed as diencephalic syndrome, because of marked emaciation and a huge tumor mass expanding into the diencephalon and frontal lobe on the brain CT scan. He was irradiated with up to 5,000 rads. Seven months after radiation therapy, he developed transient right hemiparesis. Arteriography revealed stenosis or occlusion of the middle sized cerebral arteries. Although radiation therapy is acceptable in children with certain brain tumors, and very few patients develop postradiation vasculopathy, the risk of radiation therapy requires more careful consideration in the treatment of intracranial tumors. (author)

  11. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargo, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ferris, Robert L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Ohr, James [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Clump, David A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K. [Division Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Branstetter, Barton F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Heron, Dwight E., E-mail: herond2@umpc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m{sup 2} on day −7 and then 250 mg/m{sup 2} on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time.

  12. A Prospective Phase 2 Trial of Reirradiation With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Plus Cetuximab in Patients With Previously Irradiated Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, John A.; Ferris, Robert L.; Ohr, James; Clump, David A.; Davis, Kara S.; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar; Kim, Seungwon; Johnson, Jonas T.; Bauman, Julie E.; Gibson, Michael K.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Salvage options for unresectable locally recurrent, previously irradiated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (rSCCHN) are limited. Although the addition of reirradiation may improve outcomes compared to chemotherapy alone, significant toxicities limit salvage reirradiation strategies, leading to suboptimal outcomes. We therefore designed a phase 2 protocol to evaluate the efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plus cetuximab for rSCCHN. Methods and Materials: From July 2007 to March 2013, 50 patients >18 years of age with inoperable locoregionally confined rSCCHN within a previously irradiated field receiving ≥60 Gy, with a Zubrod performance status of 0 to 2, and normal hepatic and renal function were enrolled. Patients received concurrent cetuximab (400 mg/m 2 on day −7 and then 250 mg/m 2 on days 0 and +8) plus SBRT (40-44 Gy in 5 fractions on alternating days over 1-2 weeks). Primary endpoints were 1-year locoregional progression-free survival and National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 graded toxicity. Results: Median follow-up for surviving patients was 18 months (range: 10-70). The 1-year local PFS rate was 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44%-75%), locoregional PFS was 37% (95% CI: 23%-53%), distant PFS was 71% (95% CI: 54%-85%), and PFS was 33% (95% CI: 20%-49%). The median overall survival was 10 months (95% CI: 7-16), with a 1-year overall survival of 40% (95% CI: 26%-54%). At last follow-up, 69% died of disease, 4% died with disease, 15% died without progression, 10% were alive without progression, and 2% were alive with progression. Acute and late grade 3 toxicity was observed in 6% of patients respectively. Conclusions: SBRT with concurrent cetuximab appears to be a safe salvage treatment for rSCCHN of short overall treatment time

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1992 activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-01-01

    Under SLAC's supervision, the SPEAR ring and injector system were operated for the first time in a truly dedicated mode for user experimentation. In October, SSRL became a division of SLAC. With that organizational change, SSRL became fully responsible for the operation, maintenance and improvement of SPEAR and its injection accelerators. At the same time, other radiation sources were studied. Free electron lasers providing enormous peak brightnesses and time average brightnesses about two orders of magnitude greater than the machines presently being constructed or commissioned were the object of one line of analysis. Ultra-short pulse beams at lower photons energies were also studied. These, as well, are described in Chapter 2. Significant gains were also made on the beam lines. Perhaps the most dramatic was the introduction of YB 66 crystals into the Jumbo monochromator, as described in Chapter 3. Looking to the future, SSRL held a workshop on Fourth Generation Light Sources in February and two workshops in conjunction with the Users Meeting. The impact of the high quality running is demonstrated by the many high quality experimental programs performed on SPEAR during the year. These are described in Chapter 6

  14. Surveillance of environmental radiation in Finland. Annual report 2011; Ympaeristoen saeteilyvalvonta Suomessa. Vuosiraportti 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustonen, R. (ed.)

    2012-08-15

    The main goal of the surveillance of environmental radioactivity is to be always aware of levels of artificial radiation in the environment to which the public is exposed. Another goal is to detect all remarkable changes in levels of environmental radiation and radioactivity. Compliance with the basic safety standards laid down for protection of health of the general public against dangers arising from ionising radiation can be ensured with environmental radiation surveillance. Running of surveillance programmes on continuous basis also maintains and develops competence and readiness to respond to radiological emergencies. This report summarises the results of environmental radiation surveillance in 2011. The report also contains some comparisons with results from the previous years. Surveillance of environmental radiation contains surveillance of artificial radiation and artificial radioactive elements in the environment. Natural radiation and natural radioactive elements are not associated with the surveillance programme, although the greater part of the public exposure to radiation is caused by natural radiation. Exposure to natural radiation is controlled separately if there is reason to suspect, that natural radioactive elements cause unusual high exposure to the public (e.g. indoor radon and natural radionuclides in drinking water). Nuclear power plant licensees are responsible for environmental surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Finland. Those results are reported elsewhere. Surveillance of environmental radioactivity in Finland is one of the official obligations of the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK). This obligation is based on the national and the European Communities' legislation. The Finnish radiation protection legislation appoints STUK as the national authority responsible for surveillance of environmental radioactivity, and the Euratom Treaty assumes continuous monitoring of levels of radioactivity in the air

  15. Final Report: Energetics of Radiation Tolerant Nanoceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The report describes in details the achievements of the project addressing the performance of nanomaterials in radioactive environments. The project addresses the fundamentals of the role of interface features on the defect dynamics during irradiation and present models to predict behavior based on thermodynamic properties. Papers and products, including formation of students in this strategic area, are presented in details as well.

  16. Final Report: Energetics of Radiation Tolerant Nanoceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Ricardo [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-12-20

    The report describes in details the achievements of the project addressing the performance of nanomaterials in radioactive environments. The project addresses the fundamentals of the role of interface features on the defect dynamics during irradiation and present models to predict behavior based on thermodynamic properties. Papers and products, including formation of students in this strategic area, are presented in details as well.

  17. Radiation chemistry of high polymers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dole, M.; Welch, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Work on calibrating the radiation intensity in our γ-ray source as a function of height and horizontal displacement was completed. For extended chain (high crystallinity) polyethylene (PE) before and after quenching from the melt irradiated at room temperature, the crosslinking yield increased twofold on lowering the crystallinity from 96 to 70%. The G-value for alkyl radical production was about 75% higher in the quenched extended chain sample as compared to the value before quenching. The G (alkyl) values were determined for irradiations at 77K. The rate of decay of the alkyl radicals in PE samples of single crystals having different stem lengths was studied at 80 and 85 0 . It was found that the mole fraction of the slowly decaying free radicals increased with the stem length. Hydrogen gas was found to catalyze both the slow and fast decays. Because hydrogen does not dissolve in the crystalline regions of the PE, the catalytic effect must occur at the amorphous boundary of the crystalline stems. With respect to the kinetics of the allyl radical, either it was found that the data could be explained in terms of two simultaneous but spatially separated second order reactions. As the temperature is raised to 135 0 , the two reactions merge into one. Hydrogen gas has no effect on the decay of the allyl radicals. In the case of the highly crystalline extended chain samples, the allyl decay in some cases follows the simple kinetic equation (1/c) - (1/c 0 ) = k√t, where k is called a time independent diffusion controlled reaction rate constant. The less the crystallinity of the sample the greater the k constant. A preliminary study of isotactic polypropylene (PP) was carried out and a definite hydrogen gas catalysis of the free radical decay in PP was seen. Similarly in crystalline 1-leucine the hydrogen catalytic effect could also be clearly demonstrated

  18. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2011. Report of the radiation protection register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, Gerhard; Kammerer, Lothar; Karofsky, Ralf; Mordek, Else; Schlosser, Andrea; Spiesl, Josef

    2013-04-01

    In Germany, persons who are occupationally exposed to ionising radiation are monitored by several official dosimetry services that transmit the dose records about individual radiation monitoring to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''Optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. The annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2011, about 350,000 workers were monitored with dosemeters for occupational radiation exposure. The number increased during the past five years continuously by 10 %. Only 19 % of the monitored persons received measurable personal doses. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.58 mSv corresponding to 3 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. In total, 7 persons exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv, i.e. two cases per 100,000 monitored persons. The collective dose of the monitored persons decreased to 38.5 Person-Sv, the lowest value since the last fifty years of occupational dose monitoring. In 2010, 45 airlines calculated the route doses of 39,000 members of the aircraft crew personnel by using certified computer programmes for dose calculation and sent the accumulated monthly doses via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 83 person-Sv, and thus significantly higher than the total collective dose of the workers monitored with personal dosemeters (38.5 person-Sv). The annual average dose of aircraft crew personnel was 2.12 mSv and decreased compared to 2010 (2,30 mSv). In 2011, about 70,000 outside-workers were in

  19. Annual report 2002 on the radiation and nuclear safety in the Republic of Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Stritar, A.

    2003-06-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has prepared Annual Report on the Radiation and Nuclear Safety in the Republic of Slovenia for 2002. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia. This report is different from the previous ones. The main part was shortened so that it can be easily read and understood. All details and numerous data are put into the extended report, which is available in the electronic form on an CD or at the home page of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration. (author)

  20. Annual report 2002 on the radiation and nuclear safety in the Republic of Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.; Stritar, A.

    2003-06-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has prepared Annual Report on the Radiation and Nuclear Safety in the Republic of Slovenia for 2002. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia. This report is different from the previous ones. The main part was shortened so that it can be easily read and understood. All details and numerous data are put into the extended report, which is available in the electronic form on an CD or at the home page of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration.

  1. Occupational radiation exposure in Germany in 2006. Report of the radiation protection register

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frasch, G.; Fritzsche, E.; Kammerer, L.; Karofsky, R.; Spiesl, J.; Stegemann, R.

    2008-06-01

    In Germany, persons occupationally exposed to radiation are monitored by several official dosimetric services who transmit their records about individual radiation doses to the Radiation Protection Register of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). The number of dose recordings reported to the Radiation Protection Register has annually increased to more than three million records per year and thus accumulated to more than 34 million dose records at the end of 2006. The purpose of the Radiation Protection Register is to supervise the keeping of the dose limits by each radiation worker and to monitor the compliance with the radiation protection principle ''optimisation'' by performing detailed annual statistical analyses of the monitored persons and their radiation exposure. Amongst others, the annual report of the Radiation Protection Register provides information about status and development of occupational radiation exposure in Germany. In 2006, about 312,000 workers were monitored with dosimeters for occupational radiation exposure. About 18 % of the monitored persons received a measurable personal dose. The average annual dose of these exposed workers was 0.75 mSv. This value is the lowest average annual dose since dose monitoring for occupational worker was introduced. It remains below the dose limit of 1 mSv for the general public and amounts only 4 % of the annual dose limit of 20 mSv for radiation workers. Since 2003 aircraft crew personnel is subject to dose monitoring if it is employed in accordance with the German employment act and likely to receive an effective dose of at least 1 mSv per year from cosmic radiation during flight operation. This accounts for about 33.000 pilots and flight attendants. 45 airlines report the monthly accumulated dose values of their personnel via the Federal Office for Civil Aviation (''Luftfahrt-Bundesamt, LBA'') to the BfS. The collective dose of the aircraft crew personnel is 71 Person-Sv and thus

  2. Report on the Uranium Mine Radiation Safety Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    Since 1981 the Canadian Institute for Radiation Safety (CAIRS) has administered a semi-annual course on radiation safety in uranium mines under contract to and in consultation with the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The course is intended primarily for representatives from mining companies, regulatory agencies, unions, and mine and mill workers. By the terms of its contract with the AECB, CAIRS is required to submit a report on each course it conducts. This is the report on the June 1987 course. It lists the course objectives and the timetable, outlines for each lecture, the lecturers' resumes, and the participants. The students' evaluations of the course are included

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  4. Offsite radiation doses summarized from Hanford environmental monitoring reports for the years 1957-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldat, J.K.; Price, K.R.; McCormack, W.D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1957, evaluations of offsite impacts from each year of operation have been summarized in publicly available, annual environmental reports. These evaluations included estimates of potential radiation exposure to members of the public, either in terms of percentages of the then permissible limits or in terms of radiation dose. The estimated potential radiation doses to maximally exposed individuals from each year of Hanford operations are summarized in a series of tables and figures. The applicable standard for radiation dose to an individual for whom the maximum exposure was estimated is also shown. Although the estimates address potential radiation doses to the public from each year of operations at Hanford between 1957 and 1984, their sum will not produce an accurate estimate of doses accumulated over this time period. The estimates were the best evaluations available at the time to assess potential dose from the current year of operation as well as from any radionuclides still present in the environment from previous years of operation. There was a constant striving for improved evaluation of the potential radiation doses received by members of the public, and as a result the methods and assumptions used to estimate doses were periodically modified to add new pathways of exposure and to increase the accuracy of the dose calculations. Three conclusions were reached from this review: radiation doses reported for the years 1957 through 1984 for the maximum individual did not exceed the applicable dose standards; radiation doses reported over the past 27 years are not additive because of the changing and inconsistent methods used; and results from environmental monitoring and the associated dose calculations reported over the 27 years from 1957 through 1984 do not suggest a significant dose contribution from the buildup in the environment of radioactive materials associated with Hanford operations

  5. Report on the PWR-radiation protection/ALARA Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, D.J. [Consumers Power Co., Covert, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In 1992, representatives from several utilities with operational Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) formed the PWR-Radiation Protection/ALARA Committee. The mission of the Committee is to facilitate open communications between member utilities relative to radiation protection and ALARA issues such that cost effective dose reduction and radiation protection measures may be instituted. While industry deregulation appears inevitable and inter-utility competition is on the rise, Committee members are fully committed to sharing both positive and negative experiences for the benefit of the health and safety of the radiation worker. Committee meetings provide current operational experiences through members providing Plant status reports, and information relative to programmatic improvements through member presentations and topic specific workshops. The most recent Committee workshop was facilitated to provide members with defined experiences that provide cost effective ALARA performance.

  6. Working Group on Ionising Radiations. Report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The programme of work for 1987/88 by the Working Group on Ionising Radiation, Health and Safety Commision in February 1988, included the main topics of continuing interest and concern in relation to ionising radiations in general and the Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 (IRR 85) (Ref 1) in particular. These were: emergency dose limitation, occupational dose limitation, practical experience of the principle of keeping doses as low as reasonably practicable, experience of the regulatory requirements in respect of internal dosimetry and the need for a standing advisory committee on ionising radiations. Calibration of radiotherapy equipment was also considered as a matter of principle following a specific incident involving cancer patients. This report of progress during the first year summarises the Group's opinions on each topic and gives recommendations. (author)

  7. National Solar Radiation Data Base, Vol. 2 - Final Technical Report (1961-1990)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, E. L.; Marion, W.; Myers, D.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.

    1995-01-01

    This technical report explains the procedures used during the 4-year production of the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) (1961-1990). It is the second volume in a two-volume report on the NSRDB. The first volume, User's Guide-National Solar Radiation Data Base, provides the information needed to use the data base products. Volume 2 concentrates on results from the R&D required to producea solar radiation data base that would represent a significant update of a previous data base (SOLMET). More than 90% of the data in the NSRDB were estimated using a model--the Meteorological/Statistical (METSTAT) model. Much of Volume 2 concerns the METSTAT model and the sources of its input data. In addition, it contains results of comparisons of the NSRBD with the previous SOLMET data base.Results of the model evaluations and data base comparisons favor the use of NSRDB data over SOLMET data to select optimum sites and estimate performance for solar energy systems. The report noted that to improve data on solar radiation, 'measured' data need to become the mainstav of future data bases.

  8. Report on nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovincic, D.

    2001-09-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), in co-operation with the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia, the Administration for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief and the Ministry of the Interior, has prepared a Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in the Republic of Slovenia for 2000. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia.

  9. Report on the Application of Ionizing Radiations in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Araya, J.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents an analysis of the different public and private institutions, that in any form applies ionizing radiations. In total a sample of 387 was considered; it offers a great reliability, considering the size of Costa Rican market. Fundamentally the information was taken from the archives of the Atomic Energy Commision of Costa Rica; also from reports of labors and surveys carried out during 1991, tending to justify the Project ARCAL XVI: Industrial Applications of the Nuclear Technology. (author)

  10. Nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovincic, D.

    2001-09-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), in co-operation with the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia, the Administration for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief and the Ministry of the Interior, has prepared a Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in the Republic of Slovenia for 2000. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia. (author)

  11. Nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), in co-operation with the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia, the Administration for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief and the Ministry of the Interior, has prepared a Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in the Republic of Slovenia for 1997. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia. Contributions to the report were furthermore prepared by competent authorities in the field of nuclear safety: the Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO), the Milan Copic Nuclear Training Centre, etc. The report contains 17 chapters. (author)

  12. Report on nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA), in co-operation with the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia, the Administration for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief and the Ministry of the Interior, has prepared a Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in the Republic of Slovenia for 1997. This is one of the regular forms of reporting on the work of the Administration to the Government and National Assembly of the Republic of Slovenia. Contributions to the report were furthermore prepared by competent authorities in the field of nuclear safety: the Agency for Radwaste Management (ARAO), the Milan Copic Nuclear Training Centre, etc. The report contains 19 chapters.

  13. Unexpected finding of T-cell lymphoma in a previously healthy 16-year-old patient after a thorax trauma: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach Okholm-Hansen, Anna; Brorson, Stig

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We describe the clinical course and emphasize the difficulties in diagnosing T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The differential diagnostic difficulties have previously been described in regard to pneumonia, but to the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first case report to desc...... relevant to pediatricians, surgeons, anesthesiologists, and general practitioners....

  14. The reactor accident at Chernobyl, U.S.S.R. Radiation measurements in Denmark. 3. report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In continuation of the reporting of 4 May and 11 May 1986 this report summarizes the radioactivity measurements made during the third and fourth week after the accident at Chernobyl. The data have been collated by the Inspectorate of Nuclear Installations from measurements made by Risoe National Laboratory and the National Institute of Radiation Hygiene. The radioactivity remaining in the air after the first two weeks shows daily variations at low levels without significant contribution to the fall out levels on the ground surfaces. The ground contamination shows a decreasing trend according to radioactive decay and for the plants also according to natural cleaning mechanisms. The radioactive data from the third and fourth week after the accident confirm the previous estimate that the total radiation impact on the Danish area from the accident, including future radiation exposures from the contamination experienced up to now, corresponds at most to approximately one month of natural background radiation. For the time to come the measuring programme and data reporting arrangements will be reorganized with a view to the future long term follow-up of the situation. Thus, this report is expected to be the last in the series of ad hoc reports for prompt dissemination of data on the Danish radioactivity measurements. (author)

  15. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'NEIL, RC; STAMBAUGH, RD

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 FINAL REPORT FOR THE DIII-D RADIATIVE DIVERTOR PROJECT. The Radiative Divertor Project originated in 1993 when the DIII-D Five Year Plan for the period 1994--1998 was prepared. The Project Information Sheet described the objective of the project as ''to demonstrate dispersal of divertor power by a factor of then with sufficient diagnostics and modeling to extend the results to ITER and TPX''. Key divertor components identified were: (1) Carbon-carbon and graphite armor tiles; (2) The divertor structure providing a gas baffle and cooling; and (3) The divertor cryopumps to pump fuel and impurities

  16. Radiation-induced osteosarcoma of the calvaria; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Yasuo; Shigemori, Minoru; Miyagi, Jun; Ochiai, Satoshi; Lee, Souichi; Watanabe, Toshinori; Abe, Hitoshi; Morimatsu, Minoru [Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-01-01

    The authors report a case of radiation-induced calvarial osteosarcoma. A 58-year-old female received subtotal removal of the pituitary adenoma and 5000 rads postoperative irradiation. Seven years later, an osteoblastic osteosarcoma occurred in the frontotemporal region. She received total tumor removal and chemotherapy. However, computed tomography subsequently revealed multiple small lesions at the margin of the bone flap. A chest x-ray film demonstrated lung metastasis. Local recurrence and lung metastasis require careful attention in radiation-induced osteosarcoma patients. (author).

  17. Progress report on the neutral beam radiation hardening study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.D.; Condit, R.H.; Hoenig, C.L.; Wilcox, T.P.; Erickson, J.

    1978-01-01

    A neutral beam injector as presently conceived directly views the plasma it is sustaining. In turn the injector is exposed to the primary fusion neutrons plus secondary neutrons and gammas streaming back up the neutral beam duct. The intent of this work is to examine representative beam lines to see how performance and lifetimes could be affected by this radiation environment and to determine how unacceptable effects could be alleviated. Potential radiation induced problems addressed in this report have been limited to: (1) overheating of cryopanels and insulators, (2) gamma flux induced electrical conductivity increase of insulators, and (3) neutron and gamma fluence induced damage to insulator materials

  18. Radiation protection philosophy and risk estimates. NCRP Report 43 (1975), NAS-Beir Committee Report (1972, UNSCEAR Report (1972)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casarett, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the NCRP report no. 43 was to determine what influence the epidemiological and experimental radiobiological reports of the past several years should have on current NCRP radiation exposure standards. The position of the NCRP is that the lowest practicable radiation level below the recommended dose limits is the fundamental basis for establishing radiation protection standards, and on the assumption that the most important health hazards do not have a dose threshold. The BEIR report states that societal needs can be met with far lower average exposures and risks than permitted by the current Radiation Protection Guide of 170 millirems per yr, and that the current Guide is unnecessarily high. A review is given of the recent history of radiation protection standards and a discussion is given of similarities and differences between the BEIR and UNSCEAR reports

  19. Radiation effects in rock salt. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gies, H.; Hild, W.; Kuehle, T.; Moenig, J.

    1994-01-01

    Knowledge of the irradiation defects and the accompanying energy storage in rock salt resulting from the absorption of ionizing radiation emitted by vitrified high level radioactive waste (HLW) disposed off in geological rock salt formations in an important prerequisite for a realistic assessment of possible consequences. Based on a critical review of the scientific status this report attempts to evaluate whether the available database is satisfactory and sufficiently reliable for the performance of such an assessment. Apart from a brief description of the radiation-and temperature-conditions prevailing in a HLW-repository, a detailed presentation is given of both the interaction of radiation with rock salt and the theories and models developed for their quantification

  20. Overview of DOE Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fix, J.J.; Briscoe, G.J.; Selby, J.M.; Vallario, E.J.

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the adequacy of the present system, identify any necessary short-term improvements and propose feasible alternatives for an improved system. The study includes topical reports as follows: current Personnel Dosimetry Practices at DOE Facilities; overview of DOE Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS); and alternatives to Provide Upgraded Occupational Exposure Record System. This study constitutes the second report and was a joint effort between Battelle Northwest and EG and G, Idaho Falls. EG and G has been responsible for the respository since the fall of 1978

  1. A case report of radiation necrosis of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Inouye, Tetsuzo; Hiraide, Fumihisa; Tsubaki, Yasukiyo; Miyakogawa, Norimasa; Sawada, Masamichi

    1983-01-01

    A case of radiation necrosis of the larynx is reported. The patient was a 79-year-old man who was radiated with the dosis of 3900 rad for suspected carcinoma of the larynx in 1976 and 5300 rad for carcinoma of the larynx in 1980. After completion of radiation therapy, he started to have hoarseness. He was admitted to the hospital because of severe dyspnea. Fiberoptic examination revealed almost complete obstruction of the laryngeal lumen by necrotic tissues due to radiation necrosis. There was little space reserved for respiration. No motility of the vocal cords and arytenoids was observed. After tracheostomy, conservative local and systemic treatments and repeated removal of necrotic tissues through laryngomicrosurgery were performed. However, an advanced necrosis with infection could not be controlled. Therefore, total laryngectomy was performed. Microscopically, no malignant cells were noted in the larynx. As most soft tissues were degenerated into fibrosis, the pharynx was left open. When infection was entirely controlled, the lining flap method from the anterior chest was applied to close the pharynx. When severe radiation necrosis occurs in the larynx, laryngectomy is sometimes mandatory to be performed. It is important that infection should be controlled before and after laryngectomy. Delayed skin flap method is advised. (author)

  2. Case report of radiation necrosis of the larynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Inouye, Tetsuzo; Hiraide, Fumihisa; Tsubaki, Yasukiyo; Miyakogawa, Norimasa; Sawada, Masamichi (National Defence Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1983-02-01

    A case of radiation necrosis of the larynx is reported. The patient was a 79-year-old man who was radiated with the dosis of 3900 rad for suspected carcinoma of the larynx in 1976 and 5300 rad for carcinoma of the larynx in 1980. After completion of radiation therapy, he started to have hoarseness. He was admitted to the hospital because of severe dyspnea. Fiberoptic examination revealed almost complete obstruction of the laryngeal lumen by necrotic tissues due to radiation necrosis. There was little space reserved for respiration. No motility of the vocal cords and arytenoids was observed. After tracheostomy, conservative local and systemic treatments and repeated removal of necrotic tissues through laryngomicrosurgery were performed. However, an advanced necrosis with infection could not be controlled. Therefore, total laryngectomy was performed. Microscopically, no malignant cells were noted in the larynx. As most soft tissues were degenerated into fibrosis, the pharynx was left open. When infection was entirely controlled, the lining flap method from the anterior chest was applied to close the pharynx. When severe radiation necrosis occurs in the larynx, laryngectomy is sometimes mandatory to be performed. It is important that infection should be controlled before and after laryngectomy. Delayed skin flap method is advised.

  3. Report on nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia in 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has prepared a Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in Slovenia for 2001 as a regular form of reporting to the citizens of the Republic of Slovenia on the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle and the use of the ionising sources. The report has been prepared in collaboration with the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia (HIRS), the Administration for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief (ACPDR), the Pool for Assurance and Reinsurance of Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Pool for Decommissioning of the NPP Krsko and for the Radwaste Disposal from the NPP Krsko. The reports of the Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ARAO), the Institute of Oncology, the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Medical Centre Ljubljana and the technical support organisations are also included. The SNSA made no crucial modifications to the reports of the above mentioned institutions. The modifications were made just facilitate a reading of the reports.

  4. Nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia. Annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janzekovic, H.

