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Sample records for previously healthy infants

  1. Event Sequence Variability in Healthy Swallowing: Building on Previous Findings

    OpenAIRE

    Molfenter, Sonja M.; Leigh, Chelsea; Steele, Catriona M.

    2014-01-01

    This study builds on previous work by Kendall, Leonard and McKenzie, which investigated event sequence variability for 12 paired-events during swallowing by healthy volunteers. They identified four event pairs, which always occurred in a stereotyped order as well as a most-common occurring overall order of events during swallowing. In the current study, we investigate overall event sequencing and the same four paired-events in a sample of swallows by healthy, young (under 45 years old) volunt...

  2. Urban parents' perceptions of healthy infant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Stephanie A; Leite, Kelly R; Shaffer, Michele L; Birch, Leann L; Paul, Ian M

    2011-08-01

    To examine how urban parents' perceptions of healthy infant size and growth relate to objective weight-for-length percentiles of their children, parents of 222 (69% minority) 6- to 27-month-old infants were surveyed. In all, 41% of parents said growth charts had never been explained to them, and 31% were not confident they understood the meaning of chart percentiles. A total of 20% of parents preferred their child weigh ≥75th percentile, and these children had higher mean weight-for-length percentiles than their peers (P = .05). Similarly, 37% of parents agreed that "a chubby baby is a healthy baby," and these children had higher mean weight-for-length percentiles than others in the cohort ( P = .02). Additionally, 58% of parents ranked a growth curve with consistent growth at the 10th percentile as the "least healthy" of 6 infant growth curves. Growth charts are not consistently explained to or understood by urban parents, and many prefer early life growth patterns associated with later obesity.

  3. Cryptococcal meningitis in a previously healthy child | Chimowa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An 8-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 3 weeks history of headache, neck stiffness, deafness, fever and vomiting and was diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis. She had documented hearing loss and was referred to tertiary-level care after treatment with fluconazole did not improve her neurological ...

  4. Event sequence variability in healthy swallowing: building on previous findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Sonja M; Leigh, Chelsea; Steele, Catriona M

    2014-04-01

    This study builds on previous work by Kendall, Leonard, and McKenzie, which investigated event sequence variability for 12 paired events during swallowing by healthy volunteers. They identified four event pairs that always occurred in a stereotyped order and a most common occurring overall order of events during swallowing. In the current study, we investigated overall event sequencing and the same four paired events in a sample of swallows by healthy young (under 45 years old) volunteers. Data were collected during a 16-swallow lateral videofluoroscopy protocol, which included manipulations of bolus volume, barium density, bolus viscosity, and swallow cueing. Our results agreed with previous findings that variable event sequencing is found in healthy swallowing, and, in regard to obligatory sequencing of two paired events, movement of the arytenoids toward the base of the epiglottis begins prior to upper esophageal sphincter (UES) opening and maximum hyolaryngeal approximation occurs after UES opening. However, our data failed to replicate the previous findings that there is obligatory sequencing of maximum pharyngeal constriction after maximal UES distension and the UES opens before bolus arrival at the UES. The most common observed overall event sequence reported by Kendall et al. was observed in only 4/293 swallows in our dataset. Manipulations of bolus volume, bolus viscosity, barium concentration, swallow cueing, and swallow repetitions could not completely account for the differences observed between the two studies.

  5. Haemophilus influenzae type f meningitis in a previously healthy boy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronit, Andreas; Berg, Ronan M G; Bruunsgaard, Helle

    2013-01-01

    Non-serotype b strains of Haemophilus influenzae are extremely rare causes of acute bacterial meningitis in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 14-year-old boy, who was previously healthy and had been immunised against H influenzae serotype b (Hib......). The causative pathogen was identified as H influenzae serotype f (Hif), and was successfully treated with ceftriaxone. An immunological evaluation revealed transient low levels of immunoglobulins but no apparent immunodeficiency was found 2 years after the clinical insult....

  6. Fulminant Pneumococcal Pericarditis in a Previously Healthy Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Cvetan; Nath, Ermin; Moon, Michael; Windram, Jonathan; Graham, Michelle M

    2017-04-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a rare acutely life-threatening condition. Initial symptoms, signs, and investigations can be nonspecific. Echocardiography is invaluable for establishing the diagnosis and initial management. We present a case of a previously healthy patient with purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the absence of a primary focus of infection. The patient deteriorated rapidly with cardiac tamponade and septic shock and was managed successfully by a combined medical and surgical approach. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tolerance of a standard intact protein formula versus a partially hydrolyzed formula in healthy, term infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marunycz John D

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents who perceive common infant behaviors as formula intolerance-related often switch formulas without consulting a health professional. Up to one-half of formula-fed infants experience a formula change during the first six months of life. Methods The objective of this study was to assess discontinuance due to study physician-assessed formula intolerance in healthy, term infants. Infants (335 were randomized to receive either a standard intact cow milk protein formula (INTACT or a partially hydrolyzed cow milk protein formula (PH in a 60 day non-inferiority trial. Discontinuance due to study physician-assessed formula intolerance was the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes included number of infants who discontinued for any reason, including parent-assessed. Results Formula intolerance between groups (INTACT, 12.3% vs. PH, 13.7% was similar for infants who completed the study or discontinued due to study physician-assessed formula intolerance. Overall study discontinuance based on parent- vs. study physician-assessed intolerance for all infants (14.4 vs.11.1% was significantly different (P = 0.001. Conclusion This study demonstrated no difference in infant tolerance of intact vs. partially hydrolyzed cow milk protein formulas for healthy, term infants over a 60-day feeding trial, suggesting nonstandard partially hydrolyzed formulas are not necessary as a first-choice for healthy infants. Parents frequently perceived infant behavior as formula intolerance, paralleling previous reports of unnecessary formula changes. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00666120

  8. Serum lutein concentrations in healthy term infants fed human milk or infant formula with lutein

    OpenAIRE

    Bettler, Jodi; Zimmer, J. Paul; Neuringer, Martha; DeRusso, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Lutein is a carotenoid that may play a role in eye health. Human milk typically contains higher concentrations of lutein than infant formula. Preliminary data suggest there are differences in serum lutein concentrations between breastfed and formula-fed infants. Aim of the study To measure the serum lutein concentrations among infants fed human milk or formulas with and without added lutein. Methods A prospective, double-masked trial was conducted in healthy term formula-fed infant...

  9. FEEDING GUIDELINES FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS (START HEALTHY PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Butte

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The dietary guidelines for americans contains recommendations on diets and healthy lifestyles but it does not deal with specificities of the diet and feeding breast and small infants (to 2 years. However, parents and carecgivers need practical recommendations on feeding infants and toddlers that are necessary to ensure a normal growth and to create the basis for forming healthy food habits, which apart from other benefits might help prevent the development of obesity and other diseases in both childhood and adulthood. The feeding guidelines for infants and toddlers is aimed at providing parents and carecgivers with practical information on feeding breast and small infants. It is intendced for adding and broadening recommendations worked out by other expert groups and organizations. The article provides a substantiation of the guidelines. The methodology, results and a complete reference list used to work out the recommendations are presented in another document.Key words: infants, nutrition.

  10. Antibiotic resistance potential of the healthy preterm infant gut microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Few studies have investigated the gut microbiome of infants, fewer still preterm infants. In this study we sought to quantify and interrogate the resistome within a cohort of premature infants using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. We describe the gut microbiomes from preterm but healthy infants, characterising the taxonomic diversity identified and frequency of antibiotic resistance genes detected. Results Dominant clinically important species identified within the microbiomes included C. perfringens, K. pneumoniae and members of the Staphylococci and Enterobacter genera. Screening at the gene level we identified an average of 13 antimicrobial resistance genes per preterm infant, ranging across eight different antibiotic classes, including aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones. Some antibiotic resistance genes were associated with clinically relevant bacteria, including the identification of mecA and high levels of Staphylococci within some infants. We were able to demonstrate that in a third of the infants the S. aureus identified was unrelated using MLST or metagenome assembly, but low abundance prevented such analysis within the remaining samples. Conclusions We found that the healthy preterm infant gut microbiomes in this study harboured a significant diversity of antibiotic resistance genes. This broad picture of resistances and the wider taxonomic diversity identified raises further caution to the use of antibiotics without consideration of the resident microbial communities.

  11. The bioelectrical impedance vector migration in healthy infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L'Abee, Carianne; Poorts-Borger, Petra H.; Gorter, Erna H. G. M.; Piccoli, Antonio; Stolk, Ronald P.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    Background & aims: Detecting young children with high amount of body fat is important to intervene in the development of obesity. The aim of this study is to gain inside in the bioelectrical impedance vector analysis in healthy infants. Methods: Repeated measurements of whole body reactance and

  12. Prophylactic vitamin D in healthy infants: assessing the need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Agustina; Rodríguez, Julián; Carvajal, Ignacio; Prieto, M A Luz; Rodríguez, Rosa M A; Pérez, Ana M A; Cepeda, Angeles; Nuño, Fernando; Santos, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    The objective was to evaluate the need for vitamin D prophylaxis in healthy infants. This was a prospective and randomized study performed at primary care clinics. Eighty-eight full-term 1-month-old healthy infants were randomly assigned to receive (n = 41) or not (n = 47) 402 IU/d of vitamin D for 1 year. Primary outcome measures were serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations at 3, 6, and 12 months of age; secondary measures included data on feeding, habitat, season of birth, sun exposure, and physical examination. At 3 and 6 months of age, serum 25OHD levels (±SD) were significantly higher (P vitamin D deficiency. Serum 25OHD and PTH concentrations were weakly but significantly correlated (r = -0.29, P = .009) at 3 months of age. Healthy infants without vitamin D prophylaxis had lower circulating concentrations of 25OHD at 3 and 6 months of age, the lowest value being found in 3-month breast-fed infants. The clinical relevance of these findings is probably negligible because serum 25OHD levels spontaneously increased with age and were not associated with high serum PTH. Clinical manifestations of rickets were not observed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lutein-fortified infant formula fed to healthy term infants: evaluation of growth effects and safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Anne M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Objectives Breast milk contains lutein derived from the mother's diet. This carotenoid is currently not added to infant formula, which has a small and variable lutein content from innate ingredients. This study was conducted to compare the growth of infants fed lutein-fortified infant formula with that of infants fed infant formula without lutein fortification. Subjects/Methods This 16-week study was prospective, randomized, controlled, and double-blind with parallel groups of healthy term infants fed either control formula (Wyeth S-26 Gold, designated as Gold or experimental formula (Wyeth S-26 Gold fortified with lutein at 200 mcg/l, designated as Gold + Lutein. Two hundred thirty-two (232 infants ≤ 14 days postnatal age were randomized and 220 (94.8% completed the study. Weight (g, head circumference (cm, and length (cm were measured at Weeks 4, 8, 12, and 16. The primary endpoint was weight gain (g/day from baseline to Week 16. Safety was assessed through monitoring of study events (SEs throughout the study and evaluation of selected blood chemistry tests performed at Week 16. Results Infants in both treatment groups demonstrated appropriate growth. No differences between treatment groups were found in any of the measures of growth at any of the measurement time points. Both study formulas were well tolerated. The mean values of all measured blood chemistry parameters fell within the modified normal ranges for infants, and the values for both groups for any measured parameter were similar. Conclusions Infants fed lutein-fortified S-26 Gold demonstrated growth equivalent to that of infants fed unfortified lutein formula.

  14. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Lauritzen, L.; Kjaer, T.M.R.

    2007-01-01

    (n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 x 2 intervention in 64 healthy...... Danish infants, who received cow's milk or infant formula alone or with fish oil (FO) (3.4 +/- 1.1 mL/d) from 9 to 12 mo of age. Before and after the intervention, fatty acid composition of erythrocyte membranes, plasma IgE, C-reactive protein, and soluble IL-2 receptor concentrations were measured. TNF......-alpha, INF-gamma, and IL-10 concentrations in whole-blood cultures, stimulated for 22 h with LPS+phytohema-glutinin (PHA) or Lactobacillus paracasei, were also determined. IgA was measured in feces when infants were 10 mo of age. FO supplementation effectively raised erythrocyte (n-3) PUFA (P

  15. Corpus callosum and motor development in healthy term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chaw-Liang; Hung, Kun-Long; Yang, Yi-Chen; Ho, Che-Sheng; Chiu, Nan-Chang

    2015-02-01

    Corpus callosum atrophy has been associated with cognitive and motor deficits in elderly people. However, the role of the corpus callosum in infant development is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of corpus callosum size on motor development in infants. We investigated cerebral ultrasonograms performed on healthy infants aged 4 to 6 months. The correlation between the development of rolling over and corpus callosum size was calculated for determining odds ratios. Covariates, including gestational age, sex, age in months, and head circumference were tested using logistic regression. We investigated 244 cerebral ultrasonograms performed on term infants from 2009 to 2011. The percentage of rolling over development in the examined infants increased with age (47.8%, 78.4%, and 97.5% at ages 4, 5, and 6 months, respectively). There was no significant difference in the development of rolling over between male (67.9%) and female (73.6%) children or among different gestational age groups. After the other covariates in the logistic model were adjusted, only age and corpus callosum size (length and thickness) were significantly associated with the development of rolling over: 3.86 times the odds (confidence interval, 2.1 to 7.0) for age in months, 1.14 times the odds (confidence interval, 1.0 to 1.3) for corpus callosum length, and 3.92 times the odds (confidence interval, 1.6 to 9.6) for corpus callosum thickness. Corpus callosum size is positively associated with the development of rolling over in healthy term infants, independent of the gestational age, sex, age, and head circumference. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The bioelectrical impedance vector migration in healthy infants

    OpenAIRE

    L'Abee, Carianne; Poorts-Borger, Petra H.; Gorter, Erna H. G. M.; Piccoli, Antonio; Stolk, Ronald P.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Background & aims: Detecting young children with high amount of body fat is important to intervene in the development of obesity. The aim of this study is to gain inside in the bioelectrical impedance vector analysis in healthy infants. Methods: Repeated measurements of whole body reactance and resistance were assessed, using a 50 kHz frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, in 51 boys and 62 girls during infancy. Bivariate vector analysis, which can be used to determine tissue hydration a...

  17. Parenting Stress in Parents of Infants With Congenital Heart Disease and Parents of Healthy Infants: The First Year of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfenshtein, Nadya; Hanlon, Alexandra L; Deatrick, Janet A; Medoff-Cooper, Barbara

    2017-12-01

    While we know that the parents of infants with congenital heart disease (CHD), the most prevalent group of congenital anomalies, experience increased parenting stress, the stress levels throughout infancy have yet to be studied. Stress experienced by parents beyond the normative stress of parenting can interfere with parenting processes, and bear adverse family outcomes. This prospective cohort study was conducted to describe and compare parenting stress levels during infancy between parents of infants with complex CHD and parents of healthy infants. The Parenting Stress Index-Long Form was distributed to parents of infants with complex CHD and parents of healthy infants (N = 129). T-tests were used to compare stress between groups at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of age. Parents of infants with complex CHD had higher parenting stress than parents of healthy infants on multiple subscales on the Child and Parent Domains, at 3 months of age. The stress remained higher on the demandingness subscale throughout infancy. Parents of CHD infants also demonstrated significantly higher stress scores on the life stress subscale at 12 months of age. Findings highlight stressful periods related to parenting infants with CHD, which may increase existing psycho-social risk for parents of infants with CHD. Early family intervention may promote parental adaptation to the illness, and help establishing healthy parenting practices.

  18. The bioelectrical impedance vector migration in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Abée, Carianne; Poorts-Borger, Petra H; Gorter, Erna H G M; Piccoli, Antonio; Stolk, Ronald P; Sauer, Pieter J J

    2010-04-01

    Detecting young children with high amount of body fat is important to intervene in the development of obesity. The aim of this study is to gain inside in the bioelectrical impedance vector analysis in healthy infants. Repeated measurements of whole body reactance and resistance were assessed, using a 50kHz frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis, in 51 boys and 62 girls during infancy. Bivariate vector analysis, which can be used to determine tissue hydration and soft tissue mass, was conducted. The 95% confidence intervals of the mean vectors for different age groups and the 95%, 75% and 50% tolerance intervals were plotted, using resistance and reactance components standardized by the participant's height. During infancy impedance vectors changed significantly: A vector migration of the Xc/H of 8.50ohm/m and the R/H of -95.68ohm/m between the age of two months and eight to twelve months (p=0.0001) was observed. Bivariate, reference tolerance intervals of the impedance vectors for healthy infants at the age of two months are presented. Our results show a significant impedance vector migration during the first year of life. New reference tolerance intervals for the second month of life were constructed. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of Growth of Healthy Term Infants Fed Extensively Hydrolyzed Protein- and Amino Acid-Based Infant Formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene W. Borschel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this narrative review was to assess published growth data for healthy, term, infants consuming extensively hydrolyzed protein-based (EHF, or amino acid-based formulas (AAF. These data may be of use to clinicians managing infants with medical conditions consuming these products. A search was conducted using key terms: amino acid-based, hydrolysate, hydrolyzed, hydrolysed, infant formula, infant formulae or formulas, baby formula, or formulae or formulas, infant, infants, infantile, and growth. Seven controlled, randomized, prospective growth trials of healthy term infants fed EHFs or AAFs at similar time points during the first four months of age met these and other criteria, including that the trial was published in a peer-reviewed journal, subjects were enrolled by ≤14 days of age and were exclusively formula-fed at entry and throughout the duration of the trial, and infants were assessed at regular intervals with weight measures available ideally at 14 days, one, two, three, and four months of age. Results suggested that healthy infants receiving commonly available EHFs and AAFs do not appear to experience accelerated growth as reported for infants fed many standard formulas. Differences in growth patterns were observed with some formulas supporting normative growth patterns during the first four months but others appearing to support markedly lower growth patterns. These observations should be confirmed in well-designed prospective randomized trials. Until that time, it is recommended that EHFs and AAFs be chosen carefully with individual patient needs considered.

  20. Orbital cellulitis caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a previously healthy neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Tzu-Hui; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Chu, Yen-Chang; Lee, Chien-Yu; Lien, Reyin

    2013-04-01

    A 30-day-old, previously healthy, near-term neonate presented with fever and swelling of the left eye. Orbital cellulitis of the left eye was diagnosed by computed tomography. Both blood culture and pus that was drained from the orbital abscess were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which was found to be a strain indigenous to the local community by a molecular method. Using vancomycin therapy and surgical drainage, the infant recovered uneventfully. Orbital cellulitis in neonates may rapidly progress to abscess formation, even to sepsis, and S. aureus is the most common pathogen. With the increasing prevalence of community-associated MRSA, empiric antibiotics effective against MRSA should be first considered in endemic areas. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Possible pulmonary Rhizopus oryzae infection in a previously healthy child after a near-drowning incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Magdalena M; Lippmann, Norman; Kobelt, Louise; Petzold-Quinque, Stefanie; Ritter, Lutz; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Manuela

    2016-06-01

    This article reports on a previously healthy 17-month-old boy who developed pulmonary mucormycosis after a near-drowning incident in a goose pond. The patient survived without neurological sequelae and recovered, under treatment with amphotericin B, from the rare and often invasive fungal infection with Rhizopus spp., usually occurring in immunodeficient patients.

  2. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Hospitalizations in Healthy Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, Andrea V.; Samuel, Miny; Lohr, Kathleen N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have explored the risk for and impact of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection requiring hospitalization among healthy preterm infants born at 29–35 weeks of gestational age not given RSV immunoprophylaxis. We performed a systematic review and qualitative synthesis of these studies. Methods: Two experienced reviewers used prespecified inclusion/exclusion criteria to screen titles/abstracts and full-text studies using MEDLINE, Embase, BIOSIS and Cochrane Library (January 1, 1985, to November 6, 2014). We abstracted data on risk factors for RSV hospitalization, incidence and short- and long-term outcomes of RSV hospitalization. Using standard procedures, we assessed study risk of bias and graded strength of evidence (SOE). Results: We identified 4754 records and reviewed 27. Important risk factors for RSV hospitalization included young age during the RSV season, having school-age siblings and day-care attendance, with odds ratios >2.5 in at least one study (high SOE). Incidence rates for RSV hospitalizations ranged from 2.3% to 10% (low SOE). Length of hospital stays ranged from 3.8 to 6.1 days (low SOE). Recurrent wheezing rates ranged from 20.7% to 42.8% 1 to 2 years after RSV hospitalization (low SOE). Conclusions: Young chronological age and some environmental risk factors are important clinical indicators of an increased risk of RSV hospitalization in healthy preterm infants 32 to 35 weeks of gestational age. SOE was low for estimates of incidence of RSV hospitalizations, in-hospital resource use and recurrent wheezing in this population. Studies were inconsistent in study characteristics, including weeks of gestational age, age during RSV season and control for confounding factors. PMID:27093166

  3. Posture and movement in healthy preterm infants in supine position in and outside the nest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrari, F.; Bertoncelli, N.; Gallo, C.; Roversi, M. F.; Guerra, M. P.; Ranzi, A.; Madders-Algra, M.

    Objective: To evaluate whether lying in a nest affects the posture and spontaneous movements of healthy preterm infants. Method: 10 healthy preterm infants underwent serial video recording in the supine position, when lying in a nest and outside it, at three ages: 30-33 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA)

  4. Infants Prefer Tunes Previously Introduced by Speakers of Their Native Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, Gaye; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Infants show attentional biases for certain individuals over others based on various cues. However, the role of these biases in shaping infants' preferences and learning is not clear. This study asked whether infants' preference for native speakers (Kinzler, Dupoux, & Spelke, 2007) would modulate their preferences for tunes. After getting…

  5. Ecthyma gangrenosum in the periorbital region in a previously healthy immunocompetent woman without bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somenath Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG is a cutaneous lesion classically associated with potentially fatal Pseudomonas septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other bacterial and fungal pathogens have also been implicated. Although EG typically occurs in immunocompromised or neutropenic patients, it may occasionally affect a previously healthy person. The cutaneous findings are characteristic with small indurated papulovesicles progressing rapidly to necrotic ulcers with surrounding erythema and a central black Eschar. While lesions can occur at any site, most are commonly found over the buttocks, perineum, limbs, and axillae. We describe a case of EG in periorbital region in a previously healthy woman who responded to appropriate antibiotic treatment for Pseudomonas. It is very important to establish the diagnosis early so that appropriate systemic antibiotic therapy can be initiated to reduce morbidity and potential mortality.

  6. Pulmonary Aspergillosis in a Previously Healthy 13-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan H. Rayment

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is a rare, polygenic primary immunodeficiency. In this case report, we describe a previously healthy 13-year-old boy who presented with multifocal pulmonary aspergillosis and was subsequently diagnosed with an autosomal recessive form of chronic granulomatous disease. CGD has a variable natural history and age of presentation and should be considered when investigating a patient with recurrent or severe infections with catalase-positive organisms.

  7. Clinical characteristics of disseminated cryptococcosis in previously healthy children in China

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Li-Wei; Jiao, An-Xia; Wu, Xi-Rong; Zhao, Shun-Ying; Ma, Yun; Liu, Gang; Yin, Ju; Xu, Bao-Ping; Shen, Kun-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background Disseminated cryptococcosis is a rare and fatal disease, and limited data exist regarding it in children. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of disseminated cryptococcosis in previously healthy children in China. Methods Hospitalized patients with disseminated cryptococcosis were enrolled during January 1996 to December 2015 in Beijing Children?s Hospital, Capital Medical University, China. Data on clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatment, and ...

  8. Understanding infants' and children's social learning about foods: previous research and new prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shutts, Kristin; Kinzler, Katherine D; DeJesus, Jasmine M

    2013-03-01

    Developmental psychologists have devoted significant attention to investigating how children learn from others' actions, emotions, and testimony. Yet most of this research has examined children's socially guided learning about artifacts. The present article focuses on a domain that has received limited attention from those interested in the development of social cognition: food. We begin by reviewing the available literature on infants' and children's development in the food domain and identify situations in which children evidence both successes and failures in their interactions with foods. We focus specifically on the role that other people play in guiding what children eat and argue that understanding patterns of successes and failures in the food domain requires an appreciation of eating as a social phenomenon. We next propose a series of questions for future research and suggest that examining food selection as a social phenomenon can shed light on mechanisms underlying children's learning from others and provide ideas for promoting healthy social relationships and eating behaviors early in development.

  9. Spinal Arachnoiditis as a Complication of Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in Non-HIV Previously Healthy Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Mika; Kosa, Peter; Khan, Omar; Hammoud, Dima A.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Browne, Sarah K.; Lin, Yen-Chih; Romm, Elena; Ramaprasad, Charu; Fries, Bettina C.; Bennett, John E.; Bielekova, Bibiana; Williamson, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Cryptococcus can cause meningoencephalitis (CM) among previously healthy non-HIV adults. Spinal arachnoiditis is under-recognized, since diagnosis is difficult with concomitant central nervous system (CNS) pathology. Methods. We describe 6 cases of spinal arachnoiditis among 26 consecutively recruited CM patients with normal CD4 counts who achieved microbiologic control. We performed detailed neurological exams, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping and biomarker analysis before and after adjunctive immunomodulatory intervention with high dose pulse corticosteroids, affording causal inference into pathophysiology. Results. All 6 exhibited severe lower motor neuron involvement in addition to cognitive changes and gait disturbances from meningoencephalitis. Spinal involvement was associated with asymmetric weakness and urinary retention. Diagnostic specificity was improved by MRI imaging which demonstrated lumbar spinal nerve root enhancement and clumping or lesions. Despite negative fungal cultures, CSF inflammatory biomarkers, sCD27 and sCD21, as well as the neuronal damage biomarker, neurofilament light chain (NFL), were elevated compared to healthy donor (HD) controls. Elevations in these biomarkers were associated with clinical symptoms and showed improvement with adjunctive high dose pulse corticosteroids. Conclusions. These data suggest that a post-infectious spinal arachnoiditis is an important complication of CM in previously healthy individuals, requiring heightened clinician awareness. Despite microbiological control, this syndrome causes significant pathology likely due to increased inflammation and may be amenable to suppressive therapeutics. PMID:28011613

  10. Spontaneous movements in the supine position of healthy term infants and preterm infants with or without periventricular leukomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouwaki, Masanori; Yokochi, Mitsuko; Togawa, Yasuko; Kamiya, Takeshi; Yokochi, Kenji

    2013-04-01

    The individual motor elements presumed to be essential for motor development were determined from spontaneous movements involving the entire body of normal term and preterm infants. Then, diagnostic items for motor abnormality in infants with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) were investigated. Video recordings of 24 healthy term infants, 21 normal preterm infants (8 males, 13 females; median gestational age 30 weeks; median birth weight 1216g) and 14 preterm infants with PVL (6 males, 8 females; median gestational age 30 weeks; median birth weight 1360g) were analyzed. In healthy term infants, predominant shoulder rotation was noticed until 1 month of age. After 2 months of age, isolated movements of the shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle frequently emerged. In preterm infants with PVL at the corrected age of 2 months, startle response and predominant shoulder rotation were more frequently seen and isolated neck, shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, and ankle movements were less frequently seen than in the normal preterm infants (Fisher's exact test, p<0.025). At 2 months of age, isolated movements evolve, and their failure to occur is suggested to be a useful sign for the diagnosis of cerebral motor disorders. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Early additional food and fluids for healthy breastfed full-term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hazel A; Becker, Genevieve E

    2016-08-30

    Health organisations recommend exclusive breastfeeding for six months. However, the addition of other fluids or foods before six months is common in many countries. Recently, research has suggested that introducing solid food at around four months of age while the baby continues to breastfeed is more protective against developing food allergies compared to exclusive breastfeeding for six months. Other studies have shown that the risks associated with non-exclusive breastfeeding are dependent on the type of additional food or fluid given. Given this background we felt it was important to update the previous version of this review to incorporate the latest findings from studies examining exclusive compared to non-exclusive breastfeeding. To assess the benefits and harms of additional food or fluid for full-term healthy breastfeeding infants and to examine the timing and type of additional food or fluid. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 March 2016) and reference lists of all relevant retrieved papers. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials in infants under six months of age comparing exclusive breastfeeding versus breastfeeding with any additional food or fluids. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. Two review authors assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 11 trials (2542 randomised infants/mothers). Nine trials (2226 analysed) provided data on outcomes of interest to this review. The variation in outcome measures and time points made it difficult to pool results from trials. Data could only be combined in a meta-analysis for one primary (breastfeeding duration) and one secondary (weight change) outcome. None of the trials reported on physiological jaundice. Infant mortality was only reported in one trial.For the majority of older trials, the description of study methods was inadequate to

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Commensal Enterococcus faecalis 62, Isolated from a Healthy Norwegian Infant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brede, Dag Anders; Snipen, Lars Gustav; Ussery, David

    2011-01-01

    The genome of Enterococcus faecalis 62, a commensal isolate from a healthy Norwegian infant, revealed multiple adaptive traits to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) environment and the milk-containing diet of breast-fed infants. Adaptation to a commensal existence was emphasized by lactose and other...

  13. [Hepatotoxicity in healthy infants exposed to nevirapine during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iveli, Pablo; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; Soler-Palacín, Pere; Martín-Nalda, Andrea; Rovira-Girabal, Núria; Fortuny-Guasch, Clàudia; Figueras-Nadal, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    The use of nevirapine in HIV-infected pregnant women is discouraged due to its potential to cause hepatotoxicity. There is limited information available on the toxicity in non-HIV infected newborn exposed to this drug during pregnancy. The aim of the study is to determine the extent of hepatotoxicity in the newborn exposed to nevirapine and HIV during pregnancy. A cross-sectional, observational, multicenter study was conducted on a cohort of healthy infants born to HIV-infected mothers, in whom the first determination of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), before 6weeks of age, was collected. Patients were allocated to 2groups according to exposure to nevirapine during pregnancy. Hepatotoxicity was rated according to the AIDS Table for Grading the Severity of Adult and Pediatric Adverse Events (DAIDS). This study included 160newborns from 159pregnancies (88exposed to nevirapine-based regimens and 71 exposed to protease inhibitors-based therapies). No cases of hepatotoxicity were observed according to the DAIDS Table for Grading. Two cases of ALT above normal values (2.8%; 95%CI: 0.3-9.8%) were observed in patients not exposed to nevirapine, and one case (1.1%; 95%CI: 0.0-6.1%) in the group exposed to nevirapine (P=.585). The lack of differences between groups suggests that highly active antiretroviral treatment regimens including nevirapine administered during pregnancy do not involve a higher risk of liver disease compared to other treatment combinations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Eikenella corrodens endocarditis and liver abscess in a previously healthy male, a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm, Anne Christine; Vøgg, Ruth Ottilia Birgitta; Permin, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eikenella corrodens is one of the HACEK bacteria constituting part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, however, still an uncommon pathogen. We report a case of a large Eikenella corrodens liver abscess with simultaneously endocarditis in a previously healthy male. CASE PRESENTATION...... corrodens concurrent liver abscess and endocarditis. The case report highlights that Eikenella corrodens should be considered as a cause of liver abscess. Empirical treatment of pyogenic liver abscess will most often cover Eikenella corrodens, but the recommended treatment is a third generation...... and abscess drainage, on which he slowly improved. He was discharged after 1.5 months of hospitalisation. On follow-up 2 months later, the patient was asymptomatic with normalized biochemistry and ultrasound showed complete regression of the abscess. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first case of documented Eikenella...

  15. Clinical characteristics of disseminated cryptococcosis in previously healthy children in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Wei; Jiao, An-Xia; Wu, Xi-Rong; Zhao, Shun-Ying; Ma, Yun; Liu, Gang; Yin, Ju; Xu, Bao-Ping; Shen, Kun-Ling

    2017-05-22

    Disseminated cryptococcosis is a rare and fatal disease, and limited data exist regarding it in children. This study aimed to investigate the clinical characteristics of disseminated cryptococcosis in previously healthy children in China. Hospitalized patients with disseminated cryptococcosis were enrolled during January 1996 to December 2015 in Beijing Children's Hospital, Capital Medical University, China. Data on clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, treatment, and prognosis were evaluated. A total of 52 pediatric patients with no underlying disease were enrolled, including 38 boys and 14 girls. Only 10 cases had a history of exposure to pigeon droppings. Fever, cough, and hepatomegaly were 3 main manifestations of disseminated cryptococcosis. However, headache was more common in patients with central nervous system (CNS) invasion than in patients with non-CNS invasion (P scattered distribution (57.1%, 12/21) or miliary distribution (42.9%, 9/25), especially localized in subpleural area. Subsequent invasion occurred in the CNS, abdomen lymph nodes, liver, spleen, peripheral lymph nodes, and skin. In all patients, 42.3% (22/52) and 51.9% (27/52) had elevated eosinophils or IgE, respectively. The positive rate of serum cryptococcal antigen was higher, especially in patients with CNS invasion (approximately 83.3%), than with other primary methods used for pathogen detection, including cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cryptococcal antigen, cultures of blood, bone marrow, or CSF, and CSF ink staining. The overall mortality rate of pediatric patients in our study was 11.5% (6/52). Some cases had long-term sequela, including hydrocephalus, cirrhosis, or blindness. Disseminated cryptococcosis can occur in previously healthy or immunocompetent children in China. Lung and CNS were most commonly invaded by this disease. Furthermore, most cases usually showed no obvious or specific symptoms or signs, and therefore pediatricians should pay more careful attention to identify

  16. Infants Prefer Tunes Previously Introduced by Speakers of Their Native Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soley, Gaye; Sebastián-Gallés, Núria

    2015-01-01

    Infants show attentional biases for certain individuals over others based on various cues. However, the role of these biases in shaping infants' preferences and learning is not clear. This study asked whether infants' preference for native speakers (Kinzler, Dupoux, & Spelke, 2007) would modulate their preferences for tunes. After getting equal exposure to two different tunes introduced by two speakers, 7-month-olds (N = 32) listened longer to the tune that was introduced by a native speaker compared to the tune that was introduced by a foreign speaker. This suggests that the social-emotional context in which exposure to stimuli occurs influences auditory preferences, and that the early emerging attentional biases might have important ramifications regarding social learning in early infancy. © 2015 The Authors. Child Development © 2015 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  17. Acute Hepatitis and Pancytopenia in Healthy Infant with Adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Matoq

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are a common cause of respiratory infection, pharyngitis, and conjunctivitis in infants and young children. They are known to cause hepatitis and liver failure in immunocompromised patients; they are a rare cause of hepatitis in immunocompetent patients and have been known to cause fulminant hepatic failure. We present a 23-month-old immunocompetent infant who presented with acute noncholestatic hepatitis, hypoalbuminemia, generalized anasarca, and pancytopenia secondary to adenovirus infection.

  18. Propionic acidemia in a previously healthy adolescent with acute onset of dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laemmle, Alexander; Balmer, Christian; Doell, Carsten; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Häberle, Johannes; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2014-07-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a rare autosomal recessive organic aciduria resulting from defects in propionyl-CoA-carboxylase (PCC), a key enzyme of intermediate energy metabolism. PA mostly manifests during the neonatal period, when affected newborns develop severe metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. We present a previously healthy teenager, who suffered from acute fatigue and breathlessness. The patient was tachycardic, displayed a precordial heave and a systolic murmur. Cardiac investigations revealed severe dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Biochemical work up led to the diagnosis of PA. Remarkably, this patient of consanguineous Hispanic origin was in a good general health condition before the acute onset of DCM. Diagnosis of PA was confirmed by enzymatic and molecular genetic analysis, the latter revealing a novel homozygous mutation in the PCCB gene (c.1229G > A; p.R410Q). Residual PCC enzyme activity of approximately 14 % of normal was detected in patient's lymphocytes and fibroblasts, thereby providing a possible explanation for the hitherto asymptomatic phenotype. Isolated DCM, although rare, can be the leading and/or sole symptom of late-onset PA. Therefore, patients with DCM should receive a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation including selective screening for inborn errors of metabolism.

  19. Respiratory impedance in healthy unsedated South African infants: effects of maternal smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Diane; Czövek, Dorottya; Smith, Emilee; Willemse, Lauren; Alberts, Ane; Gingl, Zoltán; Hall, Graham L; Zar, Heather J; Sly, Peter D; Hantos, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    Non-invasive techniques for measuring lung mechanics in infants are needed for a better understanding of lung growth and function, and to study the effects of prenatal factors on subsequent lung growth in healthy infants. The forced oscillation technique requires minimal cooperation from the individual but has rarely been used in infants. The study aims to assess the use of the forced oscillation technique to measure the influence of antenatal exposures on respiratory mechanics in unsedated infants enrolled in a birth cohort study in Cape Town, South Africa. Healthy term infants were studied at 6-10 weeks of age using the forced oscillation technique. Respiratory impedance was measured in the frequency range 8-48 Hz via a face mask during natural sleep. Respiratory system resistance, compliance and inertance were calculated from the impedance spectra. Of 177 infants tested, successful measurements were obtained in 164 (93%). Median (25-75%) values for resistance, compliance and inertance were 50.2 (39.5-60.6) cmH2 O.s.L(-1), 0.78 (0.61-0.99) mL.cmH2 O(-1) and 0.062 (0.050-0.086) cmH2 O.s(2) .L(-1), respectively. As a group, male infants had 16% higher resistance (P = 0.006) and 18% lower compliance (P = 0.02) than females. Infants whose mothers smoked during pregnancy had a 19% lower compliance than infants not exposed to tobacco smoke during pregnancy (P = 0.005). Neither maternal HIV infection nor ethnicity had a significant effect on respiratory mechanics. The forced oscillation technique is sensitive enough to demonstrate the effects of tobacco smoke exposure and sex in respiratory mechanics in healthy infants. This technique will facilitate assessing perinatal influences of lung function in infancy. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Tolerance of natural baby skin-care products on healthy, full-term infants and toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Coret, Catherine D; Suero, Michael B; Tierney, Neena K

    2014-01-01

    Catherine D Coret, Michael B Suero, Neena K Tierney Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc, Skillman, NJ, USA Purpose: To evaluate the tolerance of baby skin-care products with at least 95% naturally derived ingredients on infants and toddlers. Materials and methods: Healthy, full-term infants and toddlers aged 1–36 months were enrolled. In study 1, a lightly fragranced natural baby hair and body wash (n=30), a lightly fragranced natural baby shampoo (n=30), or a lightly...

  1. Differences in walking attainment ages between low-risk preterm and healthy full-term infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. Restiffe

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare gross motor development of preterm infants (PT without cerebral palsy with healthy full-term (FT infants, according to Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS; to compare the age of walking between PT and FT; and whether the age of walking in PT is affected by neonatal variables. METHODS: Prospective study compared monthly 101 PT and 52 FT, from the first visit, until all AIMS items had been observed. Results: Mean scores were similarity in their progression, except from the eighth to tenth months. FT infants were faster in walking attainment than PT. Birth weight and length and duration of neonatal nursery stay were related to walking delay. CONCLUSION: Gross motor development between PT and FT were similar, except from the eighth to tenth months of age. PT walked later than FT infants and predictive variables were birth weight and length, and duration of neonatal intensive unit stay.

  2. Comparison of Neutrophil Apoptosis by the Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Exotoxins between Healthy Individuals and Term Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Khazaei

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be colonized in different human tissues and result in some infections potentially. Thus, considering that these bacteria are resistance to most of the current antibiotics, an examination on pathogenesis mechanisms of such bacteria can be effective in controlling the infections developed by it.Materials and Methods: In this project, among 40 blood samples (20 healthy persons, 20 infants, an amount of 5 ml (2 ml in the infants heparinized blood was collected form each and then neutrophils were isolated by a standard method and were counted by neubauer lam. After culturing Pseudomonas bacteria in broth medium, some tubes with densities of 1, 2, 3 and 4 McFarland were prepared and the bacteria were isolated by centrifuge method with 3000rpm for 10 minutes and then its exotoxin were exposed to neutrophils of the groups under study. The effect of time and the bacteria count on the amount of the secreted toxin and in adjacency to neutrophils was measured.Results: There were 11 men and 9 women in the health group and the infants group consisted of 12 boys and 8 girls. Death cell percentage of neutrophils was 100% in the health group and 8.90% in the infants group. Percentage of bacterial growth in the medium 1 and 2 McFarland was zero; in the medium 3 McFarland, it was 12.5% in the healthy group and 1% in the infants group (p<0.10. The average rate of cell death in the minute 15th was different in two groups (68.5% in health group vs. 92.5% in the infants (p<0.0005. Conclusion: This study showed the effect of Pseudomonas bacteria on the development of early cell death in the infants very well. As it was shown, this effect is time-dependent and this cell death (apoptosis is occurred in the infants earlier than health people.

  3. Comparison of haematology and biochemistry parameters in healthy South African infants with laboratory reference intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, B-M; Tameris, M; Geldenhuys, H; Luabeya, A; Bunyasi, E; Hawkridge, T; McClain, J B; Mahomed, H; Scriba, T J; McShane, H; Hatherill, M

    2018-01-01

    Paediatric laboratory reference intervals used in Africa and Asia may be derived from historical intervals of predominantly Caucasian infants in Europe or North America. These intervals may therefore not be compatible with the range of normality for developing country populations. We aimed to compare haematology and biochemistry parameters in healthy South African infants with local laboratory reference intervals. We compared the baseline haematology and biochemistry results of 634 (316 male and 318 female) HIV-unexposed infants, aged 3-6 months, living in a rural area of the Western Cape Province, South Africa, against laboratory reference intervals supplied by the South African National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS). We calculated the percentage of observed values out of bound (in terms of lower and upper limits) compared to laboratory reference intervals. Of the 634 healthy infants screened, 316 (49.84%) were male and 318 (50.16%) female. A majority (91.05%) had platelet counts above the laboratory reference interval upper limit (350 × 10 9 cells/l), while over half, 54.85% and 56.98% had mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) values below the lower limits of 77.0-105.0 fl and 26.0-34.0 pg, respectively. A small proportion were outside the reference limits for haematocrit, namely 15.71% below and 7.14% above the normal limits of 0.31-0.38 l/l. For male and female infants, 33.65% and 18.04% of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) values and 7.01% and 14.56% of alanine transaminase (ALT) values were above the upper limits, respectively. For male infants, 10.83% of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) values, and for female infants, 31.11% of GGT values were below the lower limits of 12 U/l for males and 15 U/l for females. We observed no significant deviations (>10% out of bound) from NHLS reference intervals in the remaining haematology and biochemistry parameters measured. Haematology and biochemistry parameters in apparently healthy South

  4. Prevalence and outcomes of breast milk expressing in women with healthy term infants: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Expressing breast milk has become increasingly prevalent, particularly in some developed countries. Concurrently, breast pumps have evolved to be more sophisticated and aesthetically appealing, adapted for domestic use, and have become more readily available. In the past, expressed breast milk feeding was predominantly for those infants who were premature, small or unwell; however it has become increasingly common for healthy term infants. The aim of this paper is to systematically explore the literature related to breast milk expressing by women who have healthy term infants, including the prevalence of breast milk expressing, reported reasons for, methods of, and outcomes related to, expressing. Methods Databases (Medline, CINAHL, JSTOR, ProQuest Central, PsycINFO, PubMed and the Cochrane library) were searched using the keywords milk expression, breast milk expression, breast milk pumping, prevalence, outcomes, statistics and data, with no limit on year of publication. Reference lists of identified papers were also examined. A hand-search was conducted at the Australian Breastfeeding Association Lactation Resource Centre. Only English language papers were included. All papers about expressing breast milk for healthy term infants were considered for inclusion, with a focus on the prevalence, methods, reasons for and outcomes of breast milk expression. Results A total of twenty two papers were relevant to breast milk expression, but only seven papers reported the prevalence and/or outcomes of expressing amongst mothers of well term infants; all of the identified papers were published between 1999 and 2012. Many were descriptive rather than analytical and some were commentaries which included calls for more research, more dialogue and clearer definitions of breastfeeding. While some studies found an association between expressing and the success and duration of breastfeeding, others found the opposite. In some cases these inconsistencies were compounded

  5. Prevalence and outcomes of breast milk expressing in women with healthy term infants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Helene M; Forster, Della A; Amir, Lisa H; McLachlan, Helen L

    2013-11-19

    Expressing breast milk has become increasingly prevalent, particularly in some developed countries. Concurrently, breast pumps have evolved to be more sophisticated and aesthetically appealing, adapted for domestic use, and have become more readily available. In the past, expressed breast milk feeding was predominantly for those infants who were premature, small or unwell; however it has become increasingly common for healthy term infants. The aim of this paper is to systematically explore the literature related to breast milk expressing by women who have healthy term infants, including the prevalence of breast milk expressing, reported reasons for, methods of, and outcomes related to, expressing. Databases (Medline, CINAHL, JSTOR, ProQuest Central, PsycINFO, PubMed and the Cochrane library) were searched using the keywords milk expression, breast milk expression, breast milk pumping, prevalence, outcomes, statistics and data, with no limit on year of publication. Reference lists of identified papers were also examined. A hand-search was conducted at the Australian Breastfeeding Association Lactation Resource Centre. Only English language papers were included. All papers about expressing breast milk for healthy term infants were considered for inclusion, with a focus on the prevalence, methods, reasons for and outcomes of breast milk expression. A total of twenty two papers were relevant to breast milk expression, but only seven papers reported the prevalence and/or outcomes of expressing amongst mothers of well term infants; all of the identified papers were published between 1999 and 2012. Many were descriptive rather than analytical and some were commentaries which included calls for more research, more dialogue and clearer definitions of breastfeeding. While some studies found an association between expressing and the success and duration of breastfeeding, others found the opposite. In some cases these inconsistencies were compounded by imprecise definitions of

  6. Are infants with torticollis at risk of a delay in early motor milestones compared with a control group of healthy infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Anna; Nilsson, Staffan; Lagerkvist, Anna-Lena; Beckung, Eva

    2009-07-01

    Recently it has been claimed that infants with congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) are at risk of a delay in early motor milestones. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether infants with CMT are indeed at risk in comparison with a control group of healthy infants. A second aim was to investigate whether the time spent in a prone position and plagiocephaly had any influence on motor development. Eighty-two infants with CMT (35 females and 47 males) were compared with 40 healthy infants (18 females and 22 males). Motor development was assessed with the Alberta Infant Motor scale (AIMS). Multiple regression showed that infants in the CMT group had a significantly lower AIMS score than the control group at 2 months (p=0.03) and 6 months of age (p=0.05). Infants who spent at least three occasions daily in a prone position when awake had significantly higher AIMS scores than infants who spent less time prone at 2 months (p=0.001), 6 months (pmotor milestones significantly later than the control group until the age of 10 months, but the risk of delay seems to be more strongly associated with little or no time prone when awake than with CMT.

