WorldWideScience

Sample records for previously imagined life

  1. Imagining xenophobia: Life orientation, language and literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridge, Stanley

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that if the learning area Life Orientation is to give substance to the recommendations of the James Report (2000 values will have to be imaginatively apprehended and reinterpreted in each life situation. This article explores ways of using language and literature study to give imaginative access to xenophobia, a key social problem in South Africa (and beyond and so taking Life Orientation beyond the letter of the lay to honouring its ‘spirit, purport and objects’ (Constitution 39.(2. The three literary works used in this case are Judges 12 (New International Bible, Snow Falling on Cedars (David Guterson and Welcome to our Hillbrow (Phaswane Mpe.

  2. [When life needs routine, imagination, listening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognoni, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    When life needs routine, imagination, listening. Barbara is a 44 years old oncologist, married and with two children, that tells through others but also with her own words of her cancer, until death. Giuseppe is a laboratory technician, researcher, mountaineer, promoter of humanitarian initiatives Bosnia and Croatia; his lateral amyotrophic sclerosis is told by his wife, in a booklet written after his death. Their two stories are the occasions for reflecting on the importance and role of closeness, listening, dreaming, narrating in improving the quality of life and care: none of these words are included in the guidelines.

  3. Imagined Adulthood under Transition--Somali-Swedish Girls' Life-Planning in a Late Modernity Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohme, Gunnel Maria

    2014-01-01

    This article examines how Muslim girls of Somali origin raised in Sweden imagine their adulthood in regard to career and family life. The theoretical framework is social constructionist in that it assumes that children have agency and are capable and competent actors, in contrast to what has previously been generally assumed about children from…

  4. Significance and role of imagination in the life of modern person

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ирина Аркадиевна Кадиевская

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article it is proved that the formation of gloomy morbid imagination is dangerous to human life and health, while the development of a positive optimistic creative imagination contrary is justified and useful. Results in this direction have shown methods like autogenic training (AT, biofeedback (BFB, meditation, psychomuscular, ideamotor, visuomotor training etc.

  5. Imagination and memory: does imagining implausible events lead to false autobiographical memories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezdek, Kathy; Blandon-Gitlin, Iris; Gabbay, Pamela

    2006-10-01

    Previous studies have reported that imagination can induce false autobiographical memories. This finding has been used to suggest that psychotherapists who have clients imagine suspected repressed memories of childhood sexual abuse may, in fact, be inducing false memories for the imagined events. In this study, at Time 1 and then, 2 weeks later, at Time 2, 145 subjects rated each of 20 events on the Life Events Inventory as to whether each had occurred to them in childhood. One week after Time 1, the subjects were told that 2 target events were plausible and 2 were implausible. They were then asked to imagine 1 plausible and 1 implausible target event. Plausibility and imagining interacted to affect occurrence ratings; whereas imagining plausible events increased the change in occurrence ratings, imagining implausible events had no effect on occurrence ratings.

  6. Embodied Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Koefoed; Kozel, Susan

    2007-01-01

    ituated in the domain of research into mobile, wireless, networked and wearable computing, this exploratory paperintroduces the embodied imagination method and explains how it can contribute to the design process by creating an elastic space of performance that incorporates daily life and personal...

  7. Imagination can create false autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, Giuliana; Memon, Amina

    2003-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that imagining an event can alter autobiographical beliefs. The current study examined whether it can also create false memories. One group of participants imagined a relatively frequent event and received information about an event that never occurs. A second group imagined the nonoccurring event and received information about the frequent event. One week before and again 1 week immediately after the manipulation, participants rated the likelihood that they had experienced each of the two critical events and a series of noncritical events, using the Life Events Inventory. During the last phase, participants were also asked to describe any memories they had for the events. For both events, imagination increased the number of memories reported, as well as beliefs about experiencing the event. These results indicate that imagination can induce false autobiographical memories.

  8. Imagination Embodied: The Sacraments Reappropriated

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the 2015 REA Atlanta conference theme, "The Power of Imagining: The Life Giving Possibilities of Education in Faith," this article proposes a postmodern reclamation of imagination as the human bridge to sacramentally encounter the Divine. It re-examines sacramental religious education retrieving imagination from material…

  9. Brain Ways: Meynert, Bachelard and the Material Imagination of the Inner Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Scott

    2016-07-01

    The Austrian psychiatrist Theodor Meynert's anatomical theories of the brain and nerves are laden with metaphorical imagery, ranging from the colonies of empire to the tentacles of jellyfish. This paper analyses among Meynert's earliest works a different set of less obvious metaphors, namely, the fibres, threads, branches and paths used to elaborate the brain's interior. I argue that these metaphors of material, or what the philosopher Gaston Bachelard called 'material images', helped Meynert not only to imaginatively extend the tracts of fibrous tissue inside the brain but to insinuate their function as pathways co-extensive with the mind. Above all, with reference to Bachelard's study of the material imagination, I argue that Meynert helped entrench the historical intuition that the mind, whatever it was, consisted of some interiority - one which came to be increasingly articulated through the fibrous confines of the brain.

  10. Imagination Deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Remy; Welch, Marlene

    2012-01-01

    Imagination is one component of creativity; self-expression is another. The early childhood classroom should be full of creative possibilities that allow children to use their imaginations. For creativity to flourish, staff must provide an environment that fosters creative expression. Imagination itself is "the act or power of forming a mental…

  11. "Imagine that ..."

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Madsen, Sabine; Hansen, Anne Vorre

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this paper is user ideation within front-end innovation. We present and discuss an approach which we refer to as “Imagine that. . . ”. With “Imagine that. . . ” users tell stories of how they imagine they will use a future IT system. The oral stories are captured online using a remot...

  12. Landslide risk impact management and web services for improving resilience: the LIFE+IMAGINE project approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congi, Maria Pia; Campo, Valentina; Cipolloni, Carlo; Delmonaco, Giuseppe; Guerrieri, Luca; Iadanza, Carla; Spizzichino, Daniele; Trigila, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    The increasing damage caused by natural disasters in the last decades points out the need for interoperable added-value services to support environmental safety and human protection, by reducing vulnerability of exposed elements as well as improving the resilience of the involved communities. For this reason, to provide access to harmonized and customized data is only one of several steps towards delivering adequate support to risk assessment, reduction and management. Scope of the present work is to illustrate a methodology under development for analysis of potential impacts in areas prone to landslide hazard in the framework of the EC project LIFE+IMAGINE. The project aims to implement an infrastructure based on web services for environmental analysis, that integrates in its own architecture specifications and results from INSPIRE, SEIS and GMES. Existing web services will be customized during the project to provide functionalities for supporting the environmental integrated management. The implemented infrastructure will be applied to landslide risk scenarios, to be developed in selected pilot areas, aiming at: i) application of standard procedures to implement a landslide risk analysis; ii) definition of a procedure for assessment of potential environmental impacts, based on a set of indicators to estimate the different exposed elements with their specific vulnerability in the pilot area. More in detail, the landslide pilot will be aimed at providing a landslide risk scenario through the implementation and analysis of: 1) a landslide inventory from available historical databases and maps; 2) landslide susceptibility and hazard maps; 3) assessment of exposure and vulnerability on selected typologies of elements at risk; 4) implementation of a landslide risk scenario for different sets of exposed elements (e.g. population, road network, residential area, cultural heritage). The pilot will be implemented in Liguria, Italy, in two different catchment areas located

  13. Complexes and imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Verena

    2014-11-01

    Fantasies as imaginative activities are seen by Jung as expressions of psychic energy. In the various descriptions of active imagination the observation of the inner image and the dialogue with inner figures, if possible, are important. The model of symbol formation, as Jung describes it, can be experienced in doing active imagination. There is a correspondence between Jung's understanding of complexes and our imaginations: complexes develop a fantasy life. Complex episodes are narratives of difficult dysfunctional relationship episodes that have occurred repeatedly and are internalized with episodic memory. This means that the whole complex episode (the image for the child and the image for the aggressor, connected with emotions) is internalized and can get constellated in everyday relationship. Therefore inner dialogues do not necessarily qualify as active imaginations, often they are the expression of complex-episodes, very similar to fruitless soliloquies. If imaginations of this kind are repeated, new symbols and new possibilities of behaviour are not found. On the contrary, old patterns of behaviour and fantasies are perpetuated and become cemented. Imaginations of this kind need an intervention by the analyst. In clinical examples different kinds of imaginations are discussed. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  14. Event-related potential signatures of perceived and imagined emotional and food real-life photos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo-Ramos, Fernando; Hellemans, Kim; Comeau, Amy; Heenan, Adam; Faulkner, Andrew; Abizaid, Alfonso; D'Angiulli, Amedeo

    2015-06-01

    Although food and affective pictures share similar emotional and motivational characteristics, the relationship between the neuronal responses to these stimuli is unclear. Particularly, it is not known whether perceiving and imagining food and affective stimuli elicit similar event-related potential (ERP) patterns. In this study, two ERP correlates, the early posterior negativity (EPN) and the late positive potential (LPP) for perceived and imagined emotional and food photographs were investigated. Thirteen healthy volunteers were exposed to a set of food photos, as well as unpleasant, pleasant, and neutral photos from the International Affective Picture System. In each trial, participants were first asked to view a photo (perception condition), and then to create a visual mental image of it and to rate its vividness (imagery condition). The results showed that during perception, brain regions corresponding to sensorimotor and parietal motivational (defensive and appetitive) systems were activated to different extents, producing a graded pattern of EPN and LPP responses specific to the photo content - more prominent for unpleasant than pleasant and food content. Also, an EPN signature occurred in both conditions for unpleasant content, suggesting that, compared to food or pleasant content, unpleasant content may be attended to more intensely during perception and may be represented more distinctly during imagery. Finally, compared to LLP activation during perception, as well as imagery and perception of all other content, LPP activation was significantly reduced during imagery of unpleasant photos, suggesting inhibition of unwanted memories. Results are framed within a neurocognitive working model of embodied emotions.

  15. Imagining Evil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Morton

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It is in a way easier to imagine evil actions than we often suppose, but what it is thus relatively easy to do is not what we want to understand about evil. To argue for this conclusion I distin- guish between imagining why someone did something and imagining how they could have done it, and I try to grasp partial understanding, in part by distinguishing different imaginative pers- pectives we can have on an act. When we do this we see an often unnoticed asymmetry: we do not put the same demands on our understanding of wrongdoing as on that of most everyday, morally acceptable, actions.

  16. Niger - IMAGINE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This impact evaluation uses random assignment at the village level to estimate impacts of the IMAGINE program on enrollment, attendance, learning and other education...

  17. Managerial Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Savvas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the links between imagination and human resource management. The concept imagination has received little scholarly attention within the field of management, despite its potential to inform a number of lines of inquiry. At the present time, much of the research literature on imagination is confined to the visual arts, literature, and education. Human resource (HR professionals could play a part in aligning employees with organizational goals and bring about organizational change if they developed their thinking in a more imaginative way. Developing managerial imagination can help solve the dilemmas and contradictions they face. A diagram is developed, which maps the development of the personnel function and offers four possibilities within a framework. They are biography, personal framing, history, and social structure. The outcome of this analysis provides a development of the personnel function one of which is a globally imaginative HR management. Within such a framework, the concept of “the imaginative performer” is discussed. The implications of combining imagination with management may provide a theoretical and practical way to understanding HR management.

  18. Seeing failure in your life: Imagery perspective determines whether self-esteem shapes reactions to recalled and imagined failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Lisa K; Valenti, Greta; Pfent, Alison; Eibach, Richard P

    2011-12-01

    The present research reveals that when it comes to recalling and imagining failure in one's life, changing how one looks at the event can change its impact on well-being; however, the nature of the effect depends on an aspect of one's self-concept, namely, self-esteem. Five studies measured or manipulated the visual perspective (internal first-person vs. external third-person) individuals used to mentally image recalled or imagined personal failures. It has been proposed that imagery perspective determines whether people's reactions to an event are shaped bottom-up by concrete features of the event (first-person) or top-down by their self-concept (third-person; L. K. Libby & R. P. Eibach, 2011b). Evidence suggests that differences in the self-concepts of individuals with low and high self-esteem (LSEs and HSEs) are responsible for self-esteem differences in reaction to failure, leading LSEs to have more negative thoughts and feelings about themselves (e.g., M. H. Kernis, J. Brockner, & B. S. Frankel, 1989). Thus, the authors predicted, and found, that low self-esteem was associated with greater overgeneralization--operationalized as negativity in accessible self-knowledge and feelings of shame--only when participants had pictured failure from the third-person perspective and not from the first-person. Further, picturing failure from the third-person, rather than first-person, perspective, increased shame and the negativity of accessible knowledge among LSEs, whereas it decreased shame among HSEs. Results help to distinguish between different theoretical accounts of how imagery perspective functions and have implications for the study of top-down and bottom-up influences on self-judgment and emotion, as well as for the role of perspective and abstraction in coping.

  19. Material Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    As a mass medium of modern culture, design sets the frame for human imaginative interaction with the world. In its many appearances, design can be seen as kind of material imagination where concepts and sensual appearances meet in different constellations. In this process something is made present...... as the product of a series of constructive factors related to schematization. Second, I discuss in two examples of design, how these factors operate and how the process of imagination is conditioned by the specific materiality of the design....

  20. Imagining Sound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimshaw, Mark; Garner, Tom Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We make the case in this essay that sound that is imagined is both a perception and as much a sound as that perceived through external stimulation. To argue this, we look at the evidence from auditory science, neuroscience, and philosophy, briefly present some new conceptual thinking on sound...... that accounts for this view, and then use this to look at what the future might hold in the context of imagining sound and developing technology....

  1. Imagined futures, present lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Anne Line; Wildermuth, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    is discussed centrally in this attempt to contribute to an empirically grounded understanding of the role that media play for youth in their striving to ‘find a place in life'. In the empirical context presented in the article, imaginations, expanded and circulated by a globalized media circuit...

  2. Imagination inflation in the mirror: Can imagining others' actions induce false memories of self-performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Isabel; Echterhoff, Gerald

    2015-06-01

    Imagining oneself performing a simple action can trigger false memories of self-performance, a phenomenon called imagination inflation. However, people can, and often do, imagine others' behavior and actions. According to a visual-similarity account, imagining another person's actions should induce the same kind of memory error, a false memory of self-performance. We tested this account in three experiments, in which performance was followed by imagination. In the imagination phase, participants were asked to either imagine themselves or to imagine another person performing actions, some of which were not previously performed. Two weeks later, a surprise source-memory test was administered in which participants had to decide whether a depicted action had been performed or not performed. Results revealed that imagining another person can trigger false memories of self-performance. However, visual similarity between performance and imagination predicted the amount of false memories only for other-imagination but not for self-imagination. These findings are consistent with research suggesting that other- and self-imagination rely on different mechanisms: While other-imagination primarily involves visual imagery, self-imagination primarily involves motor imagery. Accordingly, false action memories from other-imagination may result from visual similarity, whereas false action memories from self-imagination may result from motor simulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Life-history traits in an evergreen Mediterranean oak respond differentially to previous experimental environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rey Benayas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms respond both to current and previous environments, which can have important consequences on population dynamics. However, there is little experimental evidence based on long-term field studies of the effects of previous environments on the performance of individuals. We tested the hypothesis that trees that establish under different environmental conditions perform differently under similar post-establishment conditions. We used the slow-growing, evergreen Mediterranean oak Quercus ilex subsp. rotundifolia as target species. We analyzed the effects of previous environments, competition effects and tradeoffs among life-history traits (survival, growth, and reproduction. We enhanced seedling establishment for three years by reducing abiotic environmental harshness by means of summer irrigation and artificial shading in 12 experimental plots, while four plots remained as controls. Then these treatments were interrupted for ten years. Seedlings under ameliorated environmental conditions survived and grew faster during early establishment. During the post-management period, previous treatments 1 did not have any effect on survival, 2 experienced a slower above-ground growth, 3 decreased root biomass as indicated from reflectivity of Ground Penetration Radar, 4 increased acorn production mostly through a greater canopy volume and 5 increased acorn production effort. The trees exhibited a combination of effects related to acclimation for coping with abiotic stress and effects of intra-specific competition. In accordance with our hypothesis, tree performance overall depended on previous environmental conditions, and the response was different for different life-history traits. We recommend early management because it increased plot cover, shortened the time to attain sexual maturity and increased the amount of acorn production. Plots such as those assessed in this study may act as sources of propagules in deforested

  4. Toward a physiology of the romantic imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Richard C

    2009-01-01

    If historicist studies have equated the Romantic imagination with ideology, this essay seeks to recover a physiological imagination. Such recovery will show that historicist studies of the imagination have not been historical enough. Even as physiology attempted to make a science out of the living as opposed to the dead, it turned to concepts like life, predisposition, and potentiality to give the imagination a curious immaterial materiality, one that made materiality a site of possibility rather than determinism.

  5. Imagined Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merritt, Timothy Robert; Nørgaard, M.; Laursen, C.

    2015-01-01

    to this book focuses on the human responses to objects that change shape in response to input from users, environment, or other circumstances. In this chapter we discuss the term "imagined physics", meaning how actuated devices are in one sense tied to their physical form, yet through the use of actuators...

  6. On Major Developments in Preschoolers' Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diachenko, Olga M.

    2011-01-01

    The role of the imagination in adult thinking is to go beyond reality and to express generalised laws. The researcher's job is to specify the cultural tools that preschool children use in the development of their imagination. Previous research has identified two main stages in the development of imagination up until the age of six, a third stage…

  7. Imagining a Different Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mary

    2009-01-01

    The report of the Panel on Fair Access to the Professions, chaired by Alan Milburn, was published at the end of the summer. The report was the result of considerable investigation into the progress, or lack of it, of people from lower socio-economic groups in gaining access to professional jobs. It seems that this issue is one that all the main…

  8. Refrigerated shelf life of vacuum-packaged, previously frozen ostrich meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otremba, M M; Dikeman, M E; Boyle, E A

    1999-07-01

    Previously frozen ostrich meat was evaluated over 28 days to determine the refrigerated shelf life. Intact steaks and ground meat from three ostrich carcasses were vacuum-packaged, frozen to -40°C for 5 days, and stored in a 0°C walk-in cooler. Instrumental analysis of CIE L*a*b* values indicated that ostrich meat was very dark in color, initially and over time. Microbial growth stayed slightly below 1.0 × 10(7) CFU/g for up to 21 days of refrigerated storage. Sensorially evaluated color showed an increase (p meat by 28 days. Sensory aroma scores significantly (pmeat stored under refrigerated conditions should be used within 10 days.

  9. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role......, this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references...... in cooperation and development of ICTs seems to pass unnoticed. However, since they are aligned into ICTs, technicities impact innovation....

  10. Mathematics for the imagination

    CERN Document Server

    Higgins, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Mathematics for the Imagination provides an accessible and entertaining investigation into mathematical problems in the world around us. From world navigation, family trees, and calendars to patterns, tessellations, and number tricks, this informative and fun new book helps you to understand the maths behind real-life questions and rediscover your arithmetical mind.This is a follow-up to the popular Mathematics for the Curious, Peter Higgins's first investigation into real-life mathematical problems.A highly involving book which encourages the reader to enter into the spirit of mathematical ex

  11. End-Of-Life Medical Spending In Last Twelve Months Of Life Is Lower Than Previously Reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    French, Eric; McCauley, Jeremy; Aragon, Maria

    2017-01-01

    , the United States, and the Canadian province of Quebec to measure the composition and magnitude of medical spending in the three years before death. In all nine countries, medical spending at the end of life was high relative to spending at other ages. Spending during the last twelve months of life made up...... a modest share of aggregate spending, ranging from 8.5 percent in the United States to 11.2 percent in Taiwan, but spending in the last three calendar years of life reached 24.5 percent in Taiwan. This suggests that high aggregate medical spending is due not to last-ditch efforts to save lives......Although end-of-life medical spending is often viewed as a major component of aggregate medical expenditure, accurate measures of this type of medical spending are scarce. We used detailed health care data for the period 2009–11 from Denmark, England, France, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Taiwan...

  12. Life cycle impact assessment of ammonia production in Algeria: A comparison with previous studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhlouf, Ali; Serradj, Tayeb; Cheniti, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) from “cradle to gate” of one anhydrous ton of ammonia with a purity of 99% was achieved. Particularly, the energy and environmental performance of the product (ammonia) were evaluated. The eco-profile of the product and the share of each stage of the Life Cycle on the whole environmental impacts have been evaluated. The flows of material and energy for each phase of the life cycle were counted and the associated environmental problems were identified. Evaluation of the impact was achieved using GEMIS 4.7 software. The primary data collection was executed at the production installations located in Algeria (Annaba locality). The analysis was conducted according to the LCA standards ISO 14040 series. The results show that Cumulative Energy Requirement (CER) is of 51.945 × 10 3 MJ/t of ammonia, which is higher than the global average. Global Warming Potential (GWP) is of 1.44 t CO 2 eq/t of ammonia; this value is lower than the world average. Tropospheric ozone precursor and Acidification are also studied in this article, their values are: 549.3 × 10 −6 t NMVOC eq and 259.3 × 10 −6 t SO 2 eq respectively

  13. Health related quality of life and health status in adult survivors with previously operated complex congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Ottenkamp, J.; Vliegen, H. W.; Vogels, T.; Zwinderman, K. H.; Kamphuis, R. P.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    To examine the impact of previously operated complex congenital heart disease on health related quality of life and subjective health status and to determine the relation between these parameters and physical status. Cross sectional; information on medical follow up was sought retrospectively.

  14. Does the previous diagnosis of arterial hypertension affect one's daily life? Pro-Saude Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo Filho, Gilberto Senechal de; Lopes, Claudia de Souza; Faerstein, Eduardo

    2013-12-01

    In addition to damaging several target organs, arterial hypertension may negatively impact patients' activities of daily living. Biological and behavioral mechanisms underlying such limitations have yet to be clarified. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether having been previously told of a hypertension diagnosis is associated with the frequency and duration of temporary limitations in activities of daily living, and whether these relationships differ by gender, age, or socioeconomic position. We analyzed sectional data from 2,666 participants (56% women; 55% with high school or lower schooling) at the baseline phase (1999 - 2001) of a longitudinal investigation of university employees in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (Pró-Saúde Study), asking participants whether they had ever been diagnosed with hypertension by a health professional, if they had been unable to perform any activities of daily living due to a health problem in the previous 2 weeks, and for how many days that had occurred. Multinomial logistic regression models were fitted for the overall study population and for age, gender, educational level, and per capita household income strata. Associations between hypertension diagnosis and temporary limitations were not observed in the overall study population and in gender, education and income strata. However, there were higher odds of temporary limitations among participants aged 55 years old or more with hypertension diagnosis (adjusted OR = 9.5; 95%CI 1.5 - 58.6), regardless of blood pressure levels and use of antihypertensive medication. Elderly people may keep an attitude of higher vigilance regarding conditions or events potentially worsening their health status.

  15. Previous experiences and emotional baggage as barriers to lifestyle change - a qualitative study of Norwegian Healthy Life Centre participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Følling, Ingrid S; Solbjør, Marit; Helvik, Anne-S

    2015-06-23

    Changing lifestyle is challenging and difficult. The Norwegian Directorate of Health recommends that all municipalities establish Healthy Life Centres targeted to people with lifestyle issues. Little is known about the background, experiences and reflections of participants. More information is needed about participants to shape effective lifestyle interventions with lasting effect. This study explores how participants in a lifestyle intervention programme describe previous life experiences in relation to changing lifestyle. Semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews were performed with 23 participants (16 women and 7 men) aged 18 - 70 years. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation searching for issues describing participants' responses, and looking for the essence, aiming to share the basis of life-world experiences as valid knowledge. Participants identified two main themes: being stuck in old habits, and being burdened with emotional baggage from their previous negative experiences. Participants expressed a wish to change their lifestyles, but were unable to act in accordance with the health knowledge they possessed. Previous experiences with lifestyle change kept them from initiating attempts without professional assistance. Participants also described being burdened by an emotional baggage with problems from childhood and/or with family, work and social life issues. Respondents said that they felt that emotional baggage was an important explanation for why they were stuck in old habits and that conversely, being stuck in old habits added load to their already emotional baggage and made it heavier. Behavioural change can be hard to perform as psychological distress from life baggage can influence the ability to change. The study participants' experience of being stuck in old habits and having substantial emotional baggage raises questions as to whether or not Healthy Life Centres are able to help participants who need to make a lifestyle

  16. The Theatre of Imagining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, Ulla

    This dissertation examines the concept of imagination – in the human mind and on the stage. The scope is twofold: On the one hand, to examine the cultural history of imagination in a European context; on the other hand, to analyze the cultural enactment of imagination in the drama text as potential...... performance with the audience as active co-players. The dissertation’s examination of the cultural history of imagination via three selected periods uncovers a very complex, variable and diverse conception of imagination: From the perception of imagination in the Renaissance as a reproductive but potentially...... distorting and corrupt mirror; over the idealist and romantic view of imagination as a productive, creative force, like a lamp by whose divine light new insights could be illuminated; to the existentialist, phenomenological, modernist understanding of imagination as simultaneously intentionality...

  17. Imagination in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillancourt Menton, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Imagination in Education was a qualitative inquiry that explored the effects the implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) had on imagination within high school cultures. The central question for this study was: How do New York City Department of Education (NYC DOE) high school principals conceptualize imagination within their…

  18. Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Graves

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ambition of this issue of Portal is to reach across the methodological boundaries of history, politics, literature and geography to apply their complementary perspectives to the study of identity and its relation to space and place, an aim that involves attempting to identify the many different ways the notoriously slippery concepts of identity and geography may intersect. For this issue we have selected articles that cast a fresh perspective on two areas where identity and geography intersect: the construction of identity through the imaginative recreation of place in literature: Mapping Literary Spaces; and the study of the shifting relationships of centre and periphery, exclusion and inclusion in urban settings and geopolitical confrontations: Social and Political Peripheries. Gerard Toal has written that geography is not a noun but a verb: it does not describe what space is but studies what we do with space, imaginatively and politically. The articles in this issue illustrate the exercise of the literary and political imagination and the role of materiality and memory in the creation of geographic representation. They show too a new awareness of the centrality of space in the constitution of identities, and the need for a new geocritical reading of its discourse, as the interrelations of place and community are played out on the many scales of social and political life, from the local to the global.   The special issue is organised thus: Introduction Matthew Graves (Aix-Marseille University & Liz Rechniewski (Sydney University: “Imagining Geographies, Mapping Identities.” I. Mapping Literary Spaces - Isabelle Avila (University of Paris XIII, "Les Cartes de l'Afrique au XIXe siècle et Joseph Conrad : Perceptions d'une Révolution Cartographique." - Daniela Rogobete (University of Craiova, "Global vs Glocal: Dimensions of the post-1981 Indian English Novel." II. Social and Political Peripheries - Elizabeth Rechniewski (Sydney

  19. The Theatre of Imagining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallenbach, Ulla

    distorting and corrupt mirror; over the idealist and romantic view of imagination as a productive, creative force, like a lamp by whose divine light new insights could be illuminated; to the existentialist, phenomenological, modernist understanding of imagination as simultaneously intentionality...... and nothingness. This analysis of the context and theory of imagination forms the basis of three analyses of the imagination in text and practice. Via dramaturgical close readings of three dramas of Shakespeare, Ibsen and Ionesco respectively, the dissertation examines both how the spectator’s imagination...

  20. The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    and the phenomenology of imagination, he seeks to answer fundamental questions about what design is and how it works that are often ignored in academic research. Folkmann considers three conditions in design: the possible, the aesthetic, and the imagination. Imagination is a central formative power behind the creation......In The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design, Mads Folkmann investigates design in both material and immaterial terms. Design objects, Folkmann argues, will always be dual phenomena--material, and immaterial, sensual and conceptual, actual and possible. Drawing on formal theories of aesthetics...... and the life of design objects; aesthetics describes the sensual, conceptual, and contextual codes through which design objects communicate; the concept of the possible--the enabling of new uses, conceptions, and perceptions--lies behind imagination and aesthetics. The possible, Folkmann argues, is contained...

  1. Niger - Threshold (IMAGINE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This impact evaluation uses random assignment at the village level to estimate impacts of the IMAGINE program on enrollment, attendance, learning and other education...

  2. Life cycle assessment of nuclear-based hydrogen production using thermochemical water decomposition: extension of previous work and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L.I.; Dincer, I.; Rosen, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    An extension of a previous Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) of nuclear-based hydrogen production using thermochemical water decomposition is reported. The copper-chlorine thermochemical cycle is considered, and the environmental impacts of the nuclear and thermochemical plants are assessed, while future needs are identified. Environmental impacts are investigated using CML 2001 impact categories. The nuclear fuel cycle and construction of the hydrogen plant contribute significantly to total environmental impacts. The environmental impacts for the operation of the thermochemical hydrogen production plant contribute much less. Changes in the inventory of chemicals needed in the thermochemical plant do not affect significantly the total impacts. Improvement analysis suggests the development of more sustainable processes, particularly in the nuclear plant. Other important and necessary future extensions of the research reported are also provided. (author)

  3. Awakening Students' Sociological Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Students who experience a transcendent moment as they vicariously walk in the shoes of another person demonstrate the utilization of sociological imagination. Even though the concept of sociological imagination was advanced more than 50 years ago by sociologist C. Wright Mills, there is high value to revisit this concept and for its application to…

  4. Gettysburg re-imagined

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chronis, Athinodoros; Arnould, Eric J.; Hampton, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    narrative of the American Civil War and we explore ethnographically the ways in which this historical episode is (re)imagined and articulated in tourism at Gettysburg. Our research provides an alternative account to mental imagery theory that is based on restrictive cognitive conceptions of imagination...... and expands narrative-based theories of consumption experiences. We argue that the workings of imagination in tourism sites are inextricably linked to the production of cultural imaginaries, that is, socially important narratives invested with collective values; we illustrate the process through which......We investigate the role of imagination in the consumption experience and we theorize the ways in which important collective narratives are (re)imagined at storyscapes - consumption spaces where narratives are the focal object of consumption. We ground our empirical investigation in the historical...

  5. Digital landscapes of imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starlight Vattano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Urban landscapes that exist in the expression of an imaginative sequence define their shape through the digital representation. These hyperreal dimensions, combine imagination and representation as constituents a new reality, which follows the utopian, suprematist and constructivist theories, where the two-dimensional dynamics is transformed into an infinite space in which the imagination creates new forms. Although interpretations of the urban landscape film, put in place a correspondence between reality and virtuality, into the modeling of spatial movements, from which do not arise contraries, but only interdependencies. It is a particular type of representation that takes shape via the digital in motion and provides new tools for urban representation.

  6. After Imagining/ Après l'imaginer: Imaginations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Managing Editors

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We welcome you to Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies / Revue d’études interculturelles de l’image, an open-access online peer-reviewed journal born out of research and developments in cross-cultural and intersecting epistemological fields that have at their root a determined focus on the role and power of the image in contemporary culture and in cultural communications. Nous vous souhaitons la bienvenue à Imaginations: Journal of Cross-Cultural Image Studies / Revue d’études interculturelles de l’image, un journal en ligne à accès libre dont les contributions sont préalablement soumises à un comité de révision par les pairs. Cette publication est le fruit d’un vif intérêt pour la recherche et la pratique au croisement de multiples champs épistémologiques et interculturels autour du rôle et de la puissance de l’image dans la société et les média contemporains.

  7. Imaginative Interaction with Internet Games. For Children and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaford, Jeanette

    2012-01-01

    This article explores children's imaginative interaction with Internet games in the belief that an understanding of children's life experiences is essential to effective teaching and learning within the classroom. It is underpinned by the idea that imaginative play is, at least in some part, the work of children undertaking identity practice. It…

  8. Calling in imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Balcerzan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “imagination” has numerous meaning: colloquial, paraliterary, scientific. They all refer to auto-communication, which is a conversation of an individual with him or herself, when our mind faculties: memory, intuition, observation, intelligence, knowledge – and imagination, too – compete for dominance or strive for harmonious cooperation. Similarly to the generally understood imagination, its particular, important species (literary imagination requires internal classification, because it is always an imagination of role: of the author, the reader, the expert, the performer, the censor, the distributor, or sometimes of the translator. The question of translator’s and author’s status provokes a comparison between author’s and translator’s imagination: they share some qualities, but also have decidedly different ones. The opposition between created nature and creating nature, which is a notion used by Józef Czechowicz, might be helpful in capturing the similarities and differences. But this opposition, too, demands a literary and historical context. The author created by the romantic myth seems someone gifted with imagination creating literary worlds, which are limitless, whereas the author of realist works, especially diaries, must give priority to observation, when a piece of external, empirical reality is described and recorded. Baroque, romanticism, realism, expressionism, avant-garde, postmodernism differ in their canons of imagination. The creative process by the author of an original work becomes a negotiation between innovations of authorial fantasy and recreation of the canon. The translator is under much stronger pressure from his or her times, because his or her objectives and tasks are different. Usually, knowledge is enough for a translator: linguistic, historical, literary, common, encyclopaedic, specialised. If knowledge fails, the translator reaches out to imagination as an instrument for interpretation of

  9. Quality of life following total hip arthroplasty in patients with acetabular fractures, previously managed by open reduction and internal fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasoon Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: From this study it is inferred that the functional outcome of THR and quality of life in patients who had acetabular fractures and were initially managed by open reduction and internal fixation is good.

  10. Imagination in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, P A

    1997-01-01

    Current focus in the health care ethics literature on the character of the practitioner has a reputable pedigree. Rather than offer a staple diet of Aristotelian ethics in the undergraduate curricula, perhaps instead one should follow Murdoch's suggestion and help the practitioner to develop vision and moral imagination, because this has a practical rather than a theoretical aim. The imaginative capacity of the practitioner plays an important part in both the quality of the nurse's role enactment and the moral strategies which the nurse uses. It also plays a central part in the practitioner's ability to communicate with a patient and in the type of person which the practitioner becomes. Can the moral imagination be stimulated and nurtured? Some philosophers and literary critics argue that not only is this possible, but that literature is the means of doing so. If this is the case then a place should be made for literature in already crowded health care curricula. PMID:9055163

  11. School, Earth and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Anna; Grieco, Giovanni; Oneta, Cristina

    2015-04-01

    Geology needs to be explained and narrated to the people, focusing on the goal of making that big change of mindset that will allow individuals and the entire community to tune into the timing and the ways in which the Earth evolves. In order to achieve these important goals it is necessary to educate children from an early age so that they learn to live an environmentally friendly life. With the project "School, Earth and imagination" we introduce, with a fun and new way, notions and topics in geological and environmental sciences in schools at all levels with the final goal of improving both knowledge and sensibility for these topics into the community. Through this project we start from the children (kindergarten and primary school, ages between 3 and 8 years) because they are the foundation of our society, and without foundations nothing can be built. The "School, Earth and imagination" project wants to give the children a real opportunity to approach reality and in general the surrounding environment, for the first time even before the traditional scholastic experience, with a scientific point of view, experimenting some basic physical concepts like temperature, weight, hardness and so on directly through their body. The project is structured and developed in modules that provide a high flexibility in order to meet needs and requirements of different schools in different situations. Each module is part of the journey of Mariolino, a character that represents a very curious child who introduces basic concepts associating them to geological processes. The Journey of Mariolino, as each module, follows an insistent scheme that starts from the presentation of the problem, follows with its discussion through direct questions and ends with experimentation of the hypotheses that children have proposed to validate the solution of the problem. Each module is independent and never ends without giving children a solution and is always structured with a practical activity

  12. Imagining the Future University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard; Barnett, Ronald

    'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett.......'Imagining the Future University' is a special issue in the journal Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education, published by Peter Lang. Editor in Chief of the journal is John Petrovic, University of Alabama. The speciale issue is edited by Søren Bengtsen and Ronald Barnett....

  13. Physics imagination and reality

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Philip Russell

    1991-01-01

    Physics: Imagination and Reality introduces the reader to major ideas and the conceptual structure of modern physics, by tracing its development from the introduction of fields into physics by Faraday and Maxwell in the last century. Because the approach is historical, the book provides a comprehensive overview of the subjects. It should appeal to anyone interested in a basic understanding of the contemporary physicists view of the physical world. It avoids all but the simplest mathematics and presents ideas and concepts in everyday language.Physics: Imagination and Reality attempts to provide

  14. Imagine A Collective Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Silvia Campanini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Iceland plays a key role in the circumpolar context. The research investigates the fields of both the icelandic cultural landscape perception and the icelandic cultural identity. It considers the book Ultima thule; or, a summer in Iceland and Ólafur Elíasson art works as two sides of a same medal: the Iceland on the brain concept (F. Burton. The transition from a cultural identity to a collective landscape identity is investigated analysing Imagine J. Lennon's song which inspired Yõko Ono's work art titled Imagine Peace Tower.

  15. One month after diagnosis : quality of life, coping and previous functioning in siblings of children with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, BA; Grootenhuis, MA; Hoekstra-Weebers, JEHM; Last, BF

    Background The aim of the present study is to describe the quality of life (QoL) of siblings of children with cancer and to predict it according to their health before the diagnosis of cancer in the ill child and their ways of coping with the illness. Methods Participants were 83 siblings from 56

  16. Imagination in Creative Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiltschnig, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This paper unpacks the notion of imagination presented in the I5-system of knowledge creation along several theoretical contributions and process models from “knowledge science”, creativity research and design studies. It aims at conceptual clarification and integration around the key notion of “...... research and interview accounts from first, second and third person perspectives....

  17. Imagination og emergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler 2 væsentlige principper i entrepreneurskabsundervisning på de videregående uddannelser, nemlig imagination "som evnen til at kunne forestille sig" og emergens "som kilde til ny videndannelse". Endvidere indeholder artiklen en diskussion af hvad entreprenurskabsundervisning er...

  18. Critique, generativity, and imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole

    2011-01-01

    demands of providing foundations for knowledge and proper directions of political actions. Critique can be associated with generativity and imagination which includes creative and, at times, surrealistic elements. Such features of critique are relevant for the further development for critical enterprises...

  19. Open space and imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. Scott Place; Bruce Hronek

    2001-01-01

    Open space is a necessary tool in our park system for fostering creativity and allowing for relaxation. In addition, open space areas allow people to exercise, find self-worth, and to use their imagination. This manuscript addresses the issue of what is happening in open space provided in several park settings. Do residents use open space as a place where they can play...

  20. Imagination: innovating the could be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letcher, Deborah C

    2014-10-01

    Imagination is powerful. It may bring questions to mind or bring clarity to wondering about something. Imagination may bring new thought, new ideas, and new possibles to day-to-day thinking, contemplation, and being. In this column, imagination will be explored first through a nursing perspective and then examined through the lens of philosophers and other great thinkers. The column concludes with discussion of imagination as it relates to the Humanbecoming Teaching-Learning Model. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Memorial consequences of imagination in children and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Alp; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz

    2008-08-01

    Recent work with adults suggests that imagination can impair later recall of previously encoded events but can improve recall of subsequently encoded events. The present study examined the memorial consequences of imagination in children. Kindergartners, first and fourth graders, and young adults studied two successively presented lists of items. Between the two lists, participants were given an imagination task supposed to create a change in mental context. As expected, in adults, the imagination task impaired recall of the previously encoded material (List 1) and improved recall of the subsequently encoded material (List 2). In children, significant List 1 impairment was present from first grade on, but even fourth graders failed to show improvement for List 2. The results challenge a purely context-based explanation of the memorial costs and benefits of imagination. Instead, they suggest that the two effects are mediated by different mechanisms with different developmental trajectories.

  2. Theological imagination as hermeneutical device: Exploring the hermeneutical contribution of an imaginal engagement with the text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneke Viljoen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the past, biblical scholarship has neglected the hermeneutical contribution that an imaginal engagement with the text may make. The author’s aim in this article was to develop theological imagination as a hermeneutical device. This was done by briefly considering the concurrence in the hermeneutic contributions of three interpreters of biblical texts, with specific regard to their understanding of biblical imagination. These were Walter Brueggemann, Paul Ricoeur and Ignatius of Loyola. Their hermeneutical contributions concur in their understanding of a biblically informed imagination, and it is specifically this aspect of the concurrence of their thought that was explored. An illustration from Proverbs 14:27, which draws on the metaphor and biblical motif of the fountain or source of life, was put forward to demonstrate how the concurrence in the contributions of these biblical interpreters may influence an imaginal engagement with the text. Keywords: Old Testament; Proverbs; Hermeneutics; The fear of the Lord/Yahweh;  Walter Brueggemann; Paul Ricoeur;  Ignatius of Loyola; Imaginal engagement

  3. Responsibility and evil imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, R

    1995-09-01

    In this Niebuhrian perspective on hostile and violent discourse the author utilizes H. R. Niebuhr's fourfold notion of responsibility and his concept of evil imagination to examine relations marred by protracted hostility toward hated "other" or "others." The author argues that violent and hostile discourse manifests a particular form of responsibility whereby persons expressing hostility toward hated "others" construct, by way of negative representations, maligned histories and identities for the "other" and at the same time construct an idealized or glorified history and identity for themselves. These positive and negative representations and histories, then, are utilized to answer questions regarding interpretation, accountability, and solidarity. Niebuhr's concept of evil imagination is employed to hypothesize about the intransigence of this form of responsibility and to suggest reasons why elevated and maligned representations, identities, and histories are, more often than not, inextricably and tragically linked.

  4. Imagined Potentialities of Healthcare Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on health care technologies and initiatives, particularly, Electronic Health Records (EHRs). These technologies are ascribed various potentialities, attributing them the capacity to do a wide range of things, from improving efficiency to saving medical costs and even saving...... lives. These complex and often conflicting imagined potentialities lead to inflicted burden on designers, policy makers and healthcare practitioners who are faced with different realities on the ground. The conflicting notions have real life effects as these impact our present understanding of...... an inherent capacity to produce a change. The term potentiality has a long history in Western philosophy, in particularly in Aristotle’s metaphysics where he distinguishes between potentiality and actuality. Potentiality refers to the capacity that a thing can be said to have; the capacity to come...

  5. Imagine Moving Off the Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfrey, Priscilla R.

    2006-01-01

    Moving off the planet will be a defining moment of this century as landing on the Moon was in the last. For that to happen for humans to go where humans cannot go-- simulation is the sole solution. NASA supports simulation for life-cycle activities: design, analysis, test, checkout, operations, review and training. We contemplate time spans of a century and more, teams dispersed to different planets and the need for systems that endure or adapt as missions, teams and technology change. Without imagination such goals are impossible. But with imagination we can go outside our present perception of reality to think about and take action on what has been, is and, especially, what might be. Consciously maturing an imagined, possibly workable, idea through framing it to optimization to design, and building the product provides us with a new approach to innovation and simulation fidelity. We address options, analyze, test and make improvements in how we think and work. Each step includes increasingly exact information about costs, schedule, who will be needed, where, when and how. NASA i integrating such thinking into its Exploration Product Realization Hierarchy for simulation and analysis, test and verification, and stimulus response goals. Technically NASA follows a timeline of studies, analysis, definition, design, development and operations with concurrent documentation. We have matched this Product Realization Hierarchy with a continuum from image to realization that incorporates commitment, current and needed research and communication to ensure superior and creative problem solving as well as advances in simulation. One result is a new approach to collaborative systems. Another is a distributed observer network prototyped using game engine technology bringing advanced 3-D simulation of a simulation to the desktop enabling people to develop shared consensus of its meaning. Much of the value of simulation comes from developing in people their ability to make good

  6. Reward and Novelty Enhance Imagination of Future Events in a Motivational-Episodic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulganin, Lisa; Wittmann, Bianca C.