    2002-01-01

    The Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) has prepared a Report on Nuclear and Radiation Safety in Slovenia for 2001 as a regular form of reporting to the citizens of the Republic of Slovenia on the activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle and the use of the ionising sources. The report has been prepared in collaboration with the Health Inspectorate of the Republic of Slovenia (HIRS), the Administration for Civil Protection and Disaster Relief (ACPDR), the Pool for Assurance and Reinsurance of Liability for Nuclear Damage and the Pool for Decommissioning of the NPP Krsko and for the Radwaste Disposal from the NPP Krsko. The reports of the Agency for Radioactive Waste Management (ARAO), the Institute of Oncology, the Department of Nuclear Medicine of the Medical Centre Ljubljana and the technical support organisations are also included. The SNSA made no crucial modifications to the reports of the above mentioned institutions. The modifications were made just facilitate a reading of the reports. (author)

  5. Case report of cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis after chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindts, Isabelle; Stellamans, Karin; Planckaert, Nikie; Goethals, Laurence; Bonny, Michiel

    2014-01-01

    The radiation recall reaction (RRR) is an inflammatory reaction that occurs in previously irradiated areas. The phenomenon is probably due to an idiosyncratic hypersensitivity reaction, in which a second agent can recall the inflammatory reaction. This case report documents a cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis (RRD). We observed a severe RRD in a patient after chemoradiotherapy treatment with cisplatin for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, precipitated by cold temperatures, which developed 9 days after completion of therapy. In the medical literature, RRD following extreme cold temperatures seems to be a peculiar event. Until further information on the interaction is available, future studies on combined chemotherapy with cisplatin should be carefully monitored and any side effects clearly documented. This case suggests that environmental conditions may play a contributing role in the development of RRD. This case also implies that neither fraction size nor total radiation dose is a determining factor in the development of the dermatologic reaction. (orig.) [de

  6. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees Eighteenth annual report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    All US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors are required to submit occupational radiation exposure records to a central repository. The data required include a summary of whole-body exposures to ionizing radiation, a summary of internal depositions of radioactive materials above specified limits, and occupational exposure reports for terminating employees. This report is a summary of the data submitted by DOE and DOE contractors for 1985. A total of 95,806 DOE and DOE contractor employees were monitored for whole-body ionizing radiation exposures in 1985. In addition to the employees, 96,665 visitors were monitored. Of all employees monitored, 58.4% received a dose equivalent that was less than measurable, 39.8% a measurable exposure less than 1 rem, and 1.9% an exposure greater than 1 rem. One employee received a dose equivalent greater than 5 rem (8.66 rem). The exposure received by 91.9% of the visitors to DOE facilities was less than measurable. No visitors received a dose equivalent greater than 2 rem. The collective dose equivalent for DOE and DOE contractor employees was 8223 person-rem. The collective dose equivalent for visitors was 461 person-rem. These averages are significantly less than the DOE 5-rem/year radiation protection standard for whole-body exposures. Ten new cases of internal depositions were reported in 1985 that exceeded 50% of the pertinent annual dose-equivalent standard. Of these ten cases, eight occurred in a previous year and are reported now because recent revisions in the dose calculations established these cases as reportable depositions. Twenty-six cases reported during 1985 were considered to be the continued tracking of previous depositions. 5 figs., 32 tabs

  7. Radiation tolerance of the spinal cord previously-damaged by tumor operation: long term neurological improvement and time-dose-volume relationships after irradiation of intraspinal gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Of 26 patients with intramedullary spinal cord gliomas (9 astrocytomas, 5 glioblastomas, 12 ependymomas) seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1962-1980, 24 were irradiated (21 initially and 3 after post-surgical recurrence). Those 19 patients who survived at least 1 year after completion of irradiation were evaluated for post-irradiation neurological changes.No patient developed radiation myelopathy. Return to a permanently and completely normal neurological status occured for 33/51 (65%) of pre-irradiation neurological deficits. The major cause of post-irradiation neurological deterioration was tumor recurrence. Although 18/19 patients had their thoracic or lumbar spinal cords irradiated, each with field sizes greater than 10 cm, spinal cord doses approaching, equalling, or occasionally exceeding various definitions of spinal cord tolerance were tolerated well without evidence of radiation myelopathy. Spinal cords of patients with intramedullary gliomas, often with major neurological deficits prior to irradiation, may be treated safely to doses approaching or equalling spinal cord tolerance levels. These doses are expected to locally control most ependymomas and astrocytomas without an increased radiation myelopathy. Caution should be observed if doses higher than this are contemplated in an attempt to cure glioblastoma, because the 5% tolerance level of the damaged spinal remains to be defined

  8. Radiation Protection and Safety Department - annual report 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, H.; Koelzer, W.

    1978-03-01

    The duties cover tasks relative to radiation protection and safety on behalf of the institutes and departments of Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe and environmental monitoring for the whole Nuclear Research Center as well as own research and development work, mainly performed under the Nuclear Research Center and the Nuclear Safeguards Project. The centers of interest of R and D activities were: investigation of the atmospheric diffusion in the micro- and meso-scale, study of the radiological consequences of accidents in reactors under probabilistic aspects, implementation of nuclear fuel safeguarding systems, improvements in radiation protection measurement technology. This report gives details of the different duties, indicates the results of 1977 routine measurements, and reports about new results of investigations and developments of the working groups of the department. (orig.) [de

  9. Radiation-induced morphea of the breast: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheah Nellie LC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Radiation-induced morphea (RIM of the breast is a rare complication of radiotherapy. It is disfiguring, painful and defeats the purpose of achieving a good cosmesis in breast-conservation surgery. This report describes a severe case of RIM in a breast cancer patient together with photographic illustrations of the serial changes over time and histopathology slides. A review of the literature is provided.

  10. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong

    2006-01-01

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis

  11. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma treated with surgery and radiation therapy -case report-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ji Young; Oh, Yoon Kyeong [College of Medicine, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is an uncommon dura-based tumor and can recur not only locally but also distantly in the neural axis or extraneural sites. We report our experience of radiation therapy, one preoperative and one elective postoperative, in two patients with meningeal HPC and reviewed the role of radiation therapy. A 41-year-old man (Case 1) presented with a 3-month history of headache and right hemiparesis. The mass was nearly unresectable at the first and second operation and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Preoperative radiation therapy was given with a total dose of 55.8 Gy/31 fractions to the large residual mass of left frontoparietal area. Follow-up computerized tomography (CT) showed marked regression of tumor after radiation therapy. The third operation was performed to remove the residual tumor at 6 months after the radiation therapy and a 2 x 2 cm sized tumor was encountered. The mass was totally removed. The serial follow-up CT showed no evidence of recurrence and he is alive without distant metastasis for 4 years and 10 months after the first operation. A 45-year-old woman (Case 2) presented with suddenly developed headache and visual impairment. Tumor mass occupying right frontal lobe was removed with the preoperative diagnosis of meningioma. It was totally removed with attached sagittal sinus and diagnosed as meningeal HPC. Elective postoperative radiation therapy was performed to reduce local recurrence with a total dose of 54 Gy/30 fractions to the involved area of right frontal lobe. She is alive for 5 years maintaining normal activity without local recurrence and distant metastasis.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  13. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Part 2. Physical radiations and biological significance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.

    1984-08-01

    The report comprises a teaching text, encompassing all physical radiations likely to be of biological interest, and the relevant biological effects and their significance. Topics include human radiobiology, delayed effects, radiation absorption in organisms, aqueous radiation chemistry, cell radiobiology, mutagenesis, and photobiology

  14. Treatment and reporting of uncertainties for environmental radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colle, R.

    1980-01-01

    Recommendations for a practical and uniform method for treating and reporting uncertainties in environmental radiation measurements data are presented. The method requires that each reported measurement result include the value, a total propagated random uncertainty expressed as the standard deviation, and a combined overall uncertainty. The uncertainty assessment should be based on as nearly a complete assessment as possible and should include every conceivable or likely source of inaccuracy in the result. Guidelines are given for estimating random and systematic uncertainty components, and for propagating and combining them to form an overall uncertainty

  15. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-15

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety.

  16. Status Report of Simulated Space Radiation Environment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Phil Hyun; Nho, Young Chang; Jeun, Joon Pyo; Choi, Jae Hak; Lim, Youn Mook; Jung, Chan Hee; Jeon, Young Kyu

    2007-11-01

    The technology for performance testing and improvement of materials which are durable at space environment is a military related technology and veiled and securely regulated in advanced countries such as US and Russia. This core technology cannot be easily transferred to other country too. Therefore, this technology is the most fundamental and necessary research area for the successful establishment of space environment system. Since the task for evaluating the effects of space materials and components by space radiation plays important role in satellite lifetime extension and running failure percentage decrease, it is necessary to establish simulated space radiation facility and systematic testing procedure. This report has dealt with the status of the technology to enable the simulation of space environment effects, including the effect of space radiation on space materials. This information such as the fundamental knowledge of space environment and research status of various countries as to the simulation of space environment effects of space materials will be useful for the research on radiation hardiness of the materials. Furthermore, it will be helpful for developer of space material on deriving a better choice of materials, reducing the design cycle time, and improving safety

  17. A discussion for alteration of the radiation issues based on the clipping analyses of radiation articles reported in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Youn, Dol Mi; Yoo, Ji Yup; Park, Tai Jin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation accidents having occurred in recent containing the accident in Fukushima nuclear power plants of Japan were resulted to the increase in some public concern, anxiety and confusion for radiation or nuclear safety. The public anxiety for radiation is not being decreased though the announcements done in radiation research institutes in Korea. Therefore, this study aims at providing an effective system for radiation publicity to the public members by the clipping analysis for the radiation articles reported in the media. And, the relation between those radiation issues and the radiation perception to the public members is analyzed. The radiation articles reported by them in 2013 and 2014 have been collected, and they are then classified with the article characteristic, field and tendency. Classified articles have been reviewed by dividing as two year. The 210 articles have been compared for their tendencies, characteristics and fields by year reported, and their characteristic comparison by reported year are then reviewed. Though the frequency that the radiological accidents have occurred in worldwide is far low compared to the accidental frequencies occurred in the general industrial fields, the radiation perception is being still deteriorated because of its special problem, which is defined as exposure, contamination or radioactivity, about radiation. The basic principles for radiation communication were suggested for preventing some unnecessary misunderstanding due to the variation of understanding for radiation issues. It is necessary to perform a variety of strategies for the publicity in improving the radiation perception, to build a relationship with the press or the media and then to consistently interact with them. Radiation communication must be performed by radiation experts or complete charge department, and must be consistently performed and be taken predictable patterns

  18. A discussion for alteration of the radiation issues based on the clipping analyses of radiation articles reported in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Youn, Dol Mi; Yoo, Ji Yup; Park, Tai Jin [Korean Association for Radiation Application, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation accidents having occurred in recent containing the accident in Fukushima nuclear power plants of Japan were resulted to the increase in some public concern, anxiety and confusion for radiation or nuclear safety. The public anxiety for radiation is not being decreased though the announcements done in radiation research institutes in Korea. Therefore, this study aims at providing an effective system for radiation publicity to the public members by the clipping analysis for the radiation articles reported in the media. And, the relation between those radiation issues and the radiation perception to the public members is analyzed. The radiation articles reported by them in 2013 and 2014 have been collected, and they are then classified with the article characteristic, field and tendency. Classified articles have been reviewed by dividing as two year. The 210 articles have been compared for their tendencies, characteristics and fields by year reported, and their characteristic comparison by reported year are then reviewed. Though the frequency that the radiological accidents have occurred in worldwide is far low compared to the accidental frequencies occurred in the general industrial fields, the radiation perception is being still deteriorated because of its special problem, which is defined as exposure, contamination or radioactivity, about radiation. The basic principles for radiation communication were suggested for preventing some unnecessary misunderstanding due to the variation of understanding for radiation issues. It is necessary to perform a variety of strategies for the publicity in improving the radiation perception, to build a relationship with the press or the media and then to consistently interact with them. Radiation communication must be performed by radiation experts or complete charge department, and must be consistently performed and be taken predictable patterns.

  19. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1985-November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.

    1986-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Radiological Research Laboratory of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University. The bulk of the research of the Laboratory involves basic and fundamental aims, not confined to radiotherapy. Research carried out in the Laboratory covers the determination of microdosimetry quantities, computer simulation of particle tracks, determination of oncogenic transformation, and the transfection of DNA into cells. The Hallmark of the Laboratory is the interaction between physics and biology

  20. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2014; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung. Jahresbericht 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Loebke-Reinl, Angelika; Peter, Josef (comps.) [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The annual report 2014 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following topics: (1) Actual data and their evaluation: natural environmental radioactivity, artificial environmental radioactivity, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. (2) Fundamentals and general information: legal basis and explanations, basic information on natural environmental radioactivity, basic information on artificial radioactivity in the environment, basic information on occupational radiation exposure, basic information on radiation exposures from medical applications, basic information on the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, basic information on non-ionizing radiation. (3) Tables.

  1. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe 2 and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials

  2. [Metatropic dysplasia in a girl with c.1811_1812delinsAT mutation in exon 11 of the TRPV4 gene not previously reported].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Matysiak-Scholze, Uta; Heinze, Jessica; Barrera, Albaro; Lacruz-Rengel, María Angelina; Bracho, Ana; Guerrero, Yudith

    2015-01-01

    Metatropic dysplasia is a skeletal disorder with clinical heterogeneity, characterized by craniofacial dysmorphy including frontal bossing and midface hypoplasia, short trunk,progressive kyphoscoliosis and shortened limbs. The TRPV4 gene is located on 12q24.11, coding a cation channel with nonselective permeability to calcium; it is expressed and involved in many physiological processes through responses to different stimuli. Over 50 mutations in TRPV4 have been described. We present a seven months old girl with heterozygous mutation c.1811_1812delinsAT; p.I604N in intron 11 not previously reported in the TRPV4 gene and with clinical findings compatible with metatropic dysplasia.

  3. New Record of Sillago sinica (Pisces: Sillaginidae in Korean Waters, and Re-identification of Sillago parvisquamis Previously Reported from Korea as S. sinica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Bae

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A single specimen of the genus Sillago, collected from Gwangyang, Korea, in May 2009, is characterized by XI first dorsal fin spines, 3 or 4 rows of melanophore pattern along the second dorsal fin membrane, and a darkish posterior margin of the caudal fin. Our specimen was identified as Sillago sinica reported as a new species; this identification is confirmed by mitochondrial DNA cytochrome oxidase subunit I sequences, which show that our specimen corresponds to S. sinica (d=0.000 and differs from the congeneric species Sillago parvisquamis (d=0.170. Comparisons of Korean specimens previously reported as S. parvisquamis with specimens of S. sinica show that the S. parvisquamis specimens are actually S. sinica. We propose the new Korean name “buk-bang-jeom-bo-ri-myeol” for S. sinica.

  4. Environmental Radiation Data: report 55, July-September 1988. Quarterly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    Environmental Radiation Data (ERD) contains data from the Environmental Radiation Ambients Monitoring System (ERAMS). Data from similar networks operated by contributing States, Canada, Mexico, and the Pan American Health Organization are reported in the ERD when available. The ERAMS is comprised of nationwide sampling stations that provide air, surface and drinking water and milk samples from which environmental radiation levels are derived. Sampling locations are selected to provide optimal population coverage while functioning to monitor fallout from nuclear devices and other forms of radioactive contamination of the environment. The radiation analyses performed on these samples include gross alpha and gross beta levels, gamma analyses for fission products, and specific analyses for uranium, plutonium, strontium, iodine, radium, krypton, and tritium

  5. Radiation induced sarcoma after treatment of glioblastoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Victor Domingos Lisita; Anjos, Caroline Souza dos; Candido, Priscila Barile Marchi; Dias Junior, Antonio Soares; Santos, Evandro Airton Sordi dos; Godoy, Antonio Carlos Cavalcante; Saggioro, Fabiano P.; Carlotti Junior, Carlos Gilberto; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glioblastoma multiform is the most lethal central nervous system neoplasm, with a median survival of around 13 months and the worst prognosis among all gliomas. The therapeutic approach of glioblastoma consists in neurosurgery with maximum possible resection of tumor volume, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy reduces the risk of tumor recurrence through direct and indirect damage to tumor deoxyribonucleic acid. The long-term effects of radiation therapy include tissue necrosis, vasculopathy, and radiation-induced neoplasia. The most reported secondary intracranial malignant tumors include meningiomas, gliomas, and sarcomas. The latency period between skull radiotherapy and the appearance of radioinduced lesions varies in the literature from six months to 47 years, with an average of 18.7 years. Case report: The present report describes the appearance of high-grade spindle cell sarcoma after ten months in a patient who received glioblastoma treatment at Hospital das Clínicas of Ribeirão Preto of the University of São Paulo. Conclusion: The rarity of this association is probably due to the poor survival of patients with glioblastoma, thus limiting the time to development of secondary neoplasia

  6. 1997 report on occupational radiation exposures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This series of reports provides statistics on occupational radiation exposures of monitored workers in Canada. The information is based on the data in the National Dose Registry (NDR) maintained by the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. The Registry is a centralized record-keeping system containing dose information on all monitored workers in Canada. It includes records from the National Dosimetry Services, as well as data submitted by nuclear power generating stations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., uranium mines and private dosimeter processing companies. Information for input into the NDR is received in a number of different physical forms. Data from the National Dosimetry Service are fed directly from the dosimeter reading stations into a computer. Most other dose records are submitted to the Registry in computer readable form. The report provides data on the two consecutive years prior to the year in which the data are extracted form the database. The data for the second year will be close to stable at the time of data extraction. Some changes may still occur, for which the most frequent causes are: 1. a high dose to a dosimeter is judged to be non-personal after investigation; 2. a job category of a worker is updated; or 3. dosimeters or data are returned late. The report therefore contains preliminary data on the second year, and more complete data on the first year

  7. Monitoring the radiation dose to a multiprogrammable pacemaker during radical radiation therapy: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller-Runkel, R.; Orsolini, G.; Kalokhe, U.P.

    1990-01-01

    Multiprogrammable pacemakers, using complimentary metaloxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry, may fail during radiation therapy. We report about a patient who received 6,400 cGy for unresectable carcinoma of the left lung. In supine treatment position, arms raised above the head, the pacemaker was outside the treated area by a margin of at least 1 cm, shielded by cerrobend blocking mounted on a tray. From thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements, we estimate that the pacemaker received 620 cGy in scatter doses. Its function was monitored before, during, and after completion of radiation therapy. The pacemaker was functioning normally until the patient's death 5 months after completion of treatment. The relevant electrocardiograms (ECGs) are presented

  8. Prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes following SBRT ± cetuximab for locally-recurrent, previously-irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, John A.; Heron, Dwight E.; Ferris, Robert L.; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Wegner, Rodney E.; Kalash, Ronny; Ohr, James; Kubicek, Greg J.; Burton, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as a promising salvage strategy for unresectable, previously-irradiated recurrent squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (rSCCHN). Here-in, we report the first prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality-of-life (PR-QoL) following re-irradiation with SBRT ± cetuximab for rSCCHN. Materials and methods: From November 2004 to May 2011, 150 patients with unresectable, rSCCHN in a previously-irradiated field receiving >40 Gy were treated with SBRT to 40–50 Gy in 5 fractions ± concurrent cetuximab. PR-QoL was prospectively acquired using University of Washington Quality-of-Life Revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Overall PR-QoL, health-related PR-QoL, and select domains commonly affected by re-irradiation progressively increase following an initial 1-month decline with statistically significant improvements noted in swallowing (p = 0.025), speech (p = 0.017), saliva (p = 0.041), activity (p = 0.032) and recreation (p = 0.039). Conclusions: Especially for patients surviving >1-year, improved tumor control associated with SBRT re-irradiation may ameliorate decreased PR-QoL resulting from rSCCHN. These improvements in PR-QoL transcend all measured domains in a validated PR-QoL assessment tool independent of age, use of cetuximab, tumor volume, and interval since prior irradiation.

  9. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  10. Prospective monitoring and self-report of previous falls among older women at high risk of falls and fractures: a study of comparison and agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrícia A; Dias, João M D; Silva, Silvia L A; Dias, Rosângela C

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the occurrence of falls is an important step for screening and for rehabilitation processes for the elderly. The methods of monitoring these events are susceptible to recording biases, and the choice of the most accurate method remains challenging. (i) To investigate the agreement between retrospective self-reporting and prospective monitoring of methods of recording falls, and (ii) to compare the retrospective self-reporting of falls and the prospective monitoring of falls and recurrent falls over a 12-month period among older women at high risk of falls and fractures. A total of 118 community-dwelling older women with low bone density were recruited. The incidence of falls was monitored prospectively in 116 older women (2 losses) via monthly phone calls over the course of a year. At the end of this monitoring period, the older women were asked about their recall of falls in the same 12-month period. The agreement between the two methods was analyzed, and the sensitivity and specificity of self-reported previous falls in relation to the prospective monitoring were calculated. There was moderate agreement between the prospective monitoring and the retrospective self-reporting of falls in classifying fallers (Kappa = 0.595) and recurrent fallers (Kappa = 0.589). The limits of agreement were 0.35 ± 1.66 falls. The self-reporting of prior falls had a 67.2% sensitivity and a 94.2% specificity in classifying fallers among older women and a 50% sensitivity and a 98.9% specificity in classifying recurrent fallers. Self-reporting of falls over a 12-month period underestimated 32.8% of falls and 50% of recurrent falls. The findings recommend caution if one is considering replacing monthly monitoring with annual retrospective questioning.

  11. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and policy coordination - first annual report, June 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This is the first annual report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). CIRRPC was established on April 9, 1984, by Dr. George A. Keyworth, II, Science Advisor to the President and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). CIRRPC replaced the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy and was assigned responsibilities of the former Interagency Radiation Research Committee and former Radiation Policy Council. CIRRPC is chartered under the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology (FCCSET). Its overall charge is to coordinate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation matters between agencies, evaluate radiation research, and provide advice on the formulation of radiation policy

  12. Exploiting Novel Radiation-Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Exploiting Novel Radiation -Induced Electromagnetic Material Changes for Remote Detection and Monitoring: Final Progress Report Distribution...assess the effects of ionizing radiation on at least three classes of electromagnetic materials. The proposed approach for radiation detection was...that was desired to be monitored remotely. Microwave or low millimeter wave electromagnetic radiation would be used to interrogate the device

  13. Biomarkers of exposition to ionizing radiation and hematology parameters in fitness for work. Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djokovic, J.; Milacic, S.; Rakic, B.; Pajic, J.; Petrovic, D.; Vuckovic, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is frequently used in medicine, especially during diagnostic procedures. The workers who are exposed to radiation have obligation for periodic check up. Presented case shows changes in hematological parameters and biomarkers of exposition to ionizing radiation (chromosome aberrations, structural changes and micronucleus test). The aim of this case report is to indicate metodology of diagnostic procedures for chronicle radiation syndrome. (author) [sr

  14. ASA conference on radiation and health: Coolfont 7: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    These proceedings provide a summary of papers presented at the seventh annual ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held at the Coolfont Conference Center in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia. More than forty scientists, including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists, and physicists, participated in the conference. The 1987 conference focused on lung cancer risks, especially lung cancer risks due to radon. The BEIR IV report, which addresses health risks of radon and other internally deposited alpha-emitters, was summarized early in the conference. Results of analyses of data on miners in Colorado and in New Mexico were presented, as well as analyses of combined data from several studies, which were used as the basis of estimates in the BEIR IV report. Statistical issues related to appropriate analysis of chronic exposure and of smoking data received considerable attention and discussion. Papers describing models for lung cancer risks based on exposure to cigarette smoke, radiation, and other substances provided insights into general understanding of lung cancer mechanisms. Carcinogenic models were also the subject of a presentation on radiation-induced skin cancer in humans and animals. In addition, relevant data on animal experiments involving radon exposure were summarized. Understanding risks requires relating them to dose, and thus the presentation on dosimetry, both for miner populations and for residents of US homes, made an important contribution to the conference. Presentations on current efforts at the state and national level to assess radon levels in US homes were also of considerable interest to the participants. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base

  15. Survey of Radiation Oncology Centres in Australia: report of the radiation oncology treatment quality program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klybaba, M.; Kenny, L.; Kron, T.; Harris, J.; O'Brien, P.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the first steps towards the development of a comprehensive quality program for radiation oncology in Australia has been a survey of practice. This paper reports on the results of the survey that should inform the development of standards for radiation oncology in Australia. A questionnaire of 108 questions spanning aspects of treatment services, equipment, staff, infrastructure and available quality systems was mailed to all facilities providing radiation treatment services in Australia (n = 45). Information of 42 sites was received by June 2006 providing data on 113 operational linear accelerators of which approximately 2/3 are equipped with multi-leaf collimators. More than 75% of facilities were participating in a formal quality assurance (QA) system, with 63% following a nationally or internationally recognised system. However, there was considerable variation in the availability of policies and procedures specific to quality aspects, and the review of these. Policies for monitoring patient waiting times for treatment were documented at just 71% of all facilities. Although 85% of all centres do, in fact, monitor machine throughput, the number and types of efficiency measures varied markedly, thereby limiting the comparative use of these results. Centres identified workload as the single most common factor responsible for limiting staff involvement in both QA processes and clinical trial participation. The data collected in this 'snapshot' survey provide a unique and comprehensive baseline for future comparisons and evaluation of changes

  16. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Metastasis to the Orbit in a Coinfected HIV+ HBV+ Patient Previously Treated with Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Guerriero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma rarely metastasizes to the orbit. We report a 45-year-old male, HBV+, HIV+, with a past history of a liver transplant for ELSD (end-stage liver disease with hepatocellular carcinoma and recurrent HCC, who presented with proptosis and diplopia of the left eye. CT scans of the head revealed a large, irregular mass in the left orbit causing superior and lateral destruction of the orbital bone. Biopsy specimens of the orbital tumor showed features of metastatic foci of hepatocellular carcinoma. Only 16 other cases of HCC metastasis to the orbit have been described in literature, and this is the first case in a previously transplanted HIV+, HBV+ patient.

  17. Interim report on the special research project 'exposure to environmental radiation due to nuclear facilities'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This special research project was started in 1978 as five-year plan. The purposes are to clarify the aspect of radiation exposure in human bodies due to the radioactive substances brought into the environment regarding the utilization of atomic energy, its mechanism and various factors affecting it, and to contribute to the evaluation of exposure dose, the reduction of radiation exposure, the conditions of locating nuclear facilities and the improvement of the method of disposing radioactive wastes. In addition to the fields treated in the previous special research project, the experimental research concerning the metabolism of environmental radioactive nuclides in bodies, namely the problem of the peculiarity of radioactive nuclide kinetics in infants and fetuses different from adults and the possibility of causing the changes in the intake and metabolism of nuclides in foods by the difference in their states of existence, was newly included. Also the research concerning the method of evaluating the absorbed dose in human organs at the time of irradiation outside and inside bodies in a new subject. Accordingly, this special research project is composed of (1) the research concerning the radionuclide kinetics in the environment, (2) the research concerning the radionuclide kinetics in bodies, (3) the research concerning the measurement and evaluation of dose absorbed in internal organs due to environmental radiation, and (4) the research concerning the monitoring of low level environmental radiation. The results obtained so far are reported. (Kako, I.)

  18. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history

  19. Upgrading environmental radiation data: health physics society committee report HPSR-1 (1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    This report is a collection of nine individual Health Physics Society subcommittee reports on different aspects of environmental radiation data associated with nuclear power plants. The subcommittee reports include: Environmental Radiation Monitoring Objectives, Definition of Critical Pathways and Radionuclides for Population Radiation Exposure at Nuclear Power Stations, Propagation of Uncertainties in Environmental Pathway Dose Models, Detection of Changes in Environmental Levels Due to Nuclear Power Plants, Quality Assurance for Environmental Monitoring Programs, Reporting of Environmental Radiation Measurements Data, Statistical Methods for Environmental Radiation Data Interpretation, Effective Communication with the Public, Environmental Radiological Surveillance-Mechanisms for Information Exchange

  20. Radiation Protection Aspects of Primary Water Chemistry and Source-term Management Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-04-01

    are related to radiation field generation are addressed, such as material issues (steam generator, cobalt inventory, surface preconditioning and fuel assembly support structure material) and chemical methods (pH control, zinc injection, shut down and start-up operations and purification) are also addressed. Specific contamination with 110 Ag or 124 Sb is also discussed. Chapter 4 - radiation field measurement techniques - provides information regarding measurement techniques and mapping strategies (such as the EPRI methodology or the EDF RB index) that are used in order to precisely follow radiation field evolution within the RB and to detect abnormal elevation of dose rate. Routine measurements with common techniques such as routine dose rate meters are described as well as more complex techniques such as CZT detectors or germanium detector. Advantages and disadvantages of both techniques are discussed. In the follow up of the report, techniques for full system and component remediation are discussed with quantitative data sets 'remediation of contamination'. Experiences of various sites with respect to source term management are provided, addressing the topics previously discussed in the report in section titled as 'radiation protection outcomes'. (authors)

  1. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, January-March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-06-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first quarter of 1988

  2. NRC TLD direct radiation monitoring network: Progress report, April--June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; McNamara, N.