  7. Pacifier use does not alter sleep and spontaneous arousal patterns in healthy term-born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoi, Alexsandria; Andrew, Shanelle; Wong, Flora Y; Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-12-01

    Impaired arousal from sleep has been implicated in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Sleeping in the prone position is a major risk factor for SIDS. Epidemiological studies have shown that pacifier use decreases the risk of SIDS, even when infants sleep prone. We examined spontaneous arousability in infants slept prone and supine over the first 6 months of life and hypothesised that spontaneous arousals would be increased in pacifier users, particularly in the prone position. Healthy term infants (n = 30) were studied on three occasions over the first 6 months after birth. Spontaneous cortical arousals and subcortical activations were scored and converted into frequency per hour of sleep. There was no effect of pacifier use on total time spent sleeping or awake or the number of spontaneous awakenings at any age. There was also no effect of pacifier use on the frequency or duration of the total number of spontaneous arousals or on cortical arousals and subcortical activations. Pacifier use did not alter infant spontaneous arousability at any of the three ages studied, in either the prone or supine sleeping position. Any preventative effect of pacifiers for SIDS may be through physiological mechanisms other than increased arousability. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Neonatal Amygdala Functional Connectivity at Rest in Healthy and Preterm Infants and Early Internalizing Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Cynthia E; Sylvester, Chad M; Mintz, Carrie; Kenley, Jeanette K; Shimony, Joshua S; Barch, Deanna M; Smyser, Christopher D

    2017-02-01

    Alterations in the normal developmental trajectory of amygdala resting state functional connectivity (rs-FC) have been associated with atypical emotional processes and psychopathology. Little is known, however, regarding amygdala rs-FC at birth or its relevance to outcomes. This study examined amygdala rs-FC in healthy, full-term (FT) infants and in very preterm (VPT) infants, and tested whether variability of neonatal amygdala rs-FC predicted internalizing symptoms at age 2 years. Resting state fMRI data were obtained shortly after birth from 65 FT infants (gestational age [GA] ≥36 weeks) and 57 VPT infants (GA amygdala regions of interest. Total internalizing symptoms and the behavioral inhibition, depression/withdrawal, general anxiety, and separation distress subdomains were assessed in a subset (n = 44) at age 2 years using the Infant Toddler Social Emotional Assessment. In FT and VPT infants, the amygdala demonstrated positive correlations with subcortical and limbic structures and negative correlations with cortical regions, although magnitudes were decreased in VPT infants. Neonatal amygdala rs-FC predicted internalizing symptoms at age 2 years with regional specificity consistent with known pathophysiology in older populations: connectivity with the anterior insula related to depressive symptoms, with the dorsal anterior cingulate related to generalized anxiety, and with the medial prefrontal cortex related to behavioral inhibition. Amygdala rs-FC is well established in neonates. Variability in regional neonatal amygdala rs-FC predicted internalizing symptoms at 2 years, suggesting that risk for internalizing symptoms may be established in neonatal amygdala functional connectivity patterns. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa-pneumonia in a previously healthy man occupationally exposed to metalworking fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is well known and frequently found in hospitals and nursing care facilities, many cases are also reported outside these boundaries. In general, this pathogen infects debilitated patients either by comorbidities or by any form of immunodeficiency. In cases of respiratory infection, tobacco abuse seems to play an important role as a risk factor. In previously healthy patients, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with P. aeruginosa as the etiological agent is extremely rare, and unlike the cases involving immunocompromised or hospitalized patients, the outcome is severe, and is fatal in up to 61.1% of cases. Aerosolized contaminated water or solutions are closely linked to the development of respiratory tract infection. In this setting, metalworking fluids used in factories may be implicated in CAP involving previously healthy people. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man who worked in a metalworking factory and presented a right upper lobar pneumonia with a rapid fatal outcome. P. aeruginosa was cultured from blood and tracheal aspirates. The autopsy findings confirmed a hemorrhagic necrotizing pneumonia with bacteria-invading vasculitis and thrombosis. A culture of the metalworking fluid of the factory was also positive for P. aeruginosa. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that both strains (blood culture and metalworking fluid were genetically indistinguishable. The authors highlight the occupational risk for the development of this P. aeruginosa-infection in healthy people.

  10. Validation of transcutaneous bilirubin nomogram for identifying neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in healthy Chinese term and late-preterm infants: a multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangbin Yu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to prospectively validate a previously constructed transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB nomogram for identifying severe hyperbilirubinemia in healthy Chinese term and late-preterm infants. METHODS: this was a multicenter study that included 9,174 healthy term and late-preterm infants in eight hospitals of China. TcB measurements were performed using a JM-103 bilirubinometer. TcB values were plotted on a previously developed TcB nomogram, to identify the predictive ability for subsequent significant hyperbilirubinemia. RESULTS: in the present study, 972 neonates (10.6% developed significant hyperbilirubinemia. The 40th percentile of the nomogram could identify all neonates who were at risk of significant hyperbilirubinemia, but with a low positive predictive value (PPV (18.9%. Of the 453 neonates above the 95th percentile, 275 subsequently developed significant hyperbilirubinemia, with a high PPV (60.7%, but with low sensitivity (28.3%. The 75th percentile was highly specific (81.9% and moderately sensitive (79.8%. The area under the curve (AUC for the TcB nomogram was 0.875. CONCLUSIONS: this study validated the previously developed TcB nomogram, which could be used to predict subsequent significant hyperbilirubinemia in healthy Chinese term and late-preterm infants. However, combining TcB nomogram and clinical risk factors could improve the predictive accuracy for severe hyperbilirubinemia, which was not assessed in the study. Further studies are necessary to confirm this combination.

  11. Enterococcus faecalis from healthy infants modulates inflammation through MAPK signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugui Wang

    Full Text Available Colonizing commensal bacteria after birth are required for the proper development of the gastrointestinal tract. It is believed that bacterial colonization pattern in neonatal gut affects gut barrier function and immune system maturation. Studies on the development of faecal microbiota in infants showed that the neonatal gut was first colonized with enterococci followed by other microbiota such as Bifidobacterium. Other studies showed that babies who developed allergy were less often colonized with Enterococcus during the first month of life as compared to healthy infants. Many studies have been conducted to elucidate how bifidobacteria or lactobacilli, some of which are considered probiotic, regulate infant gut immunity. However, fewer studies have been focused on enterococi. In our study, we demonstrate that E. faecalis, isolated from healthy newborns, suppress inflammatory responses activated in vivo and in vitro. We found E. faecalis attenuates proinflammatory cytokine secretions, especially IL-8, through JNK and p38 signaling pathways. This finding shed light on how the first colonizer, E.faecalis, regulates inflammatory responses in the host.

  12. The Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ian M; Williams, Jennifer S; Anzman-Frasca, Stephanie; Beiler, Jessica S; Makova, Kateryna D; Marini, Michele E; Hess, Lindsey B; Rzucidlo, Susan E; Verdiglione, Nicole; Mindell, Jodi A; Birch, Leann L

    2014-07-18

    Because early life growth has long-lasting metabolic and behavioral consequences, intervention during this period of developmental plasticity may alter long-term obesity risk. While modifiable factors during infancy have been identified, until recently, preventive interventions had not been tested. The Intervention Nurses Starting Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories (INSIGHT). Study is a longitudinal, randomized, controlled trial evaluating a responsive parenting intervention designed for the primary prevention of obesity. This "parenting" intervention is being compared with a home safety control among first-born infants and their parents. INSIGHT's central hypothesis is that responsive parenting and specifically responsive feeding promotes self-regulation and shared parent-child responsibility for feeding, reducing subsequent risk for overeating and overweight. 316 first-time mothers and their full-term newborns were enrolled from one maternity ward. Two weeks following delivery, dyads were randomly assigned to the "parenting" or "safety" groups. Subsequently, research nurses conduct study visits for both groups consisting of home visits at infant age 3-4, 16, 28, and 40 weeks, followed by annual clinic-based visits at 1, 2, and 3 years. Both groups receive intervention components framed around four behavior states: Sleeping, Fussy, Alert and Calm, and Drowsy. The main study outcome is BMI z-score at age 3 years; additional outcomes include those related to patterns of infant weight gain, infant sleep hygiene and duration, maternal responsiveness and soothing strategies for infant/toddler distress and fussiness, maternal feeding style and infant dietary content and physical activity. Maternal outcomes related to weight status, diet, mental health, and parenting sense of competence are being collected. Infant temperament will be explored as a moderator of parenting effects, and blood is collected to obtain genetic predictors of weight status. Finally, second

  13. A critical period of corticomuscular and EMG-EMG coherence detection in healthy infants aged 9-25weeks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritterband-Rosenbaum, Anina; Herskind, Anna; Li, Xi

    2017-01-01

    The early postnatal development of functional corticospinal connections in human infants is not fully clarified. We used EEG and EMG to investigate the development of corticomuscular and intramuscular coherence as indicators of functional corticospinal connectivity in healthy infants aged 1...... for infants younger than 9 weeks, whereas a short-lasting (10-20 ms) central peak was observed for EMG-EMG synchronization in older infants. This peak was largest for infants aged 9-25 weeks. These data suggest that the corticospinal drive to lower and upper limb muscles shows significant developmental...... changes with an increase in functional coupling in infants aged 9-25 weeks, a period which coincides partly with the developmental period of normal fidgety movements. We propose that these neurophysiological findings may reflect the existence of a sensitive period where the functional connections between...

  14. Increased kidney growth in formula-fed versus breast-fed healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Ida M; Damgaard, Ida N; Boisen, Kirsten A

    2004-01-01

    versus breast feeding on kidney growth in a cohort of 631 healthy children examined at birth, and at 3 and 18 months of age. Kidney size was determined by ultrasonography and related to gender, age, body size, and feeding category (fully breast fed, partially breast fed, or fully formula fed at 3 months...... in relative kidney size were temporary, as they did not persist at 18 months of age, when all children received a normal mixed diet. The immediate renal effects of formula feeding should be taken into consideration for recommendations concerning infant feeding. Whether there are any long-term effects of early...

  15. [Management of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal dis orders in healthy infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toca, María del C; Sosa, Patricia; Aprigliano, Gustavo; Furnes, Raquel; Marchisone, Silvia; Mora, Mabel; Orsi, Marina; Saieg, Graciela; Tabacco, Omar; Wagener, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Healthy infants during the first year of life often have multiple functional gastrointestinal symptoms such as colic, regurgitation and constipation. The usual fuzziness and/or crying at this stage of life is interpreted as digestive discomfort or pain, and the corresponding concerns result in unsuitable behaviors as overeating, interruption of breastfeeding, multiple changes of formulas, innumerable queries and unnecessary medications. The aim of this paper is to update knowledge on the pathophysiology of the most common functional gastrointestinal dis orders, in order to avoid over diagnosis and select the most appropriate therapeutic approach and convenient nutritional interventions.

  16. Previous experiences and emotional baggage as barriers to lifestyle change - a qualitative study of Norwegian Healthy Life Centre participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Følling, Ingrid S; Solbjør, Marit; Helvik, Anne-S

    2015-06-23

    Changing lifestyle is challenging and difficult. The Norwegian Directorate of Health recommends that all municipalities establish Healthy Life Centres targeted to people with lifestyle issues. Little is known about the background, experiences and reflections of participants. More information is needed about participants to shape effective lifestyle interventions with lasting effect. This study explores how participants in a lifestyle intervention programme describe previous life experiences in relation to changing lifestyle. Semi-structured qualitative in-depth interviews were performed with 23 participants (16 women and 7 men) aged 18 - 70 years. The data were analysed using systematic text condensation searching for issues describing participants' responses, and looking for the essence, aiming to share the basis of life-world experiences as valid knowledge. Participants identified two main themes: being stuck in old habits, and being burdened with emotional baggage from their previous negative experiences. Participants expressed a wish to change their lifestyles, but were unable to act in accordance with the health knowledge they possessed. Previous experiences with lifestyle change kept them from initiating attempts without professional assistance. Participants also described being burdened by an emotional baggage with problems from childhood and/or with family, work and social life issues. Respondents said that they felt that emotional baggage was an important explanation for why they were stuck in old habits and that conversely, being stuck in old habits added load to their already emotional baggage and made it heavier. Behavioural change can be hard to perform as psychological distress from life baggage can influence the ability to change. The study participants' experience of being stuck in old habits and having substantial emotional baggage raises questions as to whether or not Healthy Life Centres are able to help participants who need to make a lifestyle

  17. CHRONOVAC VOYAGEUR: A study of the immune response to yellow fever vaccine among infants previously immunized against measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Catherine; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Tondeur, Laura; Poirier, Béatrice; Seffer, Valérie; Desprès, Philippe; Consigny, Paul-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2017-10-27

    For administration of multiple live attenuated vaccines, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends either simultaneous immunization or period of at least 28days between vaccines, due to a possible reduction in the immune response to either vaccine. The main objective of this study was to compare the immune response to measles (alone or combined with mumps and rubella) and yellow fever vaccines among infants aged 6-24months living in a yellow fever non-endemic country who had receivedmeasles and yellow fever vaccines before travelling to a yellow fever endemic area. A retrospective, multicenter case-control study was carried out in 7 travel clinics in the Paris area from February 1st 2011 to march 31, 2015. Cases were defined as infants immunized with the yellow fever vaccine and with the measles vaccine, either alone or in combination with mumps and rubella vaccine, with a period of 1-27days between each immunization. For each case, two controls were matched based on sex and age: a first control group (control 1) was defined as infants having received the measles vaccine and the yellow fever vaccine simultaneously; a second control group (control 2) was defined as infants who had a period of more than 27days between receiving the measles vaccine and yellow fever vaccine. The primary endpoint of the study was the percentage of infants with protective immunity against yellow fever, measured by the titer of neutralizing antibodies in a venous blood sample. One hundred and thirty-one infants were included in the study (62 cases, 50 infants in control 1 and 19 infants in control 2). Of these, 127 (96%) were shown to have a protective titer of yellow fever antibodies. All 4 infants without a protective titer of yellow fever antibodies were part of control group 1. The measles vaccine, alone or combined with mumps and rubella vaccines, appears to have no influence on humoral immune response to the yellow fever vaccine when administered between 1 and 27

  18. Catch up growth in low birth weight infants: striking a healthy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vandana; Singhal, Atul

    2012-06-01

    Catch-up growth in the first few months of life is seen almost ubiquitously in infants born small for their gestational age and conventionally considered highly desirable as it erases the growth deficit. However, recently such growth has been linked to an increased risk of later adiposity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in both low income and high-income countries. In India, a third of all babies are born with a low birth weight, but the optimal growth pattern for such infants is uncertain. As a response to the high rates of infectious morbidities, undernutrition and stunting in children, the current policy is to promote rapid growth in infancy. However, with socio-economic transition and urbanization making the Indian environment more obesogenic, and the increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, affecting progressively younger population, the long term adverse programming effect of fast/excessive weight gain in infancy on later body composition and metabolism may outweigh short-term benefits. This review discusses the above issues focusing on the need to strike a healthy balance between the risks and benefits of catch-up growth in Indian infants.

  19. Antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus spp. isolated from the feces of healthy infants against enteropathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodabadi, Abolfazl; Soltan Dallal, Mohammad Mehdi; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Douraghi, Masoumeh; Sharifi Yazdi, Mohammad Kazem; Amin Harati, Farzaneh

    2015-08-01

    Lactobacilli are normal microflora of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and are a heterogeneous group of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Lactobacillus strains with Probiotic activity may have health Benefits for human. This study investigates the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus strains obtained from the feces of healthy infants and also explores antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus strains with probiotic potential against enteropathogenic bacteria. Fecal samples were collected from 95 healthy infants younger than 18 months. Two hundred and ninety Lactobacillus strains were isolated and assessed for probiotic potential properties including ability to survive in gastrointestinal conditions (pH 2.0, 0.3% oxgall), adherence to HT-29 cells and antibiotic resistance. Six strains including Lactobacillus fermentum (4 strains), Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus plantarum showed good probiotic potential and inhibited the growth of enteropathogenic bacteria including ETEC H10407, Shigella flexneri ATCC 12022, Shigella sonnei ATCC 9290, Salmonella enteritidis H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica ATCC 23715. These Lactobacillus strains with probiotic potential may be useful for prevention or treatment of diarrhea, but further in vitro and in vivo studies on these strains are still required. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Posture and movement in healthy preterm infants in supine position in and outside the nest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, F; Bertoncelli, N; Gallo, C; Roversi, M F; Guerra, M P; Ranzi, A; Hadders-Algra, M

    2007-09-01

    To evaluate whether lying in a nest affects the posture and spontaneous movements of healthy preterm infants. 10 healthy preterm infants underwent serial video recording in the supine position, when lying in a nest and outside it, at three ages: 30-33 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) (early preterm), 34-36 weeks PMA (late preterm) and 37-40 weeks PMA (term). The nest was shell-shaped, made by putting two rolled blankets in a form of an oval. Posture was assessed both before and after general movements by scoring the predominant postural pattern. Movements towards and across the midline, elegant wrist movements, abrupt hand and/or limb movements, rolling to side, and frozen postures of the arms and legs were assessed during four general movements. All data relating to motor and postural items were normalised into frequencies of events per minute because the general movements varied in duration. When lying in the nest, the infants more often displayed a flexed posture with shoulder adduction and elbow, and hip and knee flexion, and the head was frequently in the midline. The nest was also associated with an increase in elegant wrist movements and movements towards and across the midline and a reduction in abrupt movements and frozen postures of the limbs. The nest did not affect the occurrence of asymmetrical tonic neck posture. A nest promotes a flexed posture of the limbs with adduction of shoulders, facilitates elegant wrist movements and movements towards and across the midline and reduces abrupt movements and frozen postures of the arms and legs.

  1. Breast pump use amongst mothers of healthy term infants in Melbourne, Australia: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Helene M; Amir, Lisa H; McLachlan, Helen L; Forster, Della A

    2016-02-01

    this paper describes the use of breast pumps amongst a group of mothers of healthy term infants in Melbourne, Australia, between birth and six months post partum. a prospective cohort study; data were collected using structured questionnaires. 1003 postpartum women who had given birth to healthy infants at term were recruited from three Melbourne maternity hospitals between July 2009 and April 2011. Data were collected by face-to-face interview at recruitment and by telephone interview three and six months later. at recruitment (24 to 48 hours post partum), 60% (605/1003) of women already had a breast pump. At two weeks post partum expressing was common; 62% (290/466) of women had expressed by this time, with 40% (186/466) doing so several times a day. By six months post partum 83% (754/911) of the women had a breast pump and 40% (288/715) were expressing, although most just occasionally. The most common reasons for any expressing in the first six months were 'to be able to go out and leave the baby' (35%; 268/772); milk supply 'not enough'(27%; 207/772); and having 'too much' milk (19%; 147/772). The increasing popularity of expressing breast milk to feed infants is not driven by women returning to the workforce, as only 10% of women (80/772) expressed because they had returned to paid employment. health professionals should be aware that in some settings breast pump use is common in the first six months, and this is not always related to maternal workforce participation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Asynchrony of the early maturation of white matter bundles in healthy infants: Quantitative landmarks revealed noninvasively by diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubois, J.; Perrin, M.; Mangin, J.F.; Cointepas, Y.; Duchesnay, E.; Le Bihan, D.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Dubois, J.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Perrin, M.; Mangin, J.F.; Cointepas, Y.; Duchesnay, E.; Le Bihan, D.; Hertz-Pannier, L.

    2008-01-01

    Normal cognitive development in infants follows a well-known temporal sequence, which is assumed to be correlated with the structural maturation of underlying functional networks. Postmortem studies and, more recently, structural MR imaging studies have described qualitatively the heterogeneous spatio-temporal progression of white matter myelination. However, in vivo quantification of the maturation phases of fiber bundles is still lacking. We used noninvasive diffusion tensor MR imaging and tractography in twenty-three 1-4-month-old healthy infants to quantify the early maturation of the main cerebral fascicles. A specific maturation model, based on the respective roles of different maturational processes on the diffusion phenomena, was designed to highlight asynchronous maturation across bundles by evaluating the time-course of mean diffusivity and anisotropy changes over the considered developmental period. Using an original approach, a progression of maturation in four relative stages was determined in each tract by estimating the maturation state and speed, from the diffusion indices over the infants group compared with an adults group on one hand, and in each tract compared with the average over bundles on the other hand. Results were coherent with, and extended previous findings in 8 of 11 bundles, showing the anterior limb of the internal capsule and cingulum as the most immature, followed by the optic radiations, arcuate and inferior longitudinal fascicles, then the spino-thalamic tract and fornix, and finally the cortico-spinal tract as the most mature bundle. Thus, this approach provides new quantitative landmarks for further noninvasive research on brain-behavior relationships during normal and abnormal development. (authors)

  3. Asynchrony of the early maturation of white matter bundles in healthy infants: Quantitative landmarks revealed noninvasively by diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, J.; Perrin, M.; Mangin, J.F.; Cointepas, Y.; Duchesnay, E.; Le Bihan, D.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [CEA, Serv Hosp Frederic Joliot, UNAF, F-91406 Orsay (France); Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [INSERM, U562, Orsay (France); Dubois, J.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Perrin, M.; Mangin, J.F.; Cointepas, Y.; Duchesnay, E.; Le Bihan, D.; Hertz-Pannier, L. [IFR49, Paris (France)

    2008-07-01

    Normal cognitive development in infants follows a well-known temporal sequence, which is assumed to be correlated with the structural maturation of underlying functional networks. Postmortem studies and, more recently, structural MR imaging studies have described qualitatively the heterogeneous spatio-temporal progression of white matter myelination. However, in vivo quantification of the maturation phases of fiber bundles is still lacking. We used noninvasive diffusion tensor MR imaging and tractography in twenty-three 1-4-month-old healthy infants to quantify the early maturation of the main cerebral fascicles. A specific maturation model, based on the respective roles of different maturational processes on the diffusion phenomena, was designed to highlight asynchronous maturation across bundles by evaluating the time-course of mean diffusivity and anisotropy changes over the considered developmental period. Using an original approach, a progression of maturation in four relative stages was determined in each tract by estimating the maturation state and speed, from the diffusion indices over the infants group compared with an adults group on one hand, and in each tract compared with the average over bundles on the other hand. Results were coherent with, and extended previous findings in 8 of 11 bundles, showing the anterior limb of the internal capsule and cingulum as the most immature, followed by the optic radiations, arcuate and inferior longitudinal fascicles, then the spino-thalamic tract and fornix, and finally the cortico-spinal tract as the most mature bundle. Thus, this approach provides new quantitative landmarks for further noninvasive research on brain-behavior relationships during normal and abnormal development. (authors)

  4. Twenty-four hour metabolic rate measurements utilized as a reference to evaluate several prediction equations for calculating energy requirements in healthy infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rising Russell

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, only short-duration metabolic rate measurements of less than four hours have been used to evaluate prediction equations for calculating energy requirements in healthy infants. Therefore, the objective of this analysis was to utilize direct 24-hour metabolic rate measurements from a prior study to evaluate the accuracy of several currently used prediction equations for calculating energy expenditure (EE in healthy infants. Methods Data from 24-hour EE, resting (RMR and sleeping (SMR metabolic rates obtained from 10 healthy infants, served as a reference to evaluate 11 length-weight (LWT and weight (WT based prediction equations. Six prediction equations have been previously derived from 50 short-term EE measurements in the Enhanced Metabolic Testing Activity Chamber (EMTAC for assessing 24-hour EE, (EMTACEE-LWT and EMTACEE-WT, RMR (EMTACRMR-LWT and EMTACRMR-WT and SMR (EMTACSMR-LWT and EMTACSMR-WT. The last five additional prediction equations for calculating RMR consisted of the World Health Organization (WHO, the Schofield (SCH-LWT and SCH-WT and the Oxford (OXFORD-LWT and OXFORD-WT. Paired t-tests and the Bland & Altman limit analysis were both applied to evaluate the performance of each equation in comparison to the reference data. Results 24-hour EE, RMR and SMR calculated with the EMTACEE-WT, EMTACRMR-WT and both the EMTACSMR-LWT and EMTACSMR-WT prediction equations were similar, p = NS, to that obtained from the reference measurements. However, RMR calculated using the WHO, SCH-LWT, SCH-WT, OXFORD-LWT and OXFORD-WT prediction equations were not comparable to the direct 24-hour metabolic measurements (p Conclusions Weight based prediction equations, derived from short-duration EE measurements in the EMTAC, were accurate for calculating EE, RMR and SMR in healthy infants.

  5. Effects of baby massage on neonatal jaundice in healthy Iranian infants: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili, Hosein; Sheikhi, Sanaz; Shariat, Mamak; Haghnazarian, Edith

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of baby massage on transcutaneous bilirubin levels and stool frequency of healthy term newborns. This Pilot study was conducted on 50 healthy newborns in Valiasr Hospital of IKHC. The infants were randomly allocated to two treatment (massage) and control group. The massage group received massage therapy (according to Touch Therapy) for four days from the first day postnatal while the control group received routine care. Main variable studied were transcutaneous bilirubin level (TCB) and stool frequency which were compared in two groups. There were 50 newborns in the study 25 in each group (50%). There was a significant difference in the TCB levels between two groups (p=0.000) with those in the massage group having lower bilirubin levels. As for the stool frequency there was a significant difference in two groups on the first day showing more defecation in the control group (p=0.042) which on the consequent days was not significant and the frequencies were almost similar. Massage group had a lower transcutaneous billirubin levels compared to the control group, thus, these pilot results indicate that massaging the newborns can be accompanied by a lower bilirubin level in the healthy term newborn. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tolerance of natural baby skin-care products on healthy, full-term infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coret, Catherine D; Suero, Michael B; Tierney, Neena K

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the tolerance of baby skin-care products with at least 95% naturally derived ingredients on infants and toddlers. Healthy, full-term infants and toddlers aged 1-36 months were enrolled. In study 1, a lightly fragranced natural baby hair and body wash (n=30), a lightly fragranced natural baby shampoo (n=30), or a lightly fragranced natural baby lotion (n=32) were assessed over 2 weeks. In study 2, a lightly fragranced natural baby hair and body wash and a lightly fragranced natural baby lotion (n=33) were assessed as a regimen over 4 weeks. The wash and shampoo were used three or more times per week, but not more than once daily. Lotions were applied in the morning or after a bath. Clinicians assessed the arms, legs, torso, or scalp for erythema, dryness, peeling/flakiness (study 1 only), tactile roughness, edema (study 1 only), rash/irritation (study 2 only), and overall skin condition (study 2 only) at baseline, week 1, and weeks 2 or 4. Parents completed skin assessment questionnaires. In study 2, stratum corneum hydration was measured. Subjects were monitored for adverse events. No significant changes in clinical grading scores were observed, indicating that all products were well tolerated. By the end of each study, >90% of parents/caregivers believed each product was mild and gentle. In study 2, improvement in stratum corneum hydration was observed (+37% at week 1 and +48% at week 4, Pproduct-related adverse events. The natural baby skin-care products were well tolerated by infants and toddlers when used alone or as part of a skin-care regimen.

  7. The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) Study: examining developmental origins of allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Padmaja; Anand, Sonia S; Becker, Allan B; Befus, A Dean; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R; Denburg, Judah A; HayGlass, Kent T; Kobor, Michael S; Kollmann, Tobias R; Kozyrskyj, Anita L; Lou, W Y Wendy; Mandhane, Piushkumar J; Miller, Gregory E; Moraes, Theo J; Pare, Peter D; Scott, James A; Takaro, Tim K; Turvey, Stuart E; Duncan, Joanne M; Lefebvre, Diana L; Sears, Malcolm R

    2015-10-01

    The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development (CHILD) birth cohort study recruited 3624 pregnant women, most partners and 3542 eligible offspring. We hypothesise that early life physical and psychosocial environments, immunological, physiological, nutritional, hormonal and metabolic influences interact with genetics influencing allergic diseases, including asthma. Environmental and biological sampling, innate and adaptive immune responses, gene expression, DNA methylation, gut microbiome and nutrition studies complement repeated environmental and clinical assessments to age 5. This rich data set, linking prenatal and postnatal environments, diverse biological samples and rigorous phenotyping, will inform early developmental pathways to allergy, asthma and other chronic inflammatory diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Fish oil affects blood pressure and the plasma lipid profile in healthy Danish infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Schack-Nielsen, L.; Michaelsen, K.F.

    2006-01-01

    Animal and epidemiologic studies indicate that early nutrition has lasting effects on metabolism and cardiovascular disease risk. In adults, (n-3) long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) from fish oils improve blood pressure, the lipid profile, and possibly cardiovascular disease mortality. This randomized trial...... is the first to investigate the effects of fish oil on blood pressure and the lipid profile in infancy. Healthy term 9-mo old infants In 83) were randomly assigned to 5 mL fish oil daily or no fish oil for 3 mo and to 2 different milk types. Before and after the intervention, blood pressure was measured...... with an oscillometric device, and blood was sampled for analysis of erythrocyte fatty acid composition and the plasma lipid profile. This paper examines the effects of the fish oil supplement, with adjustment for the effects of the milk intervention when relevant. The fish oil intervention increased erythrocyte (n-3...

  9. Initial Application of Diffusional Kurtosis Imaging in Evaluating Brain Development of Healthy Preterm Infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Shi

    Full Text Available To explore the parametric characteristics of diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI in the brain development of healthy preterm infants.Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and DKI were performed in 35 preterm (29 to 36 weeks gestational age [GA]; scanned at 33 to 44 weeks postmenstrual age [PMA] and 10 term infants (37.4 to 40.7 weeks GA; scanned at 38.3 to 42.9 weeks PMA. Fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD and mean kurtosis (MK values from 8 regions of interest, including both white matter (WM and gray matter (GM, were obtained.MK and FA values were positively correlated with PMA in most selected WM regions, such as the posterior limbs of the internal capsule (PLIC and the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC. The positive correlation between MK value and PMA in the deep GM region was higher than that between FA and PMA. The MK value gradually decreased from the PLIC to the cerebral lobe. In addition, DKI parameters exhibited subtle differences in the parietal WM between the preterm and term control groups.MK may serve as a more reliable imaging marker of the normal myelination process and provide a more robust characterization of deep GM maturation.

  10. Food intake during the previous 24 h as a percentage of usual intake: a marker of hypoxia in infants with bronchiolitis: an observational, prospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrard François

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia associated with bronchiolitis is not always easy to assess on clinical grounds alone. The aim of this study was to determine the value of food intake during the previous 24 hours (bottle and spoon feeding, as a percentage of usual intake (24h FI, as a marker of hypoxia, and to compare its diagnostic value with that of usual clinical signs. Methods In this observational, prospective, multicenter study, 18 community pediatricians, enrolled 171 infants, aged from 0 to 6 months, with bronchiolitis (rhinorrhea + dyspnea + cough + expiratory sounds. Infants with risk factors (history of prematurity, chronic heart or lung disorders, breast-fed infants, and infants having previously been treated for bronchial disorders were excluded. The 24h FI, subcostal, intercostal, supracostal retractions, nasal flaring, respiratory rate, pauses, cyanosis, rectal temperature and respiratory syncytial virus test results were noted. The highest stable value of transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 was recorded. Hypoxia was noted if SpO2 was below 95% and verified. Results 24h FI ≥ 50% was associated with a 96% likelihood of SpO2 ≥ 95% [95% CI, 91–99]. In univariate analysis, 24h FI  Conclusion In practice, the measure of 24 h FI may be useful in identifying hypoxia and deserves further study.

  11. Validation of transcutaneous bilirubin nomogram for identifying neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in healthy Chinese term and late-preterm infants: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhangbin; Han, Shuping; Wu, Jinxia; Li, Mingxia; Wang, Huaiyan; Wang, Jimei; Liu, Jiebo; Pan, Xinnian; Yang, Jie; Chen, Chao

    2014-01-01

    to prospectively validate a previously constructed transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) nomogram for identifying severe hyperbilirubinemia in healthy Chinese term and late-preterm infants. this was a multicenter study that included 9,174 healthy term and late-preterm infants in eight hospitals of China. TcB measurements were performed using a JM-103 bilirubinometer. TcB values were plotted on a previously developed TcB nomogram, to identify the predictive ability for subsequent significant hyperbilirubinemia. in the present study, 972 neonates (10.6%) developed significant hyperbilirubinemia. The 40(th) percentile of the nomogram could identify all neonates who were at risk of significant hyperbilirubinemia, but with a low positive predictive value (PPV) (18.9%). Of the 453 neonates above the 95(th) percentile, 275 subsequently developed significant hyperbilirubinemia, with a high PPV (60.7%), but with low sensitivity (28.3%). The 75(th) percentile was highly specific (81.9%) and moderately sensitive (79.8%). The area under the curve (AUC) for the TcB nomogram was 0.875. this study validated the previously developed TcB nomogram, which could be used to predict subsequent significant hyperbilirubinemia in healthy Chinese term and late-preterm infants. However, combining TcB nomogram and clinical risk factors could improve the predictive accuracy for severe hyperbilirubinemia, which was not assessed in the study. Further studies are necessary to confirm this combination. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Mercury Exposure in Healthy Korean Weaning-Age Infants: Association with Growth, Feeding and Fish Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Young Chang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Low-level mercury (Hg exposure in infancy might be harmful to the physical growth as well as neurodevelopment of children. The aim of this study was to investigate postnatal Hg exposure and its relationship with anthropometry and dietary factors in late infancy. We recruited 252 healthy Korean infants between six and 24 months of age from an outpatient clinic during the 2009/2010 and 2013/2014 seasons. We measured the weight and height of the infants and collected dietary information using questionnaires. The Hg content of the hair and blood was assessed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The geometric mean Hg concentration in the hair and blood was 0.22 (95% confidence interval: 0.20–0.24 µg/g and 0.94 (n = 109, 95% confidence interval: 0.89–0.99 µg/L, respectively. The hair Hg concentration showed a good correlation with the blood Hg concentration (median hair-to-blood Hg ratio: 202.7, r = 0.462, p < 0.001 and was >1 µg/g in five infants. The hair Hg concentration showed significant correlations with weight gain after birth (Z-score of the weight for age—Z-score of the birthweight; r = −0.156, p = 0.015, the duration (months of breastfeeding as the dominant method of feeding (r = 0.274, p < 0.001, and the duration of fish intake more than once per week (r = 0.138, p = 0.033. In an ordinal logistic regression analysis with categorical hair Hg content (quartiles, dietary factors, including breastfeeding as the dominant method of feeding in late infancy (cumulative odds ratio: 6.235, 95% confidence interval: 3.086–12.597, p < 0.001 and the monthly duration of fish intake more than once per week (cumulative odds ratio: 1.203, 95% confidence interval: 1.034–1.401; p = 0.017, were significantly associated with higher hair Hg content. Weight gain after birth was not, however, significantly associated with hair Hg content after adjustment for the duration of breastfeeding as the dominant method of feeding. Low-level Hg

  13. Tolerance of natural baby skin-care products on healthy, full-term infants and toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coret CD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Catherine D Coret, Michael B Suero, Neena K Tierney Johnson & Johnson Consumer Companies, Inc, Skillman, NJ, USA Purpose: To evaluate the tolerance of baby skin-care products with at least 95% naturally derived ingredients on infants and toddlers. Materials and methods: Healthy, full-term infants and toddlers aged 1–36 months were enrolled. In study 1, a lightly fragranced natural baby hair and body wash (n=30, a lightly fragranced natural baby shampoo (n=30, or a lightly fragranced natural baby lotion (n=32 were assessed over 2 weeks. In study 2, a lightly fragranced natural baby hair and body wash and a lightly fragranced natural baby lotion (n=33 were assessed as a regimen over 4 weeks. The wash and shampoo were used three or more times per week, but not more than once daily. Lotions were applied in the morning or after a bath. Clinicians assessed the arms, legs, torso, or scalp for erythema, dryness, peeling/flakiness (study 1 only, tactile roughness, edema (study 1 only, rash/irritation (study 2 only, and overall skin condition (study 2 only at baseline, week 1, and weeks 2 or 4. Parents completed skin assessment questionnaires. In study 2, stratum corneum hydration was measured. Subjects were monitored for adverse events. Results: No significant changes in clinical grading scores were observed, indicating that all products were well tolerated. By the end of each study, >90% of parents/caregivers believed each product was mild and gentle. In study 2, improvement in stratum corneum hydration was observed (+37% at week 1 and +48% at week 4, P<0.05 for both. In study 1, one baby experienced mild erythema on the neck and scalp after using the shampoo (possibly related to treatment. In study 2, there were no product-related adverse events. Conclusion: The natural baby skin-care products were well tolerated by infants and toddlers when used alone or as part of a skin-care regimen. Keywords: bath, cleanser, natural, infant, lotion, shampoo

  14. Can typical US home visits affect infant attachment? Preliminary findings from a randomized trial of Healthy Families Durham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Lisa J; Martoccio, Tiffany L; Appleyard Carmody, Karen; Goodman, W Benjamin; O'Donnell, Karen; Williams, Janis; Murphy, Robert A; Dodge, Kenneth A

    2017-12-01

    US government-funded early home visiting services are expanding significantly. The most widely implemented home visiting models target at-risk new mothers and their infants. Such home visiting programs typically aim to support infant-parent relationships; yet, such programs' effects on infant attachment quality per se are as yet untested. Given these programs' aims, and the crucial role of early attachments in human development, it is important to understand attachment processes in home visited families. The current, preliminary study examined 94 high-risk mother-infant dyads participating in a randomized evaluation of the Healthy Families Durham (HFD) home visiting program. We tested (a) infant attachment security and disorganization as predictors of toddler behavior problems and (b) program effects on attachment security and disorganization. We found that (a) infant attachment disorganization (but not security) predicted toddler behavior problems and (b) participation in HFD did not significantly affect infant attachment security or disorganization. Findings are discussed in terms of the potential for attachment-specific interventions to enhance the typical array of home visiting services.

  15. Previous Adverse Infant Outcomes as Predictors of Preconception Care Use: An Analysis of the 2010 and 2012 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby (LAMB) Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Priya; Higgins, Chandra; Chao, Shin M

    2016-06-01

    Objectives This study aimed to understand the impact of a previous adverse infant outcome (AIO) on use of preconception care prior to a subsequent pregnancy. Methods Responses from the 2010 and 2012 Los Angeles Mommy and Baby Surveys were analyzed. Weighted multivariate logistic regression was employed to identify significant associations between having had a previous AIO (preterm delivery, low birth weight infant, stillbirth, or major birth defect) and receipt of preconception care prior to the most recent pregnancy. Select patient-level covariates were included: chronic disease, age, education level, race/ethnicity, country of birth, insurance status prior to pregnancy and pregnancy intent. Adjustment for missing responses was performed using multiple chained imputation. Results After controlling for covariates, having had a previous AIO was associated with an increased odds of having utilized preconception care in the most recent pregnancy (OR 1.237, p = 0.040). Per the final regression model, a woman reporting a previous AIO and an intended subsequent pregnancy had a 42.4 % likelihood of having used preconception care. Of these women, only 28.8 % reported doing so because of concern regarding a previous birth complication. Discussion Women reporting a previous AIO were more likely to have used preconception care in a subsequent pregnancy. The prevalence of preconception care utilization remained low overall. Pregnancy intent emerged as a strong secondary predictor; any concerted strategy to improve access to preconception care must include initiatives to help ensure that pregnancies are planned.

  16. Effect of Daily Iron Supplementation in Healthy Exclusively Breastfed Infants: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxi; Granger, Matthew; Eck, Peter; Friel, James

    2017-12-01

    The literature on the iron requirements of exclusively breastfed infants contains conflicting data and contrary views. The purpose of this study was to summarize the evidence for both benefits and risks of daily oral iron supplementation with regard to hematologic, growth, cognitive parameters, and adverse effects in exclusively breastfed infants. Structured electronic searches were conducted using PubMed, Cochrane Library databases, and Google Scholar for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving daily iron supplementation in full-term healthy exclusively breastfed infants. Random- and fixed-effects models were used for calculating the pooled estimates. Four RCTs with 511 infants were included in the meta-analysis. Iron interventions had no significant effect on iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin level, or hemoglobin level. Iron interventions did result in a significant increase in Bayley psychomotor developmental indices in later life (mean difference [MD] = 7.00, confidence interval [95% CI] 0.99-13.01) and mean corpuscular volume (MD = 2.17 fL; 95% CI 0.99-3.35 fL). Iron supplementation was associated with slower growth during the exclusive breastfeeding period, but the long-term effect is unclear. Limited available evidence suggests that daily iron supplementation has beneficial effects on hematologic parameters and cognitive development, but may delay physical growth in healthy exclusively breastfed infants. There was no evidence to suggest that iron supplementation could cause other adverse effects.

  17. Normative Data for Bone Mass in Healthy Term Infants from Birth to 1 Year of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Gallo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For over 2 decades, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA has been the gold standard for estimating bone mineral density (BMD and facture risk in adults. More recently DXA has been used to evaluate BMD in pediatrics. However, BMD is usually assessed against reference data for which none currently exists in infancy. A prospective study was conducted to assess bone mass of term infants (37 to 42 weeks of gestation, weight appropriate for gestational age, and born to healthy mothers. The group consisted of 33 boys and 26 girls recruited from the Winnipeg Health Sciences Center (Manitoba, Canada. Whole body (WB as well as regional sites of the lumbar spine (LS 1–4 and femur was measured using DXA (QDR 4500A, Hologic Inc. providing bone mineral content (BMC for all sites and BMD for spine. During the year, WB BMC increased by 200% (76.0±14.2 versus 227.0±29.7 g, spine BMC by 130% (2.35±0.42 versus 5.37±1.02 g, and femur BMC by 190% (2.94±0.54 versus 8.50±1.84 g. Spine BMD increased by 14% (0.266±0.044 versus 0.304±0.044 g/cm2 during the year. This data, representing the accretion of bone mass during the first year of life, is based on a representative sample of infants and will aid in the interpretation of diagnostic DXA scans by researchers and health professionals.

  18. Inhibition of Cronobacter sakazakii by heat labile bacteriocins produced by probiotic LAB isolated from healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awaisheh, Saddam S; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Osaili, Tareq M; Ibrahim, Salam; Holley, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause bacteremia, meningitis, and necrotizing enterocolitis, most often in neonates with case-fatality rates that may reach 80%. The antimicrobial activity of lactic acid bacteria against a wide range of foodborne pathogens is well-established in different types of food products. The objective of the current study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. casei isolated from feces of healthy infants against different strains of C. sakazakii in agar and a rehydrated infant milk formula (RIMF) model. The inhibition zones of C. sakazakii around L. acidophilus or L. casei ranged from 22 to 32 mm on eMan Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) agar under aerobic conditions, while a slight reduction in antibacterial activity was noted on modified MRS (0.2% glucose) under anaerobic conditions. It was observed that pH-neutralized cell-free supernatant (CFS) of L. acidophilus or L. casei was inhibitory against tested C. sakazakii strains. The inhibition zones of neutralized CFS were lower than the antibacterial activities of live cultures. The antibacterial activity of CFS was abolished when CFS from L. acidophilus or L. casei was heated at 60 or 80 °C for either 10 min or 2 h, or treated with trypsin or pepsin. This was considered strong evidence that the inhibition was due to the production of bacteriocins by L. casei and L. acidophilus. Both the CFS and active growing cells of L. casei and L. acidophilus were able to reduce the viability of C. sakazakii in the RIMF model. The results may extend the use of natural antimicrobials instead of conventional preservation methods to improve the safety of RIMF. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Gross Motor Development of Healthy Term Infants: A Randomized Dose-Response Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklow, Brandy; Gallo, Sina; Majnemer, Annette; Vanstone, Catherine; Comeau, Kathryn; Jones, Glenville; L'Abbe, Mary; Khamessan, Ali; Sharma, Atul; Weiler, Hope; Rodd, Celia

    2016-08-01

    In addition to benefits for bone health, vitamin D is implicated in muscle function in children and adults. To determine if vitamin D dosage positively correlated with gross motor development at 3 and 6 months of age. We hypothesized that higher doses would be associated with higher scores for gross motor skills. A consecutive sample of 55 healthy, term, and breastfed infants from Montreal, Canada were recruited from a randomized trial of vitamin D supplementation between 2009 and 2012. Infants were randomized to 400 International Units (IU) (n = 19), 800 IU (n = 18) or 1,200 IU (n = 18) vitamin D3/day. Motor performance at 3 and 6 months was quantified by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS). Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. AIMS scores did not differ at 3 months. However, total AIMS scores and sitting subscores were significantly higher at 6 months in infants receiving 400 IU/day compared to 800 IU/day and 1,200 IU/day groups (p motor achievements were significantly higher in infants receiving 400 IU/day vitamin D. Our findings also support longer infants being slightly delayed.