    2015-01-01

    Thinking about personal future events is a fundamental cognitive process that helps us make choices in daily life. We investigated how the imagination of episodic future events is influenced by implicit motivational factors known to guide decision making. In a two-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we controlled learned reward association and stimulus novelty by pre-familiarizing participants with two sets of words in a reward learning task. Words were repeatedly presented and consistently followed by monetary reward or no monetary outcome. One day later, participants imagined personal future events based on previously rewarded, unrewarded and novel words. Reward association enhanced the perceived vividness of the imagined scenes. Reward and novelty-based construction of future events were associated with higher activation of the motivational system (striatum and substantia nigra/ ventral tegmental area) and hippocampus, and functional connectivity between these areas increased during imagination of events based on reward-associated and novel words. These data indicate that implicit past motivational experience contributes to our expectation of what the future holds in store. PMID:26599537

  7. Seeing Imagination as Resistance and Resistance as Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca

    2017-01-01

    with the objects of experience that can then resist our actions and thus become Gegenstand. Directionality and resistance are fundamental parts of any developmental process and characterize such relationships with the phenomenon of Gegenstand. Finally, I argue that imaginative processes are the distinctive...... features that enable humans to deal with uncertainty and change. Imagination is related to the creation of Gegenstand from non-existing objects. Imagination is also the faculty to go beyond problems in order to solve them. That is the reason why imagination is so dangerous for every dictatorship....

  8. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Delbari

    2015-03-01

    figures make the host of literary devices of any language: Symbol, allegory, paradox, myth, mythical allusion are ample imagery devices for deep understanding. This means a descriptive creation by the poet. Functional descriptions: Poetical imageries can be considered from functional perspectives as positive and imaginative illustrations. The foundation for this taxonomy are the extent of sensibility, feasibility of imagination, their concordance with intellectual rationales, language standards, public acceptability and its emotional and imaginative criteria. Positive Imageries: The poet endeavors to confirm his ideology through this kind of imagery. Since the purpose is an affirmation of the present situation, there is no logic for any imagination, emotion and hyperbole (Confirmation is far beyond imagination. It is sensible, clear and in line with intellectual foundations. It is supported by the public and enjoys high readability of people. In sum it could be said that the poet tries eagerly to provide positive criteria for his ideology. Imaginative Imageries: While positive imageries are based on logic and rational, imaginative illustrations are a host of dissimilation, paradox and great imagination. They are exciting devices with which the poet surpasses the ordinary life and goes beyond the habits of his reader. These images are unconsciously uttered by the poet. Thus a lack of rationale, intellectual thinking and decidedly rare are among the most significant characteristics of this kind of imagery. Results Focusing on imageries of contemporary poetry in Iran, the researcher has founded that the extent of visual or imagery illustrations by many poets has a direct relation to their mental (inner complication in such a way that different indications of these imageries have been internalized as idiosyncratic style of any individual poet. Meanwhile the high frequency of such imageries reflects the prominent of a given style of the era in which the poets have experienced

  9. Imagining a better future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freudendal-Pedersen, Malene; Jensen, Ole B.

    This paper is the outcome of work done on utopias of mobility, discussing different utopian visions from architects, planners, activists and mobility researchers. The work has raised a number of questions on why utopias are important in activating and building different futures. Though...... it is crucial to address the increasing social and environmental problems of contemporary urban societies with a certain element of ‘realism’ (whatever that may mean), the position taken in this paper is rather that we must find new ways of imagining ‘that which is not’. Within mobilities research only recently...

  10. Imagining a Better Future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freudendal-Pedersen, Malene; Jensen, Ole B.

    it is crucial to address the increasing social and environmental problems of contemporary urban societies with a certain element of ‘realism’ (whatever that may mean), the position taken in this paper is rather that we must find new ways of imagining ‘that which is not’. Within mobilities research only recently...... and hopeful futures also present in people’s lives (Sayer 2005). In this way we wish to engage with the creative imaginary of playful utopian thinking. Moreover we wish to open up for a debate on this as a path into including affective and emotional dimensions that often are excluded by rational and strategic...

  11. Imagination in Creative Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiltschnig, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This paper unpacks the notion of imagination presented in the I5-system of knowledge creation along several theoretical contributions and process models from “knowledge science”, creativity research and design studies. It aims at conceptual clarification and integration around the key notion...... of “insight moments” across various levels of abstraction from system perspectives through foci on groups and individuals to mental activity. This work is meant to serve as a conceptual foundation for micro-analyses of in-vivo data of creative design processes based on protocols of participatory ethnographic...

  12. The Life Cycles of Stars: An Information and Activity Booklet, Grades 9-12, 1997-1998. Imagine the Universe! Probing the Structure & Evaluation of the Cosmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlock, Laura A.; Granger, Kara C.

    This booklet contains information and activities on the life cycle of stars. Materials can be adapted for grade 9 through grade 12 classrooms. Background information about star birth and life, black dwarfs, supernovae, white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes, and the electromagnetic spectrum is included. The seven activities focus on star mass,…

  13. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Delbari

    2015-04-01

    : Symbol, allegory, paradox, myth, mythical allusion are ample imagery devices for deep understanding. This means a descriptive creation by the poet. Functional descriptions: Poetical imageries can be considered from functional perspectives as positive and imaginative illustrations. The foundation for this taxonomy are the extent of sensibility, feasibility of imagination, their concordance with intellectual rationales, language standards, public acceptability and its emotional and imaginative criteria. Positive Imageries: The poet endeavors to confirm his ideology through this kind of imagery. Since the purpose is an affirmation of the present situation, there is no logic for any imagination, emotion and hyperbole (Confirmation is far beyond imagination. It is sensible, clear and in line with intellectual foundations. It is supported by the public and enjoys high readability of people. In sum it could be said that the poet tries eagerly to provide positive criteria for his ideology. Imaginative Imageries: While positive imageries are based on logic and rational, imaginative illustrations are a host of dissimilation, paradox and great imagination. They are exciting devices with which the poet surpasses the ordinary life and goes beyond the habits of his reader. These images are unconsciously uttered by the poet. Thus a lack of rationale, intellectual thinking and decidedly rare are among the most significant characteristics of this kind of imagery. Results Focusing on imageries of contemporary poetry in Iran, the researcher has founded that the extent of visual or imagery illustrations by many poets has a direct relation to their mental (inner complication in such a way that different indications of these imageries have been internalized as idiosyncratic style of any individual poet. Meanwhile the high frequency of such imageries reflects the prominent of a given style of the era in which the poets have experienced. But what can be said in certain is the fact that notable

  14. Handedness effects of imagined fine motor movements

    OpenAIRE

    Donoff, Christopher M.; Madan, Christopher R.; Singhal, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies of movement imagery have found inter-individual differences in the ability to imagine whole-body movements. The majority of these studies have used subjective scales to measure imagery ability, which may be confounded by other factors related to effort. Madan and Singhal [2013. Introducing TAMI: An objective test of ability in movement imagery. Journal of Motor Behavior, 45(2), 153–166. doi:10.1080/00222895.2013.763764] developed the Test of Ability in Movement Imagery (TAMI)...

  15. Introduction: Victorian Fiction and the Material Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Mills

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available How should we deal with the ‘stuff' in books? This is the question addressed in the lead articles of the Spring 2008 issue of 19, all of which focus on some aspect of the material in relation to Victorian fiction. Gas, rocks, jewellery, automata and the entire contents of houses are examined in essays that explore the material imagination of Dickens, Hardy, George Eliot and Thackeray, among others. Moving forward from the previous edition, which different types of collected object, here contributors examine how the material is brought into collision with literature. The phrase 'material imagination' can be traced to the work of Gaston Bachelard who identifies two types of imagination, the formal and the material. Whereas the former focuses on surfaces and the visual perception of images, the latter consists of '…this amazing need for penetration which, going beyond the attractions of the imagination of forms, thinks matter, dreams in it, lives in it, or, in other words, materializes the imaginary'. As Bachelard suggests, the material imagination involves more than just a focus on the representation of objects and the contributions to this edition explore such wide ranging subjects as the gender politics of ownership, dispossession, the body as object, the politics of collecting and display and the dichotomy between the material and immaterial. In addition, this edition features a forum on digitisation and materiality. We are particularly pleased to be able to make use of 19's digital publishing format to further debates about digital media. In the forum, five contributors respond to a series of questions about the nature of the virtual object. All five have worked or are working on nineteenth-century digitisation projects so they are uniquely placed to consider issues surrounding representation and the nature of digital space.

  16. Infâncias imaginadas: construções do eu e da sociedade nas histórias de vida Imagined childhoods: constructions of self and society in life stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Gullestad

    2005-08-01

    self is the body as a repository of memories and an action system, and the continuous scrutinizing of childhood experiences is usually regarded as a central and natural part of the representation of the adult person. Childhood reminiscences therefore often loom large in life narratives in terms of amount, intensity, and centrality, at the same time as they have so far obtained little theoretical attention. These facts, in my view, provide a key to the cultural analysis of the present stage of modernity. I distinguish between textual childhoods and lived childhoods, and I discuss what kind of information about lived childhood life stories can provide. In particular, I ask if life stories told by adults can help us understand childhood experiences from "the child's point of view". The difference between the self who tells and the self who was is at its greatest when people narrate their childhood experiences. It is in this sense that childhood recollections can be regarded as 'imagined childhoods'. The discussion brings together insights from many disciplines with implications for both social and literary theory.

  17. The Problem of Cinematic Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafe McGregor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is two-fold: to identify the problem of cinematic imagination, and then to propose a satisfactory solution. In part one I analyze the respective claims of Dominic McIver Lopes and Roger Scruton, both of whom question the scope of imagination in film, when compared to other art forms, on the basis of its perceptual character. In order to address these concerns I develop a hybrid of Gregory Currie’s model of cinematic imagination and Kendall Walton’s theory of make-believe in section two. Section three offers a reply to Lopes and Scruton, examining the problem in terms of the tension between the normativity of films as props and the employment of the creative imagination by audiences. I conclude with a solution that admits of two incompatible conceptions of cinematic imagination.

  18. Language and imagination: Evolutionary explorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuland, Eric

    2017-10-01

    This article provides a functional analysis of the conditions for language to emerge, and analyzes its role in imagination. It starts with some initial reflections on imagination and its evolutionary beginnings in relation to the role of working memory and tool use by chimpanzees and humans up to modernity. It then presents an analysis of what it takes to develop language, and how language gives rise to higher orders of imagination. An important theme in the discussion is which of the changes in the development leading to language may have been gradual and which changes must reflect a discontinuity. It concludes with a paradoxical property of imagination: One part of our mind is able to imagine and create systems that another part of our mind is unable to deal with. It shows how this tension manifests itself in the notion of an impossible language, but crucially also in conceptions of human society at large. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Imaginative Practices and Measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Haeren, Kristen Danielle

    for self-promotion and an output of universal desire. What is depicted though the various archival material documenting their designs, portrays a scenario of a closed and stabilized world immune to the temporalities of reality embedded in experience. The projects are masked by a representational order...... was originally derived from modern measure (archival material) with a newly situated and relational reading of the landscape. Though re-presenting landscape as a constructed milieu, derived equally from material and contingent immaterial experiences of the being-in-the-world, the ambition is to construct...... a common ground for future acts of collective re-imagining. By exploring landscape as a medium, both permanently present yet always transient, the hope is to establish the Welfare Estates as part of a poetic process of continual becoming, promoting future possibilities built upon dynamics, openness...

  20. The Imagined Desert

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Drahos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The following analysis of the Australian Outback as an imagined space is informed by theories describing a separation from the objective physical world and the mapping of its representative double through language, and draws upon a reading of the function of landscape in three fictions; Joseph Conrad’s novella Heart of Darkness (1899, Greg Mclean’s 2005 horror film Wolf Creek and Ted Kotcheff’s 1971 cinematic adaptation of Kenneth Cook’s novel Wake in Fright2. I would like to consider the Outback as a culturally produced text, and compare the function of this landscape as a cultural ‘reality’ to the function of landscape in literary and cinematic fiction.

  1. A Hybrid Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew; Christensen, Steen Hyldgaard; Botin, Lars

    an alternative approach, devoting special attention to the role played by social and cultural movements in the making of science and technology. They show how social and cultural movements, from the Renaissance of the late 15th century to the environmental and global justice movements of our time, have provided...... contexts, or sites, for mixing scientific knowledge and technical skills from different fields and social domains into new combinations, thus fostering what the authors term a “hybrid imagination”. Such a hybrid imagination is especially important today, as a way to counter the competitive and commercial......This book presents a cultural perspective on scientific and technological development. As opposed to the “story-lines” of economic innovation and social construction that tend to dominate the both the popular and scholarly literature on science, technology and society (or STS, the authors offer...

  2. Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieger, Khara D.; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko; Christensen, Frans; Baun, Anders; Olsen, Stig I.

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance on how to practically apply these methods are still very much under development. This paper evaluates how research efforts have applied LCA and RA together for NM, particularly reflecting on previous experiences with applying these methods to chemicals. Through a literature review and a separate analysis of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key “lessons learned” from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches for using these methods together for NM: “LC-based RA” (traditional RA applied in a life-cycle perspective) and “RA-complemented LCA” (conventional LCA supplemented by RA in specific life-cycle steps). Hence, the latter is the only identified approach which genuinely combines LC- and RA-based methods for NM-risk research efforts to date as the former is rather a continuation of normal RA according to standard assessment procedures (e.g., REACH). Both these approaches along with recommendations for using LCA and RA together for NM are similar to those made previously for chemicals, and thus, there does not appear to be much progress made specific for NM. We have identified one issue in particular that may be specific for NM when applying LCA and RA at this time: the need to establish proper dose metrics within both methods.

  3. Analysis of current research addressing complementary use of life-cycle assessment and risk assessment for engineered nanomaterials: have lessons been learned from previous experience with chemicals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grieger, Khara Deanne; Laurent, Alexis; Miseljic, Mirko

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally agreed that successful strategies to address the health and environmental impacts of engineered nanomaterials (NM) should consider the well-established frameworks for conducting life-cycle assessment (LCA) and risk assessment (RA), scientific research, and specific guidance...... on how to practically apply these methods are still very much under development. This paper evaluates how research efforts have applied LCA and RA together for NM, particularly reflecting on previous experiences with applying these methods to chemicals. Through a literature review and a separate analysis...... of research focused on applying LCA and RA together for NM, it appears that current research efforts have taken into account some key ‘‘lessons learned’’ from previous experience with chemicals while many key challenges remain for practically applying these methods to NM. We identified two main approaches...

  4. Imagination as expansion of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zittoun, Tania; Cerchia, Frédéric

    2013-09-01

    This paper proposes a developmental view on imagination: from this perspective, imagination can be seen as triggered by some disrupting event, which generates a disjunction from the person's unfolding experience of the "real" world, and as unfolding as a loop, which eventually comes back to the actual experience. Examining recent and classical theorization of imagination in psychology, the paper opposes a deficitary view of imagination to an expansive notion of imagination. The paper explores Piaget, Vygotsky, Harris and Pelaprat & Cole consider: 1) What does provoke a "rupture" or disjunction? 2) What are the psychological processes involved in the imaginary loop? 3) What nourishes such processes? 4) What are the consequences of such imaginary loop, or what does it enable doing? The paper proposes to adopt an expansive view of imagination, as Vygotsky proposed-a perspective that has been under-explored empirically since his seminal work. To stimulate such sociocultural psychology of imagination, two empirical examples are provided, one showing how children make sense of metaphor in an experimental setting, the other showing a young person using a novel met at school as symbolic resource.

  5. Prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes following SBRT ± cetuximab for locally-recurrent, previously-irradiated head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargo, John A.; Heron, Dwight E.; Ferris, Robert L.; Rwigema, Jean-Claude M.; Wegner, Rodney E.; Kalash, Ronny; Ohr, James; Kubicek, Greg J.; Burton, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has emerged as a promising salvage strategy for unresectable, previously-irradiated recurrent squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (rSCCHN). Here-in, we report the first prospective evaluation of patient-reported quality-of-life (PR-QoL) following re-irradiation with SBRT ± cetuximab for rSCCHN. Materials and methods: From November 2004 to May 2011, 150 patients with unresectable, rSCCHN in a previously-irradiated field receiving >40 Gy were treated with SBRT to 40–50 Gy in 5 fractions ± concurrent cetuximab. PR-QoL was prospectively acquired using University of Washington Quality-of-Life Revised (UW-QoL-R). Results: Overall PR-QoL, health-related PR-QoL, and select domains commonly affected by re-irradiation progressively increase following an initial 1-month decline with statistically significant improvements noted in swallowing (p = 0.025), speech (p = 0.017), saliva (p = 0.041), activity (p = 0.032) and recreation (p = 0.039). Conclusions: Especially for patients surviving >1-year, improved tumor control associated with SBRT re-irradiation may ameliorate decreased PR-QoL resulting from rSCCHN. These improvements in PR-QoL transcend all measured domains in a validated PR-QoL assessment tool independent of age, use of cetuximab, tumor volume, and interval since prior irradiation.

  6. Improvement of Freezing of Gait in Patients with Parkinson's Disease by Imagining Bicycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kikuchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Freezing of gait (FOG is one of the factors that reduce the quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Imagining bicycling before gait start provided improvement in FOG in 2 PD patients. Imagining and mimicking bicycling after the initiation of gait allowed the rhythmic gait to continue without interruption. We suggest that imagining and mimicking bicycling, which are nonexternal cues, could serve as a helpful therapeutic approach for the intractable freezing and interruption of gait of PD patients.

  7. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rex Eugene Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization, but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ, an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMR. Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from .76 to .79, and two factors (Implementation and Learning were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientifific - r = .26 and Writing - r = .31 respectively, suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe. The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus. We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination

  8. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Rex E; Flores, Ranee A; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors ("Implementation" and "Learning") were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific-r = 0.26 and Writing-r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination ability

  9. On the use of imagination by entrepreneurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederiks, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Many scholars acknowledge that entrepreneurs use their imagination. What entrepreneurs use their imagination for is known. However, what imagination is, and how entrepreneurs can use their imagination most effectively remain unknown. The goal of this research is to increase our understanding of the

  10. Pedagogy of the possible: Imagination, autonomy, and space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garold Murray

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores pedagogical practices which can support the role of imagination in foreign language learning. Over the past decade, work on self and identity in motivation research—most notably Norton’s (2001 imagined communities and Dörnyei’s (2009 L2 motivational self system—has suggested that teachers might foster students’ motivation by helping them imagine themselves as L2 speakers and envisage contexts or communities in which they might use the target language. If teachers are to help students create and sustain visions of L2 identities, they need to employ a pedagogy which incorporates and facilitates the work of the imagination. In order to provide guidelines for pedagogical practice, this paper examines the experiences of Japanese university students studying English as a foreign language in a selfdirected learning course. Prior analysis of the data revealed several affordances which supported the participants’ metacognitive development and the role of imagination in their learning. Using these affordances as a conceptual framework, this paper builds on previous work by identifying elements in the learning environment which appear to support the role of imagination in the students’ language learning. The paper concludes by suggesting guidelines for pedagogical practice and considering the implications for further inquiry.

  11. Imagine a mouse and an elephant: Hemispheric asymmetries of imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Seda; Çetinkaya, Hakan; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to explore the existence of an asymmetrical bias in the imagination of pairs of objects of unequal size. We assumed that such pairs are conceptualized with the smaller object being placed on the left, creating an ascending size order from left to right. Such a bias could derive from a cognitive strategy known from the mental number line. Sixty-four participants were instructed to imagine stimulus-pairs that were staggered from those showing very prominent intra-pair size differences (e.g., elephant vs. mouse) to very low size differences (e.g., orange vs. apple). The results showed that the tendency to imagine the bigger object on the right side increases with the size difference of the two stimuli. Such a visual field bias was also present in stimulus-pairs including numbers so that the participants imagined smaller and larger numbers on the left and the right side of the visual fields, respectively. Taken together, our findings could imply that the left-to-right orientation observed in our object imagining task may share the same cognitive mechanism as the mental number line.

  12. Stories Lost and Found: Mobilizing Imagination in Literacy Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enciso, Patricia E.

    2017-01-01

    As literacy scholars, we continually engage with the ongoing politics of imagination in everyday life across silenced histories and uncertain futures. In this article, I draw on sociocultural theories and philosophies of imagination as well as narrative and global discourse theories to argue that literacy research, in the context of social…

  13. The inoculating role of previous exposure to potentially traumatic life events on coping with prolonged exposure to rocket attacks: A lifespan perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgi, Yuval; Gelkopf, Marc; Berger, Rony

    2015-06-30

    Relatively little research have addressed the effect of prolonged exposure to rocket attacks with a lifespan perspective and only a handful of these studies focused on the effect of this exposure as a function of aging. The present study examined the effects of seven years of rocket attacks fired toward the south of Israel on adult participants of different ages. We examined whether potentially traumatic life events (PTLEs) unrelated to rocket attacks moderated the association between post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and age. Data were obtained from a 2007 telephone survey using the Random Digit Dialing method and including 343 individuals (76.7% participation rate). Exposure to rockets, PTLEs, global distress, and post-traumatic symptomatology were assessed. Older age was associated with a higher level of PTS symptoms. Higher PTLE levels attenuated the association between age and PTS symptoms. Our results suggest that age is a risk factor for developing PTS symptoms under prolonged exposure to rocket attacks. However, previous levels of exposure to other negative events, as well as gender, appear to inoculate a person to stress, thus modulating the age-PTS association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Eismitte in the Scientific Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Nielsen, Janet

    was a setting for scientific knowledge production as well as diplomatic maneuvering, providing new insights into the history of polar exploration and the intertwining of scientific and geopolitical considerations. Author Janet Martin-Nielsen draws on new research in private, government, military......, and institutional archives in many languages in multiple countries to illuminate Eismitte’s place in the scientific imagination....

  15. Sensory imagination and narrative perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2013-01-01

    I argue that we can clarify and explain an important form of focalization or narrative perspective by the structure of perspective in sensory imagination. Understanding focalization in this way enables us to see why one particular form of focalization has to do with the representation of perceptu...

  16. Exile and the Creative Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olu Oguibe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available 'Exile and the Creative Imagination' is a personal meditation on the pain and productive potential of exile from one of Nigeria's most internationally renowned artists, poets, and cultural critics. The text explores the genesis and development of the exile theme in Oguibe's poetry and visual art production.

  17. Rhetorical facets of imagination in contemporary poetry

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Delbari; Fariba Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present article deals with the trend of literary imaginative descriptions in the purview of poetical imaginations which have been regarded greatly in the discourse of rhetoricâs. The different facets of imagination of these imageries are also introduced in this article. Throughout this study poetical demonstrations are dealt with on the basis of their indications, functions and profundity. Meanwhile overcoming superficial and intermediate layers of imagination towards inner and ...

  18. Of Eden and Nazareth: Stories to capture the imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolande Steenkamp

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In pursuit of counter-traditions that have read the Eden narrative without subscribing to the Christian fall�redemption paradigm, this article engages Richard Kearney�s hermeneutical� phenomenological reading of the imagination to explore new avenues for imagining sin and salvation along post-metaphysical lines. The first section provides insights proceeding from an intratextual reading of the Eden narrative. The second section proceeds to incorporate the biblical and rabbinical concept of the yetser to elaborate the reading described above. The section follows Kearney�s reading of the Eden narrative to elicit the imagination along ethical lines as humanity�s passion for the possible. The third section reads the annunciation narrative along these same lines, illustrating how a divine kingdom of justice and love is possibilised by an imagination captured by divine promise and hospitality. By reading these two narratives together through the lense of the imagination, novel ways of rethinking sin and salvation along post-metaphysical lines emerge that portray salvation as human participation in God�s ongoing creation of justice and love, thus enabling the God Who May Be.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This article is relevant to the fields of philosophy, philosophy of religion and theology. The narratives of fall and promise, previously read by philosopher Richard Kearney in different contexts and not in relation to one another, are read here from a decidedly theological point of view.

  19. The Relationships among Imagination, Future Imagination Tendency, and Future Time Perspective of Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of the study were to investigate the relationships among imagination, future imagination tendency, and future time perspective of junior high school students, then to explore the future time perspective which is predicted by background variables, imaginative qualities, and future imagination tendency. The subjects were 331 from…

  20. Exploration of Korean Students' Scientific Imagination Using the Scientific Imagination Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Jiyeong; Mun, Kongju; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the study of the components of scientific imagination and describes the scales used to measure scientific imagination in Korean elementary and secondary students. In this study, we developed an inventory, which we call the Scientific Imagination Inventory (SII), in order to examine aspects of scientific imagination. We…

  1. Human Geography and the Geographical Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the development of human geography, pointing out linkages between human geography and sociology. Defines sociological imagination, summarizing the logic behind it. Provides arguments for a parallel geographical imagination, and assesses the extent to which geographers exhibit a geographical imagination. (LS)

  2. Empathy and Imagination in Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sally

    2016-01-01

    The importance of imagination in understanding sustainability has often been overlooked. This paper examines acts of imagining in teaching and learning that elicit and enable the emotive experience of empathy. I frame ways of thinking about imagination and empathy through theoretical perspectives of otherness. I report on research findings into…

  3. What Is Not Yet: cultivating the imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkers, Sandra Schmidt

    2011-10-01

    In this column, the author describes imaginative capacities that encourage imaginative thinking and creating anew. Concepts from the nursing theory of humanbecoming are presented to further explore the applicability of focusing on cultivating the imagination in nursing curricula. A nursing seminar is proposed, entitled What Is Not Yet, that could foster the creative potential of nurse leaders.

  4. The Exploration of Indicators of Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoyun; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Chang, Yuhsuan; Lin, Li-Jhong

    2012-01-01

    Although early studies in the fields of education and psychology appreciated the value of imagination, little work has been done pertaining to indicators of imagination. This study synthesized early works on imagination done between 1900 and 2011 to clarify its meaning and identify potential indicators. Then, two groups of samples were collected…

  5. Imagination and Experience: An Integrative Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettes, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Three variations of experience identified in the educational literature entail different ways of thinking about and developing learners' imaginations. The relationship between these different imaginative modes resembles shifts between different kinds of understanding in Kieran Egan's theory of imaginative development. From this theoretical…

  6. Developing Moral Imagination in Leadership Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, Barbra K.; Popa, Adrian B.

    2008-01-01

    Imagination is the exercise of generating new and novel mental images. Because of its utility for the arts, it is primarily thought of as a purely aesthetic tool. And yet, as a cognitive orientation to the world, imagination has much to offer business leaders. Imagination shifts leaders away from ingrained ways of thinking; it emphasizes reframing…

  7. Evidence for Motor Simulation in Imagined Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Benjamin R.; Creem-Regehr, Sarah H.; Thompson, William B.

    2009-01-01

    A series of experiments examined the role of the motor system in imagined movement, finding a strong relationship between imagined walking performance and the biomechanical information available during actual walking. Experiments 1 through 4 established the finding that real and imagined locomotion differ in absolute walking time. We then tested…

  8. Landscape & Imagination: riflettere insieme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariella Zoppi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In Paris, at La Villette University, was four-days of debate on 2-4 Mai 2013, in which faculty members of all the world discussed on methods and experiences in teaching landscape. The conference was organized in multiple sessions: history, theories, representation, process, science and governance. All the fields discussed were related to the main problem of the identity of territories in the landscape project -from the theories to the practices- and applied in a very large range of different situations: from the rural world between conservation and transformations to the coastal areas under the pressure of tourism, from the ecology in the city life renovation to the land use control and project by community and the emergency management in natural catastrophes.

  9. Glucose homeostasis and metabolic adaptation in the pregnant and lactating sheep are affected by the level of nutrition previously provided during her late fetal life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Sanne Munch; Nielsen, Mette Benedicte Olaf; Blache, D.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether undernutrition (UN) during late fetal life can programme the subsequent adult life adaptation of glucose homeostasis and metabolism during pregnancy and lactation. Twenty-four primiparous experimental ewes were used. Twelve had been exposed to a prenatal NORM level...... during lactation. There was no effect of prenatal UN on glucose tolerance during G-IGTT, however, during RG-IGTT LOW was more glucose intolerant and apparently more insulin resistant compared to NORM. In conclusion, UN during late fetal life in sheep impairs subsequent pancreatic insulin secretory...

  10. The Eukaryotic Microbiome: Origins and Implications for Fetal and Neonatal life note bene: previous titles: The Microbiome in the Development of Terrestrial Life,and,The Origins and Development of the Neonatal Microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Miller

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available All eukaryotic organisms are holobionts representing complex collaborations between the entire microbiome of each eukaryote and its innate cells. These linked constituencies form complex localized and interlocking ecologies in which the specific microbial constituents and their relative abundance differ substantially according to age and environmental exposures. Rapid advances in microbiology and genetic research techniques have uncovered a significant previous underestimate of the extent of that microbial contribution and its metabolic and developmental impact on holobionts. Therefore, a re-calibration of the neonatal period is suggested as a transitional phase in development that includes the acquisition of consequential collaborative microbial life from extensive environmental influences. These co-dependent, symbiotic relationships formed in the fetal and neonatal stages extend into adulthood and even across generations.

  11. Imagination in Avicenna and Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Bäck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In comparing the views of Avicenna and Kant on the imagination, we find a striking congruence of doctrine. Kant's doctrines of the syntheses of the imagination in his Transcendental Deduction (both A and B have remarkable similarities with Avicenna's views. For both Avicenna and Kant, the imagination serves to connect the phenomenal and the noumenal. At the least this comparison has the dual use of placing Kant's doctrines in the context of the Aristotelian tradition and of illuminating the modern significance of the thought of Avicenna. Since Kant's thought is more familiar to us than Avicenna's (although perhaps not as evident in itself, we can use Kant also to help us understand the claims of Avicenna, On the other hand, this comparison may help to support the claim that an understanding of Kant lies to a large extent in his medieval and post-medieval roots –just as Copernicus, in his own "Copernican revolution", was following certain earlier traditions.

  12. The imagination inflation effect in healthy older adults and patients with mild Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Maureen K; Deason, Rebecca G; Reynolds, Erin; Tat, Michael J; Flannery, Sean; Solomon, Paul R; Vassey, Elizabeth A; Budson, Andrew E

    2015-07-01

    The imagination inflation effect is a type of memory distortion defined as an increased tendency to falsely remember that an item has been seen, or an action has been performed, when it has only been imagined. For patients with very mild Alzheimer's disease (AD), susceptibility to the imagination inflation effect could have significant functional consequences in daily life. We assessed whether patients with very mild AD were more or less susceptible to the imagination inflation effect when compared with healthy older adults. In the first session, participants were read an action statement such as "fill the pillbox" and engaged in 1 of 3 activities: listened to the statement being read, performed the action, or imagined performing the action. During the second session, participants imagined action statements from the first session, as well as new action statements. During the recognition test, participants were asked to determine whether action statements were or were not performed during the first session. We found that imagining performing actions increased the tendency of patients with very mild AD to falsely recall the action as having been performed to an extent similar to that of healthy older adults. We concluded that, similar to healthy older adults, patients with very mild AD were susceptible to the imagination inflation effect, which we attributed to difficulties with source monitoring and reliance on familiarity. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. The Imagination Inflation Effect in Healthy Older Adults and Patients with Mild Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Maureen K.; Deason, Rebecca G.; Reynolds, Erin; Tat, Michael J.; Flannery, Sean; Solomon, Paul R.; Vassey, Elizabeth A.; Budson, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The imagination inflation effect is a type of memory distortion defined as an increased tendency to falsely remember that an item has been seen, or an action has been performed, when it has only been imagined. For patients with very mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD), susceptibility to the imagination inflation effect could have significant functional consequences in daily life. Method We assessed whether patients with very mild AD were more or less susceptible to the imagination inflation effect when compared to healthy older adults. In the first session, participants were read an action statement such as “fill the pillbox” and engaged in one of three activities: listened to the statement being read, performed the action, or imagined performing the action. During the second session, participants imagined action statements from the first session as well as new action statements. During the recognition test, participants were asked to determine whether action statements were or were not performed during the first session. Results We found that imagining performing actions increased the tendency of patients with very mild AD to falsely recall the action as having been performed to an extent similar to that of healthy older adults. Conclusion We concluded that, similar to healthy older adults, patients with very mild AD were susceptible to the imagination inflation effect, which we attributed to difficulties with source monitoring and reliance on familiarity. PMID:25893972

  14. Relations among Individual Differences in Reproductive Strategies, Sexual Attractiveness, Affective and Punitive Intentions, and Imagined Sexual or Emotional Infidelity

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel N. Jones; Aurelio José Figueredo; Erin Denise Dickey; W. Jake Jacobs

    2007-01-01

    We examined relations among Mating Effort, Mate Value, Sex and individuals' self-reported responses to imagined sexual or emotional infidelity. We asked participants to describe the (1) upset or bother (2) aversive emotional reactions (3) punitive impulses, and (4) punitive intentions they experienced in response to imagined sexual or emotional infidelity. The results replicated previously documented sex differences in jealousy. In addition, imagined sexual infidelity upset individuals higher...

  15. Activation of sensory cortex by imagined genital stimulation: an fMRI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Nan J; Frangos, Eleni; Komisaruk, Barry R

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a previous study, our laboratory made a serendipitous finding that just thinking about genital stimulation resulted in brain activations that overlapped with, and differed from, those generated by physical genital stimulation. This study extends our previous findings by further characterizing how the brain differentially processes physical 'touch' stimulation and 'imagined' stimulation. Eleven healthy women (age range 29-74) participated in an fMRI study of the brain response to imagined or actual tactile stimulation of the nipple and clitoris. Two additional conditions - imagined dildo self-stimulation and imagined speculum stimulation - were included to characterize the effects of erotic versus non-erotic imagery. Imagined and tactile self-stimulation of the nipple and clitoris each activated the paracentral lobule (the genital region of the primary sensory cortex) and the secondary somatosensory cortex. Imagined self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple resulted in greater activation of the frontal pole and orbital frontal cortex compared to tactile self-stimulation of these two bodily regions. Tactile self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple activated the cerebellum, primary somatosensory cortex (hand region), and premotor cortex more than the imagined stimulation of these body regions. Imagining dildo stimulation generated extensive brain activation in the genital sensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, insula, nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas imagining speculum stimulation generated only minimal activation. The present findings provide evidence of the potency of imagined stimulation of the genitals and that the following brain regions may participate in erogenous experience: primary and secondary sensory cortices, sensory-motor integration areas, limbic structures, and components of the 'reward system'. In addition, these results suggest a mechanism by which some individuals may

  16. Imagination as poetics of cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Pulvirenti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Our work bases on the hypothesis of an existing interconnection between the symbolic and the metaphoric elements of the text responding to a series of mind patterns compressing perception and experience through the emerging process of conceptual blending triggering the semantic process during the creative act of poiesis. This enquiry focuses on the use of a peculiar rhetorical figure in an exemplar literary text of the famous German poet Goethe. We will try to point out the allegorical function of the scene dedicated to the «Mothers’ Kingdom», in his Faust II as a powerful poetical meta-reflection on imagination, cognition and poetics itself.

  17. Bakhtin and Buber: Problems of Dialogic Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Perlina

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent publications of biographical materials on Mikhail Bakhtin demonstrate that he was familiar with the writings of Martin Buber. The philosophical and aesthetic verbal expression of Buber's ideas within the time-spatial universe of Bakhtin's own awareness allows us to discuss this obvious biographical evidence in a wider cultural context. The central opposition of Buber's and Bakhtin's systems is the dialogic dichotomous pair: "Ich und Du" (I and Thou, or "myself and another." Bakhtin's dialogic imagination is rooted in the binaries of the subject-object relations which he initially formulated as "responsibility" and "addressivity," that is to say, as individual awareness and its responsiveness of life. The basic words of Bakhtin's philosophical aesthetics can be understood as the "relation to the other," and their semantics and terminological meaning are directly related to Martin Buber (his work, Ich und Du , 1923. In the 1930s-60s Bakhtin developed the concepts of responsibility and addressivity into his universal dialogic theory of speech-genres. His hierarchy of speech-genres was built in order to establish relations between different sub-genres of the novel (various types of poetic utterances and different species of individual discourse. However, the entire edifice of this dialogic system remained unfinished, and several types of dialogic relations between individual pronouncements of the characters and individual novelistic genres were not discussed by him. Buber's ideas on the dialogue can be used as a clue to one possible interpretation of the function of authoritative and internally persuasive discourses in different sub-genres of the novel (the novel of confession, the Bildungsroman , the autobiographical novel. In this article, Buber's philosophical cycle is used as an aid in reconstructing the integral whole of Bakhtin's "dialogic imagination," as this dialogic mode of thinking goes through his unfinished works: "Author and

  18. Self-imagination can enhance memory in individuals with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffard, Stéphane; Bortolon, Catherine; Burca, Mariana; Novara, Caroline; Gely-Nargeot, Marie-Christine; Capdevielle, Delphine; Van der Linden, Martial

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that self-referential strategies can be applied to improve memory in various memory- impaired populations. However, little is known regarding the relative effectiveness of self-referential strategies in schizophrenia patients. The main aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a new self-referential strategy known as self- imagination (SI) on a free recall task. Twenty schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls intentionally encoded words under five instructions: superficial processing, semantic processing, semantic self-referential processing, episodic self-referential processing and semantic self- imagining. Other measures included depression, psychotic symptoms and cognitive measures. We found a SI effect in memory as self- imagining resulted in better performance in memory retrieval than semantic and superficial encoding in schizophrenia patients. The memory boost for self-referenced information in comparison to semantic processing was not found for other self-referential strategies. In addition no relationship between clinical variables and free recall performances was found. In controls, the SI condition did not result in better performance. The three self-referential strategies yielded better free recall than both superficial and semantic encoding. This study provides evidence of the clinical utility of self-imagining as a mnemonic strategy in schizophrenia patients.

  19. Imagination in human social cognition, autism, and psychotic-affective conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard; Leach, Emma; Dinsdale, Natalie; Mokkonen, Mikael; Hurd, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Complex human social cognition has evolved in concert with risks for psychiatric disorders. Recently, autism and psychotic-affective conditions (mainly schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression) have been posited as psychological 'opposites' with regard to social-cognitive phenotypes. Imagination, considered as 'forming new ideas, mental images, or concepts', represents a central facet of human social evolution and cognition. Previous studies have documented reduced imagination in autism, and increased imagination in association with psychotic-affective conditions, yet these sets of findings have yet to be considered together, or evaluated in the context of the diametric model. We first review studies of the components, manifestations, and neural correlates of imagination in autism and psychotic-affective conditions. Next, we use data on dimensional autism in healthy populations to test the hypotheses that: (1) imagination represents the facet of autism that best accounts for its strongly male-biased sex ratio, and (2) higher genetic risk of schizophrenia is associated with higher imagination, in accordance with the predictions of the diametric model. The first hypothesis was supported by a systematic review and meta-analysis showing that Imagination exhibits the strongest male bias of all Autism Quotient (AQ) subscales, in non-clinical populations. The second hypothesis was supported, for males, by associations between schizophrenia genetic risk scores, derived from a set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms, and the AQ Imagination subscale. Considered together, these findings indicate that imagination, especially social imagination as embodied in the default mode human brain network, mediates risk and diametric dimensional phenotypes of autism and psychotic-affective conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Stages of Student Mathematical Imagination in Solving Mathematical Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Teguh; Sutawidjaja, Akbar; As'ari, Abdur Rahman; Sulandra, I. Made

    2017-01-01

    This research is a qualitative study that aimed to describe the stages of students mathematical imagination in solving mathematical problems. There are three kinds of mathematical imagination in solving mathematical problems, namely sensory mathematical imagination, creative mathematical imagination and recreative mathematical imagination.…

  1. Constructive episodic simulation of the future and the past: distinct subsystems of a core brain network mediate imagining and remembering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addis, Donna Rose; Pan, Ling; Vu, Mai-Anh; Laiser, Noa; Schacter, Daniel L

    2009-09-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies demonstrate that remembering the past and imagining the future rely on the same core brain network. However, findings of common core network activity during remembering and imagining events and increased activity during future event simulation could reflect the recasting of past events as future events. We experimentally recombined event details from participants' own past experiences, thus preventing the recasting of past events as imagined events. Moreover, we instructed participants to imagine both future and past events in order to disambiguate whether future-event-specific activity found in previous studies is related specifically to prospection or a general demand of imagining episodic events. Using spatiotemporal partial-least-squares (PLS), a conjunction contrast confirmed that even when subjects are required to recombine details into imagined events (and prevented from recasting events), significant neural overlap between remembering and imagining events is evident throughout the core network. However, the PLS analysis identified two subsystems within the core network. One extensive subsystem was preferentially associated with imagining both future and past events. This finding suggests that regions previously associated with future events, such as anterior hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, support processes general to imagining events rather than specific to prospection. This PLS analysis also identified a subsystem, including hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus and extensive regions of posterior visual cortex that was preferentially engaged when remembering past events rich in contextual and visuospatial detail.

  2. Imaginative ethics--bringing ethical praxis into sharper relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Mats G

    2002-01-01

    The empirical basis for this article is three years of experience with ethical rounds at Uppsala University Hospital. Three standard approaches of ethical reasoning are examined as potential explanations of what actually occurs during the ethical rounds. For reasons given, these are not found to be satisfying explanations. An approach called "imaginative ethics", is suggested as a more satisfactory account of this kind of ethical reasoning. The participants in the ethical rounds seem to draw on a kind of moral competence based on personal life experience and professional competence and experience. By listening to other perspectives and other experiences related to one particular patient story, the participants imagine alternative horizons of moral experience and explore a multitude of values related to clinical practice that might be at stake. In his systematic treatment of aesthetics in the Critique of Judgement, Kant made use of an operation of thought that, if applied to ethics, will enable us to be more sensitive to the particulars of each moral situation. Based on this reading of Kant, an account of imaginative ethics is developed in order to bring the ethical praxis of doctors and nurses into sharper relief. The Hebraic and the Hellenic traditions of imagination are used in order to illuminate some of the experiences of ethical rounds. In conclusion, it is argued that imaginative ethics and principle-based ethics should be seen as complementary in order to endow a moral discourse with ethical authority. Kantian ethics will do the job if it is remembered that Kant suggested only a modest, negative role of principle-based deliberation.