    1988-09-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of NRC licensed facility sites throughout the country for the second quarter of 1988

  3. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty for the Treatment of Rotator Cuff Deficiency: A Concise Follow-up, at a Minimum of 10 Years, of Previous Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Derek J; Pupello, Derek R; Santoni, Brandon G; Clark, Rachel E; Frankle, Mark A

    2017-11-15

    We previously evaluated 94 patients (96 shoulders) who underwent reverse shoulder arthroplasty using a central compressive screw with 5.0-mm peripheral locking screws for baseplate fixation and a center of rotation lateral to the glenoid as treatment for end-stage rotator cuff deficiency. The purpose of this study was to report updated results at a minimum follow-up of 10 years. Forty patients (42 shoulders) were available for clinical follow-up. In the patients available for study, implant survivorship, with the end point being revision for any reason, was 90.7%. Since our 5-year report, 2 patients underwent revision surgery; 1 patient sustained a periprosthetic fracture 7 years postoperatively and 1 patient had a dislocation because of chronic shoulder instability at 8 years postoperatively. At a minimum follow-up of 10 years, the patients continued to maintain their improved outcome scores and range of motion, which were comparable with earlier follow-up evaluations. Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  4. ASN annual report 2007 - ASN report abstracts on the state of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 annual report of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) presents the highlights of the year in the domain of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France. The year 2007 was marked by the implementation of a new legislative and regulatory framework created by the 13 June 2006 Act on transparency and security in the nuclear field (TSN) and the 28 June Act on the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. As in the previous two years, the year was relatively satisfactory from the nuclear safety viewpoint and slightly less so with regard to small-scale nuclear activities. For two years now, the medical field has been marked by the declaration to ASN of a number of serious radiotherapy accidents which have led to several deaths or the need for extensive surgery. The following main topics are reviewed in the document: 1 - the decrees implementing the 'TSN' act and the 'Waste' act; 2 - the new ASN, one year on; 3 - ASN regulatory actions in the field of radiotherapy; 4 - regulation of new installations; 5 - the key issues for regulation of existing installations; 6 - nuclear safety and radiation protection research; 7 - policy for management of the post-accident phase of a radiological emergency; 8 - sites and soils polluted by radioactive materials; 9 - international harmonization of nuclear safety and radiation protection

  5. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  6. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  7. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research

  8. Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    When the Advisory Committee began work in April 1994 we were charged with determining whether the radiation experiments design and administration adequately met the ethical and scientific standards, including standards of informed consent, that prevailed at the time of the experiments and that exist today and also to determine the ethical and scientific standards and criteria by which it shall evaluate human radiation experiments. Although this charge seems straightforward, it is in fact difficult to determine what the appropriate standards should be for evaluating the conduct and policies of thirty or fifty years ago. First, we needed to determine the extent to which the standards of that time are similar to the standards of today. To the extent that there were differences we needed to determine the relative roles of each in making moral evaluations. In Chapter 1 we report what we have been able to reconstruct about government rules and policies in the 1940s and 1950s regarding human experiments. We focus primarily on the Atomic Energy Commission and the Department of Defense. In Chapter 2 we turn from a consideration of government standards to an exploration of the norms and practices of physicians and medical scientists who conducted research with human subjects during this period. Using the results of our Ethics Oral History Project, and other sources, we also examine how scientists of the time viewed their moral responsibilities to human subjects as well as how this translated into the manner in which they conducted their research.

  9. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  10. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  12. 1999 report on occupational radiation exposures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sont, W.; Ashmore, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The report provides statistics on occupational radiation exposures for use by regulatory authorities, organizations and private individuals. Out of a total of 125,883 monitored workers, 4 annual doses exceeded the regulatory limit of 50 mSv in 1998. Out of 43 specified job categories, 18 had a smaller annual average in 1998 than in 1997, 17 had a higher average, and 8 had the same average rounded to 0.01 mSv. The uranium mining job categories are not in this list because the conversion factor for radon progeny exposure to effective dose was changed from 10 to 5 mSv/WLM, precluding a valid comparison of the averages. In all categories of workers, from 1996 to 1997, 19 average annual doses went up, 33 went down, and 4 stayed the same. The figures reflect a sustained effort in keeping the occupational doses low. (author)

  13. Radiation and Photochemistry Section annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the radiation chemistry and photochemistry of reactive intermediates in the condensed phase. The section on the chemistry of ions treats condensed-phase reactions of radical cations, radical cations in zeolite matrices, high energy chemistry, ions and excited states in radiolysis, and photochemistry of the polymer imaging systems. The section on the role of solvent in chemical reactivity describes a study of atomic hydrogen and deuterium in water radiolysis, solvated electron thermodynamics and transport properties, solvent relaxation dynamics, and solvation of an excess electron in an aqueous solution of LiCl. A separate section outlines activities at the 20-MeV linac and the 3-MeV Van de Graaff accelerator

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL's users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL's experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year

  16. Capture and analysis of radiation dose reports for radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midgley, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    Radiographic imaging systems can produce records of exposure and dose parameters for each patient. A variety of file formats are in use including plain text, bit map images showing pictures of written text and radiation dose structured reports as text or extended markup language files. Whilst some of this information is available with image data on the hospital picture archive and communication system, access is restricted to individual patient records, thereby making it difficult to locate multiple records for the same scan protocol. This study considers the exposure records and dose reports from four modalities. Exposure records for mammography and general radiography are utilized for repeat analysis. Dose reports for fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) are utilized to study the distribution of patient doses for each protocol. Results for dosimetric quantities measured by General Radiography, Fluoroscopy and CT equipment are summarised and presented in the Appendix. Projection imaging uses the dose (in air) area product and derived quantities including the dose to the reference point as a measure of the air kerma reaching the skin, ignoring movement of the beam for fluoroscopy. CT uses the dose indices CTDIvol and dose length product as a measure of the dose per axial slice, and to the scanned volume. Suitable conversion factors are identified and used to estimate the effective dose to an average size patient (for CT and fluoroscopy) and the entrance skin dose for fluoroscopy.

  17. Enhanced radiation sensitivity and radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) after hypericin therapy – case report and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putnik, Kurt; Stadler, Peter; Schäfer, Christof; Koelbl, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Modern radiotherapy (RT) reduces the side effects at organ at risk. However, skin toxicity is still a major problem in many entities, especially head and neck cancer. Some substances like chemotherapy provide a risk of increased side effects or can induce a 'recall phenomenon' imitating acute RT-reactions months after RT. Moreover, some phototoxic drugs seem to enhance side effects of radiotherapy while others do not. We report a case of 'radiation recall dermatitis' (RRD) one year after RT as a result of taking hypericin (St. John's wort). A 65 year old man with completely resected squamous cell carcinoma of the epiglottis received an adjuvant locoregional RT up to a dose of 64.8 Gy. The patient took hypericin during and months after RT without informing the physician. During radiotherapy the patient developed unusual intensive skin reactions. Five months after RT the skin was completely bland at the first follow up. However, half a year later the patient presented erythema, but only within the area of previously irradiated skin. After local application of a steroid cream the symptoms diminished but returned after the end of steroid therapy. The anamnesis disclosed that the patient took hypericin because of depressive mood. We recommended to discontinue hypericin and the symptoms disappeared afterward. Several drugs are able to enhance skin toxicity of RT. Furthermore, the effect of RRD is well known especially for chemotherapy agents such as taxans. However, the underlying mechanisms are not known in detail so far. Moreover, it is unknown whether photosensitising drugs can also be considered to increase radiation sensitivity and whether a recall phenomenon is possible. The first report of a hypericin induced RRD and review of the literature are presented. In clinical practise many interactions between drugs and radiotherapy were not noticed and if registered not published. We recommend to ask especially for complementary or alternative

  18. Report of an accidental exposure of patients in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, C.E. de; Mota, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Accident with radiation therapy patients, when they happen, have a high probability of being very severe. This paper reports an accident that occurred last November in Brazil involving several patients submitted to therapy with clinical electron beams from 6 to 12 MeV. A field response team from the Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and the Laboratorio de Ciencias Radiologicas (LCR/DBB/UERJ), was sent to identify the causes of the accident and evaluate its consequences. The report suggests several actions to be observed by regulatory authorities, licensees and several other legal persons and individuals with subsidiary responsibilities. Evaluation of radiologic accidents is important because it permits to introduce the lessons learned in the radiation protection system, including design of equipment and installations, radiation procedures and personnel qualification and because it renders and attitude of continuous alert so a non usual event will not run into an accident. The accident A 'flat/sym'interlock problem occurred with the electron beam of a Mevatron-74 linear accelerator. After consulting the physicist, the technicians operated the equipment on the 'research mode' (non-clinical). Later the physicist came to verify the equipment and noticed that the dose rate presented high oscillation and that the 'pgm/norm'key was set to 'pgm'. After setting the control to 'norm'the equipment resumed working and some patients were treated in clinical mode and some in research mode. The machine then stops working and the service personnel were called. On 11/28 the maintenance technician fixed the equipment and the physicist measured the dose rate under 'pgm'mode and notice that it was about eight times over the normal value. COnclusion: the working group concluded that the accident could happen only if the equipment were operated on non-clinical mode. It can be summarized as : The event initiator: the flat/sym interlock. The accident promoter: the

  19. Analysis of CT radiation dose based on radiation-dose-structured reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weipeng; Zhang Yi; Zhang Menglong; Zhang Dapeng; Song Shaojuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the CT radiation dose statistically using the standardized radiation-dose-structured report (RDSR) of digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). Methods: Using the self-designed software, 1230 RDSR files about CT examination were obtained searching on the picture archiving and communication system (PACS). The patient dose database was established by combination of the extracted relevant information with the scanned sites. The patients were divided into adult group (over 10 years) and child groups (0-1 year, 1-5 years, 5-10 years) according to the age. The average volume CT dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP) of all scans were recorded respectively, and then the effective dose (E) was estimated. The DLP value at 75% quantile was calculated and compared with the diagnostic reference level (DRL). Results: In adult group, CTDI vol and DLP values were moderately and positively correlated (r = 0.41), the highest E was observed in upper abdominal enhanced scan, and the DLP value at 75% quantile was 60% higher than DRL. In child group, their CTDI vol in group of 5-10 years was greater than that in groups of 0-1 and 1-5 years (t = 2.42, 2.04, P < 0.05); the DLP value was slightly and positively correlated with the age (r = 0.16), while E was moderately and negatively correlated with the age (r = -0.48). Conclusions: It is a simple and efficient method to use RDSR to obtain the radiation doses of patients. With the popularization of the new equipment and the application of regionalized medical platform, RDSR would become the main tool for the dosimetric level surveying and individual dose recording. (authors)

  20. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  1. Report on radiation protection calibration activities in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargrave, N.J.

    1995-01-01

    Australia is a federation of eight autonomous States or Territories. Each of these is responsible for many matters including radiation safety within their borders. National matters are the responsibility of the Federal Government. The Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) is a part of the Federal Government Department of Human Services and Health and undertakes research and service activities related to radiation health. Work related to both ionising and non ionising radiation and regulatory matters is performed. Some of the research activities relate to radiation measurement standards, environmental radioactivity (e.g. radon in air, radioactivity in drinking water), effects of electro-magnetic fields on health (ELF), ultra violet radiation (UV) and laser safety, radiochemistry, medical applications of radiation (and doses to the population as a result), general health physics, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) and electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry. The calibration of protection instruments are undertaken by the Ionising Radiation Standards Group within the Laboratory and by State Health Laboratories. (J.P.N.)

  2. Report on administrative work at radiation safety center in fiscal year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Shinotsuka, Kazunori; Asakura, Yamato; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2002-05-01

    National Institute for Fusion Science constructed Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using super conductive magnet coils. It took eight years to construct and the first plasma shot had been carried out on March 1998. Since then plasma confinement experiments have been improved. This is the report of administrative work at the radiation safety center considering radiation protection for workers at the LHD and related devices, and radiation monitoring in the site. Major scope is as follows. (1) Radiation measurement and dose monitoring in the radiation controlled area and in the site using particularly developed monitoring system named as Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (2) Establishment of education and registration system for radiation workers and access control system for the LHD controlled area. I hope that as like the published report of fiscal year 1999, the present report will be helpful for management of future radiation protection in the research institute. (author)

  3. Organisation of radiation protection at Sizewell Nuclear Power Plant in the UK. Report n. 290

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouail, P.; Jeannin, B.; Lefaure, C.; Panisset, L.

    2004-01-01

    This report first describes the organisation and management of radiation protection at Sizewell Nuclear Power Plant (UK): general organisation, organisation of the radiation protection department, goals of radiation protection at plant and corporate levels, measurement of radiation protection performance, presence of health physicists in the plant, national and international comparisons. Then, it addresses the training of workers and radiation protection specialists with respect to radiation protection, the management of zoning and surveillance (action to address the radiation risk and the contamination risk). It describes the relationships of Health physicists with contractors and other workers teams, and the relationships with safety authorities. It indicates the different outages of this organisation: general planning, information sheets, physicists work planning, reviews and meetings. It describes the management of personal dosimetry with radiation work permits and actions aimed at the reduction of doses during various operations. The last part proposes a feedback experience report and evokes the generated database, and addresses events reporting

  4. Report of activities of the radiation medicine sector - 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The radiation medicine programs, participation in work groups, bibliography about radiation medicine, systematic register of nuclear accidents, technical-scientifical interexchange, participation in congress, seminaries and others events, elaboration of technical-scientifical works, bibliographical consults, participation in palestras of Prevention Weeks of Work Accidents, training in hygiene of ionizing radiations and so on, are the topics presented. (M.A.C.) [pt

  5. Coastal-inland solar radiation difference study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bach, W.D. Jr.; Vukovich, F.M.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the characteristics of solar insolation in the coastal zone and to determine the effect of the sea breeze circulation on the global insolation. In order to satisfy these objectives, a six station sampling network was established in the coastal plain of southeastern North Carolina, where previous evidence has indicated that the sea breeze circulation is almost a daily occurrence from late May through October. Three sites (Sloop Point, Onslow Beach, and Cape Fear Technical Institute (CFTI)) were located near the coast (coastal sites) to assess the insolation at the coast. A site (Clinton) was located in an area seldom affected by the sea breeze (about 100 km from the coast). Two additional sites, Wallace and Ellis Airport, located between the coastal sites and the control site, were to be used to assess the transient impact of the sea breeze upon the insolation. Pyranometers were located at each site to measure the global insolation. Direct normal insolation measured by a pyrheliometer and ultraviolet radiation measured by uv radiometers were observed at the Sloop Point and Clinton sites only. Data were collected during the calendar year 1978. The results of the study indicated that the global insolation had greater variability over the network during the summer season (June, July, and August). During the summer, there was a systematicdiurnal variation of the difference in global insolation between the inland and the coastal sites.

  6. Case report of right hamate hook fracture in a patient with previous fracture history of left hamate hook: is it hamate bipartite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton Sandra

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hamate hook fracture is a common fracture in golfers and others who play sports that involve rackets or sticks such as tennis or hockey. This patient had a previous hamate fracture in the opposing wrist along with potential features of hamate bipartite. Case presentation A 19 year old male presented with a complaint of right wrist pain on the ulnar side of the wrist with no apparent mechanism of injury. The pain came on gradually one week before being seen in the office and he reported no prior care for the complaint. His history includes traumatic left hamate hook fracture with surgical excision. Conclusion The patient was found to have marked tenderness over the hamate and with a prior fracture to the other wrist, computed tomography of the wrist was ordered revealing a fracture to the hamate hook in the right wrist. He was referred for surgical evaluation and the hook of the hamate was excised. Post-surgically, the patient was able to return to normal activity within eight weeks. This case is indicative of fracture rather than hamate bipartite. This fracture should be considered in a case of ulnar sided wrist pain where marked tenderness is noted over the hamate, especially after participation in club or racket sports.

  7. Characterization of Cladosporols from the Marine Algal-Derived Endophytic Fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides EN-399 and Configurational Revision of the Previously Reported Cladosporol Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Lei; Li, Xiao-Ming; Mándi, Attila; Antus, Sándor; Li, Xin; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Yang; Kurtán, Tibor; Wang, Bin-Gui

    2017-10-06

    Four new cladosporol derivatives, cladosporols F-I (1-4), the known cladosporol C (5), and its new epimer, cladosporol J (6), were isolated and identified from the marine algal-derived endophytic fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides EN-399. Their structures were determined by detailed interpretation of NMR and MS data, and the absolute configurations were established on the basis of TDDFT-ECD and OR calculations. The configurational assignment of cladosporols F (1) and G (2) showed that the previously reported absolute configuration of cladosporol A and all the related cladosporols need to be revised from (4'R) to (4'S). Compounds 1-6 showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, and Vibrio harveyi with MIC values ranging from 4 to 128 μg/mL. Compound 3 showed significant cytotoxicity against A549, Huh7, and LM3 cell lines with IC 50 values of 5.0, 1.0, and 4.1 μM, respectively, and compound 5 showed activity against H446 cell line with IC 50 value of 4.0 μM.

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL's history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia's leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR's performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY '91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL's three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL's users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  11. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report describes research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during one year period from April 1, 1987 through March 31, 1988. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: (i) studies on surface phenomena under electron and ion irradiations and (ii) studies on radiation chemistry of high polymers and radiation dosimetry. (J.P.N.)

  12. International conference on non-military radiation emergencies: [Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The subject of this report was limited to non-military radiation emergencies because such events needed to be addressed and the topic was considered to be manageable. The Conference theme developed around the lessons learned from the radiation emergencies at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and Windscale. Specific topics to be considered included acute and long-term effects of radiation exposure; frequency and nature of radiation emergencies; national standards for exposures to ionizing radiation; plans and procedures for responding to emergencies at the hospital, community, and national levels; and responsibilities of physicians and other health professionals regarding radiation exposures and emergencies

  13. Final Report for Annex II--Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources In Saudi Arabia, 1998-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.; Marion, W. F.; Al-Abbadi, N. M.; Mahfoodh, M.; Al-Otaibi, Z.

    2002-04-01

    The Final Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1998-2000 summarizes the accomplishment of work performed, results achieved, and products produced under Annex II, a project established under the Agreement for Cooperation in the Field of Renewable Energy Research and Development between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United States. The report covers work and accomplishments from January 1998 to December 2000. A previous progress report, Progress Report for Annex II - Assessment of Solar Radiation Resources in Saudi Arabia 1993-1997, NREL/TP-560-29374, summarizes earlier work and technical transfer of information under the project. The work was performed in at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and at selected weather stations of the Saudi Meteorological and Environmental Protection Administration (MEPA).

  14. Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management. EG-SAM Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    phases. In line with the agreed timeline for preparation, the expert group was motivated to develop an interim (preliminary) report before the end of 2013 (with a general perspective and discussion of specific severe accident management worker dose issues), and to finalize the report by organizing an international workshop in 2014 to address national experiences on best occupational RP management practices and protocols for optimum RP job coverage during severe accident, initial response and recovery efforts to identify good RP practices and RP lessons learned from previous reactor accidents, which will be submitted to the ISOE Management Board for approval. This interim report comprises six main chapters. Chapter 2 provides essential information on radiation protection management and organisation. Chapter 3 establishes the goal of radiation protection training and exercises related to severe accident management. Chapter 4 discusses facility characteristics that must be considered when planning actions in response to a severe accident. Chapter 5 provides for the interpretation and application of an overall approach for the protection of workers. Chapter 6 discusses radioactive materials, contamination controls and logistics during the emergency phase. Chapter 7 addresses key lessons learned from past accidents, including Chernobyl and Fukushima. (authors)

  15. Arrhythmias and sudden death among older children and young adults following tetralogy of Fallot repair in the current era: are previously reported risk factors still applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Swati; Kovach, Julie; Singh, Harinder; Karpawich, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    Young adult patients (pts) with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) remain at risk for arrhythmias (Ar) and sudden cardiac death (SCD). Based on past studies with earlier pt subsets, Ar/SCD events were associated with right ventricular (RV) systolic pressures >60 mm Hg, outflow tract gradients >20 mm Hg, and QRS duration >180 ms. However, there are limited recent studies to evaluate these risk factors in the current patient generation. Patients with TOF followed over the past 50 years were grouped by presence of any arrhythmias (group 1), absence of arrhythmias (group 2), and presence of SCD or significant ventricular arrhythmias (group 3) and correlated with current pt age, gender, age at repair, repair types, echocardiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, electrocardiogram/Holter, hemodynamics, and electrophysiology findings. Of 109 pts, 52 were male aged 17-58 years. Of these, 59 (54%) had Ar, two of whom had SCD. These 59 pts were chronologically older at the time of analysis, with repair at an older age and wider QRS duration (78-240, mean 158 ms) when compared with those without Ar. However, there was no correlation with surgical era, surgical repair, gender, RV pressure >60 mm Hg, right ventricular outflow tract gradient >20 mm Hg, or RV end-diastolic volume on CMRI. Ar/SCD risk continues to correlate with repair age and advancing pt age. QRS duration is longer in these patients but at a shorter interval (mean 158 ms) and less RV pressure (mean 43 mm Hg) than previously reported. In the current TOF patient generation, neither surgical era, type of repair, RV outflow gradient nor RV volume correlate with Ar/SCD. Electrophysiologic testing to verify and identify arrhythmias remains clinically effective. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structural analysis of eight novel and 112 previously reported missense mutations in the interactive FXI mutation database reveals new insight on FXI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Rebecca E; Shiltagh, Nuha; Gomez, Keith; Mellars, Gillian; Cooper, Carolyn; Perry, David J; Tuddenham, Edward G; Perkins, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    Factor XI (FXI) functions in blood coagulation. FXI is composed of four apple (Ap) domains and a serine protease (SP) domain. Deficiency of FXI leads to an injury-related bleeding disorder, which is remarkable for the lack of correlation between bleeding symptoms and FXI coagulant activity (FXI:C). The number of mutations previously reported in our interactive web database (http://www.FactorXI.org) is now significantly increased to 183 through our new patient studies and from literature surveys. Eight novel missense mutations give a total of 120 throughout the FXI gene (F11). The most abundant defects in FXI are revealed to be those from low-protein plasma levels (Type I: CRM-) that originate from protein misfolding, rather than from functional defects (Type II: CRM+). A total of 70 Ap missense mutations were analysed using a consensus Ap domain structure generated from the FXI dimer crystal structure. This showed that all parts of the Ap domain were affected. The 47 SP missense mutations were also distributed throughout the SP domain structure. The periphery of the Ap beta-sheet structure is sensitive to structural perturbation caused by residue changes throughout the Ap domain, yet this beta-sheet is crucial for FXI dimer formation. Residues located at the Ap4:Ap4 interface in the dimer are much less directly involved. We conclude that the abundance of Type I defects in FXI results from the sensitivity of the Ap domain folding to residue changes within this, and discuss how structural knowledge of the mutations improves our understanding of FXI deficiencies.

  17. Workers radiation protection. Occupational exposure to ionizing radiations in France: 2015 results. 2016 Mission report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-06-01

    National results of the individual monitoring of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation are reported for all civilian and military activities subject to authorization or declaration (i.e. medical and veterinary activities, nuclear industry, defence, non-nuclear industry and research), as well as for activities concerned by the enhanced exposure to natural radiation. 365 830 workers within activities subject to authorization or declaration were monitored by passive dosimetry in 2015, which represents an increase by 1.7 % compared to 2014. The average individual dose in 2015 was very close to the value in 2014. Furthermore, 14 138 workers received more than 1 mSv (i.e. the legal dose limit for the public), and 2 606 workers received more than 5 mSv. 2 workers received more than 20 mSv (i.e. the dose limit for the workers in the French regulation). As a result, the collective dose increased from 56.3 to 61.9 man.Sv (10 %), thus reaching the same level as in the years 2009 to 2013. Important differences are noticed according to the occupational activities: the average dose in the medical and veterinary field (which represents 62.4 % of the monitored workers) and that in the research field (3.6 % of the monitored workers) are less than 0.4 mSv; the average doses are higher in the nuclear field and in the non-nuclear industry (representing together 30.1 % of the monitored workers), respectively 1.17 mSv and 1.38 mSv. Concerning internal dosimetry, 279 877 individual examinations have been performed in 2015, 52 % of which are radio-toxicological analysis of excreta and 48 % are direct body counting. In 2015, 2 workers had a committed effective dose greater than or equal to 1 mSv and the maximum dose was 3 mSv. Data or trends relative to workers exposed to natural radioactivity are also dealt with in this report (air crews, personnel subjected to radon exposure). In particular, results of aircrew dosimetry are reported: in 2015, the average individual dose of 19 565

  18. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, M.B.; Davis, M.V.

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10 4 rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10 5 rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects

  19. Anticoagulation and high dose liver radiation. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lightdale, C.J.; Wasser, J.; Coleman, M.; Brower, M.; Tefft, M.; Pasmantier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Two groups of patients were observed for evidence of acute radiation hepatitis during high dose radiation to the liver. The first group of 18 patients with metastatic liver disease received an average of 4,050 rad to the whole liver. Half received anticoagulation with warfarin. One patient on anticoagulation developed evidence of acute radiation hepatitis while 2 patients did so without anticoagulation. Eleven patients with Hodgkin's disease received 4,000 rad to the left lobe of the liver during extended field radiation. Four of these 11 patients were anticoagulated to therapeutic range. Only one of the fully anticoagulated patients showed changes on liver scan consistent with radiation hepatitis whereas three did so without anticoagulation. No serious sequelae from anticoagulation occurred in either group. These preliminary data suggest that anticoagulation may be safely administered with high dose hepatic radiation and that further trials with anticoagulation are warranted

  20. Survey of radiation protection, radiation transport, and shielding information needs of the nuclear power industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.; Roussin, R.W.; McGill, B.L.

    1976-04-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) is engaged in a program to seek out, organize, and disseminate information in the area of radiation transport, shielding, and radiation protection. This information consists of published literature, nuclear data, and computer codes and advanced analytical techniques required by ERDA, its contractors, and the nuclear power industry to improve radiation analysis and computing capability. Information generated in this effort becomes a part of the RSIC collection and/or data base. The purpose of this report on project 219-1 is to document the results of the survey of information and computer code needs of the nuclear power industry in the area of radiation analysis and protection

  1. Survey of radiation protection, radiation transport, and shielding information needs of the nuclear power industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskewitz, B.F.; Trubey, D.K.; Roussin, R.W.; McGill, B.L.

    1976-04-01

    The Radiation Shielding Information Center (RSIC) is engaged in a program to seek out, organize, and disseminate information in the area of radiation transport, shielding, and radiation protection. This information consists of published literature, nuclear data, and computer codes and advanced analytical techniques required by ERDA, its contractors, and the nuclear power industry to improve radiation analysis and computing capability. Information generated in this effort becomes a part of the RSIC collection and/or data base. The purpose of this report on project 219-1 is to document the results of the survey of information and computer code needs of the nuclear power industry in the area of radiation analysis and protection.

  2. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: first reported treatment in Australasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corry, J.; Joon, D.L.; Hope, G.; Smylie, J.; Henkul, Z.; Wills, J.; Cramb, J.; Towns, S.; Archer, P.