  20. Perception of vulnerability among mothers of healthy infants in a middle-income country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, D G; Ertem, I O; Karaaslan, T; Forsyth, B W

    2009-11-01

    Although four decades have passed since the concept of 'vulnerable children' has been introduced into paediatric literature, research on vulnerability is limited to high-income, Western countries. To adapt and adopt practices that have been advised for paediatricians to prevent 'the vulnerable child syndrome', information is needed also on the prevalence and correlates of perceived vulnerability in children in low- and middle-income (LAMI) countries. To determine the rate and correlates of the perception of vulnerability among healthy young children in a healthy population of children in Ankara, Turkey. In this cross-sectional observational study, participants comprised of a 'prescriptive sample' of healthy, thriving children with no known health risk for vulnerability. Maternal perception of child vulnerability was assessed using the Child Vulnerability Scale (CVS). Potential risks factors for vulnerability including history of threatened abortion during pregnancy, child gender, birth order, maternal and paternal age and education were collected using a structured questionnaire. A total of 519 children - 264 boys (50.9%) and 255 girls (49.1%) - comprised the sample. The internal consistency of the CVS was 0.71. Item-total scale correlations were 0.30 or above for all of the eight items. The median CVS score of the sample was 2.0 and 30 mothers (5.8%) were found to perceive their children as vulnerable. None of the socio-demographic variables that were investigated were found to be associated with high vulnerability scores. This study is the first to examine maternal perceived vulnerability of healthy children in a middle-income country. The findings imply that a high proportion of healthy children are perceived as vulnerable by their mothers and that previously studied socio-demographic factors do not explain perceived vulnerability. The results of this study may provide a comparison point for studies on childhood vulnerability in LAMI countries.

  1. Correlation properties of spontaneous motor activity in healthy infants: a new computer-assisted method to evaluate neurological maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmeier, Sandra; Grunt, Sebastian; Delgado-Eckert, Edgar; Latzin, Philipp; Steinlin, Maja; Fuhrer, Katharina; Frey, Urs

    2013-06-01

    Qualitative assessment of spontaneous motor activity in early infancy is widely used in clinical practice. It enables the description of maturational changes of motor behavior in both healthy infants and infants who are at risk for later neurological impairment. These assessments are, however, time-consuming and are dependent upon professional experience. Therefore, a simple physiological method that describes the complex behavior of spontaneous movements (SMs) in infants would be helpful. In this methodological study, we aimed to determine whether time series of motor acceleration measurements at 40-44 weeks and 50-55 weeks gestational age in healthy infants exhibit fractal-like properties and if this self-affinity of the acceleration signal is sensitive to maturation. Healthy motor state was ensured by General Movement assessment. We assessed statistical persistence in the acceleration time series by calculating the scaling exponent α via detrended fluctuation analysis of the time series. In hand trajectories of SMs in infants we found a mean α value of 1.198 (95 % CI 1.167-1.230) at 40-44 weeks. Alpha changed significantly (p = 0.001) at 50-55 weeks to a mean of 1.102 (1.055-1.149). Complementary multilevel regression analysis confirmed a decreasing trend of α with increasing age. Statistical persistence of fluctuation in hand trajectories of SMs is sensitive to neurological maturation and can be characterized by a simple parameter α in an automated and observer-independent fashion. Future studies including children at risk for neurological impairment should evaluate whether this method could be used as an early clinical screening tool for later neurological compromise.

  2. Nutrition for healthy term infants: recommendations from birth to six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This joint statement provides health professionals in Canada with evidence-informed principles and recommendations to promote communication of accurate, consistent advice to parents and caregivers on infant nutrition in the first six months. Participating organizations in the Infant Feeding Joint Work Group collaborated to revise guidance from 1998 and 2005. Development of this statement involved an extensive review of scientific evidence in peer-reviewed literature, with content guidance from the Infant Feeding Expert Advisory Group and broad stakeholder consultation. Updated guidance on nutrition from six months to two years will be available in early 2014. Each section of this joint statement includes recommendations, rationale and references, organized under seven principles. The first five principles and recommendations are: Breastfeeding is the normal and unequalled method of feeding infants. · Recommend exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months. Breastfeeding initiation and duration rates increase with active protection, support, and promotion. · Implement the policies and practices of the Baby-Friendly Initiative (BFI) for hospitals and community health services. Supplemental vitamin D is recommended for breastfed infants. · Recommend a daily vitamin D supplement of 10 µg (400 IU) for breastfed infants. First complementary foods should be iron-rich. · Recommend meat, meat alternatives, and iron-fortified cereal as an infant's first complementary foods. Routine growth monitoring is important to assess infant health and nutrition. · Use the World Health Organization (WHO) Growth Charts for Canada for optimal monitoring of infant growth. Additional recommendations are provided under the last two principles regarding unnecessary feeding changes (e.g., responding to infant gastrointestinal issues) and rare contraindications for breastfeeding (e.g., advising mothers with infections, using medications or illicit drugs). A separate section addresses

  3. Cry-Based Classification of Healthy and Sick Infants Using Adapted Boosting Mixture Learning Method for Gaussian Mixture Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesam Farsaie Alaie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We make use of information inside infant’s cry signal in order to identify the infant’s psychological condition. Gaussian mixture models (GMMs are applied to distinguish between healthy full-term and premature infants, and those with specific medical problems available in our cry database. Cry pattern for each pathological condition is created by using adapted boosting mixture learning (BML method to estimate mixture model parameters. In the first experiment, test results demonstrate that the introduced adapted BML method for learning of GMMs has a better performance than conventional EM-based reestimation algorithm as a reference system in multipathological classification task. This newborn cry-based diagnostic system (NCDS extracted Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs as a feature vector for cry patterns of newborn infants. In binary classification experiment, the system discriminated a test infant’s cry signal into one of two groups, namely, healthy and pathological based on MFCCs. The binary classifier achieved a true positive rate of 80.77% and a true negative rate of 86.96% which show the ability of the system to correctly identify healthy and diseased infants, respectively.

  4. Assessment of the Relationship between Recurrent High-risk Pregnancy and Mothers’ Previous Experience of Having an Infant Admitted to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Hantoosh Zadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim:  High-risk pregnancies increase the risk of Intensive Care Unit (ICU and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU admission in mothers and their newborns. In this study, we aimed to identify the association between the recurrence of high-risk pregnancy and mothers’ previous experience of having an infant admitted to NICU. Methods:We performed a cohort, retrospective study to compare subsequent pregnancy outcomes among 232 control subjects and 200 female cases with a previous experience of having a newborn requiring NICU admission due to intrauterine growth retardation, preeclampsia, preterm birth, premature rupture of membranes, and asphyxia. The information about the prevalence of subsequent high-risk pregnancies was gathered via phone calls. Results: As the results indicated, heparin, progesterone, and aspirin were more frequently administered in the case group during subsequent pregnancies, compared to the control group (P

  5. Diversity of the Lactobacillus group in breast milk and vagina of healthy women and potential role in the colonization of the infant gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, R.; Heilig, G.H.J.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Smidt, H.; Rodriguez, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the diversity of the Lactobacillus group in breast milk and the vagina of healthy women and understand their potential role in the infant gut colonization using the 16S rRNA gene approaches. Methods and Results: Samples of breast milk, vaginal swabs and infant faeces were

  6. Breastfeeding and Red Meat Intake Are Associated with Iron Status in Healthy Korean Weaning-age Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeana; Chang, Ju Young; Shin, Sue; Oh, Sohee

    2017-06-01

    The present study investigated risk factors for iron deficiency (ID) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) during late infancy, including feeding type and complementary feeding (CF) practice. Healthy term Korean infants (8-15 months) were weighed, and questionnaires regarding delivery, feeding, and weaning were completed by their caregivers. We also examined levels of hemoglobin, serum iron/total iron-binding capacity, serum ferritin, and mean corpuscular volume (MCV). Among 619 infants, ID and IDA were present in 174 infants (28.1%) and 87 infants (14.0%), respectively. The 288 infants with exclusively/mostly breastfeeding until late infancy (BFL) were most likely to exhibit ID (53.1%) and IDA (28.1%). The risk of ID was independently associated with BFL (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 47.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18.3-122.9), male sex (aOR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-2.9), fold weight gain (aOR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.5-4.6), and perceived inadequacy of red meat intake (aOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.7). In addition to the risk factors for ID, Cesarean section delivery (aOR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.1-3.2) and low parental CF-related knowledge (aOR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.2) were risk factors for IDA. In conclusion, prolonged breastfeeding and perceived inadequacy of red meat intake may be among the important feeding-related risk factors of ID and IDA. Therefore, more meticulous education and monitoring of iron-rich food intake, such as red meat, with iron supplementation or iron status testing during late infancy if necessary, should be considered for breastfed Korean infants, especially for those with additional risk factors for ID or IDA. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  7. Early skin-to-skin contact between healthy late preterm infants and their parents: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyqvist, Kerstin H; Rosenblad, Andreas; Volgsten, Helena; Funkquist, Eva-Lotta; Mattsson, Elisabet

    2017-01-01

    Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is an important factor to consider in the care of late preterm infants (born between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 completed weeks of gestation). The literature suggests that SSC between preterm infants and their mothers facilitates breastfeeding. However, more studies are needed to explore potential dose-response effects between SSC and breastfeeding as well as studies that explicitly investigate SSC by fathers among late preterm infants. The aim was to investigate the duration of healthy late preterm infants' SSC with the mother and father, respectively, during the first 48 h after birth and the associations with breastfeeding (exclusive/partial at discharged), clinical and demographic variables. This was an observational cohort study in which parents to healthy late preterm infants, born between 34 5/7 and 36 6/7 completed weeks of gestation, recorded duration of SSC provided by mother and father, respectively. Demographic and clinical variables were retrieved from the medical records and were used as predictors. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between the predictors and the outcome, SSC (hours), separately for mothers and fathers. The mean (standard deviation [SD]) time per day spent with SSC with mothers ( n  = 64) and fathers ( n  = 64), was 14.7 (5.6) and 4.4 (3.3) hours during the first day (24 h) after birth and 9.2 (7.1) and 3.1 (3.3) hours during the second day (24 h), respectively. Regarding SSC with mothers, no variable was significantly associated with SSC during the first day, while the mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) time of SSC during the second day was 6.9 (1.4-12.4) hours shorter for each additional kg of birthweight ( p  = 0.014). Concerning SSC with fathers, the mean (95% CI) time of SSC during the first day was 2.1 (0.4-3.7) hours longer for infants born at night ( p  = 0.015), 1.7 (0.1-3.2) hours longer for boys ( p  = 0.033), 3.2 (1.2-5.2) hours longer for infants born by

  8. A 3-Arm randomised controlled trial of Communicating Healthy Beginnings Advice by Telephone (CHAT to mothers with infants to prevent childhood obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ming Wen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With an increasing prevalence of obesity in young children globally, there is an urgent need for the development of effective early interventions. A previous Healthy Beginnings Trial using a nurse-led home visiting program has demonstrated that providing mothers with evidence-based advice can improve maternal practice regarding obesity prevention, and can reduce Body Mass Index (BMI in the first few years of life. However, the costs for scale-up of home visiting limit its population reach. This trial aims to determine the efficacy of Communicating Healthy Beginnings Advice by Telephone (CHAT to mothers with infants in improving infant feeding practices and preventing the early onset of childhood overweight and obesity. Methods/Design We propose a 3-arm randomised controlled trial (RCT with a consecutive sample of 1056 mothers with their newborn children in New South Wales (NSW Australia. Pregnant women who are between weeks 28 and 34 of their pregnancy will be invited to participate in the CHAT trial. Informed consent will be obtained, and after baseline data collection, participants will be randomly allocated to the telephone intervention, text messaging intervention, or the control group. The intervention comprises telephone consultations or text messages, together with 6 intervention packages being mailed at specific times from the third trimester of pregnancy until 12 months post birth. The main trial outcome measures include a duration of breastfeeding, b timing of introduction of solids, c nutrition behaviours, physical activity and television viewing, and d weight and BMI z-score at 12 and 24 months, e cost-effectiveness, as well as f feasibility and acceptability of the interventions. Discussion The results will ascertain whether early intervention using telephone consultation or text messaging together with staged mailed intervention resources can be feasible and effective in improving infant feeding practices

  9. Explaining infant feeding: The role of previous personal and vicarious experience on attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy, and breastfeeding outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartle, Naomi C; Harvey, Kate

    2017-11-01

    Breastfeeding confers important health benefits to both infants and their mothers, but rates are low in the United Kingdom and other developed countries despite widespread promotion. This study examined the relationships between personal and vicarious experience of infant feeding, self-efficacy, the theory of planned behaviour variables of attitudes and subjective norm, and the likelihood of breastfeeding at 6-8 weeks post-natally. A prospective questionnaire study of both first-time mothers (n = 77) and experienced breastfeeders (n = 72) recruited at an antenatal clinic in South East England. Participants completed a questionnaire at 32 weeks pregnant assessing personal and vicarious experience of infant feeding (breastfeeding, formula-feeding, and maternal grandmother's experience of breastfeeding), perceived control, self-efficacy, intentions, attitudes (to breastfeeding and formula-feeding), and subjective norm. Infant feeding behaviour was recorded at 6-8 weeks post-natally. Multiple linear regression modelled the influence of vicarious experience on attitudes, subjective norm, and self-efficacy (but not perceived control) and modelled the influence of attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and past experience on intentions to breastfeed. Logistic regression modelled the likelihood of breastfeeding at 6-8 weeks. Previous experience (particularly personal experience of breastfeeding) explained a significant amount of variance in attitudes, subjective norm, and self-efficacy. Intentions to breastfeed were predicted by subjective norm and attitude to formula-feeding and, in experienced mothers, self-efficacy. Breastfeeding at 6 weeks was predicted by intentions and vicarious experience of formula-feeding. Vicarious experience, particularly of formula-feeding, has been shown to influence the behaviour of first-time and experienced mothers both directly and indirectly via attitudes and subjective norm. Interventions that reduce exposure to formula

  10. The metabolic activity of the enteric microflora and the pattern of sensitization in different types of feeding in healthy infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Bogdanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to investigate the metabolic activity of the enteric microflora and the rate of milk protein sensitization during different types of feeding in healthy infants of Moscow. A total of 200 apparently healthy children were followed up. According to feeding patterns, there were 100 formula-fed babies (a study group and 100 breast-fed ones (a comparison group. Subgroup 1 of the study group included 51 infants receiving formulas based on New Zealand goat's milk with prebiotics; Subgroup 2 consisted of 49 infants having formulas based on cow's milk-serum proteins with prebiotics. The metabolic activity of the enteric microflora was investigated by gas liquid chromatography; the concentrations of allergen-specific IgE and IgG antibodies against cow's and goat's milk proteins in coprofllrates were determined by noncompetitive enzyme immunoassay using special test systems (Allergopharma, Germany before and during the ingestion of the formulas with prebiotics. The use of the formulas containing prebiotics led to increases in acetic acid and butyric acid concentrations and anaerobic index in both subgroups. However, their highest values in the coproflltrates were observed in Subgroup 1 and breast-fed infants. Analysis of allergen-specific IgE and IgC antibodies before formula indigestion showed that the level of latent sensitization to goat's milk protein was substantially lower than that to cow's milk protein (+ Class 1 and + Class 2, respectively. Subgroup 1 showed a more pronounced tendency to decrease the rate of latent sensitization to these types of protein. Thus, the most pronounced positive tendency in the examined indicators was observed in babies receiving breast milk or formulas based on New Zealand goat's milk with prebiotics.

  11. A new topical panthenol-containing emollient: skin-moisturizing effect following single and prolonged usage in healthy adults, and tolerability in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettler, Hans; Kurka, Peter; Wagner, Christine; Sznurkowska, Katarzyna; Czernicka, Olga; Böhling, Arne; Bielfeldt, Stephan; Wilhelm, Klaus-Peter; Lenz, Holger

    2017-05-01

    Two studies were conducted with a new topical panthenol-containing emollient (NTP-CE) to investigate the skin-moisturizing effect in healthy adults and tolerability in healthy infants. In Study 1 (N = 44), a single skin application of NTP-CE was performed followed by a 4-week twice-daily application. Skin hydration and stratum corneum (SC) water content change (using Raman spectroscopy) were measured. In the 4-week Study 2 (N = 65, aged 3-25 months), NTP-CE tolerability was assessed using a 5-point scoring system; skin hydration was determined in a subset (N = 21). In Study 1, mean AUC 0 - 24 h for skin capacitance change from baseline was 302.03 i.u. with NTP-CE and -15.90 i.u. in control areas (p < .001). With NTP-CE (at 4 h), the water content within the upper SC part was reduced (-45.10 vs. -13.39 g/cm 2 , p = .013) and the water gradient increased (0.51 vs. 0.11 g/cm 4 , p = .036), indicating relocation of water into deeper layers. In Study 2, there was no statistically significant change from baseline in mean cutaneous tolerability scores. At days 7, 14, and 28, skin hydration had increased by 42%, 54%, and 49%, respectively (all p < .001). Single and prolonged NTP-CE usage is associated with sustained and deep skin moisturization. NTP-CE is well tolerated by healthy infants.

  12. Hybrid PET/MRI imaging in healthy unsedated newborn infants with quantitative rCBF measurements using 15O-water PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Julie B; Lindberg, Ulrich; Olesen, Oline V

    2018-01-01

    were scanned in a PET/MRI scanner during natural sleep after median intravenous injection of 14 MBq 15O-water. Regional CBF was quantified using a one-tissue-compartment model employing an image-derived input function (IDIF) from the left ventricle. PET rCBF showed the highest values in the thalami.......36, significantly higher than previous ASL data. The rCBF ASL measurements were all unsuccessful primarily owing to subject movement. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time, a minimally invasive PET/MRI method using low activity 15O-water PET for quantitative rCBF assessment in unsedated healthy newborn...... infants and found a white/grey matter CBF ratio similar to that of the adult human brain....

  13. Pacifier Use and Early Life Weight Outcomes in the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, Emily E; Savage, Jennifer S; Birch, Leann L; Beiler, Jessica S; Paul, Ian M

    2018-01-01

    Although widely used by infants, little is known about the long-term effects of pacifiers. We investigated relationships between pacifier use in infancy and appetite, temperament, feeding, and weight outcomes through age 2 years using data from the Intervention Nurses Start Infants Growing on Healthy Trajectories study. Mother-newborn dyads were randomized to a responsive parenting intervention for obesity prevention or a control group. Infants with data on pacifier use (n = 250) were categorized as using a pacifier beyond early infancy (≥4 months of age) or not. Anthropometrics were measured at 6 months, 1, and 2 years with overweight defined as weight-for-length ≥95th percentile at 1 year and BMI ≥85th percentile at 2 years. Mothers completed questionnaires on temperament, appetite, and feeding. Infants who used a pacifier at 4 months or later (68%) had greater conditional weight gain from birth to 6 months (p = 0.01), weight-for-length z-score at 1 year (p pacifier at ≥4 months were more likely to be overweight at ages 1 year (11.7% vs. 1.3%, p = 0.03) and 2 years (20.1% vs. 7.9%, p = 0.03). Pacifier use was associated with shorter breastfeeding duration and less responsive parent feeding styles, but these variables did not mediate the relationship between pacifiers and weight. Parent-reported temperament and appetite were unrelated to pacifier use. Pacifier use beyond early infancy is associated with accelerated infant growth and toddler overweight, although the reasons for this relationship are unclear.

  14. Promoting Healthy Growth or Feeding Obesity? The Need for Evidence-Based Oversight of Infant Nutritional Supplement Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Lampl

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD model recognizes growth in infancy and childhood as a fundamental determinant of lifespan health. Evidence of long-term health risks among small neonates who subsequently grow rapidly poses a challenge for interventions aiming to support healthy growth, not merely drive weight gain. Defining healthy growth beyond “getting bigger” is essential as infant and young child feeding industries expand. Liquid-based nutritional supplements, originally formulated for undernourished children, are increasingly marketed for and consumed by children generally. Clarifying the nature of the evidentiary base on which structure/function claims promoting “healthy growth” are constructed is important to curb invalid generalizations. Evidence points to changing social beliefs and cultural practices surrounding supplementary feeding, raising specific concerns about the long-term health consequences of an associated altered feeding culture, including reduced dietary variety and weight gain. Reassessing the evidence for and relevance of dietary supplements’ “promoting healthy growth” claims for otherwise healthy children is both needed in a time of global obesity and an opportunity to refine intervention approaches among small children for whom rapid subsequent growth in early life augments risk for chronic disease. Scientific and health care partnerships are needed to consider current governmental oversight shortfalls in protecting vulnerable populations from overconsumption. This is important because we may be doing more harm than good.

  15. Predictors of Infant Body Composition at 5 Months of Age: The Healthy Start Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauder, Katherine A; Kaar, Jill L; Starling, Anne P; Ringham, Brandy M; Glueck, Deborah H; Dabelea, Dana

    2017-04-01

    To examine associations of demographic, perinatal, and infant feeding characteristics with offspring body composition at approximately 5 months of age. We collected data on 640 mother/offspring pairs from early pregnancy through approximately 5 months of age. We assessed offspring body composition with air displacement plethysmography at birth and approximately 5 months of age. Linear regression analyses examined associations between predictors and fat-free mass, fat mass, and percent fat mass (adiposity) at approximately 5 months. Secondary models further adjusted for body composition at birth and rapid infant growth. Greater prepregnant body mass index and gestational weight gain were associated with greater fat-free mass at approximately 5 months of age, but not after adjustment for fat-free mass at birth. Greater gestational weight gain was also associated with greater fat mass at approximately 5 months of age, independent of fat mass at birth and rapid infant growth, although this did not translate into increased adiposity. Greater percent time of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with lower fat-free mass (-311 g; P composition by demographic, perinatal, and infant feeding characteristics, although our data also show that increased adiposity at birth persists through approximately 5 months of age. Our findings warrant further research into implications of differences in infant body composition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Early skin-to-skin contact between healthy late preterm infants and their parents: an observational cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin H. Nyqvist

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Skin-to-skin contact (SSC is an important factor to consider in the care of late preterm infants (born between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 completed weeks of gestation. The literature suggests that SSC between preterm infants and their mothers facilitates breastfeeding. However, more studies are needed to explore potential dose-response effects between SSC and breastfeeding as well as studies that explicitly investigate SSC by fathers among late preterm infants. The aim was to investigate the duration of healthy late preterm infants’ SSC with the mother and father, respectively, during the first 48 h after birth and the associations with breastfeeding (exclusive/partial at discharged, clinical and demographic variables. Methods This was an observational cohort study in which parents to healthy late preterm infants, born between 34 5/7 and 36 6/7 completed weeks of gestation, recorded duration of SSC provided by mother and father, respectively. Demographic and clinical variables were retrieved from the medical records and were used as predictors. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between the predictors and the outcome, SSC (hours, separately for mothers and fathers. Results The mean (standard deviation [SD] time per day spent with SSC with mothers (n = 64 and fathers (n = 64, was 14.7 (5.6 and 4.4 (3.3 hours during the first day (24 h after birth and 9.2 (7.1 and 3.1 (3.3 hours during the second day (24 h, respectively. Regarding SSC with mothers, no variable was significantly associated with SSC during the first day, while the mean (95% confidence interval [CI] time of SSC during the second day was 6.9 (1.4–12.4 hours shorter for each additional kg of birthweight (p = 0.014. Concerning SSC with fathers, the mean (95% CI time of SSC during the first day was 2.1 (0.4–3.7 hours longer for infants born at night (p = 0.015, 1.7 (0.1–3.2 hours longer for boys (p = 0.033, 3.2 (1.2–5.2 hours

  17. The paternal component of the "healthy migrant" effect: fathers' natality and infants' low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Ambika; Lane, Sandra D; Hall, Meghan; Tso, Evaline; Pinto, Natasha; Oberoi, Navpriya; Suk, William; Badawy, Zaki; Wojtowycz, Martha A; Aubry, Richard

    2011-11-01

    This study examines the predictors of birth outcomes among women of European and African ancestry and considers the birthplace of the babies' fathers (foreign born vs. native born) as a protective factor. This is a secondary data analysis of 146,431 singleton births among women of European and African ancestry, both native-born and foreign-born, in a 21 birth hospital region of Central New York State from 1996 to 2003. Foreign born fathers were found to have 15% fewer low birth weight infants than US-born fathers, after controlling for the race and birthplace of the mother, tobacco use and Medicaid. Although this secondary data analysis does not allow us to determine the social determinants of the better birth outcomes among infants of foreign born fathers, it does demonstrate that fathers matter and that foreign born fathers are associated with reduced low birth weight in their infants.

  18. Serum paraoxonase and arylesterase values as antioxidants in healthy premature infants at fasting and posprandial times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahveci, H; Laloglu, F; Kilic, O; Ciftel, M; Yildirim, A; Orbak, Z; Ertekin, V; Laloglu, E

    2015-05-01

    Newborn infants, particularly preterm infants, are at greater risk of oxidative stress because of an imbalance between high oxidant loads and immature antioxidant defenses. In several studies, the activities of serum paraoxonase (PON) and arylesterase (ARE) have been found to decline in patients under increased oxidative stress. We investigated the relationships between PON-1 and ARE with fasting and postprandial in premature newborns in this study. Serum paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase levels were investigated in premature infants less than 37 weeks, after birth while they were fasting and postprandial. The paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase values of infants in fasting were significantly lower than the values in postprandial (for paraoxonase-1, p = 0.034, 0.002, and 0.002, respectively; for arylesterase, p paraoxonase-1 and arylesterase values are increased in postprandial and reduced in fasting, showing that these neonates are subjected to oxidative stress. Thus, starting feeding as soon as possible in premature newborns is vital to protect them from oxidative damage.

  19. Long-range correlations in rectal temperature fluctuations of healthy infants during maturation.

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    Georgette Stern

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Control of breathing, heart rate, and body temperature are interdependent in infants, where instabilities in thermoregulation can contribute to apneas or even life-threatening events. Identifying abnormalities in thermoregulation is particularly important in the first 6 months of life, where autonomic regulation undergoes critical development. Fluctuations in body temperature have been shown to be sensitive to maturational stage as well as system failure in critically ill patients. We thus aimed to investigate the existence of fractal-like long-range correlations, indicative of temperature control, in night time rectal temperature (T(rec patterns in maturing infants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured T(rec fluctuations in infants every 4 weeks from 4 to 20 weeks of age and before and after immunization. Long-range correlations in the temperature series were quantified by the correlation exponent, alpha using detrended fluctuation analysis. The effects of maturation, room temperature, and immunization on the strength of correlation were investigated. We found that T(rec fluctuations exhibit fractal long-range correlations with a mean (SD alpha of 1.51 (0.11, indicating that T(rec is regulated in a highly correlated and hence deterministic manner. A significant increase in alpha with age from 1.42 (0.07 at 4 weeks to 1.58 (0.04 at 20 weeks reflects a change in long-range correlation behavior with maturation towards a smoother and more deterministic temperature regulation, potentially due to the decrease in surface area to body weight ratio in the maturing infant. alpha was not associated with mean room temperature or influenced by immunization CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the quantification of long-range correlations using alpha derived from detrended fluctuation analysis is an observer-independent tool which can distinguish developmental stages of night time T(rec pattern in young infants, reflective of maturation of

  20. Unexpected finding of T-cell lymphoma in a previously healthy 16-year-old patient after a thorax trauma: a case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach Okholm-Hansen, Anna; Brorson, Stig

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We describe the clinical course and emphasize the difficulties in diagnosing T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma. The differential diagnostic difficulties have previously been described in regard to pneumonia, but to the best of the authors' knowledge this is the first case report...... to describe lymphoma in relation to trauma.CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 16-year-old Danish boy presented to our hospital with chest pain and accentuated protruding thoracic veins. Ten days prior to hospitalization he had suffered a blunt thoracic trauma while playing soccer. After drainage...... of an excessive amount of pleural fluid, he developed severe respiratory distress. A chest tube was inserted and he was transferred to a level 1 trauma centre. Here, a computed tomography scan unexpectedly revealed significantly swollen mediastinal and retroperitoneal lymph nodes, and he was later diagnosed...

  1. A comparison of hexachlorophene and Lactacyd on growth of skin flora in healthy term newborn infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHattie, J. C.; Crossan, M.; Talukdar, C.; Elder, R.; Murdock, A. I.

    1974-01-01

    Reports of toxicity from the routine bathing of newborn infants with hexachlorophene resulted in discontinuing its use in the newborn nurseries of the Ottawa Civic Hospital, only to be followed by an outbreak of skin infections. As a result, a controlled trial of bathing newborn babies with either Lactacyd or pHisoHex was begun. The efficacy of the soaps was evaluated by comparing the colonization of the nose and umbilical cords of 158 pHisoHex-washed babies and 156 Lactacyd-washed babies on the day of discharge from hospital. The gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial flora of nose and cord of infants washed with pHisoHex and Lactacyd were identical in frequency and distribution. PMID:4834430

  2. Sensitive quantitative analysis of the meconium bacterial microbiota in healthy term infants born vaginally or by cesarean section.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Nagpal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For decades, babies were thought to be born germ-free, but recent evidences suggest that they are already exposed to various bacteria in-utero. However, the data on population levels of such pioneer gut bacteria, particularly in context to birth mode, is sparse. We herein aimed to quantify such bacteria from the meconium of 151 healthy term Japanese infants born vaginally or by C-section. Neonatal first meconium was obtained within 24-48 hours of delivery; RNA was extracted and subjected to reverse-transcription-quantitative PCR using specific primers for Clostridium coccoides group, Clostridium leptum subgroup, Bacteroides fragilis group, Atopobium cluster, Prevotella, Bifidobacterium, Lactobacillus, Enterococcus, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Clostridium perfringens, and C. difficile. We detected several bacterial groups in both vaginally- and cesarean-born infants. B. fragilis group, Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus, Streptococcus and Staphylococcus were detected in more than 50% of infants, with counts ranging from 105-108 cells/g sample. About 30-35% samples harbored Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus (104-105 cells/g; whereas C. coccoides group, C. leptum subgroup and C. perfringens were detected in 10-20% infants (103-105 cells/g. Compared to vaginally-born babies, cesarean-born babies were significantly less often colonized with Lactobacillus genus (6% vs. 37%; P=0.01 and L. gasseri subgroup (6% vs. 31%; P=0.04. Overall, seven Lactobacillus subgroups/ species i.e. L. gasseri subgroup, L. ruminis subgroup, L. casei subgroup, L. reuteri subgroup, L. sakei subgroup, L. plantarum subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the samples from vaginally-born group, whereas only two members i.e. L. gasseri subgroup and L. brevis were detected in the cesarean group. These data corroborate that several bacterial clades may already be present before birth in term infants’ gut. Further, Remarkably lower detection rate

  3. A Randomized Double Blind Controlled Safety Trial Evaluating D-Lactic Acid Production in Healthy Infants Fed a -containing Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papagaroufalis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background D-Lactic acidosis in infants fed lactic acid bacteria-containing products is a concern. Methods The primary objective of this non-inferiority trial was to compare urinary D-lactic acid concentrations during the first 28 days of life in infants fed formula containing Lactobacillus reuteri (1.2 x 10 6 colony forming units (CFU/ml with those fed a control formula. The non-inferiority margin was set at a two-fold increase in D-lactic acid (0.7 mmol/mol creatinine, log-transformed. Healthy term infants in Greece were enrolled between birth and 72 hours of age, and block randomized to a probiotic ( N = 44 or control ( N = 44 group. They were exclusively fed their formulae until 28 days of age and followed up at 7, 14, 28, 112, and 168 ± 3 days. Anthropometric measurements were taken at each visit and tolerance recorded until 112 days. Urine was collected before study formula intake and at all visits up to 112 days and blood at 14 days. Results D-Lactic acid concentration in the probiotic group was below the non-inferiority margin at 28 days: treatment effect -0.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: [-0.48 to 0.41] mmol/mol creatinine but was above the non-inferiority margin at 7 and 14 days–-treatment effect 0.50 (95% CI: [0.05-0.96] mmol/mol creatinine and 0.45 (95% CI: [0.00-0.90] mmol/mol creatinine, respectively. Blood acid excess and pH, anthropometry, tolerance, and adverse events (AEs were not significantly different between groups. Conclusion Intake of L. reuteri -containing formula was safe and did not cause an increase in D-lactic acid beyond two weeks. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01119170.

  4. Predicting growth of the healthy infant using a genome scale metabolic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Avlant; Mardinoglu, Adil; Nielsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    An estimated 165 million children globally have stunted growth, and extensive growth data are available. Genome scale metabolic models allow the simulation of molecular flux over each metabolic enzyme, and are well adapted to analyze biological systems. We used a human genome scale metabolic model...... to simulate the mechanisms of growth and integrate data about breast-milk intake and composition with the infant's biomass and energy expenditure of major organs. The model predicted daily metabolic fluxes from birth to age 6 months, and accurately reproduced standard growth curves and changes in body...

  5. Exposure to secondhand smoke, exclusive breastfeeding and infant adiposity at age 5 months in the Healthy Start study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B F; Sauder, K A; Starling, A P; Ringham, B M; Glueck, D H; Dabelea, D

    2017-08-01

    Infant adiposity may be influenced by several environmental risk factors, but few studies have explored these interactions. To examine the interaction between exposure to secondhand smoke and breastfeeding exclusivity on adiposity at age 5 months. We studied 813 mother-offspring pairs from the longitudinal Healthy Start study. Fat mass and fat-free mass were measured by air displacement plethysmography. Linear regression analyses were used to estimate the association between household smokers (none, any) with fat mass, fat-free mass, percent fat mass, weight-for-age z-score, weight-for-length z-score and BMI-for-age z-score as separate outcomes. Interaction terms between household smokers and breastfeeding exclusivity (secondhand smoke and a lack of exclusive breastfeeding was associated with increased adiposity at age 5 months. For example, within the not exclusively breastfed strata, exposure to secondhand smoke was associated with increased fat mass (0.1 kg; 95% CI: 0.0-0.2; P = 0.05). Conversely, within the exclusively breastfed strata, there was virtually no difference in fat mass between exposed and non-exposed infants (coefficient: -0.1; 95% CI: -0.3-0.1; P = 0.25). Our findings may inform new public health strategies with potential relevance for both smoking cessation and obesity prevention. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  6. Culture Negative Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Resulting in Hydrocephalus and Severe Neurological Sequelae in a Previously Healthy Immunocompetent Man with Penicillin Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaini, Shahin; Karlsen, Gunn Hege; Nandy, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Caucasian man with penicillin allergy was admitted with evolving headache, confusion, fever, and neck stiffness. Treatment for bacterial meningitis with dexamethasone and monotherapy ceftriaxone was started. The cerebrospinal fluid showed negative microscopy...... the catheter. The patient had severe neurological sequelae. This case report emphasises the importance of covering empirically for Listeria monocytogenes in all patients with penicillin allergy with suspected bacterial meningitis. The case also shows that it is possible to have significant infection...... for bacteria, no bacterial growth, and negative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial DNA. The patient developed hydrocephalus on a second CT scan of the brain on the 5th day of admission. An external ventricular catheter was inserted and Listeria monocytogenes grew in the cerebrospinal fluid from...

  7. Purulent pericarditis secondary to community-acquired, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in previously healthy children. A sign of the times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutmer, Jeffrey E; Yates, Andrew R; Bannerman, Tammy L; Marcon, Mario J; Karsies, Todd J

    2013-06-01

    Purulent pericarditis secondary to community-acquired, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a potentially lethal infection that has yet to be described in the pediatric population. Only four cases of purulent pericarditis secondary to CA-MRSA have been described in the English literature, all of whom were adults. We report on the first two pediatric cases of purulent pericarditis secondary to CA-MRSA to increase awareness of this potentially fatal condition. Clinical data were obtained from an 8-year-old male patient and a 7-month-old female patient, both previously healthy, who presented to our hospital for treatment of severe shock and multiorgan failure. Literature review was performed using MEDLINE and Cochrane databases. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to confirm the organism type. Our previously healthy patients presented with refractory shock and were found to have purulent pericarditis with tamponade secondary to CA-MRSA. Both patients required emergent pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial debridement. Isolates from both patients were found to be MRSA USA type 300, a common type of CA-MRSA that has become the most frequent cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Purulent pericarditis survival hinges upon early empiric antibiotic therapy targeting resistant Staphylococcus, rapid diagnostic efforts, and expeditious pericardial drainage when diagnosed. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach provided for complete recovery in both cases, and both children were discharged with normal cardiac function. These two cases emphasize the need for consideration of CA-MRSA presenting with purulent pericarditis as an etiology for refractory shock.

  8. Fish oil affects blood pressure and the plasma lipid profile in healthy Danish infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Schack-Nielsen, L.; Michaelsen, K.F.

    2006-01-01

    with an oscillometric device, and blood was sampled for analysis of erythrocyte fatty acid composition and the plasma lipid profile. This paper examines the effects of the fish oil supplement, with adjustment for the effects of the milk intervention when relevant. The fish oil intervention increased erythrocyte (n-3.......04) than infants not administered fish oil. Plasma triacylglycerol was inversely associated with the erythrocyte content of eicosapentaenoic acid (r = 0.34, P dose. The observed effects of fish oil are in accordance with findings in adults. The long-term health implications......Animal and epidemiologic studies indicate that early nutrition has lasting effects on metabolism and cardiovascular disease risk. In adults, (n-3) long-chain PUFA (LCPUFA) from fish oils improve blood pressure, the lipid profile, and possibly cardiovascular disease mortality. This randomized trial...

  9. Mutations in Genes Encoding Cardiac Ion Channels Previously Associated With Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Are Present With High Frequency in New Exome Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Refsgaard, Lena; Nielsen, Jonas B

    2013-01-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is the leading cause of death in the first 6 months after birth in the industrialized world. The genetic contribution to SIDS has been investigated intensively and to date, 14 cardiac channelopathy genes have been associated with SIDS. Newly published data from...

  10. Reference values of reticulocyte counts in five age groups of healthy infants at rawalpindi, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, K.T.; Zafar, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the reference range values of reticulocyte counts among various infantile age groups at tertiary care hospitals. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out at the Haematology Department of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from March 2010 to March 2011. The sample size was 2000 which was equally distributed between males and females across five age groups. <27 days Group I; 03 months Group II; 06 months Group III; 09 months Group IV; and 1 year Group V. Each group had 400 patients. Reticulocyte staining was used to calculate the percentage of reticulocyte in all the groups. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Gender had no effect on reticulocyte count in all the five groups. The average range of reticulocyte count was 5.1 to 7.5 in Group I, observed in 272 (68%) infants, with a mean value of 1.58+-0.65. For all the remaining groups, 7.6 to 10 was the average range. The mean reticulocyte count value in Group II was 0.73+-0.37, while the values were 0.83+-0.44, 0.82+-0.44 and 0.80+-0.43 in Group III, Group IV and Group V respectively. A significant difference was seen between Group I and the remaining four (p <0.05). Conclusion: Reference values of reticulocyte counts currently used in our region were somewhat different from those currently used. (author)

  11. Safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of two doses of RIX4414 live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Eliete C; Clemens, Sue Ann C; Oliveira, Consuelo S; Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Rubio, Pilar; Gabbay, Yvone B; da Silva, Veronilce B; Mascarenhas, Joana D P; Noronha, Vânia L; Clemens, Ralf; Gusmão, Rosa Helena P; Sanchez, Nervo; Monteiro, Talita Antônia F; Linhares, Alexandre C

    2007-01-01

    To determine the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of two doses of rotavirus vaccine in healthy Brazilian infants. A randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela. Infants received two oral doses of vaccine or placebo at 2 and 4 months of age, concurrently with routine immunizations, except for oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV). This paper reports results from Belém, Brazil, where the number of subjects per group and the viral vaccine titers were: 194 (10(4.7) focus forming units - FFU), 196 (10(5.2) FFU), 194 (10(5.8) FFU) and 194 (placebo). Anti-rotavirus (anti-RV) antibody response was assessed in 307 subjects. Clinical severity of gastroenteritis episodes was measured using a 20-point scoring system with a score of >or= 11 defined as severe GE. The rates of solicited general symptoms were similar in vaccine and placebo recipients. At 2 months after the second dose, a serum IgA response to RV occurred in 54.7 to 74.4% of vaccinees. No interference was seen in the immunogenicity of routine vaccines. Vaccine efficacy against any rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) was 63.5% (95%CI 20.8-84.4) for the highest concentration (10(5.8) FFU). Efficacy was 81.5% (95%CI 44.5-95.4) against severe RVGE. At its highest concentration (10(5.8) FFU), RIX4414 provided 79.8% (95%CI 26.4-96.3) protection against severe RVGE by G9 strain. RIX4414 was highly immunogenic with a low reactogenicity profile and did not interfere with seroresponse to diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Hib antigens. Two doses of RIX4414 provided significant protection against severe GE caused by RV.

  12. Test-retest reliability of computer-based video analysis of general movements in healthy term-born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Susanne Collier; Støen, Ragnhild; Sæther, Rannei; Jensenius, Alexander Refsum; Adde, Lars

    2015-10-01

    A computer-based video analysis has recently been presented for quantitative assessment of general movements (GMs). This method's test-retest reliability, however, has not yet been evaluated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of computer-based video analysis of GMs, and to explore the association between computer-based video analysis and the temporal organization of fidgety movements (FMs). Test-retest reliability study. 75 healthy, term-born infants were recorded twice the same day during the FMs period using a standardized video set-up. The computer-based movement variables "quantity of motion mean" (Qmean), "quantity of motion standard deviation" (QSD) and "centroid of motion standard deviation" (CSD) were analyzed, reflecting the amount of motion and the variability of the spatial center of motion of the infant, respectively. In addition, the association between the variable CSD and the temporal organization of FMs was explored. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 1.1 and ICC 3.1) were calculated to assess test-retest reliability. The ICC values for the variables CSD, Qmean and QSD were 0.80, 0.80 and 0.86 for ICC (1.1), respectively; and 0.80, 0.86 and 0.90 for ICC (3.1), respectively. There were significantly lower CSD values in the recordings with continual FMs compared to the recordings with intermittent FMs (ptest-retest reliability of computer-based video analysis of GMs, and a significant association between our computer-based video analysis and the temporal organization of FMs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation: how a healthy infant is born

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Mecacci

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal nutrition during pregnancy and lactation influences the growth and potential development of the fetus and contributes to the maturity of a healthy baby.The lack of sufficient calories, of macro- and micronutrients, can lead to deficiencies in building materials for the development and growth of the fetus: moreover there is growing evidence that the maternal nutritional status can alter the epigenetic state of the fetal genome, therefore alterations in nutrition during crucial periods of fetal development may result in developmental adaptations that permanently change the physiology, the metabolism of the offspring, and, as a consequence, predispose these individuals to diseases as adults.In this review we collected indications for the recommended intake of calories and nutrients for a healthy diet during pregnancy and lactation, also analyzing some nutritional choices that may increase the risk of nutritional deficiencies and the way to prevent them.Pregnancy-related dietary changes should begin prior to conception, with appropriate modifications throughout pregnancy and lactation, and appropriate supplementation of vitamins and minerals. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  14. Culture Negative Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Resulting in Hydrocephalus and Severe Neurological Sequelae in a Previously Healthy Immunocompetent Man with Penicillin Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Gaini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously healthy 74-year-old Caucasian man with penicillin allergy was admitted with evolving headache, confusion, fever, and neck stiffness. Treatment for bacterial meningitis with dexamethasone and monotherapy ceftriaxone was started. The cerebrospinal fluid showed negative microscopy for bacteria, no bacterial growth, and negative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial DNA. The patient developed hydrocephalus on a second CT scan of the brain on the 5th day of admission. An external ventricular catheter was inserted and Listeria monocytogenes grew in the cerebrospinal fluid from the catheter. The patient had severe neurological sequelae. This case report emphasises the importance of covering empirically for Listeria monocytogenes in all patients with penicillin allergy with suspected bacterial meningitis. The case also shows that it is possible to have significant infection and inflammation even with negative microscopy, negative cultures, and negative broad range polymerase chain reaction in cases of Listeria meningitis. Follow-up spinal taps can be necessary to detect the presence of Listeria monocytogenes.