  3. Brief Report: New Evidence for a Social-Specific Imagination Deficit in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Eycke, Kayla D.; Müller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that children with autism have deficits in drawing imaginative content. However, these conclusions are largely based on tasks that require children to draw impossible persons, and performance on this task may be limited by social deficits. To determine the generality of the deficit in imagination in children with autism,…

  4. The Moral Imagination of De-extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Bruce

    2017-07-01

    We live amidst the sixth great extinction of life on Earth, and we live under the sign of molecular biology and biotechnology. An ethical maxim that is well-nigh universally acknowledged holds that with great power comes great moral responsibility. For those who accept the science and embrace the responsibility, there are two rather different kinds of moral vision and moral imagination at work. Detractors of biotechnology say that we should see ourselves as creaturely good citizens of the biotic community, accepting and accommodating what evolutionary natural selection has bequeathed to us, warts and all. Boosters of biotechnology say that we should see ourselves as its sovereigns, fashioning better forms of synthetic life and genetically driving evolution in better ways through anthropogenic selection. Faced with biodiversity loss, technology boosters, or eco-modernists, tend to respond by upping the ante on technology in hopes of increasing the benefits and lessening the impact of human relations with nature. The detractors, or eco-communitarians, respond by seeking to restructure the relationship between humans and nature by lowering the profile of human power so as to hear the voice of nonhuman being and better attune ourselves to it. Undergirding both of these moral visions is atonement. As a way of providing atonement, however, de-extinction fails. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  5. Mental health and health-related quality of life among adult Latino primary care patients living in the United States with previous exposure to political violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David P; Gelberg, Lillian; Liu, Honghu; Shapiro, Martin F

    2003-08-06

    Although political violence continues in parts of Central America, South America, and Mexico, little is known about its relationship to the health of Latino immigrants living in the United States. To determine (1) rates of exposure to political violence among Latino adult primary care patients who have immigrated to the United States from Central America, South America, and Mexico and its impact on mental health and health-related quality of life and (2) frequency of disclosure of political violence to primary care clinicians. Two-stage cluster design survey of a systematic sample of Latino immigrant adults in 3 community-based primary care clinics in Los Angeles, conducted from July 2001 to February 2002. Reports of exposure to political violence in home country before immigrating to the United States and communication with clinicians about political violence; self-reported measures of health-related quality of life using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (MOS SF-36); symptoms of depression, anxiety, and alcohol disorders using the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD); and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version (PCL-C). A total of 638 (69%) of 919 eligible patients participated. The nonresponse rates did not differ by age, sex, recruitment sites, or clinic sessions. In weighted analyses, 54% of participants reported political violence experiences in their home countries, including 8% who reported torture. Of those exposed to political violence, 36% had symptoms of depression and 18% had symptoms of PTSD vs 20% and 8%, respectively, among those not exposed to political violence. Controlling for age, sex, country, years lived in the United States, acculturation, income, health insurance status, and recruitment site in a subsample of 512 participants (56%), those who reported political violence exposure were more likely to meet symptom criteria for PTSD (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.4; 95

  6. Activation of sensory cortex by imagined genital stimulation: an fMRI analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan J. Wise

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the course of a previous study, our laboratory made a serendipitous finding that just thinking about genital stimulation resulted in brain activations that overlapped with, and differed from, those generated by physical genital stimulation. Objective: This study extends our previous findings by further characterizing how the brain differentially processes physical ‘touch’ stimulation and ‘imagined’ stimulation. Design: Eleven healthy women (age range 29–74 participated in an fMRI study of the brain response to imagined or actual tactile stimulation of the nipple and clitoris. Two additional conditions – imagined dildo self-stimulation and imagined speculum stimulation – were included to characterize the effects of erotic versus non-erotic imagery. Results: Imagined and tactile self-stimulation of the nipple and clitoris each activated the paracentral lobule (the genital region of the primary sensory cortex and the secondary somatosensory cortex. Imagined self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple resulted in greater activation of the frontal pole and orbital frontal cortex compared to tactile self-stimulation of these two bodily regions. Tactile self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple activated the cerebellum, primary somatosensory cortex (hand region, and premotor cortex more than the imagined stimulation of these body regions. Imagining dildo stimulation generated extensive brain activation in the genital sensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, insula, nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas imagining speculum stimulation generated only minimal activation. Conclusion: The present findings provide evidence of the potency of imagined stimulation of the genitals and that the following brain regions may participate in erogenous experience: primary and secondary sensory cortices, sensory-motor integration areas, limbic structures, and components of the

  7. Imagining value, imagining users: academic technology transfer for health innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Sanders, Carrie B; Lehoux, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Governments have invested heavily in the clinical and economic promise of health innovation and express increasing concern with the efficacy and efficiency of the health innovation system. In considering strategies for 'better' health innovation, policy makers and researchers have taken a particular interest in the work of universities and related public research organizations: How do these organizations identify and transfer promising innovations to market, and do these efforts make best use of public sector investments? We conducted an ethnographic study of technology transfer offices (TTOs) in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada, to consider the place of health and health system imperatives in judgments of value in early-stage health innovation. Our analysis suggests that the valuation process is poorly specified as a set of task-specific judgments. Instead, we argue that technology transfer professionals are active participants in the construction of the innovation and assign value by 'imagining' the end product in its 'context of use'. Oriented as they are to the commercialization of health technology, TTOs understand users primarily as market players. The immediate users of TTOs' efforts are commercial partners (i.e., licensees, investors) who are capable of translating current discoveries into future commodities. The ultimate end users - patients, clinicians, health systems - are the future consumers of the products to be sold. Attention to these proximate and more distal users in the valuation process is a complex and constitutive feature of the work of health technology transfer. At the same time, judgements about individual technologies are made in relation to a broader imperative through which TTOs seek to imagine and construct sustainable innovation systems. Judgments of value are rendered sensible in relation to the logic of valuation for systems of innovation that, in turn, configure users of health innovation in systemic ways.

  8. Imagine Creating Rubrics that Develop Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda Payne

    2009-01-01

    English teachers are by nature rather imaginative, a trait that is not taught in a methods class or listed as a disposition in standards for teacher preparation. Whether as part of a learning activity or a "what if" question posed in a literature discussion, imagination and creativity are integral parts of classrooms and their inclusion is as…

  9. Imagining Comparative Education: Past, Present, Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulston, Rolland

    2000-01-01

    Presents a study questioning how comparative educators use their imaginations to construct new knowledge/understanding on representing educational phenomenon; the genres and forms of representations and how these code choices influenced ways of seeing and thinking; and how the self-reflexive history of imagination is patterned as an intertextual…

  10. Engaging Students' Imaginations in Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Gillian; Egan, Kieran

    2013-01-01

    Imagination is rarely acknowledged as one of the main workhorses of learning. Unfortunately, disregarding the imagination has some clearly negative pedagogical impacts: Learning is more ineffective than it should be and much schooling is more tedious than it need be. In this paper, we outline a somewhat new way of thinking about the process of…

  11. Co-construction of Imagination spaces -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Brian Lystgaard

    2016-01-01

    , this article shows how idea development can be accomplished through the co-construction of a co-imagined space that functions as a resource for participants. This co-constructed imagination space is a theoretical construct which in oriented-to details can be accomplished through (1) organisation of turn...

  12. Imagination "First": Unleash the Power of Possibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Manoj Chandra

    2015-01-01

    The creativity program, "imagination 'first': unleash the power of possibility," implemented in public primary and secondary schools in Northern Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, deals with the power of imagination in unleashing creativity among gifted students and teachers. Following an in-depth literature review on creativity for…

  13. Imagination as a Vehicle for Comprehension Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Lorena A.

    2013-01-01

    Imagination has been described as a cognitive endeavor that serves as a catalyst for creative actions and aids in the development of comprehension skills. Studies show that incorporating imagination into classroom practice builds on children's lived experiences and encourages the creative reworking of elements that enable the generation of new…

  14. Theological imagination as hermeneutical device: Exploring the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-08

    Jul 8, 2016 ... Ignatius of Loyola. One of the key characteristics of Ignatian spirituality is its deep appreciation of the imagination. The sixteenth century. Spanish mystic grasped the important role of the imagination in an engagement with the biblical text. Living during the. Renaissance, at the dawn of modernity (Marsh ...

  15. Giambattista Vico and the psychological imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This special issue originates from an international workshop on “Vico and imagination,” that took place at Aalborg University in 2014, within a research project on Giambattista Vico and the epistemology of psychology. Imagination has inexplicably been relegated to the background in contemporary...... psychology, despite the fact that imaginative processes are involved in even the most mundane activities. In this editorial, I first present the rationale and the content of the articles and commentaries. Then I outline a brief history of the concept of imagination before Vico, drawing some consequences...... for contemporary psychology. Finally, I provide the proposal for a new research program on imagination as a higher psychological function that enables us to manipulate complex meanings of both linguistic and iconic forms in the process of experiencing....

  16. Creating bizarre false memories through imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ayanna K; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2002-04-01

    The present study explored memory for familiar or usual actions (e.g., flip the coin) and bizarre or unusual actions (e.g., sit on the dice). In Session 1, action statements were presented to 210 participants, who had to either perform or imagine those actions. In Session 2, 24 h later, participants imagined performing various actions, some presented in the first session and others totally new. Finally, in Session 3, 2 weeks later, participants were tested on their memory for the original actions. We found that as the number of imaginings increased in Session 2, so did the proportion of did responses to actions that were only imagined or not even presented. This pattern was present for both bizarre and familiar actions. These results demonstrate that bizarre actions may lose the item distinctiveness that is used to make accurate memory decisions after repeated imagination.

  17. Supporting imagination in the context of work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte

    2018-01-01

    looks into a specific working practice for problem solving called Proactive Review which was developed and implemented in a global IT company over a period of seven years. This working practice requires imagination from individuals, the teams in which the individuals belong, and the management at all......This chapter explores imagination in the context of work. When we work, we meet challenges and problems that we are obliged to solve. Most often we utilize well-defined work processes for the problem-solving, but now and then we run into new problems that need something else. This “something else...... on the task as well as colleagues who are influenced by the problem and its solution. Imagination becomes crucial to problem solving, and the final solution is a new way of doing – it is an innovation. When imagination is required at work, the workplace represents the context of the imagination. This chapter...

  18. THE ROLE OF IMAGINATION IN ATTAINING THE KNOWLEDGE OF GOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATIANA BORODAI

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author wishes to defend a fundamental point: most ancient and early Christian thinkers (from Augustine to Thomas Aquinas thought that the human imagination as a cognitive faculty was a hindrance to metaphysical thinking, to theology, and therefore to the beatifi c vision and salvation. Today, on the contrary, this cognitive faculty is considered to be a positive and very valuable one. The turning-point in the process of this re-evaluation is located in the fourteenth century, when a new literary genre of spiritual literature appeared — the meditationes vitae Christi. For the fi rst time, imagination was seen as a most effi cient tool for attaining a knowledge of God and the fi nal goal of man’s life.

  19. Artistic Imagination in the Illuminationist Theosophy of Suhrawardi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Shafiei

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this article is, first, to explain the faculty of imagination and its function as epistemological realm (continuous imagination and also analyze ontological aspects of imagination, known as imaginational world or plan of ideal (discrete imagination, and then describe the role of these imaginations in founding the early and most important theosophical theories in the realm of Islamic art, literature and architecture (especially mosque.

  20. A real life study of Helicobacter pylori eradication with bismuth quadruple therapy in naïve and previously treated patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas José Gómez-Rodríguez

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a quadruple regimen (BMTO of the "3-in-1 capsule" (containing bismuth subcitrate potassium, metronidazole and tetracycline plus omeprazole in naïve and previously treated patients diagnosed with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection in the clinical setting in Seville (Spain. Methods: This is a prospective study carried out on consecutive patients with a confirmed H. pylori infection and upper gastrointestinal symptoms. After providing their informed consent, the patients were treated for ten days with a 3-in-1 capsule containing bismuth subcitrate potassium (140 mg, metronidazole (125 mg and tetracycline (125 mg: Pylera®, three capsules four times daily, plus omeprazole (20 or 40 mg twice daily. Eradication of infection was determined by a negative urea breath test at least 28 days after the end of treatment. Results: A total of 58 consecutive patients were enrolled into this study, two of whom withdrew early due to vomiting on days three and five, respectively. In this cohort, 17 patients (29.3% had a prior history of medication to treat H. pylori. In the intent-to-treat population, eradication was achieved in 97.6% (40/41 and 82.4% (14/17 of cases in patients treated with BMTO as a first-line or rescue therapy, respectively. At least one adverse event was reported by 28 (48% patients, mostly mild effects (86%. Conclusion: A ten day treatment with BMTO is an effective and safe strategy to combat confirmed H. pylori infection in patients.

  1. EIT and the Popular Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurman, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    The Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope on board SOHO, designed and built by Principal Investigator Jean-Pierre Delaboudiniere and his French/Belgan/US team, has produced numerous scientific breakthroughs, and has become both the standard coronal finder telescope and the determinant of whether halo coronal mass ejections are earthward-directed. Due to the dramatic nature of the images produced by EIT over the last nearly ten years, those images have been adopted worldwide in a manner no one could have foreseen before the launch of SOHO. I examine a small sample of the many scientific, commercial, and cultural uses of EIT imagery from the last decade in order to demonstrate how well-visualized, scientific imagery can first penetrate and then become an accepted part of the popular imagination.

  2. Introduction. Localization, imagination, social spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Viallet

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dossier presented in these pages invites us to study phenomena of production and reproduction of  both objects and places connected with the memory of the Passion in the Middle Ages and early Modern. These introductory words concentrate at first on the notion of localization then on that of collective imagination, underlining the fertile convergence of following two approaches: one emphasizing religious sensibility, the other scrutinizing the practices and the political meanings of the devotional processes in particular. We insist therefore on the distinction between the monumental complexes situated outside of cities and those connecting intramural and outer-urban spaces, resulting from the assimilation of both landscape and topography of the city with those of Jerusalem and of the drama of the Passion. The meanings and consequences of this difference of localization were as important in the practices of devotion as on the sociopolitical plane, from the “disciplining” to the construction of social space.

  3. A cidade imaginada ou o imaginário da cidade The city imagined, or the city’s imaginary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Lopes Nogueira

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo trata da temática da cidade real-cidade imaginária. Argumenta que, ao refletirmos sobre a cidade, refletimos, também, sobre nós mesmos, com todos os nossos sonhos, frustrações, ansiedades e esperanças. A discussão parte de uma ciência reencantada, que aproxima as questões do cotidiano, da memória, do símbolo e do mito.Exploring the topic ‘actual city/imagined city’, the article argues that when we reflect on the question of city, we are also reflecting upon ourselves - including all our dreams, frustrations, anxieties, and hopes. This discussion is made possible by a science that interrelates the issues of daily life, of memory, of symbol and of myth.

  4. Emotion rendering in auditory simulations of imagined walking styles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchet, Luca; Rodá, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigated how different emotional states of a walker can be rendered and recognized by means of footstep sounds synthesis algorithms. In a first experiment, participants were asked to render, according to imagined walking scenarios, five emotions (aggressive, happy, neutral, sad......, and tender) by manipulating the parameters of synthetic footstep sounds simulating various combinations of surface materials and shoes types. Results allowed to identify, for the involved emotions and sound conditions, the mean values and ranges of variation of two parameters, sound level and temporal...... distance between consecutive steps. Results were in accordance with those reported in previous studies on real walking, suggesting that expression of emotions in walking is independent from the real or imagined motor activity. In a second experiment participants were asked to identify the emotions...

  5. Event-related potential study of frontal activity during imagination of rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomori, Izumi; Uemura, Jun-ichi; Nakagawa, Yoshiro; Hoshiyama, Minoru

    2011-12-01

    In 11 healthy volunteers, we used event-related potentials (ERP) to investigate the frontal activity associated with imagining a beat. In imagery sessions, subjects were asked to imagine a rhythm during a silent recording period following a series of guide sounds played at 1 Hz. In control sessions, subjects were asked to imagine a vowel sound ("a") continuously during the silent recording period. In eight subjects, relative negative potentials were recorded during imagery sessions (compared with potentials in control sessions), with timing that was similar to that of the guide sounds. Activity in the left frontal region was more significant than that in other areas during beat imagination. These data indicate that a semantic strategy for simple rhythm imagery might involve temporary phasic activation in the left frontal area, although rhythm production and perception might be generated in the right side, as reported in previous studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Handedness effects of imagined fine motor movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoff, Christopher M; Madan, Christopher R; Singhal, Anthony

    2018-03-01

    Previous studies of movement imagery have found inter-individual differences in the ability to imagine whole-body movements. The majority of these studies have used subjective scales to measure imagery ability, which may be confounded by other factors related to effort. Madan and Singhal [2013. Introducing TAMI: An objective test of ability in movement imagery. Journal of Motor Behavior, 45(2), 153-166. doi: 10.1080/00222895.2013.763764 ] developed the Test of Ability in Movement Imagery (TAMI) to address these confounds by using a multiple-choice format with objectively correct responses. Here we developed a novel movement imagery questionnaire targeted at assessing movement imagery of fine-motor hand movements. This questionnaire included two subscales: Functionally-involved Movement (i.e., tool-related) and Isolated Movement (i.e., hand-only). Hand-dominance effects were observed, such that right-handed participants were significantly better at responding to right-hand questions compared to left-hand questions for both imagery types. A stronger handedness effect was observed for Functionally-involved Movement imagery, and it did not correlate with the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. We propose that the Functionally-involved Movement imagery subscale provides an objective hand imagery test that induces egocentric spatial processing and a greater involvement of memory processes, potentially providing a better skill-based measure of handedness.

  7. Organizations: power/history/imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Clegg

    Full Text Available The paper takes the assumptions of bounded rationality as the premise for organization theorizing. It draws a distinction between a science of objects and a science of subjects, arguing the latter as the more appropriate frame for organization analysis. Organization studies, it suggests, are an example of the type of knowledge that Flyvbjerg, following Aristotle, terms 'phronesis'. At the core of phronetic organization studies, the paper argues, there stands a concern with power, history and imagination. The core of the paper discusses power and the politics of organizing, to point up some central differences in approach to the key term in the trinity that the paper invokes. The paper concludes that organization theory and analysis is best cultivated not in an ideal world of paradigm consensus or domination but in a world of discursive plurality, where obstinate differences in domain assumptions are explicit and explicitly tolerated. A good conversation assumes engagement with alternate points of view, argued against vigorously, but ultimately, where these positions pass the criteria of reason rather than prejudice, tolerated as legitimate points of view. In so doing, it elaborates and defends criteria of reason.

  8. Integrating Project Portfolio With Business Strategy: Imagineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Buaes Dal Maso

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aligning project management to the strategy of a big company is a difficult job. Through Imagineering (the business department and project management program, The Walt Disney Company has done this alignment in an exemplary way. Using a theoretical investigation, this study analyzed the Imagineering as a reference in strategic management of global projects through Disney´s business portfolio, a global benchmarking and with Malmberg et al. (2010 as a company guide. As the main results of the correlations carried out, it was noted that the Imagineers who work in project teams apply tools and techniques with a strategic vision focused on differentiation, generating value, and mixing imagination with technical capacity. The Blue Sky department and its integrated units make possible the creation and deployment of the attractions, the theme parks, hotels, resorts and the Disney sea cruises, demonstrating in this way, to be a highly effective project management office.

  9. New control system: IMAGIN supervision in ADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maugeais, C.

    1991-01-01

    The structure, the initialization, the operating cycle, the different messages and the errors treatment of the new user oriented packages written in ADA language for IMAGIN software are presented. (A.B.). 2 figs

  10. Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Imagine stopping the progression of Alzheimer's Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of Contents For ... I have friends and loved ones suffering from Alzheimer's. But I can imagine… and hope for… a ...

  11. Imagination perspective affects ratings of the likelihood of occurrence of autobiographical memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Benjamin U; Pezdek, Kathy; Lam, Shirley T

    2014-07-01

    Two experiments tested and confirmed the hypothesis that when the phenomenological characteristics of imagined events are more similar to those of related autobiographical memories, the imagined event is more likely to be considered to have occurred. At Time 1 and 2-weeks later, individuals rated the likelihood of occurrence for 20 life events. In Experiment 1, 1-week after Time 1, individuals imagined 3 childhood events from a first-person or third-person perspective. There was a no-imagination control. An increase in likelihood ratings from Time 1 to Time 2 resulted when imagination was from the third-person but not first-person perspective. In Experiment 2, childhood and recent events were imagined from a third- or first-person perspective. A significant interaction resulted. For childhood events, likelihood change scores were greater for third-person than first-person perspective; for recent adult events, likelihood change scores were greater for first-person than third-person perspective, although this latter trend was not significant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On Imaginative Criminology and Its Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Jon Frauley

    2015-01-01

    In growing numbers criminologists are discovering the value of imaginative and creative approaches for enquiry. There is now a critical mass of criminological work that engages substantively and theoretically with cultural artefacts such as film, fiction, music, dance, art, photography and cultural institutions. In doing so these works highlight criminology’s persistent epistemological and methodological weaknesses. The broad and fragmented “imaginative criminology” movement offers a challeng...

  13. The Imagined Audience on Social Network Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden Litt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When people construct and share posts on social network sites like Facebook and Twitter, whom do they imagine as their audience? How do users describe this imagined audience? Do they have a sub-audience in mind (e.g., “friends who like reality television”? Do they share more broadly and abstractly (e.g., “the public”? Do such imaginings fluctuate each time a person posts? Using a mixed-methods approach involving a 2-month-long diary study of 119 diverse American adults and their 1,200 social network site posts, supplemented with follow-up interviews (N = 30, this study explores the imagined audience on social network sites. The findings reveal that even though users often interacted with large diverse audiences as they posted, they coped by envisioning either very broad abstract imagined audiences or more targeted specific imagined audiences composed of personal ties, professional ties, communal ties, and/or phantasmal ties. When people had target imagined audiences in mind, they were most often homogeneous and composed of people’s friends and family. Users’ imaginings typically fluctuated among these audience types as they posted even though the potential audience as per their posts’ privacy settings often did not change. The findings provide a list of audience types, as well as detailed descriptions, examples, and frequencies on which future research can build. With people’s online presence playing an important role for their reputations, these findings provide more insight into for whom people are managing their privacy and whom they have in mind as they share.

  14. Systemic evil and the international political imagination

    OpenAIRE

    Hayden, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In light of the persistence of discourses of atrocity in the post-Holocaust era, and with the resurgence of talk of evil that followed 11 September 2001, it is clear that the idea of evil still possesses a powerful hold upon the modern imagination. Yet, the interplay of evil and the political imagination – in particular, how different images of evil have shaped the discourses and practices of international politics – remains neglected. This article suggests that evil is depicted through three...

  15. Memory, Imagination, and Predicting the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, Sinéad L.

    2014-01-01

    On the face of it, memory, imagination, and prediction seem to be distinct cognitive functions. However, metacognitive, cognitive, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging evidence is emerging that they are not, suggesting intimate links in their underlying processes. Here, we explore these empirical findings and the evolving theoretical frameworks that seek to explain how a common neural system supports our recollection of times past, imagination, and our attempts to predict the future. PMID:23846418

  16. Expanding Policy Imagination in Political Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Much of the literature in political economy seeks to capture an essential insight into the evolution of political and economic systems to provide a foundation for policy advice. This article suggests that attempts to nut out the kernels of change often restrict rather than expand policy imagination...... be implemented. Historical sociology provides a way to generate information about contextual constellations through two "tonics": intentional rationality and social mechanisms. With the assistance of these tonics, historical sociology widens political economy's policy imagination....

  17. Cosmopolitanism through mobility: physical-corporeal or virtual-imagined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Knut

    2017-06-01

    In the context of increasing cross-border mobility and the associated interconnections and diversities, 'cosmopolitanism' has become a key concept in sociology. Understood as individual real-world orientation, many authors consider a central cause for cosmopolitanism in physical-corporeal mobility, in particular transnationally. However, the significance of virtual and imagined mobility, such as via television or the Internet, is increasingly emphasized. Nevertheless, it has so far been little examined how and with which relative strength physical-corporeal and virtual-imagined mobility are associated with cosmopolitan orientations. Unlike previous studies, the two forms of mobility are considered simultaneously. On the basis of existing studies and theoretical considerations, it is assumed that the dimension of global orientation is influenced rather by physical-corporeal than by virtual-imagined mobility, whereas the dimension of cultural openness is influenced rather by virtual-imagined than by physical mobility. One reason could be the different potential of the mobility forms to respond to perceived conflicts in the confrontation with the Other. The hypotheses are preliminary tested using data from an online survey that allows both to distinguish locals, (national) shuttles and transnationals, and to query media use. An exploratory principal component analysis confirmed, as in other studies, that global orientation and cultural openness are distinct dimensions. The results of the multivariate analyses largely support the hypotheses and indicate that in investigations of cosmopolitanism, the processes of identity-related self-categorization should be distinguished from pure socialization processes. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2017.

  18. Enhancing memory and imagination improves problem solving among individuals with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Craig P; Primosch, Mark; Maxson, Chelsey M; Stewart, Brandon T

    2017-08-01

    Recent work has revealed links between memory, imagination, and problem solving, and suggests that increasing access to detailed memories can lead to improved imagination and problem-solving performance. Depression is often associated with overgeneral memory and imagination, along with problem-solving deficits. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that an interview designed to elicit detailed recollections would enhance imagination and problem solving among both depressed and nondepressed participants. In a within-subjects design, participants completed a control interview or an episodic specificity induction prior to completing memory, imagination, and problem-solving tasks. Results revealed that compared to the control interview, the episodic specificity induction fostered increased detail generation in memory and imagination and more relevant steps on the problem-solving task among depressed and nondepressed participants. This study builds on previous work by demonstrating that a brief interview can enhance problem solving among individuals with depression and supports the notion that episodic memory plays a key role in problem solving. It should be noted, however, that the results of the interview are relatively short-lived.

  19. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  20. Imaginative science education the central role of imagination in science education

    CERN Document Server

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2016-01-01

    This book is about imaginative approaches to teaching and learning school science. Its central premise is that science learning should reflect the nature of science, and therefore be approached as an imaginative/creative activity. As such, the book can be seen as an original contribution of ideas relating to imagination and creativity in science education. The approaches discussed in the book are storytelling, the experience of wonder, the development of ‘romantic understanding’, and creative science, including science through visual art, poetry and dramatization. However, given the perennial problem of how to engage students (of all ages) in science, the notion of ‘aesthetic experience’, and hence the possibility for students to have more holistic and fulfilling learning experiences through the aforementioned imaginative approaches, is also discussed. Each chapter provides an in-depth discussion of the theoretical background of a specific imaginative approach (e.g., storytelling, ‘wonder-full’ s...

  1. Imagine math 3 between culture and mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Imagine mathematics, imagine with the help of mathematics, imagine new worlds, new geometries, new forms. This volume in the series “Imagine Math” casts light on what is new and interesting in the relationships between mathematics, imagination, and culture. The book opens by examining the connections between modern and contemporary art and mathematics, including Linda D. Henderson’s contribution. Several further papers are devoted to mathematical models and their influence on modern and contemporary art, including the work of Henry Moore and Hiroshi Sugimoto. Among the many other interesting contributions are an homage to Benoît Mandelbrot with reference to the exhibition held in New York in 2013 and the thoughts of Jean-Pierre Bourguignon on the art and math exhibition at the Fondation Cartier in Paris. An interesting part is dedicated to the connections between math, computer science and theatre with the papers by C. Bardainne and A. Mondot.  The topics are treated in a way that is rigorous but capt...

  2. Corked Hats and "Coronation Street": British and New Zealand Children's Imaginative Geographies of the Other.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Sarah L.; Valentine, Gill

    2000-01-01

    Explores the ways British and New Zealand children imagined each other's environments and cultures. Illustrates the sources and importance of stereotypical understandings of landscape, people, and patterns of daily life in other nations, and the ways these may be contested through Internet contact. (JPB)

  3. The Secret Places: Essays on Imaginative Work in English Teaching and on Culture of the Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, David

    A child's own purpose in life is to educate himself and to explore experience; consequently, secondary-school children will benefit from English teaching that encourages their imaginative creativity rather than forces strict adherence to arbitrary rules. When considering their childhood memories and the adult experiences before them, children…

  4. The Classification and Indexing of Imaginative Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Rune

    2005-01-01

    With the indexing of imaginative literature included in an expanding number of bibliographic databases, the overall representation of this kind of literature has definitely been improved. Still, in terms of information retrieval and being able to judge the relevance of the titles, it seems...... that the usefulness of classification and indexing alike are still being restricted by some old romantic and objectivistic, or even positivistic, ideas and ideals. In order to argue that point the paper firstly re-examines the classification of imaginative literature in early editions of the Dewey Decimal...... Classification, then analyzes the main structures in the modern classification and indexing in the Library of Congress and in the Danish Bibliographic Centre. It is concluded that the classification of imaginative literature not has changed very much since the days of Dewey and that the indexing largely reflects...

  5. The Aesthetics of Imagination in Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkmann, Mads Nygaard

    methodology to cultural studies. Throughout, he offers concrete examples to illustrate theoretical points. Folkmann’s philosophically informed account shows design--in all its manifestations, from physical products to principles of organization--to be an essential medium for the articulation...... and the phenomenology of imagination, he seeks to answer fundamental questions about what design is and how it works that are often ignored in academic research. Folkmann considers three conditions in design: the possible, the aesthetic, and the imagination. Imagination is a central formative power behind the creation...... as a structure of meaning within the objects of design, which act as part of our interface with the world. Taking a largely phenomenological perspective that reflects both continental and American pragmatist approaches, Folkmann also makes use of discourses that range from practice-focused accounts of design...

  6. Imagine that: self-imagination improves prospective memory in memory-impaired individuals with neurological damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilli, Matthew D; McFarland, Craig P

    2011-12-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that "self-imagination" - a mnemonic strategy developed by Grilli and Glisky (2010) - enhances episodic memory in memory-impaired individuals with neurological damage more than traditional cognitive strategies, including semantic elaboration and visual imagery. The present study investigated the effect of self-imagination on prospective memory in individuals with neurologically based memory deficits. In two separate sessions, 12 patients with memory impairment took part in a computerised general knowledge test that required them to answer multiple choice questions (i.e., ongoing task) and press the "1" key when a target word appeared in a question (i.e., prospective memory task). Prior to the start of the general knowledge test in each session, participants attempted to encode the prospective memory task with one of two strategies: self-imagination or rote-rehearsal. The findings revealed a "self-imagination effect (SIE)" in prospective memory as self-imagining resulted in better prospective memory performance than rote-rehearsal. These results demonstrate that the mnemonic advantage of self-imagination extends to prospective memory in memory-impaired individuals with neurological damage and suggest that self-imagination has potential in cognitive rehabilitation.

  7. Orientalist Imaginations and Touristification of Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2005-01-01

    promotion in the city-state. The tourism authorities in Singapore have found that the city destination has become too modern and western for many tourists, and the destination has embarked on a campaign to make Singapore more oriental. The creation of the museums is one strategy to orientalize Singapore......; these museums assert different layers of Singapore's oriental identities. Each museum appropriates the tourist orientalist imagination in different ways. This paper argues that the orientalist imagination can be understood as a set of knowledge resources for the construction of local identities to enhance...

  8. IMAGINE: Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steininger, Theo

    2018-03-01

    IMAGINE (Interstellar MAGnetic field INference Engine) performs inference on generic parametric models of the Galaxy. The modular open source framework uses highly optimized tools and technology such as the MultiNest sampler (ascl:1109.006) and the information field theory framework NIFTy (ascl:1302.013) to create an instance of the Milky Way based on a set of parameters for physical observables, using Bayesian statistics to judge the mismatch between measured data and model prediction. The flexibility of the IMAGINE framework allows for simple refitting for newly available data sets and makes state-of-the-art Bayesian methods easily accessible particularly for random components of the Galactic magnetic field.

  9. Examining the Association between the "Imagination Library" Early Childhood Literacy Program and Kindergarten Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Shahin; Bush, Andrew J.; Sell, Marie; Imig, Doug

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated participation in the "Imagination Library" early childhood literacy enrichment program and children's pre-literacy and pre-numeracy skills at kindergarten entry in an urban school district. Previous studies have demonstrated that program participation is associated with greater early childhood reading practices.…

  10. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  11. Theological imagination as hermeneutical device: Exploring the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These were Walter Brueggemann, Paul Ricoeur and Ignatius of Loyola. Their hermeneutical contributions concur in their understanding of a biblically informed imagination, and it is specifically this aspect of the concurrence of their thought that was explored. An illustration from Proverbs 14:27, which draws on the metaphor ...

  12. Sociological imagination for the aged society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore how the sociological imagination may generate new insights regarding the dangers and possibilities that arise when an old order disintegrates and a new one has to be created. The new order is theorized as the “aged society”. The aged society is demarcated by

  13. Multimodal Literacies: Imagining Lives through Korean Dramas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Grace MyHyun; Omerbašic, Delila

    2017-01-01

    Global networks of information and interactions have created new conditions for access to myriad literacies, languages, and communities. Engagements with transnational texts and communities can support the imagination of lives different from one's local context. This article presents data from two qualitative studies of adolescent literacy…

  14. Engaging Interview Participants with Imaginative Variation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many such methods involve requesting participants to describe particular experiences in ... imaginative variation is an analytic method available to phenomenological researchers for ..... longstanding interest in the development and use of qualitative methods in psychology, particularly the template analysis style of thematic ...

  15. Driving Symbolic Consumption through Imagined Vertical Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostinelli, Massimiliano; Ringberg, Torsten; Luna, David

    Drawing on theories of embodied cognition and compensatory consumption, we provide evidence that merely imagining oneself moving upward or downward affects preference for symbolic products. Altogether, two studies show that magining taking an elevator down, as opposed to up, decreases self-worth ...

  16. Imagining Unmediated Early Swahili Narratives in Abdulrazak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gurnah's strategy in the novel imbues Swahili storytellers with interiority and agency denied by the European mediators who transcribed their stories. Rather than naively imagine unmediated access to late nineteenth-century Swahili storytellers, Gurnah embraces his fraught project as an English language mediator with ...

  17. Imagining Other Lives | Mackenzie | Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Goodin's argument emphasizes the role of art and other forms of cultural representation in helping to bring about this expansion of moral imagination. Drawing on debates in philosophy of mind concerning the scope and limits of our capacities to simulate other minds, I argue that Goodin's analysis of 'democratic deliberation ...

  18. Second-Language Learning through Imaginative Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how Egan's (1997) work on imagination can enrich our understanding of teaching English as a second language (ESL). Much has been written on ESL teaching techniques; however, some of this work has been expounded in a standard educational framework, which is what Egan calls an assembly-line model. This model can easily underlie…

  19. Mind Machines, Myth, Metaphor, and Scientific Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Sue Curry

    This paper builds upon the poetics of scientific discourse which provide extraordinary insights into the workings of the scientific imagination and into the ways it is both colonized and liberated by the medium of social and ideological transfer--metaphor. The paper examines what constructivism is teaching us about the role metaphor plays in…

  20. Reading as Experience: Literature, Response and Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Klaudia Hiu Yen; Patkin, John

    2016-01-01

    This article uses the findings from an empirical study on Hong Kong students' reading practices as collected through face-to-face interviews on major university campuses in Hong Kong to argue for the importance of "affective" and "imaginative" engagement with literary texts if students are to develop an interest in reading.…

  1. Frontier Imaginings and Subversive Indigenous Spatialities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prout, Sarah; Howitt, Richard

    2009-01-01

    One of the most powerful and enduring aspects of publicly projected Anglo-Australian national identities is part of what [Howitt, R., 2001. Frontiers borders, edges: liminal challenges to the hegemony of exclusion. Australian Geographical Studies 39, 233-245.] has referred to as frontier imaginings: the carving out of the Australian physical and…

  2. Just Imagine...Improving the Band Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerull, David S.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of imagination as a tool to improve students' musicianship. Suggests that imagery can be used to teach intonation, tone color, sight-reading, and expression. Describes active listening in which the students must use musical memory and participate in musical expression to produce a certain sound that may be difficult to describe.…

  3. Dentine hypersensitivity: real or imagined | Gbadebo | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, the cause, diagnosis and possible management to give relief can be a dilemma for the clinician who at times may wonder if the sensation the individual is presenting with, is real or imagined. Aim: The purpose of this paper was to review dentine hypersensitivity in view of causes, diagnosis and management.

  4. The Sociological Imagination and Social Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hironimus-Wendt, Robert J.; Wallace, Lora Ebert

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we maintain that sociologists should deliberately teach social responsibility as a means of fulfilling the promise that C. Wright Mills envisioned. A key aspect of the sociological imagination includes a sense of social responsibility, but that aspect is best learned through a combination of experience and academic knowledge.…

  5. Space and the American imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, Howard E.

    1994-01-01

    The introduction will set out the principal theme of the book: that the rise of the U.S. space program was due to a concerted effort by science writers, engineers, industrialists, and civic and political leaders to create a popular culture of space exploration based on important elements of American social life (such as frontier mythology, fears about the cold war, and the rise of the consumer culture). Much of the disillusionment with the NASA space program which set in during the third decade of space flight can be traced to a widening gap between popular expectations and the reality of space exploration.

  6. Using imagination to understand the neural basis of episodic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassabis, Demis; Kumaran, Dharshan; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2008-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) studies investigating the neural basis of episodic memory recall, and the related task of thinking about plausible personal future events, have revealed a consistent network of associated brain regions. Surprisingly little, however, is understood about the contributions individual brain areas make to the overall recollective experience. In order to examine this, we employed a novel fMRI paradigm where subjects had to imagine fictitious experiences. In contrast to future thinking, this results in experiences that are not explicitly temporal in nature or as reliant on self-processing. By using previously imagined fictitious experiences as a comparison for episodic memories, we identified the neural basis of a key process engaged in common, namely scene construction, involving the generation, maintenance and visualisation of complex spatial contexts. This was associated with activations in a distributed network, including hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and retrosplenial cortex. Importantly, we disambiguated these common effects from episodic memory-specific responses in anterior medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus. These latter regions may support self-schema and familiarity processes, and contribute to the brain's ability to distinguish real from imaginary memories. We conclude that scene construction constitutes a common process underlying episodic memory and imagination of fictitious experiences, and suggest it may partially account for the similar brain networks implicated in navigation, episodic future thinking, and the default mode. We suggest that further brain regions are co-opted into this core network in a task-specific manner to support functions such as episodic memory that may have additional requirements. PMID:18160644

  7. Principles or imagination? Two approaches to global justice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coeckelbergh, Mark

    2007-01-01

    What does it mean to introduce the notion of imagination in the discussion about global justice? What is gained by studying the role of imagination in thinking about global justice? Does a focus on imagination imply that we must replace existing influential principle-centred approaches such as that

  8. The Nature of Imagination in Education for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sally

    2015-01-01

    The importance of imagination in education has a significant history (Egan, 1986, 2001; Eisner, 1976; Greene, 1988; Steiner, 1954; Warnock, 1976); however, scholarship is often theoretical, and the involvement of imagination in understanding sustainability is often overlooked (Jones, 1995; Judson, 2010; Stewart, 2009). Imagination has rarely been…

  9. Interactive Dynamics of Imagination in a Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilppö, Jaakko; Rajala, Antti; Zittoun, Tania; Kumpulainen, Kristiina; Lipponen, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a conceptual framework for researching the dynamics of imagination in science classroom interactions. While educational interest in imagination has recently increased, prior research has not adequately accounted for how imagination is realized in and through classroom interactions, nor has it created a framework for its…

  10. The Need for Imagination and Creativity in Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Pat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the need for imagination and creativity in adult education instructional design both online and face-to-face. It defines both imagination and creativity as well as provides an overview of the history of instructional design. It provides an examination of imagination and its application in educational…

  11. 'Imagining ourselves': South African music as a vehicle for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines some of the ways in which South African music is involved in the negotiation of white South African identity. In particular, it examines how music may be considered a vehicle for constructing 'imagined communities' and imagined individual others, and how these processes of imagining may serve to ...

  12. The Search for Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    Each recent report of liquid water existing elsewhere in the solar system has reverberated through the international press and excited the imagination of humankind. We have come to realize that where there is liquid water on Earth, virtually no matter what the physical conditions, there is life. Dr. Lynn Rothschild, an evolutionary biologist known for her work on life in extreme environments and a founder of the field of astrobiology, tells us about intriguing new data. The prevalence of potential abodes for life in our solar system and beyond, the survival of microbes in the space environment, modeling of the potential for transfer of life between celestial bodies, and advances in synthetic biology suggest that life could be more common than previously thought. Are we truly "alone"?

  13. Relations among Individual Differences in Reproductive Strategies, Sexual Attractiveness, Affective and Punitive Intentions, and Imagined Sexual or Emotional Infidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel N. Jones

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We examined relations among Mating Effort, Mate Value, Sex and individuals' self-reported responses to imagined sexual or emotional infidelity. We asked participants to describe the (1 upset or bother (2 aversive emotional reactions (3 punitive impulses, and (4 punitive intentions they experienced in response to imagined sexual or emotional infidelity. The results replicated previously documented sex differences in jealousy. In addition, imagined sexual infidelity upset individuals higher in Mating Effort more than those lower in Mating Effort. Higher Mating Effort also predicted greater temptation, intention, and likelihood to engage in punitive behaviors in response to imagined sexual or emotional infidelity. We discuss these data in light of individual differences in relations between reproductive strategy and romantic jealousy. Additionally, we point to the importance of controlling for co-linearity between reactions to sexual and emotional infidelity, and the need for addressing related methodological problems within jealousy research.

  14. Imagining real and unreal things: evidence of a dissociation in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, F J; Baron-Cohen, S

    1996-01-01

    children with autism were no worse than clinical controls in their ability to generate ideas about real objects, suggesting that a global generativity deficit cannot explain the previous findings. Rather, these results point to a specific impairment in the ability to imagine unreal objects. This is discussed in terms of its possible neural dissociability from other kinds of imagery, and in terms of its possible relationship to theory of mind.

  15. Layers Of Visual Imagination And Degrees Of Subjectivity In Listening Experiences Exploring Visual Imagination In Acousmatic Composition And Listening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Poillucci

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electroacoustic music especially Acousmatic is often perceived differently between listeners and a wide variety of visual images is evoked. This because of the spectromorphological qualities and the abstract reality in which this kind of music carries the listener into. In everyday life it seems that we have a natural tendency to assess and understand reality around us and to quantise how and if the perceived circumstances could affect our wellbeing. Some studies also affirm that brain and the biological function of the sensory and perceptual processes are commonly identical in each listener. This gives evidence that arises the interest to investigate which variations the subjectivity of visual imagery depends on and if it is possible to unfold it in various layers. This experimental research has taken in consideration questionnaire-based listening tests to gather details from each listening experience and to get a better understanding of the visual imagery evoked by electroacoustic compositions into the listeners mind and its degrees of objectivity and subjectivity. The compositions used in the experiment were both composed by the author with the intention of guiding listeners into their personal perceptual-imaginative journey by delivering encoded perhaps objective sonic cues. This paper is a theoretical inter-disciplinary analysis backed by research on the foundations of senses perception cognition emotions etc. An artistic approach based on scientific evidences led to the theorization of layers of imagination and their bias to produce visual images with a degree of subjectivity that lies into micro aspects of sounds and in the perceptual and innate knowledge of each individual. Glossary The terms listed here have been invented or readapted for the purpose of the study in order to make concepts easier to assimilate and understand. Aural World sonic world with intrinsic features Smalley 1997. The purely auditory realm which an

  16. [Brain mechanisms of imagination during verbal creative problem solving].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodionov, A R

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, EEG spectral analysis was used to examine the brain mechanisms of imagination in student actors and student non-actors under three experimental conditions: when subjects created a coherent story based on a presented picture (STORY), listed the details of the presented picture (DETAIL) and executed simple calculation while they looked at neutral background (COUNT). Statistical comparison of STORY and DETAIL conditions revealed significantly higher spectral power in alpha1 (7.5-10 Hz) and alpha2 (10-12.5 Hz) bands in the most of investigated cortical areas in actors and non-actors. By contrast, in comparisons STORY-COUNT and DETAIL-COUNT significantly lower spectral power in the same frequency bands in all investigated cortical areas in both groups was obtained. The most prominent differences in comparison STORY-DETAIL were revealed over the central parietal area. The most prominent differences in comparisons STORY-COUNT and DETAIL-COUNT were revealed mainly over the occipital areas. These EEG changes were found in both groups of subjects. Taking this fact into account we consider parietal areas to be stable element of the brain system which maintain verbal creativity in actors and non-actors. The discussion of our results with respect to those obtained in previous studies leads to conclusion that parietal areas are involved into the mechanism of selective inhibition of visual information processing during imagination.

  17. Imagining the ideal dairy farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Clarissa S; Hötzel, Maria José; Weary, Daniel M; Robbins, Jesse A; von Keyserlingk, Marina A G

    2016-02-01

    Practices in agriculture can have negative effects on the environment, rural communities, food safety, and animal welfare. Although disagreements are possible about specific issues and potential solutions, it is widely recognized that public input is needed in the development of socially sustainable agriculture systems. The aim of this study was to assess the views of people not affiliated with the dairy industry on what they perceived to be the ideal dairy farm and their associated reasons. Through an online survey, participants were invited to respond to the following open-ended question: "What do you consider to be an ideal dairy farm and why are these characteristics important to you?" Although participants referenced social, economic, and ecological aspects of dairy farming, animal welfare was the primary issue raised. Concern was expressed directly about the quality of life for the animals, and the indirect effect of animal welfare on milk quality. Thus participants appeared to hold an ethic for dairy farming that included concern for the animal, as well as economic, social, and environmental aspects of the dairy system. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Remembering the past and imagining the future: Selective effects of an episodic specificity induction on detail generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madore, Kevin P; Schacter, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    According to the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis, remembering past experiences and imagining future experiences both rely heavily on episodic memory. However, recent research indicates that nonepisodic processes such as descriptive ability also influence memory and imagination. We recently found that an episodic specificity induction--brief training in recollecting details of past experiences--enhanced detail generation on memory and imagination tasks but not a picture description task and thereby concluded that the induction can dissociate episodic processes involved in remembering the past and imagining the future from those nonepisodic processes involved in description. To evaluate the generality of our previous findings and to examine the role of generative search in producing those findings, we modified our paradigm so that word cues replaced picture cues, and a word comparison task that requires generation of sentences and word definitions replaced picture description. Young adult participants received either a specificity induction or one of two control inductions before completing the memory, imagination, and word comparison tasks. Replicating and extending our previous work, we found that the specificity induction increased detail generation in memory and imagination without having an effect on word comparison. The induction's selective effect on memory and imagination stemmed from an increase in internal (i.e., on-topic and episodic) details and had no effect on external (e.g., off-topic or semantic) details. The results point to the efficacy of the specificity induction for isolating episodic processes involved in remembering the past and imagining the future even when a nonepisodic task requires generative search.