    2002-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is an exciting new advance in the practice of radiation oncology. It is the use of non-uniform radiation beams to achieve conformal dose distributions. As a result of the high initial capital costs and the time and complexity of planning, IMRT is not yet a widely available clinical treatment option. We describe the process involved in applying this new technology to a case of locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. Radiation-induced camptocormia and dropped head syndrome. Review and case report of radiation-induced movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kuhnt, Thomas; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Hering, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, camptocormia and dropped head syndrome (DHS) have gained attention as particular forms of movement disorders. Camptocormia presents with involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine that typically increases during walking or standing and may severely impede walking ability. DHS is characterized by weakness of the neck extensors and a consecutive inability to extend the neck; in severe cases the head is fixed in a ''chin to chest position.'' Many diseases may underlie these conditions, and there have been some reports about radiation-induced camptocormia and DHS. A PubMed search with the keywords ''camptocormia,'' ''dropped head syndrome,'' ''radiation-induced myopathy,'' ''radiation-induced neuropathy,'' and ''radiation-induced movement disorder'' was carried out to better characterize radiation-induced movement disorders and the radiation techniques involved. In addition, the case of a patient developing camptocormia 23 years after radiation therapy of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen is described. In total, nine case series of radiation-induced DHS (n = 45 patients) and - including our case - three case reports (n = 3 patients) about radiogenic camptocormia were retrieved. Most cases (40/45 patients) occurred less than 15 years after radiotherapy involving extended fields for Hodgkin's disease. The use of wide radiation fields including many spinal segments with paraspinal muscles may lead to radiation-induced movement disorders. If paraspinal muscles and the thoracolumbar spine are involved, the clinical presentation can be that of camptocormia. DHS may result if there is involvement of the cervical spine. To prevent these disorders, sparing of the spine and paraspinal muscles is desirable. (orig.) [de

  4. Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumours. Technological evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeghari-Squalli, Nadia

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this report was to analyse the efficacy and safety data of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable primary (hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and metastatic liver tumors (LM), to define the indications and the place of SBRT in the therapeutic strategy with the aim of its inclusion in the CCAM (French National list of reimbursement). The key points that arose from this assessment are the following: - The results are preliminary and the literature is inconclusive about safety and efficacy; - There are no standardised guidelines for: the indications, the eligibility criteria, the treatment protocols or the place of SBRT in the therapeutic strategy; - SBRT is a technique that requires great rigorous radioprotection and quality assurance procedures; the professionals and National institutions concerned recommend that SBRT only be performed in centres with sufficient resources, specific expertise and an organisation which guarantees that the quality assurance procedures will be respected. Recommendations HAS believes it is premature to recommend SBRT for the routine treatment of liver tumors and its reimbursement by the National Health Insurance (Assurance Maladie). HAS recommends its use in the strict context of clinical research by centres with sufficient resources, specific expertise and an organisation which guarantees that the quality assurance procedures will be respected. The literature search strategy prioritized randomised comparative studies and systematic reviews; If these were not available then non-randomised controlled trials, prospective studies were to be used and finally retrospective studies and case series were to be used. The assessment of SRBT for liver tumors was based on the critical analysis of clinical data from: - Three prospective case series, five retrospective case series, four health technology evaluation reports and 11 good practice recommendations, for primary liver tumors (HCC) - One prospective

  5. Project Radiation Protection East. Swedish cooperation program for radiation protection in Eastern and Central Europe. Status Report, March 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snihs, J.O.; Johansson, Mai; Grapengiesser, S.; Bennerstedt, T.

    1996-04-01

    Until now the Swedish program for radiation protection work in central and Eastern europe has been granted 55 MSEK by the Swedish government. The projects are assessed, planned and performed in close cooperation with partner organizations in the East. Since 1994, radiation protection cooperation concerning the former Soviet Navy training reactors in Paldiski, Estonia, is included in Radiation Protection East. The government has granted 8 MSEK for this purpose. This report presents a summary over some 150 projects, their status, allocated funds and their distribution over countries and project areas. The presentation is updated up to March 1996. 7 figs

  6. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that were responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The studies were based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA

  7. Synchrotron radiation facilities at DESY, a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.E.

    1979-12-01

    A short summary of the developments which have led to the present extensive use of Synchrotron Radiation at DESY is presented and a description of the Synchrotron Radiation facilities presently available and under development is given with emphasis on the new HASYLAB project at the storage ring DORIS. (orig.) 891 HSI/orig. 892 MKO

  8. Source book of educational materials for radiation therapy. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijar, M.L.

    1979-08-01

    The Source Book is a listing of educational materials in radiation therapy technology. The first 17 sections correspond to the subjects identified in the ASRT Curriculum Guide for schools of radiation therapy. Each section is divided into publications and in some sections audiovisuals and training aids. Entries are listed without endorsement

  9. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC's history structure, and operations; CIRRPC's most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies

  10. Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC`s history structure, and operations; CIRRPC`s most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies.

  11. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees - 1991. Twenty-fourth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.H.; Hui, T.E.; Millet, W.H.; Scholes, V.A.

    1994-11-01

    This is the 24th annual radiation exposure report published by US DOE and its predecessor agencies. This report summarizes the radiation exposures received by both employees and visitors at DOE and COE contractor facilities during 1991. Trends in radiations exposures are evaluated. The significance of the doses is addressed by comparing them to the DOE limits and by correlating the doses to health risks based on risk estimates from expert groups

  12. Nuclear Reactor RA Safety Report, Vol. 9, Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    Instrumentation for Radiation protection existing at the RA reactor is dating mostly from the period 1957-1959 when the reactor has been built. With some minor exception it was produced in USSR. Radiation protection system was constructed based on specific design project, somewhat modified original USSR project which has been indispensable because of some modification of the building design. During the past 27 years no renewal of the instrumentation was done, only maintenance was performed. Instrumentation consists of old electronic devices which caused difficulties and even prevented regular maintenance because of lack of spare parts. Instrumentation for radiation protection at the RA reactor is classified as follows: centralized dosimetry system; stationary dosimetry instrumentation, movable and personal dosimetry systems. Apart from the scheme of dosimetry instrumentation this volume includes description of radiation protection procedures; protection devices; radiation doses and dose limit data; program for environmental radioactivity control; medical control procedures [sr

  13. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  14. Report on the recently-updated study of cancer mortality in the A-bomb survivors: insights for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentner, N.E.

    1997-01-01

    The Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima has recently released an updated study of cancer mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of survivors of the atomic bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. (The LSS is believed to contain about one-half of the total number of survivors who were within 2.5 km of the hypocentre.) The update has considerably more statistical power than previous studies because of five more years of follow-up(1986-1990 inclusive) and because of adding 10.536 survivors for whom DS86 dose estimates recently became available. Together these add about 550.000 person-years of follow-up compared to the previous report, which covered mortality to the end of 1985. Moreover, about 25% of the excess solid cancer deaths have occurred in these last five years of follow-up. Since the LSS is the most important source of information about the risk of induced cancer in humans following acute radiation exposures, this paper first summarizes this important new information. This is a keystone of radiation risk assessment and therefore of our radiation protection history; one cannot make sense of the current controversy concerning linearity without understanding what this data says and doesn't say. This communication then moves into a discussion of what implications there may be from this updated information, in the context of current debates about whether the linear-no threshold model is an appropriate one for radiation protection use. (DM)

  15. Case report of cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis after chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindts, Isabelle; Stellamans, Karin; Planckaert, Nikie; Goethals, Laurence [AZ Groeninge Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kortrijk (Belgium); Bonny, Michiel [AZ Groeninge Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2014-08-15

    The radiation recall reaction (RRR) is an inflammatory reaction that occurs in previously irradiated areas. The phenomenon is probably due to an idiosyncratic hypersensitivity reaction, in which a second agent can recall the inflammatory reaction. This case report documents a cold-weather-induced radiation recall dermatitis (RRD). We observed a severe RRD in a patient after chemoradiotherapy treatment with cisplatin for a nasopharyngeal carcinoma, precipitated by cold temperatures, which developed 9 days after completion of therapy. In the medical literature, RRD following extreme cold temperatures seems to be a peculiar event. Until further information on the interaction is available, future studies on combined chemotherapy with cisplatin should be carefully monitored and any side effects clearly documented. This case suggests that environmental conditions may play a contributing role in the development of RRD. This case also implies that neither fraction size nor total radiation dose is a determining factor in the development of the dermatologic reaction. (orig.) [German] Die ''Radiation-Recall-Reaktion'' (RRR) ist eine Entzuendungsreaktion, die in zuvor bestrahlten Bereichen auftritt. Das Phaenomen wird wahrscheinlich durch eine spezifische Ueberempfindlichkeitsreaktion verursacht, bei der ein zweites Agens die Entzuendungsreaktion hervorruft. Dieser Fallbericht beschreibt eine kaltwetterinduzierte RR-Hautentzuendung. Wir beobachteten bei dem Patienten nach einer Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin aufgrund eines Nasopharynxkarzinoms eine heftige RR-Dermatitis (RRD) aufgrund kalter Temperaturen, die sich 9 Tage nach Therapiebeendigung entwickelte. In der medizinischen Literatur scheint eine RRD infolge extrem kalter Temperaturen ein besonderes Ereignis. Bis weitere Informationen zu der Interaktion verfuegbar sind, sollten zukuenftige Studien zur Kombinationstherapie mit Cisplatin sorgfaeltig ueberwacht und Nebenwirkungen eindeutig dokumentiert

  16. Radiation optic neuropathy after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Hoving, Marjanke A.; Links, Thera P.; Dullaart, Robin P.F.; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Weeme, Cees A. ter; Canrinus, Alof A.; Szabo, Ben G.; Pott, Jan-Willem R.

    2003-01-01

    For diagnosing radiation optic neuropathy (RON) ophthalmological and imaging data were evaluated from 63 acromegalic patients, irradiated between 1967 and 1998. Two patients developed RON: one patient in one optic nerve 10 years and another patient in both optic nerves 5 months after radiation therapy. RON is a rare complication after external beam radiation therapy for acromegaly, which can occur after a considerable latency period

  17. Effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation: implications for nuclear energy and medical radiation. The 1979 report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (The BEIR Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1979-04-01

    The following aspects of the 1979 BEIR report are described: societal decision-making; nuclear energy needs and medical care services; epidemiological and experimental studies; public acceptance; concept of risks to health; risk estimates and cost-benefit analysis; and comparison of risks. Other topics discussed are as follows: need for advisory committees on radiation; value of the BEIR report; health effects of low levels of ionizing radiation; determination of radiation risk estimates; and quantitation of radioinduced cancer risk estimates

  18. Discussion of some issues in environmental impact reports of nuclear and radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1995-01-01

    The author discusses some issues in compilation and evaluation of environmental impact reports of nuclear and radiation facilities which should be noticeable. Some recommendations are made to improve the quality of the reports as well

  19. Radiation Protection Institute,Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Protection Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission was established to provide scientific and technical support for executing the operational functions of the Radiation Protection Board. The 2014 Annual Report highlights the operational activities of Institutes. Also presented is a list of research projects, publications and abstracts of technical reports.

  20. Radiation Protection Legislation in the Nordic Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Person, Lars.

    1990-01-01

    Recent alterations in the radiation protection laws of the Nordic countries are presented. The report amends the previous SS-report 87-37 with the title Radiation Protection and Atomic Energy Legislation in the Nordic Countries. (au)

  1. CIRRPC: Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination. Eighth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, A.L.

    1992-12-01

    CIRRPC's eighth year was marked by the completion of several CIRRPC projects, including: An independent study on the possible health effects of extremely low-frequency electric and magnetic fields; a report evaluating the uncertainties identified in a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report on the biological effects of ionizing radiation and their impact on the report's application to Federal risk assessment; an analysis of the use of two reports on radiation risk assessment from NAS and the United Nations; and an update of Part 11 of ORAU's radiation protection fact sheets, a compilation of major US radiation protection standards and guides. CIRRPC also sponsored a workshop on internal dosimetry and provided financial support to the 1991 Health Physics Society Summer School on the biological basis of radiation protection practice. The program highlights are briefly described in this report

  2. Report on the actual state of the basic, applied research and industrial applications of the radiation in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez V, H.

    1991-07-01

    In this report the main works of basic, applied research and industrial applications that are carried out in Mexico, about radiations (radiation chemistry, technology, applications, use and isotope production, etc.): infrastructure, radiation sources, groups and research programs are presented. (Author)

  3. The BEIR 3 report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    In 1980, a report was compiled by the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation on the effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation (BEIR-III Report). A general background is given of the implications of this report on the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. First, the reasons for having advisory committees on radiation and why the BEIR Committee and its current report are somewhat different from the others are briefly outlined. This is followed by discussions on 1) the important biological effects of low-level radiation; 2) what we know and do not know about the health effects of low-level radiation; 3) the uncertainties in the dose-response relationships for radiation-induced cancer; 4) the controversy over the estimation of the cancer risk from low-level radiation; 5) the sources of epidemiological data for the estimation of excess cancer risk in exposed human populations; 6) the risk estimates of radiation-induced cancer in man; and 7) the implications of numerical risk estimation for radiation protection and public health policy. (UK)

  4. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-11-01

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961

  5. The effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Report of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1972-11-01

    In the summer of 1970, the Federal Radiation Council (whose activities have since been transferred to the Radiation Office of the EPA) asked the National Academy of Sciences for information relevant to an evaluation of present radiation protection guides. This report is in response to that request. It presents a summary and analysis, by members of the Advisory Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations and its subcommittees, of current knowledge relating to risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. In many respects, the report is a sequel to the reports of the Committee on the Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation, published by the NAS-NRC from 1956 to 1961.

  6. Report on radiation exposure of lead-scintillator stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    A stack of lead and scintillator was placed in a neutral beam obtained from targeting 800 GeV protons. Small pieces of film containing radiochromic dye were placed adjacent to the layers of scintillator for the purpose of measuring the radiation dose to the scintillator. Our motivation was to calibrate the radiation dose obtainable in this manner for future tests of scintillator for SSC experiments and to relate dose to flux to check absolute normalization for calculations. We also observed several other radiation effects which should be considered for both damage and compensation in a calorimeter

  7. STUDIES IN WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION AND RADIATION INJURY. VOLUME III, A REPORT ON IONIZING RADIATION RECORD KEEPING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atomic Energy Commission, Washington, DC.

    THE SUCCESSFUL OPERATION OF THE PERMISSIBLE LEVEL CONCEPT OF RADIATION CONTROL NECESSARILY ENTAILS A COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEM UNDER WHICH EXPOSURE MUST BE RECORDED AND EMPLOYEES NOTIFIED OF THEIR EXPOSURE HISTORY. IN AN INVESTIGATION OF RECORD KEEPING NECESSARY TO PROCESS RADIATION CLAIMS, QUESTIONNAIRES OR LETTERS WERE RECEIVED FROM 45 STATE AGENCIES…

  8. Intraarterial infusion of cisplatin with and without preoperative concurrent radiation for urinary bladder cancer. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Mori, Hiromu; Matsumoto, Shunro

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical efficacy of treating urinary bladder cancer by intraarterial infusion of cisplatin using an implanted reservoir with and without preoperative concurrent radiation. No previous reports have compared the results obtained by these two methods of treatment. Twenty-three patients with bladder cancer were treated by intraarterial infusion of cisplatin using an implanted reservoir with (n=13) and without (n=10) concurrent radiation. The cisplatin plus radiation group received intraarterial cisplatin at a total dose of 200-400 mg and concurrent radiation to a total dose to 30 Gy. The cisplatin group received intraarterial cisplatin at a total dose of 100-600 mg. In the cisplatin plus radiation group, the overall tumor response rate was 92%. Seven of 13 (53%) patients obtained complate response (CR), and the 2-year actuarial survival rate was 92%. Only one of the seven complete responders has had a local recurrence. In the cisplatin group, the overall tumor response rate was 90%. Four of 10 (40%) patients obtained CR, and median survival was 8 months. Three of the four complete responders have had local recurrence. There was no significant difference between these two groups in the frequency of side effects. Concurrent radiation therapy with intraarterial cisplatin resulted in a very low rate of recurrence of bladder cancer compared with intraarterial cisplatin therapy alone. This method was useful for urinary bladder cancer and may become the treatment of choice for this type of cancer. (author)

  9. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 5, No. 2. Progress report, April-June 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.; Kramaric, M.; Cohen, L.

    1985-09-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network provides continuous measurement of the ambient radiation levels around licensed NRC facilities, primarily power reactors. The Network is intended to measure radiation levels during routine facility operations and to establish background radiation levels used to assess the radiological impact of an unusual condition, such as an accident. This report presents the radiation levels measured around all facilities in the Network for the second quarter of 1985. A complete listing of the site facilities monitored is included

  10. Radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible. Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molla, M.R.; Nishio, Juntaro; Matsuya, Tokuzo; Miyazaki, Tadashi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). School of Dentistry)

    1982-12-01

    Radiation therapy for the head and neck malignant tumor may often cause osteoradionecrosis of the mandible, leading to radiation osteomyelitis with a source of infection. The present study demonstrates two cases with radiation osteomyelitis of the mandible to discuss the etiology, radiological findings and preventive measure for this type of bone disease. The results indicate that, 1) A higher dose in external radiotherapy may claimed to be a potent factor to cause osteoradionecrosis and post irradiation periodontitis of the tooth associated with pain, may be preliminary symptom of leading radiation osteomyelitis, where a delayed healing of tooth extraction is an accelerating factor responsible for rapid progress of osteomyelitic changes. 2) Once infection sets in post irradiated bone, radio-osteomyelitic change is quite progressive even after various conservative measure. 3) Only radiological change in those cases is a slow formation of sequestrum time ranging from 7 to 10 months, with a gradual separation of dead bone as a large mass.

  11. Earth as a radio source: terrestrial kilometric radiation. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurnett, D.A.

    1974-02-01

    Radio wave experiments on the IMP-6 and 8 satellites have shown that the earth emits very intense electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from about 50 kHz to 500 kHz. A peak intensity the total power emitted in this frequency range is about 1 billion watts. The earth is, therefore, a very intense planetary radio source, with a total power output comparable to the decametric radio emission from Jupiter. This radio emission from the earth is referred to as terrestrial kilometric radiation. Terrestrial kilometric radiation appears to originate from low altitudes (less than 3.0 Re) in the auroral region. Possible mechanisms which can explain the generation and propagation of the terrestrial kilometric radiation are discussed. (U.S.)

  12. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  13. Extended abstracts: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response [final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.

    2000-01-01

    In July 1999, we organized the 4th International Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held in Killiney Bay, Dublin, Ireland, on July 17-18. Roughly 75 scientists (about equal numbers of physicists and biologists) attended the workshop, the fourth in a bi-annual series. Extended abstracts from the meeting were published in the Radiation Research journal, vol. 153, iss. 2, pp. 220-238 (February 2000)(attached). All the objectives in the proposal were met

  14. A prospective evaluation of treatment with Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIR-spheres) in patients with unresectable liver metastases from colorectal cancer previously treated with 5-FU based chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, L; Gibbs, P; Yip, D; Shapiro, JD; Dowling, R; Smith, D; Little, A; Bailey, W; Liechtenstein, M

    2005-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of selective internal radiation (SIR) spheres in patients with inoperable liver metastases from colorectal cancer who have failed 5FU based chemotherapy. Patients were prospectively enrolled at three Australian centres. All patients had previously received 5-FU based chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients were ECOG 0–2 and had liver dominant or liver only disease. Concurrent 5-FU was given at investigator discretion. Thirty patients were treated between January 2002 and March 2004. As of July 2004 the median follow-up is 18.3 months. Median patient age was 61.7 years (range 36 – 77). Twenty-nine patients are evaluable for toxicity and response. There were 10 partial responses (33%), with the median duration of response being 8.3 months (range 2–18) and median time to progression of 5.3 mths. Response rates were lower (21%) and progression free survival shorter (3.9 mths) in patients that had received all standard chemotherapy options (n = 14). No responses were seen in patients with a poor performance status (n = 3) or extrahepatic disease (n = 6). Overall treatment related toxicity was acceptable, however significant late toxicity included 4 cases of gastric ulceration. In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that have previously received treatment with 5-FU based chemotherapy, treatment with SIR-spheres has demonstrated encouraging activity. Further studies are required to better define the subsets of patients most likely to respond

  15. PWR radiation fields at combustion engineering plants through mid-1985: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barshay, S.S.; Beineke, T.A.; Bradshaw, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents the results of the initial phase of the EPRI-PWR Standard Radiation Monitoring Program (SRMP) for PWR nuclear power plants with Nuclear Steam Supply Systems supplied by Combustion Engineering, Inc. The purposes of the SRMP are to provide reliable, consistent and systematic measurements of the rate of radiation-field buildup at operating PWR's; and to use that information to identify opportunities for radiation control and the consequent reduction of occupational radiation exposure. The report includes radiation surveys from seven participating power plants. These surveys were conducted at well-defined locations on the reactor coolant loop piping and steam generators, and/or inside the steam generator channel heads. In most cases only one survey is available from each power plant, so that conclusions about the rate of radiation-field buildup are not possible. Some observations are made about the distribution pattern of radiation levels within the steam generator channel heads and around the reactor coolant loops. The report discusses the relationship between out-of-core radiation fields (as measured by the SRMP) and: the pH of the reactor coolant, the concentration of lithium hydroxide in the reactor coolant, and the frequency of changes in reactor power level. In order to provide data for possible future correlations of these parameters with the SRMP radiation-field data, the report summarizes information available from participating plants on primary coolant pH, and on the frequency of changes in reactor power level. 12 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs

  16. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-21

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government`s role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future.

  17. Interim report of the Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments was created by President Clinton to advise the Human Radiation Interagency Working Group on the ethical and scientific criteria applicable to human radiation experiments carried out or sponsored by the U.S. Government. The Committee seeks to answer several fundamental question: What ethics criteria should be used to evaluate human radiation experiments? What was the Federal Government's role in human radiation experiments? What are the criteria for determining appropriate Federal responses where wrongs or harms have occurred? What lessons learned from studying past and present research standards and practices should be applied to the future? The Committee has been gathering vast amounts of information and working to render it orderly and accessible. In the next six months, the Committee will continue with the tasks of data gathering and organizing. The focus of the work, however, will be developing criteria for judging historical and contemporary experiments, policies, and procedures, as well as criteria for remedies that may be appropriate where harms or wrongs have ocurred. Based on findings, the Committee will make specific recommendations regarding policies for the future

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described

  19. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  20. Radiation-induced chondrosarcomas: A case report with review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy has become an important component of various cancer treatments. The development of second malignancy as a result of radiation therapy is a well-known sinister complication. However, radiation-induced sarcomas (RIS are rare complications of radiation therapy. The timescale between completion of the radiotherapy and the development of a second malignancy, known as the latent period, can vary widely from as little as 5 years to 50 years later. Radiation-induced sarcomas per se are very rare and those with histomorphology of chondrosarcomas are even rarer. We report a rare case of RIS of left iliac bone in a 62-year-old lady after combined chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma (stage IIb. This case is being reported for its extreme rarity, vivid histology and clinical presentation.

  1. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2006 to March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio; Kaneko, Osamu; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2007-10-15

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is proceeding with the research on magnetic confining nuclear fusion both experimentally and theoretically. During the experiment with deals with very hot plasma, X ray is generated. Therefore the experimental devices with their surroundings are administrated in conformity with the Industrial Safety and Health Law to keep workplace safety. The Radiation Control Safety Office of Safety Hygiene Protection Bureau carries out measuring the radiation dose level regularly, registering the employees who are engaged in plasma experiments, and training them. Non-regulated small sealed sources are used in some detectors. The treating of these sources is controlled by the Safety and Environmental Research Center. This report is on administrative works for radiation safety in the last fiscal year 2006. It includes (1) report on the establishment of radiation safety management system, (2) report on the establishment of training and registration system for radiation workers, and (3) results of radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site by using Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiment (RMSAFE). The report has been published annually. We hope that these reports would be helpful for future safety management in NIFS. (author)

  2. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2006 to March 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Akio; Kaneko, Osamu; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2007-10-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is proceeding with the research on magnetic confining nuclear fusion both experimentally and theoretically. During the experiment with deals with very hot plasma, X ray is generated. Therefore the experimental devices with their surroundings are administrated in conformity with the Industrial Safety and Health Law to keep workplace safety. The Radiation Control Safety Office of Safety Hygiene Protection Bureau carries out measuring the radiation dose level regularly, registering the employees who are engaged in plasma experiments, and training them. Non-regulated small sealed sources are used in some detectors. The treating of these sources is controlled by the Safety and Environmental Research Center. This report is on administrative works for radiation safety in the last fiscal year 2006. It includes (1) report on the establishment of radiation safety management system, (2) report on the establishment of training and registration system for radiation workers, and (3) results of radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site by using Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiment (RMSAFE). The report has been published annually. We hope that these reports would be helpful for future safety management in NIFS. (author)

  3. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  4. Radiation-associated colon cancer: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Ishihara, Soichiro; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Kaneko, Manabu; Murono, Koji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Teppei; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2017-06-01

    Radiation-associated colon cancer is a rare clinical entity. We herein describe the case of a patient with radiation-associated colon cancer who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy. Certain characteristics of radiation-associated colon cancer are highlighted. The patient was a 48-year-old man who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy at a total dose of 50 Gy, at the age of 29 years. When the patient presented at the University of Tokyo Hospital, 19 years after the surgery, he complained of severe anal pain and frequent defecation. Colonoscopy revealed two flat tumors in the sigmoid colon, located 10 cm to the oral side of the anastomosis site, which were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinomas. In addition, colonoscopy identified five flat polyps near the tumors, which were resected endoscopically. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the sigmoid colon and no evidence of distant metastasis. Laparoscopic-assisted intersphincteric resection of the rectum and sigmoid colon with diverting ileostomy was performed. There were no specific postoperative complications and the patient was discharged from the hospital on the 20th postoperative day. On pathological examination, the resected rectum and sigmoid colon contained two separate tumors and six flat polyps. The two tumors were diagnosed as well-differentiated adenocarcinomas with invasion of the subserosa and submucosa, respectively. A total of 17 regional lymph nodes without metastasis were resected. The six flat polyps were diagnosed as tubular adenomas. We herein present a case of a radiation-associated colon cancer in a patient who had undergone low anterior resection for rectal cancer following preoperative radiotherapy 19 years prior. Colonoscopic surveillance of radiation-associated colon cancer may be indicated for rectal cancer patients treated with preoperative

  5. De novo adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma presenting anew in an elderly patient with previous normal CT and MRI studies: A case report and implications on pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Walker, B.S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas are histologically benign epithelial tumors which arise from embryonic remnants of the craniopharyngeal duct and Rathke’s pouch. They are thought to have a congenital origin and are histologically unique from papillary craniopharyngioma. We describe the case of an elderly male who presented with symptoms related to a large craniopharyngioma with previously normal brain magnetic resonance and computed tomography imaging studies. These findings dispute the embryogenic theory that craniopharyngiomas observed in adults develop from the persistent slow growth of embryonic remnants.

  6. 1996 report on occupational radiation exposures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Statistics are provided on occupational radiation exposures of monitored workers in Canada. The information is based on the data in the National Dose Registry maintained by the Radiation Protection Bureau of Health Canada. The Registry is a centralized record-keeping system containing dose information on all monitored workers in Canada. It includes records from the National Dosimetry Services (NDS), as well as data submitted by nuclear power generating stations, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., uranium mines, and private dosimeter processing companies. About 80 percent of the records are from the NDS. 9 refs., 4 tabs

  7. Radiation-Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. Report 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shelton, Jacob H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ericson, Milton Nance [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blalock, Benjamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    As the recent accident at Fukushima Daiichi so vividly demonstrated, telerobotic technologies capable of withstanding high radiation environments need to be readily available to enable operations, repair, and recovery under severe accident scenarios when human entry is extremely dangerous or not possible. Telerobotic technologies that enable remote operation in high dose rate environments have undergone revolutionary improvement over the past few decades. However, much of this technology cannot be employed in nuclear power environments because of the radiation sensitivity of the electronics and the organic insulator materials currently in use. This is a report of the activities involving Task 3 of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) 2 project Radiation Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays [1]. Evaluation of the performance of the system for both pre- and post-irradiation as well as operation at elevated temperature will be performed. Detailed performance of the system will be documented to ensure the design meets requirements prior to any extended evaluation. A suite of tests will be developed which will allow evaluation before and after irradiation and during temperature. Selection of the radiation exposure facilities will be determined in the early phase of the project. Radiation exposure will consist of total integrated dose (TID) up to 200 kRad or above with several intermediate doses during test. Dose rates will be in various ranges determined by the facility that will be used with a target of 30 kRad/hr. Many samples of the pre-commercial devices to be used will have been tested in previous projects to doses of at least 300 kRad and temperatures up to 125C. The complete systems will therefore be tested for performance at intermediate doses. Extended temperature testing will be performed up to the limit of the commercial sensors. The test suite performed at each test point will consist of operational testing of the three basic

  8. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2013; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung. Jahresbreicht 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachenberger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Loebke-Reinl, Angelika; Peter, Josef (comps.) [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The report on environmental radioactivity and radiation exposure 2013 includes data concerning the following issues: sources of natural and artificial radioactivity, radon in buildings, radioactive materials in construction materials and industrial products, nuclear weapon tests, the consequences of reactor accidents in Chernobyl and Fukushima, nuclear facilities, occupational exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, handling of radioactive materials in research and technology, radioactive wastes, radiation accidents and specific incidents.