  15. Typhi–Induced Septic Shock and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Previously Healthy Teenage Patient Treated With High-Dose Dexamethasone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Brosset Ugas MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is commonly characterized by fever and abdominal pain. Rare complications include intestinal hemorrhage, bowel perforation, delirium, obtundation, and septic shock. Herein we describe the case of a previously healthy 16-year-old male without history of travel, diagnosed with typhoid fever complicated by septic shock and acute respiratory distress syndrome treated with high-dose dexamethasone. This case details severe complications of typhoid fever that are uncommonly seen in developed countries, and the successful response to high-dose dexamethasone as adjunct therapy. High-dose dexamethasone treatment has reportedly decreased Salmonella Typhi mortality, but controlled studies specifically performed in children are lacking, and most reports of its use are over 30 years old and all have originated in developing countries. Providers should include Salmonella Typhi in the differential diagnosis of the pediatric patient with fever, severe abdominal pain, and enteritis, and be aware of its potentially severe complications and the limited data on safety and efficacy of adjunctive therapies that can be considered in addition to antibiotics.

  16. Impact of a federal healthy start program on feto-infant morbidity associated with absent fathers: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, Hamisu M; August, Euna M; Mbah, Alfred K; Alio, Amina P; Berry, Estrellita Lo; Aliyu, Muktar H

    2014-11-01

    The absence of fathers during pregnancy increases the risk of feto-infant morbidities, including low birth weight (LBW), preterm birth (PTB), and small-for-gestational age. Previous research has shown that the Central Hillsborough Healthy Start project (CHHS)-a federally funded initiative in Tampa, Florida-has improved birth outcomes. This study explores the effectiveness of the CHHS project in ameliorating the adverse effects of fathers' absence during pregnancy. This retrospective cohort study used CHHS records linked to vital statistics and hospital discharge data (1998-2007). The study population consisted of women who had a singleton birth with an absent father during pregnancy. Women were categorized based on residence in the CHHS service area. Propensity score matching was used to match cases (CHHS) to controls (rest of Florida). Conditional logistic regression was employed to generate odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) for matched observations. Women residing in the CHHS service area were more likely to be high school graduates, black, younger (fathers in the CHHS service area had a reduced likelihood of LBW (OR 0.76, 95 % CI 0.65-0.89), PTB (OR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.62-0.84), very low birth weight (OR 0.50, 95 % CI 0.35-0.72) and very preterm birth (OR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.34-0.69) compared to their counterparts in the rest of the state. This study demonstrates that a Federal Healthy Start project contributed to a significant reduction in adverse fetal birth outcomes in families with absent fathers.

  17. [Serum anion gap in the umbilical cord blood of healthy newborn infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwik, Michał; Jóźwik, Marcin; Pietrzycki, Bartosz

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the determination of serum anion gap in arterial and venous umbilical cord blood obtained from a carefully selected group of 47 healthy term newborns. In the arterial blood, the following concentrations of particular anions were found: chloride - 102.85 +/- 4.35 mmol/l, bicarbonate - 22.26 +/- 2.67 mmol/l, protein anions - 11.89 +/- 1.00 mmol/l, and residual anions - 14.26 +/- 4.35 mmol/l, while in the venous blood these values were: chloride - 104.28 +/- 4.14 mmol/l, bicarbonate - 20.79 +/- 2.70 mmol/l, protein anions - 12.48 +/- 1.23 mmol/l, and residual anions - 13.03 +/- 3.06 mmol/l. Provided strict clinical and biochemical (acid-base balance and blood gases) selections criteria are applied, these data are likely to represent normal values for term newborns and can be the basis for comparison of umbilical serum anion gap in newborns under depressed conditions, like asphyxia. As discussed, the role of serum anion gap studies in the diagnosis of the type of metabolic acidosis, as well as in the monitoring of neonatal therapy is most important.

  18. Non-perforation tension pneumoperitoneum resulting from primary non-aerobic bacterial peritonitis in a previously healthy middle-aged man: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milev, Ognyan Georgiev; Nikolov, Plamen Cekov

    2016-06-06

    Tension pneumoperitoneum is a rare surgical emergency in which free intraperitoneal gas accumulates under pressure. The known sources of free gas are perforated hollow viscera. We believe this is the first published case of a tension non-perforation pneumoperitoneum secondary to anaerobic gas production. This occurred in a background of primary non-aerobic bacterial peritonitis, which developed in an immunocompetent adult man. A previously healthy 45-year-old Bulgarian man presented with a 3-week history of abdominal pain. He displayed signs of shock, peritonitis, and abdominal compartment syndrome. A plain abdominal X-ray showed the pathognomonic "saddlebag sign" with his liver displaced downwards and medially. An emergency laparotomy released pressurized gas, accompanied by 3100 mL of foamy pus. A sudden hemodynamic deterioration occurred soon after decompression. The sources of infection and tension pneumoperitoneum were not found. The peritoneal exudate sample did not recover aerobes. A laparostomy was created and three planned re-operations were performed. During the second re-laparotomy we placed an intraperitoneal silo and his abdomen was closed with skin sutures. Definitive fascial closure was achieved through separation of his two rectus muscles from their posterior sheaths. He was discharged in good health on the 25th postoperative day. Our case provides evidence supporting the theory that anaerobic infection may underlie the etiology of tension pneumoperitoneum. Prior to decompressive laparotomy the patient should receive an intravenous volume bolus to compensate for possible hypotension. If laparostomy leads to lateralization of the rectus muscles with a gap of 6 cm or less, the posterior part of the components separation technique is effective in achieving fascial closure. We present an original classification of tension pneumoperitoneum defining it as primary or secondary.

  19. Bacteriocin production, antibiotic susceptibility and prevalence of haemolytic and gelatinase activity in faecal lactic acid bacteria isolated from healthy Ethiopian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birri, Dagim Jirata; Brede, Dag Anders; Tessema, Girum Tadesse; Nes, Ingolf F

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this study was to characterise lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from faecal samples of healthy Ethiopian infants, with emphasis on bacteriocin production and antibiotic susceptibility. One hundred fifty LAB were obtained from 28 healthy Ethiopian infants. The isolates belonged to Lactobacillus (81/150), Enterococcus (54/150) and Streptococcus (15/150) genera. Lactobacillus species were more abundant in the breast-fed infants while Enterococcus dominated the mixed-fed population. Bacteriocin-producing LAB species were isolated from eight of the infants. Many different bacteriocins were identified, including one new bacteriocin from Streptococcus salivarius, avicin A (class IIa) from Enterococcus avium, one class IIa bacteriocin from Enterococcus faecalis strains, one unknown bacteriocin from E. faecalis and two unknown bacteriocins from Lactobacillus fermentum strains and the two-peptide gassericin T from Lactobacillus gasseri isolate. Susceptibility tests performed for nine antibiotics suggest that some lactobacilli might have acquired resistance to erythromycin (3 %) and tetracycline (4 %) only. The streptococci were generally antibiotic sensitive except for penicillin, to which they showed intermediate resistance. All enterococci were susceptible to ampicillin while 13 % showed penicillin resistance. Only one E. faecalis isolate was vancomycin-resistant. Tetracycline (51 %) and erythromycin (26 %) resistance was prevalent among the enterococci, but multidrug resistance was confined to E. faecalis (47 %) and Enterococcus faecium (33 %). Screening of enterococcal virulence traits revealed that 2 % were β-haemolytic. The structural genes of cytolysin were detected in 28 % of the isolates in five enterococcal species, the majority being E. faecalis and Enterococcus raffinosus. This study shows that bacteriocin production and antibiotic resistance is a common trait of faecal LAB of Ethiopian infants while virulence factors occur at low levels.

  20. Safety and immunomodulatory effects of three probiotic strains isolated from the feces of breast-fed infants in healthy adults: SETOPROB study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Plaza-Diaz

    Full Text Available We previously described the isolation and characterization of three probiotic strains from the feces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants: Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, Bifidobacterium breve CNCM I-4035 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. These strains were shown to adhere to intestinal mucus in vitro, to be sensitive to antibiotics and to resist biliary salts and low pH. In the present study, a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with 100 healthy volunteers in three Spanish cities was carried out to evaluate the tolerance, safety, gut colonization and immunomodulatory effects of these three probiotics. Volunteers underwent a 15-day washout period, after which they were randomly divided into 5 groups that received daily a placebo, a capsule containing one of the 3 strains or a capsule containing a mixture of two strains for 30 days. The intervention was followed by another 15-day washout period. Patients did not consume fermented milk for the entire duration of the study. Gastrointestinal symptoms, defecation frequency and stool consistency were not altered by probiotic intake. No relevant changes in blood and serum, as well as no adverse events occurred during or after treatment. Probiotic administration slightly modified bacterial populations in the volunteers' feces. Intestinal persistence occurred in volunteers who received L. rhamnosus CNCM I-4036. Administration of B. breve CNCM I-4035 resulted in a significant increase in fecal secretory IgA content. IL-4 and IL-10 increased, whereas IL-12 decreased in the serum of volunteers treated with any of the three strains. These results demonstrate that the consumption of these three bacterial strains was safe and exerted varying degrees of immunomodulatory effects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01479543.

  1. A systematic review of controlled trials of lower-protein or energy-containing infant formulas for use by healthy full-term infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infant formulas have historically been developed based on providing macronutrients at intake concentrations approximately matching the composition of human milk. In most countries, targets of 1.4–1.5 g of protein/dL and 20 kcal/oz (67–68 kcal/dL) have been set as the protein and energy concentration...

  2. Protein quality and quantity in cow's milk-based formula for healthy term infants: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macé, Katherine; Steenhout, Philippe; Klassen, Petra; Donnet, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The development of infant formula with optimized protein quality and quantity has been, and still is, the subject of intense investigation. A better understanding of the protein composition of breast milk and infant needs in association with technological breakthroughs in cow's milk fractionation, has led to the development of infant formulas with a protein content that is closer to that of human milk. Today, infant formulas with a protein/energy ratio of 1.8 g/100 kcal are commercially available. These formulas have been shown to be safe and nutritionally adequate for term infants. However, the short-term and potentially long-term metabolic benefits of formulas with reduced protein content have still to be elucidated and are currently under investigation. In addition to providing amino acids as building blocks for growth, milk is the source of numerous bioactive factors/hormones which are involved in multiple physiological processes. Continuous efforts are being made to identify new bioactive compounds in human milk. However, a better understanding of their biological functions in suckling infants as well as a comparison with their bovine counterparts are needed. Technological processes, which preserve some bioactive factors in cow's milk already exist. These processes could be applied to infant formulas.

  3. Dynamics of co-existing Escherichia colilineages in situ of the infant gut and multiplex phenotypic targeted recovery of previously uncultivated bacteria from the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumpert, Heidi

    were selected due to an observed change in their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Via full genome sequencing, we identified that in both cases a conjugative plasmid harboring antibiotic resistance genes was transferred between co-existing E. coli lineages and is responsible for the change...... conditions. Antibiotictolerance phenotypes were determined, and this mapping was used to carefully tailor antibiotic combinations to specifically select for previously uncultivated bacteria. Usingthis method, four previously uncultivated species were successfully cultured andgenome sequenced, and two...... of which had 16S rRNA identities of less than 95% topreviously cultured bacteria. We assessed the genomic coverage and abundance ofthese sequenced isolates in the gut using publicly available metagenomes....

  4. The HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programmme for early Years) feasibility randomised control trial: acceptability and feasibility of an intervention to reduce infant obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEachan, Rosemary R C; Santorelli, Gillian; Bryant, Maria; Sahota, Pinki; Farrar, Diane; Small, Neil; Akhtar, Shaheen; Sargent, Judith; Barber, Sally E; Taylor, Natalie; Richardson, Gerry; Farrin, Amanda J; Bhopal, Raj S; Bingham, Daniel D; Ahern, Sara M; Wright, John

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of infant obesity is increasing, but there is a lack of evidence-based approaches to prevent obesity at this age. This study tested the acceptability and feasibility of evaluating a theory-based intervention aimed at reducing risk of obesity in infants of overweight/obese women during and after pregnancy: the Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years (HAPPY). A feasibility randomised controlled trial was conducted in Bradford, England. One hundred twenty overweight/obese pregnant women (Body Mass Index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m(2)) were recruited between 10-26 weeks gestation. Consenting women were randomly allocated to HAPPY (6 antenatal, 6 postnatal sessions: N = 59) or usual care (N = 61). Appropriate outcome measures for a full trial were explored, including: infant's length and weight, woman's BMI, physical activity and dietary intake of the women and infants. Health economic data were collected. Measurement occurred before randomisation and when the infant was aged 6 months and 12 months. Feasibility outcomes were: recruitment/attrition rates, and acceptability of: randomisation, measurement, and intervention. Intra-class correlations for infant weight were calculated. Fidelity was assessed through observations and facilitator feedback. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews explored acceptability of methods, implementation, and intervention content. Recruitment targets were met (~20 women/month) with a recruitment rate of 30 % of eligible women (120/396). There was 30 % attrition at 12 months; 66 % of recruited women failed to attend intervention sessions, but those who attended the first session were likely to continue to attend (mean 9.4/12 sessions, range 1-12). Reaction to intervention content was positive, and fidelity was high. Group clustering was minimal; an adjusted effect size of -0.25 standard deviation scores for infant weight at 12 months (95 % CI: -0.16-0.65) favouring the intervention was observed using

  5. Effects of parenting role and parent-child interaction on infant motor development in Taiwan Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yi-Chen; Lin, Dai-Chan; Lee, Chun-Yang; Lee, Meng-Chih

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have rarely focused on healthy infants' motor development, and nationwide birth cohort studies in Taiwan are limited. It has been shown that parent-child interactions significantly influence infant motor development and the effect of mother-infant attachment on infant development is stronger than father-infant attachment. However, it is not well understood that whether the mother-infant or father-infant interaction has the confounding effect on infant motor development. To understand healthy infant motor development in Taiwan; and to investigate the effects of parenting roles and parent-child interactions on infant motor development. Data were derived from the 1st through the 2nd waves of the Taiwan Birth Cohort Study-Pilot Database. Infants were classified into two categories (complete or incomplete development) according to their developmental milestones. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) and random effects models were used to clarify the possible long-term effects. The rate of infants who completed development in 6 months was 30.50%; however the rate was increased in 18 month-old children (80.01%). A mother's perceived infant care competence was the most important factor for infant motor development. "Whether or not the infant was the only baby in the family" and "parent-child interaction" had slightly significant effect on infant motor development. In conclusion, the mother's perceived competence must be strengthened and parent-infant interactions should be emphasized on a daily basis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The HAPPY (Healthy and Active Parenting Programmme for early Years feasibility randomised control trial: acceptability and feasibility of an intervention to reduce infant obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary R. C. McEachan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of infant obesity is increasing, but there is a lack of evidence-based approaches to prevent obesity at this age. This study tested the acceptability and feasibility of evaluating a theory-based intervention aimed at reducing risk of obesity in infants of overweight/obese women during and after pregnancy: the Healthy and Active Parenting Programme for Early Years (HAPPY. Methods A feasibility randomised controlled trial was conducted in Bradford, England. One hundred twenty overweight/obese pregnant women (Body Mass Index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m2 were recruited between 10–26 weeks gestation. Consenting women were randomly allocated to HAPPY (6 antenatal, 6 postnatal sessions: N = 59 or usual care (N = 61. Appropriate outcome measures for a full trial were explored, including: infant’s length and weight, woman’s BMI, physical activity and dietary intake of the women and infants. Health economic data were collected. Measurement occurred before randomisation and when the infant was aged 6 months and 12 months. Feasibility outcomes were: recruitment/attrition rates, and acceptability of: randomisation, measurement, and intervention. Intra-class correlations for infant weight were calculated. Fidelity was assessed through observations and facilitator feedback. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews explored acceptability of methods, implementation, and intervention content. Results Recruitment targets were met (~20 women/month with a recruitment rate of 30 % of eligible women (120/396. There was 30 % attrition at 12 months; 66 % of recruited women failed to attend intervention sessions, but those who attended the first session were likely to continue to attend (mean 9.4/12 sessions, range 1–12. Reaction to intervention content was positive, and fidelity was high. Group clustering was minimal; an adjusted effect size of −0.25 standard deviation scores for infant weight at 12 months (95 % CI:

  7. Safety and immunogenicity of a meningococcal B recombinant vaccine when administered with routine vaccines to healthy infants in Taiwan: A phase 3, open-label, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Nan-Chang; Huang, Li-Min; Willemsen, Arnold; Bhusal, Chiranjiwi; Arora, Ashwani Kumar; Mojares, Zenaida Reynoso; Toneatto, Daniela

    2018-01-16

    Neisseria meningitidis is associated with high mortality and morbidity in infants and children worldwide. This phase 3 study (NCT02173704) evaluated safety and immunogenicity of a 4-component serogroup B recombinant meningococcal vaccine (4CMenB) co-administered with routine vaccines in Taiwanese infants. In total, 225 healthy infants were randomized (2 : 1 ) to receive 4CMenB and routine vaccines (4CMenB+Routine) or routine vaccines only (Routine group) at 2, 4, 6 and 12 months of age. Routine vaccines were diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b, 13-valent pneumococcal, hepatitis B, measles-mumps-rubella and varicella vaccines. Immune responses to 4CMenB components (factor H binding protein [fHbp], Neisserial adhesin A [NadA], porin A [PorA] and Neisseria heparin-binding antigen [NHBA]) were evaluated at 1 month post-primary and post-booster vaccination, using human serum bactericidal assay (hSBA). Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed. A sufficient immune response was demonstrated for fHbp, NadA and PorA, at 1 month post-primary and booster vaccination. In the 4CMenB+Routine group, hSBA titers ≥5 were observed in all infants for fHbp and NadA, in 79% and 59% of infants for PorA and NHBA, respectively, at 1 month post-primary vaccination and in 92-99% of infants for all antigens, at 1 month post-booster vaccination. In the 4CMenB+Routine group, hSBA geometric mean titers for all antigens increased post-primary (8.41-963) and post-booster vaccination (17-2315) compared to baseline (1.01-1.36). Immunogenicity of 4CMenB was not impacted by co-administration with routine pediatric vaccines in infants. Reactogenicity was slightly higher in the 4CMenB+Routine group compared with Routine group, but no safety concerns were identified.

  8. Microarray analysis reveals marked intestinal microbiota aberrancy in infants having eczema compared to healthy children in at-risk for atopic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nylund Lotta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deviations in composition and diversity of intestinal microbiota in infancy have been associated with both the development and recurrence of atopic eczema. Thus, we decided to use a deep and global microarray-based method to characterize the diversity and temporal changes of the intestinal microbiota in infancy and to define specific bacterial signatures associated with eczema. Faecal microbiota at 6 and 18 months of age were analysed from 34 infants (15 with eczema and 19 healthy controls selected from a prospective follow-up study based on the availability of faecal samples. The infants were originally randomized to receive either Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG or placebo. Results Children with eczema harboured a more diverse total microbiota than control subjects as assessed by the Simpson’s reciprocal diversity index of the microarray profiles. Composition of the microbiota did not differ between study groups at age of 6 months, but was significantly different at age of 18 months as assessed by MCPP (p=0.01. At this age healthy children harboured 3 -fold greater amount of members of the Bacteroidetes (p=0.01. Microbiota of children suffering from eczema had increased abundance of the Clostridium clusters IV and XIVa, which are typically abundant in adults. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supplementation in early infancy was observed to have minor long-term effects on the microbiota composition. Conclusion A diverse and adult-type microbiota in early childhood is associated with eczema and it may contribute to the perpetuation of eczema.

  9. Infant growth outcomes from birth to 12 months of age: findings from the Delta Healthy Sprouts comparative impact trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Multicomponent lifestyle interventions designed for both the gestational and early postnatal periods may be key to the prevention of obesity and its consequences in children. This paper’s primary objective was to determine if infant growth outcomes differed between treatment arms of a ...

  10. Healthy food availability and participation in WIC (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children) in food stores around lower- and higher-income elementary schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, June M.; Yen, Irene H.; Pallis, Lauren C.; Laraia, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The nutritional intake of schoolchildren is affected not only by what is consumed at school but also by what is available in food outlets near schools. The present study surveys the range of food outlets around schools and examines how the availability of healthy food in the food stores encountered varies by income status of the school and by store participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food assistance programme. Design Network buffer zones were created to reflect a quarter-mile (400m) walk from elementary schools with lower- and higher-income student populations in Oakland, CA, USA. All food outlets within these zones were categorised by type, and audits were conducted within food stores using a checklist to assess for the presence or absence of twenty-eight healthy items (in five domains). Setting Mid-sized city in the USA. Subjects Food outlets near public elementary schools. Results There were considerably more food outlets around lower-income schools. Food stores near higher-income schools had higher scores in two of the five domains (healthy beverages/low-fat dairy and healthy snacks). However, there were more food stores near lower-income schools that accepted WIC vouchers. Stratification showed that WIC stores scored higher than non-WIC stores on four of the five domains. Conclusions Although higher-income students have more access to healthy food in the environment surrounding their school, this disparity appears to be mitigated by stores that accept WIC and offer more healthy snacking options. Federal programmes such as this may be particularly valuable for children in lower-income areas. PMID:21205402

  11. [Hepatitis B with a fatal outcome in a 3-month-old infant of a healthy chronic carrier mother].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Luyer, B; Bastard, C; Devaux, A M; Ensel, P

    1983-01-01

    A 81 day old male infant developed an acute hepatitic failure and died shortly thereafter. Determinations of HBs antigen and antibody (AB) and HBeAg and AB were performed in the parents and sibling of the infected child. The mother and a sister were an asymptomatic carrier of HBsAg, the first HBeAg positive and the second HBeAB positive. An elder sibling was HBsAg and HBeAg positive in this serum. The father was anti-HBs positive. In the family of the sister, the man and two childs were HBsAg and anti-HBsAB negative. A new baby in the family of the propositus born and a combination of HB vaccine and HBIg (hepatite B immuno-globulin) was started at birth. Unfortunately the child died of S.D.I.S. (Sudden Death Infant Syndrome). The HB vaccine was immuno-genetic in this infant and the anti-HBs in the immuno-globulin M (IgM) was positive as in several adults controls. This case allow us to discuss vertical transmission of hepatitis B, the clinical aspect of neonatal hepatitis and the preventing HB infection by combinaison of HB vaccine and HBIg.

  12. Evaluating the Influence of the Revised Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Food Allocation Package on Healthy Food Availability, Accessibility, and Affordability in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenhua; McKyer, E Lisako J; Dowdy, Diane; Evans, Alexandra; Ory, Marcia; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Wang, Suojin; Miao, Jingang

    2016-02-01

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was implemented to improve the health of pregnant women and children of low socioeconomic status. In 2009, the program was revised to provide a wider variety of healthy food choices (eg, fresh fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain items). The purpose of this study was to evaluate (1) the impact of the revised WIC Nutrition Program's food allocation package on the availability, accessibility, and affordability of healthy foods in WIC-authorized grocery stores in Texas; and (2) how the impact of the policy change differed by store types and between rural and urban regions. WIC-approved stores (n=105) across Texas were assessed using a validated instrument (88 items). Pre- (June-September 2009) and post-new WIC package implementation (June-September 2012) audits were conducted. Paired-sample t tests were conducted to compare the differences between pre- and post-implementation audits on shelf width and number of varieties (ie, availability), visibility (ie, accessibility), and inflation-adjusted price (ie, affordability). Across the 105 stores, post-implementation audits showed increased availability in terms of shelf space for most key healthy food options, including fruit (PFood visibility increased for fresh juices (Pfoods such as fruits (Pbread (Pbread (Pfood availability and visibility were observed in stores of different types and in different locations, although smaller or fewer effects were noted in small stores and stores in rural regions. Implementation of the revised WIC food package has generally improved availability and accessibility, but not affordability, of healthy foods in WIC-authorized stores in Texas. Future studies are needed to explore the impact of the revised program on healthy food option purchases and consumption patterns among Texas WIC participants. Copyright © 2016 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Parental recommendations for population level interventions to support infant and family dietary choices: a qualitative study from the Growing Up in Wales, Environments for Healthy Living (EHL) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanom, Ashrafunnesa; Hill, Rebecca A; Morgan, Kelly; Rapport, Frances L; Lyons, Ronan A; Brophy, Sinead

    2015-03-11

    Childhood obesity presents a challenge to public health. This qualitative study explored the main barriers to dietary choices faced by parents with infants, and the types of interventions and policy level recommendations they would like to see put in place, to promote a healthier food environment. 61 semi-structured interviews with prospective parents and parents of infants (61 mothers and 35 fathers) were conducted. Families were selected according to community deprivation levels using the Townsend Deprivation Index to ensure a representative sample from deprived and affluent neighbourhoods. Inductive thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Parents identified triggers which led to unhealthy dietary choices such as reliance on fast food outlets due to; shift work, lack of access to personal transport, inability to cook, their own childhood dietary experiences, peer pressure and familial relationships. Parents who made healthy dietary choices reported learning cooking skills while at university, attending community cooking classes, having access to quality food provided by church and community organisations or access to Healthy Start vouchers. They called for a reduction in supermarket promotion of unhealthy food and improved access to affordable and high-quality fresh produce in the local area and in supermarkets. There was a strong message to policy makers to work with commercial companies (food manufactures) as they have resources to lower costs and target messages at a diverse population. Provision of targeted advice to fathers, minority ethnic parents, and tailored and practical advice and information on how to purchase, prepare, store and cook food was requested, along with community cookery classes and improved school cookery lessons. There is a need for parent directed community/population level interventions that aims to reduce socio-ecological barriers to making healthy dietary choices. Parents desired improvements in meals provided in workplaces

  14. Safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W and Y conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) administered with routine infant vaccinations: results of an open-label, randomized, phase 3b controlled study in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnour, Arturo; Silas, Peter E; Lamas, Marta Raquel Valdés; Aragón, Carlos Fernándo Grazioso; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Acuña, Teobaldo Herrera; Castrejón, Tirza De León; Izu, Allen; Odrljin, Tatjana; Smolenov, Igor; Hohenboken, Matthew; Dull, Peter M

    2014-02-12

    The highest risk for invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is in infants aged meningococcal conjugate vaccination has the potential to prevent IMD caused by serogroups A, C, W and Y. This phase 3b, multinational, open-label, randomized, parallel-group, multicenter study evaluated the safety of a 4-dose series of MenACWY-CRM, a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, concomitantly administered with routine vaccinations to healthy infants. Two-month-old infants were randomized 3:1 to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines or routine vaccines alone at ages 2, 4, 6 and 12 months. Adverse events (AEs) that were medically attended and serious adverse events (SAEs) were collected from all subjects from enrollment through 18 months of age. In a subset, detailed safety data (local and systemic solicited reactions and all AEs) were collected for 7 days post vaccination. The primary objective was a non-inferiority comparison of the percentages of subjects with ≥1 severe systemic reaction during Days 1-7 after any vaccination of MenACWY-CRM plus routine vaccinations versus routine vaccinations alone (criterion: upper limit of 95% confidence interval [CI] of group difference vaccines and 13% after routine vaccines alone (group difference 3.0% (95% CI -0.8, 6.4%). Although the non-inferiority criterion was not met, post hoc analysis controlling for significant center and group-by-center differences revealed that MenACWY-CRM plus routine vaccinations was non-inferior to routine vaccinations alone (group difference -0.1% [95% CI -4.9%, 4.7%]). Rates of solicited AEs, medically attended AEs, and SAEs were similar across groups. In a large multinational safety study, a 4-dose series of MenACWY-CRM concomitantly administered with routine vaccines was clinically acceptable with a similar safety profile to routine vaccines given alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiorespiratory disorders of infants of diabetic mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrabovski Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the characteristics of modern era is the explosion of diabetes in the world. Today more than 400,000,000 people suffer from diabetes in the entire world. During the last decade the number of women with the disorder of glucose homeostasis is six to seven times greater than in the previous period. Therefore, the re-evaluation of the impact of glucose intolerance on the course and outcome of pregnancy is very current. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the data on the influence of mothers’ glucose homeostasis disturbances on the occurrence of cardiorespiratory disorders in newborns, as well as their influence on the perinatal outcome. Methods. Prospective examination included 102 newborns in total - 31 infants of mothers with glucose homeostasis disorder (Group I and 71 infants of healthy mothers (Group II. Average age, body height, body weight, body mass index, parity and illness duration of the pregnant women had been determined, as well as the delivery method. Every newborn was provided with physical examination, Apgar score was calculated, body weight and body length were measured. Also, electrocardiography and brain ultrasound, as well as the basic hematology biochemical and microbiological analysis, were performed within the examinations of the infants. Results. The average weight and obesity incidence with diabetic women was higher than in the control group and their infants were heavier and with lower gestational age. Heart failures were diagnosed in five (16.1% infants of diabetic mothers and in one (1.4% infant of a healthy woman (p<0.01. Respiratory disorders were diagnosed in 48.4% infants of diabetic mothers and in 12.6% of healthy mothers (p<0.01. Forty-two percent of infants of diabetic mothers and 19.7% infants of healthy mothers needed additional oxygen. Conclusion. Congenital anomalies of the cardiovascular system and respiratory disorders in the infants of diabetic mothers were six to eight

  16. EFFICIENCY OF USING THE ADAPTED GOAT’S MILK FORMULA IN THE DIET OF HEALTHY YOUNG INFANTS: A MULTICENTER PROSPECTIVE COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Тatyana E. Borovik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is no doubt that it is necessary to study the efficiency of milk formulas that are introduced into the Russian market of baby food. This applies to both new products and known brands of formulas whose composition is subject to change.Objective. Our aim was to assess the clinical efficacy of the adapted goat's milk formula in the diet of young infants.Methods. We conducted a prospective comparative study with healthy full-term  children aged 0–5 months being on a formula (main group or breast feeding (comparison group. The tolerability of the adapted goat's milk formula, the dynamics of anthropometric indicators, changes in body composition as well as microscopic characteristics  of stool and general clinical and biochemical parameters  of peripheral blood were assessed after 1 month.Results. Good tolerability of the goat's milk formula was noted in 184 (96.8% of 190 children in the main group. In the course of taking the product, the proportion of children with functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract decreased significantly from 57 (30% to 27 (14% (p < 0.001. Physical development,  complete blood count results, the levels of ferritin, prealbumin and 25(OHD in children of the main group and the comparison group (n = 71 were comparable and were within the mean age parameters. Qualitative analysis of the level of specific IgE to goat's milk proteins did not reveal any sensibilization in any of the children receiving the milk formula, either at the beginning of the study or after 1 month of taking the product.Conclusion. The studied adapted goat's milk formula can be used in nutrition of young infants in cases of lack or absence of mother's milk.

  17. Initial assessment of jaundice in otherwise healthy infants--a comparison of methods in two postnatal units.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, N M

    2012-02-01

    Transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) has the potential to reduce total serum bilirubin (TS) sampling. The principal aim of this study was to determine and compare the number of initial TSB samples (TSBs) in two postnatal units (hospitals A & B) whereby hospital A used TcB and hospital B did not. A secondary aim was to determine the clinical factors that led to initial TSBs exceeding exchange transfusion level in both hospitals. Results demonstrated both hospitals had similar populations and patient numbers following selection criteria. 1645 neonates (10.4%) had one or more TSBs performed in hospital A, versus 2373 neonates (15.1%) in hospital B (p < 0.01). Fourteen neonates in hospital A and 3 neonates in hospital B had initial TSBs above exchange transfusion level. For neonates with TSBs above exchange, preventable factors related to earlier testing and follow up. In routine clinical practice, TcB is associated with a significantly reduced number of TSB measurements. TSB levels above exchange transfusion are linked to preventable factors, in otherwise healthy neonates.

  18. The effect of inert gas choice on multiple breath washout in healthy infants: differences in lung function outcomes and breathing pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Per M; Bengtsson, Lovisa; Lindblad, Anders; Robinson, Paul D

    2017-12-01

    The detrimental effects on breathing pattern during multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) have been described with different inhaled gases [100% oxygen (O 2 ) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF 6 )] but detailed comparisons are lacking. N 2 - and SF 6 -based tests were performed during spontaneous quiet sleep in 10 healthy infants aged 0.7-1.3 yr using identical hardware. Differences in breathing pattern pre and post 100% O 2 and 4% SF 6 exposure were investigated, and the results obtained were compared [functional residual capacity (FRC) and lung clearance index (LCI)]. During 100% O 2 exposure. mean inspiratory flow ("respiratory drive") decreased transiently by mean (SD) 28 (9)% ( P pattern of change reversed. No significant effect on breathing pattern was observed during SF 6 testing. In vitro testing confirmed that technical artifacts did not explain these changes. Mean (SD) FRC and LCI in vivo were significantly higher with N 2 vs. SF 6 washout: 216 (33) vs. 186 (22) ml ( P pattern during test performance and the functional residual capacity and lung clearance index values obtained. Data suggest the detrimental effect of breathing pattern of 100% O 2 and movement of O 2 across the alveolar capillary membrane, with direct effects on MBW outcomes. SF 6 MBW during infancy avoids this and can be further optimized by addressing the sources of technical artifact identified in this work.

  19. Efficacy and safety of a pentavalent live human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RV5) in healthy Chinese infants: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Zhaojun; Mo, Yi; Li, Mingqiang; Tao, Junhui; Yang, Xu; Kong, Jilian; Wei, Dingkai; Fu, Botao; Liao, Xueyan; Chu, Jianli; Qiu, Yuanzheng; Hille, Darcy A; Nelson, Micki; Kaplan, Susan S

    2017-10-13

    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial was conducted in healthy Chinese infants to assess the efficacy and safety of a pentavalent live human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RotaTeq™, RV5) against rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE). 4040 participants aged 6-12weeks were enrolled and randomly assigned to either 3 oral doses of RV5 (n=2020) or placebo (n=2020), administered ∼4weeks apart. The participants also received OPV and DTaP in a concomitant or staggered fashion. The primary objective was to evaluate vaccine efficacy (VE) against naturally-occurring RVGE at least 14days following the third dose. Key secondary objectives included: VE against naturally-occurring severe RVGE and VE against severe and any-severity RVGE caused by rotavirus serotypes contained in the vaccine, occurring at least 14days after the third dose. All adverse events (AEs) were collected for 30days following each dose. Serious AEs (SAEs) and intussusception cases were collected during the entire study. (ClinicalTrials.gov registry: NCT02062385). VE against RVGE of any-severity caused by any serotype was 69.3% (95% CI: 54.5, 79.7). The secondary efficacy analysis showed an efficacy of: 78.9% (95% CI: 59.1, 90.1) against severe RVGE caused by any serotype; 69.9% (95% CI: 55.2, 80.3) and 78.9% (95% CI: 59.1, 90.1) against any-severity and severe RVGE caused by serotypes contained in the vaccine, respectively. Within 30days following any vaccination, 53.5% (1079/2015) and 53.3% (1077/2019) of participants reported at least one AE, and 5.8% (116/2015) and 5.7% (116/2019) reported SAEs in the vaccine and placebo groups, respectively. No SAEs were considered vaccine-related in recipients of RV5. Two intussusception cases were reported in recipients of RV5 who recovered after receiving treatment. Neither was considered vaccine-related. In Chinese infants, RV5 was efficacious against any-severity and severe RVGE caused by any serotype and generally well

  20. Food Sources of Energy and Macronutrient Intakes among Infants from 6 to 12 Months of Age: The Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes (GUSTO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Xuan Lim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrition during complementary feeding is important for the growth, development and well-being of children. We aim to examine the energy and macronutrient intake composition and their main food sources in a mother–offspring cohort study in Singapore. The diets of infants were assessed by 24 h dietary recalls or food diaries collected from mothers when their offspring were 6 (n = 760, 9 (n = 893 and 12 (n = 907 months of age. Food sources of energy and macronutrients were determined using the population proportion methodology. Energy intakes per day (kcal; mean (standard deviation, SD of these infants were 640 (158 at 6 months, 675 (173 at 9 months, and 761 (208 at 12 months. Infant formula, breastmilk and infant cereals were the top three food sources of energy and macronutrient intakes in infants through the period 6 to 12 months. Other main energy and carbohydrate sources at 9 and 12 months of age were rice porridge, infant biscuits and fresh fruits, while fish, red meat and eggs were the other main protein and total fat sources. Breast-fed and mixed-fed infants had a more varied diet as compared to formula-fed infants. Formula-fed infants had consistently higher protein and lower total fat consumption compared to those who were breastfed. An understanding of these main food sources during complementary feeding can inform local dietary recommendations and policies.

  1. Food Sources of Energy and Macronutrient Intakes among Infants from 6 to 12 Months of Age: The Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Shan-Xuan; Toh, Jia-Ying; Han, Wee-Meng; Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi; Yap, Fabian; Chong, Yap-Seng; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong

    2018-01-01

    Adequate nutrition during complementary feeding is important for the growth, development and well-being of children. We aim to examine the energy and macronutrient intake composition and their main food sources in a mother–offspring cohort study in Singapore. The diets of infants were assessed by 24 h dietary recalls or food diaries collected from mothers when their offspring were 6 (n = 760), 9 (n = 893) and 12 (n = 907) months of age. Food sources of energy and macronutrients were determined using the population proportion methodology. Energy intakes per day (kcal; mean (standard deviation, SD)) of these infants were 640 (158) at 6 months, 675 (173) at 9 months, and 761 (208) at 12 months. Infant formula, breastmilk and infant cereals were the top three food sources of energy and macronutrient intakes in infants through the period 6 to 12 months. Other main energy and carbohydrate sources at 9 and 12 months of age were rice porridge, infant biscuits and fresh fruits, while fish, red meat and eggs were the other main protein and total fat sources. Breast-fed and mixed-fed infants had a more varied diet as compared to formula-fed infants. Formula-fed infants had consistently higher protein and lower total fat consumption compared to those who were breastfed. An understanding of these main food sources during complementary feeding can inform local dietary recommendations and policies. PMID:29534442

  2. The influence of a formula supplemented with dairy lipids and plant oils on the erythrocyte membrane omega-3 fatty acid profile in healthy full-term infants: a double-blind randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannì Maria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human milk is the optimal nutrition for infants. When breastfeeding is not possible, supplementation of infant formula with long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids appears to promote neurodevelopmental outcome and visual function. Plant oils, that are the only source of fat in most of infant formulas, do not contain specific fatty acids that are present in human and cow milk and do not encounter milk fat triglyceride structure. Experimental data suggest that a mix of dairy lipids and plant oils can potentiate endogenous synthesis of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. This trial aims to determine the effect of an infant formula supplemented with a mixture of dairy lipids and plant oils on the erythrocyte membrane omega-3 fatty acid profile in full-term infants (primary outcome. Erythrocyte membrane long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and fatty acids content, the plasma lipid profile and the insulin-growth factor 1 level, the gastrointestinal tolerance, the changes throughout the study in blood fatty acids content, in growth and body composition are evaluated as secondary outcomes. Methods/Design In a double-blind controlled randomized trial, 75 healthy full-term infants are randomly allocated to receive for four months a formula supplemented with a mixture of dairy lipids and plant oils or a formula containing only plant oils or a formula containing plant oils supplemented with arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. Twenty-five breast-fed infants constitute the reference group. Erythrocyte membrane omega-3 fatty acid profile, long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the other fatty acids content, the plasma lipid profile and the insulin-growth factor 1 level are measured after four months of intervention. Gastrointestinal tolerance, the changes in blood fatty acids content, in growth and body composition, assessed by means of an air displacement plethysmography system, are also evaluated throughout the study

  3. Increased Cytomegalovirus Secretion and Risks of Infant Infection by Breastfeeding Duration From Maternal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Compared to Negative Mothers in Sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Musonda, Kunda G.; Nyonda, Mary; Filteau, Suzanne; Kasonka, Lackson; Monze, Mwaka; Gompels, Ursula A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding imparts beneficial immune protection and nutrition to infants for healthy growth, but it is also a route for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. In previous studies, we showed that HCMV adversely affects infant development in Africa, particularly with maternal HIV exposure. In this study, we analyzed infants risks for acquisition of HCMV infection from breastfeeding and compared HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers. METHODS...

  4. Effect of body position on ventilation distribution in ventilated preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Judith L; Johnston, Leanne; Brauer, Sandy; Woodgate, Paul; Schibler, Andreas

    2013-02-01

    Positioning is considered vital to the maintenance of good lung ventilation by optimizing oxygen transport and gas exchange in ventilated premature infants. Previous studies suggest that the prone position is advantageous; however, no data exist on regional ventilation distribution for this age group. To investigate the effect of body position on regional ventilation distribution in ventilated and nonventilated preterm infants using electrical impedance tomography. Randomized crossover study design. Neonatal ICU. A total of 24 ventilated preterm infants were compared with six spontaneously breathing preterm infants. Random assignment of the order of the positions supine, prone, and quarter prone. Ventilation distribution was measured with regional impedance amplitudes and global inhomogeneity indices using electrical impedance tomography. In the spontaneously breathing infants, regional impedance amplitudes were increased in the posterior compared with the anterior lung (p < 0.01) and in the right compared with the left lung (p = 0.03). No differences were found in the ventilated infants. Ventilation was more inhomogeneous in the ventilated compared with the healthy infants (p < 0.01). Assessment of temporal regional lung filling showed that the posterior lung filled earlier than the anterior lung in the spontaneously breathing infants (p < 0.02) whereas in the in the ventilated infants the right lung filled before the left lung (p < 0.01). In contrast to previous studies showing that ventilation is distributed to the nondependent lung in infants and children, this study shows that gravity has little effect on regional ventilation distribution.

  5. Infant Development: Birth to 3 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the foundation of his or her healthy development. Trust your ability to meet your baby's needs. You ... infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/infant-development/art-20048012 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  6. Serum folate levels among healthy infants aged 6–8 months: relation to infants’ nutritional status indicators and maternal knowledge-attitude-practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Ernawati

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin B12 and folate deficiency can cause anemia which may lead growth and development impairments. This study was aimed to determine serum folate levels among infants aged 6–8 months and the relation to infants’ nutritional indicators and maternal knowledge-attitude-practice about infant feeding.Methods: A cross–sectional design was implemented in infants aged 6–8 months and their mothers as respondents who met the study criteria. Data collected among the infants included sex, age, length, weight, intake of energy, protein and folate (based on a one–month semi–quantitative FFQ and a 24–hour food recall, serum folate and hemoglobin levels. Data collected among the mothers included age, education level, income based on average minimum monthly wage, knowledge, attitude and behavior concerning infant’s feeding, i.e. breast milk and complementary feeding practices.Results: This study found that the median of serum folate levels was 43.05 nmol/L with values ranging from 19.92 nmol/L to 104.24 nmol/L. Serum folate level had a strong positive correlation with its related factors, protein and folate intake.Conclusions: Protein-folate–rich complementay food should be provided to infants aged 6 months and over to maintain serum folate level. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:138-42Keywords: Folate, infants, nutrient intake, nutritional status

  7. Evaluation of safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated tetravalent (G1-G4) Bovine-Human Reassortant Rotavirus vaccine (BRV-TV) in healthy Indian adults and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, M S; Kundu, R; Gupta, M; Kanungo, S; Ganguly, N; Singh, M P; Bhattacharya, M K; Ghosh, R; Kumar, R; Sur, D; Chadha, S M; Saluja, T

    2014-08-11

    Rotavirus infections, prevalent in human populations worldwide are mostly caused by Group A viruses. Live attenuated rotavirus vaccines are highly effective in preventing severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. However, the cost of these vaccines and local availability can be a barrier for widespread adoption in public health programs in developing countries where infants suffer a heavy burden of rotavirus related morbidity and mortality. A phase I/II study was carried out with the long term aim to produce a locally licensed vaccine which is equally safe and immunogenic as compared to available licensed vaccines. This study was conducted in two cohorts. In the first cohort, 20 healthy adults were administered a single dose of the rotavirus vaccine (highest antigen concentration planned for infants) or placebo and were followed up for 10 days for safety. Following demonstration of safety in adult volunteers, 100 healthy infants were recruited (cohort 2) and randomly divided into five equal study groups. They were administered three doses of either the investigational rotavirus vaccine (BRV-TV) at one of the three antigen concentrations or Rotateq or Placebo at 6-8, 10-12 and 14-16 weeks of age. All infants were followed up for safety till 28 days after the third dose. Immune response to the vaccine, in terms of seroresponse and geometric mean concentrations, was compared across the five study groups. Increase in anti-rotavirus serum IgA antibodies from baseline, demonstrated higher immune response for all the three antigen concentrations of BRV-TV vaccine and RotaTeq in comparison with the placebo. Sero-response rates for placebo, BRV-TV dose-levels 10(5.0) FFU, 10(5.8) FFU, 10(6.4) FFU, and Rotateq at 28 days post third dose were 11.1%, 27.8%, 41.2%, 83.3%, and 63.2% respectively using the four-fold or more criteria. The BRV-TV vaccine arm corresponding to the highest antigen concentration of 10(6.4) FFU had a higher sero-response rate compared to the active comparator

  8. ‘Khelaifiella massiliensis’, ‘Niameybacter massiliensis’, ‘Brachybacterium massiliense’, ‘Enterobacter timonensis’, ‘Massilibacillus massiliensis’, new bacterial species and genera isolated from the gut microbiota of healthy infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tidjani Alou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main characteristics of ‘Khelaifiella massiliensis’ strain Mt13T (= CSUR P1935, = DSM100591, ‘Niameybacter massiliensis’ strain Mt14T (= CSUR P1909, = DSM100592, ‘Brachybacterium massiliense’ strain MT5T (= CSUR P2240, = DSM101766, ‘Enterobacter timonensis’ strain mt20T (= CSUR P2201, = DSM 101775 and ‘Massilibacillus massiliensis’ strain Marseille-P2411T (= CSUR P2411, = DSM102838, new species isolated from the gut of healthy African infants, are presented.