  19. Following Sadra in the Realm of Imagination and Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Piravivanak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Imagination and death are two mysterious areas of the truth that serve as a buffer zone between sense and reason, world and afterworld. By imagination, we mean imaginary forms, the world of imagination and faculty of imagination. With faculty of imagination, man in the world is able to imagine the transcendental truths and meaning in guise of appropriate imaginary forms, given that imagination relates itself to higher foundation of Being, not to the common sense.Death, which is a buffer zone between the world and afterworld, enables man to observe ideal truths. Abundance of paradise graces is realized through imagination according to the will of paradise people in the ideal world which is the field of spiritualization of bodies and corporealization of spirits.Death and imagination are transcendence from the sensual and entering the abstraction of limbo, from a lower to a higher stage. Then, man reaches an openness in the realm of death and imagination which can never be grasped in sensual stage. Art , the field of imagination , is a death toward divine Beauty. Sadra, in the 7th volume of Asfar Arbae, believes that chaste love of artists helps them gain a clear mind, compassionate spirit and fine view that develop a beauty which is manifestation of divine Beauty.In fact, the artist’s imaginary forms are medium of transcendence to the name of Allah. Then, art, in its original sense, is the death of whatever than God and the manifestation of God’s beauty.

  20. Musical expertise and the ability to imagine loudness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Laura; Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    Most perceived parameters of sound (e.g. pitch, duration, timbre) can also be imagined in the absence of sound. These parameters are imagined more veridically by expert musicians than non-experts. Evidence for whether loudness is imagined, however, is conflicting. In music, the question of whether loudness is imagined is particularly relevant due to its role as a principal parameter of performance expression. This study addressed the hypothesis that the veridicality of imagined loudness improves with increasing musical expertise. Experts, novices and non-musicians imagined short passages of well-known classical music under two counterbalanced conditions: 1) while adjusting a slider to indicate imagined loudness of the music and 2) while tapping out the rhythm to indicate imagined timing. Subtests assessed music listening abilities and working memory span to determine whether these factors, also hypothesised to improve with increasing musical expertise, could account for imagery task performance. Similarity between each participant's imagined and listening loudness profiles and reference recording intensity profiles was assessed using time series analysis and dynamic time warping. The results suggest a widespread ability to imagine the loudness of familiar music. The veridicality of imagined loudness tended to be greatest for the expert musicians, supporting the predicted relationship between musical expertise and musical imagery ability.

  1. Musical Expertise and the Ability to Imagine Loudness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Laura; Bailes, Freya; Dean, Roger T.

    2013-01-01

    Most perceived parameters of sound (e.g. pitch, duration, timbre) can also be imagined in the absence of sound. These parameters are imagined more veridically by expert musicians than non-experts. Evidence for whether loudness is imagined, however, is conflicting. In music, the question of whether loudness is imagined is particularly relevant due to its role as a principal parameter of performance expression. This study addressed the hypothesis that the veridicality of imagined loudness improves with increasing musical expertise. Experts, novices and non-musicians imagined short passages of well-known classical music under two counterbalanced conditions: 1) while adjusting a slider to indicate imagined loudness of the music and 2) while tapping out the rhythm to indicate imagined timing. Subtests assessed music listening abilities and working memory span to determine whether these factors, also hypothesised to improve with increasing musical expertise, could account for imagery task performance. Similarity between each participant’s imagined and listening loudness profiles and reference recording intensity profiles was assessed using time series analysis and dynamic time warping. The results suggest a widespread ability to imagine the loudness of familiar music. The veridicality of imagined loudness tended to be greatest for the expert musicians, supporting the predicted relationship between musical expertise and musical imagery ability. PMID:23460791

  2. Musical expertise and the ability to imagine loudness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bishop

    Full Text Available Most perceived parameters of sound (e.g. pitch, duration, timbre can also be imagined in the absence of sound. These parameters are imagined more veridically by expert musicians than non-experts. Evidence for whether loudness is imagined, however, is conflicting. In music, the question of whether loudness is imagined is particularly relevant due to its role as a principal parameter of performance expression. This study addressed the hypothesis that the veridicality of imagined loudness improves with increasing musical expertise. Experts, novices and non-musicians imagined short passages of well-known classical music under two counterbalanced conditions: 1 while adjusting a slider to indicate imagined loudness of the music and 2 while tapping out the rhythm to indicate imagined timing. Subtests assessed music listening abilities and working memory span to determine whether these factors, also hypothesised to improve with increasing musical expertise, could account for imagery task performance. Similarity between each participant's imagined and listening loudness profiles and reference recording intensity profiles was assessed using time series analysis and dynamic time warping. The results suggest a widespread ability to imagine the loudness of familiar music. The veridicality of imagined loudness tended to be greatest for the expert musicians, supporting the predicted relationship between musical expertise and musical imagery ability.

  3. Robotic art, culture and cultural imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romic, Bojana

    2015-01-01

    In the recent years there has been an ongoing debate about the notion and (possible) function of robotic culture; with the development of the new generation of drones, as well as the advancement in social and health robotics, questions about robot culture seem to open a variety of discussions...... – beginning with the inquiry of how can we grasp the notion of culture, as an umbrella term for the range of habitual and technological practices, in relation to equally heterogeneous field of robotics. This article aims to accentuate the importance of cultural imagination of robots in situating the robotic...... research, observing it 'as a mixed register of fantasy and an actual practice' (Kakoudaki, 2007). The emphasis will be put on the robotic art which, I argue, is in the fluid state of exchange with other areas of robotic research, equally benefiting from the larger context of cultural imagination of robots...

  4. Expanding Policy Imagination in Political Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    Much of the literature in political economy seeks to capture an essential insight into the evolution of political and economic systems to provide a foundation for policy advice. This article suggests that attempts to nut out the kernels of change often restrict rather than expand policy imagination...... capacity to see political, social, and economic changes that do not conform to conventional theories, as well as distorting our understanding of how the contemporary world works. What policymakers want, more than prediction or recitation of conventional theories, is context to understand how policy can...... be implemented. Historical sociology provides a way to generate information about contextual constellations through two "tonics": intentional rationality and social mechanisms. With the assistance of these tonics, historical sociology widens political economy's policy imagination....

  5. The Classification and Indexing of Imaginative Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Rune

    2005-01-01

    that the usefulness of classification and indexing alike are still being restricted by some old romantic and objectivistic, or even positivistic, ideas and ideals. In order to argue that point the paper firstly re-examines the classification of imaginative literature in early editions of the Dewey Decimal...... Classification, then analyzes the main structures in the modern classification and indexing in the Library of Congress and in the Danish Bibliographic Centre. It is concluded that the classification of imaginative literature not has changed very much since the days of Dewey and that the indexing largely reflects...... only the most obvious aspects of the books. Finally, it is proposed that the inclusion of a note in the representation might be able to incorporate significant aspects of the works that neither the classification nor the indexing are designed to handle....

  6. Transports of delight how technology materializes human imagination

    CERN Document Server

    Hancock, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This inspiring book shows how the spiritual side of life, with its thoughts, feelings, and aspirations, is intimately bound up with our material technologies. From the wonder of Gothic Cathedrals, to the quiet majesty of lighter than air flight, to the ultimate in luxury of the north Atlantic steamers, Peter Hancock explores how these sequential heights of technology have enabled our dreams of being transported to new and uncharted realms to become reality. Sometimes literally, sometimes figuratively, technology has always been there to make material the visions of our imagination. This book shows how this has essentially been true for all technologies from Stonehenge to space station. But technology is far from perfect. Indeed, the author argues here that some of the most public and tragic of its failures still remain instructive, emblematic, and even inspiring. He reports on examples such as a Cathedral of the Earth (Beauvais), a Cathedral of the Seas (Titanic), and a Cathedral of the Air (Hindenburg) and t...

  7. Weaving with the world: Winnicott's re-imagining of reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Dodi

    2012-01-01

    For Winnicott, at the root of psychic life is primary creativity from which meaningfulness emerges spontaneously. One non-psychoanalytic source of Winnicott's view can be found in the work of the English romantic poets Wordsworth and Coleridge. Winnicott discovered in these poets kindred spirits who deepened his appreciation of the delicate area between what is perceived and what conceived. The author suggests one way to read Winnicott's theory of primary creativity is as a re-imagining of what it means to have contact with reality. For Winnicott, the emphasis is less on conflict between pleasure and reality and more on contrast between two different kinds of relationship with reality as it becomes increasingly external.

  8. Failures of Imagination: Disability and the Ethics of Selective Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniewicka, Marta

    2015-10-01

    The article addresses the problem of disability in the context of reproductive decisions based on genetic information. It poses the question of whether selective procreation should be considered as a moral obligation of prospective parents. To answer this question, a number of different ethical approaches to the problem are presented and critically analysed: the utilitarian; Julian Savulescu's principle of procreative beneficence; the rights-based. The main thesis of the article is that these approaches fail to provide any appealing principles on which reproductive decisions should be based. They constitute failures of imagination which may result in counter-intuitive moral judgments about both life with disability and genetic selection. A full appreciation of the ethical significance of recognition in procreative decisions leads to a more nuanced and morally satisfying view than other leading alternatives presented in the article. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ring-tailed lemurs: a species re-imagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauther, Michelle L; Gould, Lisa; Cuozzo, Frank P; O'Mara, M Teague

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, ring-tailed lemurs have been studied continuously in the wild. As one of the most long-studied primate species, the length and breadth of their study is comparable to research on Japanese macaques, baboons and chimpanzees. They are also one of the most broadly observed of all primates, with comprehensive research conducted on their behaviour, biology, ecology, genetics, palaeobiology and life history. However, over the last decade, a new generation of lemur scholars, working in conjunction with researchers who have spent decades studying this species, have greatly enhanced our knowledge of ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, research on this species has expanded beyond traditional gallery forest habitats to now include high altitude, spiny thicket, rocky outcrop and anthropogenically disturbed coastal forest populations. The focus of this special volume is to 're-imagine' the 'flagship species of Madagascar', bringing together three generations of lemur scholars. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. A Reduction in Delay Discounting by Using Episodic Future Imagination and the Association with Episodic Memory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaochen; Kleinschmidt, Helena; Martin, Jason A; Han, Ying; Thelen, Manuela; Meiberth, Dix; Jessen, Frank; Weber, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Delay discounting (DD) refers to the phenomenon that individuals discount future consequences. Previous studies showed that future imagination reduces DD, which was mediated by functional connectivity between medial prefrontal valuation areas and a key region for episodic memory (hippocampus). Future imagination involves an initial period of construction and a later period of elaboration, with the more elaborative latter period recruiting more cortical regions. This study examined whether elaborative future imagination modulated DD, and if so, what are the underlying neural substrates. It was assumed that cortical areas contribute to the modulation effect during the later period of imagination. Since future imagination is supported by episodic memory capacity, we additionally hypothesize that the neural network underlying the modulation effect is related to individual episodic memory capacity. Twenty-two subjects received an extensive interview on personal future events, followed by an fMRI DD experiment with and without the need to perform elaborative future imagination simultaneously. Subjects' episodic memory capacity was also assessed. Behavioral results replicate previous findings of a reduced discount rate in the DD plus imagination condition compared to the DD only condition. The behavioral effect positively correlated with: (i) subjective value signal changes in midline brain structures during the initial imagination period; and (ii) signal changes in left prefrontoparietal areas during the later imagination period. Generalized psychophysiological interaction (gPPI) analyses reveal positive correlations between the behavioral effect and functional connectivity among the following areas: right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and left hippocampus; left inferior parietal cortex (IPC) and left hippocampus; and left IPC and bilateral occipital cortices. These changes in functional connectivity are also associated with episodic memory capacity. A hierarchical

  11. [The role of imagination in modern medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Heinz

    2004-06-01

    In Renaissance and early modern times, the concept of imagination (Latin imaginatio) was essential for the (natural) philosophical explanation of magic processes, especially in the anthropology of Paracelsus. He assumed that imagination was a natural vital power including cosmic, mental, phychical, and physical dimensions. The Paracelsians criticized traditional humor pathology ignoring their theory of' 'natural magic'. On the other hand, they were criticized by their adversaries as charlatans practicing 'black magic'. About 1800, in between enlightenment and romanticism, the healing concept of, animal magnetism' (Mesmerism) evoked an analogous debate, whether, magnetic' phenomena originated from a real (physical) power (so-called, fluidum') or were just due to fantasy or imagination (German Einbildungskraft). At the end of the 19th century, the French internist Hippolyte Bernheim created-against the background of medical hypnosis (hypnotism') as a consequence of Mesmerism - his theory of suggestion and autosuggestion: a new paradigm of psychological respectively psychosomatic medicine, which became the basis for the concept of, placebo' in modern biomedicine. From now on, all the effects of, alternative medicine' could easily be explained by the, placebo-effect', more or less founded - at least unconsciously - on fraud.

  12. Postmodern imaginative constructivism for STSE understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Christian

    The influences of science and technology on society and the environment (STSE) have been an integral component of the formal educational curricula for four decades, and yet industrialized countries frequently struggle to balance the benefits of science and technology with the social justice and environmental issues inherent to contemporary society. Canadian citizens often fail to connect scientific and technological understandings with the subtle and yet ubiquitous personal, political, cultural, environmental, and social consequences that result from these understandings. This phenomenological research will explore potential discourses of control within education and society that may preclude authentic, contextual, and meaningful understandings of science and technology relative to their significant consequences, and an imaginative adaptation of Egan's Ironic Understanding and McGinn's Foreground and Background Dimensions to imaginatively express an awareness of postmodern STSE understandings. This research is designed to explore student understandings of how the diverse and complex influences of science and technology affect students through postmodern, imaginative, and constructivist photography. Participants demonstrated a limited Ironic Understanding of STSE, a critical awareness of specific modernist influences, increased personal and affective connections to science and technology, and an awareness of the duality of STSE. Participants' photographic artifacts can be utilized to inform teaching and learning strategies in order to purposefully craft curriculum and lesson plan design for personalized and engaging learning opportunities that incorporate students' awareness of STSE.

  13. A linguagem do imaginário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruda, Francimar Duarte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A linguagem do imaginário constitui, hoje, uma questão situada na arena de debates sobre as possibilidades da comunicação. É digna de reflexão essa busca tumultuada de pistas para compreender a forma como os seres lidam com a sua competência comunicativa e as suas frustrações pela não comunicação concreta. Admite-se atualmente, cada vez mais, a necessidade de se desvendarem os mistérios de uma linguagem com base ontológica, deixando antever o prenúncio de um novo paradigma. Este terá que incorporar novas regras num modelo mais amplo e generoso, onde a linguagem simbólica e, portanto, imaginária mostre sua importância e concretude. Este texto pretende percorrer os labirintos dessa proposta mostrando uma comunicação pelo imaginário como con-sentimento e esclarecer alguns de seus pressupostos

  14. The Neurobiology of Imagination: Possible Role of Interaction-Dominant Dynamics and Default Mode Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnati, Luigi F.; Guidolin, Diego; Battistin, L.; Pagnoni, G.; Fuxe, K.

    2013-01-01

    This work aims at presenting some hypotheses about the potential neurobiological substrate of imagery and imagination. For the present purposes, we will define imagery as the production of mental images associated with previous percepts, and imagination as the faculty of forming mental images of a novel character relating to something that has never been actually experienced by the subject but at a great extent emerges from his inner world. The two processes appear intimately related and imagery can arguably be considered as one of the main components of imagination. In this proposal, we argue that exaptation and redeployment, two basic concepts capturing important aspects of the evolution of biological structures and functions (Anderson, 2007), could also be useful in explaining imagery and imagination. As far as imagery is concerned it is proposed that neural structures originally implicated in performing certain functions, e.g., motor actions, can be reused for the imagery of the virtual execution of that function. As far as imagination is concerned we speculate that it can be the result of a “tinkering” that combines and modifies stored perceptual information and concepts leading to the creation of novel “mental objects” that are shaped by the subject peculiar inner world. Hence it is related to his self-awareness. The neurobiological substrate of the tinkering process could be found in a hierarchical model of the brain characterized by a multiplicity of functional modules (FMs) that can be assembled according to different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it is surmised that a possible mechanism for the emergence of imagination could be represented by modulatory mechanisms controlling the perviousness of “modifiers” along the communication channels within and between FMs leading to their dynamically reassembling into novel configurations. PMID:23745117

  15. The Neurobiology of Imagination: Possible Role of Interaction-Dominant Dynamics and Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Francesco Agnati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at presenting some hypotheses about the potential neurobiological substrate of imagery and imagination. For the present purposes, we will define imagery as the production of mental images associated with previous percepts, and imagination as the faculty of forming mental images of a novel character relating to something that has never been actually experienced by the subject but at a great extent emerges from his inner world.The two processes appear intimately related and imagery can arguably be considered as one of the main components of imagination. In this proposal, we argue that exaptation and redeployment, two basic concepts capturing important aspects of the evolution of biological structures and functions (Anderson 2007, could also be useful in explaining imagery and imagination. As far as imagery is concerned it is proposed that neural structures originally implicated in performing certain functions, e.g. motor actions, can be reused for the imagery of the virtual execution of that function. As far as imagination is concerned we speculate that it can be the result of a tinkering that combines and modifies stored perceptual information and concepts leading to the creation of novel mental objects that are shaped by the subject peculiar inner world. Hence it is related to his self-awareness. The neurobiological substrate of the tinkering process could be found in a hierarchical model of the brain characterized by a multiplicity of functional modules (FMs that can be assembled according to different spatial and temporal scales. Thus, it is surmised that a possible mechanism for the emergence of imagination could be represented by modulatory mechanisms controlling the perviousness of modifiers along the communication channels within and between FMs leading to their dynamically reassembling into novel configurations.

  16. IMAGINING THE ABSENT PARTNER - INTIMACY AND IMAGINATION IN LONG-DISTANCE RELATIONSHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iveta Jurkane-Hobein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dominant discourse on relationships in modernity argues for the importance of intimacy, including the intimacy of bodies, for the relationship to be continuous. This raises the question as to how couples that cannot meet face-to-face on a regular basis due to geographical distance maintain intimacy during repetitious non-co-presence. In this article, intimacy is seen as a relational quality that is created and maintained by individuals themselves through practices of intimacy (Jamieson, 2011. The study aims to analyse practices of intimacy in long-distance relationships (LDRs that enable long-distance couples to make their relationship continuous beyond face-to-face encounters. The study is based on 19 in-depth interviews with indi Shrani viduals in Latvia with LDR experience, and argues that the intimacy practices in LDRs trigger imagination. Imagination, in its turn, enables practicing four dimensions of intimacy: embodied, emotional, daily and imagined.

  17. Human milk: a source of more life than we imagine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurink, P.V.; Bergenhenegouwen, van J.; Jimenez, E.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Fernandez, L.; Garssen, J.; Knol, J.; Rodriguez, J.M.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of bacteria in human milk has been acknowledged since the seventies. For a long time, microbiological analysis of human milk was only performed in case of infections and therefore the presence of non-pathogenic bacteria was yet unknown. During the last decades, the use of more

  18. Imagining Rural Audiences in Remote Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia Green

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1979, Australia’s then-Communication Minister Tony Staley commented that the introduction of satellite communications to the bush would “dispel the dis-tance – mental as well as geographical – between urban and regional dwellers, between the haves and the have-nots in a communication society” (Staley 1979: 2225, 2228-9. In saying this, Staley imagined a marginalised and disadvantaged audience of “have-nots”, paying for their isolation in terms of their mental dis-tance from the networked communications of the core. This paper uses ethnographic audience studies surveys and interviews (1986-9 to examine the validity of Staley’s imaginations in terms of four communication technologies: the telephone, broadcast radio, 2-way radio and the satellite. The notion of a mental difference is highly problematic for the remote audience. Inso-far as a perception of lack and of difference is accepted, it is taken to reflect the perspective and the product of the urban policy-maker. Far from accepting the “distance” promulgated from the core, remote audiences see such statements as indicating an ignorance of the complexity and sophistica-tion of communications in an environment where the stakes are higher and the options fewer. This is not to say that remote people were not keen to acquire satel-lite services – they were – it is to say that when they imagined such services it was in terms of equity and interconnections, rather than the “dispelling of distance”.

  19. The exercise of moral imagination in stigmatized work groups

    OpenAIRE

    Roca, Esther

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces the concept of moral imagination in a work context to provide an ethical approach to the controversial relationships between dirty work and dirty workers. Moral imagination is assessed as an essential faculty to overcome the stigma associated with dirty work and facilitate the daily work lives of workers. The exercise of moral imagination helps dirty workers to face the moral conflicts inherent in their tasks and to build a personal stance toward ...

  20. The Barbarian North in Medieval Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Rix, Robert William

    This book examines the sustained interest in legends of the pagan and peripheral North, tracing and analyzing the use of an ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ legend (Scandinavia as an ancestral homeland) in a wide range of medieval texts from all over Europe, with a focus on the Anglo-Saxon tradition. The pagan...... North was an imaginative region, which attracted a number of conflicting interpretations. To Christian Europe, the pagan North was an abject Other, but it also symbolized a place from which ancestral strength and energy derived. Rix maps how these discourses informed ‘national’ legends of ancestral...

  1. Gangs and a global sociological imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Alistair; Hagedorn, John M

    2018-02-01

    Across the globe, the phenomenon of youth gangs has become an important and sensitive public issue. In this context, an increasing level of research attention has focused on the development of universalized definitions of gangs in a global context. In this article, we argue that this search for similarity has resulted in a failure to recognize and understand difference. Drawing on an alternative methodology we call a 'global exchange', this article suggests three concepts-homologies of habitus, vectors of difference and transnational reflexivity-that seek to re-engage the sociological imagination in the study of gangs and globalization.

  2. Imaginative methodologies in the social sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and reignite social scientific methodology. Imaginative Methodologies challenges the mainstream social science methodological orthodoxy closely guarding the boundaries between the social sciences and the arts and humanities, pointing out that authors and artists are often engaged in projects parallel to those...... of the social sciences and vice versa, and that artistic and cultural productions today do not constitute a specialist field, but are integral to our social reality. The book will be of interest to scholars and students in the social sciences and across the arts and humanities working with questions...... of philosophy of social science, methodology, social theory, creativity, poetics, pedagogy and related topics....

  3. Imagining Garage Start-Ups: Interactive Effects of Imaginative Capacities on Entrepreneurial Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Cheng; Yao, Shu-Nung; Chen, Shi-An; King, Jung-Tai; Liang, Chaoyun

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a structural examination of the interaction among different imaginative capacities and the entrepreneurial intention of electrical and computer engineering students. Two studies were combined to confirm the factor structure of survey items and test the hypothesised interaction model. The results indicated that imaginative…

  4. The Multidimensional Spectrum of Imagination: Images, Dreams, Hallucinations, and Active, Imaginative Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel J.T. Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A theory of the structure and cognitive function of the human imagination that attempts to do justice to traditional intuitions about its psychological centrality is developed, largely through a detailed critique of the theory propounded by Colin McGinn. Like McGinn, I eschew the highly deflationary views of imagination, common amongst analytical philosophers, that treat it either as a conceptually incoherent notion, or as psychologically trivial. However, McGinn fails to develop his alternative account satisfactorily because (following Reid, Wittgenstein and Sartre he draws an excessively sharp, qualitative distinction between imagination and perception, and because of his flawed, empirically ungrounded conception of hallucination. His arguments in defense of these views are rebutted in detail, and the traditional, passive, Cartesian view of visual perception, upon which several of them implicitly rely, is criticized in the light of findings from recent cognitive science and neuroscience. It is also argued that the apparent intuitiveness of the passive view of visual perception is a result of mere historical contingency. An understanding of perception (informed by modern visual science as an inherently active process enables us to unify our accounts of perception, mental imagery, dreaming, hallucination, creativity, and other aspects of imagination within a single coherent theoretical framework.

  5. No imagination effect on boundary extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Margaret P; Multhaup, Kristi S

    2016-01-01

    Boundary extension (BE) occurs when people falsely remember perceiving beyond the edges of a presented scene. Theorists argue that BE occurs because people mistakenly attribute information they have generated to the study stimulus-that is, they make a source memory error. Inspired by this idea, in six experiments we tested whether scene details resulting from explicit imagination would be misremembered as actual visual perceptions, resulting in increased BE as compared with standard instructions. In four experiments, undergraduates completed a BE task with separate study and test blocks; in two further experiments, undergraduates completed a trial-by-trial BE task (N = 290). Half of the participants elaborated on the study pictures (imagined smells and sounds, or what was to the left and right of the scene, or what a photographer would see by zooming in or out). Robust BE was found in all experiments, but none of the elaborations modified the size of BE; therefore, BE is not to be affected by explicit elaboration and may be related to spatial rather than visual imagery ability.

  6. Associative dreaming: reverie and active imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, August J

    2011-02-01

    The idea of countertransference has expanded beyond its original meaning of a neurotic reaction to include all reactions of the therapist: affective, bodily, and imaginal. Additionally, Jung's fundamental insight in 'The psychology of the transference' was that a 'third thing' is created in the analysis, but he failed to demonstrate how this third is experienced and utilized in analysis. This 'analytic third', as Ogden names it, is co-created by analyst and analysand in depth work and becomes the object of analysis. Reverie, as developed by Bion and clinically utilized by Ogden, provides a means of access to the unconscious nature of this third. Reverie will be placed on a continuum of contents of mind, ranging from indirect to direct associative forms described as associative dreaming. Active imagination, as developed by Jung, provides the paradigm for a mode of interaction with these contents within the analytic encounter itself. Whether the analyst speaks from or about these contents depends on the capacity of the patient to dream. Classical amplification can be understood as an instance of speaking about inner contents. As the ego of the analyst, the conscious component, relates to unconscious contents emerging from the analytic third, micro-activations of the transcendent function constellate creating an analytic compass. © 2011, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  7. O imaginal público: prolegómenos a uma abordagem comunicacional do imaginário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Mateus

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho procuramos delinear alguns aspectos que evidenciama dimensão comunicacional do imaginário. Isso significa que precisamos de prestar atenção ao modo como o imaginar colectivo modela a realidade social e como a publicidade colabora nesse processo. Sugerindo uma ligação estreita entre o imaginário, a sociedade e a publicidade, nomeamos “imaginal público” ao conjunto dinâmico, simbólico e complexo de imaginários diversos e heterogéneos quepermeiam as sociedades.

  8. Creativity and Imagination in Autism and Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Jaime; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    1999-01-01

    Three studies are reported that address the often-described impoverished creativity in children with either autism or Asperger syndrome. Findings indicated both groups were more likely to generate reality-based than imaginative ideas. Results support both the executive dysfunction and the imagination-deficit hypotheses for the observed deficiency.…

  9. Young children's imagination in science education and education for sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiman, Cecilia; Lundegård, Iann

    2017-09-01

    This research is concerned with how children's processes of imagination, situated in cultural and social practices, come into play when they invent, anticipate, and explore a problem that is important to them. To enhance our understanding of young children's learning and meaning-making related to science and sustainability, research that investigates children's use of imagination is valuable. The specific aim of this paper is to empirically scrutinize how children's imaginations emerge, develop, and impact their experiences in science. We approach imagination as a situated, open, and unscripted act that emerges within transactions. This empirical study was conducted in a Swedish pre-school, and the data was collected `in between' a science inquiry activity and lunchtime. We gathered specific video-sequences wherein the children, lived through the process of imagination, invented a problem together and produced something new. Our analysis showed that imagination has a great significance when children provide different solutions which may be useful in the future to sustainability-related problems. If the purpose of an educational experience in some way supports children's imaginative flow, then practicing an open, listening approach becomes vital. Thus, by encouraging children to explore their concerns and questions related to sustainability issues more thoroughly without incautious recommendations or suggestions from adults, the process of imagination might flourish.

  10. Female genealogies in André Brink's Imaginings of Sand

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tienie

    Female genealogies in André Brink's Imaginings of Sand. One of the subversive strategies of Brink in Imaginings of Sand (1996) is his rewriting of male history as a female genealogy. Genealogy is the instrument which confers legitimacy and controls the transfer of authority and property through various judicial processes.

  11. Imagination and Politics in Iris Murdoch's Moral Philosophy | Clarke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... how the exercise of moral imagination, as Murdoch conceives it, would seem to be essential to their full and proper recognition. While the discussion is necessarily preliminary in some respects, it should allay any suspicion that Murdoch's moral philosophy is blind to the moral and political importance of the imagination or ...

  12. The role of the imagination in museum visits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The imagination plays an important role in museums, today more than ever. Visitors use their repositories of imagination or repertoires to make sense of their encounters with objects and exhibits. In this article, I argue that this initial meaning making, rather than being the end goal of museum ...

  13. Remembering the past and imagining the future in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacter, Daniel L.; Gaesser, Brendan; Addis, Donna Rose

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated commonalities between remembering past events and imagining future events. Behavioral studies have revealed that remembering the past and imagining the future depend on shared cognitive processes, whereas neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have shown that many of the same brain regions are involved in both remembering the past and imagining the future. Here, we review recent cognitive and neuroimaging studies that examine remembering the past and imagining the future in elderly adults. These studies document significant changes in elderly adults’ capacities to imagine future events that are correlated with their memory deficits; most strikingly, older adults tend to remember the past and imagine the future with less episodic detail than younger adults. These findings are in line with the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis, which holds that that past and future events draw on similar information and rely on similar underlying processes, and that episodic memory supports the construction of future events by extracting and recombining stored information into a simulation of a novel event. At the same time, however, recent data indicate that non-episodic factors also contribute to age-related changes in remembering the past and imagining the future. We conclude by considering a number questions and challenges concerning the interpretation of age-related changes in remembering and imagining, as well as functional implications of this research for everyday concerns of older adults. PMID:22987157

  14. The Effects of Creative Personality and Psychological Influences on Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yuling; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Liang, Chaoyun

    2015-01-01

    Film production involves numerous imaginative tasks. These tasks are closely associated to seeing the film-that-is-to-come through what is currently completed and what can be creatively added. The present study was aimed at examining the effects of both creative personality and psychological variables on the imagination of film majors. The…

  15. Dewey's Notion of Imagination in Philosophy for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleazby, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    The imagination has traditionally been associated with unreality and is commonly thought to be the antithesis of reason. This is a notion of imagination that can be found in Plato's writing and has influenced modern Western epistemology and educational ideals. As such, traditional schooling, which has focused on the cultivation of reason and the…

  16. Exercising the Ecological Imagination: Representing the Future of Place

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Joy

    2013-01-01

    The ecological realities of many communities are desperate but not determined. As teachers inevitably encounter these realities in their communities, they can respond by activating students' imaginations to conceive of better alternatives. Greene (1995) outlined how the imagination has the power to envision alternative realities and better…

  17. Pedagogy of the Possible: Imagination, Autonomy, and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Garold

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores pedagogical practices which can support the role of imagination in foreign language learning. Over the past decade, work on self and identity in motivation research--most notably Norton's (2001) imagined communities and Dörnyei's (2009) L2 motivational self system--has suggested that teachers might foster students' motivation…

  18. The Mediating Effects of Generative Cognition on Imagination Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yuling; Liang, Chaoyun; Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    This study, based in Taiwan, aims to explore what psychological factors influence imagination stimulation of education major students, and what the relationship is between these factors and imagination. Both principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were employed to determine the most appropriate structure of the developed…

  19. Teaching Meanings: Imagination and the Teacher In-Becoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missias, Matthew T.

    2017-01-01

    Imagination--broadly defined here as narratives individuals construct about experience and possibility--is integral to helping people understand their lived experiences. In the context of teacher education, imagination is an indispensable dimension of developing one's self-conception as a teacher, and of defining what is and is not acceptable…

  20. Using the Sociological Imagination to Teach about Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell Trautner, Mary; Borland, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The sociological imagination is a useful tool for teaching about plagiarism and academic integrity, and, in turn, academic integrity is a good case to help students learn about the sociological imagination. ?We present an exercise in which the class discusses reasons for and consequences of dishonest academic behavior and then examines a series of…

  1. "Minding the gap": imagination, creativity and human cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaprat, Etienne; Cole, Michael

    2011-12-01

    Inquiry into the nature of mental images is a major topic in psychology where research is focused on the psychological faculties of imagination and creativity. In this paper, we draw on the work of L.S. Vygotsky to develop a cultural-historical approach to the study of imagination as central to human cognitive processes. We characterize imagination as a process of image making that resolves "gaps" arising from biological and cultural-historical constraints, and that enables ongoing time-space coordination necessary for thought and action. After presenting some basic theoretical considerations, we offer a series of examples to illustrate for the reader the diversity of processes of imagination as image making. Applying our arguments to contemporary digital media, we argue that a cultural-historical approach to image formation is important for understanding how imagination and creativity are distinct, yet inter-penetrating processes.

  2. ‘Such Stuff as Dreams are Made On’: Encountering Clothes, Imagining Selves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosie Findlay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In a personal essay, Ida Hattemer-Higgins describes the discovery of a decrepit store in Athens brimming with designer deadstock from decades past. The clothes she finds therein are the stuff of dreams for any fashion enthusiast, as is the store itself, a dim, forgotten place where garments are concealed like buried treasure under layers of dust, and where the author herself drifts into a state of semi-consciousness. What Hattemer-Higgins describes is the sensual pleasure of finding beautiful clothes, and the future self that she imagines being when she wears them. This article considers the relationship between the garments we wear and the selves we imagine into them in trying them on, buying them, and wearing them in every day life. These modalities are explored through a phenomenological discussion of dress, with reference to Hattemer-Higgins’s essay as well as my own lived experience of dressing.

  3. Are We Alone? The Search for Life in the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2017-01-01

    Each report of liquid water existing elsewhere in the solar system has reverberated through the international press and excited the imagination of humankind. We have come to realize that where there is liquid water on Earth, virtually no matter what the physical conditions, there is life. Dr. Lynn Rothschild, an evolutionary biologist known for her work on life in extreme environments and a founder of the field of astrobiology, tells us about intriguing new data. The prevalence of potential abodes for life in our solar system and beyond, the survival of microbes in the space environment, modeling of the potential for transfer of life between celestial bodies, and advances in synthetic biology suggest that life could be more common than previously thought. Are we truly alone?

  4. The Barbarian North in Medieval Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen-Rix, Robert William

    the disciplines of poetry, history, rhetoric, linguistics, and archaeology. After years of intense critical interest in medieval attitudes towards the classical world, Africa, and the East, this first book-length study of ‘the North’ will inspire new debates and repositionings in medieval studies.......This book examines the sustained interest in legends of the pagan and peripheral North, tracing and analyzing the use of an ‘out-of-Scandinavia’ legend (Scandinavia as an ancestral homeland) in a wide range of medieval texts from all over Europe, with a focus on the Anglo-Saxon tradition. The pagan...... North was an imaginative region, which attracted a number of conflicting interpretations. To Christian Europe, the pagan North was an abject Other, but it also symbolized a place from which ancestral strength and energy derived. Rix maps how these discourses informed ‘national’ legends of ancestral...

  5. Remembering, imagining, false memories & personal meanings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Martin A; Loveday, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    The Self-Memory System encompasses the working self, autobiographical memory and episodic memory. Specific autobiographical memories are patterns of activation over knowledge structures in autobiographical and episodic memory brought about by the activating effect of cues. The working self can elaborate cues based on the knowledge they initially activate and so control the construction of memories of the past and the future. It is proposed that such construction takes place in the remembering-imagining system - a window of highly accessible recent memories and simulations of near future events. How this malfunctions in various disorders is considered as are the implication of what we term the modern view of human memory for notions of memory accuracy. We show how all memories are to some degree false and that the main role of memories lies in generating personal meanings. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Imaginative critique of the contemporary city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Di Masso Tarditti

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we introduce the contributions of different authors to a critique of contemporary urban phenomena. We begin pinpointing both the relevance and the epistemic limits of the city in the frame of the social sciences. We then develop a series of arguments that stress the main limitations of the dominant trend in environmental psychology dedicated to the study of urban phenomena. Consequently, we advocate an interdisciplinary, critique, reflexive and comprehensive approach to the study of the city. Finally, we synthesise the texts composing the monograph. The aim is to provide some materials for an epistemological, theoretical and methodological critique of urban environmental psychology, on the one hand, and to promote the imagination as a powerful and thorough instrument of knowledge, on the other hand.

  7. Geophysics: creativity and the archaeological imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Ferraby

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper article explores archaeology as a creative practice by engaging specifically with the processes and visuals of geophysics. An area of archaeology considered highly scientific, a different way of looking reveals geophysics to be a poetic form of landscape study. The processes used to collect, alter, interpret and visualize visualise the data are creative acts that have parallels with more easily recognizable recognisable arts practices such as painting, drawing or photography. The paper article explores the ideas behind ways of seeing, the archaeological imagination, technologies and process. The section that follows explores the different elements of work and the ways of seeing and thinking they inspire. The paper article ends by showcasing how other arts practices can give alternative perspectives on geophysics and how these can in turn influence fine art.

  8. Imaginal action: towards a Jungian conception of enactment, and an extraverted counterpart to active imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robin S

    2018-04-01

    This theoretical paper considers the fashion in which Jung's psychology radically challenges modern assumptions concerning the nature of subjectivity. With an eye for the clinical implications of Jung's late work, the author introduces the idea of imaginal action. In order to explain what is meant by this, the paper begins by exploring how Jung's thinking demonstrates an underlying bias towards introversion. It is argued that while Jung's interest in synchronicity ultimately resulted in his developing a worldview that might address the introverted biases of his psychology, the clinical implications of this shift have not been sufficiently clarified. With reference to some short examples from experience, the author outlines a conception of relational synchronicity wherein the intrapsychic emerges non-projectively within the interpersonal field itself. Comparing and contrasting these occurrences to the more introverted practice of active imagination, it is claimed that such a notion is implicit in Jung's work and is needed as a corrective to his emphasis on interiority. The author suggests that imaginal action might be conceived as a distinctly Jungian approach to the psychoanalytic notion of enactment. It is also shown how the idea outlined might find further support from recent developments in the field of transpersonal psychology. © 2018, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  9. Mentally walking through doorways causes forgetting: The location updating effect and imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Zachary; Peterson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have documented an intriguing phenomenon whereby simply walking through a doorway causes forgetting (the location updating effect). The Event Horizon Model is the most commonly cited theory to explain these data. Importantly, this model explains the effect without invoking the importance or reliance upon perceptual information (i.e., seeing oneself pass through the doorway). This generates the intriguing hypothesis that the effect may be demonstrated in participants who simply imagine walking through a doorway. Across two experiments, we explicitly test this hypothesis. Participants familiarised themselves with both real (Experiment 1) and virtual (Experiment 2) environments which served as the setting for their mental walk. They were then provided with an image to remember and were instructed to imagine themselves walking through the previously presented space. In both experiments, when the mental walk required participants to pass through a doorway, more forgetting occurred, consistent with the predictions laid out in the Event Horizon Model.

  10. Imagined Affordance: Reconstructing a Keyword for Communication Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nagy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, we reconstruct a keyword for communication—affordance. Affordance, adopted from ecological psychology, is now widely used in technology studies, yet the term lacks a clear definition. This is especially problematic for scholars grappling with how to theorize the relationship between technology and sociality for complex socio-technical systems such as machine-learning algorithms, pervasive computing, the Internet of Things, and other such “smart” innovations. Within technology studies, emerging theories of materiality, affect, and mediation all necessitate a richer and more nuanced definition for affordance than the field currently uses. To solve this, we develop the concept of imagined affordance. Imagined affordances emerge between users’ perceptions, attitudes, and expectations; between the materiality and functionality of technologies; and between the intentions and perceptions of designers. We use imagined affordance to evoke the importance of imagination in affordances—expectations for technology that are not fully realized in conscious, rational knowledge. We also use imagined affordance to distinguish our process-oriented, socio-technical definition of affordance from the “imagined” consensus of the field around a flimsier use of the term. We also use it in order to better capture the importance of mediation, materiality, and affect. We suggest that imagined affordance helps to theorize the duality of materiality and communication technology: namely, that people shape their media environments, perceive them, and have agency within them because of imagined affordances.

  11. Serbian public opinion on child imagination and its correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksić Slavica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Child imagination is considered in developmental theories as a desirable precondition for later creative production, though in everyday use, imagination is viewed as fantasy, unreal, not practical and not important. The topic of interest in this paper is public opinion of imagination as the quality that can be encouraged to learn at home and the factors which influence this opinion. The data for the analysis were collected from the Third and Fourth Wave of World Values Survey. The findings suggest that imagination has a very low status among other child qualities which have to be supported. The increase in interest for imagination in the world and in Europe between the Third and Fourth Wave of the survey can indicate larger compliance with the actual demands of educational reform for democratization of education and encouragement of creativity of the young. Stagnation of child imagination status in the opinion of Serbian respondents is understandable in the framework of social crisis which happened at the time when the survey was conducted. The preference of imagination is positively correlated with respondents' postmaterialist orientation and educational level, but negatively with their age. The implications of findings for nurturing creativity in formative period are discussed. It is concluded that the school is invited to offer special programs to compensate for public opinion effects.

  12. Differential cortical activation during observation and observation-and-imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, H I; Wolkorte, R; Ijzerman, M J; van Putten, M J A M

    2013-09-01

    The activity of the brain during observation or imagination of movements might facilitate the relearning of motor functions after stroke. The present study examines whether there is an additional effect of imagination over observation-only. Eight healthy subjects observed and observed-and-imagined a movement of a hand; 64-channel EEG was used to measure brain activity. The synchronization of the theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-13 Hz) and beta (13-25 Hz) frequency bands was calculated and plotted in topoplots. The temporal changes of the sensorimotor area (C3, C4) and the centro-parietal cortex (Pz) were analyzed in the two experimental conditions. During observation-and-imagination, a significant larger desynchronization (p = 0.004) in the sensorimotor area was found compared to observation-only in all electrodes and frequency bands. In addition, temporal differences were found between observation and observation-and-imagination in the alpha frequency bands. During observation-and-imagination, modulations of EEG rhythms were stronger than during observation-only in the theta, alpha and beta frequency bands and during almost the whole activity fragment. These findings suggest an additive effect of imagination to observation in the rehabilitation after stroke.

  13. The sociological imagination in a time of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Kari Marie

    2018-04-01

    Despite rising calls for social science knowledge in the face of climate change, too few sociologists have been engaged in the conversations about how we have arrived at such perilous climatic circumstances, or how society can change course. With its attention to the interactive dimensions of social order between individuals, social norms, cultural systems and political economy, the discipline of sociology is uniquely positioned to be an important leader in this conversation. In this paper I suggest that in order to understand and respond to climate change we need two kinds of imagination: 1) to see the relationships between human actions and their impacts on earth's biophysical system (ecological imagination) and 2) to see the relationships within society that make up this environmentally damaging social structure (sociological imagination). The scientific community has made good progress in developing our ecological imagination but still need to develop a sociological imagination. The application of a sociological imagination allows for a powerfully reframing of four key problems in the current interdisciplinary conversation on climate change: why climate change is happening, how we are being impacted, why we have failed to successfully respond so far, and how we might be able to effectively do so. I visit each of these four questions describing the current understanding and show the importance of the sociological imagination and other insights from the field of sociology. I close with reflections on current limitations in sociology's potential to engage climate change and the Anthropocene.