  9. Protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. A report for discussion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The acceptability of practices which involve the release of radionuclides into the environment, and of situations where residual radionuclides from accidents or improperly controlled practices exist in the environment, are generally assessed on the basis of implied radiation doses to humans. This approach is consistent with the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which include the statement that 'the standard of environmental control needed to protect man to the degree currently thought desirable will ensure that other species are not put at risk'. The general applicability of this statement has been explored in previous IAEA and other publications. These concluded that the statement is generally valid but that reliance upon human based radiological protection criteria may not be adequate for all possible space or time scales. In recent years awareness of the vulnerability of the environment has increased and the need to protect it against the effects of industrial pollutants has been recognized. This trend is reflected in new and developing international policies for environmental protection. In the context of protection of the environment against ionizing radiation, the existing international approach is being challenged in some IAEA Member States and proposals are being made for strategies which provide for explicit protection of the environment. The present publication represents a first step towards establishing an internationally accepted philosophy and associated methodology for protecting the environment against ionizing radiations. The report reviews the various related issues and examines possible approaches to establishing criteria. It is intended for use in stimulating discussion on the subject in Member States. For its part, the IAEA intends to continue a programme of work in this area with the long term objective of providing specific recommendations on primary protection criteria and methods for

  10. Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

  11. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ``biological fingerprint`` of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  12. Previous ISD Program Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    report. The detail required for such a review would be unwieldy and would comsume inordinate amounts of time. The result of the document review will...attempts have been made at writing specific behavioral objectives (SBOs). These, however, have proven to be inadequate in that they are not stated in... behavioral terms (e.g., "will understand," "will have a knowledge of," etc.). C. Development of CRO/CRTs? In nearly all cases, ISD teams are just

  13. Spinal Cord Glioblastoma Induced by Radiation Therapy of Nasopharyngeal Rhabdomyosarcoma with MRI Findings: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Se Jin; Kim, In One [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Radiation-induced spinal cord gliomas are extremely rare. Since the first case was reported in 1980, only six additional cases have been reported.; The radiation-induced gliomas were related to the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma, thyroid cancer, and medullomyoblastoma, and to multiple chest fluoroscopic examinations in pulmonary tuberculosis patient. We report a case of radiation-induced spinal cord glioblastoma developed in a 17-year-old girl after a 13-year latency period following radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma. MRI findings of our case are described.

  14. Radiation and Photochemistry Section annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    A survey is presented of research on reactive intermediates in the condensed phase and chemistry induced by energetic radiation. The survey is presented in two major parts: (1) ions, excited states, and other transients in condensed phase; and (2) role of solvents in chemical reactivity. Accelerator activities (20-MeV linac, 3-MeV Van de Graaff) are summarized

  15. Combined Injury Modeling: Radiation and Burn Workshop Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    the effects manifest from 6-12 months post exposure, which is later than the lung and GI effects. Liver effects may also play a prominent role...when radiation exposure is combined with burn. For instance, in the Chernobyl accident, hepatic encephalopathy was a major cause of death in patients

  16. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Final report, October 1, 1971--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, H.H.; Hall, E.J.

    1978-02-01

    Research under Contract EY-76-C-02-3243 has been carried out in the area of Radiation Physics, Biophysics and Radiation Biology. During the period of this contract the major accomplishments include, in Physics, the refinement of tissue equivalent dosimetry, the formulation of the concepts of microdosimetry, the development of apparatus used in microdosimetry, and the development of ionization chambers with internal gas multiplication. Principal contributions in Radiobiology have included the determination of RBE and OER as a function of neutron energy, the study of combined effects of radiation and a variety of other agents, and the investigation of the transformation of cells in tissue culture. Theoretical research centered around the development of the theoretical framework of microdosimetry and the establishment of the Theory of Dual Radiation Action. In a cooperative effort with Brookhaven National Laboratory, a major accelerator facility dedicated exclusively to Radiobiology and Radiation Physics, has been developed. Members of the laboratory have performed extensive service to national and international organizations

  17. An Evaluation of Departmental Radiation Oncology Incident Reports: Anticipating a National Reporting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terezakis, Stephanie A.; Harris, Kendra M.; Ford, Eric; Michalski, Jeff; DeWeese, Theodore; Santanam, Lakshmi; Mutic, Sasa; Gay, Hiram

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Systems to ensure patient safety are of critical importance. The electronic incident reporting systems (IRS) of 2 large academic radiation oncology departments were evaluated for events that may be suitable for submission to a national reporting system (NRS). Methods and Materials: All events recorded in the combined IRS were evaluated from 2007 through 2010. Incidents were graded for potential severity using the validated French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) 5-point scale. These incidents were categorized into 7 groups: (1) human error, (2) software error, (3) hardware error, (4) error in communication between 2 humans, (5) error at the human-software interface, (6) error at the software-hardware interface, and (7) error at the human-hardware interface. Results: Between the 2 systems, 4407 incidents were reported. Of these events, 1507 (34%) were considered to have the potential for clinical consequences. Of these 1507 events, 149 (10%) were rated as having a potential severity of ≥2. Of these 149 events, the committee determined that 79 (53%) of these events would be submittable to a NRS of which the majority was related to human error or to the human-software interface. Conclusions: A significant number of incidents were identified in this analysis. The majority of events in this study were related to human error and to the human-software interface, further supporting the need for a NRS to facilitate field-wide learning and system improvement

  18. An Evaluation of Departmental Radiation Oncology Incident Reports: Anticipating a National Reporting System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terezakis, Stephanie A., E-mail: stereza1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Harris, Kendra M. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Ford, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); DeWeese, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Santanam, Lakshmi; Mutic, Sasa; Gay, Hiram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Systems to ensure patient safety are of critical importance. The electronic incident reporting systems (IRS) of 2 large academic radiation oncology departments were evaluated for events that may be suitable for submission to a national reporting system (NRS). Methods and Materials: All events recorded in the combined IRS were evaluated from 2007 through 2010. Incidents were graded for potential severity using the validated French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) 5-point scale. These incidents were categorized into 7 groups: (1) human error, (2) software error, (3) hardware error, (4) error in communication between 2 humans, (5) error at the human-software interface, (6) error at the software-hardware interface, and (7) error at the human-hardware interface. Results: Between the 2 systems, 4407 incidents were reported. Of these events, 1507 (34%) were considered to have the potential for clinical consequences. Of these 1507 events, 149 (10%) were rated as having a potential severity of ≥2. Of these 149 events, the committee determined that 79 (53%) of these events would be submittable to a NRS of which the majority was related to human error or to the human-software interface. Conclusions: A significant number of incidents were identified in this analysis. The majority of events in this study were related to human error and to the human-software interface, further supporting the need for a NRS to facilitate field-wide learning and system improvement.

  19. Addendum report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (3). Recent related overseas activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Kawaura, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    Following the Statement on Tissue Reaction issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), revisions and discussions are underway in various international organizations about the standards, guidelines and methods for the eye dosimetry. We have previously discussed these issues in six interim reports, followed by two addendum reports on lens dosimetry. This addendum report reviews ongoing overseas discussion and work in relation to research on radiogenic cataracts and implementation of the new eye lens dose limit, such as those in the European Commission, Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi), Open Project for European Radiation Research Area (OPERRA), and the Unite Sates National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). This report serves as the last part of a series of reports by the Japan Health Physics Society Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye. (author)

  20. Radiation-induced effects in organic systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    This project, which is of twenty-seven years duration, has been devoted to furthering our basic understanding of the processes involved in the absorption and distribution of high-energy radiation in organic molecules. The early phases of the work were concerned with the gross chemical effects of radiation and included studies in a number of important classes of organic compounds including alcohols, aliphatic acids, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Basic information was acquired through these studies that has led to a better understanding of the effects of high-energy radiation on condensed media. During this period the so-called protective effect of low concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons was also studied. A contribution of lasting significance at this time was the development of a technique for the post-radiolysis analysis of trapped free radicals by photochemical means. A comprehensive series of papers on the reactions of thermal hydrogen atoms with frozen organic substrates represented the beginning of a new phase in the approach to the problems of radiation chemistry in this laboratory. Since that time the general philosophy guided the research has been to single out events or processes suspected of contributing to the gross-radiation effect and study them in isolation. Thus from 1970 on efforts were devoted to charge-exchange processes, ionization efficiencies (w-values), radical decay process in solids and ion-dissociation reactions. The first by means of a modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the second utilizing an ionization chamber constructed in the FSU shops, the third using electron spin resonance detection, and the last involving the use of a dual mass spectrometer, solid target system invented in our laboratory. The most productive of these efforts has been the radical decay work

  1. Two case reports: Carcinoma of the cervix and carcinoma of the endometrium treated with radiotherapy after previous irradiation for benign uterine bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, C. [Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1998-08-01

    In the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, low doses of radiotherapy were used to treat benign uterine bleeding. The cases of two women who received this form of therapy and later developed gynaecological malignancies and had high-dose pelvic radiotherapy are presented. A 76-year-old woman with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage-II B squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix received external beam radiotherapy and intra-uterine brachytherapy and a 77-year-old woman with a FIGO stage-I B endometrial adenocarcinoma received adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Both women had a significant past history of low-dose-rate intra-uterine irradiation for dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Therefore the theoretical question of carcinogenesis was raised, and also the practical questions of what dose had previously been given and what further dose could be safely given with regard to normal tissue tolerance. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 20 refs.

  2. Two case reports: Carcinoma of the cervix and carcinoma of the endometrium treated with radiotherapy after previous irradiation for benign uterine bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, C.

    1998-01-01

    In the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, low doses of radiotherapy were used to treat benign uterine bleeding. The cases of two women who received this form of therapy and later developed gynaecological malignancies and had high-dose pelvic radiotherapy are presented. A 76-year-old woman with an International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage-II B squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix received external beam radiotherapy and intra-uterine brachytherapy and a 77-year-old woman with a FIGO stage-I B endometrial adenocarcinoma received adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy. Both women had a significant past history of low-dose-rate intra-uterine irradiation for dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Therefore the theoretical question of carcinogenesis was raised, and also the practical questions of what dose had previously been given and what further dose could be safely given with regard to normal tissue tolerance. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  3. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, January-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report provides the status and results of the NRC Thermoluminescent Dosimeter (TLD) Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. It presents the radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 55 NRC-licensed facility sites throughout the country for the first half of 1981. The program objectives, scope, and methodology are given. The TLD system, dosimeter location, data processing scheme, and quality assurance program are outlined

  4. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October-December 1985. Volume 5, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, J.; Rabatin, K.; Cohen, L.

    1986-05-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1985. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  5. NRC TLD [thermoluminescent dosimeter] Direct Radiation Monitoring Network: Progress report, October--December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.; NcNamara, N.

    1989-04-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1988. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 4 tabs

  6. BEIR-III report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-03-01

    A general background is given of the implications the BEIR-III Report may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides are discussed

  7. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

  8. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Tooth extraction by orthodontic force after radiation therapy: report of case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodu, B.; Filler, S.J.; Woodfin, G.K.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents a therapeutic approach to orthodontic tooth extraction in a patient at high risk for the development of osteoradionecrosis with conventional techniques. The rationale for this procedure is discussed in detail, combining principles of radiation biology, clinical radiation therapy, and biomechanics of tooth movement.

  10. Radiation carcinogenesis. Comprehensive three-year progress report, 1 May 1972--15 March 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.; Gates, O.

    1976-03-01

    Progress is reported on studies on the pathological effects of various doses of x radiation on rats and mice, with emphasis on radioinduced carcinogenesis in parabiont rats with one of the pair exposed to 1000 R of whole body x radiation and the other shielded. Results are included from studies on alterations in metabolic parameters and life span induced by irradiation

  11. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program

  12. Tooth extraction by orthodontic force after radiation therapy: report of case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodu, B.; Filler, S.J.; Woodfin, G.K.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents a therapeutic approach to orthodontic tooth extraction in a patient at high risk for the development of osteoradionecrosis with conventional techniques. The rationale for this procedure is discussed in detail, combining principles of radiation biology, clinical radiation therapy, and biomechanics of tooth movement

  13. BEIR-III report and its implications for radiation protection and public health policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-03-01

    A general background is given of the implications the BEIR-III Report may have on societal decision-making in the regulation of activities concerned with the health effects of low-level radiation. The scientific basis for establishing appropriate radiation protection guides are discussed. (ACR)

  14. NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struckmeyer, R.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Report of the radiation group on radiation backgrounds and damage in the ISABELLE intersection regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Toohig, T.E.

    1976-01-01

    The Radiation Group was charged to examine radiation aspects of the current ISABELLE design and the projected experimental arrangements. Some samples of questions to be addressed were: (1) how does the overall shielding design impact the experimental design, (2) what backgrounds might be expected from the proposed beam scraping, shaving, etc. schemes, (3) what are the radiation damage considerations for experimental electronics near the beam, and (4) what backgrounds might be expected in an experiment from operation of another experiment in the same or the adjacent intersection region. A review is given based on the ISABELLE Proposal, The Proceedings of the 1975 ISABELLE Summer Study, and the estimate of ISABELLE shielding requirements by Stevens and Thorndike

  16. Radiation-induced colon cancer with high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Masami; Ueno, Masashi; Koizumi, Koichi [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital] [and others

    2002-07-01

    We report a 67-year-old female with radiation-induced colon cancer which developed 23 years after radiation therapy for cancer of the endometrium. She was strongly suspected to be a case of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) due to her clinical manifestations, i.e. metachronous multiple cancer developed in the endometrium and colon. MSI test and immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins revealed that MSI was highly positive and expression of hMSH2 was lost in the colon cancers. Further, on examining the genetic change, the point mutation, ACG{yields}ATG, responsible for amino acid change, was detected in codon8 (exon1) of the hMSH2 gene. The change, however, could be a polymorphism of this gene and further analyses were necessitated to confirm the genetic background for HNPCC. Interestingly, three cancers with adenoma were located in the mucosa of radiation colitis, in which several atypical glands were also found. This is the only case of radiation-induced colorectal cancer with MSI-H in our hospital. Because of our previous studies, we believe that the genetic pathway in carcinogenesis of the radiation-induced colon cancer is different from that of HNPCC, despite their having several kinds of clinical and pathological features in common. (author)

  17. Radiation-induced colon cancer with high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Masami; Ueno, Masashi; Koizumi, Koichi

    2002-01-01

    We report a 67-year-old female with radiation-induced colon cancer which developed 23 years after radiation therapy for cancer of the endometrium. She was strongly suspected to be a case of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) due to her clinical manifestations, i.e. metachronous multiple cancer developed in the endometrium and colon. MSI test and immunohistochemistry for mismatch repair (MMR) proteins revealed that MSI was highly positive and expression of hMSH2 was lost in the colon cancers. Further, on examining the genetic change, the point mutation, ACG→ATG, responsible for amino acid change, was detected in codon8 (exon1) of the hMSH2 gene. The change, however, could be a polymorphism of this gene and further analyses were necessitated to confirm the genetic background for HNPCC. Interestingly, three cancers with adenoma were located in the mucosa of radiation colitis, in which several atypical glands were also found. This is the only case of radiation-induced colorectal cancer with MSI-H in our hospital. Because of our previous studies, we believe that the genetic pathway in carcinogenesis of the radiation-induced colon cancer is different from that of HNPCC, despite their having several kinds of clinical and pathological features in common. (author)

  18. The use of porcine small intestinal submucosa mesh (SURGISIS as a pelvic sling in a man and a woman with previous pelvic surgery: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sahaf Osama

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Closing the pelvic peritoneum to prevent the small bowel dropping into the pelvis after surgery for locally recurrent rectal cancer is important to prevent adhesions deep in the pelvis or complications of adjuvant radiotherapy. Achieving this could be difficult because sufficient native tissue is unavailable; we report on the use of small intestine submucosa extra-cellular matrix mesh in the obliteration of the pelvic brim. Case presentation We describe two cases in which submucosa extra-cellular matrix mesh was used to obliterate the pelvic brim following resection of a recurrent rectal tumour; the first patient, a 78-year-old Caucasian man, presented with small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions to a recurrent rectal tumour. The second patient, an 84-year-old Caucasian woman, presented with vaginal discharge caused by an entero-vaginal fistula due to a recurrent rectal tumour. Conclusion We report on the use of submucosa extra-cellular matrix mesh as a pelvic sling in cases where primary closure of the pelvic peritoneum is unfeasible. Its use had no infective complications and added minimal morbidity to the postoperative period. This is an original case report that would be of interest to general and colorectal surgeons.

  19. Radiation biophysicl study of biological molecules. Progress report, February 1, 1975--June 30, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: direct action target investigation of molecular weights of enzymes exposed to fast electrons; direct action gamma radiation dosimetry with T 1 bacteriophage; uv radiation sensitivity of T 1 bacteriophage on various host strains of E. coli; temperature dependence of uv radiation direct action on dry T 1 bacteriophage; investigation of light and temperature effects during incubation of T 1 bacteriophage exposed to fast electrons; test of superoxide anion as a radiation intermediate in cellular radiobiology; uv action spectra related to error-prone repair; uv-reactivation experiments with T 1 and lambda bacteriophages; and split-dose uv mutagenesis in E. coli

  20. A-State-of-the-Art Report on Application of Radiation Technology to Environmental Pollution Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Kwang; Lee, Myun Joo

    2004-06-15

    Radiation technology has been rapidly developed for decades and its applicability also enlarged to many fields such as environmental protection, medical care, manufacturing industry, agriculture, and bio technology. In this report, we focused on the present situation of the development of radiation facilities and state-of-the-art on application of radiation to environmental pollution control including purification of flue gas, waste water treatment, and recycling of biological waste. We especially discussed the radiation technology for environmental pollution control and described the capability of its application to the industrial plants in Korea.

  1. Radiation-induced bilateral cystic frontal lobe necroses demonstrating a fluid-blood level; Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineura, Katsuyoshi; Sasajima, Toshio; Kowada, Masayoshi [Akita Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ogawa, Toshihide

    1992-02-01

    A 41-year-old male developed radiation-induced bilateral cystic frontal lobe necroses after irradiation for an olfactory neuroblastoma. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed the lesions, one containing a fluid-blood level on CT scans and niveau formation on MR images. It was proved to be a coagulated hematoma within the cyst at surgery. Such a fluid-blood level in a radiation-induced cyst has never been reported, although hemorrhage frequently accompanies delayed radiation necrosis. Positron emission tomography with multiple tracers may be useful in differentiating cerebral radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence, because of absence of abnormal tracer accumulation. (author).

  2. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  3. Radiation hygienic annual report 2012. General environmental radioactivity and radiation surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear facilities in Bavaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfau, T.; Bernkopf, J.; Klement, R.; Bayerisches Landesamt fuer Umwelt, Augsburg

    2013-01-01

    The radiation hygienic annual report 2012 includes the following issues: (1) Introduction: Legal aspects of the surveillance, implementation of the radiation protection law, nuclear facility sites in Bavaria, interim storage facilities in Bavaria. (2) Natural radioactivity surveillance: measured data for the exposure paths air, water, food chain land, food chain water, residuals and waste. (3) Radiation surveillance in the vicinity of nuclear facilities in Bavaria: measures for air, precipitation, soils, plants, food chain land, milk and milk products, surface water, food chain water, drinking and ground water; measured data in the vicinity of NNP Isar 1 bd Isar 2 (KKI1/KKI2), NPP Gundremmingen (KGG), NPP Grafenrheinfeld (KKG), research neutron source Muenchen FRM II; emissions, meteorological conditions, spreading calculations.

  4. Four Forensic Entomology Case Studies: Records and Behavioral Observations on Seldom Reported Cadaver Fauna With Notes on Relevant Previous Occurrences and Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Natalie K; Sisson, Melissa S; Archambeault, Alan D; Rahlwes, Brent C; Willett, James R; Bucheli, Sibyl R

    2015-03-01

    A yearlong survey of insect taxa associated with human decomposition was conducted at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science (STAFS) facility located in the Center for Biological Field Studies of Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, TX. During this study, four insect-cadaver interactions were observed that represent previously poorly documented yet forensically significant interactions: Syrphidae maggots colonized a corpse in an aquatic situation; Psychodidae adults mated and oviposited on an algal film that was present on a corpse that had been recently removed from water; several Panorpidae were the first insects to feed upon a freshly placed corpse in the autumn; and a noctuid caterpillar was found chewing and ingesting dried human skin. Baseline knowledge of insect-cadaver interactions is the foundation of forensic entomology, and unique observations have the potential to expand our understanding of decomposition ecology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Radiation-associated ischemic coloproctitis. Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomori, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Takashi; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Isa, Tsutomu; Muto, Yoshihiro; Egawa, Haruhiko [Ryukyus Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1999-10-01

    Radiation-associated ischemic coloproctitis is a rare clinical entity caused by vascular insufficiency to the rectosigmoid colon. It most commonly occurs after radiotherapy for gynecological cancer. We present herein the cases of two patients who developed radiation-associated coloproctitis with transmural necrosis and eventual perforation. Perforation of the rectosigmoid colon occurred 3.5 years after radiotherapy in case 1, a 46-year-old woman, and presented as a well-defined small area of transmural necrosis. Conversely, in case 2, a 55-year-old woman, it occurred 1.5 years after radiotherapy, and presented as segmental, diffuse transmural necrosis. The lesion in case 1 had been caused by intramural vascular obliteration due to marked fibrosis of the bowel wall, while that in case 2 had been caused by occlusion of the mesenteric artery with thrombosis. Both patients underwent Hartmann's resection without rectal excision, and survived the perforative event. (author)

  6. Radiation-associated ischemic coloproctitis. Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomori, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Takashi; Shiraishi, Masayuki; Isa, Tsutomu; Muto, Yoshihiro; Egawa, Haruhiko

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-associated ischemic coloproctitis is a rare clinical entity caused by vascular insufficiency to the rectosigmoid colon. It most commonly occurs after radiotherapy for gynecological cancer. We present herein the cases of two patients who developed radiation-associated coloproctitis with transmural necrosis and eventual perforation. Perforation of the rectosigmoid colon occurred 3.5 years after radiotherapy in case 1, a 46-year-old woman, and presented as a well-defined small area of transmural necrosis. Conversely, in case 2, a 55-year-old woman, it occurred 1.5 years after radiotherapy, and presented as segmental, diffuse transmural necrosis. The lesion in case 1 had been caused by intramural vascular obliteration due to marked fibrosis of the bowel wall, while that in case 2 had been caused by occlusion of the mesenteric artery with thrombosis. Both patients underwent Hartmann's resection without rectal excision, and survived the perforative event. (author)

  7. Report reorganisation radiation protection R.U.L.-A.Z.L.-I.R.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    In this report a radiation-protection organization is proposed for hospitals. The financial, material and personal consequences are indicated. Legal aspects are taken into consideration, and regulations are proposed

  8. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report: third new contract year

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1980-01-01

    Research progress for 1979-1980 is reported. Projects discussed include the process of radiation-induced repair, Weigle-reactivation, induced radioresistance, the induction of the recA gene product, uv mutagenesis, and the induction of lambda

  9. Radiation physics and biology: Progress report for period December 1, 1986-November 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, J.S.

    1987-04-01

    This annual report describes progress made on 14 individual research projects. These projects fall naturally into theoretical biophysics, experimental microdosimetry and radiation biology. Each project has been separately abstracted for the Energy Data Base

  10. Effects of ionizing radiation on salamander orientation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoop, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    Pens were stocked with larvae of Am, bystoma opacum, A. maculatum, and Rana sylvatica and observations were made on survivorship, metamorphosis, size of juveniles, length of larval period, and migration. Migrating adults were irradiated with a 137 Cs source; the control and experimental animals were then returned to their points of capture and released. Radiation effects were not evident. Studies were conducted on the uptake and turnover of sodium, praseodymium, and europium by larval and hatchling amphibians and reptiles

  11. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1976-01-01

    Studies on regulation of gene expression included research projects on turnover of ribosomal RNA, ribonuclease-resistant oligonucleotides, and reutilization of oligonucleotides. Studies on radiation effects on RNA included research projects on radioinduced strand breaks in RNA and radioinduced alterations in RNA nucleotides. Effects of vasopression on radiosensitivity were studied. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions included research projects on synthesis and spectroscopic analysis of nucleotide-amino acid covalently bonded model compound and intermolecular interactions between tryptophan and dinucleoside phosphates

  12. ASA conference on radiation and health, Coolfont VI: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The 1986 ASA Conference on Radiation and Health (Coolfont VI) continued the procedure established in 1981 of holding forenoon and evening sessions, leaving afternoons free for discussion and relaxation. One exception was made this year in that Michael and Marie Stoline were invited to discuss the Chernobyl Disaster on Monday afternoon. The program consisted of the following topics: a general overview of radiation and health problems; cytogenetics and radiation (human and animal studies and statistical analysis of dose-response curves); uranium and health effects, including continuing emphasis on radon, which has attracted considerable national interest lately; epidemiologic studies of workers at nuclear power plants and an uranium processing plant; the latest assessment of atomic bomb dosimetry. These Coolfont Conferences provide an excellent environment for an interchange of ideas and information in an assemblage of scientists from a variety of disciplines. Unfortunately there is one important factor which limits this interchange: language. In order to overcome the difficulty of statisticians understanding nuclear scientists and nuclear scientists understanding statisticians, I suggested one of two procedures: each group prepare a set of commonly used terms with definitions which would be understood by the other group(s); have an introductory session in which each group attempts to explain its language to the other group(s). This problem of communication is even more serious when scientists attempt to explain their research efforts to the general public. The Coolfont Conferences on Radiation and Health should be ideal forums for development of a language which could be understood by the general public as well as different scientific groups. This document contains the abstracts of 12 presented papers

  13. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1974-01-01

    Work during the past year has been focused on three areas related to the cellular effects of radiation. Radiation effects on RNA and the regulation of gene expression and amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were studied. Studies on the radiation response of RNA in growing and confluent cells were continued. We have derived radiation survival curves and demonstrated repair of potentially lethal damage in 3T3 cells. Studies of giant cell formation and turnover of ribosomal RNA in irradiated cells has demonstrated differences in growing and confluent cells. We have sought evidence consistent with our hypothesis for regulation of eukaryotic gene expression with segments of RNA reutilized to prime new RNA synthesis. Data derived from the turnover of ribosomal RNA and the methylation pattern of ribosomal RNA during turnover are consistent with the possibility that a segment of 18s ribosomal RNA is being conserved during new RNA synthesis. We were unable to show reutilization of the 5' trinucleotide of 18s and 28s ribosomal RNA but did find a ribonuclease resistant oligonucleotide in 18s RNA which appeared to be reutilized. In studies of amino acid nucleic-acid interactions using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy we have been able to successfully synthesize an amidate and begin an examination of the intramolecular interactions. We have also studied intermolecular interactions betweentryptophan and nucleoside monophosphates and found upfield shifts which provide evidence for preferential stacking of the 6-membered ring of tryptophan with adenine and evidence for specific geometry of interactions of tryptophan with cytosine. (U.S.)