  9. Influence of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on the temporal variation of pneumococcal carriage and the nasal microbiota in healthy infants: a longitudinal analysis of a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Moana; Maurer, Josua; Korten, Insa; Allemann, Aurélie; Aebi, Suzanne; Brugger, Silvio D; Qi, Weihong; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp; Hilty, Markus

    2017-07-24

    Bacterial colonization of the upper airways is a prerequisite for subsequent invasive disease. With the introduction of the 7- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13), changes in pneumococcal upper airway colonization have been described. It is, however, less evident whether the vaccines lead to compositional changes of the upper airway microbiota. Here, we performed a case-control study using samples from a longitudinal infant cohort from Switzerland. We compared pneumococcal carriage and the nasal microbiota within the first year of life of healthy infants vaccinated with either PCV7 (n = 20, born in 2010) or PCV13 (n = 21, born between 2011 and 2013). Nasal swabs were collected every second week (n = 763 in total). Pneumococcal carriage was analyzed by quantitative PCR of the pneumococcal-specific lytA gene. Analysis of the bacterial core microbiota was performed based on 16S rRNA sequencing and subsequent oligotyping. We exclusively performed oligotyping of the core microbiota members, which were defined as the five most abundant bacterial families (Moraxellaceae, Streptococcaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Corynebacteriaceae, and Pasteurellaceae). Linear mixed effect (LME) and negative binomial regression models were used for statistical analyses. We found a higher number of samples positive for pneumococcal carriage in PCV7- compared to PCV13-vaccinated infants (LME model; P = 0.01). In contrast, infants vaccinated in the PCV13 era had an increased alpha diversity as measured by the richness and the Shannon Diversity Index (LME model; P = 0.003 and P = 0.01, respectively). Accordingly, the PCV13 era was associated with clusters of a higher diversity than PCV7-associated clusters. Furthermore, infants vaccinated with PCV13 had a higher binary-based within-subject microbiota similarity, as well as a decreased Jensen-Shannon distance over time as compared to PCV7-vaccinated infants, indicating a higher microbiota stability in the PCV

  10. Toll-like receptor induced pro-interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 in monocytes are lower in healthy infants compared to adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Libraty

    Full Text Available Infants have long been known to have higher infectious diseases morbidity and mortality and suboptimal vaccination responses compared to older children and adults. A variety of differences in innate and adaptive immune responses have been described between these two groups. We compared Toll-like receptor (TLR-induced production of pro-interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α between 2-month-old infants and adults. TLR 7/8-induced production of pro-IL-1β and IL-6 in monocytes was lower in 2-month-old infants compared to adults. There was no difference in TLR 7/8-induced production of TNF-α. Lower TLR-induced production of pro-IL-1β and IL-6 in innate immune cells during early infancy likely contributes to suboptimal vaccine responses and infectious diseases susceptibility.

  11. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from faeces of healthy neonates and potential mother-to-infant microbial transmission through breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Daniel; Lozano, Carmen; Jiménez, Esther; Albújar, Mar; Gómez, Adolfo; Rodríguez, Juan M; Torres, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Twenty-one women and their respective singleton infants participated in this study, contributing with samples of breast milk and faeces (at days 7, 14 and 35 after birth), respectively, used for Staphylococcus aureus recovery. The aim was to track the carriage of S. aureus in milk and infant faeces of mother-infant pairs, and to determine the genetic lineages of the isolates, their potential clonal relationships and their content in antimicrobial resistance, virulence and immune evasion cluster genes. The molecular characterization was performed by PCR and sequencing. Clonal relationship among mother-infant isolates was conducted by spa typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from milk samples of 6 of 21 mothers (16 isolates) and from faecal samples of 12 of 21 infants (25 isolates). From these 41 S. aureus recovered, 18 were methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and 23 methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). Twelve diferentes spa types and eight sequence types were detected among S. aureus. Predominant clonal complexes were CC5 (43.9%) and CC30 (36.6%). MRSA strains presented a multidrug-resistance profile, 65.2% of MSSA strains harboured tsst-1 toxin gene and 26.8% of total strains carried the cna gene. A potential mother-to-infant S. aureus transmission was demonstrated in four cases by spa typing, MLST and PFGE (transmission of t322/ST5/CC5-PFGE-A, t136/ST34/CC30-PFGE-B and t021/ST1869/CC30-PFGE-C strains). Breastfeeding seems to contribute to early S. aureus intestinal colonization in neonates what might affect the immune system development. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Early Benefits of a Starter Formula Enriched in Prebiotics and Probiotics on the Gut Microbiota of Healthy Infants Born to HIV+ Mothers: A Randomized Double-Blind Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cooper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The gut microbiota of infants is shaped by both the mode of delivery and the type of feeding. The gut of vaginally and cesarean-delivered infants is colonized at different rates and with different bacterial species, leading to differences in the gut microbial composition, which may persist up to 6 months. In a multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind trial conducted in South Africa, we tested the effect of a formula supplemented with a prebiotic (a mixture of bovine milk-derived oligosaccharides [BMOS] generated from whey permeate and containing galactooligosaccharides and milk oligosaccharides such as 3′- and 6′-sialyllactose and the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B. lactis strain CNCM I-3446 on the bifidobacteria levels in the gut of infants born vaginally or via cesarean section in early life. Additionally, the safety of the new formulation was evaluated. A total of 430 healthy, full-term infants born to HIV-positive mothers who had elected to feed their child beginning from birth (≤3 days old exclusively with formula were randomized into this multicenter trial of four parallel groups. A total of 421 infants who had any study formula intake were included in the full analysis set (FAS. The first two groups consisted of cesarean-delivered infants assigned to the Test formula (n = 92 (a starter infant formula [IF] containing BMOS at a total oligosaccharide concentration of 5.8 ± 1.0 g/100 g of powder formula [8 g/L in the reconstituted formula] + B. lactis [1 × 10 7 colony-forming units {cfu}/g] or a Control IF (n = 101; the second two groups consisted of vaginally delivered infants randomized to the same Test (n = 115 or Control (n = 113 formulas from the time of enrollment to 6 months. The primary efficacy outcome was fecal bifidobacteria count at 10 days, and the primary safety outcome was daily weight gain (g/d between 10 days and 4 months. At 10 days, fecal bifidobacteria counts were significantly higher

  13. A randomized, phase 1/2 trial of the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of bivalent rLP2086 meningococcal B vaccine in healthy infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinon-Torres, Federico; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Bernaola-Iturbe, Enrique; Diez-Domingo, Javier; Jiang, Qin; Perez, John L

    2014-09-08

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MnB) is a major cause of invasive meningococcal disease in infants. A conserved, surface-exposed lipoprotein, LP2086 (a factor H-binding protein [fHBP]), is a promising MnB vaccine target. A bivalent, recombinant vaccine targeting the fHBP (rLP2086) of MnB was developed. This phase 1/2 clinical study was designed to assess the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of a 4-dose series of the rLP2086 vaccine at 20-, 60-, 120-, or 200-μg dose levels in vaccine-naive infants when given with routine childhood vaccines. The study was to consist of two phases: a single-blind sentinel phase and an open-label full enrollment phase. During the sentinel phase, randomization of subjects to the next higher dose was delayed pending a 14-day safety review of dose 1 of the preceding dose cohort. The full enrollment phase was to occur after completion of the sentinel phase. Local reactions were generally mild and adverse events infrequent; however, after only 46 infants were randomized into the study, fever rates were 64% and 90% in subjects receiving one 20- or 60-μg rLP2086 dose, respectively. Most fevers were group and 1 subject in the 60-μg group experienced fevers >39.0°C; no fevers were >40.0°C. Due to these high fever rates, the study was terminated early. No immunogenicity data were collected. This report discusses the safety and acceptability of rLP2086 in infants after one 20- or 60-μg dose. Due to the high fever rate experienced in the 20- and 60-μg groups, rLP2086 in the current formulation may not be acceptable for infants. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Immunogenicity of a reduced schedule of meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine given concomitantly with the Prevenar and Pediacel vaccines in healthy infants in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Jo; Borrow, Ray; Andrews, Nick; Morris, Rhonwen; Waight, Pauline; Hudson, Michael; Balmer, Paul; Findlow, Helen; Findlow, Jamie; Miller, Elizabeth

    2009-02-01

    This study investigated the use of two doses of three different meningococcal group C conjugate (MCC) vaccines when given for primary immunization with a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and Pediacel, a combination product containing five acellular pertussis components, diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate, and inactivated-poliovirus vaccine. The immune response after a single dose of MCC is also presented. Infants were randomized to receive two doses of one of the MCC vaccines and PCV7 at 2 and 3 months or at 2 and 4 months of age. Meningococcal group C serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) geometric mean titers, Hib-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) geometric mean concentrations (GMCs), and diphtheria and tetanus antitoxin GMCs, together with the proportions of infants achieving putative protective levels, were determined. A total of 393 infants were recruited. Following the first dose of NeisVac-C (MCC conjugated to tetanus toxoid), 97% of infants achieved protective levels (SBA titer of >or=8), compared with 80% and 53%, respectively, for Menjugate and Meningitec (both of which are conjugated to CRM(197)). SBA responses to MCC vaccines were not significantly different when administered at 2 and 3 or 2 and 4 months of age. Following two doses of each MCC, 98 to 100% of infants achieved protective levels. Both PRP IgG and tetanus responses were significantly enhanced when Pediacel was coadministered with NeisVac-C. This study demonstrates that NeisVac-C and Menjugate generate good immunogenicity after the first dose at 2 months of age when coadministered with PCV7 and Pediacel and merit further investigation in single-dose priming strategies.

  15. Cranial duplex sonography of the infant and neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, E.G.; White, E.M.; Schellinger, D.; Choyke, P.L.; Lane, P.E.; Sarcone, A.L.

    1986-01-01

    This study was implemented to assess the feasibility of using duplex sonography in imaging the infant brain and to evaluate flow patterns in healthy preterm infants, preterm infants with intracranial hemorrhage, healthy term infants, and hydrocephalics. In almost every subject the pericallosal, callosomarginal anterior cerebral, basilar, middle cerebral, and internal carotid arteries as well as the vein of Galen were evaluated. Ten patients from each of the four groups were evaluated. Evaluation of flow was undertaken using both absolute velocity values and pulsatility index. The most significant variable was gestational age; preterm infants tended to have much lower flow velocity than term infants. Term infants always exhibited diphasic flow patterns, whereas diastolic flow to zero was noted in a significant number of preterm infants. No preterm infants with and without intracranial hemorrhage were compared. Flow to zero during diastole was noted in both groups. Finally, no difference in flow was noted between hydrocephalic infants and healthy infants

  16. Thymic size in uninfected infants born to HIV-positive mothers and fed with pasteurized human milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, H; Ersbøll, A K

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To examine the size of the thymus in uninfected infants born to HIV-positive mothers and to study the effects of feeding by human donor milk on the size of the thymus in these infants. METHODS: The absolute and relative thymic size was assessed by sonography as thymic index (Ti), and the Ti...... the size of the thymus was smaller in uninfected infants of HIV-positive mothers compared with infants of HIV-negative mothers but when birthweight was taken into account this difference disappeared. Feeding by human donor milk seemed to result in an increased size of the thymus at 4 mo of age compared....../weight-ratio (Ti/w) at birth and at 4 mo of age in 12 healthy uninfected infants born to HlV-infected mothers. All infants were exclusively fed pasteurized donor milk. The results were compared with those obtained from a previous cohort of exclusively breastfed, partially breastfed and exclusively formula...

  17. Acidified infant formula explained | Labuschagne | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The development of effective methods to prevent acute gastroenteritis is an important goal for infant health. Exclusive breastfeeding and postponement of complementary foods until the age of six months is recommended for healthy infants. However, at times, infant formula is required. Various types are commercially ...

  18. Effect of dietary protein on plasma insulin-like growth factor-1, growth, and body composition in healthy term infants: a randomised, double-blind, controlled trial (Early Protein and Obesity in Childhood (EPOCH) study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putet, Guy; Labaune, Jean-Marc; Mace, Katherine; Steenhout, Philippe; Grathwohl, Dominik; Raverot, Veronique; Morel, Yves; Picaud, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-28

    The effect of protein intake on growth velocity in infancy may be mediated by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). This study aimed to determine the effects of formulae containing 1·8 (F1·8) or 2·7 g (F2·7) protein/418·4 kJ (100 kcal) on IGF-1 concentrations and growth. Healthy term infants were randomly assigned to receive F1·8 (n 74) or F2·7 (n 80) exclusively for the first 4 months of life. A group of breast-fed infants (n 84) was followed-up simultaneously (reference). Growth and body composition were measured at 0·5, 4, 6, 12, 36, 48 and 60 months of life. The IGF-1 concentrations at 4 months (primary outcome) were similar in the F1·8 (67·1 (sd 20·8) ng/l; n 70) and F2·7 (71·2 (sd 27·5) ng/l; n 73) groups (P=0·52). Both formula groups had higher IGF-1 concentrations than the breast-fed group at 4 and 9 months of age (P≤0·0001). During the first 60 months of life, anthropometric parameters in the F1·8 group were lower compared with the F2·7 group, and the differences were significant for head circumference from 2 to 60 months, body weight at 4 and 6 months and length at 9, 12 and 36 months of age. There were no significant differences in body composition between these two groups at any age. We conclude that, in formula-fed infants, although increased protein intake did not affect the IGF-1 concentration during the first 12 months of life, it did affect length and head circumference growth, suggesting that factors other than IGF-1 could play roles in determining growth velocity.

  19. Evaluation of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and concomitant meningococcal group C conjugate vaccine in healthy infants and toddlers in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Domingo, Javier; Gurtman, Alejandra; Bernaola, Enrique; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Martinon-Torres, Federico; Pineda-Solas, Valentin; Delgado, Alfonso; Infante-Marquez, Pilar; Liang, John Z; Giardina, Peter C; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2013-11-04

    Given the concurrent administration of multiple vaccines during routine pediatric immunizations, efforts to elucidate the potential interference of any vaccine on the immune response to the concomitantly administered antigens are fundamental to prelicensure clinical research. This phase 3 randomized controlled trial of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) versus 7-valent PCV (PCV7) assessed immune responses of concomitantly administered meningococcal group C conjugated to diphtheria toxin cross-reactive material 197 (MnCCV-CRM197) in a 2-dose infant series and 15-month toddler dose. 619 subjects were randomized, 315 to PCV13 and 304 to PCV7. MnCCV-CRM197-induced immune responses were similar between the PCV13 and PCV7 groups, with >97% of the subjects achieving a ≥1:8 meningococcal serum bactericidal assay (SBA) titer after both dose 2 and the toddler dose. Geometric mean titers were lower in the PCV13 group 191.22 (167.72, 218.02) versus 266.19 (234.86, 301.71) following dose 2 and 432.28 (361.22, 517.31) versus 730.84 (642.05, 831.91) following the toddler dose. The geometric mean (GM) meningococcal SBA titer ratios (PCV13/PCV7) were 0.72 after dose 2 and 0.59 after the toddler dose. The criteria for MnCCV-CRM197 non-inferiority for GM titers were satisfied after dose 2. Percent responders was similar up to titers of 1:128. PCV13 elicited substantial antipneumococcal responses against all 13 serotypes, with ≥90% of the subjects achieving an antibody concentration ≥0.35μg/mL after dose 3 in the infant series. Safety and tolerability were similar between the vaccine groups. Immunogenicity results of MnCCV-CRM197 for PCV13 compared with PCV7 included lower GMTs, but the clinical significance of this is unknown as the proportion of infants achieving protective MenC antibody titers was comparable in the two groups. Percent responders were similar up to titers of 1:128. PCV13 has an acceptable safety profile in infants and toddlers, while providing

  20. Hip Problems in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A hip problem in infants is known as developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). It is when the ball of the ... later in life? Resources International Hip Dysplasia Institute, Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) International Hip Dysplasia Institute, Hip-Healthy Swaddling ...

  1. Elimination Kinetics of Ethanol in a 5-Week-Old Infant and a Literature Review of Infant Ethanol Pharmacokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B. Ford

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ethanol metabolism occurs through alcohol dehydrogenase, but minor metabolic pathways such as the P450 enzymes CYP2E1 and CYP1A2 and the enzyme catalase exist. These enzymes have distinct developmental stages. Elimination kinetics of ethanol in the infant is limited. We report the elimination kinetics of ethanol in a 5-week-old African-American male who had a serum ethanol level of 270 mg/dL on admission. A previously healthy 5-week-old African-American male was brought to the ED with a decreased level of consciousness. His initial blood ethanol level was 270 mg/dL. Serial blood ethanol levels were obtained. The elimination rate of ethanol was calculated to be in a range from 17.1 to 21.2 mg/dL/hr and appeared to follow zero-order elimination kinetics with a R2=0.9787. Elimination kinetics for ethanol in the young infant has been reported in only four previously published reports. After reviewing these reports, there appears to be variability in the elimination rates of ethanol in infants. Very young infants may not eliminate ethanol as quickly as previously described. Given that there are different stages of enzyme development in children, caution should be used when generalizing the elimination kinetics in young infants and children.

  2. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  3. Inhibin A, inhibin B, follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, estradiol, and sex hormone-binding globulin levels in 473 healthy infant girls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellakooty, M; Schmidt, I M; Haavisto, A M

    2003-01-01

    The early postnatal regulation of reproductive hormones seems to be more complex in girls than in boys. The aim of this study was to describe inhibins A and B, FSH, LH, estradiol, and SHBG in a large prospective cohort of 473 unselected, healthy, 3-month-old girls. In full term, appropriate-for- ...

  4. Associations among maternal nutrition and infant birth outcomes in a cohort of pregnant, primarily African American, rural, Southern women: Delta Healthy Sprouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and aims: At no point during a woman’s life is good nutrition more important than during her reproductive years as her dietary choices affect not only her health but also that of her child. Delta Healthy Sprouts is a randomized, controlled, comparative trial testing the impact of two Ma...

  5. Different IgG-subclass distributions after whole-cell and acellular pertussis infant primary vaccinations in healthy and pertussis infected children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrikx, Lotte H.; Schure, Rose-Minke; Ozturk, Kemal; de Rond, Lia G. H.; de Greeff, S. C.; Sanders, Elisabeth A. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; Buisman, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    The distribution of IgG-subclasses provides insight in the immunological mechanisms of protection against whooping cough. We investigated the effect of Dutch whole-cell pertussis and acellular pertussis vaccines administered in infancy on the IgG-subclass distributions in healthy children aged 12

  6. Denmark: Botulism in an infant or infant botulism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pærregaard, A; Angen, Øystein; Lisby, M

    2008-01-01

    A 4.5 months old, previously healthy Danish girl was admitted to a paediatric department after six days of passive behaviour and weak suck. Over the next days she became increasingly weak, developed bilateral ptosis, the muscle stretch reflexes were lost, and mydriasis with slow pupillary responses...... was noted. Botulism was suspected and confirmed by testing of patient serum in a bioassay. The condition of the patient improved following administration of botulism antiserum. The clinical picture was suggestive of intestinal (infant) botulism. However, botulism acquired from consumption of food...... with preformed neurotoxin could not be excluded. The food history revealed consumption of a commercially produced banana/peach puree which was suspected as a possible source, and based on a precautionary principle this product was recalled. The case description illustrates a risk-management dilemma between...

  7. Osteopathy may decrease obstructive apnea in infants: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Denayer, Etienne; Vandenbossche, Thierry; Vermet, Luc; Hauser, Bruno; Deschepper, Jean; Engelen, Agnes

    2008-07-19

    Obstructive apnea is a sleep disorder characterized by pauses in breathing during sleep: breathing is interrupted by a physical block to airflow despite effort. The purpose of this study was to test if osteopathy could influence the incidence of obstructive apnea during sleep in infants. Thirty-four healthy infants (age: 1.5-4.0 months) were recruited and randomized in two groups; six infants dropped out. The osteopathy treatment group (n = 15 infants) received 2 osteopathic treatments in a period of 2 weeks and a control group (n = 13 infants) received 2 non-specific treatments in the same period of time. The main outcome measure was the change in the number of obstructive apneas measured during an 8-hour polysomnographic recording before and after the two treatment sessions. The results of the second polysomnographic recordings showed a significant decrease in the number of obstructive apneas in the osteopathy group (p = 0.01, Wilcoxon test), in comparison to the control group showing only a trend suggesting a gradual physiologic decrease of obstructive apneas. However, the difference in the decline of obstructive apneas between the groups after treatment was not significant (p = 0.43). Osteopathy may have a positive influence on the incidence of obstructive apneas during sleep in infants with a previous history of obstructive apneas as measured by polysomnography. Additional research in this area appears warranted.

  8. The Effect of Interactive Web-Based Monitoring on Breastfeeding Exclusivity, Intensity, and Duration in Healthy, Term Infants After Hospital Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Azza H; Roumani, Ali M; Szucs, Kinga; Zhang, Lingsong; King, Demetra

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a Web-based interactive breastfeeding monitoring system increased breastfeeding duration, exclusivity, and intensity as primary outcomes and decreased symptoms of postpartum depression as a secondary outcome. Two-arm, randomized controlled trial. Three hospitals in the Midwestern United States. One hundred forty one (141) mother-newborn dyads were recruited before discharge. Postpartum women were randomly assigned to the control or intervention groups. Women in the control group (n = 57) followed the standard hospital protocol, whereas women in the intervention group (n = 49) were given access to an online interactive breastfeeding monitoring system and were prompted to record breastfeeding and infant output data for 30 days. A follow-up online survey was sent to both groups at 1, 2, and 3 months to assess breastfeeding outcomes and postpartum depression. For mothers and infants, there were no significant differences in demographics between groups. No significant differences in breastfeeding outcomes were found between groups at discharge (p = .707). A significant difference in breastfeeding outcomes was found between groups at 1, 2, and 3 months (p = .027, p 3.0 ± 3.4, and 2.8 ± 3.6, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between groups at 1, 2, and 3 months (p = .389, .170, and .920, respectively) for depression. The Web-based interactive breastfeeding monitoring system may be a promising intervention to improve breastfeeding duration, exclusivity, and intensity. Copyright © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Taking the 'Mother' out of 'Motherese' :young infants' preference for mothers' use of infant-directed speech

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, Sheryl H

    1990-01-01

    Previous research on infant perception of speech has shown that infants prefer their mother's voice over the voice of an unfamiliar female. Additionally, infants show a preference for the type of speech that is normally directed towards infants, known as infant-directed (10) speech. The linguistic and prosodic features of 10 speech are typically exaggerated in comparison to speech that is used amongst adults (adult-directed or AD speech). Most previous studies investigating infant preference ...

  10. Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in healthy infants, children, and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Dalgaard, P; Blum, W F

    1995-01-01

    -I. However, the diagnostic value of IGFBP-3 is still controversial, perhaps because the quality of the available normative data for IGFBP-3 varies. It has recently been shown that a large number of individuals is required to establish reference ranges for IGF-I that take into account age, sex, body mass...... index (BMI), and pubertal stage. Therefore, we measured IGFBP-3, IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-2 levels by RIA in 907 healthy children to establish well characterized normative data on IGFBP-3 according to age, sex, and pubertal stage and to study the complex relationship between IGFs and their BPs...... data on a large group of healthy individuals...

  11. Synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics in infant formula for full term infants: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugambi Mary N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics are being added to infant formula to promote growth and development in infants. Previous reviews (2007 to 2011 on term infants given probiotics or prebiotics focused on prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity. This review focused on growth and clinical outcomes in term infants fed only infant formula containing synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics. Methods Cochrane methodology was followed using randomized controlled trials (RCTs which compared term infant formula containing probiotics, prebiotics or synbiotics to conventional infant formula with / without placebo among healthy full term infants. The mean difference (MD and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI were reported for continuous outcomes, risk ratio (RR and corresponding 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes. Where appropriate, meta-analysis was performed; heterogeneity was explored using subgroup and sensitivity analyses. If studies were too diverse a narrative synthesis was provided. Results Three synbiotic studies (N = 475, 10 probiotics studies (N = 933 and 12 prebiotics studies (N = 1563 were included. Synbiotics failed to significantly increase growth in boys and girls. Use of synbiotics increased stool frequency, had no impact on stool consistency, colic, spitting up / regurgitation, crying, restlessness or vomiting. Probiotics in formula also failed to have any significant effect on growth, stool frequency or consistency. Probiotics did not lower the incidence of diarrhoea, colic, spitting up / regurgitation, crying, restlessness or vomiting. Prebiotics in formula did increase weight gain but had no impact on length or head circumference gain. Prebiotics increased stool frequency but had no impact on stool consistency, the incidence of colic, spitting up / regurgitation, crying, restlessness or vomiting. There was no impact of prebiotics on the volume of formula tolerated, infections and gastrointestinal

  12. Synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics in infant formula for full term infants: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics are being added to infant formula to promote growth and development in infants. Previous reviews (2007 to 2011) on term infants given probiotics or prebiotics focused on prevention of allergic disease and food hypersensitivity. This review focused on growth and clinical outcomes in term infants fed only infant formula containing synbiotics, probiotics or prebiotics. Methods Cochrane methodology was followed using randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which compared term infant formula containing probiotics, prebiotics or synbiotics to conventional infant formula with / without placebo among healthy full term infants. The mean difference (MD) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported for continuous outcomes, risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% CI for dichotomous outcomes. Where appropriate, meta-analysis was performed; heterogeneity was explored using subgroup and sensitivity analyses. If studies were too diverse a narrative synthesis was provided. Results Three synbiotic studies (N = 475), 10 probiotics studies (N = 933) and 12 prebiotics studies (N = 1563) were included. Synbiotics failed to significantly increase growth in boys and girls. Use of synbiotics increased stool frequency, had no impact on stool consistency, colic, spitting up / regurgitation, crying, restlessness or vomiting. Probiotics in formula also failed to have any significant effect on growth, stool frequency or consistency. Probiotics did not lower the incidence of diarrhoea, colic, spitting up / regurgitation, crying, restlessness or vomiting. Prebiotics in formula did increase weight gain but had no impact on length or head circumference gain. Prebiotics increased stool frequency but had no impact on stool consistency, the incidence of colic, spitting up / regurgitation, crying, restlessness or vomiting. There was no impact of prebiotics on the volume of formula tolerated, infections and gastrointestinal microflora. The

  13. Zinc for preterm infants: Who needs it and how much is needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment of micronutrient requirements for infants remains a challenge. For healthy full-term infants, breast milk is an appropriate standard for virtually all nutrients. In contrast, guidelines for infants who are not healthy, and infants who are born preterm, are much more tenuous....

  14. Strengthening health services to deliver nutrition education to promote complementary feeding and healthy growth of infants and young children: formative research for a successful intervention in peri-urban Trujillo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Rebecca C; Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Villasante, Ruben; Narro, M Rocio; Penny, Mary E

    2017-04-01

    Formative research is critical for developing effective nutrition-specific interventions to improve infant and young child (IYC) feeding practices and promote healthy growth. Health workers interact with caregivers during health facility visits, yet there is limited research about how to optimize delivery of such interventions during these visits. The extensive reach of IYC health services globally calls for research to address this gap. In Trujillo, Peru, formative research was conducted to explore complementary feeding practices with caregivers as well as health worker routines and interactions with caregivers related to feeding and healthy growth; results informed the development and delivery of an educational intervention. Multiple qualitative methods were used to collect data on a purposive sample of health workers and caregivers from three health facilities and communities: household trials followed. Complementary feeding messages with doable behaviours were developed, and three were selected as key to promote based on their nutritional impact and cultural acceptability. In the health facilities, medical consultation, well-child visits and nutrition consultation all dealt with aspects of IYC nutrition/growth during their interactions with caregivers but were independent and inconsistent in approach. A nutrition education strategy was developed based on consistency, quality and coverage in the IYC health services. We conclude that formative research undertaken in the community and IYC health services was critical to developing a successful and culturally relevant intervention to promote optimal complementary feeding practices and healthy growth during interactions between health workers and caregivers at routine health facility visits. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Infant Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Midwest. Top of Page Infant Mortality Rates by Race and Ethnicity, 2015 *Source: Table 1 (p. 79) ... 1.27MB] . In 2015, infant mortality rates by race and ethnicity were as follows: Non-Hispanic black ...

  16. Safety, immune lot-to-lot consistency and non-inferiority of a fully liquid pentavalent DTwp-HepB-Hib vaccine in healthy Indian toddlers and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Dulari J; Dhaded, Sangappa M; Ravi, Mandyam D; Dubey, Anand P; Kundu, Ritabrata; Lalwani, Sanjay K; Chhatwal, Jugesh; Mathew, Leni G; Gupta, Madhu; Sharma, Shiv D; Bavdekar, Sandeep B; Jayanth, Midde V; Ravinuthala, Suresh; Sil, Arijit; Dhingra, Mandeep S

    2016-04-02

    Pentavalent combination vaccines are important tools to strengthen the immunization programs in numerous countries throughout the world. A large number of countries have recognized the value of combination vaccines and have introduced whole cell pentavalent vaccines into their immunization programs. A phase III, multi-center, randomized, single blinded study of a fully liquid pentavalent DTwP-HepB-Hib investigational vaccine (Shan5™) was conducted across India in 2 cohorts: 15 toddlers were evaluated for safety and immunogenicity following a single booster dose (Cohort 1) followed by 1085 infants (Cohort 2) evaluated for immunogenicity and safety following 3-dose primary immunization of the investigational vaccine or a locally licensed comparator vaccine (Pentavac SD). Immune consistency analysis among 3 lots of the investigational vaccine, and immune non-inferiority analysis of pooled (3 lots) data of investigational vaccine vs. comparator vaccine were carried out in cohort 2. The vaccines demonstrated comparable safety and immune responses in cohort 1. In cohort 2, equivalent immune consistency among 3 lots was observed for all antigens except whole cell pertussis antigens, where a marginal variation was observed which was linked to the low power of the test and concluded to not have any clinical significance. Immune non-inferiority against the comparator vaccine was demonstrated for all 5 antigens. Safety results were comparable between vaccine groups. This investigational, fully-liquid, whole-cell pertussis (wP) containing new pentavalent vaccine was found to be safe and immunologically non-inferior to the licensed comparator vaccine.

  17. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  18. Healthy full-term infants' brain responses to emotionally and linguistically relevant sounds using a multi-feature mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostilainen, Kaisamari; Wikström, Valtteri; Pakarinen, Satu; Videman, Mari; Karlsson, Linnea; Keskinen, Maria; Scheinin, Noora M; Karlsson, Hasse; Huotilainen, Minna

    2018-03-23

    We evaluated the feasibility of a multi-feature mismatch negativity (MMN) paradigm in studying auditory processing of healthy newborns. The aim was to examine the automatic change-detection and processing of semantic and emotional information in speech in newborns. Brain responses of 202 healthy newborns were recorded with a multi-feature paradigm including a Finnish bi-syllabic pseudo-word/ta-ta/as a standard stimulus, six linguistically relevant deviant stimuli and three emotionally relevant stimuli (happy, sad, angry). Clear responses to emotional sounds were found already at the early latency window 100-200 ms, whereas responses to linguistically relevant minor changes and emotional stimuli at the later latency window 300-500 ms did not reach significance. Moreover, significant interaction between gender and emotional stimuli was found in the early latency window. Further studies on using multi-feature paradigms with linguistic and emotional stimuli in newborns are needed, especially those containing of follow-ups, enabling the assessment of the predictive value of early variations between subjects. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Formula tolerance in postbreastfed and exclusively formula-fed infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, B; Halter, R J; Kuchan, M J; Baggs, G E; Ryan, A S; Masor, M L

    1999-01-01

    Perceived intolerance to infant formula is a frequently reported reason for formula switching. Formula intolerance may be related to perceived symptoms of constipation, fussiness, abdominal cramps, and excessive spit-up or vomit. Commercially available formulas differ from each other in processing and in sources and levels of protein, lipids, and micronutrients. These differences may affect tolerance. The objective of this article was to compare the tolerance of two commercially available powder infant formulas that differ in composition. Measures of tolerance in exclusively breastfed infants weaned to an infant formula and exclusively formula-fed infants were evaluated. Two clinical studies were conducted. In study 1, 82 healthy, full-term infants who were exclusively breastfed at the time of enrollment were randomized at weaning to formula A (commercially available Similac With Iron Powder) or formula B (previously available Enfamil With Iron Powder). Parents completed daily records of tolerance during exclusive breast milk feeding, during the weaning period, and for a 2-week exclusive formula-feeding period. In study 2, 87 healthy, full-term infants who were exclusively formula-fed at the time of study enrollment (by 2 weeks of age) were fed a standard cow milk-based formula (previously commercially available Similac With Iron Powder) and then randomized to receive formula A or B for a 2-week period. Parents completed daily records of tolerance throughout the study. Formula A was a cow milk-based formula with a whey:casein ratio of 48:52 and a fat blend of 42% high-oleic safflower, 30% coconut, and 28% soy oils. Formula B was a cow milk-based formula with a whey:casein ratio of 60:40 and a fat blend of 45% palm olein, 20% soy, 20% coconut, and 15% high-oleic sunflower oils. Both formulas had lactose as the source of carbohydrate and contained 12 mg of iron per liter. Only formula A contained nucleotides at the time of the study. Measures of tolerance included

  20. Ventilatory response of the newborn infant to mild hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, G; Malcolm, G; Henderson-Smart, D

    1997-09-01

    The transition from an immature (biphasic) to a mature (sustained hyperpneic) response to a brief period of sustained hypoxia is believed to be well advanced by postnatal day 10 for newborn infants. However, a review of the supporting evidence convinced us that this issue warranted further, more systematic investigation. Seven healthy term infants aged 2 days to 8 weeks were studied. The ventilatory response (VR) elicited by 5 min breathing of 15% O2 was measured during quiet sleep. Arterial SaO2 (pulse oximeter) and minute ventilation (expressed as a change from control, delta V'i) were measured continuously. Infants were wrapped in their usual bedding and slept in open cots at room temperature (23 degrees-25 degrees). Infants aged 2-3 days exhibited predominantely a sustained hypopnea during the period of hypoxia (delta V'i = -2% at 1 min, -13% at 5 min). At 8 weeks of age, the mean response was typically biphasic (delta V'i = +9% at 1 min, -4% at 5 min). This age-related difference between responses was statistically significant (two-way ANOVA by time and age-group; interaction P < 0.05). These data reveal that term infants studied under ambient conditions during defined quiet sleep may exhibit an immature VR to mild, sustained hypoxia for at least 2 months after birth. This suggests that postnatal development of the O2 chemoreflex is slower than previously thought.

  1. Ontogenesis of the Gut Microbiota Composition in Healthy, Full-Term, Vaginally Born and Breast-Fed Infants over the First 3 Years of Life: A Quantitative Bird's-Eye View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Ravinder; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Takuya; Nomoto, Koji; Kawashima, Kazunari; Nagata, Satoru; Yamashiro, Yuichiro

    2017-01-01

    Early-life intestinal microbiota development is crucial for host's long-term health and is influenced by many factors including gestational age, birth and feeding modes, birth environment, ethnic/geographical background, etc. However, 'quantitative' data on the actual population levels of gut bacterial communities when these influences are controlled for is relatively rare. Herein, we demonstrate a quantitative perspective of microbiota development in natural and healthy milieus, i.e., in healthy, full-term, vaginally born and breast-fed infants ( n = 19) born at same clinic. Fecal microbiota at age 1 and 7 days, 1, 3, and 6 months and 3 years is quantified using highly sensitive reverse-transcription-quantitative-PCR assays targeting bacterial rRNA molecules. At day 1, we detect one or more bacteria in all (100%) of the babies, wherein the microbiota is composed mainly of enterobacteria (35%), Bacteroides fragilis group (23%), enterococci (18%), staphylococci (13%), and bifidobacteria (9%). Altogether, facultative anaerobes predominate during first few weeks whereafter obligate anaerobes including bifidobacteria, B. fragilis group, Clostridium coccoides group, and Clostridium leptum subgroup gradually start prevailing. At 3 years, the composition is represented almost entirely (99%) by obligate anaerobes including C. leptum subgroup (34%), bifidobacteria (22%), B. fragilis group (21%), C. coccoides group (17%), Atopobium cluster (4%), and Prevotella (1%). The overall obligate/facultative proportion is 32/68, 37/63, 54/46, 70/30, 64/36, and 99/1% at 1 and 7 days, 1, 3, and 6 months and 3 years, respectively. However, interestingly, considerable individual-specific variations in the obligate/facultative ratios as well as in the proportions of Firmicutes, Bacteroides, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria communities are seen among these babies. This disparity even within this highly homogenous cohort manifests the magnitude of diverse patterns of gut microbiota

  2. The development and application of an engagement index on the participants use of an infant feeding app: the Growing healthy program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Taki

    2015-10-01

    Methods/Results: The Engagement Index (EI tool developed by Web analytics Demystified (Peterson & Carrabis, 2008 was adapted and used to measure how participants engaged with the Growing healthy app. The EI tool comprises five sub-indices designed to capture a range of participant behaviours: Click-Depth Index (Ci describes the number of pages accessed each time participants visit the app (Ci= Sessions having at least ‘n’ page views / All Sessions; Recency Index (Ri measures the days elapsed since the participant last accessed the app (Ri= 1/Number of days elapsed since the most recent session; Loyalty Index (Li measures the frequency of app access over the program (Li= 1 - (1 / Number of visitor sessions during the timeframe; Interaction Index (Ii measures the number of push notifications opened from those sent (Ii= Sessions where visitor completes an action / All Sessions; and Feedback Index (Fi is a subjective indicator of the participant’s satisfaction with the app (Fi= number of positive responses/number of survey questions completed. Participants’ subjective satisfaction with the app was assessed from a quantitative survey (questions included: ease of navigation, readability, quality and usefulness of the content on the app this score comprised the Fi. The total participant EI score was then calculated as the average across the five sub-indices, thus providing a scale ranging from disengaged through to highly engaged. Modelling will be done to establish the strength of the relationship between the EI and intervention outcomes, whilst controlling for co-variates such as parental age. Secondary analysis will be undertaken to consider the strength of associations between each sub-index and study outcomes. Conclusion MHealth interventions delivered by apps provide the opportunity to investigate participants’ engagement with the intervention and its constituent parts. The use of an Engagement Index may help researchers to understand how participants

  3. Associations of infant feeding with trajectories of body composition and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Katherine A; Wagner, Carol L; Feldman, Henry A; Shypailo, Roman J; Belfort, Mandy B

    2017-08-01

    Background: The extent to which breastfeeding is protective against later-life obesity is controversial. Little is known about differences in infant body composition between breastfed and formula-fed infants, which may reflect future obesity risk. Objective: We aimed to assess associations of infant feeding with trajectories of growth and body composition from birth to 7 mo in healthy infants. Design: We studied 276 participants from a previous study of maternal vitamin D supplementation during lactation. Mothers used monthly feeding diaries to report the extent of breastfeeding. We measured infants' anthropometrics and used dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry to assess body composition at 1, 4, and 7 mo. We compared changes in infant size ( z scores for weight, length, and body mass index [BMI (in kg/m 2 )]) and body composition (fat and lean mass, body fat percentage) between predominantly breastfed and formula-fed infants, adjusting in linear regression for sex, gestational age, race/ethnicity, maternal BMI, study site, and socioeconomic status. Results: In this study, 214 infants (78%) were predominantly breastfed (median duration: 7 mo) and 62 were exclusively formula fed. Formula-fed infants had lower birth-weight z scores than breastfed infants (-0.22 ± 0.86 and 0.16 ± 0.88, respectively; P < 0.01) but gained more in weight and BMI through 7 mo of age (weight z score difference: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.71; BMI z score difference: 0.35; 95% CI: 0, 0.69), with no difference in linear growth ( z score difference: 0.05; 95% CI: -0.24, 0.34). Formula-fed infants gained more lean mass (difference: 303 g; 95% CI: 137, 469 g) than breastfed infants, but not fat mass (difference: -42 g; 95% CI: -299, 215 g). Conclusions: Formula-fed infants gained weight more rapidly and out of proportion to linear growth than did predominantly breastfed infants. These differences were attributable to greater accretion of lean mass, rather than fat mass. Any later obesity risk

  4. Healthy Places for Healthy People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Describes the Healthy Places for Healthy People technical assistance program that helps communities create walkable, healthy, economically vibrant places by engaging with local health care facility partners

  5. Triple outlet right ventricle: a previously unknown cardiac malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingo, Jennifer E; Carroll, Sheila J; Crystal, Matthew A

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of an infant with three distinct outflow tracts from the right ventricle. Three outlets from the heart have been previously named the "Tritruncal Heart". We review the two previously reported cases of tritruncal hearts and describe the anatomy, diagnosis, surgical management, and outcome of our case. Embryologic implications are also discussed.

  6. Motor Acquisition Rate in Brazilian Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Virlaine Bardella; de Lima, Carolina Daniel; Tudella, Eloisa

    2009-01-01

    This study used the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) with the aim of characterizing motor acquisition rate in 70 healthy 0-6-month-old Brazilian infants, as well as comparing both emergence (initial age) and establishment (final age) of each skill between the study sample and the AIMS normative data. New motor skills were continuously acquired…

  7. Thymic size in uninfected infants born to HIV-positive mothers and fed with pasteurized human milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth; Hasselbalch, H; Ersbøll, A K

    2003-01-01

    /weight-ratio (Ti/w) at birth and at 4 mo of age in 12 healthy uninfected infants born to HlV-infected mothers. All infants were exclusively fed pasteurized donor milk. The results were compared with those obtained from a previous cohort of exclusively breastfed, partially breastfed and exclusively formula......AIM: To examine the size of the thymus in uninfected infants born to HIV-positive mothers and to study the effects of feeding by human donor milk on the size of the thymus in these infants. METHODS: The absolute and relative thymic size was assessed by sonography as thymic index (Ti), and the Ti......-fed infants. RESULTS: At birth the Ti was reduced in infants born to HIV-infected mothers in comparison with that in control infants but this difference disappeared when their birthweights were taken into consideration (Ti/w-ratio). At 4 mo of age the geometric mean Ti of infants fed donor milk was 23...

  8. Differential effects of intrauterine growth restriction on brain structure and development in preterm infants: a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nelly; Falcón, Carles; Sanz-Cortés, Magdalena; Figueras, Francesc; Bargallo, Núria; Crispi, Fátima; Eixarch, Elisenda; Arranz, Angela; Botet, Francesc; Gratacós, Eduard

    2011-03-25

    Previous evidence suggests that preterm newborns with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) have specific neurostructural and neurodevelopmental anomalies, but it is unknown whether these effects persist in early childhood. We studied a sample of 18 preterm IUGR, 15 preterm AGA - born between 26 and 34 weeks of gestational age (GA) - and 15 healthy born-term infants. Infants were scanned at 12 months corrected age (CA), in a 3T scanner, without sedation. Analyses were made by automated lobar volumetry and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). The neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed in all subjects at 18 months CA with the Bayley Scale for Infant and Toddler Development, third edition. IUGR infants had reduced relative volumes for the insular and temporal lobes. According to VBM, IUGR infants had bilateral reduced gray matter (GM) in the temporal, parietal, frontal, and insular regions compared with the other groups. IUGR infants had increased white matter (WM) in temporal regions compared to the AGA group and in frontal, parietal, occipital, and insular regions compared to the term group. They also showed decreased WM in the cerebellum and a non-significant trend in the hippocampus compared to term infants. IUGR infants had reduced neurodevelopmental scores, which were positively correlated with GM in various regions. These data suggest that the IUGR induces a distinct brain pattern of structural changes that persist at 1 year of life and are associated with specific developmental difficulties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Umbilical Cord Separation Time among Infants Seen at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Setting: Well Baby/Immunisation clinic in University of Benin teaching hospital, Benin city, Edo state, Nigeria. Subjects: Four hundread and ninety seven consecutive mothers with their healthy infants were documented for age, parity, place of delivery of infant, mode of delivery, gender of infants, cord care and the time it took ...

  10. The naturally occurring α-tocopherol stereoisomer RRR-α-tocopherol is predominant in the human infant brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuchan, J M; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Johnson, E J

    2016-01-01

    α-Tocopherol is the principal source of vitamin E, an essential nutrient that plays a crucial role in maintaining healthy brain function. Infant formula is routinely supplemented with synthetic α-tocopherol, a racaemic mixture of eight stereoisomers with less bioactivity than the natural stereois......α-Tocopherol is the principal source of vitamin E, an essential nutrient that plays a crucial role in maintaining healthy brain function. Infant formula is routinely supplemented with synthetic α-tocopherol, a racaemic mixture of eight stereoisomers with less bioactivity than the natural...... stereoisomer RRR-α-tocopherol. α-Tocopherol stereoisomer profiles have not been previously reported in the human brain. In the present study, we analysed total α-tocopherol and α-tocopherol stereoisomers in the frontal cortex (FC), hippocampus (HPC) and visual cortex (VC) of infants (n 36) who died of sudden...