  14. Gershwin, Imagination and the Present Day Culture: Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaida Berchi Petrancu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I analyzed George Gershwin’s musical works and the role of imagination in his musical compositions. In his case, imagination is a new product of his mind. This is in accordance with his interests, purposes and cultural backgrounds. Efforts to appreciate his works should be done in classical terms rather than using some new criteria. Failure to follow these criteria could culminate to relativism, as a result of the decreased role of imagination in today’s art. This bias may lead to imitation.

  15. Remembering and imagining alternative versions of the personal past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Jacques, Peggy L; Carpenter, Alexis C; Szpunar, Karl K; Schacter, Daniel L

    2018-02-01

    Although autobiographical memory and episodic simulations recruit similar core brain regions, episodic simulations engage additional neural recruitment in the frontoparietal control network due to greater demands on constructive processes. However, previous functional neuroimaging studies showing differences in remembering and episodic simulation have focused on veridical retrieval of past experiences, and thus have not fully considered how retrieving the past in different ways from how it was originally experienced may also place similar demands on constructive processes. Here we examined how alternative versions of the past are constructed when adopting different egocentric perspectives during autobiographical memory retrieval compared to simulating hypothetical events from the personal past that could have occurred, or episodic counterfactual thinking. Participants were asked to generate titles for specific autobiographical memories from the last five years, and then, during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) scanning, were asked to repeatedly retrieve autobiographical memories or imagine counterfactual events cued by the titles. We used an fMRI adaptation paradigm in order to isolate neural regions that were sensitive to adopting alternative egocentric perspectives and counterfactual simulations of the personal past. The fMRI results revealed that voxels within left posterior inferior parietal and ventrolateral frontal cortices were sensitive to novel visual perspectives and counterfactual simulations. Our findings suggest that the neural regions supporting remembering become more similar to those underlying episodic simulation when we adopt alternative egocentric perspectives of the veridical past. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imagining with the body in analytical psychology. Movement as active imagination: an interdisciplinary perspective from philosophy and neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Ana

    2018-04-01

    This article explores how the body and imagination operate as pathways of knowledge through the use of Movement as Active Imagination in clinical practice. This method activates the transcendent function, thus encouraging new therapeutic responses. A philosophical perspective (Spinoza, Nietzsche, Merleau-Ponty) and some concepts from neuroscience (embodied cognition, somatic markers, image schema, mirror neurons, neuronal plasticity) will accompany us throughout this work, illustrated with a clinical vignette. Three levels of integration: 1) body, 2) body-emotion, 3) body-emotion-imagination are proposed: these mark a progressive sense of articulation and complexity. Finally the relation between creativity and neuronal plasticity will be considered. © 2018, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  17. Dialogic Imagination in the Book of Deuteronomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Polzin

    1984-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the profoundest insights into the syntax of narrative is the complex system of relationships between reporting and reported speech worked out in programmatic form by Voloshinov-Bakhtin in a number of groundbreaking studies (for example, in English translation, Marxism and the Philosophy of Language by V.N. Voloshinov and The Dialogic Imagination by Bakhtin. Interesting literary insights into texts that have been studied and interpreted over centuries and even milennia now await the application by present-day scholars of Bakhtin's theories. The Book of Deuteronomy offers a unique opportunity within the Bible of applying the reported/reporting speech approach of Bakhtin. The entire book of thirty-four chapters consists of a series of reported speeches of Moses framed with only about fifty-six verses by the reporting speech of the Deuteronomic narrator. The dynamic relationship of these two voices in the book provides one with a reading of Deuteronomy that significantly departs from the predominant scholarly view.

  18. Geografias do mundo imaginário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Alegria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Geographies of the imagined world. The idea that Geography ismore about the construction of images of the world than about a given “objective reality” inspired this study of the mental representations of several countries. Among the multiple possible representations of 12 countries (Portugal, France, Norway, Egypt,Mauritania, Mozambique, United States, Mexico, Brazil, China, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, we began by charting their location in a world map as indicated by over 300 respondents with at least high school attendance. Then, the compilation of a vast number of mental images (three per country and respondent led to the definition ofsix general categories that bring together mental images of a similar kind: nature, culture and history, tourism and gastronomy, economy and society, specific places and no answer/wrong answers. In each category, we have highlighted the dominant (most frequentidea. Location, the relative frequency of the no answer/wrong answerscategory and the dominant images for each country all proved significant when it comes to dividing the countries into groups, and serve as indicators of the richness and variety of the mental representations. The study provided answers to some of the original research questions, but leaves many others unanswered.

  19. Ad Oculos. Images, Imagination and Abstract Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cirafici

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The unusual edition of Elements of Euclid released for publishing in 1847 by Oliver Byrne offers the occasion to suggest a few elements for discussion on the uniqueness of the ‘representation’ of geometric-mathematical thinking—and more in general of the abstract thinking—enshrined in its ‘nature of a pure imaginative vision able to connect the intelligible with the tangible’. The purpose is, thus, a reasoning on images and communicative artefacts, that, when articulated, provide different variations of the idea of ‘transcription’ of complex theoretical structures from one language (that of abstract logic to another (that of sensory experience, with a view to facilitate, ease and make more accurate the noetic process. Images able over time to facilitate the understanding of complex and abstract theoretical principles—since able to show them in an extremely concrete way, ad oculos,—and which at some points could reveal the horizons of art interpretation to inscrutable and figurative meaningless formulas.

  20. Recreating African Futures through literary imagination. The newest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recreating African Futures through literary imagination. The newest gender, racial, national and African identities as revealed in Mario Lúcio Sousa's O Novíssimo Testamento (The newest Testament) (Cape Verde)

  1. Moral imagination in simulation-based communication skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruth P

    2011-01-01

    Clinical simulation is used in nursing education and in other health professional programs to prepare students for future clinical practice. Simulation can be used to teach students communication skills and how to deliver bad news to patients and families. However, skilled communication in clinical practice requires students to move beyond simply learning superficial communication techniques and behaviors. This article presents an unexplored concept in the simulation literature: the exercise of moral imagination by the health professional student. Drawing from the works of Hume, Aristotle and Gadamer, a conceptualization of moral imagination is first provided. Next, this article argues that students must exercise moral imagination on two levels: towards the direct communication exchange before them; and to the representative nature of simulation encounters. Last, the limits of moral imagination in simulation-based education are discussed.

  2. THE LIS STUDY (LYUBERTSY STUDY ON MORTALITY RATE IN PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. EVALUATION OF DRUG THERAPY. PART 2. INFLUENCE OF PREVIOUS DRUG TREATMENT ON LONG-TERM LIFE PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate drug therapy received by patients who had survived acute myocardial infarction (AMI in the framework of the AMI register (the “LIS” study and estimate this therapy influence on long-term outcomes of the disease. Material and methods. The total of 961 patients of 1133 enrolled in the “LIS” study , were discharged from hospital. 191 patients had died during follow-up. 632 patients (who had survived and consented to visit out-patient clinic underwent repeated examination (median of follow-up 1.6 [1.0; 2.4] years. Data about treatment before and during AMI were received from patient’s charts; data about treatment after AMI were obtained from out-patient medical records. Results. Before reference AMI only a small number of the patients received the main drug groups (antiplatelet agents, β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, statins, at that ACE inhibitors were prescribed more often than the others. Use of β-blockers and ACE inhibitors before reference AMI significantly improved long-term life prognosis [relative risk (RR 0.70 and 0.66, respectively]. Rate of the main drug groups prescribed in hospital was rather high with the exception of thrombolytics (less than 10%. Thrombolytics, β-blockers and antiplatelet agents prescribed in hospital significantly improved long-term life prognosis of patients (RR 0.42, 0.65 and 0.58 respectively. At the second visit (according to data of out-patient medical records rate of antiplatelet agents, ACE inhibitors, β-blockers and statins prescription exceeded 60%. Conclusion. Very low prevalence of adequate drug therapy preceding AMI determines high mortality rate among survived acute stage of myocardial infarction patients in long-term period.

  3. THE LIS STUDY (LYUBERTSY STUDY ON MORTALITY RATE IN PATIENTS AFTER ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. EVALUATION OF DRUG THERAPY. PART 2. INFLUENCE OF PREVIOUS DRUG TREATMENT ON LONG-TERM LIFE PROGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate drug therapy received by patients who had survived acute myocardial infarction (AMI in the framework of the AMI register (the “LIS” study and estimate this therapy influence on long-term outcomes of the disease. Material and methods. The total of 961 patients of 1133 enrolled in the “LIS” study , were discharged from hospital. 191 patients had died during follow-up. 632 patients (who had survived and consented to visit out-patient clinic underwent repeated examination (median of follow-up 1.6 [1.0; 2.4] years. Data about treatment before and during AMI were received from patient’s charts; data about treatment after AMI were obtained from out-patient medical records. Results. Before reference AMI only a small number of the patients received the main drug groups (antiplatelet agents, β-blockers, ACE inhibitors, statins, at that ACE inhibitors were prescribed more often than the others. Use of β-blockers and ACE inhibitors before reference AMI significantly improved long-term life prognosis [relative risk (RR 0.70 and 0.66, respectively]. Rate of the main drug groups prescribed in hospital was rather high with the exception of thrombolytics (less than 10%. Thrombolytics, β-blockers and antiplatelet agents prescribed in hospital significantly improved long-term life prognosis of patients (RR 0.42, 0.65 and 0.58 respectively. At the second visit (according to data of out-patient medical records rate of antiplatelet agents, ACE inhibitors, β-blockers and statins prescription exceeded 60%. Conclusion. Very low prevalence of adequate drug therapy preceding AMI determines high mortality rate among survived acute stage of myocardial infarction patients in long-term period.

  4. Declaring the Republic of the Moon - Some artistic strategies for re-imagining the Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Frenais., R.

    2014-04-01

    Sooner or later, humans are going back to the Moonwhether to mine it, to rehearse for a Mars mission or to just live there. But how will human activity there reflect what has happened on Earth since the last moon mission, to reflect the diversity and political and social changes that have happened since? Can artists imagine what it would be like to live on the Moon? Artists are already taking part in many scientific endeavours, becoming involved in emerging fields such as synthetic bioloogy, nanotechology, ecological remediation and enthusiastically participating in citizen science. There are already artists in Antarctica. It should be inevitable that artists will sooner or later accompany the next visit by humans to the Moon. But why wait? Artists are already imagining how it would be to live on the Moon, whether in their imaginations or though rehearsals in lunar analogues. In the recent exhibition 'Republic of the Moon' a number of visionary strategies were employed, from the use of earth-moon-earth 'moonbouncing' (Katie Paterson) to the breeding and imprinting of real geese as imagined astronauts. (Agnes Meyer-Brandis). The Outer Space Treaty and the (unsigned) Moon treaty were re-analysed and debates and even small demonstrations were organised protesting (or demanding) the industrial exploitation of the Moon. Fortuitously, China's Chang-e mission landed during the exhibition and the life and death of the rover Jade Rabbit brought a real life drama to the Republic of the Moon. There have been other artistic interventions into lunar exploration, including Aleksandra Mir's First Woman on the Moon, Alicia Framis's Moonlife project and of course the historic inclusion of two artistic artefacts into the Apollo missions, Monument to the Fallen Astronaut (still on the Moon) and the Moon Museum, reportedly inserted by an engineer into the leg of the Lunar Exploration Module. With the worldwide race by the Global Lunar X Prize teams to land a rover independently of any

  5. Rousseau's Imaginary Friend: Childhood, Play, and Suspicion of the Imagination in "Emile"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuffelton, Amy B.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Amy Shuffelton considers Jean-Jacques Rousseau's suspicion of imagination, which is, paradoxically, offered in the context of an imaginative construction of a child's upbringing. First, Shuffelton articulates Rousseau's reasons for opposing children's development of imagination and their engagement in the sort of imaginative play…

  6. Emotions That Facilitate Language Learning: The Positive-Broadening Power of the Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Peter; Gregersen, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    The imagination is powerful, in part, because of the emotions that can be activated by imagining future states. Imagined future states are a key feature of the L2 self-system proposed by Dornyei, and emotion may be the key to the motivational quality of the imagined future self. In particular, this paper focuses on positive anticipated and…

  7. In Search of an Index of Imagination for Virtual Experience Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoyun; Hsu, Yuling; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Li-Jhong

    2013-01-01

    Imagination is a gift to humans, and a creative faculty of the mind. Although early studies in the fields of philosophy and psychology appreciated the value of imagination, little work has been done pertaining to indicators of imagination. This study synthesized early works on imagination carried out between 1900 and 2012 to clarify its meaning…

  8. Memory, Imagination, and Predicting the Future: A Common Brain Mechanism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullally, Sinéad L; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2014-06-01

    On the face of it, memory, imagination, and prediction seem to be distinct cognitive functions. However, metacognitive, cognitive, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging evidence is emerging that they are not, suggesting intimate links in their underlying processes. Here, we explore these empirical findings and the evolving theoretical frameworks that seek to explain how a common neural system supports our recollection of times past, imagination, and our attempts to predict the future. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Artistic Imagination in the Illuminationist Theosophy of Suhrawardi

    OpenAIRE

    F Shafiei; H Bolkharie Ghahi

    2011-01-01

    Sheikhe Eshraq is known in the Islamic civilization as the first theorist of imaginational world. His important idea in Hekmat-al-Eshraq and other works in the proof of a world between lights world and material world as an isthmus (imaginational world or mundus imaginalis) between this world and hereafter or between spiritual world and obvious material world has important and significant effect on the expression of the universe stages in the works of Islamic wisdom such as Hazarate Khams (fiv...

  10. American television fiction transforming Danish teenagers' religious imaginations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that American television fiction with supernatural themes offers Danish teenage audiences a playground for exploring different religious imaginations in a continuous process of internal negotiations; thereby transforming their imaginations. This process of the mediatization...... narratives. This essay presents the findings of an empirical qualitative study of seventy-two Danish teenagers and considers two primary parameters for the case-based reception study: the teenagers' levels of fandom and their connection with institutionalized religion. In other words, how are religious...

  11. Evaluation of child imagination in European cultural-historical context

    OpenAIRE

    Maksić Slavica; Pavlović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Encouraging child imagination is a desirable for developing creativity in youth and adulthood, and creativity is viewed as one of the solutions to the problems the contemporary word is facing. The aim of this paper is to examine the linkage between macro-social factors and evaluation of imagination as a characteristic that should be encouraged in children. For analysis we used data on European countries encompassed by the World Values Study (1999-2004). The results indicate that wealthier and...

  12. Is Moving More Memorable than Proving? Effects of Embodiment and Imagined Enactment on Verb Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, David M; Pexman, Penny M

    2016-01-01

    Theories of embodied cognition propose that sensorimotor information is simulated during language processing (e.g., Barsalou, 1999). Previous studies have demonstrated that differences in simulation can have implications for word processing; for instance, lexical processing is facilitated for verbs that have relatively more embodied meanings (e.g., Sidhu et al., 2014). Here we examined the effects of these differences on memory for verbs. We observed higher rates of recognition (Experiments 1a-2a) and recall accuracy (Experiments 2b-3b) for verbs with a greater amount of associated bodily information (i.e., an embodiment effect). We also examined how this interacted with the imagined enactment effect: a memory benefit for actions that one imagines performing (e.g., Ditman et al., 2010). We found that these two effects did not interact (Experiment 3b), suggesting that the memory benefits of automatic simulation (i.e., the embodiment effect) and deliberate simulation (i.e., the imagined enactment effect) are distinct. These results provide evidence for the role of simulation in language processing, and its effects on memory.

  13. Is Moving More Memorable than Proving? Effects of Embodiment and Imagined Enactment on Verb Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, David M.; Pexman, Penny M.

    2016-01-01

    Theories of embodied cognition propose that sensorimotor information is simulated during language processing (e.g., Barsalou, 1999). Previous studies have demonstrated that differences in simulation can have implications for word processing; for instance, lexical processing is facilitated for verbs that have relatively more embodied meanings (e.g., Sidhu et al., 2014). Here we examined the effects of these differences on memory for verbs. We observed higher rates of recognition (Experiments 1a-2a) and recall accuracy (Experiments 2b-3b) for verbs with a greater amount of associated bodily information (i.e., an embodiment effect). We also examined how this interacted with the imagined enactment effect: a memory benefit for actions that one imagines performing (e.g., Ditman et al., 2010). We found that these two effects did not interact (Experiment 3b), suggesting that the memory benefits of automatic simulation (i.e., the embodiment effect) and deliberate simulation (i.e., the imagined enactment effect) are distinct. These results provide evidence for the role of simulation in language processing, and its effects on memory. PMID:27445956

  14. False memories in schizophrenia? An imagination inflation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammarella, Nicola; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A; Petito, Annamaria; Fairfield, Beth; Bellomo, Antonello

    2010-10-30

    Data showing how schizophrenia patients tend to be more susceptible to false memories have been rather mixed and, as far as we know, no studies have investigated whether patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder are particularly prone to imagination inflation effects, that is, whether repeatedly imagining an action increases the likelihood of remembering the action as having been performed. In this study, a group of patients with psychosis and a group of normal controls were asked to perform or to imagine performing simple action statements one or four times in a single study session. In a test session that occurred 24 h later, participants were instructed to discriminate whether the action statement had been carried out, imagined or whether it was new (a source monitoring task). The primary finding was that patients were more susceptible to source-monitoring errors than controls, especially in terms of considering an imagined action as having been performed. However, both groups showed comparable levels of imagination inflation effects. Results add evidence to the hypothesis that the nature of patients' false memories may be particularly linked to poor use of source-monitoring processes. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Similarities and differences in the default mode network across rest, retrieval, and future imagining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellana, B; Liu, Z-X; Diamond, N B; Grady, C L; Moscovitch, M

    2017-03-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been identified reliably during rest, as well as during the performance of tasks such as episodic retrieval and future imagining. It remains unclear why this network is engaged across these seemingly distinct conditions, though many hypotheses have been proposed to account for these effects. Prior to generating hypotheses explaining common DMN involvement, the degree of commonality in the DMN across these conditions, within individuals, must be statistically determined to test whether or not the DMN is truly a unitary network, equally engaged across rest, retrieval and future imagining. To provide such a test, we used comparable paradigms (self-directed, uninterrupted thought of equal duration) across the three conditions (rest, retrieval, and future imagining) in a within-participant design. We found lower than expected pattern similarity in DMN functional connectivity across the three conditions. Similarity in connectivity accounted for only 40-50% of the total variance. Partial Least Squares (PLS) analyses revealed the medial temporal regions of the DMN were preferentially coupled with one another during episodic retrieval and future imagining, whereas the non-medial temporal regions of the DMN (e.g., medial prefrontal cortex, lateral temporal cortex, and temporal pole) were preferentially coupled during rest. These results suggest that DMN connectivity may be more flexible than previously considered. Our findings are in line with emerging evidence that the DMN is not a static network engaged commonly across distinct cognitive processes, but is instead a dynamic system, topographically changing in relation to ongoing cognitive demands. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1155-1171, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [The dance of death theme. On the cultural erosion of the figure of imagination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski, J

    1999-01-01

    The Dance of Death theme was the most developed figure of imagination of the late Middle Ages. Its sources were not only rich but also mysterious: oriental influence, pagan customs, Christian religion, and the habits of medieval everyday life. The imagery tendency of religious themes and the invention of wood engraving established the Dance of Death theme as a popular form of death imagery. The modern erosion of the Dance of Death theme has two reasons: 1) dying, death and corpses no longer constitute a sensual experience; 2) medical context of death disintegrated the former sacrum which has established ideological horizons of death imagery.

  17. Central Asia in the Iranian geopolitical imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Wastnidge

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This article charts Iran’s relations with Central Asia following the break-up of the Soviet Union in 1991. This event gave Iran a new set of neighbours to the north, and this came at a time when Iran was undergoing changes in the direction of its foreign policy from radical idealistic goals, such as the export of the Islamic Revolution, to more pragmatic aims, including giving priority to its own national interests and pursuing good neighbourly relations. Since 1991, Iran has attempted to develop relations towards the Central Asian states, both bilaterally and through various regional fora. Iran’s actions have been based, in part, on a greater commitment to regionalism that has been evident in Iranian foreign policy since the early 1990s. This has focused on cultivating economic, infrastructural and cultural links with the region, rather than any form of ideological crusade, and has helped reduce Iran’s international isolation. Following a historical contextualisation and explanation of the place that the lands of Central Asia hold in the Iranian geopolitical imagination, the article explores the key concerns of Iran in the region. It will examine Iran’s position on what it perceives as being the key issues shaping its Central Asian diplomacy, namely regional economic cooperation, pipeline politics, the status of the Caspian Sea, security cooperation and cultural diplomacy. This provides a revealing case study of how Iran perceives itself as a vital player in the region, seeking to emphasise the benefits of its geostrategic location, relative stability, and increasing international role following the nuclear deal.

  18. Drawing links between the autism cognitive profile and imagination: Executive function and processing bias in imaginative drawings by children with and without autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Eycke, Kayla D; Müller, Ulrich

    2018-02-01

    Little is known about the relation between cognitive processes and imagination and whether this relation differs between neurotypically developing children and children with autism. To address this issue, we administered a cognitive task battery and Karmiloff-Smith's drawing task, which requires children to draw imaginative people and houses. For children with autism, executive function significantly predicted imaginative drawing. In neurotypically developing controls, executive function and cognitive-perceptual processing style predicted imaginative drawing, but these associations were moderated by mental age. In younger (neurotypically developing) children, better executive function and a local processing bias were associated with imagination; in older children, only a global bias was associated with imagination. These findings suggest that (a) with development there are changes in the type of cognitive processes involved in imagination and (b) children with autism employ a unique cognitive strategy in imaginative drawing.

  19. Translator’s inferential excursions, with imagination in the background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Tokarz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a literary work, signals that trigger reader’s inferential excursions allow the reader’s imagination to identify with and control the represented world. They constitute an important element of sense-generating mechanism. Thanks to imagination, the translator imitates the inferential mechanism of the original on various level’s of the text’s structure, activating the imagination of the reader. The translator’s imagination is bi- or multivalent in having the linguistic-semiotic, literary, and cultural quality. Although it manifests itself in language, it goes beyond the boundaries of language. Imagination is a form of consciousness which has no object of its own, and a medium connecting a specific non-imaginary knowledge with representations. It constitutes a mind faculty shaped on the basis of sensory and mental perception. It is derived from individual principles of perception and cognition data processing. It usually requires a stymulus to activate the capabilities of the imagining subject. As a mind faculty, imagination is based on the mental capability common to all people, which is the ability to create chains of associations.Translator’s respect for inferential excursions in the original text is necessary for retaining the original meaning, regardless of whether they occur on the phonetic-phonological level (as in Ionesco’s The Chairs, or on the level of image-semantic and syntactic relations (as in translation of Apollinaire’s Zone, or on the level of syntax (as in translation of Mrożek’s short stories into Slovenian, or on the level of cultural communication (as in Slovenian translation of Gombrowicz’s Trans-Atlantic.

  20. Children's imagination and belief: Prone to flights of fancy or grounded in reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan D; Ronfard, Samuel; Francioli, Stéphane P; Harris, Paul L

    2016-07-01

    Children ranging from 4 to 8years (n=39) reported whether they could imagine various improbable phenomena (e.g., a person making onion juice) as well as various impossible phenomena (e.g., a person turning an onion into a banana) and then described what they imagined. In their descriptions, children mentioned ordinary causes much more often than extraordinary causes. Descriptions of such ordinary causes were provided more often in relation to improbable (rather than impossible) phenomena. Following these imaginative efforts, children judged if each phenomenon could really happen. To check whether these reality judgments were affected by children's attempts to imagine, a control group (n=39) made identical reality judgments but were not first prompted to imagine each phenomenon. Children across the age range judged that impossible phenomena cannot really happen but, with increasing age, judged that improbable phenomena can happen. This pattern emerged in both the imagination and control groups; thus simply prompting children to imagine did not alter their reality judgments. However, within the imagination group, judgments that phenomena can really happen were associated with children's claims to have successfully imagined the phenomena and with certain characteristics of their descriptions: imagining ordinary causes and imagining phenomena obtain. Results highlight close links between imagination and reality judgments in childhood. Contrary to the notion that young children have a rich imagination that readily defies reality, results indicate that their imagination is grounded in reality, as are their beliefs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Children’s imagination and belief: Prone to flights of fancy or grounded in reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jonathan D.; Ronfard, Samuel; Francioli, Stéphane P.; Harris, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Children ranging from 4 to 8 years (n = 39) reported whether they could imagine various improbable phenomena (e.g., a person making onion juice) as well as various impossible phenomena (e.g., a person turning an onion into a banana) and then described what they imagined. In their descriptions, children mentioned ordinary causes much more often than extraordinary causes. Descriptions of such ordinary causes were provided more often in relation to improbable (rather than impossible) phenomena. Following these imaginative efforts, children judged if each phenomenon could really happen. To check whether these reality judgments were affected by children’s attempts to imagine, a control group (n = 39) made identical reality judgments but were not first prompted to imagine each phenomenon. Children across the age range judged that impossible phenomena cannot really happen but, with increasing age, judged that improbable phenomena can happen. This pattern emerged in both the imagination and control groups; thus simply prompting children to imagine did not alter their reality judgments. However, within the imagination group, judgments that phenomena can really happen were associated with children’s claims to have successfully imagined the phenomena and with certain characteristics of their descriptions: imagining ordinary causes and imagining phenomena obtain. Results highlight close links between imagination and reality judgments in childhood. Contrary to the notion that young children have a rich imagination that readily defies reality, results indicate that their imagination is grounded in reality, as are their beliefs. PMID:27060420

  2. European Locations Dreamed with a Limited Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Donnelly

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: This visual essay develops the idea of the artefact’s ability to suggest, imply or initiate a narrative or string of narrative associations.

             European Locations Dreamed with a Limited Imagination is a series of images of the same quotidian objects composed differently and photographed from a variety of angles. These common, modern, mass-produced objects range from a reel of cotton and a bull-dog clip to a marble and a gold cup-cake case. Individually these mass produced, cheap objects suggest only ‘use-value’. Here, however, they become representative of possible locations. This sensibility is steered further by the use of simplistic text; these objects appear as though they are advertisements for European getaways.

             This essay continues Donnelly's interest in the use of found objects, especially the mass-produced, to create tableaux. Her work is made in the studio over a period of time

  3. The role of moral imagination in patients' decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommetveit, Kjetil; Scully, Jackie Leach; Porz, Rouven

    2013-04-01

    This article reviews recent developments within a number of academic disciplines pointing toward an increasing importance of imagination for understanding morality and cognition. Using elements from hermeneutics and metaphor theory, it works toward a framework for a more context-sensitive understanding of human agency, especially focusing on moral deliberation and change. The analytic framework is used to analyze the story of a patient making tough decisions in the context of prenatal diagnosis. We show how a relatively stable outlook on the world, here called the "baseline of choice," is challenged by unexpected events and how imaginative processes enter into the active creation of a new moral order. The ensuing interpretation is then placed within a broader philosophical landscape. John Dewey's notion of "dramatic rehearsal" is put forward as one particularly promising way of understanding moral imagination, deliberation, and decision-making.

  4. Imagined communities: Banal nationalism in Barcelona “Locutorios”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Feliu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the huge competition that has emerged as a result of the on-going increase in the available ways one can connect to telephone and computer networks, Barcelona call shops, known as “locutorios,” are relatively successful small businesses. As a result of our research using a collective ethnographic fieldwork of “locutorios” in Barcelona, we articulated Michael Billig’s concept of banal nationalism and Benedict Anderson’s concept of imagined community to show that national imagined communities can be found in these public spaces of connection. The remarkable relevance of national identifications in these spaces, which paradoxically symbolize globalization as few other places do, is not only that they occur without apparent conflicts, but they also allow for coexistence and facilitate the emergence of new imagined communities.

  5. Spatial Poetics and the Politics of Imagination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Rosendal

    2017-01-01

    In May 2012, INHEPI—an international network of performance artists—produced a series of experiments with participatory performance. By evoking a range of recurrent spatial-imaginary models, their artistic practice facilitated a bridge between the dream of a postpolitical community and the politi...... and the political interruption of the tacit social structures of modern urban life....

  6. What imagination can teach us about higher mental functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The chapter uses the history of the concept of imagination as example of how psychology creates a normative model of mental processes that affects our understanding of development. Following the traditional hierarchy of psychological functions, with abstract rationality on top, we fail to underst......The chapter uses the history of the concept of imagination as example of how psychology creates a normative model of mental processes that affects our understanding of development. Following the traditional hierarchy of psychological functions, with abstract rationality on top, we fail...

  7. Empathy Examined From Perspectives of Neuroscience and Artistic Imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Michael A; Grossenbacher, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    This response to Ian E. Wickramasekera II's article, Mysteries of Hypnosis and the Self Are Revealed by the Psychology and Neuroscience of Empathy, is addressed from a joint perspective on consciousness comprising two related orientations: neuroscience and artistic imagination. We find that the central importance of empathy to empathic involvement theory (Wickramasekera II, 2015) reflects the pivotal nature of empathy in the brain and in the relational exchange implicit in the psychotherapeutic process, particularly when using art in therapy. We offer a preliminary unpacking of the roles related to key psychological processes, such as imagination, that are implicated in clinical uses of verbal and visual empathic resonance.

  8. Anterior hippocampus: the anatomy of perception, imagination and episodic memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Peter; Maguire, Eleanor A

    2016-03-01

    The brain creates a model of the world around us. We can use this representation to perceive and comprehend what we see at any given moment, but also to vividly re-experience scenes from our past and imagine future (or even fanciful) scenarios. Recent work has shown that these cognitive functions--perception, imagination and recall of scenes and events--all engage the anterior hippocampus. In this Opinion article, we capitalize on new findings from functional neuroimaging to propose a model that links high-level cognitive functions to specific structures within the anterior hippocampus.

  9. Effect of Imagination on Sport Achievements of Novice Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra E. Gorovaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the connection between the use of types of mental imagery by athletes and the level of their imagination. Taking the model of imagery use suggested by K. Martin, S. Moritz and С Hall, the authors used a Russian version of "The Sport Imagery Questionnaire" (SIQ with soccer players 8, 10 and 14 years old. The data shows that subjects with a higher level of imagination are more inclined to use mental imagery in their practice. Age differences in types of imagery usage are shown. The results indicated that mentalimagery training can result in enhanced performance among junior athletes.

  10. The More Vivid the Imagination the Better: The Role of the Vividness of Imagination in Vasoconstriction Training and Vasodilatation Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graef, Julia E; Rief, Winfried; Nestoriuc, Yvonne; Weise, Cornelia

    2017-12-01

    Blood volume pulse biofeedback represents an effective non-pharmacological treatment for migraine. However, the underlying mechanisms of blood volume pulse biofeedback are still unclear. This study investigated the influence of vividness of imagination, private body consciousness, perfectionism, and general self-efficacy on physiological (blood volume pulse amplitude) and psychological (session performance rated by participants and by trainers) success. Changes in skin conductance and skin temperature indicating habituation to training context were examined. Forty-five healthy male participants were randomized to four sessions of vasoconstriction training or vasodilatation training. Hierarchical linear models were estimated. Results showed significant changes of session performance rated by participants (UC = 0.62, p imagination was highly important for both psychological achievement ratings (UC participants  = 1.3, p imagination.

  11. Mathematics and Forms of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severin Schroeder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available According to Wittgenstein, mathematics is embedded in, and partly constituting, a form of life. Hence, to imagine different, alternative forms of elementary mathematics, we should have to imagine different practices, different forms of life in which they could play a role. If we tried to imagine a radically different arithmetic we should think either of a strange world (in which objects unaccountably vanish or appear or of people acting and responding in very peculiar ways. If such was their practice, a calculus expressing the norms of representation they applied could not be called false. Rather, our criticism could only be to dismiss such a practice as foolish and to dismiss their norms as too different from ours to be called ‘mathematics’.

  12. Music, clicks, and their imaginations favor differently the event-based timing component for rhythmic movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravi, Riccardo; Quarta, Eros; Del Tongo, Claudia; Carbonaro, Nicola; Tognetti, Alessandro; Minciacchi, Diego

    2015-06-01

    The involvement or noninvolvement of a clock-like neural process, an effector-independent representation of the time intervals to produce, is described as the essential difference between event-based and emergent timing. In a previous work (Bravi et al. in Exp Brain Res 232:1663-1675, 2014a. doi: 10.1007/s00221-014-3845-9 ), we studied repetitive isochronous wrist's flexion-extensions (IWFEs), performed while minimizing visual and tactile information, to clarify whether non-temporal and temporal characteristics of paced auditory stimuli affect the precision and accuracy of the rhythmic motor performance. Here, with the inclusion of new recordings, we expand the examination of the dataset described in our previous study to investigate whether simple and complex paced auditory stimuli (clicks and music) and their imaginations influence in a different way the timing mechanisms for repetitive IWFEs. Sets of IWFEs were analyzed by the windowed (lag one) autocorrelation-wγ(1), a statistical method recently introduced for the distinction between event-based and emergent timing. Our findings provide evidence that paced auditory information and its imagination favor the engagement of a clock-like neural process, and specifically that music, unlike clicks, lacks the power to elicit event-based timing, not counteracting the natural shift of wγ(1) toward positive values as frequency of movements increase.

  13. Motor planning and performance in transitive and intransitive gesture execution and imagination: Does EEG (RP) activity predict hemodynamic (fNIRS) response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balconi, Michela; Cortesi, Livia; Crivelli, Davide

    2017-05-01

    The interplay between neural structures and processes underlying motor planning and proper movement initiation and guidance is still a matter of debate. The present study aimed at investigating cortical correlates of motor planning and production when execution and imagery of real-life gestures are performed, with an additional focus on potential specificities of meaningful transitive/intransitive gestures. Electrophysiological (Readiness Potential - RP) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) measures were analyzed to investigate the relationship between processes supporting action planning, execution and imagination. Participants were instructed to observe videos presenting various gestures and then to execute or to imagine them. We observed comparable RP before gesture execution and imagination, with a "facilitation effect" of transitive gestures in particular for imagination. Further, while the supplementary motor regions showed similar O 2 Hb profiles during both execution and imagination of transitive/intransitive gestures, premotor and posterior parietal areas showed specificities respectively for execution processes and transitive gesture execution. Finally, regression analyses showed that RP amplitude is a predictive factor of subsequent hemodynamic brain activity during action production. Such predictive role was modulated by both task and gesture type factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Exile, exilic consciousness and the poetic imagination in Tanure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a thematic trajectory, exile constitutes a visible presence in the Nigerian poetic afflatus and imagination. This is sometimes not adequately or sufficiently acknowledged. Increasingly, however, exile and exilic consciousness have continued to occupy a contested and contestable site in literature especially Nigerian poetry.

  15. 'To Think Representatively': Arendt on Judgment and the Imagination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the standpoint of the spectator, I go on to examine their most distinctive features, in particular, the link between judgment, the imagination, and the ability to think 'representatively'. I also examine the philosophical sources of Arendt's theory of judgment, namely, Kant's theory of aesthetic judgment and its criteria of validity.

  16. Imagination et temporalisation chez Kant, Husserl et Richir

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fazakas, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 2 (2016), s. 502-521 ISSN 2067-3655 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ16-00994Y Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : image * imagination * phantasia * schematism * temporalization * presence * present * weilen Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion http://www.metajournal.org/article_details.php?id=278

  17. Science Fiction Handbook, Revised: A Guide to Writing Imaginative Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camp, L. Sprague; de Camp, Catherine C.

    This book provides the general reader with an introduction to the field of imaginative fiction. The first two chapters describe the growth of science fiction from Aristophanes to Asimov and give the history of its parent literature, fantasy. The rest of the book affords the apprentice writer an overview of skills necessary for creating imaginative…

  18. Imagining the Political : Young Women, Participation and the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Imagining the Political : Young Women, Participation and the Crafting of the Political in Egypt. IDRC's Women's Rights and Citizenship (WRC) program initiative is supporting a body of comparative research on whether and how democracy and governance institutions are responding to women's rights and gender equality.

  19. The Thought Experiment: An Imaginative Way into Civic Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnowski, Myra

    2009-01-01

    Thought experiments enable students to think about persistent social issues by drawing on both knowledge and imagination. In this article, the author provides examples of thought experiments found in literature for adults and middle school students, a rationale for doing thought experiments in the classroom, a step-by-step procedure to follow, and…

  20. Human Rights Education: Imaginative Possibilities for Creating Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Monisha

    2015-01-01

    Background/Context: Human rights education has proliferated in the past four decades and can be found in policy discussions, textbook reforms, and grassroots initiatives across the globe. This article specifically explores the role of creativity and imagination in human rights education (HRE) by focusing on a case study of one non-governmental…

  1. Literature and Truth : Imaginative Writing as a Medium for Ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansdown, Richard

    2017-01-01

    In Literature and Truth Richard Lansdown continues a discussion concerning the truth-bearing status of imaginative literature that pre-dates Plato. The book opens with a general survey of contemporary approaches in philosophical aesthetics, and a discussion of the contribution to the question made

  2. Olfactory Imagination and Odor Processing: Three Same-Different Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, E.P.; Stelt, van der O.; Nixdorf, R.R.; Linschoten, M.R.I.; Mojet, J.; Wijk, de R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Do people who claim to have olfactory imagination process odors more efficiently? In three same–different experiments, using all possible combinations of odors and odor names as primes and targets, selected high imagers (n¿=¿12) were faster (±230 ms; P¿

  3. Musical Imagination: Perception and Production, Beauty and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, David J.

    2012-01-01

    In our recently-published book "Musical Imaginations" (Hargreaves, Miell, & MacDonald, 2012), I suggest that the creative aspects of music "listening" have been neglected, and that putting these at the centre of musical creativity (which is usually seen as being manifested in the activities of composition, improvisation and performance) can lead…

  4. William Morris and John Dewey: Imagining Utopian Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman-Moir, John

    2012-01-01

    With strikingly resonance William Morris and John Dewey independently imagined what utopian education might plausibly be. Neither remotely thought of utopia as a perfectly ordered society, but rather as a process. Each understood education functionally in terms of how it fits with art, work, and democracy within a holistic conception of utopia.…

  5. Imagining Instructions: Mental Practice in Highly Cognitive Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Paul

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews recent empirical investigations of imagination or mental practice in highly cognitive, realistic educational domains such as mathematics or learning computer applications. While mental practice has been a standard tool in training schedules devised by sports psychologists for several decades, with its efficacy studied…

  6. Imagining the Political : Young Women, Participation and the ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Imagining the Political : Young Women, Participation and the Crafting of the Political in Egypt. IDRC's Women's ... This project will investigate issues and challenges surrounding women's participation in political decision-making, the judiciary and the public sector in Egypt. And, it will ... Institution. American University in Cairo.

  7. Re-Imagining the Land, North Sutherland, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, A. F. D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on contemporary re-imaginings of the land in North Sutherland that counter global, modernist discourse. One narrative concerns the reinvention of the past; the other concerns the reconstruction of the present. Through both, people create what Edward Said (Culture and Imperialism. Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1994) calls a…

  8. Clouds, Graphs, and Maps: Distant Reading and Disciplinary Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Derek Norton

    2009-01-01

    "Clouds, Graphs, and Maps: Distant Reading and Disciplinary Imagination" examines recent efforts by scholars in rhetoric and composition to account for patterns and trends indicative of the discipline's maturation. Many of these "discipliniographic" appraisals resort, on the one hand, to anecdotal, experience-based accounts or, on the other hand,…

  9. A Hockey Night in Canada: An Imagined Conversation between Theorists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Curtis

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, various methodological issues surrounding the sociological study of sport are explored. Through an imagined dialogue between two graduate students at a hockey game, this work brings together three divergent approaches to social enquiry: Positivist Grounded Theory, Constructivist Grounded Theory, and Actor-Network Theory. This paper…

  10. Imagining the Music: Methods for Assessing Musical Imagery Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Terry; Williamon, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Timing profiles of live and imagined performances were compared with the aim of creating a context-specific measure of musicians' imagery ability. Thirty-two advanced musicians completed imagery use and vividness surveys, and then gave two live and two mental performances of a two-minute musical excerpt, tapping along with the beat of the mental…

  11. Film showing - Higgs: into the heart of imagination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    On 29 April at 7pm Dutch filmmakers, Hannie van den Bergh and Jan van den Berg, will introduce their directorial debut, Higgs: into the heart of imagination in CERN’s Main Auditorium.   This documentary is about the curiousity, passion and imaginative powers of science. Featuring physicists working at CERN, in particular in ATLAS, and filmed over four years, the film-makers have created a cinematic journey into the heart of imagination. They follow Stan Bentvelsen, head of the Dutch research group at CERN, and watch as he prepares his team for the start of the LHC, as well as the scientific competition to find the elusive Higgs particle. The film also features Peter Higgs as he discusses his work from 1964. The directors have created theatre productions and other multimedia projects under the title The Imagination of Invisible Dimensions, which allow for adventurous dialogues between art and science. All are welcome to attend this showing and afterwards there will be a short question...

  12. Just Research in Contentious Times: Widening the Methodological Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    In this intensely powerful and personal new text, Michelle Fine widens the methodological imagination for students, educators, scholars, and researchers interested in crafting research with communities. Fine shares her struggles over the course of 30 years to translate research into policy and practice that can enhance the human condition and…

  13. Student peer reviewers' views on teaching innovations and imaginative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2016-04-01

    Various teaching innovations have been proven effective in promoting students' critical thinking, creativity, problem solving and active learning. However, little attention has been paid to the possibility of including students as peer reviewers to evaluate these innovations in light of imaginative learning. This study explored the perspective of senior students who played the role of the student peer reviewer on three teaching innovations, namely writing poetry, composing songs and creating role-plays in problem-based learning (PBL), specifically in relation to imaginative learning. A focus group interview. Ten senior nursing students who had experienced the conventional PBL approach but not the mentioned teaching innovations were invited to participate in reviewing a video recording of a PBL class using the above teaching innovations with a total of 18 junior year students. Five themes were identified using content analysis: (i) motivation to learn, (ii) increased empathy, (iii) information retention, (iv) development of critical thinking and creativity, and (v) drawbacks of teaching innovations. It is suggested that student peer reviewers should be considered, as they can bring an outsider-learner's views on understanding the impacts of teaching innovations on imaginative learning. A call should be made to invite student peer reviewers on teaching and learning approaches, and more effort should be devoted to promoting an understanding of how imaginative learning can be achieved via teaching innovations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Engaging Social Imagination: The Developmental Work of Wordless Book Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaker, Judith T.; Miller, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The reading process and reading development have been addressed by researchers for decades. As a result we know much about what reading is and how it happens. However, less is known about how reading influences other aspects of children's development, specifically the development of social imagination. To address this, we examined the narrative…

  15. Establishing Sociological Imagination before Blame in Historical Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousalis, Rina

    2017-01-01

    Although finding fault with someone or something is part of human nature, blame is merely a perception. Before assigning blame in the causation of historical events, students should be given the opportunity to look past textbook generalizations and establish sociological imagination, or the ability to recognize history's connection to society and…

  16. Imagination, Playfulness, and Creativity in Children's Play with Different Toys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo????ller, Signe?? Juhl?