  14. Cellular therapy to treat ionizing radiation-induced cutaneous radiation syndrome: 2 cases report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderitter, M.; Chapel, A.; Trompier, F.; Clairand, I.; Bottolier-Depois, J.F.; Gourmelon, P.; Bey, E.; Lataillade, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text: Localized irradiation at high dose exposition could induce severe radiation burns characterized by the occurrence of unpredictable successive inflammatory waves leading to the extension in surface and depth of necrotic processes. The medical management of these severe radiation burns remains today a challenging issue unresolved by the classical therapeutical approach. For the first time, two victims (accident of Chile, 2006 and accident of Senegal, 2007) accidentally exposed to an iridium gammagraphy radioactive source experienced a new and innovative therapeutic strategy combining dosimetry-guided surgery lesion excision and injection of MSC. The clinical evolution was remarkable. The clinical transfer of this therapeutic option was possible based on the research perform in the Institute and the IRSN/Percy hospital cooperation. Our data suggested that cellular therapy based on Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) injection could be used to repair numerous injured tissues. We have studied the potential use of human MSC (hMSC) in order to limit radiation-induced skin lesions. Our pre-clinical data suggest a possible use of hMSC for the treatment of the early phase of the cutaneous radiation syndrome. The understanding of the precise healing mechanisms of hMSC in animal model is under investigation. These results will be helpful to generalize this innovative therapy to the treatment of other radiological complications. (author)

  15. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology: Progress report, December 1, 1987-November 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.; Delegianis, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiation therapy. At the current level of funding, approximately one quarter of the research of the Laboratory could be regarded as in support of radiotherapy, with the remainder addressing more basic issues. The new initiatives have been in two directions. First, there has been an increased emphasis on research in radiation chemistry, inasmuch as this subject which involves the study of free radicals and fast radiation chemistry processes starts to bridge the gap between physics and biology, between the initial deposition of radiant energy and its final expression in terms of biological consequences. Second, the emphasis in the biological research has moved towards studies at the molecular level, with the appointment of new members of staff with expertise in this area. Individual chapters were processed separately for the data base

  16. ASN report on the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The first part of this huge report proposes a detailed overview of ASN activities in different fields: ionizing radiations related to nuclear activities and risks for health and the environment, principles and actors of nuclear safety control, of radiation protection and of protection of the environment, regulation, control of nuclear activities and exposures to ionizing radiations, emergency situations, public information and transparency, international relationships, regional overview of nuclear safety and radiation protection. The second part addresses the activities controlled by the ASN: medical use of ionizing radiations, non medical use of ionizing radiations, transport of radioactive materials, electronuclear power stations, facilities involved in the nuclear fuel cycle, research facilities and other nuclear installations, the safety of dismantling of nuclear base installations, radioactive wastes and polluted sites and soils

  17. Report on administrative work at radiation safety center in fiscal year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2003-03-01

    National Institute for Fusion Science constructed Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using super conductive magnet coils. It took eight years to construct and the first plasma shot had been carried out on March 1998. In the experiments high plasma temperature and improved plasma confinement have been achieved. This is the report of administrative work at the radiation safety center considering radiation protection for workers at the LHD and related devices, and radiation monitoring in the site. Major scope is as follows. (1) Radiation measurement and dose monitoring in the radiation controlled area and in the site using particularly developed monitoring system named as Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (2) Establishment of education and registration system for radiation workers and access control system for the LHD controlled area. I hope that as like the published reports of fiscal year 1999 and 2000, the present report will be helpful for management of future radiation protection in the research institute. (author)

  18. Report on administrative work at radiation safety center in fiscal year 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Sakuma, Yoichi; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Sugiyama, Takahiko; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2005-06-01

    National Institute for Fusion Science constructed the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using super conductive magnet coils system. It took eight years to construct and the first plasma shot was carried out on March 1998. Since then high temperature plasma and improved plasma confinement experiments have been achieved. This is the report on administrative work at the radiation safety center considering radiation protection for workers at the LHD and the Compact Helical Device (CHS), and radiation measurement and monitoring in the site. Major scope is as follows. (1) Radiation (X ray) dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and in the site using particularly developed monitoring system named as Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (2) Establishment of education and registration system for radiation workers and accessing control system for the LHD controlled area. As same as the published annual reports from fiscal year 1999 to 2002, this report will be helpful for the future radiation safety management in the research institute. (author)

  19. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2004 to March 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi

    2006-11-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) constructed the Large Helical Device (LHD) which is the largest magnetic confinement plasma experimental device using a super conducting magnet coils system. The first plasma shot was carried out in March 1998 after eight years of construction. Since then high temperature plasmas and improved plasma confinement experiments have been achieved. On 1st April 2004, NIFS became one of the research institutes which constitute National Institute of Natural Sciences. Since then the regulation system of safety, health and environmental management has been minorly changed. This is a report on administrative work for radiation safety at the LHD and the Compact Helical System (CHS), and radiation measurement and monitoring on the site from 1st April 2004 to 31st March 2006. Major topics are as follows. (1) Establishment of a radiation safety management system based on the law of occupational safety, health and environment. (2) Radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site using a particularly developed monitoring system named Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiments (RMSAFE). (3) Establishment of an education and registration system for radiation workers, and accessing control system for the LHD controlled area. This report has been annually published from fiscal year 1999. We expect that these reports could be helpful for future radiation safety management in NIFS. (author)

  20. Homozygous loss of function BRCA1 variant causing a Fanconi-anemia-like phenotype, a clinical report and review of previous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Bruna L; Homma, Thais K; Funari, Mariana F A; Lerario, Antônio M; Leal, Aline M; Velloso, Elvira D R P; Malaquias, Alexsandra C; Jorge, Alexander A L

    2018-03-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare and heterogeneous genetic syndrome. It is associated with short stature, bone marrow failure, high predisposition to cancer, microcephaly and congenital malformation. Many genes have been associated with FA. Previously, two adult patients with biallelic pathogenic variant in Breast Cancer 1 gene (BRCA1) had been identified in Fanconi Anemia-like condition. The proband was a 2.5 year-old girl with severe short stature, microcephaly, neurodevelopmental delay, congenital heart disease and dysmorphic features. Her parents were third degree cousins. Routine screening tests for short stature was normal. We conducted whole exome sequencing (WES) of the proband and used an analysis pipeline to identify rare nonsynonymous genetic variants that cause short stature. We identified a homozygous loss-of-function BRCA1 mutation (c.2709T > A; p. Cys903*), which promotes the loss of critical domains of the protein. Cytogenetic study with DEB showed an increased chromosomal breakage. We screened heterozygous parents of the index case for cancer and we detected, in her mother, a metastatic adenocarcinoma in an axillar lymph node with probable primary site in the breast. It is possible to consolidate the FA-like phenotype associated with biallelic loss-of-function BRCA1, characterized by microcephaly, short stature, developmental delay, dysmorphic face features and cancer predisposition. In our case, the WES allowed to establish the genetic cause of short stature in the context of a chromosome instability syndrome. An identification of BRCA1 mutations in our patient allowed precise genetic counseling and also triggered cancer screening for the patient and her family members. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Feline leprosy due to Candidatus 'Mycobacterium lepraefelis': Further clinical and molecular characterisation of eight previously reported cases and an additional 30 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Carolyn R; Malik, Richard; Globan, Maria; Reppas, George; McCowan, Christina; Fyfe, Janet A

    2017-09-01

    This paper, the last in a series of three on 'feline leprosy', provides a detailed description of disease referable to the previously unnamed species, Candidatus 'Mycobacterium lepraefelis', a close relative of the human pathogens Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium lepromatosis. Cases were sourced retrospectively and prospectively for this observational study, describing clinical, geographical and molecular microbiological data for cats definitively diagnosed with Candidatus 'M lepraefelis' infection. A total of 145 cases of feline leprosy were scrutinised; 114 'new' cases were sourced from the Victorian Infectious Diseases Reference Laboratory (VIDRL) records, veterinary pathology laboratories or veterinarians, and 31 cases were derived from six published studies. Thirty-eight cats were definitively diagnosed with Candidatus 'M lepraefelis' infection. Typically, cats tended to be middle-aged or older when first infected, with a male predilection. Affected cats typically had widespread cutaneous lesions, in some cases after initially localised disease. Advanced cases were often systemically unwell. All cats had outdoor access. The histological picture was lepromatous in the majority of patients, although two cases had tuberculoid disease. In one case that underwent necropsy, lesions were evident in the liver, spleen and lungs. Treatment was varied, although most cats received a combination of oral clarithromycin and rifampicin. Prognosis for recovery was variable, but typically poor. Candidatus 'M lepraefelis' typically causes high bacterial index (lepromatous) feline leprosy that in some cases progresses to systemic mycobacteriosis. The disease has a variable clinical course and prognosis. Many cases either died or were euthanased due to the infection. Multilocus sequence analysis reveals a heterogeneous picture and further analysis of draft genome sequencing may give clues to the taxonomy and epidemiology of this organism. Prospective treatment trials and

  2. Manche storage Centre. Information report on nuclear safety and radiation protection 2014. Annual report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-06-01

    After a presentation of the Manche Storage Centre (CSM), the first French centre of surface storage of weakly and moderately radioactive wastes, of its history, its buildings and activities, of the multi-layer cover, of the water management system (installation, controls, sampling), this report then describes the measures related to nuclear safety (principles and objectives), the management of conventional and nuclear wastes produced by the Centre and its other environmental impacts. The follow up of the installations and of their effluents and releases are then addressed: origin, locations and results of radiological controls of rainfalls, of risky effluents, of underground waters, of rivers, impacts of the Centre on its environment (releases in the sea, in rivers, in sediments). The measures related to radiation protection are described: principles, staff dosimetry, and personnel safety. The next part presents the nuclear event scale (INES) and indicates that no incident occurred in 2014. Finally the actions related to public information and transparency are summarized. Recommendations of the CHSCT are reported at the end

  3. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome previously diagnosed as Seckel syndrome: report of a novel mutation of the PCNT gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piane, Maria; Della Monica, Matteo; Piatelli, Gianluca; Lulli, Patrizia; Lonardo, Fortunato; Chessa, Luciana; Scarano, Gioacchino

    2009-11-01

    We report on a 3-year-old boy with prenatal onset of proportionate dwarfism, postnatal severe microcephaly, high forehead with receded hairline, sparse scalp hair, beaked nose, mild retrognathia and hypotonia diagnosed at birth as Seckel syndrome. At age 3 years, he became paralyzed due to a cerebrovascular malformation. Based on the clinical and radiological features showing evidence of skeletal dysplasia, the diagnosis was revised to Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) syndrome. Western blot analysis of the patient's lymphoblastoid cell line lysate showed the absence of the protein pericentrin. Subsequent molecular analysis identified a novel homozygous single base insertion (c.1527_1528insA) in exon 10 of the PCNT gene, which leads to a frameshift (Treo510fs) and to premature protein truncation. PCNT mutations must be considered diagnostic of MOPD II syndrome. A possible role of pericentrin in the development of cerebral vessels is suggested. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Late type III endoleak after thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair and previous infrarenal stent graft implantation - a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczyński, Jerzy; Macioch, Waldemar; Chudziński, Witold; Gałązka, Zbigniew

    2017-09-01

    Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) effectively improved the results of thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. TEVAR is a less invasive procedure that can be performed under local anesthesia with shorter hospital stay. The perioperative morbidity and mortality rates are lower for endovascular than open repair, but the rate of secondary interventions is higher for TEVAR. We report a case of an elderly man with synchronous abdominal and thoracic aortic aneurysms. A type III dangerous endoleak was recognized 3 years after TEVAR. It was successfully repaired during an endovascular procedure. There were no new endoleaks after 12 months of follow-up. TEVAR may be the only option of treatment for risky and elderly patients. However, postoperative monitoring is necessary to exclude different types of endoleaks. Most of them undergo effective endovascular repair.

  5. Synchrotron radiation: appendix to the Daresbury annual report 1990/91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Appendix to the Annual Report of the Daresbury Laboratory of the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council contains the 1990 Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, specifications for the beamlines and stations, the index for the synchrotron radiation user reports, the reports themselves and the list of publications detailing work performed on the Synchrotron Radiation Source. By far the largest part of the Appendix is taken up with the user reports for the period 1990 to 1991. They include reports on structural determination of sodium methyl, an investigation of DNA-Binding Proteins, monitoring of vital processes in live cells, the structure of semiconductor interfaces, the structure and properties of glasses and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid samples. (author)

  6. Radiation-induced camptocormia and dropped head syndrome. Review and case report of radiation-induced movement disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Clemens; Kuhnt, Thomas; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Hering, Kathrin [Leipzig University, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    In recent years, camptocormia and dropped head syndrome (DHS) have gained attention as particular forms of movement disorders. Camptocormia presents with involuntary forward flexion of the thoracolumbar spine that typically increases during walking or standing and may severely impede walking ability. DHS is characterized by weakness of the neck extensors and a consecutive inability to extend the neck; in severe cases the head is fixed in a ''chin to chest position.'' Many diseases may underlie these conditions, and there have been some reports about radiation-induced camptocormia and DHS. A PubMed search with the keywords ''camptocormia,'' ''dropped head syndrome,'' ''radiation-induced myopathy,'' ''radiation-induced neuropathy,'' and ''radiation-induced movement disorder'' was carried out to better characterize radiation-induced movement disorders and the radiation techniques involved. In addition, the case of a patient developing camptocormia 23 years after radiation therapy of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the abdomen is described. In total, nine case series of radiation-induced DHS (n = 45 patients) and - including our case - three case reports (n = 3 patients) about radiogenic camptocormia were retrieved. Most cases (40/45 patients) occurred less than 15 years after radiotherapy involving extended fields for Hodgkin's disease. The use of wide radiation fields including many spinal segments with paraspinal muscles may lead to radiation-induced movement disorders. If paraspinal muscles and the thoracolumbar spine are involved, the clinical presentation can be that of camptocormia. DHS may result if there is involvement of the cervical spine. To prevent these disorders, sparing of the spine and paraspinal muscles is desirable. (orig.) [German] In den letzten Jahren haben Bewegungsstoerungen von Wirbelsaeule und paraspinaler Muskulatur in

  7. Radiative corrections to Expt. 416. Backward πN charge exchange. Internal report No. 131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.T.Y.

    The importance of radiative corrections in elastic hadronic reactions has been reported recently. This report describes the computational techniques and results of applying the radiative corrections to a backward charge-exchange scattering experiment. The particular reaction considered is π - p → π 0 + n + γ Evaluation of the Schwinger term, evaluation of the numerical integration term, evaluation of the region in which the photon is detected and a check of the unitarity condition are considered. Appendixes contain listings of computer codes written to calculate radiative corrections. (19 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  8. An advanced APD-based spectroscopic radiation monitor. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell Woodring, PhD; James Christian, PhD

    2007-01-01

    A highly sensitized radiation imager is under development through DOE SBIR contract DE-FG02-99ER 82866. This imager will be extraordinarily useful to the DOE in its decontamination and decommissioning activities. The basis for this advanced, state-of-the-art radiation imager is a new type of photon detector, an avalanche photodiode (APD). Only recently has APD technology advanced to the point where it is useful for applications like the radiation imager. To date, the major drawback in the use of avalanche photodiodes was the inability to use many of them in a single application because of the need for many channels of readout, complicated device holders, and dead space between detectors. RMD has solved this dilemma through the development of compact arrays of APDs. Additionally, the fabrication technique has been refined to the point were the bulk production of large quantities of arrays is now feasible. These new APD arrays have excellent application flexibility. The capability to tailor the detector properties; such as size, sensitivity, pixellation, and pitch make APD arrays excellent candidates for a variety of photosensing schemes previously dominated by photomultiplier tubes (PMT). In fact, at RMD it is currently possible to make APD arrays with 2-mm 2 detectors (pixels) in monolithic square arrays 14 pixels on a side (196 detectors). As proposed in Phase II work, paneling 9 of these arrays (as the basis of a highly sensitive radiation imager) would make a photodetector that was 100 cm 2 in sensitive area. This results in approximately 1800 individual detectors that require data sampling and control. This is an enormous electronics load. To reduce the electronics complexity for the readout scheme of APD arrays (one of the major aspects of the proposed Phase II research) individual detectors (in the array) will be grouped together on common readout lines by rows and columns. This row-column-addressing scheme reduces the readout complexity from 1800 to 90 if 42

  9. Resolution of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) by correcting a lateral head translation posture following previous failed traditional chiropractic therapy: a CBP® case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Jason O; Oakley, Paul A; Moore, Robert R; Ruggeroli, Edward P; Harrison, Deed E

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] To present the case of the resolution of right temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) following the correction of a right lateral head translation posture. [Subject and Methods] A 24 year old female reported facial pain and jaw clicking in the right TMJ. Radiography revealed a 19 mm right head (shift) translation posture. TMJ vibration analysis showed characteristic abnormalities for the right TMJ. The patient was treated with CBP ® technique mirror image ® left sided exercises, and traction methods as well as spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). [Results] After 36 treatments over a 12-week time period, a complete correction of the lateral head posture was achieved corresponding with a complete resolution of jaw pain and clicking. TMJ vibration analysis demonstrated normal right side TMJ characteristics following treatment. [Conclusion] Abnormal head/neck postures, such as lateral head translation, may be an unrealized source of TMJD and may be explained through the 'regional interdependence' model or by how seemingly unrelated anatomy may be associated with a primary complaint.

  10. In-Situ Radiation Detection Demonstration Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert; Miller, David R.; Miller, Mark Laverne; Duce, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) has hundreds of facilities where radioactive materials have been used or are being used, including firing ranges, low-level radioactive waste disposal areas, and areas where past activities have resulted in environmental contamination. Affected sites range in size from a few acres to square miles. Impact to the DoD comes through military base closure and release to the public. It is important that radioactive contaminants are remediated to levels that result in acceptable risk to the public. Remediation requires characterization studies, e.g., sampling and surveys, to define the affected areas, removal actions, and final confirmatory sampling and surveys. Characterization of surface contamination concentrations has historically been performed using extensive soil sampling programs in conjunction with surface radiation surveys conducted with hand-held radiation monitoring equipment. Sampling is required within the suspect affected area and a large buffer area. Surface soil contaminant characterization using soil sampling and hand held monitoring are costly, time consuming, and result in long delays between submission of samples for analysis and obtaining of final results. This project took an existing, proven radiation survey technology that has had limited exposure and improved its capabilities by documenting correlation factors for various detector/radionuclide geometries that commonly occur in field surveys. With this tool, one can perform characterization and final release surveys much more quickly than is currently possible, and have detection limits that are as good as or better than current technology. This paper will discuss the capabilities of a large area plastic scintillation detector used in conjunction with a global positioning system (GPS) to improve site characterization, remediation, and final clearance surveys of the radioactively contaminated site. Survey results can rapidly identify areas that require remediation as

  11. Car radiator burns: a report on 72 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Baker, A A; Attalla, M F; el-Ekiabi, S A; al Ghoul, A

    1989-08-01

    Seventy-two cases of car radiator burns (CRB) were treated in the Burns Unit, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar, over a 6-year period (1982-87). All the patients were males and most were between 20 and 40 years old. Chest wall, face and right upper limb were the commonest sites involved. Most of the patients suffered from relatively minor scalds. The scenario of the accidents as well as the topography of the burned areas were characteristic to this particular type of injury. The exceptionally high temperatures in the summer months were significantly related to the incidence of this type of burn.

  12. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report, October 1, 1982-November 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    A wide range of research is carried out at the Radiological Research Laboratory, from computer simulation of particle tracks to the determination of oncogenic transformation in mammalian cells. Mechanistic studies remain the central mission in an attempt to understand the biological action of ionizing radiations. Collaborative research is carried out on the use of radiosensitizers on chemosensitizers on the effect of hormones on oncogenic transformation and on cataractogenesis

  13. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-01-01

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These

  14. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and

  15. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy 4 years after radiation: report of a case followed up with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piquemal, R.; Renard, J.P.; Cottier, J.P.; Herbreteau, D.; Arsene, S.; Rospars, C.; Lioret, E.; Jan, M.

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy in a 32-year-old man with Cushing's disease and a recurrent tumour of the left cavernous sinus. The patient experienced rapid, painless loss of vision 4 years after treatment without recurrence of tumour or other visual disorder. MRI showed enlargement and contrast enhancement of the optic chiasm. A year later the patient was almost blind and MRI showed atrophy and persistent contrast enhancement of the chiasm. (orig.)

  16. Vertebral fracture complications following radiation therapy. Report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hisato; Komine, Mitsunori; Kurokawa, Hiroaki

    2007-01-01

    We observed the outbreak time of a spinal compression fracture following radiation therapy and its natural course. Case 1 was a 88-year-old, woman. NTX 66.9. Underwent cobalt irradiation 54 Gy for esophageal cancer. Three months after irradiation, the first lumbar vertebra was found to de compressed, and low back pain occurred. Vacuum cleft phenomenon in X-P appeared after two weeks, but anterior callus formation appeared in eight weeks, after which the low back pain disappeared. Case 2 was a 77-year-old woman. NTX 86.5. Underwent irradiation 69 Gy for uterine carcinoma. Six months after the irradiation, the fourth/five lumbar vertebra were found to be compressed. Great collapse occurred in X-P after two weeks, but stabilized and did not aggravate thereafter. Low back pain also disappeared. Radiotherapy affects bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts), inhibiting bone remodeling. As a result, deficient elastic resistance occurs. Vertebral bodies are also compressed in such a situation. After that normal callus formation starts from adjacent normal bone cells. The compression fracture observed ranged from three to six months after radiation. Natural course is well. Therefore conservative therapy is recommended. (author)

  17. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubin, Daniel [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography; Bromwich, David H [Ohio State University; Vogelmann, Andrew M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verlinde, Johannes [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Russell, Lynn M [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography

    2017-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) is the most technologically advanced atmospheric and climate science campaign yet fielded in Antarctica. AWARE was motivated be recent concern about the impact of cryospheric mass loss on global sea level rise. Specifically, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) is now the second largest contributor to rising sea level, after the Greenland Ice Sheet. As steadily warming ocean water erodes the grounding lines of WAIS components where they meet the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas, the retreating grounding lines moving inland and downslope on the underlying terrain imply mechanical instability of the entire WAIS. There is evidence that this point of instability may have already been reached, perhaps signifying more rapid loss of WAIS ice mass. At the same time, the mechanical support provided by adjacent ice shelves, and also the fundamental stability of exposed ice cliffs at the ice sheet grounding lines, will be adversely impacted by a warming atmosphere that causes more frequent episodes of surface melting. The surface meltwater damages the ice shelves and ice cliffs through hydrofracturing. With the increasing concern regarding these rapid cryospheric changes, AWARE was motivated by the need to (a) diagnose the surface energy balance in West Antarctica as related to both summer season climatology and potential surface melting, and (b) improve global climate model (GCM) performance over Antarctica, such that future cryospheric projections can be more reliable.

  18. EVALUATION OF BRACHYTHERAPY FACILITY SHIELDING STATUS IN KOREA OBTAINED FROM RADIATION SAFETY REPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MI HYUN KEUM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-eight radiation safety reports for brachytherapy equipment were evaluated to determine the current status of brachytherapy units in Korea and to assess how radiation oncology departments in Korea complete radiation safety reports. The following data was collected: radiation safety report publication year, brachytherapy unit manufacturer, type and activity of the source that was used, affiliation of the drafter, exposure rate constant, the treatment time used to calculate workload and the HVL values used to calculate shielding design goal values. A significant number of the reports (47.4% included the personal information of the drafter. The treatment time estimates varied widely from 12 to 2,400 min/week. There was acceptable variation in the exposure rate constant values (ranging between 0.469 and 0.592 (R-m2/Ci·hr, as well as in the HVLs of concrete, steel and lead for Iridium-192 sources that were used to calculate shielding design goal values. There is a need for standard guidelines for completing radiation safety reports that realistically reflect the current clinical situation of radiation oncology departments in Korea. The present study may be useful for formulating these guidelines.

  19. Report on administrative work for radiation safety from April 2010 to March 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kiyohiko; Uda, Tatsuhiko; Asakura, Yamato; Kawano, Takao; Yamanishi, Hirokuni; Miyake, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    The National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) is proceeding with basic research on magnetic nuclear fusion which is expected to be a perpetual energy source for the future. Because the object of research is a hot plasma, high energy particles which are elements of the plasma generate X-rays. Therefore we administrate the devices and their surroundings in conformity with the Industrial Safety and Health Law to maintain workplace safety. We measure the radiation dose levels regularly, register the employees who are engaged in plasma experiments, and educate them. We also control the handling of non-regulated small sealed sources that are used in the detectors in some cases. This report is on administrative work for radiation safety in the last fiscal year 2010. It includes (1) a report on the establishment of a radiation safety management system, (2) results of radiation dose measurement and monitoring in the radiation controlled area and on the site by using Radiation Monitoring System Applicable to Fusion Experiment (RMSAFE), (3) a report on the establishment of an education and registration system for radiation workers. (author)

  20. BOOK REVIEW: NCRP Report No. 160: Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States NCRP Report No. 160: Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Jim

    2010-10-01

    This report by Committee 6 of the Council is an extensive update of a previous report on the exposure of the US population to ionizing radiation sources from data gathered in the 1980s (published as Report 93 in 1987). It is combined with an update on the more in-depth assessment of data on medical exposures previously reported in 1989 (Report 100). Individual chapters in this new report are dedicated to specific sources of exposure to the US population—both from natural and artificial radiation—and the level of detail in each chapter is intended to reflect the significance of the contribution of each source to the total collective dose of the population. The first chapter is on the most significant contributor: background radiation. It expands on the concept of natural background radiation in Report 93, renaming it 'ubiquitous background', and describing in detail the contributions from both extra-terrestrial and terrestrial sources. The data demonstrates that the average dose from such exposure has varied little since the previous report (a slight increase from 3.0 mSv to 3.1 mSv). The next chapter is on medical radiation, i.e. the exposure to the population when attending as patients, not including occupational exposure to hospital workers. The most striking data published in the entire report is the increase in the contribution to the total US population dose attributed to such medical exposures. It is now as significant as that from background radiation: medical exposures now account for an average effective dose to the US citizen of 3.00 mSv, up from 0.53 mSv in 1992 (Report 100). The most important contribution to this increase is the 1.46 mSv from CT scanning alone. The nuclear medicine (including PET) contribution is up from 0.14 mSv to 0.77mSv. This evidently must be due to significant changes in medical radiological practice in the US tied to the increase in the availability of CT and PET imaging facilities. These increasing contributions have driven

  1. Radiation and Photochemistry Section annual report, October 1992--November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The research described in this survey is a study of transient intermediates and chemistry induced by energetic radiation in the condensed phase. The survey is presented in two major parts: the first one studies ions, excited states, and other transients in the condensed phase; the second one studies the role of solvents in chemical reactivity. Some highlights of the past year were observations of ion-molecule reactions of excited aromatic cations via flash photolysis and transient dc conductivity; anion solvation study revealing role of solvent molecular structure; zeolite matrix study of C 7 H 8 radical cation chemistry; and H atom reaction with O 2 , I - , and comparison of diffusion of H, D, and muonium in ice. Refs, 25 figs, 5 tabs

  2. Automated radiofrequency radiation dosimetry. Final report, Jun 89-Sep 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, O.P.