  11. Herpes Zoster in a 3-month-old infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Malveiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpes Zoster (HZ is rare in infancy and results from reactivation of varicella-zoster virus, latent in the dorsal root ganglia of sensory or cranial nerves after primary infection (chickenpox. Case Report: We describe the case of an healthy infant, three months old, without previous clinical symptoms of chickenpox, in spite of having contacted with the disease at two weeks of life. She was hospitalized for vesicular-papular rash involving unilaterally dermatomes L4 and L5 and was treated with acyclovir with good clinical outcome. Conclusion: The immaturity of the immune system and the interference of maternal antibodies contribute to the manifestation of HZ in the first year of life. In a previously healthy child it is not recommended the exclusion of underlying immunodeficiency or malignant disease.

  12. [Oral polio vaccine in infants does not interfere in detection of enterovirus in blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Marcela; Sandoval, Carmen; Valenzuela, Patricia; Montecinos, Luisa; Martínez, Constanza; Godoy, Paula; Abarca, Katia

    2013-12-01

    There is not known if a viraemia post-oral polio vaccine (OPV) is detectable by modern molecular techniques. Such viraemia could affect the performance of the real time-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for non polio enterovirus (EV) detection, technique of growing clinical use for the study of febrile infants. To determine viraemia post-first dose of OPV in healthy infants, by molecular techniques. 50 infants less than three months without previous VPO were randomized in 5 groups: a control group with pre-vaccination blood sample (BS), group 1 BS at day 2, group 2 BS at day 4, group 3, BS at day 6 and group 4, BS at day 8 post-vaccination. Conventional and specific PCR for poliovirus and real time PCR for non polio EV were performed in BS and in OPV samples. No genetic material of poliovirus was detected in any infant, while in 9 of them (18%) non polio EV was identified. Real time PCR for EV did not amplify poliovirus from OPV samples. Results suggest that no post VPO viraemia detectable by molecular methods exists. Considering that real time PCR for EV does not allow to identify polio virus, no false positives of the test are expected as a result of a recent VPO vaccination. We documented presence of non polio EV in blood of healthy asymptomatic infants.

  13. Infant reflexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... twitch their hips toward the touch in a dancing movement. GRASP REFLEX This reflex occurs if you ... Infant reflexes can occur in adults who have: Brain damage Stroke When to Contact a Medical Professional ...

  14. CPR - infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as 4 to 6 minutes later. Machines called automated external defibrillators (AEDs) can be found in many ... side down. Follow the guidelines for using infant car seats. Teach your baby the meaning of "don' ...

  15. Infant Constipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Infant Constipation Page Content Parents also worry that their babies ... without success? These signs can all suggest actual constipation. What parents can do: After the first month ...

  16. The Goldilocks Effect in Infant Auditory Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Celeste; Piantadosi, Steven T.; Aslin, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Infants must learn about many cognitive domains (e.g., language, music) from auditory statistics, yet capacity limits on their cognitive resources restrict the quantity that they can encode. Previous research has established that infants can attend to only a subset of available acoustic input. Yet few previous studies have directly examined infant…

  17. Arousal responses in babies at risk of sudden infant death syndrome at different postnatal ages.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dunne, K P

    1992-03-01

    Hypercarbic and hypoxic arousal responses during sleep were measured in healthy term infants, infants where a previous sibling died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and infants suffering a clearly defined apparent life threatening event (ALTE) requiring vigorous or mouth to mouth resuscitation. Groups of infants were tested at approximately one, six and 13 weeks postnatally. Arousal was defined as gross body movement with eyes opening and moving or crying. Hypercarbic arousal was by step increases in F1 Co2 until arousal occurred or until endtidal (PETCO2) reached 8.7 KpA (65 mm Hg) Hypoxic arousal was by step decreases in FIO2 until arousal occurred or until an FIO2 of 0.15 had been maintained for 20 minutes. There was no difference in hypercaribic arousal threshold with age in any group. Hypercarbic arousal threshold was significantly higher in siblings (mean 53.4, 53.6, 54.7 mmHg. [7.12, 7.14, 7.29 KPA] at 0, 6, 13 postnatal weeks) compared to controls (mean 50.9, 52.3, 53.0mm Hg. [6.78, 6.97, 7.29 KPS respectively). ALTE infants differed only at 12 weeks having a significantly lower threshold (51.0mmHg. [6.80 KPA] V 53.0mm Hg. (7.06 KPA]) compared to controls. There was no difference in hypoxic arousal response with age in any group. An arousal response to hypoxia occurred in only 22% of ALTE infants and 40% of siblings compared to 67% of normal infants. Deficient sleep arousal, especially to hypoxia, is common in infants and especially those considered at increased risk from SIDS. This deficiency is present in the first postnatal week and did not vary overy the first three months of postnatal life.

  18. New body composition reference charts for preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerath, Ellen W; Johnson, William; Davern, Bridget A; Anderson, Christina G; Shenberger, Jeffrey S; Misra, Sonya; Ramel, Sara E

    2017-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has recommended that nutritional management of the preterm infant should aim to achieve body composition that replicates the in utero fetus, but intrauterine body composition reference charts for preterm infants are lacking. Our objective was to create body composition reference curves for preterm infants that approximate the body composition of the in utero fetus from 30 to 36 wk of gestation. A total of 223 ethnically diverse infants born at 30 + 0 to 36 + 6 wk of gestation were enrolled. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were specified so that the sample would represent healthy appropriately growing fetuses (e.g., singleton, birth weight appropriate for their gestational age, and medically stable). Cross-sectional reference values were generated for fat mass (FM), fat-free mass (FFM), and percentage body fat (PBF) by gestational age (GA), with the use of air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) and the lambda-mu-sigma method for percentile estimation. GA-specific percentile values and a percentile and z score calculator for FFM, FM, and PBF are presented. These values aligned closely with ADP centile values published for term infants from 36 to 38 wk of gestation. The medians were also similar to the mean values for the reference fetus derived from chemical analysis previously. To our knowledge, these are the first body composition reference charts for total FM and FFM at birth in preterm infants to assist in following AAP guidelines. Future work will test the clinical utility of body composition monitoring for improving nutritional management in this population. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02855814. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  19. Decoding Pedophilia: Increased Anterior Insula Response to Infant Animal Pictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ponseti

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research found increased brain responses of men with sexual interest in children (i.e., pedophiles not only to pictures of naked children but also to pictures of child faces. This opens the possibly that pedophilia is linked (in addition to or instead of an aberrant sexual system to an over-active nurturing system. To test this hypothesis we exposed pedophiles and healthy controls to pictures of infant and adult animals during functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. By using pictures of infant animals (instead of human infants, we aimed to elicit nurturing processing without triggering sexual processing. We hypothesized that elevated brain responses to nurturing stimuli will be found – in addition to other brain areas – in the anterior insula of pedophiles because this area was repeatedly found to be activated when adults see pictures of babies. Behavioral ratings confirmed that pictures of infant or adult animals were not perceived as sexually arousing neither by the pedophilic participants nor by the heathy controls. Statistical analysis was applied to the whole brain as well as to the anterior insula as region of interest. Only in pedophiles did infants relative to adult animals increase brain activity in the anterior insula, supplementary motor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal areas. Within-group analysis revealed an increased brain response to infant animals in the left anterior insular cortex of the pedophilic participants. Currently, pedophilia is considered the consequence of disturbed sexual or executive brain processing, but details are far from known. The present findings raise the question whether there is also an over-responsive nurturing system in pedophilia.

  20. Decoding Pedophilia: Increased Anterior Insula Response to Infant Animal Pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponseti, Jorge; Bruhn, Daniel; Nolting, Julia; Gerwinn, Hannah; Pohl, Alexander; Stirn, Aglaja; Granert, Oliver; Laufs, Helmut; Deuschl, Günther; Wolff, Stephan; Jansen, Olav; Siebner, Hartwig; Briken, Peer; Mohnke, Sebastian; Amelung, Till; Kneer, Jonas; Schiffer, Boris; Walter, Henrik; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2017-01-01

    Previous research found increased brain responses of men with sexual interest in children (i.e., pedophiles) not only to pictures of naked children but also to pictures of child faces. This opens the possibly that pedophilia is linked (in addition to or instead of an aberrant sexual system) to an over-active nurturing system. To test this hypothesis we exposed pedophiles and healthy controls to pictures of infant and adult animals during functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. By using pictures of infant animals (instead of human infants), we aimed to elicit nurturing processing without triggering sexual processing. We hypothesized that elevated brain responses to nurturing stimuli will be found - in addition to other brain areas - in the anterior insula of pedophiles because this area was repeatedly found to be activated when adults see pictures of babies. Behavioral ratings confirmed that pictures of infant or adult animals were not perceived as sexually arousing neither by the pedophilic participants nor by the heathy controls. Statistical analysis was applied to the whole brain as well as to the anterior insula as region of interest. Only in pedophiles did infants relative to adult animals increase brain activity in the anterior insula, supplementary motor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal areas. Within-group analysis revealed an increased brain response to infant animals in the left anterior insular cortex of the pedophilic participants. Currently, pedophilia is considered the consequence of disturbed sexual or executive brain processing, but details are far from known. The present findings raise the question whether there is also an over-responsive nurturing system in pedophilia.

  1. Infant Care and Infant Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find ... How many infants are born each year? What steps can help promote an infant’s health before birth? ...

  2. Ischial apophyseal fracture in an abused infant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bixby, Sarah D.; Kleinman, Paul K. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wilson, Celeste R. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Child Protection Program, Department of Pediatrics, Boston, MA (United States); Barber, Ignasi [Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    We report a previously healthy 4-month-old who presented to the hospital with leg pain and swelling and no history of trauma. Radiographs demonstrated a comminuted left femur fracture. Given the concern for child abuse, skeletal survey was performed and revealed four vertebral compression deformities. Although abuse was suspected, the possibility of a lytic lesion associated with the femur fracture and multiple spinal abnormalities raised the possibility of an underlying process such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Subsequently 18F-NaF positron emission tomographic (PET) scintigraphy revealed increased tracer activity in the ischium, and MRI confirmed an ischial apophyseal fracture. Pelvic fractures, particularly ischial fractures, are extremely rare in the setting of child abuse. This case report describes the multimodality imaging findings of an ischial fracture in an abused infant. (orig.)

  3. Ischial apophyseal fracture in an abused infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bixby, Sarah D.; Kleinman, Paul K.; Wilson, Celeste R.; Barber, Ignasi

    2014-01-01

    We report a previously healthy 4-month-old who presented to the hospital with leg pain and swelling and no history of trauma. Radiographs demonstrated a comminuted left femur fracture. Given the concern for child abuse, skeletal survey was performed and revealed four vertebral compression deformities. Although abuse was suspected, the possibility of a lytic lesion associated with the femur fracture and multiple spinal abnormalities raised the possibility of an underlying process such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Subsequently 18F-NaF positron emission tomographic (PET) scintigraphy revealed increased tracer activity in the ischium, and MRI confirmed an ischial apophyseal fracture. Pelvic fractures, particularly ischial fractures, are extremely rare in the setting of child abuse. This case report describes the multimodality imaging findings of an ischial fracture in an abused infant. (orig.)

  4. Primary Raynaud's phenomenon in an infant: a case report and review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) is an extremely unusual finding in early infancy. In the present report we describe a one-month-old previously healthy male infant who presented with unilateral acrocyanosis. Although infantile acrocyanosis is known to be a benign and self-resolving condition, it is generally bilateral and symmetric. The unilateral nature of the acrocyanosis was an atypical finding in this infant. Consequently, he was closely monitored to evaluate the progression of his acrocyanosis. Based on his benign clinical course and failure to demonstrate other etiologies contributing to his acrocyanosis, he was diagnosed to have primary RP. Due to the rarity of RP in children, we review the progress in understanding the pathophysiology, epidemiology and management of RP and additionally discuss the differential diagnosis of unilateral and bilateral acrocyanosis in infants. PMID:21767369

  5. Primary Raynaud's phenomenon in an infant: a case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Caro Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Raynaud's phenomenon (RP is an extremely unusual finding in early infancy. In the present report we describe a one-month-old previously healthy male infant who presented with unilateral acrocyanosis. Although infantile acrocyanosis is known to be a benign and self-resolving condition, it is generally bilateral and symmetric. The unilateral nature of the acrocyanosis was an atypical finding in this infant. Consequently, he was closely monitored to evaluate the progression of his acrocyanosis. Based on his benign clinical course and failure to demonstrate other etiologies contributing to his acrocyanosis, he was diagnosed to have primary RP. Due to the rarity of RP in children, we review the progress in understanding the pathophysiology, epidemiology and management of RP and additionally discuss the differential diagnosis of unilateral and bilateral acrocyanosis in infants.

  6. Healthy human gut phageome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; Oost, van der John; Vos, de Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of

  7. Parent-Reported Symptoms of Sleep-Disordered Breathing Are Associated With Increased Behavioral Problems at 2 Years of Age: The Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamana, Sukhpreet K; Smithson, Lisa; Lau, Amanda; Mariasine, Jennifer; Young, Rochelle; Chikuma, Joyce; Lefebvre, Diana L; Subbarao, Padmaja; Becker, Allan B; Turvey, Stuart E; Sears, Malcolm R; Pei, Jacqueline; Mandhane, Piush J

    2018-01-01

    To examine the association between the age of onset and duration of parent-reported symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and behavioral problems at age 2. Parent-reported SDB symptoms were assessed quarterly between 3 months and 2 years among 583 Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Edmonton-site participants. Parent-reported SDB symptoms were clustered into phenotypes using group-based trajectory analysis based on age of onset and duration of symptoms. Home-based polysomnography (PSG) was completed at 1 year. The Child Behavior Checklist preschool-version (Mean T-score 50, standard deviation 10 points) assessed total, externalizing (attention), and internalizing (anxiety, depression) behaviors at 2 years. Four phenotypes were identified: no SDB (64.7%), early-onset SDB (15.7%, peak symptoms at 9 months), late-onset (14.2%, peak symptoms at 18 months), and persistent SDB symptoms (5.3%, peak symptoms from 3 through 24 months). Persistent SDB (9.5 points, 95% CI 1.7, 17.2; p = .02) predicted the greatest magnitude of effect of total behavior problems, compared with children without SDB. Children with early-onset SDB (3.5 points, 95% CI 1.6, 5.4; p ≤ .001) and late-onset SDB (6.1 points 95% CI 4.0, 8.3; p ≤ .001) had increased total behavioral problems than children without SDB to 2 years. Additional analyses showed that the SDB phenotypes' trajectories were important for internalizing but not for externalizing behavior problems. There were no significant associations between home-PSG and parent-reported behavior problems. Findings suggest that the age of onset and duration of parent-reported SDB symptoms prior to age 2 have adverse consequences for overall behavior problems. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Relationships between parental sleep quality, fatigue, cognitions about infant sleep, and parental depression pre and post-intervention for infant behavioral sleep problems

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Wendy A.; Moynihan, Melissa; Bhagat, Radhika; Wooldridge, Joanne

    2017-01-01

    Background Maternal and paternal depression has been associated with infants? behavioral sleep problems. Behavioral sleep interventions, which alter parental cognitions about infant sleep, have improved infant sleep problems. This study reports relationships between parental depression, fatigue, sleep quality, and cognitions about infant sleep pre and post-intervention for a behavioral sleep problem. Methods This secondary analysis of data from Canadian parents (n?=?455), with healthy infants...

  9. Infant temperament contributes to early infant growth: A prospective cohort of African American infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Barbara

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prospective studies linking infant temperament, or behavioral style, to infant body composition are lacking. In this longitudinal study (3 to 18 months, we seek to examine the associations between two dimensions of infant temperament (distress to limitations and activity level and two anthropometric indicators (weight-for-length z-scores (WLZ and skin fold (SF measures in a population at high risk of overweight. Methods Data are from the Infant Care and Risk of Obesity Project, a longitudinal study of North Carolina low income African American mother-infant dyads (n = 206. Two temperament dimensions were assessed using the Infant Behavior Questionnaire-Revised. A high distress to limitations score denotes an infant whose mother perceives that s/he often cries or fusses, and a high activity level score one who moves his/her limbs and squirms frequently. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted using ordinary least squares regression. Fixed effects longitudinal models were used to estimate anthropometric outcomes as a function of time varying infant temperament. Results In longitudinal models, increased activity levels were associated with later decreased fatness and WLZ. In contrast, high levels of distress to limitations were associated with later increased fatness at all time points and later increased WLZ at 12 months. Conclusion Infant temperament dimensions contribute to our understanding of the role of behavior in the development of the risk of overweight in the formative months of life. Identification of modifiable risk factors early in life may help target strategies for establishing healthy lifestyles prior to the onset of overweight.

  10. Peritoneal dialysis in infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, M D; Spurgeon, P; Haycock, G B; Chantler, C

    1983-01-01

    A commercially available closed dialysis system and a new peritoneal cannula with potential advantages for infants have been developed. The dialysis set includes three dialysate bags that may be connected to the filling burette; the warming coil of the set is placed in a thermostatically controlled water bath. The peritoneal catheter comprises a flexible tube with side holes and a sharp short bevelled needle with obturator. Advantages of the new equipment over previously available equipment a...

  11. A case of meningoencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a healthy child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Lee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative anaerobic, gram-positive bacillus that is isolated from the soil, vegetables, and wild or domestic animals. Listeria occurs predominantly in the elderly, immunocompromised patients, pregnant women and newborns. Infections by this microorganism are rare in healthy infants and children. L. monocytogenes may cause meningitis, meningoencephalitis, brain abscess, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and liver abscesses in children. The course of meningoencephalitis by listeria is often severe and even fatal. Acute hydrocephalus can develop as a complication and the mortality associated with listeriosis is significantly high. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by L. monocytogenes in a previously healthy 7-year-old girl.

  12. Infant Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... iron-fortified formula.Some formulas are made from soy milk instead of cow’s milk. If your baby seems ... cow’s milk, your doctor may suggest using a soy-milk formula.If you’re not breastfeeding, use infant ...

  13. CPR: Infant

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Refresher Center Home FIRST AID, CPR and AED LIFEGUARDING Refresher Putting It All Together: CPR—Infant (1:52) Refresher videos only utilize this player QUICK LINKS Home RedCross.org Purchase Course Materials Shop Our Store ...

  14. Microbial Therapeutics Designed for Infant Health.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watkins, Claire

    2017-10-01

    Acknowledgment of the gut microbiome as a vital asset to health has led to multiple studies attempting to elucidate its mechanisms of action. During the first year of life, many factors can cause fluctuation in the developing gut microbiome. Host genetics, maternal health status, mode of delivery, gestational age, feeding regime, and perinatal antibiotic usage, are known factors which can influence the development of the infant gut microbiome. Thus, the microbiome of vaginally born, exclusively breastfed infants at term, with no previous exposure to antibiotics, either directly or indirectly from the mother, is to be considered the "gold standard." Moreover, the use of prebiotics as an aid for the development of a healthy gut microbiome is equally as important in maintaining gut homeostasis. Breastmilk, a natural prebiotic source, provides optimal active ingredients for the growth of beneficial microbial species. However, early life disorders such as necrotising enterocolitis, childhood obesity, and even autism have been associated with an altered\\/disturbed gut microbiome. Subsequently, microbial therapies have been introduced, in addition to suitable prebiotic ingredients, which when administered, may aid in the prevention of a microbial disturbance in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this mini-review is to highlight the beneficial effects of different probiotic and prebiotic treatments in early life, with particular emphasis on the different conditions which negatively impact microbial colonisation at birth.

  15. Microbial Therapeutics Designed for Infant Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Watkins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acknowledgment of the gut microbiome as a vital asset to health has led to multiple studies attempting to elucidate its mechanisms of action. During the first year of life, many factors can cause fluctuation in the developing gut microbiome. Host genetics, maternal health status, mode of delivery, gestational age, feeding regime, and perinatal antibiotic usage, are known factors which can influence the development of the infant gut microbiome. Thus, the microbiome of vaginally born, exclusively breastfed infants at term, with no previous exposure to antibiotics, either directly or indirectly from the mother, is to be considered the “gold standard.” Moreover, the use of prebiotics as an aid for the development of a healthy gut microbiome is equally as important in maintaining gut homeostasis. Breastmilk, a natural prebiotic source, provides optimal active ingredients for the growth of beneficial microbial species. However, early life disorders such as necrotising enterocolitis, childhood obesity, and even autism have been associated with an altered/disturbed gut microbiome. Subsequently, microbial therapies have been introduced, in addition to suitable prebiotic ingredients, which when administered, may aid in the prevention of a microbial disturbance in the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this mini-review is to highlight the beneficial effects of different probiotic and prebiotic treatments in early life, with particular emphasis on the different conditions which negatively impact microbial colonisation at birth.

  16. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in infant: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiavetto, Renata Rennó

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Necrotizing fasciitis is a bacterial infection characterized by extensive necrosis of tissues, and may include skin and muscles. It's more frequent in adults than in children and generally involves the trunk and extremities. Head and neck area is less commonly affected. The most frequently isolated pathogens are the Streptococcus pyogenes (group A and Staphylococcus aureus. The anatomopathological exam is the best diagnostic method, which early identifies the disease. The clinical support, surgical debridement, and the intravenous antibiotic therapy, are fundamental for the treatment. Objective: To report a case of an infant who suffered from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis. Case Report: Infant, male sex, white, 2 months old, previously healthy, with Necrotizing Fasciitis involving the frontal and right lateral cervical regions. After adequate treatment the patient obtained excellent recovery without presenting important aesthetic or functional alterations. Conclusion: The Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis is uncommon in children. The early surgical debridement is necessary to control the infection, even if it may result in great and deep injuries. The wide spectrum antibiotic therapy and hemodynamic support are also basic for the therapeutic success.

  17. Spectrophotometric analysis in umbilical cords of infants with meconium aspiration syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Oguz; Peker, Erdal; Demir, Nihat; Akbayram, Sinan; Kirimi, Ercan

    2013-07-01

    We compared spectrophotometric analysis of the umbilical cords of infants with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) or with meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) and healthy infants. In a prospective study, 15 infants with MAS and 37 infants with MSAF were enrolled. Twenty healthy infants formed a control group. The absorption peak of umbilical cords with meconium was significantly higher in the infants with MAS or MSAF than in controls. Spectrophotometric analysis of the umbilical cords with meconium may be useful to identify developed neonates with MAS or MSAF.

  18. Healthy Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weight Gain Losing Weight Getting Started Improving Your Eating Habits Keeping It Off Healthy Eating for a Healthy ... or "program". It's about lifestyle changes in daily eating and exercise habits. Success Stories They did it. So can you! ...

  19. Estimation of gluconeogenesis in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalhan, S C; Parimi, P; Van Beek, R; Gilfillan, C; Saker, F; Gruca, L; Sauer, P J

    2001-11-01

    The rate of glucose turnover (R(a)) and gluconeogenesis (GNG) via pyruvate were quantified in seven full-term healthy babies between 24 and 48 h after birth and in twelve low-birth-weight infants on days 3 and 4 by use of [(13)C(6)]glucose and (2)H(2)O. The preterm babies were receiving parenteral alimentation of either glucose or glucose plus amino acid with or without lipids. The contribution of GNG to glucose production was measured by the appearance of (2)H on C-6 of glucose. Glucose R(a) in full-term babies was 30 +/- 1.7 (SD) micromol. kg(-1). min(-1). GNG via pyruvate contributed approximately 31% to glucose R(a). In preterm babies, the contribution of GNG to endogenous glucose R(a) was variable (range 6-60%). The highest contribution was in infants receiving low rates of exogenous glucose infusion. In an additional group of infants of normal and diabetic mothers, lactate turnover and its incorporation into glucose were measured within 4-24 h of birth by use of [(13)C(3)]lactate tracer. The rate of lactate turnover was 38 micromol. kg(-1). min(-1), and lactate C, not corrected for loss of tracer in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, contributed approximately 18% to glucose C. Lactate and glucose kinetics were similar in infants that were small for their gestational age and in normal infants or infants of diabetic mothers. These data show that gluconeogenesis is evident soon after birth in the newborn infant and that, even after a brief fast (5 h), GNG via pyruvate makes a significant contribution to glucose production in healthy full-term infants. These data may have important implications for the nutritional support of the healthy and sick newborn infant.

  20. No Camphor Toxicity in Cambodian Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey R. Johnson MS

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine deficiency and beriberi are prevalent in Cambodia, although most infants with nonspecific clinical symptoms of beriberi, including tachypnea, lack echocardiographic evidence diagnostic of the disease. Camphor activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3, a nonselective ion channel expressed in the medial preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus and thought to be important for thermo-sensitivity. Because camphorated ointments are used commonly among Cambodian infants, we hypothesized that topical camphor modulates thermoregulatory behaviors, causing beriberi-simulating tachypnea, separate from any influence of thiamine deficiency. We assessed 9 tachypneic and 10 healthy infants for Tiger Balm use and for presence of camphor in whole blood. However, no camphor was found in blood from any infants, indicating that camphor is unrelated to tachypneic illness in Cambodian infants.

  1. Relação clínica entre hábitos de sucção, má oclusão, aleitamento e grau de informação prévia das mães Clinical relationship among suction oral habits, malocclusion, infant feeding and mother's previous knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Feu Rosa Kroeff de Souza

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este estudo avaliou a relação clínica entre a forma de aleitamento da criança, orientação prévia das mães sobre amamentação natural, instalação de hábitos de sucção não-nutritivos e a presença de más oclusões. METODOLOGIA: foram examinadas 79 crianças (39 com hábitos de sucção e 40 sem hábitos de sucção, de ambos os gêneros, entre 2 e 5 anos, com a dentadura decídua completa e sem perda de tecido dentário interproximal, selecionadas de maneira randomizada, que participavam do Projeto de Bebês da Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo. Apenas um examinador (Kappa intra-examinador: 0,96 avaliou as características faciais e oclusais das crianças, no sentido ântero-posterior, transversal e vertical. As mães foram instruídas a responderem um questionário sobre o desenvolvimento da criança e o grau de orientação prévia que receberam sobre amamentação natural, hábitos, más oclusões e respiração bucal. Foram empregados os testes estatísticos qui-quadrado, teste exato de Fischer, t de Student e Odds Ratio. RESULTADOS: os resultados mostraram que: 1 existe uma relação estatisticamente significante entre o prolongamento do aleitamento materno e a redução da instalação de hábitos de sucção (pAIM: the proposal of this study was to associate infant feeding methods, mother’s previous knowledge about breast-feeding, installation of oral habits and presence of malocclusions. METHODS: 79 children (39 with suction habits and 40 without habits, both genres, from ages between 2 and 5 years old, with complete health deciduous dentition were randomizedly selected from the ones attended at Baby’s Clinic, in Federal University of Espírito Santo. Only one examiner (Kappa intra-examiner= 0.96 evaluated facial characteristics and the occlusion at transversal, antero-posterior and vertical relation. Each mother was oriented to answer a questionnaire concerning child’s development and the degree of

  2. Active noise control for infant incubators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xun; Gujjula, Shruthi; Kuo, Sen M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an active noise control system for infant incubators. Experimental results show that global noise reduction can be achieved for infant incubator ANC systems. An audio-integration algorithm is presented to introduce a healthy audio (intrauterine) sound with the ANC system to mask the residual noise and soothe the infant. Carbon nanotube based transparent thin film speaker is also introduced in this paper as the actuator for the ANC system to generate the destructive secondary sound, which can significantly save the congested incubator space and without blocking the view of doctors and nurses.

  3. Glucose Homeostasis Variables in Pregnancy versus Maternal and Infant Body Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Henriksson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine factors influence infant size and body composition but the mechanisms involved are to a large extent unknown. We studied relationships between the body composition of pregnant women and variables related to their glucose homeostasis, i.e., glucose, HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, hemoglobin A1c and IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, and related these variables to the body composition of their infants. Body composition of 209 women in gestational week 32 and of their healthy, singleton and full-term one-week-old infants was measured using air displacement plethysmography. Glucose homeostasis variables were assessed in gestational week 32. HOMA-IR was positively related to fat mass index and fat mass (r2 = 0.32, p < 0.001 of the women. Maternal glucose and HOMA-IR values were positively (p ≤ 0.006 associated, while IGFBP-1was negatively (p = 0.001 associated, with infant fat mass. HOMA-IR was positively associated with fat mass of daughters (p < 0.001, but not of sons (p = 0.65 (Sex-interaction: p = 0.042. In conclusion, glucose homeostasis variables of pregnant women are related to their own body composition and to that of their infants. The results suggest that a previously identified relationship between fat mass of mothers and daughters is mediated by maternal insulin resistance.

  4. Goniometer Measurements of Oral Labial Angle and Evaluation of Oral Motor Reflexes in Preterm Infants: Comparison to Findings in Term Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Deniz Anuk; Tugcu, Ali Ulas; Ecevit, Ayşe; Ciyiltepe, Muzeyyen; Kurt, Abdullah; Abbasoğlu, Aslıhan; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Tarcan, Aylin

    2015-10-01

    To date, no study has evaluated changes in oral labial angle as preterm infants mature. The main purpose of this study was to document goniometer measurements of the labial angle of the mouth in preterm infants, to assess changes with development, to compare to findings in healthy term infants, and also evaluate oral motor reflexes in these groups. Seventy-eight preterm infants and 45 healthy term infants were recruited for the prospective study. Labial angle was assessed via goniometer, and oral motor reflexes and the volume of milk ingested were evaluated. There was significant difference between term and preterm infants' labial angles (P Goniometer measurements of the oral labial angle may reveal oral motor performance in preterm infants and may be relevant for feeding skills assessment in this group of infants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Alterations in biochemical markers due to mercury (Hg) exposure and its influence on infant's neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Elkhatib, Rola; Al-Rouqi, Reem; Abduljabbar, Mai; Eltabache, Chafica; Al-Rajudi, Tahreer; Nester, Michael

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the role of oxidative stress due to mercury (Hg) exposure on infant's neurodevelopmental performance. A total of 944 healthy Saudi mothers and their respective infants (aged 3-12 months) were recruited from 57 Primary Health Care Centers in Riyadh City. Total mercury (Hg) was measured in mothers and infants urine and hair samples, as well as mother's blood and breast milk. Methylmercury (MeHg) was determined in the mothers and infants' hair and mother's blood. Urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), malondialdehyde (MDA), and porphyrins were used to assess oxidative stress. The infant's neurodevelopment was evaluated using Denver Developmental Screening Test II (DDST-II) and Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status. The median total Hg levels in mother's urine, infant's urine, mother's hair, infant's hair, and mother's blood and breast milk were 0.995μg/l, 0.716μg/l, 0.118μg/g dw, 0.101μg/g dw, 0.635μg/l, and 0.884μg/l respectively. The median MeHg levels in mother's hair, infant's hair, and mother's blood were 0.132μg/g dw, 0.091μg/g dw, and 2.341μg/l respectively. A significant interrelationship between mothers and infants Hg measures in various matrices was noted. This suggests that mother's exposure to different forms of Hg (total and/or MeHg) from various sources contributed significantly to the metal body burden of their respective infants. Even though Hg exposure was low, it induced high oxidative stress in mothers and infants. The influence of multiplicative interaction terms between Hg measures and oxidative stress biomarkers was tested using multiple regression analysis. Significant interactions between the urinary Hg levels in mothers and infants and oxidative stress biomarkers (8-OHdG and MDA) were noted. The MeHg levels in mother-infant hair revealed similar interaction patterns. The p-values for both were below 0.001. These observations suggest that the exposure of our infants to Hg via mothers either during

  6. Standardization of the Alberta infant motor scale in full-term Greek infants: Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrengelas, D; Siahanidou, T; Kourlaba, G; Kleisiouni, P; Bakoula, C; Chrousos, G P

    2010-04-01

    The Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is a norm-referenced test that assesses the spontaneous motor performance of infants from birth through independent walking (0-18 months). This scale has been utilized for clinical and research purposes in various countries, however, whether the initial standardization in Canadian infants is also representative of other countries' populations has been questioned. To assess whether the AIMS needs new reference values for Greek infants. A cohort of 424 healthy full-term infants (250 boys and 174 girls), aged between 7 days and 18 months, derived from various areas of the Prefecture of Attica and from all socio-economic classes to ensure a true representation, was studied. The AIMS-scores of Greek infants were compared with the norm-referenced values of the original Canadian population reported by Piper and Darrah. The mean AIMS-scores did not differ significantly between Greek and Canadian infants at any age level from birth to 18 months, except for the 2-<3 month of age when higher scores were observed in Greek infants (p=0.02). There was no significant difference in AIMS-values corresponding to the 5th and 90th percentile between Greek and Canadian infants. Inter-rater reliability was excellent in our study population [ICC: 0.99 (95% CI: 0.99-0.99)]. In healthy full-term Greek infants, gross motor maturity assessed by the AIMS during the first 18 months of age, seems to follow a similar course to that of Canadian infants. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Warmth is Analgesic in Healthy Newborns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Colleen W.; Porges, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies a behavioral and nonpharmacologic means of preventing and reducing newborn pain. Our objective was to determine whether warmth is analgesic in newborn infants undergoing vaccination—a routine painful hospital procedure. We used a prospective randomized controlled trial of 47 healthy full-term newborn infants. Infants were randomized into one of three conditions prior to vaccination: warmth exposure, pacifier suckling, or sucrose taste. Crying, grimacing, and heart rate differences were analyzed between groups before, during, and after vaccination as outcome measures. Warmer infants cried significantly less than sucrose taste or pacifier suckling after vaccination. Heart rate patterns reflected this analgesia. Core temperature did not differ between study groups. Providing natural warmth to newborn infants during a painful procedure decreases the crying and grimacing on par with the “gold” standard treatments of sucrose or pacifier. PMID:22424877

  8. Cardiac ion channelopathies and the sudden infant death syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilders, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    The sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) causes the sudden death of an apparently healthy infant, which remains unexplained despite a thorough investigation, including the performance of a complete autopsy. The triple risk model for the pathogenesis of SIDS points to the coincidence of a vulnerable

  9. Infant Choking: How to Keep Your Baby Safe

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... associated with parental knowledge of choking hazards. International Journal of Otorhinolaryngology. 2012:76;169. June 04, 2016 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/infant-choking/art-20044661 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  10. The use of prebiotics and probiotics in infant formula | Ackerberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastrointestinal flora influences health, but the composition of flora can be changed with prebiotics or probiotics. The addition of probiotics to powdered infant formula has not been demonstrated to be harmful to healthy term infants. However, evidence of clinical efficacy regarding their addition is insufficient to recommend ...

  11. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids Health Kids Environment Kids Health Menu Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works ... Scientist Coloring Science Experiments Stories Lessons Topics Expand Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works ...

  12. Tolerance, bone mineral content, and serum vitamin D concentration of term infants fed partially hydrolyzed whey-based infant formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the study was to assess the tolerance (intake, incidence of spit up/vomit, and stool patterns), bone mineral status, and vitamin D status of healthy, term infants fed one of two partially hydrolyzed bovine whey protein infant formulas from birth to 56 or 84 days of age. The control ...

  13. Characteristics of antigravity spontaneous movements in preterm infants up to 3 months of corrected age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagishima, Saori; Asaka, Tadayoshi; Kamatsuka, Kaori; Kozuka, Naoki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Igarashi, Risa; Hori, Tsukasa; Yoto, Yuko; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated whether spontaneous antigravity limbs movements in very low birth weight preterm infants were insufficient compared to those in term infants. The relationship between the quality of general movements (GMs) and antigravity limbs movements was also examined. Preterm infants with very low birth weight without central nervous system disorders nor severe respiration disorders, and healthy term infants were recruited. The infants were set in a supine position. The distance between both hands and between both feet, and the height of both hands and feet from the floor were recorded at 1-3 corrected months for preterm infants, and at 1-3 months for term infants by a 3D motion capture system. The measurements were adjusted for body proportions. GMs in preterm and term infants were assessed similarly. Thirteen preterm and 15 term infants completed the study. In preterm infants, the distance between both hands and between both feet were longer, and the height of both hands and feet were lower than those in term infants in all measurements. In term infants, the height of both hands and feet increased as they developed, but no change was observed in preterm infants. In preterm infants with abnormal GMs, the distance between both hands was longer, and the height of both hands and feet was lower than that in those with normal GMs. There were no such differences between preterm infants with normal GMs and term infants with normal GMs. Antigravity limbs movements in preterm infants within the first 3 month of corrected age were insufficient compared with those in term infants. Furthermore, no improvement with development was observed in preterm infants. In addition, preterm infants with abnormal GMs showed worse antigravity limbs movements than preterm and term infants with normal GMs. The preterm infants with normal GMs could behave similar to the full term infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Breastfeeding Determinants in Healthy Term Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Colombo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Breastfeeding is the normative standard for infant feeding. Despite its established benefits, different factors can affect breastfeeding rates over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding determinants in healthy term newborns during the first three months of life. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted in the nursery of Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan, Italy. The mother-baby dyads that were admitted to the Clinic in January and February 2017 were enrolled. Only healthy term babies with birth weight ≥10th percentile for gestational age were included. Data were collected through medical records and questionnaires administered during the follow-up period. Then, we fitted univariate and multivariate logistic models and calculated odds ratios. 746 dyads were included but 640 completed the study. The factors found to be favoring breastfeeding were a previous successful breastfeeding experience, a higher level of education of the mother, attending prenatal classes, no use of pacifier, rooming in practice, and breastfeeding on demand. Factors acting negatively on breastfeeding were advanced maternal age, non-spontaneous delivery, perception of low milk supply, mastitis, and nipple fissures. This study highlights the need to individualize the assistance provide to breastfeeding mothers, paying special attention to personal experiences.

  15. Breastfeeding Determinants in Healthy Term Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lorenzo; Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Consonni, Dario; Bettinelli, Maria Enrica; Agosti, Viola; Mangino, Giulia; Bezze, Elena Nicoletta; Mauri, Paola Agnese; Zanotta, Lidia; Roggero, Paola; Plevani, Laura; Bertoli, Donatella; Giannì, Maria Lorella; Mosca, Fabio

    2018-01-05

    Breastfeeding is the normative standard for infant feeding. Despite its established benefits, different factors can affect breastfeeding rates over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding determinants in healthy term newborns during the first three months of life. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted in the nursery of Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan, Italy. The mother-baby dyads that were admitted to the Clinic in January and February 2017 were enrolled. Only healthy term babies with birth weight ≥10th percentile for gestational age were included. Data were collected through medical records and questionnaires administered during the follow-up period. Then, we fitted univariate and multivariate logistic models and calculated odds ratios. 746 dyads were included but 640 completed the study. The factors found to be favoring breastfeeding were a previous successful breastfeeding experience, a higher level of education of the mother, attending prenatal classes, no use of pacifier, rooming in practice, and breastfeeding on demand. Factors acting negatively on breastfeeding were advanced maternal age, non-spontaneous delivery, perception of low milk supply, mastitis, and nipple fissures. This study highlights the need to individualize the assistance provide to breastfeeding mothers, paying special attention to personal experiences.

  16. Healthy Eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a healthy way to eat? • What is a balanced diet? • Why is protein important to my body? • What ... Protein foods 5. Dairy foods What is a balanced diet? A balanced diet should include a combination of ...

  17. Estimation of gluconeogenesis in newborn infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalhan, SC; Parimi, P; Van Beek, R; Gilfillan, C; Saker, F; Gruca, L; Sauer, P.J.J.

    2001-01-01

    The rate of glucose turnover (R-a) and gluconeogenesis (GNG) via pyruvate were quantified in seven full-term healthy babies between 24 and 48 h after birth and in twelve low-birth-weight infants on days 3 and 4 by use of [C-13(6)]glucose and (H2O)-H-2. The preterm babies were receiving parenteral

  18. Assessing gross motor development of Brazilian infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontijo, Ana Paula Bensemann; de Castro Magalhães, Lívia; Guerra, Miriam Queiroz Faria

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) requires reference values specific for Brazilian infants. A total of 660 (330 girls) healthy full-term infants from Belo Horizonte were assessed using the AIMS. Scores and percentile curves were compared with the Canadian reference values. Differences were found in the 5th percentile (9-<10 and 10-<11 months) and the 10th percentile (4-<5, 9-<10, and 10-<11 months) curves. No significant differences were found between sexes on the basis of the economic classification or the criteria of the Human Development Index. Primarily because of the corrections made to the 5th and 10th percentile curves, we recommend the use of the Brazilian infant data curves reported here for further studies conducted in Brazil. Because the Human Development Index of Belo Horizonte is similar to that for Brazil as a whole, the results of this study should be relevant for clinicians throughout Brazil.

  19. Breastfeeding the NICU Infant: What to Expect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Nancy E

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 14% of infants born in the United States are admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The evidence for the use of human milk in the NICU is convincing. NICU mothers are at greater risk of delayed onset of lactation and insufficient milk when compared with healthy breastfeeding couplets. Unfortunately many infants leave the NICU not receiving sufficient or any breastmilk. A mother's success depends upon the obstetric and NICU environment, and the knowledge and attitudes of those who care for her and her infant(s). Obstetrician-gynecologists have a significant role in the decision to breastfeed and the success of the provision of human milk and breastfeeding in the NICU.

  20. Preterm Infants and Parents’ self-esteem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Hanne; Madsen, Mette Kold

    Background: Little is known about parents to preterm infants and their self-esteem. The care of preterm infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is in accordance with the principles of Family Centered Care. Previously, focus has mainly been on the mother-infant-dyad. Current research has...... shown that involving the father at an early stage improves the psychological dynamic of fatherhood and encourages bonding with the infant. The self-esteem of parents appears to be negatively affected after preterm birth. Objective: To get more knowledge and a deeper understanding of the preterm parents......’ experiences of their self-esteem during admission to the NICU and later eight months after discharge. Method and data collection: A qualitative semi-structured interview was conducted in two phases: 1) Three weeks after giving birth to a preterm infant and eight months after discharge. Parents were...

  1. Development of Preference for Conspecific Faces in Human Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanefuji, Wakako; Wada, Kazuko; Yamamoto, Tomoka; Mohri, Ikuko; Taniike, Masako

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have proposed that humans may be born with mechanisms that attend to conspecifics. However, as previous studies have relied on stimuli featuring human adults, it remains unclear whether infants attend only to adult humans or to the entire human species. We found that 1-month-old infants (n = 23) were able to differentiate between…

  2. Enteral iron supplementation in preterm and low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ryan John; Davies, Mark W

    2012-03-14

    Preterm infants are at risk of exhausting their body iron stores much earlier than healthy term newborns. It is widespread practice to give enteral iron supplementation to preterm and low birth weight infants to prevent iron deficiency anaemia. However, it is unclear whether supplementing preterm and low birth weight infants with iron improves growth and neurodevelopment. It is suspected that excess exogenous iron can contribute to oxidative injury in preterm babies, causing or exacerbating conditions such as necrotising enterocolitis and retinopathy of prematurity. Additionally, the optimal dose and timing of commencement and cessation of iron supplementation are uncertain. To evaluate the effect of prophylactic enteral iron supplementation on growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm and low birth weight infants. The secondary objectives were to determine whether iron supplementation results in improved haematological parameters and prevents other causes of morbidity and mortality. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 8), MEDLINE (1951 to August 2011), CINAHL (1982 to August 2011) and conference proceedings and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials that compared enteral iron supplementation with no iron supplementation, or different regimens of enteral iron supplementation in preterm or low birth weight infants or both. We extracted data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. Both review authors separately evaluated trial quality and data extraction. We synthesised data using risk ratios (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and weighted mean differences (WMDs). Where data about the methodology and results or both were lacking, we made an attempt to contact the study authors for further information. We included twenty-six studies (2726 infants) in the

  3. Pacifier use modifies infant's cardiac autonomic controls during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Patricia; Chabanski, Sophie; Scaillet, Sonia; Groswasser, José; Kahn, André

    2004-04-01

    The risk for sudden infant death (SIDS) was postulated to decrease with the use of a pacifier and by conditions increasing parasympathetic tonus during sleep. We evaluated the influence of a pacifier on cardiac autonomic controls in healthy infants. Thirty-four healthy infants were studied polygraphically during one night: 17 infants regularly used a pacifier during sleep and 17 never used a pacifier. Thumb users or occasional pacifier users were not included in the study. The infants were recorded at a median age of 10 weeks (range 6-18 weeks). Autonomic nervous system (ANS) was evaluated by spectral analysis of the heart rate (HR). The high frequency component of HR spectral analysis reflected parasympathetic tonus and the low frequency on high frequency ratio corresponded to the sympathovagal balance. Most infants (63.6%) lost their pacifier within 30 min of falling asleep. Sucking periods were associated with increases in cardiac sympathovagal balance. During non-sucking periods, in both REM and NREM sleep, infants using a pacifier were characterized by lower sympathetic activity and higher parasympathetic tonus compared with non-pacifier users. The use of pacifiers modifies cardiac autonomic controls during both sucking and non-sucking sleep periods. Non-nutritive sucking could regulate autonomic control in infants. These findings could be relevant to mechanisms implicated in the occurrence of sudden infant deaths during sleep.