    2015-01-01

    Based on a four-month experimental study of preschool children's play with creative-construction and social-fantasy toys, the author examines the in?uence of both types of toys on the play of preschool children. Her comparative analysis considers the impact of transformative play on the development of imagination during play activities and…

  17. The Qualitative Imagination: Neoliberalism, "Blind Drift" and Alternative Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Steven Shane; Wood, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that the non-positivist origins that provided the impetus for the qualitative imagination over the past half century in educational research has undergone subtle, but nevertheless profound change and transformation as neoliberal forms of governmentality have increasingly colonised social and educational research. We examine…

  18. Activation of Imaginal Information on True and False Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sau Hou; Pierce, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the activation of imaginal information on true and false memories. Participants studied a series of concrete objects in pictures or words. The imagery group (n = 96) was instructed to form images and the control group (n = 96) was not instructed to do so. Both groups were then given a standard recognition memory test and…

  19. Imagine That!: Science Fiction as a Learning Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontell, Val

    2003-01-01

    This article, based on a presentation made by the author at the 2003 California Library Association conference, provides examples of how librarians and teachers can use Science Fiction to provide catalysts for discussion in a variety of subjects; teach students how to question intelligently; and stimulate their imaginations, thus motivating them…

  20. Art and Imagination: Reclaiming the Sense of Possibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Maxine

    1995-01-01

    The existential contexts of education reach far beyond the conceptions of Goals 2000 or the appalling actualities of family breakdown, homelessness, violence, and other "savage inequalities." Classroom encounters with the arts can move the young to imagine, extend, and renew. If the arts' significance for growth, inventiveness, and…

  1. Faith and the Literary Imagination: The Educational Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Divided into four parts, the article explores the relationship between literature and faith. The first part examines the connection between literature and the pursuit of truth and the second shows that literature can offer a challenging encounter with different beliefs. Part three examines some examples of the imagination at work in illuminating…

  2. Toward a Moral-Imaginative Pedagogy of Talmudic Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutoff, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a theoretical framework for understanding the possibility of Talmudic stories (as well as other narratives and scenes of interactions among two or more characters) to nurture the growth of the moral imagination as it is expressed in two related but distinct ways. At the intersection of work by educators, literary critics, and…

  3. Globalisation, the Research Imagination and Deparochialising the Study of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingard, Bob

    2006-01-01

    This paper works in dialogue with Arjun Appadurai's paper, "Grassroots globalization and the research imagination" in an attempt to outline some necessary changes in researching education in the multiple contexts of globalisation. The paper provides two narratives as part of this project, which Appadurai calls the…

  4. The Imagined and Real Jerusalem in Art and Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudeau, J.J.W.; Verhoeven, M.C.J.; Weijers, W.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    In The Imagined and Real Jerusalem in Art and Architecture specialists in various fields of art history, from Early Christian times to the present, articulate a variety of cultural, religious and political implications of the visualization of Jerusalem. This collection of essays calls attention to

  5. Doing it Differently: Engaging Interview Participants with Imaginative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We will discuss how the first author successfully used imaginative variation in this way in her study of the erotic experience of bondage, discipline, dominance and submission, and sadism and masochism (BDSM), before considering the usefulness of this technique when applied to areas of study beyond human sexuality.

  6. Go West: Imagining the Oregon Trail. [Lesson Plan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.

    In this lesson plan, students in grades 3-5 compare imagined travel experiences of their own with the actual experiences of 19th-century pioneers on the Oregon Trail. After the 4 lessons students will have: (1) learned about the pioneer experience on the Oregon Trail; (2) compared and contrasted modern-day travel experiences with those of the 19th…

  7. The role of imagination in experiencing natural environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert. Schroeder

    2010-01-01

    The experience of natural environments and places is multifaceted, involving psychological functions such as perception, cognition, memory, emotion, and imagination. Environmental perception and cognition were key topics in early research in environmental psychology. More recently, attention has also been directed to affective dimensions of environmental experience,...

  8. Material souls and imagination in late Aristotelian embryology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Andreas

    2010-04-01

    This article explores some continuities between Late Aristotelian and Cartesian embryology. In particular, it argues that there is an interesting consilience between some accounts of the role of imagination in trait acquisition in Late Aristotelian and Cartesian embryology. Evidence for this thesis is presented using the extensive biological writings of the Padua-based philosopher and physician, Fortunio Liceti (1577-1657). Like the Cartesian physiologists, Liceti believed that animal souls are material beings and that acts of imagination result in material images that can be transmitted by means of medical spirits to the embryo. Moreover, while the Cartesian embryologists accepted such a view in a quite speculative way, one finds penetrating criticism of imagination theories of trait acquisition in the Late Aristotelian tradition. Evidence for this thesis is presented using the no less extensive biological writings of Liceti's contemporary, Emilio Parisano (1567-1643). In conclusion, the Late Aristotelian tradition itself provides the theoretical tools for excising immaterial formative forces from embryology and at the same time evinces a much more acute sense for the problems inherent in imagination theories of trait acquisition than the Cartesian tradition.

  9. The Sociological Imagination -- A Basis for Teaching of Introductory Sociology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1974-01-01

    The problem in teaching introductory sociology is to determine what can be extracted from the sociological tradition and the current crisis in sociology that will help students lead more meaningful lives. The answer lies in kindling the sociological imagination by the development of a sociology curriculum based upon the study of contemporary youth…

  10. Unwritten: (Re)Imagining FE as Social Purpose Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycroft, Lou

    2018-01-01

    Drawing on stories from ten years of social purpose teacher education in the UK, this paper assumes that the future of further education is still unwritten. It illustrates complex and workable ideas via a theorised sketch of the fictional Bee Learning Programme, an imagined education setting of the future. The narrative that follows is designed to…

  11. Classification of Real and Imagined Sounds in Early Visual Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Vetter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Early visual cortex has been thought to be mainly involved in the detection of low-level visual features. Here we show that complex natural sounds can be decoded from early visual cortex activity, in the absence of visual stimulation and both when sounds are actually displayed and when they are merely imagined. Blindfolded subjects listened to three complex natural sounds (bird singing, people talking, traffic noise; Exp. 1 or received word cues (“forest”, “people”, “traffic”; Exp 2 to imagine the associated scene. fMRI BOLD activation patterns from retinotopically defined early visual areas were fed into a multivariate pattern classification algorithm (a linear support vector machine. Actual sounds were discriminated above chance in V2 and V3 and imagined sounds were decoded in V1. Also cross-classification, ie, training the classifier to real sounds and testing it to imagined sounds and vice versa, was successful. Two further experiments showed that an orthogonal working memory task does not interfere with sound classification in early visual cortex (Exp. 3, however, an orthogonal visuo-spatial imagery task does (Exp. 4. These results demonstrate that early visual cortex activity contains content-specific information from hearing and from imagery, challenging the view of a strict modality-specific function of early visual cortex.

  12. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in Supernatural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    2010-01-01

    these representations, the show challenges our imaginations. These transformations of banal religious representations in Supernatural come about in three ways: (1) as a mainstreaming of occulture, (2) through connecting banal religious elements to existential themes, and (3) through playful intertextuality. The series...

  13. Renegotiating religious imaginations through transformations of "banal religion" in Supernatural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Line Nybro

    these representations, the show challenges our imaginations. These transformations of banal religious representations in Supernatural come about in three ways: (1) as a mainstreaming of occulture, (2) through connecting banal religious elements to existential themes, and (3) through playful intertextuality. The series...

  14. Test of Creative Imagination: Validity and Reliability Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogan, Aysun; Ari, Meziyet; Gonen, Mubeccel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate validity and reliability of the test of creative imagination. This study was conducted with the participation of 1000 children, aged between 9-14 and were studying in six primary schools in the city center of Denizli Province, chosen by cluster ratio sampling. In the study, it was revealed that the…

  15. Democratising the Research Imagination: Globalising Knowledge about HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Debbie; Boden, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    This paper problematises globalisation and the democratisation of the research imagination, highlighting the potentials for harm and good. We do so, first, by exploring two philosophical/epistemological issues: the definition of "knowledge" and the role of "research" in knowledge creation. The paper then considers some of…

  16. Reorganization of large-scale cognitive networks during automation of imagination of a complex sequential movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, C; De Greef, N; Manto, M; Jissendi, P; Nioche, C; Habas, C

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the functional reconfiguration of the cerebral networks involved in imagination of sequential movements of the left foot, both performed at regular and fast speed after mental imagery training. Thirty-five volunteers were scanned with a 3T MRI while they imagined a sequence of ankle movements (dorsiflexion, plantar flexion, varus and valgus) before and after mental practice. Subjects were distributed in two groups: the first group executed regular movements whereas the second group made fast movements. We applied the general linear model (GLM) and model-free, exploratory tensorial independent component analytic (TICA) approaches to identify plastic post-training effects on brain activation. GLM showed that post-training imagination of movement was accompanied by a dual effect: a specific recruitment of a medial prefronto-cingulo-parietal circuit reminiscent of the default-mode network, with the left putamen, and a decreased activity of a lateral fronto-parietal network. Training-related subcortical changes only consisted in an increased activity in the left striatum. Unexpectedly, no difference was observed in the cerebellum. TICA also revealed involvement of the left executive network, and of the dorsal control executive network but no significant differences were found between pre- and post-training phases. Therefore, repetitive motor mental imagery induced specific putamen (motor rehearsal) recruitment that one previously observed during learning of overt movements, and, simultaneously, a specific shift of activity from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (attention, working memory) to the medial posterior parietal and cingulate cortices (mental imagery and memory rehearsal). Our data complement and confirm the notion that differential and coupled recruitment of cognitive networks can constitute a neural marker of training effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Imagineering in Education: A Framework to Enhance Students' Learning Performance and Creativity in Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsook, Prachyanun; Utakrit, Nattakant; Clayden, Judy

    2014-01-01

    Imagination is a powerful engine that can drive people to bring their ideas, dreams, and desires to reality. The imagination constructs stories that lead people to create. Combining imagination with engineering knowledge creates inventions which initially might seem fantastic. The authors provide in this article a brief overview of a successful…

  18. Active-imaginal exposure: examination of a new behavioral treatment for cynophobia (dog phobia)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rentz, T.O.; Powers, M.B.; Smits, J.A.J.; Cougle, J.R.; Telch, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate exposure-based treatments for cynophobia (dog phobia) and to test a newly developed hybrid imaginal exposure treatment that we have named active imaginal exposure. The treatment introduces an in vivo coping component to imaginal exposure whereby the patient

  19. Examination of Athletes' Anxiety, Motivation, Imagination Value in Competitions with Different Severity Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallayici, Mustafa; Eroglu Kolayis, Ipek; Kesilmis, Inci; Kesilmis, Mehmet Melih

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine athletes' anxiety, motivation, and imagination value in competitions with different severity level. The research was conducted on swimming athlete in elite level 18 female and 19 male totally 37. To measure the level of imagination, imagine inventory in sports and to measure trait anxiety levels STAI were…

  20. Hypnotic suggestibility predicts the magnitude of the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect in a non-hypnotic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parris, Benjamin A; Dienes, Zoltan

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated how the magnitude the word blindness suggestion effect on Stroop interference depended on hypnotic suggestibility when given as an imaginative suggestion (i.e. not post-hypnotic suggestion) and under conditions in which hypnosis was not mentioned. Hypnotic suggestibility is shown to be a significant predictor of the magnitude of the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect under these conditions. This is therefore the first study to show a linear relationship between the imaginative word blindness suggestion effect and hypnotic suggestibility across the whole hypnotizability spectrum. The results replicate previous findings showing that highs respond to the word blindness suggestion to a greater extent than lows but extend previous work by showing that the advantage for those higher on the hypnotizability spectrum occurs even in a non-hypnotic context. Negative attitudes about hypnosis may not explain the failure to observe similar effects of the word blindness suggestion in less hypnotizable individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intelligent and interactive computer image of a nuclear power plant: The ImagIn project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubensack, D.; Malvache, P.; Valleix, P.

    1998-01-01

    The ImagIn project consists in a method and a set of computer tools apt to bring perceptible and assessable improvements in the operational safety of a nuclear plant. Its aim is to design an information system that would maintain a highly detailed computerized representation of a nuclear plant in its initial state and throughout its in-service life. It is not a tool to drive or help driving the nuclear plant, but a tool that manages concurrent operations that modify the plant configuration in a very general was (maintenance for example). The configuration of the plant, as well as rules and constraints about it, are described in a object-oriented knowledge database, which is built using a generic ImagIn meta-model based on the semantical network theory. An inference engine works on this database and is connected to reality through interfaces to operators and captors on the installation; it verifies constantly in real-time the consistency of the database according to its inner rules, and reports eventual problems to concerned operators. A special effort is made on interfaces to provide natural and intuitive tools (using virtual reality, natural language, voice recognition and synthesis). A laboratory application on a fictive but realistic installation already exists and is used to simulate various tests and scenarii. A real application is being constructed on Siloe, an experimental reactor of the CEA. (author)

  2. The Existence of Alternative Framework in Students' Scientific Imagination on the Concept of Matter at Submicroscopic Level: Macro Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nurdiana; Surif, Johari

    2015-01-01

    This study is conducted with the purpose of identifying the alternative framework contained in students' imagination on the concept of matter at submicroscopic level. Through the design of purposive sampling techniques, a total of 15 students are interviewed to obtain the data. Data from analysis document is utilized to strengthen the interview.…

  3. Life in space, space in life: Nazi topographies, geographical imaginations, and Lebensraum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giaccaria, Paolo; Minca, C.

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the pivotal role the notion of Lebensraum played within the Nazi spatial mindscape. Tracing the complex and contradictory genealogies of Lebensraum, we note how geographers’ engagement with Geopolitik has only made modest reference to the role Lebensraum played in shaping the

  4. Interrogating Biosensing in Everyday Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrill, Nick; Wong, Richmond; Howell, Noura

    2017-01-01

    This workshop seeks to expand our understanding and imaginations regarding the possible roles biosensors (sensors measuring humans) can-and should-play in everyday life. By applying a critical lens to issues of interpretation, representation, and experience around biosensing and biosensors, we ai...... to shape research agendas within DIS, and generate new recommendations for designers working with biosensors or their data....

  5. Arguing over Life and Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageotte, Nichole; Buck, Gayle; Kirk, Holly

    2018-01-01

    Imagine saving just one of the 23,000 species threatened with extinction. Students studying endangered species in a general life science course faced the decision of which species to save as a summative assignment in a unit on scientific explanation and argumentation. They used the claim, evidence, and reasoning (CER) framework in which students…

  6. From memory to prospection: The overlapping and the distinct components between remembering and imagining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin eZheng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on past and reflecting on future events are two fundamentally different processes, each traveling in the opposite direction of the other through conceptual time. But what we are able to imagine seems to be constrained by what we have previously experienced, suggesting a close link between memory and prospection. Recent theories suggest that recalling the past lies at the core of imagining and planning for the future. The existence of this link is supported by evidence gathered from neuroimaging, lesion, and developmental studies. Yet it is not clear exactly how the novel episodes people construct in their sense of the future develop out of their historical memories. There must be intermediary processes that utilize memory as a basis on which to generate future oriented thinking. Here, we review studies on goal-directed processing, associative learning, cognitive control, and creativity and link them with research on prospection. We suggest that memory cooperates with additional functions like goal-directed learning to construct and simulate novel events, especially self-referential events. The coupling between memory-related hippocampus and other brain regions may underlie such memory- based prospection. Abnormalities in this constructive process may contribute to mental disorders such as schizophrenia.

  7. The importance of imagination (or lack thereof) in artificial, human and quantum decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Karl

    2016-01-13

    Enlarging upon experiments and analysis that I did jointly some years ago, in which artificial (symbolic, neural-net and pattern) learning and generalization were compared with that of humans, I will emphasize the role of imagination (or lack thereof) in artificial, human and quantum cognition and decision-making processes. Then I will look in more detail at some of the 'engineering details' of its implementation (or lack thereof) in each of these settings. In other words, the question posed is: What is actually happening? For example, we previously found that humans overwhelmingly seek, create or imagine context in order to provide meaning when presented with abstract, apparently incomplete, contradictory or otherwise untenable decision-making situations. Humans are intolerant of contradiction and will greatly simplify to avoid it. They can partially correlate but do not average. Human learning is not Boolean. These and other human reasoning properties will then be taken to critique how well artificial intelligence methods and quantum mechanical modelling might compete with them in decision-making tasks within psychology and economics. © 2015 The Author(s).

  8. Pretend play enhances creativity and imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    shallu Sansanwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature to examine the themes that aims to find the association of pretend play with creativity and how pretend play is predictive of later life creativity. The developmental trends and issues of the play and creativity are also examined to find if any age and gender differences are there in developmental patterns of creativity through pretend play. The review of literature made it clear that pretend play uses cognitive processes that are involved in creative thinking. So pretend play is a predictor of creativity. Results of studies till date also indicated that creativity though develops in continuum has periods of lags and spurts throughout the childhood to adolescence. Gender differences have also been found in girls and boys play behaviors as girls are found to be engaged more in realistic role-playing than boys of their age in preschools. Later girls are found to excel boys in verbal and fluency tasks of creativity in early adolescence. Keywords: Pretend play, Creativity, Cognitive Processes, Developmental patterns, Gender differences and Review

  9. Moving forth: Imagining physiotherapy education differently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barradell, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Contemporary and future physiotherapists are, and will be, presented with challenges different to their forebears. Yet, physiotherapy tends to remain tied to historical ways of seeing the world: these are passed down to generations of physiotherapy graduates. These historical perspectives privilege particular knowledge and skills so that students gain competency for graduation. However, contemporary practice is inherently more complex than the focus on knowledge and skills would have us believe. Professional life requires students to develop the capability to deal with uncertain and diverse futures. This paper argues that physiotherapy needs to think differently about entry-level education; the focus on knowledge and competencies that has been the mainstay in physiotherapy education must now be understood in the context of an education that embraces knowing, doing, being. Two educational frameworks are offered in support of this argument - threshold concepts and ways of thinking and practicing (WTP). Taken together, these ideas can assist physiotherapy to think in fresh ways about disciplinary learning. Threshold concepts and WTP help to understand the nature of a discipline: its behaviors, culture, discourses, and methods. By interrogating the discursive aspects of the discipline, physiotherapy educators will be better placed to provide more relevant preparation for practice.

  10. Imaginative Experience: A Narrative-Dialogic Ethnography of the Community Who Adores Its Idol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eka Ardianto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Managing customer loyalty becomes an important activity in marketing management. One of the reasons is that loyal consumers tend to make good financial performances to producer. Unfortunately, gaining a loyal customer is not a trivial activity since there are gaps to understand consumer experience comprehensively. To fulfill the gaps, this article explores imaginative experience of the community who adores its idol in the light of cultural perspective. The members of the community who adores its idol experience the imaginative experience. The author argues that those phenomena are cultural perspective, because they are meaningful to the members. Through narrative-dialogic ethnography, the author builds the concept of imaginative experience that through the imaginative media, the members do narrative-dialogic between “the realm of areal” and “the realm of afotik” then activate the imaginative relations in “the realm of aktinik”. Every member constructs its imaginative relations into imaginative constructions formed in a personal story. Managing imaginative experience could benefit the company. It can be the “Imaginative Experience Management” (IEM that accommodates imaginative consumers’ experiences with the company’s products deeply and sustainably through managing the story of its consumers’ imaginative experiences. It can also be linked to the customer loyalty programs. In this matter, IEM should be integrated with brand management.

  11. Life as an Ex-Physicist on Wall Street

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derman, Emanuel

    2001-06-01

    Financial theory looks deceptively like physics because of the techniques it uses. But physics models deal with the relatively unchanging parameters of the external world; in contrast, the parameters of financial theory are people's current estimates of, and sentiments about, future behavior. Life as a Ph.D. on Wall St is therefore very different from the way most people in academic life imagine it to be. For most of us, most of the time, it involves neither finding miraculous and previously undiscovered arbitrages, nor doing boring mindless programming. Instead, it demands an interdisciplinary mix of inventive computation, applied mathematics, financial understanding, self-education and educating others, applied in a hectic environment, to help build and maintain a business. Financial modeling as a practitioner means suffering many interruptions when you want to think quietly, and making many pragmatic compromises dictated by constraints on time and resources. It also means a stimulating and lively environment, using your imagination, avoiding complexity, and always trying to bridge the gap between analysis and intuition (yours and others).

  12. Exploring the role of repetition and sensory elaboration in the imagination inflation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ayanna K; Bulevich, John B; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2003-06-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine whether a misattribution of specific characteristics or a misattribution of global familiarity underlies false memories as assessed through imagination inflation. Using the paradigm developed by Goff and Roediger (1998), we found that the proportion of false memories increased with repeated imagination, replicating the imagination inflation effect. False memories developed through imagination were greatest in conditions that forced participants to include sensory detail in their imaginings. Finally, conscious recollection more often accompanied false memories in perceptually detailed imagination conditions, whereas feelings of familiarity more often accompanied false memories in conditions that lacked sensory cues. These results suggest that imagination that contains more perceptual information leads to more elaborate memory representations containing specific characteristics that can be confused with actually performed actions. Confusion based on these representations, as opposed to confusion based on processing fluency, is more likely to lead to false memories.

  13. An Imagineering Approach to the Future of Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, R.

    It is widely accepted that space is becoming a more congested, contested, and competitive domain. This drives a need not only to track space objects but also to have a clear and constant picture of what the objects are and how they are being operated. Space situational awareness, like most mission areas, suffers from the need to maintain aging, increasingly fragile legacy infrastructure and at the same time acquire increasingly complex materiel solutions that often fall behind schedule and over budget. Imagineering, the name for both the process by which Disney creates new theme park experiences and the corporate division that does the work, offers some new ways of thinking about balancing these needs and providing better bang-for-the-buck. Through a series of personal anecdotes that illustrate key concepts of Imagineering, this paper supports a conclusion that a new way of thinking about the space situational awareness mission area will be needed to ensure mission success moving forward.

  14. Machado de Assis, moral imagination and the novel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Passos

    Full Text Available The article discusses the premise behind binding literary value to the ability a work has to yield socio-historical information, prevalent in recent criticism on Machado de Assis. It argues that the body of Machado's work shows an increasing ambivalence regarding the links between imagined lives and history, thus proposing that in his late writings the matching between things real and things represented is a rhetorical and melancholy gesture of great insight. In order to illustrate the prevalence of moral imagination as object and technique in Machado's late novels, the author highlights a few points of contact between Machado de Assis and Henry James, contemporaries and akin in their literary sensibilities.

  15. Re-imagining the (Welfare) Professional as a Specialised Generalist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2005-01-01

    aspiring to rewrite themselves as being professional. Based on an empirical analysis of the development of the politico-administrative discourse concerning Danish home helpers, I argue that a new discursive ideal of the professional, the specialised generalist, has emerged. This ideal unites...... the contradictory poles of the generalist and the specialist. This re-imagination in the politico-administrative discourse provides input into both the contemporary, general, theoretical debates about the postmodern professional as well as, more specifically, contributing to the theorization of the welfare...... professions. The re-imagination presents a strategic opening for groups aspiring to become welfare professionals. This paradise, however, also contains some dangers. Key words: welfare professions, specialised generalist, home help, discourse, feminist....

  16. O real e o imaginário

    OpenAIRE

    Gohl, Jefferson William

    2012-01-01

    RESUMO Esta pesquisa procura captar um objeto mental na história, que é o imaginário do complô maçônico, através de uma Loja Maçônica do sul paranaense - União III . A década de 1940 se revelou um momento de extremas tensões mundiais, com a Segunda Grande Guerra e a ascensão de ditaduras por todo o mundo. Neste quadro de crises onde as paixões políticas afloravam de formas diversas, como o fascismo, integralismo ou os vários nacionalismos, procuramos entender como o imaginário do complô q...

  17. Machado de Assis, moral imagination and the novel

    OpenAIRE

    Passos, José Luiz

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses the premise behind binding literary value to the ability a work has to yield socio-historical information, prevalent in recent criticism on Machado de Assis. It argues that the body of Machado's work shows an increasing ambivalence regarding the links between imagined lives and history, thus proposing that in his late writings the matching between things real and things represented is a rhetorical and melancholy gesture of great insight. In order to illustrate the preval...

  18. Neural correlates of imagined and synaesthetic colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Anina N; Williams, Mark A; Puce, Aina; Syngeniotis, Ari; Howard, Matthew A; McGlone, Francis; Mattingley, Jason B

    2006-01-01

    The experience of colour is a core element of human vision. Colours provide important symbolic and contextual information not conveyed by form alone. Moreover, the experience of colour can arise without external stimulation. For many people, visual memories are rich with colour imagery. In the unusual phenomenon of grapheme-colour synaesthesia, achromatic forms such as letters, words and numbers elicit vivid experiences of colour. Few studies, however, have examined the neural correlates of such internally generated colour experiences. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare patterns of cortical activity for the perception of external coloured stimuli and internally generated colours in a group of grapheme-colour synaesthetes and matched non-synaesthetic controls. In a voluntary colour imagery task, both synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes made colour judgements on objects presented as grey scale photographs. In a synaesthetic colour task, we presented letters that elicited synaesthetic colours, and asked participants to perform a localisation task. We assessed the neural activity underpinning these two different forms of colour experience that occur in the absence of chromatic sensory input. In both synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes, voluntary colour imagery activated the colour-selective area, V4, in the right hemisphere. In contrast, the synaesthetic colour task resulted in unique activity for synaesthetes in the left medial lingual gyrus, an area previously implicated in tasks involving colour knowledge. Our data suggest that internally generated colour experiences recruit brain regions specialised for colour perception, with striking differences between voluntary colour imagery and synaesthetically induced colours.

  19. Remapping Capricornia: Xavier Herbert’s Cosmopolitan Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Smith

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Since its publication in 1938 critics have generally read Xavier Herbert’s Capricornia as a nationalist novel, even when its nationalism is seen to be structured by contradiction. But little attention has been given to the ways in which Herbert’s complex, multifarious and heteroglossic novel exceeds and challenges the very possibility of coherent national space and a coherent national story. This essay considers moments and spaces in Herbert’s novel where the national is displaced and unravelled. Drawing on Rebecca Walkowitz’s idea of cosmopolitan style and Suvendrini Perera’s work on Australia’s insular imagination I identify a critical cosmopolitanism that inheres in the novel’s geographical imagination and its literary form, particularly the narrative voice which retains a critical distance from the nationalist sensibility of various characters and plot lines, performing a detached and restless homelessness that I identify with the cosmopolitan. Ultimately I ask how the novel’s spatial and environmental imagination displaces its nationalist agenda, making space for a different kind of social imagination—one that does not confine itself to the terms of the nation or organise itself around a central figure for the nation.

  20. Mu rhythm suppression during the imagination of observed action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoshi, S; Ogoshi, Y; Momose, S; Takezawa, T; Mitsuhashi, Y

    2013-01-01

    Mu wave suppression is thought to accompany the activation of the mirror neuron system which occurs when a human observes or imitates the behavior of others. Our investigation indicates a possible difference in mirror neuron system activation between passive and more active observation as suggested by mu wave activation levels. Participants were asked to observe four different videos each 80 s in duration. Each video was repeated once after a 30 s interval. The first video was of visual white noise and participants were instructed to passively observe the video. This was identified as the Baseline condition and served as a mu activation level baseline. The second video was of simple bouncing balls and the observer was again asked to passively observe the video (Ball condition). The third video was of a moving hand (Observation condition). The forth video was of the same moving hand and participants also imagined executing the observed hand movement (Imagination condition). As hypothesized, the Imagination condition activated the greatest level of mu suppression, while the Ball condition activated the lowest level of mu wave suppression. The Observation condition produced a slightly larger level of mu wave suppression than the Ball condition. This progressive increase in mu wave suppression supports the hypothesis that the activation of the mirror neuron system increases as the level of active observation increases.

  1. Resisting imagination and confabulation: effects of metacognitive training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Paola; Ghetti, Simona

    2014-10-01

    False memory rejection is enhanced when individuals rely on memorability-based inferences (e.g., "I should remember this event well; if I don't, it must not have happened"). The present study investigated whether 8- and 9-year-olds and adults could be trained to engage in memorability-based inferences to reject false, but highly familiar (increased through imagination and confabulation), events. Across two experiments, participants enacted, imagined, or confabulated a series of actions differing in expected memorability. Two weeks later, half of the participants received memorability-based training before being administered an old/new recognition test in which they were asked to endorse only enacted actions. Thus, imagined and confabulated actions were to be rejected in the face of their high familiarity. Results indicated that adults, but not children, exhibited increased rejection of these false events if they were of high memorability following a training procedure that explained the functioning of memorability-based inferences (Experiment 1, N=100). Children's rejection of familiar events improved only when the training procedure closely mimicked the demands of the retrieval test (Experiment 2, N=125). Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Anomalies of Imagination and Disordered Self in Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Andreas Rosén; Parnas, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Vivid mental imagery occurs frequently in schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs). Overlapping phenomena, such as obsessions or ruminations, are also frequent in other psychiatric disorders, raising significant diagnostic challenges. Unfortunately, contemporary operational psychopathology lacks the epistemological and phenomenological framework to address such questions. Using the resources of phenomenology and philosophy of mind, we articulate the structure of imagination and describe its distinctive modifications in the SSDs. Drawing on pilot data with patients' self-descriptions, we present the notion of perceptualized imagery. The anomalous imagery acquires spatialization, spatiotemporal constancy, explorability, autonomy and a sense of experiential distance between the subject and the image. As a quasi-perceptual, stable object, such imagery often evokes an intense affective response, whereas the normal sense of 'irreality' of the fantasy may become compromised. We articulate these anomalies of imagination as being entailed by the underlying generative disorder of schizophrenia, namely the disorder of minimal self (unstable ipseity or first-person perspective). We propose that pathology of imagination is an important psychopathological aspect of the schizophrenia spectrum, with significant relevance for early diagnosis and differential diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Perceptual integration of illusory and imagined kinesthetic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyrion, Chloé; Roll, Jean-Pierre

    2009-07-01

    It is generally agreed that motor imagery involves kinesthetic sensations especially as far as first-person imagery is concerned. It was proposed to determine the extent to which motor imagery and vibration-induced illusory sensations of movement are integrated perceptually. Imagined and illusory hand movements were evoked both separately and in various combinations in 12 volunteers. After each trial, the participants were asked to draw the movement trajectory perceived. In all the subjects, propriomimetic vibration patterns applied to various wrist muscles induced spatially oriented or more complex illusory hand movements such as writing or drawing. Depending on the instructions, the subjects were also able to produce imagined hand movements in various directions and at two different velocities. When straight illusory and imagined movements were evoked simultaneously, all the subjects perceived a single movement trajectory, in which the direction and the velocity of the two ongoing sensations were exactly integrated. This perceptual integration also occurred in the case of more complex movements, such as writing and drawing, giving rise to the perception of original trajectories also combining the features of both motor images. Because these two kinesthetic images, the one intentionally and centrally induced and the other peripherally evoked, activate almost the same neural network including cortical sensory and motor areas, parietal regions, and the cerebellum, these results suggest that common processes may be involved in such a perceptual fusion. The nature of these common processes is discussed, and some fields of research in which these findings could potentially be applied are suggested.

  4. Student mathematical imagination instruments: construction, cultural adaptation and validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwijayanti, I.; Budayasa, I. K.; Siswono, T. Y. E.

    2018-03-01

    Imagination has an important role as the center of sensorimotor activity of the students. The purpose of this research is to construct the instrument of students’ mathematical imagination in understanding concept of algebraic expression. The researcher performs validity using questionnaire and test technique and data analysis using descriptive method. Stages performed include: 1) the construction of the embodiment of the imagination; 2) determine the learning style questionnaire; 3) construct instruments; 4) translate to Indonesian as well as adaptation of learning style questionnaire content to student culture; 5) perform content validation. The results stated that the constructed instrument is valid by content validation and empirical validation so that it can be used with revisions. Content validation involves Indonesian linguists, english linguists and mathematics material experts. Empirical validation is done through a legibility test (10 students) and shows that in general the language used can be understood. In addition, a questionnaire test (86 students) was analyzed using a biserial point correlation technique resulting in 16 valid items with a reliability test using KR 20 with medium reability criteria. While the test instrument test (32 students) to find all items are valid and reliability test using KR 21 with reability is 0,62.

  5. Drawing Links between the Autism Cognitive Profile and Imagination: Executive Function and Processing Bias in Imaginative Drawings by Children with and without Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Eycke, Kayla D.; Müller, Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Little is known about the relation between cognitive processes and imagination and whether this relation differs between neurotypically developing children and children with autism. To address this issue, we administered a cognitive task battery and Karmiloff-Smith's drawing task, which requires children to draw imaginative people and houses. For…

  6. Imagining the future: evidence for a hippocampal contribution to constructive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaesser, Brendan; Spreng, R Nathan; McLelland, Victoria C; Addis, Donna Rose; Schacter, Daniel L

    2013-12-01

    Imagining future events and remembering past events rely on a common core network, but several regions within this network--including the hippocampus--show increased activity for imagining future events compared to remembering past events. It remains unclear whether this hippocampal activity reflects processes related to the demands of constructing details retrieved across disparate episodic memories into coherent imaginary events, encoding these events into memory, novelty detection, or some combination of these processes. We manipulated the degree of constructive processing by comparing activity associated with the initial construction of an imagined scenario with the re-construction of an imagined scenario (imagine vs. re-imagine). After accounting for effects of novelty and subsequent memory, we found that a region in the hippocampus was preferentially activated for newly constructed imagined events compared with re-imagined events. Our results suggest that the hippocampus may support several distinct but related processes that are critical for imagining future events, and they also indicate that a particular region within posterior hippocampus may uniquely contribute to the construction of imagined future events. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Anticipatory Imagination in Aging: Revolt and Resignation in Modern Day France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Drouillard

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available “Rien n’arrive ni comme on l’espère, ni comme on le craint. Nothing really happens as we hope it will, nor as we fear it will.”1 Améry appropriates this quote of Proust to highlight how our imaginative powers can never approach its reality during an extreme event. This failure of what he coins our anticipatory imagination is depicted in his phenomenological account of torture, an event whose extremity is later compared to another embodied experience: that of aging. Equating torture with aging may seem shocking to some, and Améry was critiqued for suggesting such a parallel, particularly since he narrates a lived experience with the latter at the mere age of fifty-five. He revisits this critique in the preface to the fourth edition of On Aging: Revolt and Resignation where he states: "Today as much as yesterday I think that society has to undertake everything to relieve old and aging persons of their unpleasant destiny. And at the same time I stick to my position that all high- minded and reverential efforts in this direction, though indeed capable of being somewhat soothing- are still not capable of changing anything fundamental about the tragic hardship of aging." - Jean Améry, On Aging [Améry’s emphasis] The “today” of society that Améry referenced was 1977. But what about today? Is Améry correct in projecting that despite our best efforts nothing fundamental can change the quite unbearable experience of aging? Are attempts to aid the aging complicit in a “vile dupery” that ends in “metaphorically empty” phrases such as “rest in peace”?3 I would like to pose these questions in the wake of a heated debate in France regarding the legality of assisted suicide for aging persons (Améry took his own life and sees suicide as an acceptable form of revolt and resignation, the only authentic choices left to the aging. Thus, this paper seeks to not only dissect his account of aging (and the failure of anticipatory

  8. Digitally manipulating memory: Effects of doctored videos and imagination in distorting beliefs and memories

    OpenAIRE

    Nash, RA; Wade, KA; Lindsay, DS

    2009-01-01

    In prior research on false autobiographical beliefs and memories, subjects have been asked to imagine fictional events and they have been exposed to false evidence that indicates the fictional events occurred. But what are the relative contributions of imagination and false evidence toward false belief and memory construction? Subjects observed and copied various simple actions, then viewed doctored videos that suggested they had performed extra actions, and they imagined performing some of t...

  9. Digitally manipulating memory : effects of doctored videos and imagination in distorting beliefs and memories\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Nash, Robert Alastair; Wade, Kimberley A.; Lindsay, D. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    In prior research on false autobiographical beliefs and memories, subjects have been asked to imagine fictional events and they have been exposed to false evidence that\\ud indicates the fictional events occurred. But what are the relative contributions of imagination and false evidence toward false belief and memory construction?\\ud Subjects observed and copied various simple actions, then viewed doctored videos that suggested they had performed extra actions, and they imagined performing som...

  10. A Critical Role for the Hippocampus in the Valuation of Imagined Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lebreton, Maël; Bertoux, Maxime; Boutet, Claire; Lehericy, Stéphane; Dubois, Bruno; Fossati, Philippe; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Many choice situations require imagining potential outcomes, a capacity that was shown to involve memory brain regions such as the hippocampus. We reasoned that the quality of hippocampus-mediated simulation might therefore condition the subjective value assigned to imagined outcomes. We developed a novel paradigm to assess the impact of hippocampus structure and function on the propensity to favor imagined outcomes in the context of intertemporal choices. The ecologic...

  11. Literature, Moral Imagination and the Out-of-place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Díaz Álvarez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In early 2007, the press claimed that Turkish writer Orhan Pamuk had boarded a plane on his way to indefinite exile in New York, after the murderer of the journalist Hrant Dink had publicly threatened him. Some months later, Pamuk denied the claim from his armchair in his house in Istanbul. This article arose from the story of this refuted exile, and argues in favour of the importance of moral imagination and literature to provide the subject with a series of hermeneutical skills to translate, to engage, to achieve solidarity and understand the Other in the intercultural habitat.

  12. Perception, Imagination and Affect in Human–Robot Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kerruish

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As they arrive in our homes, nursing facilities and educational institutions, urgent questions are being asked about the ethics of encouraging people to have feelings towards social robots that have roles as companions, carers and teachers. This article suggests that the quality of these debates is enhanced by examining how people perceive robots and, in particular, how robots’ expressive characteristics stimulate feelings through engaging the embodied imagination. I discuss the perception and expression of the zoomorphic therapeutic robot Paro, before considering the directions an understanding of these processes can take discussions about the aesthetics and ethics of social robots.

  13. Imagining the past, creating identity: The case of the Bayash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorescu-Marinković Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on fieldwork conducted among several Bayash communities in the Balkans, the author examines the way in which the interlocutors assume an identity and try to construct a past for their people, using etiological legends about the origin of their community which combine heterogeneous historical and geographical knowledge. The author shows that imagining their past is as problematic for the Bayash as it is for any other Roma or non-Roma group; the author argues that the eclectic nature of this process is heralded by the fact that it is a regular stage in the development of the historical thinking of each nation.

  14. [Dreams and imaginations in the therapy of eating disordered patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gáti, Agnes; Abrahám, Ildikó; Arkovits, Amaryl

    2009-01-01

    Recently the integrative approach has been applied in the treatment of eating disorders with multicausal origin. In order to achieve long-term therapeutic effect, the psychodynamic interpretation is often needed and favoured as a part of the personal, multimodal therapeutic strategy. The present paper focuses on body image distortion as one of the most decisive and least influenceable symptom of the disorder. The symptom is interpreted along the body image distortion-body boundaries-self boundaries-autonomy line. With illustrative therapy details of dreams, imaginations, the authors aim to demonstrate the therapeutic use of dynamically oriented therapy and dynamically oriented hypnotherapy.

  15. L’imagination : zone franche des mondes possibles

    OpenAIRE

    Milleville, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Un mal dévastateur environnant, des désirs d’autre chose, un chat doué de parole, du champagne, et Leopoldo, protagoniste de Bruxelles piano-bar, glisse de Montevideo à Bruxelles. Cet article propose d’étudier la superposition de deux réalités, par le biais de l’imagination, qui ouvrent sur l’infini, par le biais de la création.Rampaging evil all around, desires of something different, a cat with the ability to speak, champagne, and Leopoldo, Bruxelles piano-bar’s protagonist, slides from Mon...

  16. Transpersonale Aspekte von Musik und Imagination in der Traumatherapie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maack, Carola

    2013-01-01

    Guided Imagery and Music nach Helen Bonny (GIM) und ihre Modifikationen haben sich in der Traumatherapie als sehr effektiv herausgestellt. In meinem Vortrag werde ich die Methode und ihre Anwendungen in der Traumatherapie vorstellen. Dabei gehe ich auch auf die Abgrenzung von Imagination im...... personalen und traunspersonalen Raum und deren jeweilige Bedeutung für traumatisierte Menschen in der unterschiedlichen Phasen ihrer Therapie ein. [The Bonny Methode of Guided Imagery and Music (GIM) and its modifications have shown to be quite effective in trauma therapy. In my presentation I will give...

  17. War Against the Imagination: Technology, Kids, and Autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anonymous

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available All children's movies produced, marketed and distributed by corporations are carefully designed sales delivery systems. They exist to sell. Secondarily, but of no less importance, they transmit ideology: even the most banal animated features transmit the social values and expectations of dominant culture. War Against the Imagination begins to develop a critical understanding of how the growing technological sophistication of story-telling media is changing both what and how stories teach young children. How are the boundaries between fantasy and reality disintegrating in the digital age, and of what impact on the lives of kids growing in our communities?

  18. Imagined futures in living with multiple conditions: Positivity, relationality and hopelessness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Lindsay-Ann; Atkinson, Sarah

    2018-02-01

    Hope serves as an overarching concept for a range of engagements that demonstrate the benefits of a positive outlook for coping with chronic conditions of ill-health and disability. A dominant engagement through medicine has positioned hope as a desirable attribute and its opposite, hopelessness, as pathological. In this engagement hope is individual, internally located and largely cognitive and able to be learned. Attaining hope reflects a process of coming to terms with the losses associated with long-term conditions and of imagining new meanings and purposes for the future ahead. This process is characterised by a set of linear temporal stages, from loss and denial to acceptance and reappraising the life-course, by an emphasis on the morally desirable exercise of self-care and by a desired outcome that, in the absence of cure, is hope. Through interviews, we aim to unsettle the privileged status given to a positive outlook through examining the expressions, contexts and negotiations of hopelessness of people living with multiple conditions of ill-health and/or disability. These narratives of hopelessness disclose the ways in which realistic imagined possibilities for the future are constrained by external structures of time and function that demand complex negotiations with places, bodies and other people. As a situated and relational narrative, hopelessness draws our attention to the need to rebalance the exclusive attention to individual, internal resources with a renewed attention to contexts and settings. Moreover, hopelessness can be generative for those living with multiple conditions in shaping alternatively framed priorities with respect to their temporal and interpersonal relations. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The action-specific effect of execution on imagination of reciprocal aiming movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoxon, Emma; Pacione, Sandra M; Song, Joo-Hyun; Welsh, Timothy N

    2017-08-01

    Past research has shown that the movement times of imagined aiming movements were more similar to actual movement times after the individual has experienced executing the movements. The purpose of the present study was to determine if experience with a set of movements altered the imagination of movements that were not experienced. Participants imagined a series of reciprocal aiming movements in different movement difficulty contexts (created by altering target width and movement amplitude) before and after actually executing a series of aiming movements. The range of difficulties of the imagined movements included difficulty contexts that were within (Experiment 1) or outside (Experiment 2) the range of difficulty experienced during execution. It was found that imagined movement times of movements within the range of movement difficulties experienced were more consistent with Fitts' Law after movement experience, whereas imagination of more difficult movements was not altered by experience. It is suggested that execution did not enhance imagination of more difficult movements because the relative contributions of motor planning and control to the more difficult movements were different from those in the experienced movements. Thus, the enhancement of imagination through experience might only occur when mechanisms underlying the executed and imagined movements are similar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Let's not, and say we would: imagined and actual responses to witnessing homophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jennifer Randall; Wilson, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We compared imagined versus actual affective and behavioral responses to witnessing a homophobic slur. Participants (N = 72) witnessed a confederate using a homophobic slur, imagined the same scenario, or were not exposed to the slur. Those who imagined hearing the slur reported significantly higher levels of negative affect than those who actually witnessed the slur, and nearly one half of them reported that they would confront the slur, whereas no participants who actually heard the slur confronted it. These findings reveal a discrepancy between imagined and real responses to homophobic remarks, and they have implications for the likelihood that heterosexuals will actually confront homophobic remarks.

  1. A neural mass model of place cell activity: theta phase precession, replay and imagination of never experienced paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cona, Filippo; Ursino, Mauro

    2015-02-01

    Recent results on hippocampal place cells show that the replay of behavioral sequences does not simply reflect previously experienced trajectories, but may also occur in the reverse direction, or may even include never experienced paths. In order to elucidate the possible mechanisms at the basis of this phenomenon, we have developed a model of sequence learning. The present model consists of two layers of place cell units. Long-range connections among units implement heteroassociation between the two layers, trained with a temporal Hebb rule. The network was trained assuming that a virtual rat moves within a virtual maze. This training leads to the formation of bidirectional synapses between the two layers, i.e. synapses connecting a neuron both with its previous and subsequent element in the path. Subsequently, two distinct conditions were simulated with the trained network. During an exploratory phase, characterized by a similar consideration to the external environment and to the internal representation, the model simulates the occurrence of theta precession in the forward path and the temporal compression. During an imagination phase, when there is no consideration to the external location, the model produces trains of gamma oscillations, without the presence of a theta rhythm, and simulates the occurrence of both direct and reverse replay, and the imagination of never experienced paths. The new paths are built by combining bunches of previous trajectories. The main mechanisms at the basis of this behavior are explained in detail, and lines for future improvements (e.g., to simulate preplay) are discussed.