    1990-12-01

    The interaction of radiofrequency (RF) and microwave (MW) electromagnetic radiation with biological tissues is of increasing importance from the standpoint of health and safety. From considerable literature devoted to the study of RF and MW bioeffects based primarily on animal experimentation it has been determined that bioeffects are correlated with mass-normalized rates of RF or MW energy absorption (specific absorption rates or SARs). An emphasis of our project was to improve the efficiency of the SAR algorithms and to extend their use to higher RF and MW frequencies. Another objective was to adapt these algorithms to computing workstations and distributed memory parallel processors that are becoming more affordable and hence readily available to potential users of these codes.

  3. Research in radiation monitoring survey instrumentation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blalock, T.V.; Kennedy, E.J.; Phillips, R.G.; Walker, E.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two low-power solid-state prototype readout units were developed, an LED display and a LCD display. This display output was in a bar-graph format, covering four-decades of information, with 10-segments per decade. The displays accept a frequency input, which is standardly available from several portable radiation-survey instruments. Both readout units will operate on two D-cell batteries (3.0 Volt), with a typical current drain requirement of 0.3 MA for the LED display and 30μA for the LCD display. A wide-range electrometer circuit was also developed. The circuit covers an input current range from 10 -13 A to 10 -8 A. The output signal is a pulse whose frequency is directly proportional to input current. The circuit requires no high-megohm resistors, and is autoranging. Several candidate input amplifiers were analyzed and evaluated for use with the electrometer circuit

  4. Wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS). Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The Science Application International Corporation (SAIC) RadStar trademark wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS) is designed to provide real-time monitoring of the radiation dose to workers as they perform work in radiologically contaminated areas. WRRMS can also monitor dose rates in a room or area. The system uses radio-frequency communications to transmit dose readings from the wireless dosimeters worn by workers to a remote monitoring station that can be located out of the contaminated area. Each base station can monitor up to 16 workers simultaneously. The WRRMS can be preset to trigger both audible and visual alarms at certain dose rates. The alarms are provided to the worker as well as the base station operator. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their self-reading dosimeters (SRDs), which are typically used to monitor workers, more difficult. The base station is an IBM-compatible personal computer that updates and records information on individual workers every ten seconds. Although the equipment costs for this improved technology are higher than the SRDs (amortized at $2.54/hr versus $1.02/hr), total operational costs are actually less ($639/day versus $851/day). This is because the WRRMS requires fewer workers to be in the contaminated zone than the traditional (baseline) technology. There are also intangible benefits associated with improved worker safety and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principles, making the WRRMS an attractive alternative to the baseline technology. The baseline technology measures only integrated dose and requires workers to check their own dosimeters manually during the task

  5. Wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS). Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1998-12-01

    The Science Application International Corporation (SAIC) RadStar{trademark} wireless remote radiation monitoring system (WRRMS) is designed to provide real-time monitoring of the radiation dose to workers as they perform work in radiologically contaminated areas. WRRMS can also monitor dose rates in a room or area. The system uses radio-frequency communications to transmit dose readings from the wireless dosimeters worn by workers to a remote monitoring station that can be located out of the contaminated area. Each base station can monitor up to 16 workers simultaneously. The WRRMS can be preset to trigger both audible and visual alarms at certain dose rates. The alarms are provided to the worker as well as the base station operator. This system is particularly useful when workers are wearing personal protective clothing or respirators that make visual observation of their self-reading dosimeters (SRDs), which are typically used to monitor workers, more difficult. The base station is an IBM-compatible personal computer that updates and records information on individual workers every ten seconds. Although the equipment costs for this improved technology are higher than the SRDs (amortized at $2.54/hr versus $1.02/hr), total operational costs are actually less ($639/day versus $851/day). This is because the WRRMS requires fewer workers to be in the contaminated zone than the traditional (baseline) technology. There are also intangible benefits associated with improved worker safety and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principles, making the WRRMS an attractive alternative to the baseline technology. The baseline technology measures only integrated dose and requires workers to check their own dosimeters manually during the task.

  6. SU-E-T-524: Web-Based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System (ROIRLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapoor, R; Palta, J; Hagan, M; Grover, S; Malik, G

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Describe a Web-based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning system that has the potential to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: The VA National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and near miss data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. Software used for this program is deployed on the VAs intranet as a Website. All data entry forms (adverse event or near miss reports, work product reports) utilize standard causal, RT process step taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM and ASTRO reports on error reporting (AAPM Work Group Report on Prevention of Errors and ASTROs safety is no accident report). All reported incidents are investigated by the radiation oncology domain experts. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The operational workflow is similar to that of the Aviation Safety Reporting System. This system is also synergistic with ROSIS and SAFRON. Results: The ROIRLS facilitates the collection of data that help in tracking adverse events and near misses and develop new interventions to prevent such incidents. The ROIRLS electronic infrastructure is fully integrated with each registered facility profile data thus minimizing key strokes and multiple entries by the event reporters. Conclusions: OIRLS is expected to improve the quality and safety of a broad spectrum of radiation therapy patients treated in the VA and fulfills our goal of Effecting Quality While Treating Safely The Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System software used for this program has been developed, conceptualized and maintained by TSG Innovations

  7. SU-E-T-524: Web-Based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System (ROIRLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, R; Palta, J; Hagan, M [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); National Radiation Oncology Program (10P4H), Richmond, VA (United States); Grover, S; Malik, G [TSG Innovations Inc., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Describe a Web-based Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning system that has the potential to improve quality of care for radiation therapy patients. This system is an important facet of continuing effort by our community to maintain and improve safety of radiotherapy.Material and Methods: The VA National Radiation Oncology Program office has embarked on a program to electronically collect adverse events and near miss data of radiation treatment of over 25,000 veterans treated with radiotherapy annually. Software used for this program is deployed on the VAs intranet as a Website. All data entry forms (adverse event or near miss reports, work product reports) utilize standard causal, RT process step taxonomies and data dictionaries defined in AAPM and ASTRO reports on error reporting (AAPM Work Group Report on Prevention of Errors and ASTROs safety is no accident report). All reported incidents are investigated by the radiation oncology domain experts. This system encompasses the entire feedback loop of reporting an incident, analyzing it for salient details, and developing interventions to prevent it from happening again. The operational workflow is similar to that of the Aviation Safety Reporting System. This system is also synergistic with ROSIS and SAFRON. Results: The ROIRLS facilitates the collection of data that help in tracking adverse events and near misses and develop new interventions to prevent such incidents. The ROIRLS electronic infrastructure is fully integrated with each registered facility profile data thus minimizing key strokes and multiple entries by the event reporters. Conclusions: OIRLS is expected to improve the quality and safety of a broad spectrum of radiation therapy patients treated in the VA and fulfills our goal of Effecting Quality While Treating Safely The Radiation Oncology Incident Reporting and Learning System software used for this program has been developed, conceptualized and maintained by TSG Innovations

  8. HMI Section of Nuclear and Radiation Physics - annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the work performed at the named institute concerning theoretical physics, nuclear reactions, hyperfine structure, atomic collisions, and developments of the VICKSI accelerator together with a list of publications and talks. (HSI) [de

  9. Report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    The report summarizes the main conclusions of specialized studies on the effects of atomic radiation on man. The material is divided into a historical review, in which the developments and trends that have become apparent throughout the years are presented, and a discussion of the present situation, highlighting the conclusions drawn from the most recent studies on radiation physics and biology. The report is written at a general level; the scientific annexes, to be published separately, forming the basis for the report's conclusions are written in a format essentially aimed at specialists. 2 figs, 11 tabs

  10. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the effects of x irradiation at the cellular level that lead ultimately to either malignant transformation or cell death. Experimental results consistent with the primer hypothesis for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes are reported. It was found that oligonucleotides can be inserted en bloc into newly synthesized RNA. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were continued by successfully synthesizing an amidate and beginning NMR studies on the interactions between its nucleic acid and amino acid moieties. In studies on radiation induced giant cells in 3T3 cells growing in culture, it was demonstrated that conditions which potentiate potential lethal damage repair and those which prevent radiation induced giant cell formation exist. In an examination of the in vitro effects of vasopressin, no direct effect was found of vasopressin on radiation sensitivity and significant effects of radiation on lysosomal enzyme activity in cultured cells were found

  11. Annual report of Radiation Effects Research Foundation, April 1, 1988 - March 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This annual report summarizes the research activities of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in the fiscal year 1988. Outcome of the work is presented, covering the two major workshops for 'immunology' and for 'radiation-induced carcinogenesis' which were held in Hiroshima on November 28-29, 1988, and on March 16-18, 1989, respectively. Study meeting of 'medical radiation research program' and Japan-the U.S. joint meeting of 'DS 86' are reported, as well as the other scientific lectures and campus study seminars. Included are research abstracts published by the Research Foundation staff. The bibliography of papers, published in scientific journals and presented in scientific meetings, is provided. Appendices give the details of the aforementioned workshops, the continuing research issues, and the personnel list of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. (N.K.)

  12. Molecular events basic to cellular radiation response. Progress report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolodny, G.M.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on studies of the effects of x irradiation at the cellular level that lead ultimately to either malignant transformation or cell death. Experimental results consistent with the primer hypothesis for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes are reported. It was found that oligonucleotides can be inserted en bloc into newly synthesized RNA. Studies on amino acid-nucleic acid interactions were continued by successfully synthesizing an amidate and beginning NMR studies on the interactions between its nucleic acid and amino acid moieties. In studies on radiation induced giant cells in 3T3 cells growing in culture, it was demonstrated that conditions which potentiate potential lethal damage repair and those which prevent radiation induced giant cell formation exist. In an examination of the in vitro effects of vasopressin, no direct effect was found of vasopressin on radiation sensitivity and significant effects of radiation on lysosomal enzyme activity in cultured cells were found.

  13. ASN report of the status of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevet, Pierre-Franck; Delmestre, Alain; Bardet, Marie-Christine; Covard, Fabienne; Landrin, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    After a presentation of the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN), its missions, some key figures illustrating its activities and its organisation, this report proposes an overview of marking events and of actions undertaken by the ASN after the Fukushima accident. Then, the report proposes a detailed and commented overview of actions undertaken by the ASN in different fields and domains: nuclear activities, principles and actors of nuclear safety and radiation protection control, regulation, control of nuclear activities and of exposures to ionizing radiations, radiological and post-accidental emergency situations, public information and transparency, international relationships, regional overview of nuclear safety and radiation protection. The last part addresses activities controlled by the ASN: medical use of ionizing radiations, industrial, research and veterinary uses and source safety, transport of radioactive materials, electronuclear plants, installations related to nuclear fuel cycle, nuclear research and other nuclear installations, safety of dismantling of base nuclear installations, radioactive wastes and polluted sites

  14. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The positive effect of education on oral hygiene practices is highlighted in this study. However there is still need for proper health enlightenment in this population with regards to use of the available oral health care facilities. Keywords: Oral hygiene, Pregnancy, Nigeria. Annals of Ibadan Postgraduate Medicine.

  15. Radiation induced esophageal ulcer; Report of a case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Endo, Mitsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeru (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1990-04-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to us on Dec. 22, 1986 because of dysphagia and esophageal ulcer. She had a previous history of left radical mastectomy for breast cancer, followed by postoperative {sup 60}Co irradiation to parasternal and supraclavicular regions with 50 Gy about 15 years before. UGIs and endoscopy showed a small ulcer surrounded by submucosal tumor-like protrusion in the esophagus at the thoracic inlet. Examination one month later revealed the ulcer which became larger despite medical treatment, now measuring 1 cm in diameter. Severe dysphagia continued. Right thoractomy and subtotal esophagectomy were performed on Jan 13, 1987. Histological examination revealed nonspecific ulcer, 5 cm in diameter, surrounded by fibrous granulation tissue. Proliferation of dilated capillary vessels was also seen in the bottom of the ulcer, the surrounding wall of which was free from remarkable infiltration of inflammatory cells. Based on these findings and previous medical history, the patient was diagnosed as having a postirradiation ulcer which appeared 15 years after irradiation. Dysphagia was considered due to esophageal dysfunction caused by severe fibrosis of the proper muscle layer. (author).

  16. Annual report of the Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, (No. 26)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The annual research activities of Osaka Laboratory for Radiation Chemistry, JAERI during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992 - March 31, 1993) are described. The research activities were conducted under the two research programs: the study on laser-induced organic chemical reactions and the study on basic radiation technology for functional materials. Detailed descriptions of the activities are presented in the following subjects: laser-induced organic synthesis, modification of polymer surface by laser irradiation, radiation-induced polymerization, preparation of fine particles by gamma ray irradiation, and electron beam dosimetry. The operation report of the irradiation facilities is also included. (author)

  17. Operations report 1985 of the Department of Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    1986-04-01

    Under the heading 'Licensing' the report deals with licensing procedures and the handling of nuclear-fuels and radioactive materials. Operational radiation protection is concerned with operational and personnel monitoring, mathematical methods and safety analyses. Environmental protection deals with emission control, immission monitoring and meteorological measurements, and safety technology with α/β-analysis, dosimetry, equipment servicing and mechanics, nuclear material safeguards. Other subdepartments take care of industrial safety, physical protection, emergency protection and training. Subjects dealt with, too, are dispersion pollutants in atmosphere and environment, further development of radiation protection methods, and the bibliography of radiation protection in KFA. (HK) [de

  18. Attenuation of radiological consequences from CDA's by radiation. Progress report, October 1, 1976--September 31, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.H.

    1977-01-01

    This technical progress report summarizes the research work accomplished during the first six months of the investigation on the significance of radiation heat transfer in attenuating the radiological consequences from LMFBR core disruptive accidents. Considerable progress has been made in modeling and computing the effects of radiative cooling on a rising HCDA bubble buoyant through a sodium pool. Our results reveal that most of the fuel vapor within the bubble can be effectively condensed out by radiating cooling. The finding has a profound implication as it could lead to a substantial reduction in subsequent aerosal releases

  19. Special report: results of the 2000-2002 association of residents in radiation oncology (arro) surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Chronowski, Gregory M.; Buck, David A.; Kang, Song; Palermo, James

    2004-01-01

    Between 2000 and 2002, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted its 18th, 19th, and 20th annual surveys of all residents training in radiation oncology in the United States. This report summarizes these results. The demographic characteristics of residents in training between 2000 and 2002 are detailed, as are issues regarding the quality of training and career choices of residents entering practice

  20. Radiation monitoring. Report covering period 1 Oct 1994 - 31 Dec 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This quarterly report on radiation monitoring in the Manchester Area uses experimental data and graphs compiled using archive materials to present a picture of gamma radiation air monitoring between 1st October 1994 and 31st December 1994. Compiled for local fire and civil defense authorities and pollution advisory body, data was collected at ten outstations. Temperature, barometric pressure, UVA and UVB readings were taken. Performance of equipment, including maintenance and outages at outstations is included. (UK)

  1. Basic aspects of radiation action on microorganisms. Progress report, April 1, 1974--March 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollard, E.C.

    1975-04-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: effects of blocking DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea on induction of lambda phage; dose response curves for uv and ionizing radiation with radiosensitive and radioresistant strains of phage; effects of oxygen, rifampin, and hydrogen peroxide on induction of radioresistance; radioinduced degradation of DNA; and induction of repair system of mutagenesis with uv and ionizing radiation. (U.S.)

  2. The report on 'effects of radiation on the environment' from UNSCEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) concluded, in response to some expressions of concern, that it would be opportune to provide an independent examination of: the current situation regarding the radiation exposure of the natural environment; and the basis available for assessing the potential impact on the environment of incremental exposures from human activities. The final report is about to be published and this paper gives a brief summary of the important points and conclusions. (author)

  3. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1988, Part -2, RA reactor annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M.; Ajdacic, N.; Zaric, M.; Vukovic, Z.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation protection tasks which enable safe operation of the RA reactor, and are defined according the the legal regulations and IAEA safety recommendations are sorted into four categories in this report: (1) Control of the working environment, dosimetry at the RA reactor and radiation protection; (2) Radioactivity control in the vicinity of the reactor and meteorology measurements; (3) Decontamination and relevant actions, collecting and treatment of fluid effluents; and and solid radioactive wastes [sr

  4. A clinical report on three cases of subacute radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shimin; Ye genyao; Liang Demin

    1989-01-01

    On April 20, 1985 a 137 Cs gamma-ray source of about 10 curies was taken into a family's bedroom. The son and both his parents were exposed to a nearly continuous irradiation for 150 days with estimated accumulated dose of 8-15 Gy. The father was complicated by skin radiation burn. The essential clinical findings on admission were general malaise, bleeding and pancytopenia (Hb 50g/l; WBC 0.4-0.7 x 10 9 /l; platelets 10 x 10 9 /l). The bone marrow was hypocellular with low colony yield in CFU-GM culture. The immunological examinations were essentially normal except for low E-RFC and lymphocyte transformation in all cases, and low IgA was seen only in the mother. Abnormalities were found in nail-bed microcirculation and thromboelastogram. Aspermia was detected twice in the son. The principal therapeutic measures were complete rest and adequated nutrition. The ward and nursing services were strictly controlled to avoid contamination. The son was transferred to LAFR for 2 weeks when the WBC was as low as 0.4 x 10 9 /l. Combined large doses of stanozolol and anisodamine were prescribed for all cases, while the son and his father received fetal liver transfusions in addition. All of them recovered well, especially the son

  5. Radiation Laboratory quarterly report, January 1, 1977--March 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-12

    Some of the studies in progress are: distribution of deposited energy around heavy-ion tracks; effect of trapping on the thermalization of electrons in hydrocarbon liquids; effect of field-dependent mobility on escape probability; kinetics of electron scavenging reactions; second-order optical properties of solvated electrons; model molecular orbital studies of the chemisorption of atomic hydrogen and oxygen on aluminum surfaces; calculation of sum rule moments for H/sub 2/O; early events in pulse-irradiated polar liquids; radiation chemical studies of reactions of SO/sub 4//sup -/ radicals with organic compounds; reactions of the phosphate and sulfate radicals with inorganic compounds; pulse radiolysis studies of antioxidants in fatty acid soap aggregates; spectrophotometric pulse radiolytic study of the radicals produced by reduction of cis- and trans-azobenzene; correlation of singlet energies of aromatic hydrocarbons with the rates of protonation of their anion radicals; the association rate of sodium laurylsulfate micelle-monomer equilibrium; transfer of an organic molecule between micelles in an aqueous environment; in-situ photolysis ESR study of some reactions of phosphate radicals; photochemistry of sydnones; differentiation of triplet state and biradical reactions; photoenolization of aromatic ketones; and studies of Ni(III) macrocyclic ligand complexes. (LK)

  6. Radiation Area Remedial Action FY 1996 summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, W.M.

    1996-11-01

    The Radiation Area Remedial Action (RARA) project is responsible for the interim stabilization and maintenance of the majority of the inactive waste sites at the Hanford Site. These waste sites include approximately 400 individual sites and 4,000 acres. Three facilities were removed from the RARA list near the end of fiscal year (FY) 1996P: the 218-W-4B, 218-E-10, and 218-E-12B Burial Grounds. These three facilities are treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) sites assigned to Fluor Daniel Hanford. Therefore, the RARA project will no longer perform activities on the inactive portions to maintain clear lines of responsibility (fully with Fluor Daniel Hanford). RARA activities are broken into two broad categories: interim stabilization, and surveillance and maintenance (S and M). Interim stabilization addresses major corrective actions for sites with radioactive surface contamination. A site continues to require S and M once it has received interim stabilization. Vegetation management is a significant activity under the RARA project. The goal is to control vegetation that may grow and spread radioactive contamination

  7. Progress report: nuclear safety and radiation protection in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    For the French Nuclear Safety Authority (Asn), the year 2006 was marked by two important nuclear laws being passed, one of which brought about a major change in its status. The year was a relatively satisfactory one with regard to nuclear safety, although the picture was more contrasted concerning radiation protection: in this area, more particularly in the medical field, the overall impression of good progress is offset by the declaration of a number of radiotherapy accidents. Given the benefits expected from radiotherapy treatment by the patient suffering from cancer, the conditions in which this activity is carried out are a subject of major concern for Asn, in the light of the serious risks linked to patient over-exposure. ( some important points as follows: the law on transparency and security in the nuclear field, the law on sustainable management of radioactive materials and waste, Asn: an independent administrative authority, EPR reactor project safety, I.R.R.S.: an international audit of Asn in 2006, harmonization of nuclear safety, cancer radiotherapy, improved information of the public after the T.S.N. law, taking account of organisational and human factors). (N.C.)

  8. Exemption of the use of radiation from the safety licence and reporting obligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-07-01

    The primary means of controlling the use of radiation is the safety licence procedure. The safety licence, and the granting of the licence, are regulated in the section 16 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/1991). In section 17 of the act, certain practices are exempted from the safety licence. In addition to these practices, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) may (on the basis of the same legal clause) exempt other types of radiation use from the safety licence, if it is possible to ascertain with sufficient reliability that the use of the radiation will not cause damage or danger to health. This guide presents the conditions applying to exemption from the safety licence for the use of radiation and reporting obligation, and also the exemption values for radioactive substances which, if exceeded, will entail the application of the safety licence and notification procedure for the use of radiation in question. The guide also presents exemptions in the use of exemption values, and requirements associated with the exemption of radiation appliances. However, the guide does not apply to the use of nuclear energy

  9. Exemption of the use of radiation from the safety licence and reporting obligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The primary means of controlling the use of radiation is the safety licence procedure. The safety licence, and the granting of the licence, are regulated in the section 16 of the Finnish Radiation Act (592/1991). In section 17 of the act, certain practices are exempted from the safety licence. In addition to these practices, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) may (on the basis of the same legal clause) exempt other types of radiation use from the safety licence, if it is possible to ascertain with sufficient reliability that the use of the radiation will not cause damage or danger to health. This guide presents the conditions applying to exemption from the safety licence for the use of radiation and reporting obligation, and also the exemption values for radioactive substances which, if exceeded, will entail the application of the safety licence and notification procedure for the use of radiation in question. The guide also presents exemptions in the use of exemption values, and requirements associated with the exemption of radiation appliances. However, the guide does not apply to the use of nuclear energy.

  10. BEIR-III report and the health effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1980-01-01

    The present BEIR-III Committee has not highlighted any controversy over the health effects of low-level radiation. In its evaluation of the experimental data and epidemiological surveys, the Committee has carefully reviewed and assessed the value of all the available scientific evidence for estimating numerical risk coefficients for the health hazards to human populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. Responsible public awareness of the possible health effects of ionizing radiations from medical and industrial radiation exposure, centers on three important matters of societal concern: (1) to place into perspective the extent of harm to the health of man and his descendants to be expected in the present and in the future from those societal activities involving ionizing radiation; (2) to develop quantitative indices of harm based on dose-effect relationships; such indices could then be used with prudent caution to introduce concepts of the regulation of population doses on the basis of somatic and genetic risks; and (3) to identify the magnitude and extent of radiation activities which could cause harm, to assess their relative significance, and to provide a framework for recommendations on how to reduce unnecessary radiation exposure to human populations. The main difference of the BEIR Committee Report is not so much from new data or new interpretations of existing data, but rather from a philosophical approach and appraisal of existing and future radiation protection resulting from an atmosphere of constantly changing societal conditions and public attitudes

  11. Some considerations on radiation protection. A questionnaire report from the nursing department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Toshiyuki; Koyama, Masanori; Saito, Masato; Ikai, Takeshi; Nakajima, Fujio; Matsui, Masayuki; Kadono, Koji; Miura, Teruo; Igimi, Yutaka

    1998-01-01

    Authors conducted the questionnairing on the radiation protection in cooperation with nurses. And on the basis of the results, we reported here what is now important for the radiation protection and what we can do as the team medical activities, including the discussion with other documents. On November 1996, the questionnairing was conducted in 165 nurses of Saiseikai Shiga Hospital and replies were received from 78% of them. Nurses from 1 year to <3 years in experience were 44% and these from 3 to <5 years in experience 19%. The questionaire was designed to elicit the interest, the sense and the understanding on the medical radiation protection, and to obtain what kinds of the interest they have and what they want to know. On the understanding of the radiation, many nurses had much interest in the radiation exposure to patients and nurses own, which occupied 33% of the respondents. One hundred thirteen nurses (68%) had some questions on the radiation protection, in which the most was on the potable radiation apparatus. Among patients' questions about the radiation, the most numerous was on the physical and genetic effects and many nurses could not respond the suitably. On the basis of these results nurses were given the training. (K.H.)

  12. Femoral Component Revision with Use of Impaction Bone-Grafting and a Cemented Polished Stem: A Concise Follow-up, at Fifteen to Twenty Years, of a Previous Report*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Te Stroet, M.A.; Gardeniers, J.W.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Rijnen, W.H.C.; Slooff, T.J.J.H.; Schreurs, B.W.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported our results for thirty-three consecutive femoral component revisions with impaction bone-grafting, performed with the X-change femoral revision system and a cemented polished Exeter stem, at a minimum of eight years of follow-up. The present updated study shows the results

  13. Pathological investigation of radiation necrosis. A case report and histo-pathological analysis of radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, N; Yoshimura, N; Ikuta, F [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    The brain and spinal cord of an 18-year-old male, who suffered from cerebellar medulloblastoma with subarachnoid spread, had been irradiated by a large amount of Linac X-ray: 14,450 rads to the lower thoracic segments and 7,400 rads to the lumbar segments. The tumor at the roof of the 4th ventricle had disseminated along the ventricular system but was limited to the subarachnoid space of the cervical spinal cord. No remarkable changes were found in the volume or consistency of the thoracic and lumbar cord. Elasticity of the lower thoracic segment was greatly diminished and the cut surfaces were yellowish white and fragile. Microscopically extensive coagulation necrosis was observed with complete disintegration of myelin and axon. Vascular changes were most prominent in the smaller vessels, eg. hyalinous thickening, concentric cleavage, adventitial fibrosis and edema of small artery perivascular spaces, fibrin thrombi occulusion of arterioles and capillaries, and telangiectasia. In the lumbar spinal cord, moderate neuronal degeneration and protoplasmic astrocytosis were observed. Changes in the lumbar posterior white column were considered to be not only secondary degeneration but also a primary lesion caused by irradiation. Liquefactive necrosis in the gray matter of the cervical cord was thought to be a nonspecific circulatory disturbance because of the absence of vascular changes. Vascular changes were thought to be very important in the histological diagnosis of radiation myelopathy and it was supposed that increased permeability of the vessel walls was a factor in coagulation necrosis. They considered this case to have typical histology of radiation myelopathy.

  14. HMI Section of Nuclear and Radiation Physics - annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the work performed in the named institute together with a list of publications and talks. The work concerns nuclear and atomic theory, heavy ion reactions, hyperfine-structure studies, ion collisions with atoms and solids, and developments on the VICKSI accelerator. (HSI)

  15. HMI Section of Nuclear and Radiation Physics - annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts of the scientific work performed at the named institute together with a list of publications and talks. The scientific work is concerned with the theory of nuclear and atomic processes with heavy ions, the experimental study of heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure studies, nuclear solid-state physics, atomic collisions, and the operation of VICKSI. (HSI)

  16. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1990-01-01

    In this progress report all of the abstracts - except two - are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) radionuclide metrology (5) applications of nuclear methods and (6) nuclear information processing. (botek)

  17. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmaier, B [comp.

    1991-12-31

    In this progress report all of the abstracts - except two - are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) radionuclide metrology (5) applications of nuclear methods and (6) nuclear information processing. (botek).

  18. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmaier, B.

    1991-01-01

    In this progress report all of the abstracts are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) applications of nuclear methods and (5) environmental investigations. (botek)

  19. Institute for Radiation Research and Nuclear Physics. Progress report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmaier, B [comp.

    1992-12-31

    In this progress report all of the abstracts are of INIS interest. The topics of the branch sessions are (1) theoretical particle physics (2) nuclear reactions (3) evaluation of nuclear data (4) applications of nuclear methods and (5) environmental investigations. (botek).