  4. Maternal and infant vitamin D status during the first 9 months of infant life-a cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Við Streym, S; Kristine Moller, U; Rejnmark, Lars

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D status and possible consequences of low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in a population of healthy mothers and their infants.Subjects/methods:A total of 107 women aged 24-41 years gave birth to 108 infants. They ....../l are needed to prevent vitamin D deficiency among newborn.......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to assess vitamin D status and possible consequences of low plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels in a population of healthy mothers and their infants.Subjects/methods:A total of 107 women aged 24-41 years gave birth to 108 infants......% of mothers and 61% of infants had 25OHD Vitamin D deficiency (25OHD50  nmol/l. During follow-up, most...

  5. Perinatal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation among women with eating disorders and their infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, A; Taborelli, E; Bye, A; Zunszain, P A; Pariante, C M; Treasure, J; Schmidt, U; Micali, N

    2017-02-01

    Psychiatric illness is associated with heightened hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity during pregnancy which may have long term effects on infant stress regulation. HPA axis regulation has not previously been investigated in women with eating disorders (ED) or their infants during the perinatal period. Women were recruited to a prospective longitudinal study in three groups: 1) current or active ED (C-ED=31), 2) past ED (P-ED=29) and healthy control (HC=57). Maternal psychopathology, diurnal cortisol levels, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH binding protein (CRH-BP) were measured during the third trimester of pregnancy. At eight weeks postpartum infant cortisol was obtained before and after routine immunisations to determine infant hormonal response to a stressful situation. Women with current ED had a significantly lower cortisol decline throughout the day compared to HC, in both adjusted and unadjusted analyses. Lower cortisol decline among women with a current ED were associated with higher levels of psychopathology during pregnancy. Women's cortisol awakening response, CRH and CRH-BP levels did not differ across the three groups. Infants' stress response was also significantly higher among those in the C-ED group, although this effect was attenuated after controlling for confounders. During pregnancy women with ED have lower cortisol declines, suggestive of blunted diurnal cortisol rhythms. Postnatally, their infants also have a heightened response to stress. This is the first study to identify HPA axis dysfunction in pregnancy in women with ED, and to show an intergenerational effect. Since dysfunctions in HPA activity during childhood may represent a risk factor for psychological and physical health problems later in life, further investigation of the potential long-term implications of these findings is crucial. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Immune-modulatory genomic properties differentiate gut microbiota of infants with and without eczema

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Seungdae

    2017-10-19

    Gut microbiota play an important role in human immunological processes, potentially affecting allergic diseases such as eczema. The diversity and structure of gut microbiota in infants with eczema have been previously documented. This study aims to evaluate by comparative metagenomics differences in genetic content in gut microbiota of infants with eczema and their matched controls. Stools were collected at the age of one month old from twelve infants from an at risk birth cohort in a case control manner. Clinical follow up for atopic outcomes were carried out at the age of 12 and 24 months. Microbial genomic DNA were extracted from stool samples and used for shotgun sequencing. Comparative metagenomic analysis showed that immune-regulatory TCAAGCTTGA motifs were significantly enriched in the six healthy controls (C) communities compared to the six eczema subjects (E), with many encoded by Bifidobacterium (38% of the total motifs in the C communities). Draft genomes of five Bifidobacterium species populations (B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. dentium, and B. pseudocatenulatum) were recovered from metagenomic datasets. The B. longum BFN-121-2 genome encoded more TCAAGCTTGA motifs (4.2 copies per one million genome sequence) than other Bifidobacterium genomes. Additionally, the communities in the stool of controls (C) were also significantly enriched in functions associated with tetrapyrrole biosynthesis compared to those of eczema (E). Our results show distinct immune-modulatory genomic properties of gut microbiota in infants associated with eczema and provide new insights into potential role of gut microbiota in affecting human immune homeostasis.

  7. Preference patterns in infant vowel perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Monika T.; Polka, Linda

    2004-05-01

    Infants show directional asymmetries in vowel discrimination tasks that reveal an underlying perceptual bias favoring more peripheral vowels. Polka and Bohn (2003) propose that this bias is language independent and plays an important role in the development of vowel perception. In the present study we measured infant listening preferences for vowels to assess whether a perceptual bias favoring peripheral vowels can be measured more directly. Monolingual (French and English) and bilingual infants completed a listening preference task using multiple natural tokens of German /dut/ and /dyt/ produced by a male talker. In previous work, discrimination of this vowel pair by German-learning and by English-learning infants revealed a robust directional asymmetry in which /u/ acts as a perceptual anchor; specifically, infants had difficulty detecting a change from /u/ to /y/, whereas a change from /y/ to /u/ was readily detected. Preliminary results from preference tests with these stimuli show that most infants between 3 and 5 months of age also listen longer to /u/ than to /y/. Preference data obtained from older infants and with other vowel pairs will also be reported to further test the claim that peripheral vowels have a privileged perceptual status in infant perception.

  8. Healthy Places

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Every person has a stake in environmental public health. As the environment deteriorates, so does the physical and mental health of the people within it. Healthy places are those designed and built to improve the quality of life for all people who live, work, worship, learn, and play within their borders -- where every person is free to make choices amid a variety of healthy, available, accessible, and affordable options. The CDC recognizes significant health issues and places that are vital in developing the Healthy Places program and provides examples in this report.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  9. The effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breastfeeding competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aghdas karimi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: according to the ethology theory mother infant separation immediately after birth can interfere with the infants innate behaviors for the initiation of breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to the effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breast feeding competence Materials and Methods: 114 primiparous, Iranian, healthy, full term mothers between 18-35 years with normal vaginal delivery who intended to breastfeed their babies. They were put in direct skin to skin contact with their infants immediately after birth for two hours. Then, rates of infant breastfeeding competence were compared with a control group receiving routine hospital cares. Results: Rates of infant breastfeeding competence were higher in the skin to skin contact group compared to routine care group (p=0.0001. Conclusion: mother- infant early skin to skin contact promotes infants natural feeding behaviors leading to higher rates of infant breastfeeding competence. These findings confirm the Theory of Ethology.

  10. The effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breastfeeding competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aghdas karimi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: according to the ethology theory mother infant separation immediately after birth can interfere with the infants innate behaviors for the initiation of breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to the effect of an interventional program based on the Theory of Ethology on infant breast feeding competence Materials and Methods: 114 primiparous, Iranian, healthy, full term mothers between 18-35 years with normal vaginal delivery who intended to breastfeed their babies. They were put in direct skin to skin contact with their infants immediately after birth for two hours. Then, rates of infant breastfeeding competence were compared with a control group receiving routine hospital cares. Results: Rates of infant breastfeeding competence were higher in the skin to skin contact group compared to routine care group (p=0.0001. Conclusion: mother- infant early skin to skin contact promotes infants natural feeding behaviors leading to higher rates of infant breastfeeding competence. These findings confirm the Theory of Ethology.

  11. Hepatitis A seroprevalence among infants aged 12 months in Ankara.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Osman Tolga; Yalçin, S Songül; Yurdakök, Kadriye; Ozmert, Elif N

    2011-01-01

    Seroprevalence studies in various age groups contribute to a better understanding of hepatitis A infection and response to hepatitis A immunization. Hepatitis A seroprevalence in 12-month-old infants from Ankara was studied. Among 601 healthy infants, overall hepatitis A seropositivity was found to be 23.5%. There were no gender differences in seropositivity (22.6% for male and 24.5% for female infants). Although vaccination of infants would be an ideal prevention strategy, presence of maternal anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody interferes with the immune response to hepatitis A vaccine in infants and young children. Therefore, further knowledge about decay of maternal antibody in infants is important in determining the optimal age for vaccination against hepatitis A. There is no recommendation for routine hepatitis A vaccination in Turkey. However, we need more seroprevalence studies in different age groups to decide the appropriate timing/age of vaccination.

  12. Rachitic hypocalcemic cardiomyopathy in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelwahab T.H. Elidrissy

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy in infants is characterized by heart failure in apparently normal children without previous organic cardiac lesions. Cardiomyopathy has been found to comprise four types. Rickets is common in Saudi Arabia, that is why I reviewed this subject. Recently this case with classical features of rickets being admitted in a serious state we thought of publishing it. The infant responded well to treatment and full recovery was achieved. Follow up biochemistry, radiology cardiac function completely recovered and bony abnormalities showed evidence of healing. This case might have been missed as respiratory infection. We recommend meticulous look for biochemical features of rickets in infants admitted with respiratory symptoms.

  13. Infant Mortality and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Profiles > Black/African American > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and African Americans African Americans have 2.2 ... to receive late or no prenatal care. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  14. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  15. Healthy Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help you find healthy ways to cope that work with your lifestyle, including: Your diabetes educator also can offer some tips for dealing ... 3633 Contact Us Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Social Media Policy | Contact ... 2018 American Association of Diabetes Educators. All rights reserved. The AADE logo is ...

  16. RECOGNIZING INFANTS' EMOTIONAL EXPRESSIONS: ARE ADOLESCENTS LESS SENSITIVE TO INFANTS' CUES?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessen, Anke; Konrad, Kerstin; Dahmen, Brigitte; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Firk, Christine

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that adolescent mothers interact less sensitively with their infants than do adult mothers. This difference might be due to developmental difficulties in the recognition of infants' emotional states in adolescents. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to explore differences in the recognition of infant signals between nonparous adolescent girls and boys as compared to female and male adults. To this end, we examined 54 childless adolescents and 54 childless adults (50% female). Participants were shown a series of 20 short videos of infants aged 3 to 6 months presenting different emotional states ranging from very distressed to very happy. In addition, participants were asked to report their own parental experiences using the German version, Fragebogen zum erinnerten elterlichen Erziehungsverhalten (J. Schumacher, M. Eisemann, & E. Brähler, ), of the Egna Minnen Befräffande Uppfostran (Own Memories of Parental Rearing Experiences in Childhood; C. Perris, L. Jacobsson, H. Lindstrom, L. von Knorring, & H. Perris, ). Adolescents rated distressed infants as more distressed than did the adults. Furthermore, female participants rated the very distressed infants as more distressed than did male participants. These data suggest that adolescents, in general, are not impaired in recognizing infant emotional states, as compared to adults. Thus, we suggest that more extreme ratings of infant signals of discomfort together with immature sociocognitive regulation processes during adolescence might contribute to reduced sensitivity observed in adolescent mothers. © 2017 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  17. Prevention of invasive Cronobacter infections in young infants fed powdered infant formulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Janine

    2012-11-01

    Invasive Cronobacter infection is rare, devastating, and epidemiologically/microbiologically linked to powdered infant formulas (PIFs). In 2002-2004, the US Food and Drug Administration advised health care professionals to minimize PIF and powdered human milk fortifier (HMF)'s preparation, feeding, and storage times and avoid feeding them to hospitalized premature or immunocompromised neonates. Labels for PIF used at home imply PIF is safe for healthy, term infants if label instructions are followed. 1) Medical, public health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Food and Drug Administration, and World Health Organization records, publications, and personal communications were used to compare 68 (1958-2003) and 30 (2004-2010) cases of invasive Cronobacter disease in children without underlying disorders. 2) The costs of PIFs and ready-to-feed formulas (RTFs) were compared. Ninety-nine percent (95/96) of all infected infants were ounces of milk-based RTF cost $0.84 more than milk-based PIF; 24 ounces of soy-based RTF cost $0.24 less than soy-based PIF. Cronobacter can infect healthy, term (not just hospitalized preterm) young infants. Invasive Cronobacter infection is extremely unusual in infants not fed PIF/HMF. RTFs are commercially sterile, require minimal preparation, and are competitively priced. The exclusive use of BM and/or RTF for infants <2 months old should be encouraged.

  18. A Randomized Controlled Study of a Fully Liquid DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T Hexavalent Vaccine for Primary and Booster Vaccinations of Healthy Infants and Toddlers in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Pío; Arguedas Mohs, Adriano; Abdelnour Vásquez, Arturo; Consuelo-Miranda, Maria; Feroldi, Emmanuel; Noriega, Fernando; Jordanov, Emilia; B Chir, Siham; Zambrano, Betzana

    2017-11-01

    Hexavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus-hepatitis B-Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T)-containing vaccines are increasingly the standard of care. This study evaluated the primary series (NCT01177722) and booster (NCT01444781) of a fully liquid DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine in Latin America. Infants (N = 1375) received hepatitis B vaccine at birth and were randomized to one of 3 batches of the investigational DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T or licensed control vaccine (DTaP-HB-IPV//PRP-T) at 2-4 to 6 months of age, coadministered with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) (2-4-6 months) and rotavirus vaccine (2-4 months). A booster of either DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T or control was given at 12-24 months, coadministered with PCV7. Immunogenicity was assessed by validated assays and safety from parental reports. Primary series seroprotection and vaccine response rates were equivalent for DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T batches. For pooled batches, noninferiority to the control vaccine was demonstrated for each antigen. There were no descriptive differences in antibody persistence or booster response between DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T and the control. The booster responses to either vaccine following DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T primary series or to DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T following a control vaccine primary series were similar. The anti-aP component (filamentous hemagglutinin [FHA] and pertussis toxin [PT]) vaccine response and anti-Haemophilus influenzae type b (PRP) series seroprotection (≥0.15 µg/mL) rates were ≥73.0% after 2 primary series doses. Antipyretics had no effect on the immune response, and an extra (oral) polio vaccination had no effect on the antipolio booster response. Responses to PCV7 and rotavirus vaccine were similar for each coadministration. There were no safety concerns observed with any vaccine. These results confirm the suitability of the fully liquid DTaP-IPV-HB-PRP-T vaccine for primary and booster vaccination of infants.

  19. Sudden unexpected death in children with a previously diagnosed cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, Florens N.; Cohen, Joeri; Blom, Nico A.; Delhaas, Tammo; Helbing, Wim A.; Lam, Jan; Sobotka-Plojhar, Marta A.; Temmerman, Arno M.; Sreeram, Narayanswani

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is known that children with previously diagnosed heart defects die suddenly. The causes of death are often unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify all infants and children within the Netherlands with previously diagnosed heart disease who had a sudden unexpected death

  20. Sudden unexpected death in children with a previously diagnosed cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, F.N.; Cohen, Joeri; Blom, N.A.; Delhaas, T.; Helbing, W.A.; Lam, J.; Sobotka-Plojhar, M.A.; Temmerman, Arno M.; Sreeram, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is known that children with previously diagnosed heart defects die suddenly. The causes of death are often unknown. Objective: The aim of the study was to identify all infants and children within the Netherlands with previously diagnosed heart disease who had a sudden unexpected death

  1. Risk factors of infant anemia in the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Michio; Kusakawa, Isao; Ohde, Sachiko; Yamanaka, Michiko; Yoda, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Infants are at particular risk of iron-deficiency anemia. We investigated changes in the blood count of the mother and infant as well as the relationship between them and the relationship between infant nutrition method and infant anemia. This retrospective cohort study included healthy neonates born between August 2011 and July 2014 at St Luke's International Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. Data from maternal blood samples obtained during late pregnancy and those of infants obtained at birth and at the age of 3, 6, and 9 months were analyzed. Using multivariate logistic regression, we investigated nutrition methods, maternal anemia, and other clinically relevant parameters that were potential risk factors for infant anemia. In total, data for 3472 infants and their mothers were analyzed. Nutrition method was the most significant risk factor for infant anemia, with risk of future anemia decreasing in the following order: exclusive breast-feeding, partial breast-feeding, and formula feeding. Furthermore, low umbilical cord blood hemoglobin led to a tendency toward anemia in the child. Infant nutrition method was the most significant factor related to anemia in late infancy. Infants with low umbilical cord blood hemoglobin are more likely to develop anemia in late infancy. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Subcutaneous Emphysema in a Healthy Child: An Unusual Clue for the Diagnosis of Foreign Body Aspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seied Mohsen Emami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM and subcutaneous emphysema are rare findings in children. Various etiologies have been reported for SPM, such as foreign body aspiration in infants, especially in those aged less than three years. In addition to the complications associated with foreign body aspiration, SPM may also become a life-threatening condition if left untreated. In the present report, we discussed a case of subcutaneous emphysema, pneumothorax, and pneumomediastinum in a 13-month-old infant previously treated for pneumonia.Case report: The infant was initially presented with subcutaneous emphysema of the neck, without respiratory distress following pneumonia. In the chest radiography, mediastinal shift and possible pneumothorax were reported, and a chest tube was inserted as the respiratory condition deteriorated. Emergency bronchoscopy showed a foreign body logged in the left respiratory tract, which was removed. Three days later, the chest tube was detached, and the patient was discharged in healthy conditions within the next two days.Conclusion: Pediatricians constantly need to consider the risk of foreign body aspiration, particularly in the presence of respiratory complications, such as SPM, even in the infants with an unreliable history of foreign body aspiration

  3. Osteopenia - premature infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal rickets; Brittle bones - premature infants; Weak bones - premature infants; Osteopenia of prematurity ... AW, Diamond FB. Disorders of mineral homeostasis in children and adolescents. In: Sperling MA ed. Pediatric Endocrinology . ...

  4. Mechanical ventilator - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventilator - infants; Respirator - infants ... WHY IS A MECHANICAL VENTILATOR USED? A ventilator is used to provide breathing support for ill or immature babies. Sick or premature babies are often ...

  5. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  6. High blood pressure - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... blood vessel of the kidney) In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  7. Caudal ropivacaine in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing; Ilett, K F; Reid, C

    2001-01-01

    Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months.......Ropivacaine is a new long-acting amino-amide local anesthetic. However, there are no data on its use in infants. In the current study, the authors investigated the pharmacokinetics of caudal ropivacaine in 30 infants younger than 12 months....

  8. Mothers' experiences of skin-to-skin care of healthy full-term newborns--a phenomenology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbye, Rebecka; Calais, Elisabet; Berg, Marie

    2011-08-01

    Previous reports have shown that skin-to-skin contact immediately after birth is the optimal form of care for a full-term, healthy infant and its mother. As this is rarely researched the aim of this study was to explore experiences of skin-to-skin care in healthy mothers of healthy, full-term infants in the first days after birth. Using a lifeworld phenomenological approach, 20 women who had childbirth in hospital and were practising skin-to-skin care were interviewed 1-2 weeks after birth. Analysis of all interview texts was directed towards discovering qualitative meanings through a process of identifying meaning units. These were then clustered and analysed with the aim of describing themes of meaning and the essence of the phenomenon. The mothers wanted to give their newborn child the best possible care and the skin-to-skin care started a positive spiral. A mutual interaction developed which acted as a generator releasing energy to the mother who wanted to continue the practice which in terms increased mother-infant affinity. Happiness, peace and satisfaction were expressed by the newborns; also a child who was crying or troublesome exhibited a positive response to skin-to-skin care. The study provides insight and knowledge which should guide attitudes and promote practices of this simple healthcare intervention; skin-to-skin contact care to healthy infants born at term. Healthcare professionals should support affinity between a mother and her newborn through facilitation and the provision of information about its benefits. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Infant crying and abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; Wal, M.F.V.D.; Brugman, E.; Sing, R.A.H.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    2004-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect are important causes of child morbidity and death. We assessed potentially detrimental parental actions induced by infant crying in 3259 infants aged 1-6 months, in the Netherlands. In infants aged 6 months, 5·6% (95% CI 4·2-7·0) of parents reported having smothered, slapped,

  10. Factors affecting infant and child mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, A L; Suchindran, C M

    1985-10-01

    This paper examines the determinants of infant and child mortality variations in Jordan, Yemen, Egypt, and Tunisia using data from WFS surveys. The analysis considers biological correlates of mortality--mother's age, birth order, birth interval, and previous infant loss--and several social factors--mother's and father's education, mother's residence, father's occupation, and mother's work experience since marriage. The estimates for the 4 countries show large variations in the mortality rates and an expected pattern of declining infant and child mortality during the period of 20 years prior to the survey. Further, the proportionate decline in child mortality in each country was generally greater than the proportionate decline in infant mortality. A persistent pattern of higher child mortality for females than for males is found, suggesting preferential care and treatment of male offspring. The higher mortality risk is found for infants born to very young and very old mothers, with short previous birth intervals, of higher birth orders, and where the previous infant had died. Among the socioeconomic characteristics, the education of the mother and rural-urban residence are found to affect infant survival. In childhood, among the demographic factors, only birth interval shows a significant effect on mortality. The risk of child mortality decreases considerably with the increase in the birth interval. The analysis of the effect of breastfeeding on mortality, although based on limited information, clearly shows the beneficial effect of breastfeeding on the infant's survival, especially during the early months of life. For all countries, the mortality rate for the non-breastfeeders is substantially higher than for the breastfeeders even when the effect of the other covariates is controlled.

  11. Healthy Environments

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This issue of Early Childhood in Focus draws attention to some key global challenges in providing healthy environments for young children. Section 1 recognises that multisectoral policy responses are needed to ensure adequate housing and improved water and sanitation, as well as recreational spaces. For young children, physical spaces are closely intertwined with emotional security and feelings of well-being. Section 2 explores the opportunities and challenges of living in urban environments....

  12. Solving Sleep Behavior Disorders in Infants and Toddlers: The Munich Research and Intervention Program for Fussy Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papousek, Mechthild

    2009-01-01

    Sleep behavior disorders do not only affect infants' well-being, they also challenge the parents' physical and emotional resources, promote risks for the growing parent-infant relationships, and burden the parents' co-parenting relationship. Sleep-onset and night waking problems are widely spread among otherwise healthy infants, and they tend to…

  13. Opportunities in Public Policy to Support Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health: The Role of Psychologists and Policymakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Florence; Mann, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    Infant and early childhood mental health practices can be supported by policies and professional standards of care that foster the healthy development of young children. Policies that support infants and toddlers include those that strengthen their families to provide a family environment that promotes mental wellness. Policy issues for infants,…

  14. The effects of giving pacifiers to premature infants and making them listen to lullabies on their transition period for total oral feeding and sucking success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Aynur; Arikan, Duygu

    2012-03-01

    This research aimed to assess the effect of giving pacifiers to premature infants and making them listen to lullabies on the transition period to total oral feeding, their sucking success and their vital signs (peak heart rate, respiration rate and oxygen saturation). It is very important that preterm infants start oral feeding as soon as possible to survive and get healthy quickly. Previous studies have shown that by using some external stimuli, premature babies can move to oral feeding at an earlier period than 34th gestational week, have increased daily weight gain and be discharged from hospital earlier. In this quasi-experimental and prospective study, 90 premature infants were studied with 30 premature infants allocated to each of pacifier, lullaby and control groups. The research was conducted at a neonatal intensive care clinic and premature unit of a university hospital in the east of Turkey between December 2007-January 2009. The data were collected through demographic information form for premature infants, the LATCH Breastfeeding Charting System and patient monitoring. We found that the group who proceeded to the oral feeding in the shortest period was the pacifier group (p 0·05). We also found that the highest sucking success was achieved by infants in the pacifier group (p 0·05). These results demonstrate that giving pacifiers to premature infants and making them listen to lullabies has a positive effect on their transition period to oral feeding, their sucking success and vital signs (peak heart rate and oxygen saturation). Neonatal intensive care nurses can accelerate premature infants' transition to oral feeding and develop their sucking success by using the methods of giving them pacifiers and making them listen to lullabies during gavage feeding. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Emotional Processing of Infants Displays in Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardi, Valentina; Corfield, Freya; Leppanen, Jenni; Rhind, Charlotte; Deriziotis, Stephanie; Hadjimichalis, Alexandra; Hibbs, Rebecca; Micali, Nadia; Treasure, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study is to examine emotional processing of infant displays in people with Eating Disorders (EDs). Background Social and emotional factors are implicated as causal and maintaining factors in EDs. Difficulties in emotional regulation have been mainly studied in relation to adult interactions, with less interest given to interactions with infants. Method A sample of 138 women were recruited, of which 49 suffered from Anorexia Nervosa (AN), 16 from Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and 73 were healthy controls (HCs). Attentional responses to happy and sad infant faces were tested with the visual probe detection task. Emotional identification of, and reactivity to, infant displays were measured using self-report measures. Facial expressions to video clips depicting sad, happy and frustrated infants were also recorded. Results No significant differences between groups were observed in the attentional response to infant photographs. However, there was a trend for patients to disengage from happy faces. People with EDs also reported lower positive ratings of happy infant displays and greater subjective negative reactions to sad infants. Finally, patients showed a significantly lower production of facial expressions, especially in response to the happy infant video clip. Insecure attachment was negatively correlated with positive facial expressions displayed in response to the happy infant and positively correlated with the intensity of negative emotions experienced in response to the sad infant video clip. Conclusion People with EDs do not have marked abnormalities in their attentional processing of infant emotional faces. However, they do have a reduction in facial affect particularly in response to happy infants. Also, they report greater negative reactions to sadness, and rate positive emotions less intensively than HCs. This pattern of emotional responsivity suggests abnormalities in social reward sensitivity and might indicate new treatment targets. PMID

  16. Emotional stress in pregnancy predicts human infant reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhler, Eva; Parzer, Peter; Brunner, Romuald; Wiebel, Angelika; Resch, Franz

    2006-11-01

    Infant distress to novelty at 4 months of life has previously been identified as an important predictor of longer term emotional development in childhood and adolescence. To investigate the relationship between prenatal stress and infant reactivity to unfamiliar visual, auditory and olfactory stimuli. Maternal emotional stress, life events and medical adversities during pregnancy and maternal personality characteristics were assessed by interview, questionnaire and patient charts at 2 weeks postnatal age. Postnatal maternal psychopathology was assessed at 2 weeks and 4 months postnatal age. Infant outcome was examined 4 months postnatally. 102 mother-infant pairs were recruited in local obstetric units, complete datasets were available for 96 mother-infant-pairs. Infant reactivity to unfamiliar stimuli was assessed when the infants were 4 months postnatal age. Maternal prenatal emotional stress was significantly associated with infant affective reactivity to novelty. Maternal postnatal psychopathology did not have an influence on affective infant reactivity. These data provide evidence for an impact of maternal emotional stress in pregnancy on early infant distress to novel stimuli, a behavioral trait whose stability throughout childhood and adolescence has previously been demonstrated.

  17. The Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities national program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Sarah L; Bussel, Jamie B

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announced a bold and unprecedented commitment of $500 million to reverse the epidemic of childhood obesity by 2015, especially in communities at greatest risk based on income, race, ethnicity, and geographic location. To support this work, the foundation launched an array of complementary initiatives aimed at building the evidence base, testing advocacy approaches, and supporting on-the-ground action to reverse the childhood obesity epidemic. Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities (HKHC), a 5-year $33.4 million national program, was one of the foundation's earliest such investments. Building on previous successes, HKHC was designed to address the policies, systems, and environments that make it easier for low-income children and their families to engage in physical activity and play and to access healthy food in their communities. As part of its strategy, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation funded 50 multidisciplinary partnerships across the country, with a special focus on 15 southern states where health disparities were most significant. The selection of Active Living By Design to lead the HKHC National Program Office and Transtria, LLC, to lead the evaluation leveraged these organizations' experience in addressing the systemic issues that contribute to physical inactivity and unhealthy eating, using a broader healthy community lens. Key elements of HKHC included funding, ongoing technical assistance and consultation, a peer learning network, and participatory evaluation. The successes of the HKHC grant program are well documented in this journal as well as through case studies and case reports, spotlights, leadership profiles, and other products available at www.healthykidshealthycommunities.org and http://www.transtria.com/hkhc.php.

  18. The occurrence of antimicrobial resistance and class 1 integrons among commensal Escherichia coli isolates from infants and elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kõljalg Siiri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of our study was to compare the presence of the intI1 gene and its associations with the antibiotic resistance of commensal Escherichia coli strains in children with/without previous antibiotic treatments and elderly hospitalized/healthy individuals. Methods One-hundred-and-fifteen intestinal E. coli strains were analyzed: 30 strains from 10 antibiotic-naive infants; 27 from 9 antibiotic-treated outpatient infants; 30 from 9 healthy elderly volunteers; and 28 from 9 hospitalized elderly patients. The MIC values of ampicillin, cefuroxime, cefotaxime, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and sulfamethoxazole were measured by E-test and IntI1 was detected by PCR. Results Out of the 115 strains, 56 (49% carried class 1 integron genes. Comparing persons without medical interventions, we found in antibiotic-naive children a significantly higher frequency of integron-bearing strains and MIC values than in healthy elderly persons (53% versus 17%; p Conclusion The prevalence of integrons in commensal E. coli strains in persons without previous medical intervention depended on age. The resistance of integron-carrying and non-carrying strains is more dependent on influencing factors (hospitalization and antibiotic administration in particular groups than merely the presence or absence of integrons.

  19. The ProPrems trial: investigating the effects of probiotics on late onset sepsis in very preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opie Gillian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late onset sepsis is a frequent complication of prematurity associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The commensal bacteria of the gastrointestinal tract play a key role in the development of healthy immune responses. Healthy term infants acquire these commensal organisms rapidly after birth. However, colonisation in preterm infants is adversely affected by delivery mode, antibiotic treatment and the intensive care environment. Altered microbiota composition may lead to increased colonisation with pathogenic bacteria, poor immune development and susceptibility to sepsis in the preterm infant. Probiotics are live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer health benefits on the host. Amongst numerous bacteriocidal and nutritional roles, they may also favourably modulate host immune responses in local and remote tissues. Meta-analyses of probiotic supplementation in preterm infants report a reduction in mortality and necrotising enterocolitis. Studies with sepsis as an outcome have reported mixed results to date. Allergic diseases are increasing in incidence in "westernised" countries. There is evidence that probiotics may reduce the incidence of these diseases by altering the intestinal microbiota to influence immune function. Methods/Design This is a multi-centre, randomised, double blinded, placebo controlled trial investigating supplementing preterm infants born at Bifidobacterium infantis, Streptococcus thermophilus and Bifidobacterium lactis. A total of 1,100 subjects are being recruited in Australia and New Zealand. Infants commence the allocated intervention from soon after the start of feeds until discharge home or term corrected age. The primary outcome is the incidence of at least one episode of definite (blood culture positive late onset sepsis before 40 weeks corrected age or discharge home. Secondary outcomes include: Necrotising enterocolitis, mortality, antibiotic usage, time to

  20. Infant obesity: are we ready to make this diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, David P; Sarpong, Kwabena; Jordan, Lindsay; Ray, Laura A; Jain, Sunil

    2010-07-01

    To assess the prevalence, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment of infant obesity (weight-for-length) in a pediatric practice. This was a retrospective nested case-control design. The investigators reviewed and abstracted data from the records of the mothers (while pregnant) and their offspring. The prevalence of infant obesity was 16%. Children who were obese at age 24 months were highly likely to have been obese at age 6 months (odds ratio=13.3, 95% CI=4.50-39.53). Mothers of obese infants gained more weight during pregnancy (+6.9 kg, Pmothers of healthy weight infants. Obese infants were more likely to have been large for gestational age (Odds ratio=2.81, 95% CI=1.27-6.22). However, only 14% and 23% of obese infants aged 6 and 24 months were diagnosed with obesity. Infant obesity was common in our practice. Infant obesity strongly predicted obesity at age 24 months. Risk factors included excessive intrapartum weight gain or being born large for gestational age. Clinicians diagnosed obesity in only a minority of children. Primary care providers need to diagnose obesity in infants and work to develop effective interventions. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Do Infants Show Social Preferences for People Differing in Race?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzler, Katherine D.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2011-01-01

    Do infants develop meaningful social preferences among novel individuals based on their social group membership? If so, do these social preferences depend on familiarity on any dimension, or on a more specific focus on particular kinds of categorical information? The present experiments use methods that have previously demonstrated infants' social…

  2. Infant Preferences for Attractive Faces: Rudiments of a Stereotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Judith H.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Two studies, one with two- to three-month-olds and one with six- to eight-month-olds, examined infant preferences for attractive faces. A visual preference technique was used. Infants were shown slides of faces of adult women previously rated for attractiveness. When shown pairs of attractive and unattractive faces, older and younger infants…

  3. Using the Alberta Infant Motor Scale to early identify very low-birth-weight infants with cystic periventricular leukomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Yu; Wang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Shan-Tair; Huang, Chao-Ching

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS) is able to identify very low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants with cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) as early as 6 months of corrected age. Longitudinal follow-up AIMS assessments were done at 6, 12, and 18 months old for 35 VLBW infants with cystic PVL (cPVL(+)), 70 VLBW infants without cystic PVL (cPVL(-)), and 76 term infants (healthy controls: HC). Corrected age was used for the preterm infants. The cPVL(+) group had significantly lower prone, supine and sitting subscales at age 6, 12, and 18 months than the cPVL(-) group (all p<0.05). The cPVL(-) group showed significantly lower supine, prone, sitting, and standing subscales than the HC group only at age 6 months. At age 6 months, the areas under the receiver operator curve used to discriminate the cPVL(+) infants from cPVL(-) infants were 0.82±0.04 for prone, 0.93±0.02 for supine, 0.83±0.05 for sitting, and 0.62±0.07 for standing. The AIMS may help early identify VLBW infants with cystic PVL at age 6 months old. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Physiologic brain dysmaturity in late preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Mark S.; Johnson, Mark W.; Ludington, Susan M.; Loparo, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Neonatal EEG sleep was used to determine if differences are expressed between healthy late preterm and full term groups. Twenty-seven 24-channel multi-hour studies were recorded at similar post–menstrual ages (PMA) and analyzed for eight asymptomatic late preterm infants (LPT) compared with nineteen healthy full term (FT) infants as a preliminary analysis, followed by a comparison of a subset of 8 FT infants, matched for gender, race, and PMA. Z scores were performed on data sets from each group pair comparing each of seven EEG/Sleep measures for entire recordings, active (AS) and quiet sleep (QS) segments and artifact-free intervals. Six of seven measures showed differences between the 8 LPT and 8 matched FT cohort pair comparisons of >0.3; REMs, arousals during QS, spectral correlations between homologous centro-temporal regions during QS, spectral beta/alpha power ratios during AS and QS, a spectral measure of respiratory regularity during QS, and sleep cycle length. Quantitative neurophysiologic analyses define differences in brain maturation between LPT and FT infants at similar PMA. Altered EEG/Sleep behaviors in the LPT are biomarkers of developmental neuroplasticity involving interconnected neuronal networks adapting to conditions of prematurity for this largest segment of the preterm neonatal population. PMID:21796018

  5. Newborn infant skin: physiology, development, and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Marty O; Adam, Ralf; Brink, Susanna; Odio, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Infant skin is critical to the newborn child's transition from the womb environment to the journey to self-sufficiency. This review provides an integrative perspective on the skin development in full term and premature infants. There is a particular focus on the role of vernix caseosa and on the implications of skin development for epidermal penetration of exogenous compounds. Healthy full-term newborn skin is well-developed and functional at birth, with a thick epidermis and well-formed stratum corneum (SC) layers. Transepidermal water loss is very low at birth, equal to, or lower than adults, indicating a highly effective skin barrier. Vernix facilitates SC development in full-term infants through a variety of mechanisms including physical protection from amniotic fluid and enzymes, antimicrobial effects, skin surface pH lowering, provision of lipids, and hydration. Premature infants, particularly those of very low birth weight, have a poor skin barrier with few cornified layers and deficient dermal proteins. They are at increased risk for skin damage, increased permeability to exogenous agents and infection. The SC barrier develops rapidly after birth but complete maturation requires weeks to months. The best methods for caring for infant skin, particularly in the diaper region, are described and related to these developmental changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. COMMERCIAL BABY PORRIDGES IN NUTRITION OF INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the issue of the most important product among additional food for infants — baby porridges. It includes historical data on usage of various cereal crops in human nutrition. A special significance of porridges in culture of food and traditions of Russian population is highlighted. The authors give information about nutritional value and chemical composition of different cereals — buckwheat, rice, pearl-barley, millet, oats etc. A special attention is given to differences in concentrations of nutrients and micronutrients manufactured by different ways from the same kind of cereal. The necessity to feed infants with commercial baby porridges is based in the article. There are also represented characteristics of various commercial porridges for nutrition of infants: hypoallergenic, glutenfree and containing gluten, enriched with pre- and probiotics. The article also contains data on nutritional value of milk and milk-free porridges. The authors raised a discussion on possibility and standards of usage of different additional components, such as sugar, maltodextrin, honey, vanillin, vegetable oils in production of infant porridges. The selection of certain type of porridges as additional food for healthy and infants with different diseases and digestive disorders is based.

  7. Stress Pattern Preference in Spanish-Learning Infants: The Role of Syllable Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Ferran; Bosch, Laura

    2010-01-01

    As a result of exposure, infants acquire biases that conform to the rhythmic properties of their native language. Previous lexical stress preference studies have shown that English- and German-, but not French-learning infants, show a bias toward trochaic words. The present study explores Spanish-learning infants' lexical stress preferential…

  8. Beyond the Distributional Input? A Developmental Investigation of Asymmetry in Infants' Categorization of Cats and Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Stephanie D.; Younger, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments are reported using a visual familiarization categorization procedure. In both experiments, infants were familiarized with sets of stimuli previously shown to contain asymmetric feature distributions that support an asymmetry in young infants' categorization of cats and dogs (i.e. infants' cat category excludes dogs but their dog…

  9. Music therapy with hospitalized infants-the art and science of communicative musicality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloch, Stephen; Shoemark, Helen; Črnčec, Rudi; Newnham, Carol; Paul, Campbell; Prior, Margot; Coward, Sean; Burnham, Denis

    2012-07-01

    Infants seek contingent, companionable interactions with others. Infants in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), while receiving care that optimizes their chances of survival, often do not have the kind of interactions that are optimal for their social development. Live music therapy (MT) with infants is an intervention that aims for contingent, social interaction between therapist and infant. This study, with a limited numbers of infants, examined the effectiveness of an MT intervention in the NICU at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne. Two groups of late pre-term and full-term infants were recruited to the study; one was given MT and the other was not. A healthy group of infants not given MT served as an additional control. The effect of MT was indexed using two measures reflecting infant social engagement: the Neurobehavioral Assessment of the Preterm Infant (NAPI) and the Alarm Distress Baby Scale (ADBB). Results suggest that the MT intervention used at The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne supports infants' neurobehavioral development. In particular, hospitalized infants who received MT were better able to maintain self-regulation during social interaction with an adult, were less irritable and cried less, and were more positive in their response to adult handling, when compared with infants who did not receive the intervention. These are important prerequisites for social interaction and development. Further and larger scale research using MT with this population is indicated. Copyright © 2012 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  10. FOOD ALLERGY IN INFANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.I. Balabolkin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the etiology, growth mechanisms, clinical implications, diagnostics and treatment of the infant food allergy. The author highlights the status of the allergy to the proteins of cow milk within this age group of children. Alongside the article describes the modern approaches to the diet therapy of the infants with the allergy to the proteins of cow milk.Key words: infant, food allergy, allergy to the proteins of cow milk, diet therapy.

  11. The Impact of Maternal Obesity and Excessive Gestational Weight Gain on Maternal and Infant Outcomes in Maine: Analysis of Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System Results from 2000 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Baugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to understand the relationships between prepregnancy obesity and excessive gestational weight gain (GWG and adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system (PRAMS data from Maine for 2000–2010 were used to determine associations between demographic, socioeconomic, and health behavioral variables and maternal and infant outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed on the independent variables of age, race, smoking, previous live births, marital status, education, BMI, income, rurality, alcohol use, and GWG. Dependent variables included maternal hypertension, premature birth, birth weight, infant admission to the intensive care unit (ICU, and length of hospital stay of the infant. Excessive prepregnancy BMI and excessive GWG independently predicted maternal hypertension. A high prepregnancy BMI increased the risk of the infant being born prematurely, having a longer hospital stay, and having an excessive birth weight. Excessive GWG predicted a longer infant hospital stay and excessive birth weight. A low pregnancy BMI and a lower than recommended GWG were also associated with poor outcomes: prematurity, low birth weight, and an increased risk of the infant admitted to ICU. These findings support the importance of preconception care that promotes achievement of a healthy weight to enhance optimal reproductive outcomes.

  12. The effects of parental sensitivity and involvement in caregiving on mother-infant and father-infant attachment in a Portuguese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Marina; Faria, Anabela; Beeghly, Marjorie; Lopes-dos-Santos, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    In the present longitudinal study, we investigated attachment quality in Portuguese mother-infant and in father-infant dyads, and evaluated whether attachment quality was related to parental sensitivity during parent-infant social interaction or to the amount of time each parent spent with the infant during play and in routine caregiving activities (e.g., feeding, bathing, play). The sample consisted of 82 healthy full-term infants (30 girls, 53 boys, 48 first born), and their mothers and fathers from mostly middle-class households. To assess parental sensitivity, mothers and fathers were independently observed during free play interactions with their infants when infants were 9 and 15 months old. The videotaped interactions were scored by masked coders using the Crittenden's CARE-Index. When infants were 12 and 18 months old, mother-infant and father-infant dyads were videotaped during an adaptation of Ainsworth's Strange Situation. Parents also described their level of involvement in infant caregiving activities using a Portuguese version of the McBride and Mills Parent Responsibility Scale. Mothers were rated as being more sensitive than fathers during parent-infant free play at both 9 and 15 months. There also was a higher prevalence of secure attachment in mother-infant versus father-infant dyads at both 12 and 18 months. Attachment security was predicted by the amount of time mothers and fathers were involved in caregiving and play with the infant, and with parents' behavior during parent-infant free play. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Language preference in monolingual and bilingual infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valji, Ayasha; Polka, Linda

    2004-05-01

    Previous research shows that infants being raised in single-language families have some basic language discrimination abilities at birth, that these skills improve over the first 6 months of life, and that infants are attending to the rhythmic properties of language to perform these skills. Research has also revealed that newborns and older babies from monolingual families prefer listening to their native language over an unfamiliar language. Data on language discrimination and preference in bilingual infants is very limited but is necessary to determine if the patterns and rate of bilingual language development parallel those of monolingual development, or if exposure to more than one language modifies developmental patterns. The present study addresses this issue by comparing language preference in monolingual English, monolingual French, and bilingual English-French infants between 3 and 10 months of age. Infant preference to listen to passages in three rhythmically different languages (English, French, Japanese) was assessed using a visual fixation procedure. Passages were produced by three female native speakers of each language. Findings will show how native language preference is affected by age and language experience in infants who experience monolingual and bilingual language exposure.

  14. Genital Problems in Infants (Female)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea Ear Problems Elimination Problems Elimination Problems in Infants and Children Eye Problems Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants ...

  15. Assessment of cardiorespiratory stability using the infant car seat challenge before discharge in preterm infants (<37 weeks' gestational age).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvey, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Preterm infants younger than 37 weeks corrected gestational age are at increased risk for abnormal control of respiration. The infant car seat challenge has been used as a screening tool to ensure cardiorespiratory stability before discharging preterm infants from many hospitals in Canada. While it is clear that infants placed in a car seat are more likely to experience oxygen desaturation and/or bradycardia than when they are supine, neither positioning predicts an adverse neurodevelopmental outcome or mortality post-discharge. A review of the literature yielded insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of the infant car seat challenge as part of discharge planning for preterm infants. This finding has prompted a change in recommendation from a previous Canadian Paediatric Society position statement published in 2000.

  16. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2011-01-01

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  17. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2012-01-31

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  18. Healthy Water Healthy People Field Monitoring Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project WET Foundation, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This 100-page manual serves as a technical reference for the "Healthy Water, Healthy People Water Quality Educators Guide" and the "Healthy Water Healthy People Testing Kits". Yielding in-depth information about ten water quality parameters, it answers questions about water quality testing using technical overviews, data interpretation guidelines,…

  19. Human milk H2O2 content: does it benefit preterm infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslak, Monika; Ferreira, Cristina H F; Shifrin, Yulia; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2018-03-01

    BackgroundHuman milk has a high content of the antimicrobial compound hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). As opposed to healthy full-term infants, preterm neonates are fed previously expressed and stored maternal milk. These practices may favor H 2 O 2 decomposition, thus limiting its potential benefit to preterm infants. The goal of this study was to evaluate the factors responsible for H 2 O 2 generation and degradation in breastmilk.MethodsHuman donors' and rats' milk, along with rat mammary tissue were evaluated. The role of oxytocin and xanthine oxidase on H 2 O 2 generation, its pH-dependent stability, as well as its degradation via lactoperoxidase and catalase was measured in milk.ResultsBreast tissue xanthine oxidase is responsible for the H 2 O 2 generation and its milk content is dependent on oxytocin stimulation. Stability of the human milk H 2 O 2 content is pH-dependent and greatest in the acidic range. Complete H 2 O 2 degradation occurs when human milk is maintained, longer than 10 min, at room temperature and this process is suppressed by lactoperoxidase and catalase inhibition.ConclusionFresh breastmilk H 2 O 2 content is labile and quickly degrades at room temperature. Further investigation on breastmilk handling techniques to preserve its H 2 O 2 content, when gavage-fed to preterm infants is warranted.

  20. Surveillance of extreme hyperbilirubinaemia in Denmark. A method to identify the newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, J.V.; Petersen, Jes Reinholdt; Ebbesen, F.

    2008-01-01

    bilirubin encephalopathy; one infant had advanced-phase symptoms. Four infants received an exchange transfusion. ABO blood group incompatibility was present in 52 infants. Thirty-seven infants were of non-Caucasian descent. CONCLUSION: A method to obtain the national epidemiological data is presented....... The observed incidence of extreme hyperbilirubinaemia is higher than previously reported in Denmark. This is mainly due to a very sensitive method of identifying the study group Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...