  2. Imaginer plus pour agir mieux. L’imagination en morale chez Carol Gilligan, Martha Nussbaum et Paul Ricoeur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Pierron

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dans leur réflexion sur le raisonnement moral, critique d’une approche rationaliste stricte, les théories du care et les philosophies travaillant à une compréhension enrichie de la raison pratique se sont attachées à mettre en valeur l’importance éthique qu’il y a à envisager la perspective de l’autre. Elles se sont concentrées à cette fin sur le travail de l’imagination. On montre ici que l’éthique du care de Gilligan, l’éthique de la narration de Nussbaum et l’éthique de la sollicitude ricoeurienne, quoique différentes, se renforcent mutuellement à partir d’une compréhension renouvelée du rôle de l’imagination dans la morale. Si l’enquête psychologique de Gilligan, la philosophie de la littérature chez Nussbaum et l’herméneutique du texte chez Ricoeur diffèrent, ces trois auteur.es ont en commun de ne pas se satisfaire des méfaits d’une rationalité instrumentale qui bride la créativité pratique des actrices morales et acteurs moraux. Il appartiendrait à l’imagination éthique de prendre la mesure de la complexité des situations morales et d’en suivre les variations subtiles, afin de prendre soin de formes de vies rendues invisibles ou d’existences vulnérables.

  3. L’imagination et les biais de l’empathie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Paris

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Empathy is an emotional mode associating the point of view of other people to physiological sensations. This phenomena tends to be more significant with certain people than others. And yet, there are sometimes good moral reasons to promote a more egalitarian empathy. Our hypo- thesis of moral psychology is that it is possible to use imagination – and in particular its volon- tary dimension and its openness to emotions – to modify certain empathic biaises.RÉSUMÉL'empathie est un mode émotionnel qui associe le point de vue d'autrui à des sensations phy- siologiques. Ce phénomène a tendance à être plus important envers certaines personnes qu'en- vers d'autres. Or, il existe parfois de bonnes raisons morales de promouvoir une empathie plus égalitaire. Notre hypothèse de psychologie morale est qu'il est possible d'utiliser l'imagination, et en particulier sa dimension volontaire et sa transparence aux émotions, pour corriger certains biais empathiques.

  4. The cosmopolitan imagination: critical cosmopolitanism and social theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanty, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Critical cosmopolitanism is an emerging direction in social theory and reflects both an object of study and a distinctive methodological approach to the social world. It differs from normative political and moral accounts of cosmopolitanism as world polity or universalistic culture in its conception of cosmopolitanism as socially situated and as part of the self-constituting nature of the social world itself. It is an approach that shifts the emphasis to internal developmental processes within the social world rather than seeing globalization as the primary mechanism. This signals a post-universalistic kind of cosmopolitanism, which is not merely a condition of diversity but is articulated in cultural models of world openness through which societies undergo transformation. The cosmopolitan imagination is articulated in framing processes and cultural models by which the social world is constituted; it is therefore not reducible to concrete identities, but should be understood as a form of cultural contestation in which the logic of translation plays a central role. The cosmopolitan imagination can arise in any kind of society and at any time but it is integral to modernity, in so far as this is a condition of self-problematization, incompleteness and the awareness that certainty can never be established once and for all. As a methodologically grounded approach, critical cosmopolitan sociology has a very specific task: to discern or make sense of social transformation by identifying new or emergent social realities.

  5. Expectancy, covert sensitization and imaginal desensitization in compulsive sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConaghy, N; Armstrong, M S; Blaszczynski, A

    1985-08-01

    Twenty subjects were randomly allocated to receive either imaginal desensitization (ID) or covert sensitization (CS) to reduce compulsive anomalous sexual behaviours. It was predicted from a behavioural completion model of compulsive urges, that patients' response to ID would be at least as good as their response to CS and would correlate with reduction in their general levels of tension following treatment. These predictions were supported. Correlations between patients' expectancies of treatment success and their response were of moderate strength for expectancy measures taken following the first session of both treatments, but much stronger for expectancy measures following the last session of ID. It was suggested that patients experienced a specific response during the further sessions of ID, which enabled them to improve their prediction of response. As aversive therapies remain the standard behavioural therapy for sexual paraphilias, the finding of the present study that imaginal desensitization without traumatic imagery or aversive physical stimuli is at least as effective would seem to require urgent replication, if only on ethical grounds.

  6. Imagination persistence on the vertical axis of Khaghani's odes, a personal style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javadi Mortezayi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractKhaghani is one of the preeminent Persian poets. He is a stylist poet. Creating exquisite, dramatic and enigmatic imaginations in the era that most of the poets tried to imitate, integrate and repeat the themes of predecessors makes his position in the poetry more clear. His poems inspired by his rich talent and his proficiency in various sciences such as medicine, astronomy, philosophy, theology, history and math are one of the most exquisite and beautiful Persian poetries.Understanding his poems seems to be difficult due to his heavy use of these sciences, as well as using specialized and strange wordings and creating out of the mind imaginations.This Shervani poet not only has created so beautiful and exquisite dramatic themes and imaginations on the horizontal axis, but also he has done same in several cases on the vertical axis of the poem. In cases the themes are felt repeated, he has uttered them masterfully and skillfully with so novel and exquisite imaginations that they are not seem repeated and keep their value. One of the most outstanding characteristics of Khaghani's personal style is imagination persistence on vertical axis of the odes.Imagination on two horizontal and vertical axes of the poet usually includes the terms such as congestion, interference and persistence. The congestion of imagination mostly takes place on the horizontal axis of the poem and resulted by involving several independence imaginations in a verse of the poem and usually leads to compression of imaginations and their interference and disparity.Poets often use congestion to demonstrate their talent and power in Poetry, while in most of the cases it has no result except for imaginations' interference and that it causes some problems for reader to reach what poet means. But, persistence means to bring several imaginations about an object, a word or a motive in several verses which indicate the talent and imagining power of the poet and his emotional

  7. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism experiencing mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Heathcote

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available No research has previously been done regarding the phenomenon of adolescents who have previously been involved in Satanism and who experience obstacles in their strive for mental health. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism present behavioral problems like aggressive outbursts, depression, “ psychosis” or suicide attempts, that could lead to suicide. In the phenomenonanalysis semi-structured, phenomenological interviews were performed with the respondents and their parents. The respondents were requested to write a naïve sketch about their life. After completion of the data-control, guidelines for nursing staff were set.

  8. winged eye Induces Transdetermination of Drosophila Imaginal Disc by Acting in Concert with a Histone Methyltransferase, Su(var3-9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Masuko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Drosophila imaginal disc cells exhibit a remarkable ability to convert cell fates in response to various perturbations, a phenomenon called transdetermination (TD. We previously identified winged eye (wge as a factor that induces eye-to-wing TD upon overexpression in eye imaginal discs, but the molecular mechanisms underlying TD have remained largely unclear. Here, we found that wge induces various histone modifications and enhances the methylation of Lys9 on histone H3 (H3K9, a feature of heterochromatin. A histone methyltransferase, Su(var3-9, is required for wge-mediated H3K9 methylation and eye-to-wing TD. Su(var3-9 is also required for classical wound-induced TD but not for normal development, suggesting its involvement in several types of imaginal disc TDs. Transcriptome analysis revealed that wge represses eye identity genes independently of Su(var3-9 and activates TD-related genes by acting together with Su(var3-9. These findings provide new insights into diverse types of chromatin regulation at progressive steps of cell-fate conversions. : Drosophila imaginal discs switch disc identity by a process known as transdetermination. Masuko et al. demonstrate that expression of the winged eye gene induces transdetermination through histone modifications such as H3K9-methylation. winged eye regulates expression of transdetermination-related genes via a histone methyltransferase, Su(var3-9. Keywords: Drosophila, imaginal disc, transdetermination, heterochromatin, cell fate, winged eye, reprogramming, Su(var3-9

  9. Desires for beverages and liking of skin care product odors in imaginative and immersive virtual reality beach contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Ninett Skovgaard K; Kraus, Alexandra A.; Ritz, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Immersive technologies simulating real-life environments allow repeated simulation of complex real-life situations at one location and, therefore, bear potential for consumer product evaluations and food behavior studies. This study aimed to assess whether a contextual exposure by immersive virtual...... reality (VR) or a photo-enhanced imaginative (PIC) condition could induce effects on desires and liking aligning with the situation. A total of 60 subjects (30 females) were presented to VR and PIC beach settings in a randomized balanced design performed in a laboratory one week apart. A follow-up test...... on beverage-related desires. The VR technology seems to be a promising tool for evaluating contextual influences in food consumer research....

  10. Dissociative Experiences, Creative Imagination, and Artistic Production in Students of Fine Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Fabello, Maria Jose; Campos, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    The current research was designed to assess the influence of dissociative experiences and creative imagination on the artistic production of Fine Arts students of the University of Vigo (Spain). The sample consisted of 81 students who were administered the Creative Imagination Scale and The Dissociative Experiences Scale. To measure artistic…

  11. Voices of Imagination: The Artist as Prophet in the Process of Social Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spehler, Rebecca McElfresh; Slattery, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Since vision, imagination, and a passion for justice are in short supply, educators must transcend traditional technical/rational approaches and create space for artists' prophetic voices to emerge. Empowering the voices of imagination through the arts will help renew the metaphysical dimension of educators' work. (27 references) (MLH)

  12. Troublesome Sentiments: The Origins of Dewey's Antipathy to Children's Imaginative Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, David I.

    2010-01-01

    One of the interesting aspects of Dewey's early educational thought is his apparent hostility toward children's imaginative pursuits, yet the question of why this antipathy exists remains unanswered. As will become clear, Dewey's hostility towards imaginative activities stemmed from a broad variety of concerns. In some of his earliest work, Dewey…

  13. Fiction as a Blend of Fact and Imagination in Chimamanda Ngozi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fiction is an imaginative story rather than being a documentation of any historical fact. However, fiction,as a branch of literature,reflects the author's society. This is why fiction is believed to be a mirror through which a society is seen. Since fiction is something that mirrors society, facts and imagination are always well ...

  14. Imagined Positive Emotions and Inhibitory Control: The Differentiated Effect of Pride versus Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzir, Maayan; Eyal, Tal; Meiran, Nachshon; Kessler, Yoav

    2010-01-01

    "Inhibitory control" is a cognitive mechanism that contributes to successful self-control (i.e., adherence to a long-term goal in the face of an interfering short-term goal). This research explored the effect of imagined positive emotional events on inhibition. The authors proposed that the influence of imagined emotions on inhibition…

  15. The Handedness of Imagined Bodies in Action and the Role of Perspective Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzoli, Daniele; Mitaritonna, Alessia; Moretto, Francesco; Carluccio, Patrizia; Tommasi, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Past research at the nexus of motor control and perception investigated the role of perspective taking in many behavioral and neuroimaging studies. Some investigators addressed the issue of one's own vs. others' action imagination, but the possible effects of a front or a back view in imagining others' actions have so far been neglected. We report…

  16. Déterritorialisation et communautés imaginées : analyse anthropo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Specifically, it is about questioning dissident and insidious forms that takes creativity dispersed bricolous tactics of individual deterritorialized groups who want to project, often within imagined communities in a utopia beyond any institutional arrangement territorializing or any dominant historical bloc. Keywords: imagined ...

  17. The Effects of Spatial Contextual Familiarity on Remembered Scenes, Episodic Memories, and Imagined Future Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Jessica; Moscovitch, Morris

    2014-01-01

    Several recent studies have explored the effect of contextual familiarity on remembered and imagined events. The aim of this study was to examine the extent of this effect by comparing the effect of cuing spatial memories, episodic memories, and imagined future events with spatial contextual cues of varying levels of familiarity. We used…

  18. Moving off the Page: Tapping into Young Children's Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Martina

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the interplay between young children's spontaneous engagement in learning through their imagination, and the mind-set of the teacher when approaching planning for instruction. Perhaps by connecting with our own imaginative thinking, we can gain insights about our young learners, and find additional strategies to promote…

  19. Development of Children's Creative Visual Imagination: A Theoretical Model and Enhancement Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedziewicz, Dorota; Karwowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model of creative imagination and its applications in early education. The model sees creative imagination as composed of three inter-related components: vividness of images, their originality, and the level of transformation of imageries. We explore the theoretical and practical consequences of this new…

  20. Progression of Chinese Students' Creative Imagination from Elementary through High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fujun; Li, Xiuju; Zhang, Huiliang; Wang, Lihui

    2012-01-01

    For almost a century, researchers have studied creative imagination, most typically that of children. This article reports on a study of the development of creative imagination of Chinese youths and its relation to the educational environment. Data consisted of 4,162 students from grades 4 through 12. Findings showed that students' creative…

  1. The Role of Radical Imagination in Social Work Education, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnetz, Zion

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the role of imagination in social work education, practice, and research. Following a brief discussion of terms, the author attempts to identify the various contributions of human imagination to social change processes. The second part presents the argument that the cultural structure known as Social Darwinism significantly…

  2. The Place of Imagination in Inclusive Pedagogy: Thinking with Maxine Greene and Hannah Arendt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Conceptualising difference is a key task for inclusive pedagogy, and vital to the politics of inclusion. My purpose in this paper is to consider the place that imagination has in helping us to conceptualise difference, and to argue that imagination has a key part to play in inclusive pedagogy. To do this I draw closely on the work of Maxine Greene…

  3. Comparing Personal Characteristic Factors of Imagination between Expert and Novice Designers within Different Product Design Stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yinghsiu; Li, Jianyou

    2015-01-01

    Imagination plays a key role in various domains in helping to create innovative ideas, drawings, poems, movies, products, etc. In product design domain, the personal characteristics of imagination are crucial abilities for conceiving novel ideas during design processes. This study focuses on personal characteristic differences and similarities…

  4. Differential Effects of Personality Traits and Environmental Predictors on Reproductive and Creative Imagination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoyun; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Hsu, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) to analyze the effects of both personality and environmental variables on the imagination of video/film major university students; and (2) to test the mediator effect resulting from the variable of social climate. The results of this study supported both indicators of imaginative capabilities and…

  5. Cultivating the Ethical Imagination in Education: Perspectives from Three Public Intellectuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    Because the subject of imagination is both complex and can be conceived of in different ways, the focus of the first part of this article is to engage in a descriptive analysis of this faculty. With the help of Greene's intellectual predecessor and former teacher Hannah Arendt, Hannah Spector draws distinctions between imagination and other…

  6. Nurturing Child Imagination in the Contemporary World: Perspectives from Different Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksic, Slavica; Pavlovic, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Imagination and creativity in today's world are becoming increasingly relevant in the light of the fact that main human work products are innovations, knowledge, ideas, and creative solutions. Nurturing child imagination is the most promising way of building up a creative personality and contributing to individual creative production in the…

  7. Urban Literacy : A Scriptive Approach to the Experience, Use and Imagination of Place

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havik, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation discusses how literature offers valuable ways to become aware of how people experience, use, and imagine places. It argues that Lefebvre’s concept of "lived space", experienced and lived through by characters, evoking memories and imaginations, is the space that we encounter in the

  8. Blueprinting a Freirean Pedagogy of Imagination: Hope, Untested Feasibility, and the Dialogic Person

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Elizabeth; Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    Paulo Freire, a radical Brazilian educator, developed a libratory pedagogy that contributes to an important discussion on the imagination, though this aspect of his work is not emphasized in critical pedagogy and adult education literature. Theorizing a Freirean imagination as a productive educational faculty connects with the work of philosophers…

  9. DNA synthesis in the imaginal wing discs of the American bollworm ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Care was taken during dissection as the fat body and muscles tend to obscure the imaginal discs. Imaginal discs were distinctly seen under stereo bino- cular microscope, from one-day old final-instar larvae of. H. armigera. 2.3 Incubation. A pair of mesothoracic wing discs was excised in lepidopteran saline (Bindokas and ...

  10. Language, Discourse and Teaching the Language Arts: The Development of Imaginative Self-Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoc-Jones, Geoff

    2005-01-01

    Paul Ricoeur asks that we conceive of the imagination less in terms of visual images than in terms of language. He develops this idea as part of the hermeneutic work of interpreting literary texts and posits that the world disclosed by the literary work provides a space for the imaginative consideration of new possibilities for the self. I…

  11. Imagination, Waldorf, and critical literacies: Possibilities for transformative education in mainstream schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Shank

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the face of transmission-oriented national curricula, this study explores possibilities for claiming space for imagination, as ‘the most powerful and energetic of learning tools’ (Egan 1986, in early childhood education in mainstream Kenyan schools. Drawing from Egan’s work on imagination and Cummins’ Nested Pedagogical Orientations framework, this study interrogates the indispensable role of imagination in transformative education, as well as its utility in the ‘transmission’ of the government curriculum. This study draws insights from an initiative integrating imaginative, Waldorf-inspired pedagogies into mainstream pre-primary and early primary classrooms to explore how imagination-based pedagogies, including storytelling, creative play, poems and verses, drawing and painting, can support the development of critical literacies in young children.

  12. Cross-modal source monitoring confusions between perceived and imagined events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, L A; Franklin, N; Johnson, M K

    2000-03-01

    Two experiments tested the prediction based on the source monitoring framework that imagination is most likely to lead to false memories when related perceived events have occurred. Consistent with this, people were more likely to falsely remember seeing events when the events had been both imagined as seen and actually heard than when they were just heard, just visually imagined, or imagined both visually and auditorily. Furthermore, when people considered potential sources for memories or more carefully evaluated features of remembered events, source errors were reduced. On average, misattributed ("false") memories differed in phenomenal qualities from true memories. Taken together, these findings show that as different qualities of mental experience flexibly enter into source attributions, qualities derived from related perceptual events are particularly likely to lead to false claims that imagined events were seen, even when the event involves a primary modality (auditory) different from the target event (visual).

  13. Remembering the past and imagining the future: examining the consequences of mental time travel on memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Benjamin C; Jobe, Tara A

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging evidence suggests that remembering the past and imagining the future rely on overlapping processes in episodic memory. The three experiments reported here examine the consequences of remembering the past and imagining the future on the accessibility of other information in memory. Participants first studied events associated with a specific context and then either (a) retrieved past autobiographical events associated with that same context or (b) imagined future autobiographical events associated with that same context. Replicating and extending evidence of retrieval-induced forgetting, remembering autobiographical events from the past caused participants to forget the related studied events. However, imagining future autobiographical events failed to cause participants to forget the related studied events. These results suggest an important difference in the memorial consequences of remembering and imagining.

  14. Remembering and imagining differentially engage the hippocampus: a multivariate fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, C Brock; Ashby, Stefania R; Nash, Michelle I

    2014-01-01

    It has been proposed that imagining the future depends on the ability to retrieve episodic details from past experiences in order to recombine them into novel possible experiences; consequently, the processes of remembering and imagining rely on similar neural substrates, including the hippocampus. We used fMRI and both univariate and multivariate analysis techniques to test this prediction. Unbiased univariate analysis did not reveal differences in the hippocampus between remembering and imagining; however, multivariate analyses revealed evidence that patterns of activity within the hippocampus distinguish between remembering and imagining. Thus, while the hippocampus seems to be involved in both remembering the past and imagining the future, the pattern of activity within the hippocampus distinguishes between these two different tasks.

  15. Alexithymia and script-driven emotional imagery in healthy female subjects: no support for deficiencies in imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Sandra; Stingl, Markus; Hartmann, Luisa C; Leibing, Eric; Leichsenring, Falk; Kruse, Johannes; Stark, Rudolf; Leweke, Frank

    2011-04-01

    Alexithymia is associated with a limited access to inner emotional processes. Furthermore, alexithymia is assumed to be characterized by a limited ability to use imagination. To evaluate the frequently proposed thesis of a reduced imagination ability in alexithymic persons, 25 high and 24 low alexithymic women self-rated their imagination ability. Furthermore, the electrodermal activity (EDA) during script-driven emotional imagination was determined and valence, arousal, and vividness of the respective imaginations were rated. Our results indicate no significant differences between high and low alexithymic women in the self-rated imagination ability, the EDA during imagination and the ratings of valence, arousal and vividness. The study provides evidence that healthy high alexithymic women are capable of differentiated emotional imagination. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  16. Imagining the future: The Power of Climate Change Fiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr Sullivan, S. M.; Kellagher, E.; Poppleton, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Fiction has galvanized the public imagination around societal concerns throughout US history, on issues including slavery, worker abuse and animal cruelty. A growing body of fiction concerned with climate change, 'cli-fi', provides the opportunity for students to engage with climate science in more visceral and affective ways. The Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) project ran a climate and energy book club from Spring 2012 through Winter 2013, in which educators, scientists and writers participated. The fictional works were intended for audiences ranging from youth through adult, with themes of dystopia, renewal, hope, oppression, and innovation. This presentation will describe the benefits, opportunities and caveats of using these works within science teaching contexts, highlight some of the works which stood out from the rest and provide an annotated bibliography of books which were included or considered.

  17. Imagination, creation and literary origins: dreaming and waking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Farrar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quotation, allusion, mediumship and speaking with or through others’ voices is an established ad well-worked aspect of culture, indeed, it seems, across all cultures, an appropriate subject indeed for COMPASIO. So too has the inspiration artists have drawn for their creation from dreams and the voices of a world beyond themselves. This has been relatively well studied in such fields as visual art and music. Less attention, however, despite its clear centrality, has been given to literary creation. This paper, by a cultural anthropologist, uses a personal case study to illustrate how this can work through the interaction between dreams and narrative. The case here, though only singular in its detailed content and process has wider implications for the comparative anthropological and comparative study of culture, individuality, imagination and creativity.

  18. Imagining Place and Moralizing Space: Jerusalem at Medieval Westminster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Slater

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Monuments and landscape ensembles across medieval Europe recreated the Christian holy places of Jerusalem for local devotees. Contemporary legends surrounding the death of King Henry IV in 1413, who died in the Jerusalem Chamber in the abbot’s house at Westminster Abbey, place the room firmly within this cultural tradition. In the sixteenth century, a neighbouring Jericho Parlour was built. This paper highlights the political significances of such “recreated Jerusalem” sites: in contrast to the religious and demographic diversity found in the earthly city, and in connection with European crusading and imperial ambitions. Exploring the “death in Jerusalem” topos in detail, it argues that the Jerusalem Chamber should not be understood as a recreated holy place. Instead, the links to the Holy Land found in the abbot’s house form part of an imaginative reinvention of space within medieval Westminster, deliberately intended to provoke moral admonition and self-scrutiny in its users.

  19. Dreams and imaginative processes in American and Balinese artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, R; Price-Williams, D

    1990-06-01

    A study is presented comparing the imaginative modes of American and Balinese artists. Strict survey comparison has not been possible owing to the lack of certain artistic types in the comparative culture and smallness of sample. By using an interview approach, a paradigmatic difference between the artistic members of the two cultures can be demonstrated. In American artists there is a more individualistic approach to creative imagery, with a stronger reliance on their dreams. In Balinese artists the creative endeavor is more collective, depending on more conscious imagery drawn from myths and common beliefs. The difference is correlated with the philosophical and cultural settings of each society in which the artist is embedded. Exemplar statements from interviews are presented to illustrate and support these propositions. Finally, it has been suggested that creative imagery should also be viewed in the perspective of differing concepts of self in the two societies.

  20. Os imaginários da Guerra Civil Espanhola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Nazario

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste breve panorama do cinema produzido na Espanha durante a guerra civil e das representações do conflito na cinematografia mundial, o autor ressalta as imprecisões dos cronistas da guerra, abertamente engajados num dos lados em luta; a propaganda que vicejou, mesclando fatos e mitos, nos filmes realizados pelos rebeldes e pelos republicanos; os exageros alimentados pelas mídias, assim como as reduções operadas pelos revisionistas. Os paradoxos da realidade local que conduziram a Espanha à guerra alimentaram o surrealismo, geraram enigmas até hoje não decifrados pelos historiadores e criaram imaginários impregnados de alusões, metáforas e simbolismos que desafiam a objetividade.

  1. The blessingway ceremony: ritual, nostalgic imagination and feminist spirituality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Emily

    2015-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in the role of spirituality on the experience of health, wellness and illness, as well as the role of spiritual practice in health care provision. For pregnancy and childbirth, this focus has tended to concentrate on hospital birth settings and care, and religious forms of spirituality. The blessingway ceremony can be described as an alternative baby shower, popular with home-birthing women. Its focus is woman-centred and draws on the power of ritual to evoke a spiritual experience for the pregnant host and her guests. This spirituality is experienced as a strong connection between women, their relationship with 'nature', and forged via the nostalgic imagination of women through time and space. This article will draw on data obtained in 2010 during doctoral fieldwork with 52 home-birthing women across eastern Australia and will examine the blessingway ceremony and its significance as a site of potential spiritual empowerment for pregnant and birthing women.

  2. Do people's motives influence their susceptibility to imagination inflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Stefanie J; Calacouris, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    People are motivated to remember past autobiographical experiences related to their current goals; we investigated whether people are also motivated to remember false past experiences related to those goals. In Session 1, we measured subjects' implicit and explicit achievement and affiliation motives. Subjects then rated their confidence about, and memory for, childhood events containing achievement and affiliation themes. Two weeks later in Session 2, subjects received a "computer-generated profile" based on their Session 1 ratings. This profile suggested that one false achievement event and one false affiliation event had happened in childhood. After imagining and describing the suggested false events, subjects made confidence and memory ratings a second time. For achievement events, subjects' explicit motives predicted their false beliefs and memories. The results are explained using source monitoring and a motivational model of autobiographical memory.

  3. The beautiful invisible creativity, imagination, and theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Vignale, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Challenging the image of theoretical physics as a dry discipline, The Beautiful Invisible shows that this highly abstract science is in fact teeming with beautiful concepts, and the task of imagining them demands profound creativity, just as creative as the work of poets or magical realist novelists such as Borges and Musil. "A good scientific theory is like a symbolic tale, an allegory of reality," writes Giovanni Vignale, as he uncovers the unexpected links between theoretical physics and artistic creativity. In engaging and at times poetic prose, and with ample quotations from many of the writers he admires, Vignale presents his own unorthodox accounts of fundamental theoretical concepts such as Newtonian mechanics, superconductivity, and Einstein's theory of relativity, illuminating their profound implications. Throughout, the author treats readers to glimpses of physics as "exercised in the still night, when only the moon rages." Indeed, as we delve behind now-familiar concepts such as "electron spin" an...

  4. Permaculture Design: On the Practice of Radical Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Rothe

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Permaculture design is a concept that aims at transforming not only agriculture, but also city planning, architecture, development, etc. In short it aims to change human habitats. It is part of a new ecological paradigm that is currently spreading in popularity from the urban gardening movement to various other alternative movements such as the slow movement, sustainable architecture, etc. Permaculture design defines itself as building on systems theory (as formulated in particular by Howard Thomas Odum and Christopher Alexander. However I would like to propose that the afterlife of systems theory as expressed in the concept of permaculture, first developed by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, should not only be sought in theoretical and analytical discourse. Instead we can understand permaculture as a form of figurative, ecological reasoning; a form of radical imagination drawn from the composite knowledge of a heterogeneous network of actors. Permaculture is thus neither a branch of environmental science nor an environmental political movement. Rather the philosophy of permaculture design questions the division between theory and practice or between rationality and sensibility. In permaculture design, these modes of knowledge are inextricably linked in explorations of patterns. In this article, I attempt to delineate the ways in which permaculture design is rooted in the practical knowledge of systems. I shall limit myself to exploratory drilling, as it were, in three aspects of permaculture design thought. First, I describe permaculture thought as a form of practical knowledge that generated through a kind of visual thinking in patterns. Second, I describe permaculture thought as a type of thinking in which radical imagination and speculation play an active role. Third, I present permaculture thought as systems theory thought. However it departs from the idea of control inherent to systems theory, drawing instead from the equally popular (and

  5. Imagining flood futures: risk assessment and management in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Stuart N; Landström, Catharina; Whatmore, Sarah J

    2011-05-13

    The mantra that policy and management should be 'evidence-based' is well established. Less so are the implications that follow from 'evidence' being predictions of the future (forecasts, scenarios, horizons) even though such futures define the actions taken today to make the future sustainable. Here, we consider the tension between 'evidence', reliable because it is observed, and predictions of the future, unobservable in conventional terms. For flood risk management in England and Wales, we show that futures are actively constituted, and so imagined, through 'suites of practices' entwining policy, management and scientific analysis. Management has to constrain analysis because of the many ways in which flood futures can be constructed, but also because of commitment to an accounting calculus, which requires risk to be expressed in monetary terms. It is grounded in numerical simulation, undertaken by scientific consultants who follow policy/management guidelines that define the futures to be considered. Historical evidence is needed to deal with process and parameter uncertainties and the futures imagined are tied to pasts experienced. Reliance on past events is a challenge for prediction, given changing probability (e.g. climate change) and consequence (e.g. development on floodplains). So, risk management allows some elements of risk analysis to become unstable (notably in relation to climate change) but forces others to remain stable (e.g. invoking regulation to prevent inappropriate floodplain development). We conclude that the assumed separation of risk assessment and management is false because the risk calculation has to be defined by management. Making this process accountable requires openness about the procedures that make flood risk analysis more (or less) reliable to those we entrust to produce and act upon them such that, unlike the 'pseudosciences', they can be put to the test of public interrogation by those who have to live with their consequences

  6. Income Outcome: Life in the Corporate University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Ferrell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Higher education on the corporate model imagines students as consumers, choosing between knowledge products and brands. It imagines itself liberating the university from the dictates of the State/tradition/aristocratic self-replication, and putting it in the hands of its democratic stakeholders. It therefore naturally subscribes to the general management principles and practices of global corporate culture. These principles – transparency, accountability, efficiency – are hard to argue with in principle. But an abstract argument in political economy comes down to earth in the challenges facing the arts and humanities, after the ‘Education Revolution’, to justify their modes of life.

  7. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  8. Undergraduate Leadership Students' Self-Perceived Level of Moral Imagination: An Innovative Foundation for Morality-Based Leadership Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Summer F.; Andenoro, Anthony C.; Sandlin, M'Randa R.; Jones, Jaron L.

    2015-01-01

    Leadership educators are faced with the challenge of preparing students to serve organizations and people in dynamic and ever changing contexts. The purpose of this study was to examine undergraduate leadership students' self-perceived level of moral imagination to make recommendations for moral imagination curricula. Moral imagination is the…

  9. From Living under Attap to Residing in the Sky: Imagination and Empathy in Source-Based History Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Loh Kah; Wei, Lee Si

    2010-01-01

    To cultivate imagination and empathy among school students is a basic challenge for history teachers. This paper examines the relative roles of the teacher and student in nurturing imagination and empathy in the Singapore history classroom, specifically, through source-based studies. Both imagination and empathy are ways for students to think…

  10. Generativity and imagination in autism spectrum disorder: evidence from individual differences in children's impossible entity drawings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jason; Goddard, Elizabeth; Melser, Joseph

    2009-06-01

    This study examined the cognitive underpinnings of spontaneous imagination in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by way of individual differences. Children with ASD (N = 27) and matched typically developing (TD) children were administered Karmiloff-Smith's (1990) imaginative drawing task, along with measures that tapped specific executive functions (generativity, visuospatial planning, and central coherence processing style) and false belief theory of mind (ToM) understanding. The ASD group drawings displayed deficits in imaginative content and a piecemeal pictorial style. ASD participants also showed group deficits in generativity, planning and ToM, and exhibited weak coherence. Individual differences in generativity were related to imaginative drawing content in the ASD group, and the association was mediated through planning ability. Variations in weak coherence were separately related to a piecemeal drawing style in the ASD group. Variations in generativity were also linked with imaginative drawing content in the TD group; the connection unfolded when it received pooled variance from receptive language ability, and thereupon mediated through false belief reasoning to cue imaginative content. Results are discussed in terms of how generativity plays a broad and important role for imagination in ASD and typical development, albeit in different ways.

  11. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  12. Moral Agency, Moral Imagination, and Moral Community: Antidotes to Moral Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traudt, Terri; Liaschenko, Joan; Peden-McAlpine, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Moral distress has been covered extensively in the nursing literature and increasingly in the literature of other health professions. Cases that cause nurses' moral distress that are mentioned most frequently are those concerned with prolonging the dying process. Given the standard of aggressive treatment that is typical in intensive care units (ICUs), much of the existing moral distress research focuses on the experiences of critical care nurses. However, moral distress does not automatically occur in all end-of-life circumstances, nor does every critical care nurse suffer its damaging effects. What are the practices of these nurses? What specifically do they do to navigate around or through the distressing situations? The nursing literature is lacking an answer to these questions. This article reports a study that used narrative analysis to explore the reported practices of experienced critical care nurses who are skilled at and comfortable working with families and physicians regarding the withdrawal of aggressive treatment. A major finding was that these nurses did not report experiencing the damaging effects of moral distress as described in the nursing literature. The verbal communication and stated practices relevant to this finding are organized under three major themes: (1) moral agency, (2) moral imagination, and (3) moral community. Further, a total of eight subthemes are identified. The practices that constitute these themes and subthemes are further detailed and discussed in this article. Understanding these practices can help mitigate critical care nurses' moral distress. Copyright 2016 The Journal of Clinical Ethics. All rights reserved.

  13. Engaging bodies in the public imagination: bioarchaeology as social science, science, and humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Duncan, William N

    2015-01-01

    Bioarchaeology is the contextual analysis of biological remains from past societies. It is a young and growing discipline born during the latter half of the twentieth century from its roots in physical anthropology and archaeology. Although often associated with the study of ancient diet and disease, bioarchaeology leverages variable temporal scales and its global scope to provide a uniquely comparative perspective on human life that transcends traditional boundaries of the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Here, we explore the public face of bioarchaeology and consider the trends in publication practices that reflect diversifying research strategies. Bioarchaeology is a popular topic on web-based science news aggregators. However, we identify a disconnect between bioarchaeology's traditional research emphases, emerging research foci, and findings that actually spark the public imagination. A majority of popular news articles emphasize basic discovery or "natural curiosities." Publication data indicate the field also remains regionally focused with relatively little emphasis on nomothetic goals. Nevertheless, bioarchaeology can do more to leverage its historical perspective and corporeal emphasis to engage a number of topics with importance across traditional academic boundaries. Big data, comparative, multi-investigator, interdisciplinary projects on violence, colonialism, and health offer the most obvious potential for driving research narratives in the biological and social sciences. Humanistic approaches that explore emotional connections to the past can also have merit. The diversity of research outlets and products indicates the field must embrace the importance of nontraditional activities in its value structure to maximize our potential in public arenas. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Thinking Outside the Box: Orbitofrontal Cortex, Imagination, and How We Can Treat Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbaum, Geoffrey; Chang, Chun-Yun; Lucantonio, Federica; Takahashi, Yuji K

    2016-12-01

    Addiction involves an inability to control drug-seeking behavior. While this may be thought of as secondary to an overwhelming desire for drugs, it could equally well reflect a failure of the brain mechanisms that allow addicts to learn about and mentally simulate non-drug consequences. Importantly, this process of mental simulation draws upon, but is not normally bound by, our past experiences. Rather we have the ability to think outside the box of our past, integrating knowledge gained from a variety of similar and not-so-similar life experiences to derive estimates or imagine what might happen next. These estimates influence our current behavior directly and also affect future behavior by serving as the background against which outcomes are evaluated to support learning. Here we will review evidence, from our own work using a Pavlovian over-expectation task as well as from other sources, that the orbitofrontal cortex is a critical node in the neural circuit that generates these estimates. Further we will offer the specific hypothesis that degradation of this function secondary to drug-induced changes is a critical and likely addressable part of addiction.

  15. Triumph & Commemoration: Collective Imagination and the ‘Ground Zero Mosque’ Controversy

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    This study reassesses the meaning of the ‘Ground Zero Mosque’ controversy of 2010 through the lens of urban sociology and collective imagination. It utilizes the imaginative fruits of civic forums, such as “Imagine NY” and “Listening to the City,” to determine New Yorkers’ collective vision for the rehabilitation of Ground Zero and Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of 9/11. Articulated as a clarion call for the manifestation of commemoration and triumph over terrorism in the New York cityscape...

  16. More than vision: imagination as an elemental characteristic of being a nurse leader-mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloughen, Andrea; O'Brien, Louise; Jackson, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring relationships are dynamic alliances that can be used as a supportive mechanism for growing nurse leaders and promoting the future of the nursing profession. This article explores imagination as one of the central meanings of being a mentor for nursing leadership. Findings from a hermeneutic-phenomenological study concerned with Australian nurse leaders' experiences and understandings of mentorship for leadership revealed that imagination was a key characteristic of being a nurse leader-mentor. Imagination that moved beyond fantasy to closely connect with reason was essential for nurse leader-mentors to recognize and activate the myriad possibilities available to mentees and the nursing profession more broadly.

  17. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  18. [Vaccines: history and stories between reality and imagination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Elisa; Zorzoli, Ermanno; D'Alò, Gian Loreto; Zaratti, Laura; Franco, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinations and the controversy around them always go in parallel. We identified four categories blending in various amounts of truth and imagination: history, myths, shams and frauds. Over the years, they have alternated and sometimes transformed into one another. This sharp separation into categories is certainly academic and forced. In fact, the line between these aspects is not clear enough to allow a rigid and well-defined division. Our work starts from the category containing the most truthfulness: history, and goes on to analyze two categories that add fantasy to facts: myths and shams (or better, "old wives' tales"). The history deals with the topics of variolation and the first anti-vaccine activists' disputes. Myths that arose around immunization include immune overload, homeoprophylaxis, and excessive hygiene. In this context, immunization itself risked becoming a myth, being considered not amenable to improvements. In the category of old wives' tales we find rumors about the presence in the vaccines of considerable quantities of supposedly toxic components such as aluminum, squalene, Thimerosal and nanoparticles, as well as the existence of secret techniques of vaccine preparation that involve unethical procedures. The last category, fraud, is the poorest in both truth and fantasy but it is still hard to confront. The most famous fraud is the supposed link between vaccines and autism. In this frame, disinformation is certainly a fertile substrate for the emergence both of elements close to reality and of very imaginative ones. Vaccine hesitancy is believed to be responsible for decreasing vaccine coverage and increasing the risk of vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks and epidemics. The role of communication in immunization is essential to its success, especially taking into account the deep transformations the world of information is going through. The great multitude of voices seem to carry the same weight, but it is not so in science. Web searches

  19. ANTICKÁ GENEZE DNEŠNÍCH SVÁTKŮ: IMAGINES MAIORUM A KULT PŘEDKŮ VE STAROVĚKÉM ŘÍMĚ (Ancient Genesis of Contemporary Holidays: Imagines maiorum and Cult of the Ancestors in Ancient Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartůněk Jiří

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available If the museums serve, among other things, to preserve the cultural heritage of mankind, we can then see the calendar as a museum of human feasts and festivals. At least since antiquity, they have revolved around two basic principles, life (birth, regeneration, harvest, fertility… and death. And it is the cult of worship of deceased ancestors and the associated celebrations that stand at the beginning of many celebrated festivals and tradition even today. In antiquity, the remembrance of the dead greately varied in their forms. And one of the most visible forms were the postmortem masks and portraits. These are today the „showcase“ of a number of world museums, showing the complexity of the funerary practices of ancient civilizations. In Rome, this phenomenon is called imagines maiorum and is an essential element in the Roman cult of ancestors.

  20. Knowledge and Previous Contraceptive Use by Pregnant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fear of side effects was the commonest reason for non-use of contraception. Conclusion: Pregnant teenagers are quite knowledgeable about contraceptive method but are poor users. Family life education, including contraception should be provided for teenagers and incorporated into the curricula of schools and colleges.

  1. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  2. Mental reversal of imagined melodies: a role for the posterior parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Halpern, Andrea R; Bouffard, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Two fMRI experiments explored the neural substrates of a musical imagery task that required manipulation of the imagined sounds: temporal reversal of a melody. Musicians were presented with the first few notes of a familiar tune (Experiment 1) or its title (Experiment 2), followed by a string of notes that was either an exact or an inexact reversal. The task was to judge whether the second string was correct or not by mentally reversing all its notes, thus requiring both maintenance and manipulation of the represented string. Both experiments showed considerable activation of the superior parietal lobe (intraparietal sulcus) during the reversal process. Ventrolateral and dorsolateral frontal cortices were also activated, consistent with the memory load required during the task. We also found weaker evidence for some activation of right auditory cortex in both studies, congruent with results from previous simpler music imagery tasks. We interpret these results in the context of other mental transformation tasks, such as mental rotation in the visual domain, which are known to recruit the intraparietal sulcus region, and we propose that this region subserves general computations that require transformations of a sensory input. Mental imagery tasks may thus have both task or modality-specific components as well as components that supersede any specific codes and instead represent amodal mental manipulation.

  3. Crosstalk between epithelial and mesenchymal tissues in tumorigenesis and imaginal disc development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Héctor; Weng, Ruifen; Cohen, Stephen M

    2014-07-07

    Cancers develop in a complex mutational landscape. Interaction of genetically abnormal cancer cells with normal stromal cells can modify the local microenvironment to promote disease progression for some tumor types. Genetic models of tumorigenesis provide the opportunity to explore how combinations of cancer driver mutations confer distinct properties on tumors. Previous Drosophila models of EGFR-driven cancer have focused on epithelial neoplasia. Here, we report a Drosophila genetic model of EGFR-driven tumorigenesis in which the neoplastic transformation depends on interaction between epithelial and mesenchymal cells. We provide evidence that the secreted proteoglycan Perlecan can act as a context-dependent oncogene cooperating with EGFR to promote tumorigenesis. Coexpression of Perlecan in the EGFR-expressing epithelial cells potentiates endogenous Wg/Wnt and Dpp/BMP signals from the epithelial cells to support expansion of a mesenchymal compartment. Wg activity is required in the epithelial compartment, whereas Dpp activity is required in the mesenchymal compartment. This genetically normal mesenchymal compartment is required to support growth and neoplastic transformation of the genetically modified epithelial population. We report a genetic model of tumor formation that depends on crosstalk between a genetically modified epithelial cell population and normal host mesenchymal cells. Tumorigenesis in this model co-opts a regulatory mechanism that is normally involved in controlling growth of the imaginal disc during development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. He said what? Physiological and cognitive responses to imagining and witnessing outgroup racism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Francine; Kawakami, Kerry; Page-Gould, Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    Responses to outgroup racism can have serious implications for the perpetuation of bias, yet research examining this process is rare. The present research investigated self-reported, physiological, and cognitive responses among "experiencers" who witnessed and "forecasters" who imagined a racist comment targeting an outgroup member. Although previous research indicates that experiencers self-reported less distress and chose a racist partner more often than forecasters, the present results explored the possibility that experiencers may actually be distressed in such situation but regulate their initial affective reactions. The results from Experiment 1 demonstrated that participants in both roles showed (a) no activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal stress axis (decreased cortisol) and (b) activation of the sympathetic autonomic nervous system (increased skin conductance). However, experiencers but not forecasters displayed a physiological profile indicative of an orienting response (decreased heart rate and increased skin conductance) rather than a defensive response (increased heart rate and increased skin conductance). Furthermore, the results from Experiment 2 provided additional evidence that experiencers are not distressed or regulating their emotional responses. In particular, experiencers showed less cognitive impairment on a Stroop task than forecasters. Together these findings indicate that when people actually encounter outgroup bias, they respond with apathy and do not censure the racist. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Imagining the future in children with severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lah, Suncica; Gott, Chloe; Epps, Adrienne; Parry, Louise

    2018-03-22

    Imagining the future events is thought to rely on re-combination and integration of past episodic memory traces into future events. Future and past events contain episodic and non-episodic details. Children with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) were found to have impaired recall of past episodic (but not semantic) event details. Here we examined whether severe TBI impairs construction of future events. Cross-sectional. Children with severe TBI (n = 14) and healthy controls (NC; n = 33) (i) completed tests of anterograde (narrative and relational) memory and executive skills, (ii) recalled past events and generated future events, and (iii) rated events' phenomenological qualities. Events were scored for episodic (internal) and non-episodic (external) details. The groups did not differ in generating details of future events although children with TBI recalled significantly fewer past internal (but not external) events' details relative to NCs. Moreover, the number of past internal details relative to future internal details was significantly higher in the NC group, but not in the TBI groups. Significant correlations between past and future were found for (i) episodic details in both groups, and (ii) semantic details in the NC group. The TBI group rated their events as being less significant than did the NC group. The groups did not differ on ratings of visual intensity and rehearsal. Children who have sustained severe TBI had impoverished recall of past, but not generation of future events. This unexpected dissociation between past and future event construction requires further research.