  20. Annual report on activities of Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal year of 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Kunihiko

    2002-08-01

    This annual report is summary of the activities of Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal year of 2001. This report consists of the introduction of the radiation control in working area of the reprocessing plant, the MOX fuel fabrication facilities and laboratories, the discharges control of these facilities, the personal dosimetry, the environmental monitoring, the control of radiation standards and calibration, the maintenance of radiation measurement instruments, the safety study, the technical support for outside organizations and other activities. (author)

  1. Radiation physics, biophysics and radiation biology. Progress report for October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, H.H.; Hall, E.J.

    1980-07-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 31 of the 32 papers presented in this progress report. The other paper is represented by an abstract only and deals with field shaping and recalibration of x-ray facilities

  2. Work report 1999 of the Safety and Radiation Protection Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    2000-05-01

    Research Centre Juelich is a member of the Hermann von Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres (HGF) in which Germany's 16 research institutions are joined together. The Centre's mission is future-oriented basic research and application-oriented research and development. The Centre's research and development activities are subsumed under the following five research priorities: - structure of matter and materials research, - energy technology, - information technology, - environmental precaution research, - life sciences. In order to perform its research tasks, the Research Centre also operates facilities in which radioactive substances are handled or ionizing radiation generated. The following facilities currently in operation are of particular significance in this respect due to their activity inventory or accelerator power: - DIDO research reactor (FRJ-2), - Large Hot Cells, chemistry cells, - interim store for spent AVR fuel elements, - decontamination operations with waste store and waste cells, - TEXTOR fusion experiment, - accelerator facilities such as COSY, JULIC, Compact and BABY cyclotron, - radionuclide laboratories in the fields of chemistry and medicine. The MERLIN research reactor (FRJ-1) has been shut down since 1985 and the fuel discharged, the decommissioning licensing procedure under the Atomic Energy Act is about to be completed. The high-temperature experimental reactor, AVR, has been shut down since the end of 1988 and received a decommissioning licence in 1994. Although it is not part of the Research Centre according to company law, it is supervised by the Research Centre with respect, amongst other aspects, to waste management and fuel element disposal. Core discharge was completed in 1997. Various nuclear facilities licensed pursuant to paragraph 9 of the Atomic Energy Act are being dismantled. This includes the fuel cells and several laboratories at the IFF and IWV-2 institutes. (orig.) [de

  3. Radiation effect on implanted pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourhamidi, A.H.

    1983-01-01

    It was previously thought that diagnostic or therapeutic ionizing radiation did not have an adverse effect on the function of cardiac pacemakers. Recently, however, some authors have reported damaging effect of therapeutic radiation on cardiac pulse generators. An analysis of a recently-extracted pacemaker documented the effect of radiation on the pacemaker pulse generator

  4. Hydrogen and methane synthesis through radiation catalysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuBow, J.

    1980-09-01

    The goal of this research was to evaluate the potential for using reactor wastes to synthesize useful products in quasi-photochemical configuration. It was found that semiconductor oxides act as heterogenous catalysts for the formation of H 2 in aqueous media under 60 Co irradiation. The principle of a gamma-ray solar cell was demonstrated experimentally. Experiments with ultraviolet irradiated TiO 2 and ZnO grains demonstrated that both H 2 and H 2 O 2 were formed, in contrast to the results of work by previous authors. These results were rationalized by energy band diagram representations and by applying principles of semiconductor photoelectrochemistry. The concept of gamma-ray assisted desulfurization of coal through radiological degradation and heterogenous catalysis was experimentally demonstrated. The proof-of-concept experiments in the present study provide the basis for further fundamental and applied investigations, particularly in a potentially efficient system with a fresh source and 1.5 m path length

  5. Radiation-damage studies for fusion reactors. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Dodd, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    FY 1983 has been a very productive year with respect to obtaining results and educating students in the field of Fusion Materials. We have analyzed the results of 14 MeV irradiated copper and have correlated the information with previous work done at HEDL. The 750 keV light ion accelerator has been used to preimplant samples with He as well as to study blistering in nickel. A collaborative effort with ORNL was completed on helium-irradiated Cu-Ni alloys. The effects of injected interstitials on void nucleation were studied and a theory developed to explain some past discrepancies in ion irradiated specimens. Initial ion irradiations have been performed on 316 SS and HT-9 alloys. New techniques for plating type 316 stainless steel, ferritic steels and aluminum have been developed as well as intense beams of Fe, Ti and Al for ion bombardment studies. Two new electron microscopy facilities have been installed; a JELCO-200CX with EDX capabilities a high resolution Vacuum Generator HB501 for very precise microchemical analysis

  6. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy 4 years after radiation: report of a case followed up with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal, R.; Renard, J.P. [Service de Medecine Interne A, Hopital Bretonneau, Tours (France); Cottier, J.P.; Herbreteau, D. [Service de Neuroradiologie, Hopital Bretonneau, Tours (France); Arsene, S.; Rospars, C. [Service d`Ophthalmologie, Hopital Bretonneau, Tpurs (France); Lioret, E.; Jan, M. [Service de Neurochirurgie, Hopital Bretonneau, Tours (France)

    1998-07-01

    We report a case of radiation-induced optic neuropathy in a 32-year-old man with Cushing`s disease and a recurrent tumour of the left cavernous sinus. The patient experienced rapid, painless loss of vision 4 years after treatment without recurrence of tumour or other visual disorder. MRI showed enlargement and contrast enhancement of the optic chiasm. A year later the patient was almost blind and MRI showed atrophy and persistent contrast enhancement of the chiasm. (orig.) With 3 figs., 13 refs.

  7. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. UNSCEAR 2000 report to the General Assembly, with scientific annexes. Volume II: Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Over the past few years the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effects of Atomic Radiation has undertaken a broad review of the sources and effects of ionizing radiation. In the present report, the Committee, drawing on the main conclusions of its scientific assessment summarizes the developments in radiation science in the years leading up to the next millennium. It covers the following: the effects of radiation exposure; levels of radiation exposure; radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident; sources of radiation exposure including natural exposures, man-made environmental exposures, medical and occupational exposures; radiation associated cancer. This volume includes five Annexes covering: DNA repair and mutagenesis; biological effects at low radiation doses; combined effects of radiation and other agents; epidemiological evaluation of radiation-induced cancer and exposure effects of the Chernobyl accident

  8. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristonmaa, S.

    2000-04-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  9. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristonmaa, S.

    1999-03-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  10. Post-radiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma following treatment of breast cancer: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jun Won; Lee, Won Ae; Kim, You Me [Dankook University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Post-radiation malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) of the breast is extremely rare. We report a case of post-radiation MFH that presented a rapidly growing mass in a 52-year-old woman who underwent breast-conserving therapy and adjuvant whole breast irradiation 6 years ago. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of primary MFH of the female breast have been reported with sonographic findings. We analyzed the sonographic and MRI findings with correlative histopathologic features, and then confirmed with surgical excision.

  11. Report of the 13th IEA workshop on radiation effects in ceramic insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    The 13th IEA Workshop on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Insulators, based on Annex II: Experimentation on Radiation Damage in Fusion Materials, to the IEA Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Radiation Damage in Fusion Materials, was held on the 9th, December, 2003, at Kyoto International Conference Center, in Kyoto, Japan, in conjunction with the 11th International Conference on Fusion Reactor Materials (ICFRM-11). 44 participants from 10 countries (26 from Japan, 5 from Spain, 3 from Belgium, 3 from USA, 2 from RF, each 1 from Austria, Greece, Italy, Romania, and UK) gathered together and discussed following issues extensively, with the newest experimental results, after the welcome remarks by one of the organizer and chairpersons, Dr. E.R. Hodgson of CIEMAT. Effects of electric field on radiation induced microstructural evolution, parasitic electrical current and voltage induced in cables and wires by radiation effects, optical materials, IFMIF related issues and fundamental aspects were discussed. Significant results such as an observation of γ-alumina and aluminum colloid formation for the Radiation Induced Electrical Degradation mechanism are obtained. This report is workshop summary, abstracts and documents of the 13th IEA Workshop on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Insulators. (author)

  12. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  13. FINAL REPORT. FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrich, Joe M.

    2004-01-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC--05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004

  14. How does the mass media report and interpret radiation data? The results of media content analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perko, T. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN, Institute for Environment Health and Safety (Belgium); Cantone, M.C. [University of Milano, Faculty of Medicine (Italy); Tomkiv, Y. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (Norway); Prezelj, I. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Social Sciences (Slovenia); Gallego, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); Melekhova, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    In communication with the general population, experts often provide quantitative information related to ionizing radiation, expressed with different units of radioactivity. However, quantitative information about radiation risks may be meaningful only to people who have the ability to comprehend basic numerical concepts and possess knowledge related to radiation. Thus, the media, as a bridge between experts and the general population, has to 'translate' quantitative information into a qualitative one. How successful and accurate are the mass media in this transformation of scientific results into publicly understandable information? Our research investigates media reporting on the concept of ionizing radiation in a case of nuclear emergencies. The presentation is focused on summarizing the 'lessons learned' from the use of radiation data in media reporting about the Fukushima nuclear accident. The in-depth media content analysis was conducted in twelve quality newspapers in Belgium, Slovenia, Italy, Spain, Norway and Russia using the same scientific methodology and analyzing the same time period. Preliminary results identified miss concepts of radiation data by media and even within emergency responders and decision makers. The research is a result of FP7 project Innovative integrated tools and platforms for radiological emergency preparedness and post-accident response in Europe - PREPARE and upgraded with a Russian experience. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  15. Genital condyloma virus infection following pelvic radiation therapy: report of seven cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowell, D.M.; Livolsi, V.A.; Ludwig, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Six women who underwent radiation therapy for gynecologic malignancies demonstrated cytologic evidence of condyloma virus infection 2 or more years following radiation. Histologic confirmation was obtained in two of the cases. A seventh patient developed in situ and invasive squamous cell carcinoma in a vulvar condyloma acuminatum following radiation therapy for Hodgkin's disease. This venereal infection is found most frequently in sexually active younger women (average age, 27 years). It is felt that depressed cell-mediated immunity consequent to the radiation therapy allowed the development of this infection in the older patients described in this report. The evolution of invasive squamous cell carcinoma in the condyloma acuminatum may indicate a possible oncogenic or cocarcinogenic effect of the virus. The immunologic responses to infection caused by the human papillomavirus group are discussed, as well as its potential for malignant transformation

  16. Spontaneous acalculous gallbladder perforation in a man secondary to chemotherapy and radiation: A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jungang; Shen, Guoliang; Shi, Ying; Zhang, Chengwu; Hong, Defei; Jin, Li; Yang, Hongguo; Sun, Wei; Cai, Hanhui; Hu, Zhiming; Wu, Weiding

    2018-05-01

    Gallbladder perforation is a serious clinical condition and associated with high morbidity and mortality. A definitive diagnosis is contentious before surgery. We herein report a case of perforation of the gallbladder neck secondary to chemotherapy and radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patient. Gallbladder perforation secondary to chemotherapy and radiation. To decrease the mortality associated with gallbladder perforation, Laparoscopic cholecystectomy and peritoneal lavage were performed followed for gallbladder perforation patient because of chemotherapy and radiation. The patient recovered fully without serious complication and discharged on the 10th postoperative day. A pathological examination of the resected gallbladder revealed cholecystitis in the thinning of the neck. Early diagnosis and surgical intervention of gallbladder perforation in relation to asopharyngeal carcinoma chemotherapy and radiation are of prime importance. The laparoscopic procedure is safe and feasible in the selected patients.

  17. Interagency task force on the health effects of ionizing radiation. final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This is the final report of the task force and incorporates the findings and recommendations of six smaller work groups, each with a more specific focus; i.e., science, privacy, care and benefits, exposure reduction, public information, and institutional arrangements. A research agenda that could provide some answers to questions about the effects of low-level radiation is proposed, along with recommendations to facilitate research. A public information program is outlined. Recommendations are advanced to improve systems that deliver care and benefits to those who may have been injured by exposure to radiation, and proposals for steps that might reduce unnecessary radiation exposure in the future are identified. The task force also recommends measures to institutionalize the interagency cooperation that characterized the task force. Three tables and one figure show the collective estimates of the U.S. general population, Federal research financing, cancer linked to radiation in particular populations, and a general dose-response model

  18. Report on results of seventeen years in consultations of radiation exposed pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, L.; Arndt, D.; Laude, G.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey it will be given results of consultations of pregnant women exposed during the pregnancy in the period of 1976 to 1992 formerly in the National Board of Atomic Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR and since 1990 in the Clinic-diagnostical Division of the Federal Health Office. The report includes dose estimations of the embryo and medical assessments of 430 pregnant women. The radiation exposure were mainly received by X-ray diagnostic (n = 406 cases) and the others by applications of radiation in nuclear medicine, research and vocational training (n = 24 cases). Results of dose and risk estimation were summarized in tables. Women having incurred fetal doses in excess of 100 mGy were recommended to interrupt pregnancy. A fetal dose above 100 mGy occured in 9 cases. The anatomico-pathological and embryological findings of the embryo or fetus showed only in one case a reference of teratogenic radiation damage. (orig.) [de

  19. Radiation-Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ericson, Milton Nance [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bobrek, Miljko [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blalock, Benjamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    As the recent accident at Fukushima Daiichi so vividly demonstrated, telerobotic technologies capable of withstanding high radiation environments need to be readily available to enable operations, repair, and recovery under severe accident scenarios where human entry is extremely dangerous or not possible. Telerobotic technologies that enable remote operation in high dose rate environments have undergone revolutionary improvement over the past few decades. However, much of this technology cannot be employed in nuclear power environments due the radiation sensitivity of the electronics and the organic insulator materials currently in use. This is the final report of the activities involving the NEET 2 project Radiation Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays. We present a detailed functional block diagram of the proposed data acquisition system, the thought process leading to technical decisions, the implemented system, and the tested results from the systems. This system will be capable of monitoring at least three parameters of importance to nuclear reactor monitoring: temperature, radiation level, and pressure.

  20. Progress report and preliminary 1981-83 agenda of the United States Radiation Policy Council

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    The U.S. Radiation Policy Council is responsible for coordinating the formulation and implementation of Federal Policy relating to radiation protection. In carrying out this very broad and basic mandate, the RPC has been directed to: Advise on the formulation of broad radiation protection policies; monitor the implementation of Federal policies; Help resolve conflicts in jurisdiction among Federal agencies; Recommend corrective legislation, if needed; ensure effective liaison with the States and the Congress; and Serve as a forum for public participation and comment. The RPC was established by Executive Order Number 12194 in February 1980. The Council was created to coordinate the formulation and implementation of Federal policies relating to radiation protection. This report summarizes the first 7 months the Council has been in operation, its activities, and decisions through September 1980

  1. [NCRP comments on radiation protection related reports, proposed standards, and meetings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Two NCRP Reports, two Annual Meeting Proceedings and one Commentary have been published during this period. NCRP Report No. 105, Radiation Protection for Medical and Allied Health Personnel is a rewrite and update of NCRP Report No. 48, which had the same title and which it supersedes. The primary objective of the new report is to update the material to include new radiation sources used in medicine. NCRP Report No. 106, Limit for Exposure to ''Hot Particles'' on the Skin was prepared in response to a request from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report addresses the potential biological effect of microscopic radioactive particles on the skin and reviews the presently available information on the subject. Proceedings No. 10, Radon, is the proceedings of the 24th Annual Meeting of the NCRP. Proceedings No. 11, Radiation Protection Today---The NCRP at Sixty Years is the proceedings of the 25th Annual Meeting of the NCRP. Commentary No. 5, Review of the Publication, Living Without Landfills, was recently released. Also included is a list of NCRP committee reports which were released in the current reporting period

  2. Radiation recall dermatitis induced by Amol during tamoxifen therapy - case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obtulowicz, A.; Pirowska, M.; Kosiniak-Kamysz, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the course of radiation therapy different types of adverse reactions of the skin are observed in approximately 95% of patients. Among the various complications encountered after radiotherapy, radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) deserves special attention. Radiation dermatitis is a form of delayed hypersensitivity of irradiated skin, and the direct trigger factors are medicines - most chemotherapeutics. The reaction is an inflammatory dermatosis. It is limited to previously irradiated skin and appears a number of months after radiotherapy. The aetiology of RRD is still unclear. Its clinical presentation may vary from mild erythema to necrosis and ulceration. The article presents the case of a 50-year-old patient, who after radiotherapy for breast cancer, during the hormonal therapy (tamoxifen), developed RRD type skin reactions after skin application of Amol. The article presents a detailed differential diagnosis of skin changes of RRD type, and discusses the principles of treatment and prevention. (authors)

  3. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    2002-01-01

    The measuring activities for radiological monitoring in the mine and the surrounding area have been continued as usual, in compliance with the relevant programmes. As in previous years, low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210 and Rn 222, including Rn 220, and the short-life radon daughter products have been detected. In some cases, the nuclide-specific concentrations in ambient air derived from the annual average were below the mean natural concentrations of those nuclides. The relevant exposure data at the most affected measuring points remained far below the maximum permissible doses given in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As compared to the natural and anthropogenic ambient radiation levels, the radiation exposure of the population in the area and the personnel on site, emanating from radioactive waste storage and performance of research projects in the Asse mine, represent an unsignificant contribution. (orig./CB) [de

  4. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    2001-01-01

    The measuring activities for radiological monitoring in the mine and the surrounding area have been continued as usual, in compliance with the relevant programmes. As in previous years, low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210 and Rn 222, including Rn 220, and the short-life radon daughter products have been detected. In some cases, the nuclide-specific concentrations in ambient air derived from the annual average were below the mean natural concentrations of those nuclides. The relevant exposure data at the most affected measuring points remained far below the maximum permissible doses given in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As compared to the natural and anthropogenic ambient radiation levels, the radiation exposure of the population in the area and the personnel on site, emanating from radioactive waste storage and performance of research projects in the Asse mine, represent an unsignificant contribution. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Radiation protection and ambient radioactivity monitoring in the area of the Asse mine. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, H.; Stippler, R.

    2000-01-01

    The measuring activities for radiological monitoring in the mine and the surrounding area have been continued as usual, in compliance with the relevant programmes. As in previous years, low amounts of the nuclides H 3, C 14, Pb 210 and Rn 222, including Rn 220, and the short-life radon daughter products have been detected. In some cases, the nuclide-specific concentrations in ambient air derived from the annual average were below the mean natural concentrations of those nuclides. The relevant exposure data at the most affected measuring points remained far below the maximum permissible doses given in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. As compared to the natural and anthropogenic ambient radiation levels, the radiation exposure of the population in the area and the personnel on site, emanating from radioactive waste storage and performance of research projects in the Asse mine, represent an insignificant contribution. (orig./CB) [de

  6. ASN annual report 2007 - ASN report abstracts on the state of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2007; ASN rapport annuel 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The 2007 annual report of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) presents the highlights of the year in the domain of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France. The year 2007 was marked by the implementation of a new legislative and regulatory framework created by the 13 June 2006 Act on transparency and security in the nuclear field (TSN) and the 28 June Act on the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. As in the previous two years, the year was relatively satisfactory from the nuclear safety viewpoint and slightly less so with regard to small-scale nuclear activities. For two years now, the medical field has been marked by the declaration to ASN of a number of serious radiotherapy accidents which have led to several deaths or the need for extensive surgery. The following main topics are reviewed in the document: 1 - the decrees implementing the 'TSN' act and the 'Waste' act; 2 - the new ASN, one year on; 3 - ASN regulatory actions in the field of radiotherapy; 4 - regulation of new installations; 5 - the key issues for regulation of existing installations; 6 - nuclear safety and radiation protection research; 7 - policy for management of the post-accident phase of a radiological emergency; 8 - sites and soils polluted by radioactive materials; 9 - international harmonization of nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  7. ASN annual report 2007 - ASN report abstracts on the state of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection in France in 2007; ASN rapport annuel 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The 2007 annual report of the French nuclear safety authority (ASN) presents the highlights of the year in the domain of nuclear safety and radiation protection in France. The year 2007 was marked by the implementation of a new legislative and regulatory framework created by the 13 June 2006 Act on transparency and security in the nuclear field (TSN) and the 28 June Act on the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. As in the previous two years, the year was relatively satisfactory from the nuclear safety viewpoint and slightly less so with regard to small-scale nuclear activities. For two years now, the medical field has been marked by the declaration to ASN of a number of serious radiotherapy accidents which have led to several deaths or the need for extensive surgery. The following main topics are reviewed in the document: 1 - the decrees implementing the 'TSN' act and the 'Waste' act; 2 - the new ASN, one year on; 3 - ASN regulatory actions in the field of radiotherapy; 4 - regulation of new installations; 5 - the key issues for regulation of existing installations; 6 - nuclear safety and radiation protection research; 7 - policy for management of the post-accident phase of a radiological emergency; 8 - sites and soils polluted by radioactive materials; 9 - international harmonization of nuclear safety and radiation protection.

  8. Report of China's innovation increase and research growth in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Qin, Qin; Bian, Kangqi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Jia; Cheng, Hongyan; Sun, Xinchen

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the research status of radiation oncology in China through survey of literature in international radiation oncology journals and retrospectively compare the outputs of radiation oncology articles of the three major regions of China-Mainland (ML), Taiwan (TW) and Hong Kong (HK). Radiation oncology journals were selected from "oncology" and "radiology, nuclear & medical image" category from Science Citation Index Expand (SCIE). Articles from the ML, TW and HK were retrieved from MEDLINE. The number of total articles, clinical trials, case reports, impact factors (IF), institutions and articles published in each journals were conducted for quantity and quality comparisons. A total 818 articles from 13 radiation oncology journals were searched, of which 427 are from ML, 259 from TW, and 132 from HK. Ninety-seven clinical trials and 5 case reports are reported in China. Accumulated IF of articles from ML (1,417.11) was much higher than that of TW (1,003.093) and HK (544.711), while the average IF of articles from ML is the lowest. The total number of articles from China especially ML increased significantly in the last decade. The number of articles published from the ML has exceeded those from TW and HK. However, the quality of articles from TW and HK is better than that from ML.

  9. Off-site environmental monitoring report: radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, G.D.; Black, S.C.; Grossman, R.F.; Patzer, R.G.; Smith, D.D.

    1985-04-01

    This report covers the routine radiation monitoring activities conducted by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas in areas which may be affected by nuclear testing programs of the Department of Energy. This monitoring is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends in environmental radiation, and to provide such information to the public. It summarizes these activities for calendar year 1984. No radioactivity attributable to NTS activities was detectable offsite by the monitoring networks. Using recorded wind data and Pasquill stability categories, atmospheric dispersion calculations based on reported radionuclides releases yield an estimated dose of 1 x 10 -3 person-rem to the population within 80 km of the Nevada Test Site during 1983. World-wide fallout of Kr-85, Sr-90, Cs-137, and Pu-239 detected by the monitoring networks would cause maximum exposure to an individual of less than 0.6 mrem per year. Plutonium in air was still detectable along with krypton-85, which continued its gradual increase, as has been reported previously. Cesium and strontium in air were near their detection limits. An occasional net exposure to offsite residents has been detected by the TLD network. On investigation, the cause of such net exposures has been due to personal habits or occupational activities, not to NTS activities. 32 refs., 36 figs., 27 tabs

  10. Malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the urinary bladder as a post-radiation secondary cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimmanon Thirayost

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Malignant fibrous histiocytomas have been periodically reported as the primary tumor in various organs including the urinary bladder, and is the second most frequent sarcoma of the urinary tract in adults. This report discusses a case of the well established diagnosis of a malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the bladder occurring as a post-radiation cancer after the treatment of a cervical carcinoma. Our findings support those of many previous studies and make the view of the nature of the disease clearer. Case presentation We report the case of a 54-year-old Thai woman who had been treated with radiation therapy for cervical cancer, who presented to our facility with urinary incontinence. Initially, our patient was diagnosed as having a high-grade urothelial carcinoma. Subsequent radical surgery rendered the final pathological diagnosis, confirmed histologically and immunohistochemically as malignant fibrous histiocytoma, with clinical and pathological staging of T4b N0 M0. Adjuvant chemotherapy was provided for our patient. Conclusions This type of malignancy is very aggressive and easily misdiagnosed due to its rarity. Therefore, in a patient with a prior history of irradiation in the pelvic area, this should be considered as a differential diagnosis to ensure early correct diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the Cruas-Meysse nuclear facilities - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 111 and 112). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2014, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix

  12. Reliability of self-reported questionnaire on occupational radiation work of radiologic technologists in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Jung [Graduate School of Public Health, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Eun Shil; Lee, Won Jin [Dept. of Preventive Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Self-completed questionnaires were used to obtain information on exposures and otherb factors necessary to evaluated disease risks. Although reliability of lifetime sun exposure of U.S. radiologic technologists and life-style factors, medical exams, and disease history of Korean nuclear power plants workers (2) were reported, few studies have evaluated the reliability of information obtained on radiation-related work in epidemiologic investigations. The aims of the study is to assess reliability of self-reported questionnaire for occupational radiation work in the radiologic technologists in Korea. Overall agreement and kappa regarding radiation work procedure, work practice, and work history were similar to those generally found for factors typically used in epidemiologic studies such as smoking (98% and 0.95) and alcohol consumption (88% and 0.67), and higher than physical activity (76% and 0.51).

  13. Annual report for FY 2011 on the activities of radiation safety in J-PARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-02-01

    This annual report describes the activities of radiation safety of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) for FY 2011. The activities described are radiation protection in workplaces, environmental monitoring, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and the technological developments of radiation protection. Occupational exposures have not exceeded the prescribed dose limit. No effluent releases were recorded exceeding the prescribed limits on the amount and concentration of radioactivity for gaseous release and liquid waste. J-PARC was suffered from the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The report also covers the activities for the recovery of J-PARC and the environmental monitoring of radioactivity from the accident. (author)

  14. Annual report for FY 2011 on the activities of radiation safety in J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    This annual report describes the activities of radiation safety of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) for FY 2011. The activities described are radiation protection in workplaces, environmental monitoring, individual monitoring, maintenance of monitoring instruments, and the technological developments of radiation protection. Occupational exposures have not exceeded the prescribed dose limit. No effluent releases were recorded exceeding the prescribed limits on the amount and concentration of radioactivity for gaseous release and liquid waste. J-PARC was suffered from the Great East Japan Earthquake and the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The report also covers the activities for the recovery of J-PARC and the environmental monitoring of radioactivity from the accident. (author)

  15. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the Belleville-sur-Loire nuclear facilities - 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 127 and 128). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2013, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix

  16. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the Paluel nuclear facilities - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 103, 104, 114 and 115). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2014, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix

  17. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the Belleville-sur-Loire nuclear facilities - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 127 and 128). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2014, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix

  18. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the Penly nuclear facilities - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 136 and 140). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2014, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix

  19. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of Belleville-Sur-Loire nuclear facilities - 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 127 and 128). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2012, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix. (J.S.)

  20. Nuclear safety and radiation protection report of the Flamanville nuclear facilities - 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This safety report was established in accordance with articles L. 125-15 and L. 125-16 of the French environmental code. It presents, first, the NPPs (INBs no. 108, 109 and 167 (under construction)). Then, the nuclear safety and radiation protection measures taken regarding the facilities are reviewed: nuclear safety definition, radiation protection of intervening parties, safety and radiation protection improvement paths, crisis management, external and internal controls, technical situation of facilities, administrative procedures in progress. The incidents and accidents which occurred in 2013, if any, are reported as well as the radioactive and non-radioactive effluents discharge in the environment. Finally, the radioactive materials and wastes generated by the facility are presented (type of waste, quantities, conditioning process). The document concludes with a presentation of the actions of communication and public information made by the direction of the facility. A glossary and the list of recommendations from the Committees for health, safety and working conditions are given in appendix