  6. O patinho feio no imaginário parental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Kolberg Lipp

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo propõe-se a discutir o tema da adoção, partindo de um caso clínico atendido através da Psicoterapia Breve Dinâmica no Centro Integrado de Psicologia - Feevale. Frente ao caso trabalhado, objetiva-se compreender o lugar que a criança adotada é convocada a ocupar no contexto familiar. O estudo aponta para diversas respostas à questão, que dizem respeito à adoção enquanto construção de um imaginário parental e as possíveis implicações no sujeito adotado quando a mesma não é revelada.The Ugly Duckling and parental imaginary. This article proposes to discuss the issue of adoption based on a clinical case observed in a Brief Dynamic Psychotherapy at Centro Integrado de Psicologia - Feevale. In this case, the authors aimed to understand the place that the adopted child is requested to occupy in the family. The study highlights several possible answers to the question, concerning adoption as a construction of a parental imaginary and the possible implications for the child when the adoption is not revealed.

  7. Nature is far more imaginative than human beings!

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Is today’s science fiction really tomorrow’s science fact (*)? If you remember the Star Trek TV series, you will have noticed that extra-dimensions are becoming more plausible than you could have imagined when Captain Kirk was leading the Enterprise. Lawrence Krauss, author of "The Physics of Star Trek", visited CERN on 28 August and told us how the LHC inspires him both as a scientist and as a writer.Wearing his cosmologist’s hat, Lawrence Krauss met the CERN audience in the Main Auditorium and gave a colloquium entitled "Cosmology as Science? From Inflation to Eternity". Wearing his other hat of bestselling writer, he told us that he finds the LHC a very inspiring human adventure. "The LHC and its experiments", he says, "represent how science can span and bridge human cultures and interests, focusing for an incredibly intense period on questions which may seem esoteric but in some way will give us insights into our place in the Universe". CERN science has inspired ...

  8. O imaginário da maternidade em Frida Kahlo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Inácio Marcondes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available O imaginário da dor e da maternidade em Frida Kahlo suscita uma reflexão sobre uma harmonia entre as imagens presentes na consciência, em contraposição com o campo onírico. Neste sentido, como pensar o surrealismo com que muitos críticos insistem em rotular a arte de Frida? Nosso método se baseia na análise de algumas pinturas de Frida e de seu diálogo com o pensamento fenomenológico acerca das imagens, questionando o movimento surrealista como mera manifestação do inconsciente na arte. A noção de maternidade está em concordância com o pensamento dos agrupamentos sociais e de esferas, postulado pelo filósofo Peter Sloterdijk. Nosso objetivo é averiguar de que maneira os objetos artísticos de Frida Kahlo revelam uma existência da dor e do maternal enquanto dado imediato da consciência.

  9. Imagine Astronomy at the Rochester Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, Valerie; Almeyda, T.; Freeman, M.; Lena, D.; Principe, D.; Punzi, K.; Sargent, B. A.; Vaddi, S.; Vazquez, B.; Vorobiev, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Imagine RIT Innovation and Creativity Festival is an annual free event held each year on the campus of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). The purpose of the festival is to showcase the work and research conducted by students and faculty at RIT, and get the public excited about science and technology. For the past three years, graduate students, post-docs and faculty in the Astrophysical Sciences and Technology graduate program at RIT have participated in the festival by showcasing their astronomy research in a fun, interactive and hands on way. We have presented work conducted with various telescopes in the fields of star formation and galaxy evolution. Here, we present our three unique exhibits and the public’s reception to each exhibit. We found that interactive games such as astro-trivia, and hands on activities such as building a scale model of the Hubble Space Telescope were the most exciting for visitors. Interactive pieces of the exhibit in general acquired the most attention, whereas posters and videos, despite their pictorial nature, were not as well received. The most successful piece of our exhibit each year has been solar observing through eclipse glasses and telescopes. Most people who observed the sun at our exhibit were left awe-struck because this was their first experience viewing an astronomical object through a telescope. We plan to improve upon our exhibit by introducing more hands-on activities that will engage the public in current astronomy research at RIT.

  10. Embodied female experience through the lens of imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Sharon R

    2010-06-01

    In 1971, I made a film entitled Self Portrait of a Nude Model Turned Cinematographer in which I explore the objectifying 'male' gaze on my body in contrast to the subjective lived experience of my body. The film was a radical challenge to the gaze that objectifies woman - and thus imprisons her - which had hitherto dominated narrative cinema. Since the objectification of women has largely excluded us from the privileged phallogocentric discourses, in this paper I hope to bring into the psychoanalytic dialogue a woman's lived experience. I will approach this by exploring how remembering this film has become a personally transformative experience as I look back on it through the lens of postmodern and feminist discourses that have emerged since it was made. In addition, I will explore how this process of imaginatively looking back on an artistic creation to generate new discourses in the present is similar to the transformative process of analysis. Lastly, I will present a clinical example, where my embodied countertransference response to a patient's subjection to the objectifying male gaze opens space for a new discourse about her body to emerge.

  11. Innovations in the Treatment of Bulimia: Transpersonal Psychology, Relaxation, Imagination, Hypnosis, Myth, and Ritual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michael H.

    1991-01-01

    Written for counselors who must help clients deal with bulimia, this article reviews bulimia's most obvious physical signs and symptoms, etiology, and behavioral characteristics. Considers innovative counseling approaches including Transpersonal Psychology, relaxation training, imagination, fantasy, hypnosis, myths, and rituals. (Author)

  12. The Poetics of Mind and Matter. Some Remarks on Ancient Images and Imagination

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thein, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 51, 1/2 (2015), s. 303-334 ISSN 0046-1628 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : Ancient art * Pliny the Elder * Flavius Philostratus * imagination * image and consciousness Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  13. Digitally manipulating memory: effects of doctored videos and imagination in distorting beliefs and memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Robert A; Wade, Kimberley A; Lindsay, D Stephen

    2009-06-01

    In prior research on false autobiographical beliefs and memories, subjects have been asked to imagine fictional events and have been exposed to false evidence that indicates that the fictional events occurred. But what are the relative contributions of imagination and false evidence toward false belief and memory construction? In the present study, subjects observed and copied various simple actions; then they viewed doctored videos that suggested that they had performed extra actions and they imagined performing some of those and some other actions. Subjects returned 2 weeks later for a memory test. False evidence or imagination alone was often sufficient to cause belief and memory distortions; in combination, they appeared to have additive or even superadditive effects. The results bear on the mechanisms underlying false beliefs and memories, and we propose legal and clinical applications of these findings.

  14. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  15. Six Memos for a Curious and Imaginative Future Scholarship in Entrepreneurship Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steyaert, Chris; Hjorth, Daniel; Gartner, William B.

    2011-01-01

    commemorative and affirmative, that is we use the work of Johannisson to explore fresh waters and invent new practices of performing scholarship in entrepreneurship studies. In the special issue, six practices are proposed that keep entrepreneurship studies imaginative: othering words and concepts, exploring...... boundaries, affecting community scholarship and entrepreneurship education, contextualizing through participation and reconceptualizing method. In the conclusion, we emphasize for the future the importance of a curious and imaginative scholarship in entrepreneurship, a utopian movement that attracts...

  16. Grip-dependent cortico-spinal excitability during grasping imagination and execution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesari, Paola; Pizzolato, Fabio; Fiorio, Mirta

    2011-06-01

    Studies converge in indicating a substantial similarity of the rules and mechanisms underlying execution, observation and imagery of actions, along with a large overlapping of their neural substrates. Recent transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies have demonstrated a muscle-specific facilitation of the observer's motor system for force requirement and type of grip during grasping observation. However, whether similar fine-tuned muscle-specificity occurs even during imagination, when subjects are free to select the most convenient grip configuration, is still unknown. Here we applied TMS over the primary motor cortex and measured the corticospinal excitability (MEP) in three muscles (FDI, ADM and FDS) while subjects imagined grasping spheres of different dimensions and materials. This range of object weights and sizes (diameters) allowed subjects to freely imagine the most suitable grip configuration among several possibilities. Activation measured during grasping imagination has been also compared to that obtained during real execution (EMG recorded from the same muscles). We found that during imagination of grasping small objects, the FDI muscle was more active than the ADM and the FDS, whereas the opposite pattern was found for big objects. Imagination of medium size objects, instead, required an equal involvement of the three muscles. The same pattern was observed when subjects were asked to perform the action. This suggests that during imagination, the cortico-spinal system is modulated in a muscle-specific/grip-specific way, as if the action would be really performed. However, when force was required (i.e., for the aluminum objects), the motor activation obtained during action execution was more fine-tuned to object dimensions than the facilitation recorded during imagination, suggesting a separate control of force production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. On the relationship between the execution, perception, and imagination of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lokman; Manson, Gerome A; Tremblay, Luc; Welsh, Timothy N

    2013-11-15

    Humans can perform, perceive, and imagine voluntary movement. Numerous investigations of these abilities have employed variants of goal-directed aiming tasks because the Fitts's law equation reliably captures the mathematical relationship between movement time (MT) and accuracy requirements. The emergence of Fitts's speed-accuracy relationship during movement execution, perception, and imagination has led to the suggestion that these processes rely on common neural codes. This common coding account is based on the notion that the neural codes used to generate an action are tightly bound to the codes that represent the perceptual consequences of that action. It is suggested that during action imagination and perception the bound codes are activated offline through an action simulation. The present study provided a comprehensive testing of this common coding hypothesis by examining the characteristics of the Fitts relationship in movement execution, perception, and imagination within the same individuals. Participants were required to imagine and perceive reciprocal aiming movements with varying accuracy requirements before and after actually executing the movements. Consistent with the common coding account, the Fitts relationship was observed in all conditions. Critically, the slopes of the regression lines across tasks were not different suggesting that the core of the speed-accuracy trade-off was consistent across conditions. In addition, it was found that incidental limb position variability scaled to the amplitude of imagined movements. This motor overflow suggests motor system activation during action imagination. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that action execution, perception, and imagination rely on a common coding system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. winged eye Induces Transdetermination of Drosophila Imaginal Disc by Acting in Concert with a Histone Methyltransferase, Su(var)3-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuko, Keita; Fuse, Naoyuki; Komaba, Kanae; Katsuyama, Tomonori; Nakajima, Rumi; Furuhashi, Hirofumi; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2018-01-02

    Drosophila imaginal disc cells exhibit a remarkable ability to convert cell fates in response to various perturbations, a phenomenon called transdetermination (TD). We previously identified winged eye (wge) as a factor that induces eye-to-wing TD upon overexpression in eye imaginal discs, but the molecular mechanisms underlying TD have remained largely unclear. Here, we found that wge induces various histone modifications and enhances the methylation of Lys9 on histone H3 (H3K9), a feature of heterochromatin. A histone methyltransferase, Su(var)3-9, is required for wge-mediated H3K9 methylation and eye-to-wing TD. Su(var)3-9 is also required for classical wound-induced TD but not for normal development, suggesting its involvement in several types of imaginal disc TDs. Transcriptome analysis revealed that wge represses eye identity genes independently of Su(var)3-9 and activates TD-related genes by acting together with Su(var)3-9. These findings provide new insights into diverse types of chromatin regulation at progressive steps of cell-fate conversions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  20. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  1. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  2. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  3. The imagination of touch: surrealist tactility in the films of Jan Švankmajer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoffer Noheden

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is a theoretical examination of tactility in the Czech surrealist filmmaker Jan Švankmajer's film Down to the Cellar (1983. Švankmajer's deployment of tactile images in a surrealist context shows the need for a discussion of the imagination's role in the embodied film experience. Departing from Laura Marks's The Skin of the Film, this article seeks to explore the surrealist embodied imagination through surrealist poetics of analogy, as defined by André Breton, and the link between these and Walter Benjamin's writings on mimesis. Finally, the film is viewed from the perspective of Gaston Bachelard's ideas of “the imagination of matter,” where matter is seen as a highly potent stimulant for the imagination. Bachelard's notion of the imagination's multisensory properties further lends credence to Švankmajer's aims to liberate the imagination of the spectator through images that invoke touch. Kristoffer Noheden is a PhD candidate in cinema studies at the Department of Media Studies, Stockholm University. In his dissertation, he examines surrealism's attempts to create a new, re-enchanting myth with a focus on its expressions in surrealist cinema. He is the co-editor, with Daniel Brodén, of the anthology I gränslandet: Nya perspektiv på film och modernism (Gidlunds, 2013. He is also the translator into Swedish of books by William S. Burroughs, Leonora Carrington, Max Ernst, and others, and co-runs the surrealist-oriented publishing house Sphinx.

  4. Remembering the past and imagining the future: Identifying and enhancing the contribution of episodic memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schacter, Daniel L; Madore, Kevin P

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that imagining or simulating future events relies on many of the same cognitive and neural processes as remembering past events. According to the constructive episodic simulation hypothesis (Schacter and Addis, 2007), such overlap indicates that both remembered past and imagined future events rely heavily on episodic memory: future simulations are built on retrieved details of specific past experiences that are recombined into novel events. An alternative possibility is that commonalities between remembering and imagining reflect the influence of more general, non-episodic factors such as narrative style or communicative goals that shape the expression of both memory and imagination. We consider recent studies that distinguish the contributions of episodic and non-episodic processes in remembering the past and imagining the future by using an episodic specificity induction – brief training in recollecting the details of a past experience – and also extend this approach to the domains of problem solving and creative thinking. We conclude by suggesting that the specificity induction may target a process of scene construction that contributes to episodic memory as well as to imagination, problem solving, and creative thinking. PMID:28163775

  5. Leg deformation during imaginal ecdysis in the downy emerald, Cordulia aenea (Odonata, Corduliidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Frantsevich, Ludmilla

    2018-04-01

    A dragonfly larva migrates from the water to the shore, perches on a plant stem and grasps it with strongly flexed legs. Adult legs inside the larval exoskeleton fit to the larval legs joint-to-joint. The adult emerges with stretched legs. During the molt, an imaginal leg must follow all the angles in exuvial joints. In turn, larval apodemes are withdrawn from imaginal legs. We visualized transient shapes of the imaginal legs by the instant fixation of insects at different moments of the molt, photographed isolated exuvial legs with the imaginal legs inside and then removed the exuvial sheath. Instant shapes of the imaginal tibia show sharp intrapodomere bends copying the angle in the larval femoro-tibial joint. The site of bending shifts distad during the molt. This is possible if the imaginal leg is pliable. The same problem of leg squeezing is also common in hemimetabolous insects as well as in other arthropods, whereas holometabolous insects overcome problems of a tight confinement either by using leg pliability in other ways but not squeezing (cyclorrhaphan flies, mosquitoes) or by pulling hardened legs out without change of their pupal zigzag configuration (moths, ants, honey bees). The pupal legs are not intended to grasp any external substrate. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Imagining Autism: Feasibility of a drama-based intervention on the social, communicative and imaginative behaviour of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadle-Brown, Julie; Wilkinson, David; Richardson, Lisa; Shaughnessy, Nicola; Trimingham, Melissa; Leigh, Jennifer; Whelton, Beckie; Himmerich, Julian

    2017-09-01

    We report the feasibility of a novel, school-based intervention, coined 'Imagining Autism', in which children with autism engage with drama practitioners though participatory play and improvisation in a themed multi-sensory 'pod' resembling a portable, tent-like structure. A total of 22 children, aged 7-12 years, from three UK schools engaged in the 10-week programme. Measures of social interaction, communication and emotion recognition, along with parent and teacher ratings, were collected before and up to 12 months after the intervention. Feasibility was evaluated through four domains: (1) process (recruitment, retention, blinding, inter-rater reliability, willingness of children to engage), (2) resources (space, logistics), (3) management (dealing with unexpected changes, ease of assessment) and (4) scientific (data outcomes, statistical analyses). Overall, the children, parents and teachers showed high satisfaction with the intervention, the amount of missing data was relatively low, key assessments were implemented as planned and evidence of potential effect was demonstrated on several key outcome measures. Some difficulties were encountered with recruitment, test administration, parental response and the logistics of setting up the pod. Following several protocol revisions and the inclusion of a control group, future investigation would be justified to more thoroughly examine treatment effects.

  7. Feel, imagine and learn! - Haptic augmented simulation and embodied instruction in physics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, In Sook

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potentials and effects of an embodied instructional model in abstract concept learning. This embodied instructional process included haptic augmented educational simulation as an instructional tool to provide perceptual experiences as well as further instruction to activate those previous experiences with perceptual simulation. In order to verify the effectiveness of this instructional model, haptic augmented simulation with three different haptic levels (force and kinesthetic, kinesthetic, and non-haptic) and instructional materials (narrative and expository) were developed and their effectiveness tested. 220 fifth grade students were recruited to participate in the study from three elementary schools located in lower SES neighborhoods in Bronx, New York. The study was conducted for three consecutive weeks in regular class periods. The data was analyzed using ANCOVA, ANOVA, and MANOVA. The result indicates that haptic augmented simulations, both the force and kinesthetic and the kinesthetic simulations, was more effective than the non-haptic simulation in providing perceptual experiences and helping elementary students to create multimodal representations about machines' movements. However, in most cases, force feedback was needed to construct a fully loaded multimodal representation that could be activated when the instruction with less sensory modalities was being given. In addition, the force and kinesthetic simulation was effective in providing cognitive grounding to comprehend a new learning content based on the multimodal representation created with enhanced force feedback. Regarding the instruction type, it was found that the narrative and the expository instructions did not make any difference in activating previous perceptual experiences. These findings suggest that it is important to help students to make a solid cognitive ground with perceptual anchor. Also, sequential abstraction process would deepen

  8. The Muslim Body in the Baroque Jesuit Imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shore, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jesuits of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries— even those living relatively closely to Muslim lands— often had no personal knowledge of Muslims, and yet the figure of the Muslim loomed large in the baroque Jesuit imagination. Because Jesuit formation involves the visualization of events and persons never seen, Jesuits of this period were in a special position to construct an imaginary Muslim, which they derived from translations of the Qur’an, from artworks, including book illustrations, and from the patterns and symbolism of Jesuit emblematics. This essay explores how baroque Jesuit visualization of the Muslim body was shaped by these factors, and also by other Europe-wide phenomena such as turcica literature.Los jesuitas de los siglos XVII y XVIII, incluso los que vivían relativamente cerca a tierras islámicas, no tenían a menudo un conocimiento personal de los musulmanes. Sin embargo, la figura del musulmán fue cobrando mucha importancia en el imaginario jesuita del Barroco. Puesto que la formación jesuita consistía en la visualización de los eventos y las personas, aunque sin haber sido vistas, los jesuitas de este período se encontraban en una situación muy especial para la construcción de un Musulmán imaginario, tomado de las traducciones del Corán, de obras de arte, incluyendo ilustraciones de libros, y de los patrones y símbolos de los emblemas jesuitas. Este ensayo explora cómo la visualización del cuerpo del musulmán en el barroco jesuita fue influida por estos factores, y también por otros fenómenos surgidos del ámbito europeo, como la literatura turca.

  9. (Re)imagining method in educational leadership and management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Do your methods properly. Eat your epistemological greens. Wash your hands after mixing with the real world. Then you will lead the good research life. Your data will be clean. Your findings warrantable. The pro- duct you will produce will be pure. Guaranteed to have a long shelf-life. Texts on educational leadership and ...

  10. Cosmology and Prehistory: Imagination on the Rise. Spotlight: Montessori Potpourri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallenberg, Harvey

    2001-01-01

    Presents the Maori cosmological perspective and the modern theory of evolution. Explains how these two creation stories can coexist. Discusses life on earth during its first 3 billion years, including concepts of singularity, Big Bang, time, space, matter, gravity, stars, planets, seas, and life. (DLH)

  11. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  12. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  13. An fMRI investigation of the relationship between future imagination and cognitive flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R P; Wiebels, K; Sumner, R L; van Mulukom, V; Grady, C L; Schacter, D L; Addis, D R

    2017-01-27

    While future imagination is largely considered to be a cognitive process grounded in default mode network activity, studies have shown that future imagination recruits regions in both default mode and frontoparietal control networks. In addition, it has recently been shown that the ability to imagine the future is associated with cognitive flexibility, and that tasks requiring cognitive flexibility result in increased coupling of the default mode network with frontoparietal control and salience networks. In the current study, we investigated the neural correlates underlying the association between cognitive flexibility and future imagination in two ways. First, we experimentally varied the degree of cognitive flexibility required during future imagination by manipulating the disparateness of episodic details contributing to imagined events. To this end, participants generated episodic details (persons, locations, objects) within three social spheres; during fMRI scanning they were presented with sets of three episodic details all taken from the same social sphere (Congruent condition) or different social spheres (Incongruent condition) and required to imagine a future event involving the three details. We predicted that, relative to the Congruent condition, future simulation in the Incongruent condition would be associated with increased activity in regions of the default mode, frontoparietal and salience networks. Second, we hypothesized that individual differences in cognitive flexibility, as measured by performance on the Alternate Uses Task, would correspond to individual differences in the brain regions recruited during future imagination. A task partial least squares (PLS) analysis showed that the Incongruent condition resulted in an increase in activity in regions in salience networks (e.g. the insula) but, contrary to our prediction, reduced activity in many regions of the default mode network (including the hippocampus). A subsequent functional

  14. Characteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brédart, Serge; Dehon, Hedwige; Ledoux, Didier; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memories of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memories (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (pmemories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all psmemories contained more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. PMID:23544039

  15. Fulminant Pneumococcal Pericarditis in a Previously Healthy Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Cvetan; Nath, Ermin; Moon, Michael; Windram, Jonathan; Graham, Michelle M

    2017-04-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare acutely life-threatening condition. Initial symptoms, signs, and investigations can be nonspecific. Echocardiography is invaluable for establishing the diagnosis and initial management. We present a case of a previously healthy patient with purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the absence of a primary focus of infection. The patient deteriorated rapidly with cardiac tamponade and septic shock and was managed successfully by a combined medical and surgical approach. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Imaginários em confronto: as brasileiras e a televisão em Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Ferin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objectivo analisar os cruzamentos entre trajectórias de vida, imaginários e percepção de conteúdos da televisão das imigrantes brasileiras em Portugal. Tendo como pano de fundo as teorias das migrações e aprofundando as teo-rias sobre a recepção, procura-se entender o papel dos Media, principalmente da televisão, nos processos de integração. Conclui-se que determinados conteúdos veiculados pelos Media são percebidos como interferindo nos quotidianos, enquanto as percepções tendem a ser selectivas e a articularem-se com as trajectórias de vida e de imigração.2 Palavras-chave: Mulheres imigrantes brasileiras; percepções dos conteúdos dos Media; consumos e usos dos Media; audiências activas e imaginação. ABSTRACT The aim of this article is to cross life trajectories, imaginaries and uses of television among Brazilian immigrants in Portugal. The objective was to identify the perceptions of information contents and the interferences of those contents in their daily lives. Having support on migration and reception theories, we seek to understand the role of media, mainly television, in the integration process. The conclusion points out to certain contents that interfere in the daily lives and to the selectivity of the perceptions. Keywords: Brazilian women immigrants; media perceptions; media uses and forms of consumption; active audiences and perceptions.

  17. Imagining transitions in old age through the Visual Matrix method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liveng, Anne; Ramvi, Ellen; Froggett, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    , from mental health to dementia and from life to death. Because, for some, these topics are hard to bear and therefore defended against and routinely excluded from everyday awareness, we used a method led by imagery and affect–the Visual Matrix–to elicit participant s’ free associative personal......-generational continuity, which together link life and death, hope and despair, separation and connectedness....

  18. Imagery, intuition and imagination in quantum physics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Andrew J.

    2018-03-01

    In response to the authors, I demonstrate how threshold concepts offer a means to both contextualise teaching and learning of quantum physics and help transform students into the culture of physics, and as a way to identify particularly troublesome concepts within quantum physics. By drawing parallels from my own doctoral research in another area of contemporary physics—special relativity—I highlight concepts that require an ontological change, namely a shift beyond the reality of everyday Newtonian experience such as time dilation and length contraction, as being troublesome concepts that can present barriers to learning with students often asking "is it real?". Similarly, the domain of quantum physics requires students to move beyond "common sense" perception as it brings into sharp focus the difference between what is experienced via the sense perceptions and the mental abstraction of phenomena. And it's this issue that highlights the important role imagery and creativity have both in quantum physics and in the evolution of physics more generally, and lies in stark contrast to the apparent mathematical focus and lack of opportunity for students to explore ontological issues evident in the authors' research. By reflecting on the authors' observations of a focus on mathematical formalisms and problem solving at the expense of alternative approaches, I explore the dialectic between Heisenberg's highly mathematical approach and Schrödinger's mechanical wave view of the atom, together with its conceptual imagery, at the heart of the evolution of quantum mechanics. In turn, I highlight the significance of imagery, imagination and intuition in quantum physics, together with the importance of adopting an epistemological pluralism—multiple ways of knowing and thinking—in physics education. Again drawing parallels with the authors' work and my own, I identify the role thought experiments have in both quantum physics education and in physics more generally. By

  19. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  20. Shaping Your Own Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peijnenburg, J

    A distinction is made between imagination in the narrow sense and in the broad sense. Narrow imagination is characterised as the ability to "see" pictures in the mind's eye or to "hear" melodies in the head. Broad imagination is taken to be the faculty of creating, either in the strict sense of

  1. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  2. Effects of Imagined Consumption and Simulated Eating Movements on Food Intake: Thoughts about Food are not Always of Advantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Haasova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Imagined food consumption is a method of elaborately imagining oneself eating a specific food that, when repeated 30 times, has been shown to decrease subsequent intake of the same food. The technique relies on a memory-based habituation process when behavioral and motivational responses to a stimulus decrease after its repeated presentation. Thus, repeatedly imagining food consumption leads to food-specific habituation effects. Large numbers of imagined consumption repetitions are effortful and time consuming and can be problematic when applied in interventions with the goal of reducing food intake. In the present study, we assessed the efficacy of the technique at smaller numbers of repetitions while testing motor simulation as a potential facilitator of the habituation-based consumption-reduction effect. 147 participants imagined eating chocolate pudding 15 or 3 consecutive times and simultaneously performed either facilitating or not-facilitating eating movements. Results showed that participants who imagined eating the chocolate pudding 15 times (M15 = 178.20, SD15 = 68.08 ate more of the pudding than those who imagined consuming it 3 times (M3 = 150.73, SD3 = 73.31. The nature of the motor movements that were performed did not impact this effect. The data suggest that the imagined food consumption technique can result in an unexpected increase in food consumption, when smaller numbers of imagination repetitions are performed.

  3. Localization of grasp representations in humans by positron emission tomography. 2. Observation compared with imagination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafton, S T; Arbib, M A; Fadiga, L; Rizzolatti, G

    1996-11-01

    Positron emission tomography imaging of cerebral blood flow was used to localize brain areas involved in the representation of hand grasping movements. Seven normal subjects were scanned under three conditions. In the first, they observed precision grasping of common objects performed by the examiner. In the second, they imagined themselves grasping the objects without actually moving the hand. These two tasks were compared with a control task of object viewing. Grasp observation activated the left rostral superior temporal sulcus, left inferior frontal cortex (area 45), left rostral inferior parietal cortex (area 40), the rostral part of left supplementary motor area (SMA-proper), and the right dorsal premotor cortex. Imagined grasping activated the left inferior frontal (area 44) and middle frontal cortex, left caudal inferior parietal cortex (area 40), a more extensive response in left rostral SMA-proper, and left dorsal premotor cortex. The two conditions activated different areas of the right posterior cerebellar cortex. We propose that the areas active during grasping observation may form a circuit for recognition of hand-object interactions, whereas the areas active during imagined grasping may be a putative human homologue of a circuit for hand grasping movements recently defined in nonhuman primates. The location of responses in SMA-proper confirms the rostrocaudal segregation of this area for imagined and real movement. A similar segregation is also present in the cerebellum, with imagined and observed grasping movements activating different parts of the posterior lobe and real movements activating the anterior lobe.

  4. Ontogenèse de l’esprit vichien et structures imaginatives chez Hegel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab Kennouche

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ontogenesis of spirit in Vico and imaginative structures in Hegel. This essay discusses somefunctions of imagination as Vico depicted them in their biblical, historical and ontogenetical aspects. The Vichian nascimento of thought as imagination aims at defining the realrelationship between mind and body outside their often false opposition. The archeology of thinking does not rest on a presumptive centered substance governing the human flesh and passions, but on a network of powerful images, enabling the first humans to implement their faculty of intellection as acuity. Reason is absent from the first processes of intelligence, as they are depicted in the New Science, first of all with the “Second Fall”. Moving from here, the paper proposes a comparison with the structure of imagination in Hegel’s philosophy, taken as a model of the primacy of a logic and divinereason, and suggests a path to interpretate even Hegel’s concept of Geist through Vico’s laws of imagination.

  5. Dissociable Contributions of Imagination and Willpower to the Malleability of Human Patience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Adrianna C; Hsu, Ming

    2017-07-01

    The ability to exercise patience is important for human functioning. Although it is known that patience can be promoted by using top-down control, or willpower, to override impatient impulses, patience is also malleable-in particular, susceptible to framing effects-in ways that are difficult to explain using willpower alone. So far, the mechanisms underlying framing effects on patience have been elusive. We investigated the role of imagination in these effects. In a behavioral experiment (Experiment 1), a classic framing manipulation (sequence framing) increased self-reported and independently coded imagination during intertemporal choice. In an investigation of neural responses during decision making (Experiment 2), sequence framing increased the extent to which patience was related to activation in brain regions associated with imagination, relative to activation in regions associated with willpower, and increased functional connectivity of brain regions associated with imagination, but not willpower, relative to regions associated with valuation. Our results suggest that sequence framing can increase the role of imagination in decision making without increasing the exertion of willpower.

  6. Reversed cortical over-activity during movement imagination following neurofeedback treatment for central neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Muhammad Abul; Fraser, Matthew; Conway, Bernard A; Allan, David B; Vučković, Aleksandra

    2016-09-01

    One of the brain signatures of the central neuropathic pain (CNP) is the theta band over-activity of wider cortical structures, during imagination of movement. The objective of the study was to investigate whether this over-activity is reversible following the neurofeedback treatment of CNP. Five paraplegic patients with pain in their legs underwent from twenty to forty neurofeedback sessions that significantly reduced their pain. In order to assess their dynamic cortical activity they were asked to imagine movements of all limbs a week before the first and a week after the last neurofeedback session. Using time-frequency analysis we compared EEG activity during imagination of movement before and after the therapy and further compared it with EEG signals of ten paraplegic patients with no pain and a control group of ten able-bodied people. Neurofeedback treatment resulted in reduced CNP and a wide spread reduction of cortical activity during imagination of movement. The reduction was significant in the alpha and beta band but was largest in the theta band. As a result cortical activity became similar to the activity of other two groups with no pain. Reduction of CNP is accompanied by reduced cortical over-activity during movement imagination. Understanding causes and consequences mechanism through which CNP affects cortical activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. O imaginário simbólico nos remakes de telenovelas

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    Mario Abel Bressan Junior

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta como objetivo: Analisar como os ícones inseridos nos remakes das telenovelas Guerra dos Sexos e Gabriela retomam um imaginário simbólico estabelecido em outra época, e se estes produzem novos significados, interferindo no sentido da história. Apresenta como recorte de análise uma cena de cada narrativa, comparando a versão original com a exibida no ano de 2012. Utiliza como amparo teórico metodológico as concepções de imaginário e imaginário simbólico de Maffesoli (2001 e 2004 e Ruiz (2003. Para a contextualização do ícone são utilizados conceitos elaborados por Charles Sanders Peirce (2008. Ao final, pode-se notar a presença de ícones semelhantes nas duas versões, mas que produzem significados diferentes.   Palavras-Chave: Imaginário. Imaginário Simbólico. Telenovela. Remake.

  8. READING LAW AND IMAGINING JUSTICE IN THE WAHKOHTOWIN CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Buhler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes an innovative community-based educational project called the “Wahkohtowin class” in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.  The class brings together former gang members, Indigenous high-school students and university students from the disciplines of law, English, and Indigenous studies to learn together about law, justice, and injustice. Students in the class read legal texts together and then discuss and critique these texts in the context of the lived experiences of people in the class. Drawing on the experience of the Wahkohtowin project, this article argues that the practice of lawyers and law students reading and interpreting legal texts and talking about justice together with members of marginalized communities is an “access-to-justice innovation.” It is an innovation because it is a model that positions lawyers and law students not as experts but, rather, as co-learners and co-creators of knowledge with people who possess important lived experiences of the impacts of law and the justice system. It resists the notion that the legal system or lawyers possess a monopoly on justice, opening space for lawyers, law students, and community members to imagine justice together. Overall, this article argues that it is important for those within the legal system who are seeking to improve access to justice to engage with, and learn from, members of marginalized communities who have direct experience with the justice system and that the Wahkohtowin class is one example of how this can happen.   Dans cet article, l’auteure analyse un projet éducatif communautaire innovateur appelé la « Wahkohtowin class » (classe de Wahkohtowin, qui se déroule à Saskatoon, en Saskatchewan.  La classe regroupe d’anciens membres de gangs, des étudiants autochtones de niveau collégial et des étudiants universitaires issus des disciplines du droit, de l’anglais et des études autochtones, qui sont appelés à se familiariser ensemble

  9. The practice of nature-study: What reformers imagined and what teachers did

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doris, Ellen Elizabeth

    The nature-study movement was an attempt to reform elementary education in America. It took place from about 1890 to 1930. Nature-Study, as envisioned by reformers, featured outdoor work and first-hand observation of common plants, animals and phenomenon. It stressed self expression and independent thinking. It also emphasized emotions and aesthetics, aiming to help children develop both knowledge of nature and an enduring love for it. Nature-study's advocates encouraged the expansion of school subject matter beyond the "three Rs." They also challenged the traditional pedagogy that revolved around rote memorization, recitation, and quiet classrooms. My investigation of the nature-study movement is focused on the practice of nature-study in schools. I first consider practice as it was imagined by reformers. I review the many specific suggestions they made, as well as more general statements about nature-study's aims, to learn what reformers hoped teachers would do. I then look at how nature-study was actually carried out. I use accounts written by teachers, children and observers, together with photographs, correspondence and reproductions of children's work to discover the range of ways in which nature-study materialized as teachers took up the subject with pupils. I also look closely at two particular versions of nature-study: one that developed in Chicago under the influence of Wilbur Jackman, and another that was promoted in New York State by faculty from Cornell's College of Agriculture. As a result of focusing in this way, I develop a detailed picture of what nature-study's advocates expected of teachers. I also describe what teachers, in specific instances, did. In addition, I offer some general conclusions about how nature-study was conceived of and carried out. I discuss how these conclusions relate to previous interpretations of the movement, and consider the relevance of the nature-study movement for contemporary educators, particularly those concerned

  10. Original article The Imagination in Sport Questionnaire – reliability and validity characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Budnik-Przybylska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Imagery is an effective performance enhancement technique. Imagery has been described previously in a range of psychological domains. Measuring imagery is critical in research and practice in sport. Self-report questionnaires are the most regularly used method. The aim of the present study was to examine reliability and validity characteristics of the Imagination in Sport Questionnaire (Kwestionariusz Wyobraźni w Sporcie – KWS. Participants and procedure Five and hundred eight (N = 326 – study I; N = 182 – study II Polish athletes completed questionnaires (169 male, 156 female – study I; 139 male, 43 female – study II, aged between 12 and 57 years (M = 22.08, SD = 8.18 – study I; age 19-24, M = 20.46, SD = 1.1 – study II, at different competitive levels and recruited from various sports disciplines. Results Results indicated the maintained good stability and internal consistency over a 3-week period. Results of confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the 7-factor structure of the KWS resulted in acceptable model fit indices (NC = 2416.63, df = 1203, GFI = 0.944, AGFI = 0.944, CFI = 0.786, RMSEA = 0.056, p (RMSEA < 0.05 = 0.002 – first study; NC = 2234.39, df = 1203, GFI = 0.673, AGFI = = 0.640, CFI = 0.691, RMSEA = 0.069, p (RMSEA < 0.05 = = 0.000 – second study. Concurrent validity was supported by examination of the relationships between the KWS subscales and the SIAM (Sport Imagery Ability Measure in Polish adaptation. In addition, differences in athletes’ imagery ability were examined across competitive levels, and in relation to both gender and age. Conclusions Overall, the results supported the reliability and construct validity of the KWS.

  11. LITERATURE AND LIFE: THE DECLINE AND FALL OF APARTHEID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Africa, all areas of life were influenced by "the politics of race"2 during the apart- heid era. In her imaginative rendering of South African society, Gordimer has depicted the various stages of the apartheid system from its introduction in the late forties and fifties; entrenchment in the sixties and seventies; gradual decline in the ...

  12. Jung i Bachelard. Problem wyobraxni i mitu (JUNG AND BACHELARD. THE PROBLEM OF IMAGINATION AND MYTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Błocian

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to some specific 'area between' interpretative achievements of Freud, Jung and Bachelard. The imagination and myth problems are involved in more general perspective of philospophical conception of man in their works. Different models of human reason and imagination idealizing forces influenced procedures of an imaginal thinking and image itself interpretations. The basis of comparation is the unconscious (Freudian 'repressed unconscious', Jungian collective unconsciuos, complex and archetype conceptions as some kind of instruments to understand image formating process, phantasies, mythical and poetical image. An example of these differences is their interpretations of Promethean myth. A way of understand dream image, Anima and Animus archetypes refer to their specific theoretical frames.

  13. Dementia and Imagination: a mixed-methods protocol for arts and science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, Gill; Newman, Andrew; Burholt, Vanessa; Woods, Bob; O'Brien, Dave; Baber, Michael; Hounsome, Barry; Parkinson, Clive; Tischler, Victoria

    2016-11-02

    Dementia and Imagination is a multidisciplinary research collaboration bringing together arts and science to address current evidence limitations around the benefits of visual art activities in dementia care. The research questions ask: Can art improve quality of life and well-being? If it does make a difference, how does it do this-and why? Does it have wider social and community benefits? This mixed-methods study recruits participants from residential care homes, National Health Service (NHS) wards and communities in England and Wales. A visual art intervention is developed and delivered as 1×2-hour weekly group session for 3 months in care and community settings to N=100 people living with dementia. Quantitative and qualitative data are collected at 3 time points to examine the impact on their quality of life, and the perceptions of those who care for them (N=100 family and professional carers). Repeated-measures systematic observations of well-being are obtained during the intervention (intervention vs control condition). The health economics component conducts a social return on investment evaluation of the intervention. Qualitative data are collected at 3 time points (n=35 carers/staff and n=35 people living with dementia) to explore changes in social connectedness. Self-reported outcomes of the intervention delivery are obtained (n=100). Focus groups with intervention participants (n=40) explore perceptions of impact. Social network analysis of quantitative and qualitative data from arts and healthcare professionals (N=100) examines changes in perceptions and practice. The study is approved by North Wales Research Ethics Committee-West. A range of activities will share the research findings, including international and national academic conferences, quarterly newsletters and the project website. Public engagement projects will target a broad range of stakeholders. Policy and practice summaries will be developed. The visual art intervention protocol will

  14. Energy Road-map 2050: Towards regional and local energy Road-maps. IMAGINE seminar 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillot, Herve; Pidoux, Blandine

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 IMAGINE Seminar held in Brussels on 9 November 2011 united around fifty representatives from Energy Cities network member cities as well as representatives from the European Parliament and the Commission, various industrial sectors and civil society organisations. Participants were invited to share their visions of their action by 2040-2050 in a sustainable and desirable city, having achieved its energy transition. The spontaneous and inspiring discussions that followed broached the following questions: - What is and should be the role of the local level in the EU Energy Road-map? - What if European local authorities were to develop their own 'Energy 2050' Road-maps? - What local and regional policies can social and economic players use for contributing to achieving European targets? - Under what conditions is the 'low energy cities with a high quality of life for all' concept relevant? The debate helped outline a shared, global vision as a step towards European collective dynamics giving territories a major role in energy transition. At the end of the day, participants from very different backgrounds converged on the following key points: - Like European institutions, territories must develop a long-term vision, failing which they will be unable to take meaningful action, mobilise players and make the right decisions in the short-term. - The energy-territory relationship, from efficient energy use to supply policies, is a major democratic challenge. - Although a number of technologies are already available, they still have to be integrated so that citizens can satisfy their needs and become fully accountable for their energy use. - Energy strategies must help meet a number of local challenges: social and territorial cohesion, employment and economic development, environmental protection and quality of life. To do so, they need to be designed taking those they are supposed to serve, i.e. citizens, into consideration. - The interaction

  15. Self-imagination/Add Imagination on Personal Experiences: Wacini Laredj’s Dakira El-Ma (Water’s Memory Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassina Laoudj

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The autobiographical novel differs from the real autobiography since the latter relies on personal and real facts of the writing ego, and the writer is not allowed to say or talk of something that is not related to him. The writer includes his personal experience in the writing according to the conditions set by Philippe Lejeune. Whereas the autobiographical novel belongs to the novelistic genre in which the writer has recourse in the first place to the element of imagination in his artistic work, taking advantage of the factors and techniques which make his novel a higher artistic work since it provides aesthetics. The proof is that the autobiographical novel is given the term “Self-imagination” at present because of its propensity for imagination in describing real facts that the writer reports reality to others with his creative composition

  16. Play, Imagination, and Creativity: A Brief Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2012-01-01

    What the ultimate goal for education is to help students develop their capabilities and in turn to maximize their potentials into practical uses in everyday life. In fact, teachers are critical resources at their disposal to facilitate maximum students learning experience and to release students' potentials in classrooms. It is believed that…

  17. Imagining Literacy Equity: Theorizing Flows of Community Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Norma

    2016-01-01

    Theorizing flows of community practices implicates three interrelated themes: (1) theorizing practices rather than practicing theories, (2) theorizing our stories, and (3) research as responsibility to the communities in which we work. One way to claim literacy research as a principled epistemological stance is to confront the real-life effects of…

  18. Imagining Lowry: A Puebloan Village Rises in Cyberspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    "People in the Past" is a CD-ROM that brings Lowry Ruin in southwest Colorado to life. Intended particularly for elementary and middle school students, the CD applies new technologies and includes Native American views in historical interpretation of the Puebloan site in 1125. Related projects include a teacher activity guide and…

  19. Implementing an Imaginative Unit: Wonders of the Water Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrennikoff, Margo

    2006-01-01

    The grade three curriculum set out by the British Columbia Ministry of Education has four categories for science: Processes of Science, Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth and Space Science. Within each of these categories there are numerous topics to teach. For example, the physical science curriculum requires students to learn about…

  20. At Home with Jane Austen: Imagining the Colonial Connection in Mansfield Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanka Grzegorczyk

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Jane Austen's Mansfield Park in the context of the complex relationship between imaginative literature and the experience of empire. Specifically, it argues that the way Austen's novel plays with the imperial experience is more ambivalent than many critics have indicated. It suggests that underlying the imaginative conceptualization of the relations between metropole and colony are certain evasions and contradictions in which the novel consciously abounds. A close reading of the novel demonstrates how issues related to metropole and colony may be articulated within the literary mainstream, and why such narrative articulation is important.