  1. Infants' Differential Social Responses to Attractive and Unattractive Faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Judith H.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Two studies examined social responses to attractive and unattractive faces on the part of 123 infants of 12 months. Results suggest that visual and behavioral preferences for attractiveness are exhibited much earlier in life than was previously thought. (RH)

  2. Acupuncture reduces crying in infants with infantile colic: a randomised, controlled, blind clinical study

    OpenAIRE

    Landgren, Kajsa; Kvorning, Nina; Hallstr?m, Inger

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether acupuncture reduces the duration and intensity of crying in infants with colic. Patients and methods 90 otherwise healthy infants, 2?8 weeks old, with infantile colic were randomised in this controlled blind study. 81 completed a structured programme consisting of six visits during 3 weeks to an acupuncture clinic in Sweden. Parents blinded to the allocation of their children met a blinded nurse. The infant was subsequently given to another nurse in a separate...

  3. Increased Cytomegalovirus Secretion and Risks of Infant Infection by Breastfeeding Duration From Maternal Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Compared to Negative Mothers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musonda, Kunda G; Nyonda, Mary; Filteau, Suzanne; Kasonka, Lackson; Monze, Mwaka; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-06-01

    Breastfeeding imparts beneficial immune protection and nutrition to infants for healthy growth, but it is also a route for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. In previous studies, we showed that HCMV adversely affects infant development in Africa, particularly with maternal HIV exposure. In this study, we analyzed infants risks for acquisition of HCMV infection from breastfeeding and compared HIV-positive and HIV-negative mothers. Two cohorts were studied in Zambia. (1) Two hundred sixty-one HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers were compared for HCMV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) loads and genotypes (glycoprotein gO) in milk from birth to 4 months postpartum. (2) Maternally HIV-exposed and HIV-unexposed infants were compared for HCMV infection risk factors. The second cohort of 460 infants, from a trial of micronutrient-fortified complementary-food to breastfeeding, were studied between 6 and 18 months of age. Human cytomegalovirus seroprevalence was assayed, and logistic regression was used to calculate risk factors for HCMV infection, including maternal HIV exposure and breastfeeding duration. Human cytomegalovirus was detected in breast milk from 3 days to 4 months postpartum, with significantly raised levels in HIV-positive women and independent of genotype. In infants, HCMV antibody seroprevalence was 83% by 18 months age. Longer breastfeeding duration increased infection risk in maternally HIV-unexposed (odds ratio [OR] = 2.69 for 18 months vs 6 months vs never; 95% CI, 3.71-111.70; P breastfeeding, which is common in Africa, increased risk of HCMV infection in infants. Both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women had extended milk HCMV secretion. Women who were HIV-positive secreted higher HCMV levels, and for longer duration, with their children at increased infection risk. Human cytomegalovirus control is required to maintain health benefits of breastfeeding. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press

  4. Infant hearing loss and connexin testing in a diverse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmenti, Lisa A; Martinez, Ariadna; Telatar, Milhan; Lai, Chih-Hung; Shapiro, Nina; Fox, Michelle; Warman, Berta; McCarra, Matthew; Crandall, Barbara; Sininger, Yvonne; Grody, Wayne W; Palmer, Christina G S

    2008-07-01

    Previous studies of connexin-related hearing loss have typically reported on mixed age groups or adults. To further address epidemiology and natural history of connexin-related hearing loss, we conducted a longitudinal study in an ethnically diverse cohort of infants and toddlers under 3 years of age. Our study compares infants with and without connexin-related hearing loss to examine differences in the prevalence of connexin and non-connexin-related hearing loss by ethnic origin, detection by newborn hearing screening, phenotype, neonatal risk factors, and family history. This is the first study to differentiate infants with and without connexin-related hearing loss. We enrolled 95 infants with hearing loss from whom both exons of Cx26 were sequenced and the Cx30 deletion was assayed. Demographic, family history, newborn hearing screening data, perinatal, and audiologic records were analyzed. Genetic testing identified biallelic Cx26/30 hearing loss-associated variants in 24.7% of infants with a significantly lower prevalence in Hispanic infants (9.1%). Eighty-two infants underwent newborn hearing screening; 12 infants passed, 3 had connexin-related hearing loss. No differences in newborn hearing screening pass rate, neonatal complications, or hearing loss severity were detected between infants with and without connexin-related hearing loss. Family history correlates with connexin-related hearing loss. Connexin-related hearing loss occurs in one quarter of infants in an ethnically diverse hearing loss population but with a lower prevalence in Hispanic infants. Not all infants with connexin-related hearing loss fail newborn hearing screening. Family history correlates significantly with connexin-related hearing loss. Genetic testing should not be deferred because of newborn complications. These results will have an impact on genetic testing for infant hearing loss.

  5. Antibody response to Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide conjugated to tetanus toxoid in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Gyhrs, A; Lausen, B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the antibody response to a Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide (HibCP) tetanus toxoid (TT) conjugate vaccine (HibCP-TT) in preterm infants. SUBJECTS: Thirty-five healthy preterm infants with gestational ages (GA) from 27 to 36 weeks and birth weights from...

  6. Kidney injury in infants and children with iron-deficiency anemia before and after iron treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Rasha H; Kandil, Shaimaa M; Zeid, Mayada S; Zaki, Maysaa E; Fouda, Ashraf E

    2017-10-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on renal tubular functions before and after iron treatment for infants and children with IDA. We measured urinary levels of two kidney injury markers: neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) and liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP). Thirty-six infants and children with IDA and 20 matched healthy controls were included. We assessed different laboratory parameters, estimated glomerular filtration rate, urinary levels of NGAL, and L-FABP. Urinary kidney injury markers were measured in IDA patients before and after 3 months of oral iron therapy. IDA patients had significantly higher urinary NGAL and L-FABP levels compared to their healthy controls. After 3 months of oral iron treatment, there was a significant improvement (decrease) in urinary NGAL and L-FABP in infants and children with IDA. Urinary markers returned to normal levels (healthy control levels) in children with IDA, but not for infants with IDA compared to their healthy controls. Subclinical kidney injury was found in infants and children with IDA. This injury was completely reversible in older children with IDA and partially reversible in infants with IDA after iron therapy. Higher urinary levels of kidney injury molecules in IDA infants after iron treatment are suggestive of more sensitivity of these infants to oxidative stress caused by iron therapy or may be due to the immaturity of the kidney and more damage caused by IDA which may require more time to recover.

  7. The amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex in infants is related to body position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Janneke L. M.; Bos, Arend F.; vd Hoeven, Johannes H.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) in healthy infants is modulated by changes in body position (prone vs. supine). The amplitude of the ATR was compared at postnatal day 1, months 2, 3 and 6, while infants were placed in prone and supine position. The ATR was

  8. Can we define an infant's need from the composition of human milk?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, Jose; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Boehm, Guenther

    Human milk is recommended as the optimal nutrient source for infants and is associated with several short- and long-term benefits for child health. When accepting that human milk is the optimal nutrition for healthy term infants, it should be possible to calculate the nutritional needs of these

  9. Corneal diameters in infants born in two hospitals in Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To measure the horizontal corneal diameters in infants at birth and compare with values reported in other studies. Design: A cross-sectional hospital based study. Subjects: All the healthy infants born within the period of one month in these hospitals were eligible for enrolment into the study. Horizontal corneal ...

  10. The Growth of Very-low-birth-weight Infants at 5 Years Old in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Wei Wang

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: The growth of VLBW infants was lower than that of healthy full-term infants through 5 years of age. The cognitive performance for VLBW children was also decreased compared to that of the control group, and there was an association between slower growth and decreased cognitive ability.

  11. PREBIOTICS IN INFANT FORMULAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract is different in breastfed infants and in children receiving standard infant formulas. While breast milk is rich in prebiotic oligosaccharides and can also contain some probiotics, standard infant formulas contain neither one thing nor the other. The formulation of an infant formula includes various prebiotic ingredients: galacto- and fructooligosaccharides, polydextrose and their combinations. There is evidence that the addition of prebiotics to baby food makes the microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract of infants receiving infant formulas more similar to the microbiota of breastfed children. Prebiotics alter the metabolic activity of the intestinal microflora (lower stool pH and increase the amount of short-chain fatty acids, have a bifidogenic effect and provide a stool consistency and bowel movement frequency that are similar to these parameters in breastfed infants. There is limited evidence that such changes in microbiota of the gastrointestinal tract may have some influence on the development of an infant's immune system. Adverse events are extremely rare in the application of prebiotics. 

  12. Stillbirth and Infant Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøhr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms behind these associations remain largely unknown. Although maternal obesity is associated with a wide range of complications in the mother and neonate that may impair fetal and infant survival, the increased risk of stillbirth and infant mortality is virtually unchanged when accounting...

  13. Breastfeeding Determinants in Healthy Term Newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo, Lorenzo; Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Consonni, Dario; Bettinelli, Maria Enrica; Agosti, Viola; Mangino, Giulia; Bezze, Elena Nicoletta; Mauri, Paola Agnese; Zanotta, Lidia; Roggero, Paola; Plevani, Laura; Bertoli, Donatella; Giannì, Maria Lorella; Mosca, Fabio

    2018-01-01

    Breastfeeding is the normative standard for infant feeding. Despite its established benefits, different factors can affect breastfeeding rates over time. The purpose of this study was to evaluate breastfeeding determinants in healthy term newborns during the first three months of life. A prospective, observational, single-center study was conducted in the nursery of Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico in Milan, Italy. The mother-baby dyads that were admitted to the Clini...

  14. Diet and Gender Influences on Processing and Discrimination of Speech Sounds in 3- and 6-Month-Old Infants: A Developmental ERP Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivik, R. T.; Andres, Aline; Badger, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Early post-natal nutrition influences later development, but there are no studies comparing brain function in healthy infants as a function of dietary intake even though the major infant diets differ significantly in nutrient composition. We studied brain responses (event-related potentials; ERPs) to speech sounds for infants who were fed either…

  15. Description of the Motor Development of 3-12 Month Old Infants with Down Syndrome: The Influence of the Postural Body Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudella, Eloisa; Pereira, Karina; Basso, Renata Pedrolongo; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to describe the rate of motor development in infants with Down syndrome in the age range of 3-12 months and identify the difficulties both in performance and acquiring motor skills in prone, supine, sitting and standing positions. Nineteen infants with Down syndrome and 25 healthy full term typical infants were…

  16. Early dyadic patterns of mother-infant interactions and outcomes of prematurity at 18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forcada-Guex, Margarita; Pierrehumbert, Blaise; Borghini, Ayala; Moessinger, Adrien; Muller-Nix, Carole

    2006-07-01

    subjects, 68% of the dyads are categorized as cooperative pattern dyads, 12% as controlling pattern dyads, and the 20% remaining as heterogeneous dyads. At 18 months, preterm infants of cooperative pattern dyads have similar outcomes as the term control infants. Preterm infants of controlling pattern dyads have significantly fewer positive outcomes as compared with preterm infants of cooperative pattern dyads, as well as compared with term control infants. They display significantly more behavioral symptoms than term infants, including more eating problems than term infants as well as infants from cooperative preterm dyads. Infants of the controlling preterm dyads do not differ significantly for the total development quotient but have worse personal-social development than term infants and worse hearing-speech development than infants from cooperative preterm dyads. The preterm infants of the heterogeneous group have outcomes that can be considered as intermediate with no significant differences compared with preterm infants from the cooperative pattern or the controlling pattern dyads. Among mother-preterm infant dyads, we identified 2 specific patterns of interaction that could play either a protective (cooperative pattern) or a risk-precipitating (controlling pattern) role on developmental and behavioral outcome, independent of perinatal risk factors and of the family's socioeconomic background. The controlling pattern is much more prevalent among preterm than term dyads and is related to a less favorable infant outcome. However, the cooperative pattern still represents almost 30% of the preterm dyads, with infants' outcome comparable to the ones of term infants. These results point out the impact of the quality of mother-infant relationship on the infant's outcome. The most important clinical implication should be to support a healthy parent-infant relationship already in the NICU but also in the first months of the infant's life. Early individualized family

  17. The association between mean platelet volume and infants with meconium stained amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, M; Konca, C; Kahramaner, Z; Erdemir, A; Gulyuz, A; Uckardes, F; Turgut, M

    2016-07-01

    The exact pathophysiology of meconium passage into the amniotic fluid is unknown, but it is frequently associated with fetal hypoxia. The mean platelet volume (MPV) seems to be a marker of platelet production and consumption and may be related to the severity of some diseases associated with bone marrow, hypoxia, and perinatal infections. We aimed to investigate the association between MPV levels and meconium-stained amniotic fluid (MSAF) in infants. MPV, serum-reactive protein and hemoglobin levels, and leukocyte and thrombocyte counts were measured in 106 infants with MSAF and a comparison group of 78 healthy control infants. The mean MPV values of the infants with MSAF were statistically significantly lower than those of the control group (p 0.05). There was also no statistically significant difference in the MPV levels of the infants with meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) compared to the infants with MSAF without MAS (p = 0.107). The optimal cut-off value for the MPV was 9.90 fl (area under the curve [AUC: 0.788]) in the infants with MSAF, with a sensitivity of 78.1% and specificity of 74.3%. Our data suggest that the MPV levels of infants with MSAF were significantly lower than those of healthy infants. This might be associated with a hypoxic process. However, the MPV levels of infants with MSAF and MAS were statistically similar. Thus, the MPV level could not be used to detect patients with or without severe disease.

  18. Socioeconomic (SES) differences in language are evident in female infants at 7months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Laura M; Brodsky, Nancy L; Hurt, Hallam

    2015-12-01

    Language skills, strongly linked to academic success, are known to differ by socioeconomic status (SES), with lower SES individuals performing less well than higher SES. To examine the effect of SES on infant language at 7months of age and the relationship between maternal vocabulary skills and infant language function. To determine if the relationships between SES and infant language are mediated by maternal vocabulary skills. Longitudinal follow-up of healthy term female African American infants born to mothers in two SES groups: Low SES (income-to-needs≤1, no education beyond high school) and Higher SES (Income-to-Needs >1, at least a high school diploma). 54 infants tested at 7months of age; 54 mothers tested at infant age 7months. Preschool Language Scale-5 (PLS-5), Vocabulary and Matrix Reasoning subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV. Low SES infants (n=29) performed less well than Higher SES (n=25) on PLS-5 Total Language, Auditory Comprehension, and Expressive Communication (p≤0.012). Maternal Vocabulary subtest scores were lower in Low SES than Higher SES (p=0.002), but not related to infant PLS Language scores (p≥0.17). Maternal vocabulary did not mediate the relationship between SES and infant language skills at age 7months. In this single sex and race cohort of healthy, term, female infants, lower SES exerted negative effects on infant language by 7months of age. While maternal vocabulary scores showed no relation with infant language skills at 7months, continued study of the relations between SES, infant outcomes and maternal characteristics is needed to determine how low SES conditions impact early language. These findings underscore the importance of early interventions, as well as policies designed to improve socioeconomic conditions for infants and families. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Belief-based action prediction in preverbal infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southgate, Victoria; Vernetti, Angelina

    2014-01-01

    Successful mindreading entails both the ability to think about what others know or believe, and to use this knowledge to generate predictions about how mental states will influence behavior. While previous studies have demonstrated that young infants are sensitive to others' mental states, there continues to be much debate concerning how to characterize early theory of mind abilities. In the current study, we asked whether 6-month-old infants appreciate the causal role that beliefs play in action. Specifically, we tested whether infants generate action predictions that are appropriate given an agent's current belief. We exploited a novel, neural indication of action prediction: motor cortex activation as measured by sensorimotor alpha suppression, to ask whether infants would generate differential predictions depending on an agent's belief. After first verifying our paradigm and measure with a group of adult participants, we found that when an agent had a false belief that a ball was in the box, motor activity indicated that infants predicted she would reach for the box, but when the agent had a false belief that a ball was not in the box, infants did not predict that she would act. In both cases, infants based their predictions on what the agent, rather than the infant, believed to be the case, suggesting that by 6months of age, infants can exploit their sensitivity to other minds for action prediction. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Infants use temporal regularities to chunk objects in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbe, Melissa M; Feigenson, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Infants, like adults, can maintain only a few items in working memory, but can overcome this limit by creating more efficient representations, or "chunks." Previous research shows that infants can form chunks using shared features or spatial proximity between objects. Here we asked whether infants also can create chunked representations using regularities that unfold over time. Thirteen-month old infants first were familiarized with four objects of different shapes and colors, presented in successive pairs. For some infants, the identities of objects in each pair varied randomly across familiarization (Experiment 1). For others, the objects within a pair always co-occurred, either in consistent relative spatial positions (Experiment 2a) or varying spatial positions (Experiment 2b). Following familiarization, infants saw all four objects hidden behind a screen and then saw the screen lifted to reveal either four objects or only three. Infants in Experiment 1, who had been familiarized with random object pairings, failed to look longer at the unexpected 3-object outcome; they showed the same inability to concurrently represent four objects as in other studies of infant working memory. In contrast, infants in Experiments 2a and 2b, who had been familiarized with regularly co-occurring pairs, looked longer at the unexpected outcome. These infants apparently used the co-occurrence between individual objects during familiarization to form chunked representations that were later deployed to track the objects as they were hidden at test. In Experiment 3, we confirmed that the familiarization affected infants' ability to remember the occluded objects rather than merely establishing longer-term memory for object pairs. Following familiarization to consistent pairs, infants who were not shown a hiding event (but merely saw the same test outcomes as in Experiments 2a and b) showed no preference for arrays of three versus four objects. Finally, in Experiments 4 and 5, we asked

  1. When Infants Talk, Infants Listen: Pre-Babbling Infants Prefer Listening to Speech with Infant Vocal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masapollo, Matthew; Polka, Linda; Ménard, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    To learn to produce speech, infants must effectively monitor and assess their own speech output. Yet very little is known about how infants perceive speech produced by an infant, which has higher voice pitch and formant frequencies compared to adult or child speech. Here, we tested whether pre-babbling infants (at 4-6 months) prefer listening to…

  2. Healthy Family 2009: Assuring Healthy Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Assuring Healthy Aging Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... for steady, modest loss. Seek emotional support from family and friends. Expect setbacks; forgive yourself. Make physical ...

  3. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy following previous abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellato, T A; Gauderer, M W; Ponsky, J L

    1984-01-01

    During a 36-month period, 89 patients have undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy without mortality. Of these patients, 25 (13 infants and children, 12 adults) had prior abdominal procedures that increased their risk for the endoscopic procedure. With two exceptions, all gastrostomies were performed utilizing local anesthesia. There was one major complication, a gastrocolic fistula, which was successfully managed by repeating the endoscopic gastrostomy procedure at a location more cephalad in the stomach. Twenty-two of the gastrostomies were placed for feeding purposes and all of these patients were able to leave the hospital with alimentation accomplished via the tube. Three of the endoscopically placed gastrostomies were for gastrointestinal tract decompression. A total of 255 patient months have been accumulated in these patients with the endoscopically placed gastrostomy in situ. The technique can be safely performed in patients with prior abdominal surgery and in the majority of cases is the technique of choice for establishing a tube gastrostomy. PMID:6428334

  4. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  5. Lingual frenulum and effect on breastfeeding in Thai newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngerncham, Sopapan; Laohapensang, Mongkol; Wongvisutdhi, Thidaratana; Ritjaroen, Yupin; Painpichan, Nipa; Hakularb, Pussara; Gunnaleka, Panidaporn; Chaturapitphothong, Penpaween

    2013-05-01

    Breastfeeding has abundant biological and psychological benefits. Effective breastfeeding requires good latching on, which is possible when the infant is able to cup around the maternal areola with his tongue. One of the most common conditions resulting in poor latching on is tongue-tie. To determine the prevalence of tongue-tie with subsequent breastfeeding difficulties and other factors affecting the success of breastfeeding in newborn infants. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study of healthy Thai infants without contraindications for breastfeeding. Physical examination of the infants and mothers and their breastfeeding practices were assessed between 24 and 48 hours of life. 2679 mother-infant dyads were recruited. The study detected a prevalence of 16% for severe tongue-tie, 37.9% of which was associated with breastfeeding difficulties. Using multiple logistic regression analysis, moderate (adjusted OR 13.3, 95% CI 7.2-24.5) and severe (adjusted OR 62, 95% CI 34.1-112.8) tongue-tie, short nipples (adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.2), mothers feeling the infant's tongue on the nipple area (adjusted OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.2-5.2) and mothers' inability to feel the infant's tongue (adjusted OR 11.8, 95% CI 4.3-32.4) independently increased the risk of breastfeeding difficulties. Tongue-tie is not uncommon and is associated with breastfeeding difficulty in newborn infants. Mothers of infants with severe tongue-tie should be closely and individually coached during breastfeeding and followed up, especially during the first critical weeks of the infant's life.

  6. Feeding infants and toddlers study: What foods are infants and toddlers eating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Mary Kay; Pac, Susan; Devaney, Barbara; Jankowski, Linda

    2004-01-01

    To describe the food consumption patterns of US infants and toddlers, 4 to 24 months of age. Descriptive analysis of data collected in the 2002 Feeding Infants and Toddlers study based on telephone interviews and 24-hour dietary recalls. A national random sample of 3,022 infants and toddlers age 4 to 24 months. The percentage of infants and toddlers consuming foods from specific food groups was estimated for six age groups, using a single 24-hour recall. Infants as young as 7 months of age showed food patterns that have been observed in older children and adults. From 18% to 33% of infants and toddlers between ages 7 and 24 months consumed no discrete servings of vegetables, and 23% to 33% consumed no fruits. French fries were one of the three most common vegetables consumed by infants 9 to 11 months of age. By 15 to 18 months, french fries were the most common vegetable. Almost half (46%) of 7- to 8-month-olds consumed some type of dessert, sweet, or sweetened beverage, and this percentage increased as age increased. By 19 to 24 months, 62% of toddlers consumed a baked dessert, 20% consumed candy, and 44% consumed a sweetened beverage. Parents and caregivers should be encouraged to offer a wide variety of vegetables and fruits daily, with emphasis on dark green, leafy, and deep yellow vegetables and colorful fruits. They should offer desserts, sweets, sweetened beverages, and salty snacks only occasionally, offering nutrient-dense, age-appropriate foods as alternatives (eg, fruit, cheese, yogurt, and cereals). Water, milk, and 100% fruit juices should be offered as alternative beverages. Because family food choices influence what foods are offered to children, family-based approaches to developing healthy eating habits may be helpful.

  7. Immune-modulatory genomic properties differentiate gut microbiota of infants with and without eczema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungdae Oh

    Full Text Available Gut microbiota play an important role in human immunological processes, potentially affecting allergic diseases such as eczema. The diversity and structure of gut microbiota in infants with eczema have been previously documented. This study aims to evaluate by comparative metagenomics differences in genetic content in gut microbiota of infants with eczema and their matched controls. Stools were collected at the age of one month old from twelve infants from an at risk birth cohort in a case control manner. Clinical follow up for atopic outcomes were carried out at the age of 12 and 24 months. Microbial genomic DNA were extracted from stool samples and used for shotgun sequencing. Comparative metagenomic analysis showed that immune-regulatory TCAAGCTTGA motifs were significantly enriched in the six healthy controls (C communities compared to the six eczema subjects (E, with many encoded by Bifidobacterium (38% of the total motifs in the C communities. Draft genomes of five Bifidobacterium species populations (B. longum, B. bifidum, B. breve, B. dentium, and B. pseudocatenulatum were recovered from metagenomic datasets. The B. longum BFN-121-2 genome encoded more TCAAGCTTGA motifs (4.2 copies per one million genome sequence than other Bifidobacterium genomes. Additionally, the communities in the stool of controls (C were also significantly enriched in functions associated with tetrapyrrole biosynthesis compared to those of eczema (E. Our results show distinct immune-modulatory genomic properties of gut microbiota in infants associated with eczema and provide new insights into potential role of gut microbiota in affecting human immune homeostasis.

  8. SystEmatic review and meta-aNAlysis of infanT and young child feeding Practices (ENAT-P) in Ethiopia : Protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habtewold, Tesfa Dejenie; Islam, Md. Atiqul; Sharew, Nigussie Tadesse; Mohammed, Shimels Hussien; Birhanu, Mulugeta Molla; Tegegne, Balewgizie Sileshi

    Introduction Infant and young child feeding (IYCF) is the cornerstone of infant and child survival, healthy growth and development, healthy future generations and national development. In spite of the importance of optimal nutrition in low- and middle-income countries, there has been no review

  9. Infant Colic and Migraine: Is There a Connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as a situation in which an otherwise healthy baby cries or displays symptoms of distress frequently and for extended periods. In these instances, there is no clear cause for the discomfort. Colic ... suddenly. In most babies, colic stops before the infant is 3 to ...

  10. Early Parent-infant Interactions; Are Health Visitors' Observations Reliable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ingeborg Hedegaard; Simonsen, Marianne; Trillingsgaard, Tea

    2014-01-01

    -infant relations, and there was no significant difference between the two groups according to intentions, self-efficacy, age, years educated and working part or full time. Certificated Marte Meo-therapists had significantly higher skills assessing mother- infant interactions and they scored significantly higher...... healthy relations. The objectives of this study were to explore health visitors’ observation skills assessing parent-infant interaction and their intention, self-efficacy and knowledge in early relationship. Design and participants: Cross-sectional study in 6 municipalities in Denmark included all health......-efficacy and knowledge in promoting early relationship and a test in observation skills assessing 5 video recorded mother-infants interactions. The videos represented different patterns of interactions and were master coded prior to the study in four dimensions: at risk, inept, adequate and sensitive according...

  11. Disseminated Candidiasis in a Young, Previously Healthy, Dog and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Nicole; Houwers, Dirk J; Schlotter, Yvette M; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun

    2017-06-01

    The reports on disseminated candidiasis in dogs so far describe at least one predisposing factor. This case report, however, highlights candidiasis in a dog without any known predisposition. A 1.5-year-old intact female Hovawart dog was presented with subcutaneous nodules and polyuria/polydipsia. An excisional biopsy revealed a chronic pyogranulomatous and necrotizing inflammation with mycotic structures. The patient became febrile and lethargic, and developed lameness. A physical examination, blood tests, urinalysis, thoracic radiographs, abdominal ultrasonography of the abdomen, fine-needle aspiration biopsies, and a culture of a subcutaneous nodule aspirate were obtained. Selected sections of multiple organs were collected for routine histology postmortem. The isolate and a subcutaneous mass were subjected to molecular identification and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis. Clinical, laboratory, and radiological findings were consistent with a granulomatous chronic systemic inflammation. Cytology and histology showed a pyogranulomatous and necrotizing inflammation with myriads of intra- and extra-cellular yeasts and extracellular hyphae. Culture yielded numerous yeast colonies, which appeared Candida albicans-like, but showed a negative serum test and a low identification in API 20 C AUX. Nucleic acid sequences showed homology with the C. albicans-type strain CBS 562. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) resulted in a new type with designation DST121. The identification of the isolates was confirmed by MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Future MLST typing and investigation of virulence can provide further evidence whether this MLST-type is associated with clinical cases of disseminated candidiasis without an apparent predisposing condition.

  12. Tuberculosis and pulmonary candidiasis co-infection present in a previously healthy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontalvo, Dilia Mildret; Jiménez Borré, Gustavo; Gómez Camargo, Doris; Chalavé Jiménez, Neylor; Bellido Rodríguez, Javier; Cuadrado Cano, Bernarda; Navarro Gómez, Shirley

    2016-06-30

    The coexistance among fungal pathogens and tuberculosis pulmonary is a clinical condition that generally occurs in immunosuppressive patients, however, immunocompetent patients may have this condition less frequently. We report the case of an immunocompetent patient diagnosed with coinfection Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Candida albicans. A female patient, who is a 22-years old, with fever and a new onset of hemoptysis. Diminished vesicular breath sounds in the apical region and basal crackling rales in the left lung base were found in the physical examination. Microbiological tests include: chest radiography and CAT scan pictograms in high resolution, Ziehl-Neelsen stain, growth medium for fungus and mycobacteria through Sabouraudís agar method with D-glucose. Medical examinations showed Candida albicans fungus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis present in the patient. Patient was treated with anti-tuberculosis and anti-fungal medications, which produced good responses. Pulmonary tuberculosis and fungal co-infection are not common in immunocompetent patients. However, we can suspect that there is a presence of these diseases by detecting new onset of hemoptysis in patients.

  13. IgG subclasses in previously healthy adult patients with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquired pneumonia., of whom 47 were considered less severely ill, while 19 were admitted to an. ICV. Outcome measures. Measurement of IgG subclass levels and detennination of any association between differences in subtype levels and various ...

  14. Yersinia enterocolitica bacteremia and enterocolitis in a previously healthy 20-month-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takao; Suzuki, Teruaki; Kawase, Jun; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Nanao, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a gram-negative bacillus that can cause illness ranging from a self-limiting enterocolitis to life-threatening bacteremia. Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B, serotype O:8 (1B/O:8), is the most pathogenic of the Yersinia species because of the presence of the high-pathogenicity island and the Yersinia virulence plasmid (pYV). Here, we report a pediatric case of Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 bacteremia and enterocolitis. A 20-month-old girl was admitted to hospital with fever,pharyngitis, and abdominal pain on day 2. Blood culture on admission was positive for Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8. Stool culture on day 5 after cefotaxime treatment was also positive for Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8, but only after cold enrichment at 4°C for 3 weeks. PCR assays identified the pYV only in stool specimens, indicating that strains from routine blood culture at 37°C lacked the pYV. The present case showed the usefulness of stool culture with cold enrichment and agglutination test for the diagnosis of Y. enterocolitica infection. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of collection and preservation of stool specimens for the identification of pYV. To our knowledge, this is the first reported pediatric case of Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 bacteremia.

  15. Disseminated Candidiasis in a Young, Previously Healthy, Dog and Review of Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Nicole; Houwers, Dirk J; Schlotter, Yvette M; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The reports on disseminated candidiasis in dogs so far describe at least one predisposing factor. This case report, however, highlights candidiasis in a dog without any known predisposition. PATIENT: A 1.5-year-old intact female Hovawart dog was presented with subcutaneous nodules and

  16. Disseminated Candidiasis in a Young, Previously Healthy, Dog and Review of Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Nicole; Houwers, Dirk J; Schlotter, Yvette M; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun

    BACKGROUND: The reports on disseminated candidiasis in dogs so far describe at least one predisposing factor. This case report, however, highlights candidiasis in a dog without any known predisposition. PATIENT: A 1.5-year-old intact female Hovawart dog was presented with subcutaneous nodules and

  17. Infants generalize representations of statistically segmented words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf Estes, Katharine

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic variation in language presents learners with a substantial challenge. To learn by tracking statistical regularities in speech, infants must recognize words across tokens that differ based on characteristics such as the speaker's voice, affect, or the sentence context. Previous statistical learning studies have not investigated how these types of non-phonemic surface form variation affect learning. The present experiments used tasks tailored to two distinct developmental levels to investigate the robustness of statistical learning to variation. Experiment 1 examined statistical word segmentation in 11-month-olds and found that infants can recognize statistically segmented words across a change in the speaker's voice from segmentation to testing. The direction of infants' preferences suggests that recognizing words across a voice change is more difficult than recognizing them in a consistent voice. Experiment 2 tested whether 17-month-olds can generalize the output of statistical learning across variation to support word learning. The infants were successful in their generalization; they associated referents with statistically defined words despite a change in voice from segmentation to label learning. Infants' learning patterns also indicate that they formed representations of across word syllable sequences during segmentation. Thus, low probability sequences can act as object labels in some conditions. The findings of these experiments suggest that the units that emerge during statistical learning are not perceptually constrained, but rather are robust to naturalistic acoustic variation.

  18. Arousal from sleep mechanisms in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Patricia; Kato, Ineko; Richardson, Heidi L; Yang, Joel S C; Montemitro, Enza; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2010-08-01

    Arousals from sleep allow sleep to continue in the face of stimuli that normally elicit responses during wakefulness and also permit awakening. Such an adaptive mechanism implies that any malfunction may have clinical importance. Inadequate control of arousal in infants and children is associated with a variety of sleep-related problems. An excessive propensity to arouse from sleep favors the development of repeated sleep disruptions and insomnia, with impairment of daytime alertness and performance. A lack of an adequate arousal response to a noxious nocturnal stimulus reduces an infant's chances of autoresuscitation, and thus survival, increasing the risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The study of arousability is complicated by many factors including the definition of an arousal; the scoring methodology; the techniques used (spontaneous arousability versus arousal responses to endogenous or exogenous stimuli); and the confounding factors that complicate the determination of arousal thresholds by changing the sleeper's responses to a given stimulus such as prenatal drug, alcohol, or cigarette use. Infant age and previous sleep deprivation also modify thresholds. Other confounding factors include time of night, sleep stages, the sleeper's body position, and sleeping conditions. In this paper, we will review these different aspects for the study of arousals in infants and also report the importance of these studies for the understanding of the pathophysiology of some clinical conditions, particularly SIDS. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eat healthily, stay healthy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    HIV and poor nutrition destroys the immune system. A well-nourished HIV infected person is less likely to develop an opportunistic infection than those with poor nutrition. Emotional stress and opportunistic infections can decrease one's appetite. Eating can become difficult and painful in persons with oropharyngeal infections. HIV-related wasting reduces protein and fat reserves. Vitamin A maintains a healthy immune system. Adding nuts, oil, mashed fish, dark green or orange fruits and vegetables, or fruit juice and replacing some water with fresh milk or coconut milk makes porridge more energy-rich. Fermenting or malting porridge makes it thinner, easier to swallow, and more nutritious. Fermentation allows for increased absorption of some nutrients (e.g., iron and zinc). The diet for persons with HIV-related infections should increase their appetite, and they should ingest enough nutrients to help the gastrointestinal tract manage and recover from diarrhea and to regain weight and strength lost during illness. All HIV-infected persons should eat as much as possible, particularly easy-to-eat and easily-absorbed foods. Those with mouth sores should avoid spicy and peppery foods. Those with a poor appetite should eat small amounts more often than usual. Those with diarrhea should eat easily digestible foods (e.g., soups) and, in some cases, avoid fatty or oily foods and milk. They should drink extra fluids to prevent dehydration. HIV-infected pregnant women should eat foods rich in vitamin A (dark green leaves or orange fruits and vegetables, liver, or egg yolk) and iron. Maternal vitamin A deficiency increases the risk of vertical HIV transmission 3-4 fold. Breast milk is the best food for all infants, particularly during diarrhea. In some communities, nongovernmental organizations provide those infected or affected by HIV/AIDS with food, food production maintenance, and nutrition counseling through their home care services.

  20. Vitamin D in the healthy European paediatric population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braegger, Christian; Campoy, Cristina; Colomb, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    by paediatricians and other healthcare professionals. Healthy children and adolescents should be encouraged to follow a healthy lifestyle associated with a normal body mass index and including a varied diet with vitamin D containing foods (fish, eggs, dairy products) and adequate outdoor activities with associated...... is to summarize the published data on vitamin D intake and prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the healthy European paediatric population, to discuss health benefits of vitamin D and to provide recommendations for the prevention of vitamin D deficiency in this population. Vitamin D plays a key role in calcium...... and a serum concentration below 25 nmol/l to indicate severe deficiency is recommended. Vitamin D deficiency occurs quite commonly among healthy European infants, children and adolescents, especially in certain risk groups including breast-fed infants not adhering to the current recommendation for vitamin D...

  1. Healthy Lifestyle: Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Children's health You want your child to eat healthy foods, but do you know which nutrients ... 15, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/nutrition-for-kids/art- ...

  2. Healthy Sleep Habits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sleep Apnea Testing CPAP Healthy Sleep Habits Healthy Sleep Habits Your behaviors during the day, and especially ... team at an AASM accredited sleep center . Quick Sleep Tips Follow these tips to establish healthy sleep ...

  3. Eating Healthy Ethnic Food

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Tipsheet: Eating Healthy Ethnic Food Trying different ethnic cuisines to give yourself a ... Looking for tips on how to order healthy foods when dining out? The Aim for a Healthy ...

  4. Healthy Vision Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Kids >> Healthy Vision Tips Listen All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Healthy Vision Tips Healthy vision starts with you! Use these ...

  5. Healthy food trends -- flaxseeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trends - flax seeds; Healthy food trends - linseeds; Healthy snacks - flaxseeds; Healthy diet - flaxseeds; Wellness - flaxseeds References Khalesi S, Irwin C, Schubert M. Flaxseed consumption may reduce blood pressure: a systematic review and ...

  6. Thalassemia: Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thalassemia” More What can a person living with thalassemia do to stay healthy? A healthy lifestyle is ... disorder”, as well as making healthy choices. Managing Thalassemia Thalassemia is a treatable disorder that can be ...

  7. Healthy food trends - kale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy food trends - borecole; Healthy snacks - kale; Weight loss - kale; Healthy diet - kale; Wellness - kale ... drugs), you may need to limit vitamin K foods. Vitamin K can affect how these medicines work. ...

  8. Healthy food trends -- quinoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy food trends - goosefoot; Healthy snacks - quinoa; Weight loss - quinoa; Healthy diet - quinoa; Wellness - quinoa ... may be purchased online or at any health food store. Major grocery stores may also carry bags ...

  9. Energy Expenditure in Infants in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Shepherd

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of energy balance represents a basic theoretical concept in the determination of nutritional and fluid requirements in humans in health and disease. Infants have special nutrient requirements, more limited reserves and relative immaturity of organ function. Energy requirements of infants have been based either retrospectively on intakes required to achieve normal growth or on equations derived from energy expenditure studies performed early this century. Recently, improved techniques for studying resting energy expenditure (REE, total energy expenditure (TEE and metabolically active body compartments in infants have facilitated more accurate estimates of energy requirements. Such studies indicated that current reference values for energy requirements are overestimates, and that compared with measured values, predicted values vary markedly between the various predictive equations with wide co-efficients of variation. In disease states with altered body composition, such as cystic fibrosis and end-stage liver disease, predictive equations markedly underestimate both energy and fluid requirements. In cystic fibrosis, both TEE and REE are 25% higher than values in healthy infants. In extrahepatic biliary atresia, energy expenditure per unit body cell mass is markedly elevated, suggesting that this is a catabolic condition in infants. Current estimates of energy and fluid requirements in both health and disease in infants need reappraisal. Bedside and free living energy expenditure methodology should be used to define accurately components of energy requirement in individual infants.

  10. Fish oil supplementation modulates immune function in healthy infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, C.T.; Lauritzen, L.; Kjaer, T.M.R.

    2007-01-01

    (n-3) PUFA influence immune function in adults and may also affect immune maturation during development. This randomized trial is, to our knowledge, the first to investigate whether fish oil supplementation in late infancy modifies immune responses. The study was a 2 x 2 intervention in 64 health...

  11. Promoting Public Policy that Supports Healthy Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Debbie M.

    2010-01-01

    The earliest years of life are critical to providing a foundation for good health. Providing adequate health care early can prevent many of the physical, social-emotional, and cognitive impairments that children could face in the future. The recent landmark health reform package signed into law includes important elements that positively affect…

  12. Ptosis - infants and children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blepharoptosis - children; Congenital ptosis; Eyelid drooping - children; Eyelid drooping - amblyopia; Eyelid drooping - astigmatism ... Ptosis in infants and children is often due to a problem with the muscle that raises the eyelid. A nerve problem in the eyelid can ...

  13. Abbott Infant Formula Recall

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This list includes products subject to recall since September 2010 related to infant formula distributed by Abbott. This list will be updated with publicly available...

  14. Urine collection - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003417.htm Urine collection - infants To use the sharing features on this ... collect the urine at home, have some extra collection bags available. How the Test will Feel There ...

  15. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  16. Cow's milk - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002448.htm Cow's milk - infants To use the sharing features on this ... year old, you should not feed your baby cow's milk, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). ...

  17. Diarrhea in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    When your infant has diarrhea; When your baby has diarrhea; BRAT diet; Diarrhea in children ... Children who have diarrhea may have less energy, dry eyes, or a dry, sticky mouth. They may also not wet their diaper as ...

  18. Diarrhea in infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... water down Pedialyte or Infalyte. Do not give sports drinks to young infants. Try giving your baby ... gastrointestinal tract infections and food poisoning. In Cherry JD, Harrison GJ, Kaplan SL, Steinbach WJ, Hotez PJ, ...

  19. Infants' perseverative search errors are induced by pragmatic misinterpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topál, József; Gergely, György; Miklósi, Adám; Erdohegyi, Agnes; Csibra, Gergely

    2008-09-26

    Having repeatedly retrieved an object from a location, human infants tend to search the same place even when they observe the object being hidden at another location. This perseverative error is usually explained by infants' inability to inhibit a previously rewarded search response or to recall the new location. We show that the tendency to commit this error is substantially reduced (from 81 to 41%) when the object is hidden in front of 10-month-old infants without the experimenter using the communicative cues that normally accompany object hiding in this task. We suggest that this improvement is due to an interpretive bias that normally helps infants learn from demonstrations but misleads them in the context of a hiding game. Our finding provides an alternative theoretical perspective on the nature of infants' perseverative search errors.

  20. Infant Feeding Practices in a Multi-Ethnic Asian Cohort: The GUSTO Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Ying Toh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimal introduction of complementary foods provides infants with nutritionally balanced diets and establishes healthy eating habits. The documentation of infant feeding practices in multi-ethnic Asian populations is limited. In a Singapore cohort study (GUSTO, 842 mother-infant dyads were interviewed regarding their feeding practices when the infants were aged 9 and 12 months. In the first year, 20.5% of infants were given dietary supplements, while 5.7% took probiotics and 15.7% homeopathic preparations. At age 9 months, 45.8% of infants had seasonings added to their foods, increasing to 56.3% at 12 months. At age 12 months, 32.7% of infants were given blended food, although 92.3% had begun some form of self-feeding. Additionally, 87.4% of infants were fed milk via a bottle, while a third of them had food items added into their bottles. At both time points, more than a third of infants were provided sweetened drinks via the bottle. Infants of Indian ethnicity were more likely to be given dietary supplements, have oil and seasonings added to their foods and consumed sweetened drinks from the bottle (p < 0.001. These findings provide a better understanding of variations in infant feeding practices, so that healthcare professionals can offer more targeted and culturally-appropriate advice.

  1. Characterization of the infant gut microbiota in a cohort of 330 Danish children at 9, 18 and 36 months by quantitative PCR array (GULDA) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Anders; Skov, Thomas; Bahl, Martin Iain

    (the so called SKOT-cohort), sampled at 9, 18 and 36 months after birth. The resulting data together with previously determined nutritional and anthropometrical parameters were used as input for multivariate statistics. We found significant changes in the composition of the gut microbiota between 9...... for microbial community characterization, which here provides new insights into the interactions between the gut microbiota, diet and physiology in infants.......We have developed a qPCR-based array (GUt Low Density Array, GULDA), which simultaneously determine the relative abundance of >30 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene targets in a given DNA-sample covering selected phylogenetic levels. GULDA was applied to fecal DNA from 330 healthy Danish infants...

  2. Having Healthy Babies (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-01-19

    Most babies in the United States are born perfectly healthy. However, a small percentage are born with birth defects, and these conditions account for one of every five infant deaths in the United States. In this podcast, Dr. Sarah Tinker discusses ways for women to improve their chances of having a healthy baby.  Created: 1/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/19/2017.

  3. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  4. Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Interaction: The Communicative Value of Infant-Directed Talking and Singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diana; Peña, Marcela

    Across culture, healthy infants show a high interest in infant-directed (ID) talking and singing. Despite ID talking and ID singing being very similar in physical properties, infants differentially respond to each of them. The mechanisms underpinning these different responses are still under discussion. This study explored the behavioral (n = 26) and brain (n = 14) responses from 6- to 8-month-old infants to ID talking and ID singing during a face-to-face mother-infant interaction with their own mother. Behavioral response was analyzed from offline video coding, and brain response was estimated from the analysis of electrophysiological recordings. We found that during ID talking, infants displayed a significantly higher number of visual contacts, vocalizations, and body movements than during ID singing. Moreover, only during ID talking were the number of visual contacts and vocalizations positively correlated with the number of questions and pauses in the mother's speech. Our results suggest that ID talking provides infants with specific cues that allow them not only to react to mother stimulation, but also to act toward them, displaying a rudimentary version of turn-taking behavior. Brain activity partially supported that interpretation. The relevance of our results for bonding is discussed. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Infants Prefer Female Body Phenotypes; Infant Girls Prefer They Have an Hourglass Shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Gerianne M; Hawkins, Laura B; Wilcox, Teresa; Hirshkowitz, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and adults show preferences for male and female body shapes consistent with evolutionary theories of reproductive fitness and mate selection. However, when these preferences for females with narrow waists (i.e., 0.7 waist-to-hip ratio) and men with broad shoulders (i.e., mesomorphic body shape) emerge during the lifespan is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, eye-movements were tracked in 146 infants (3-18 months of age) during computer presentation of three-dimensional human figures varying in body features thought relevant for reproductive success (e.g., secondary sex characteristics, waist-to-hip ratio). When presented with pairs of figures differing in apparent sex, male and female infants looked significantly longer at the female figure compared to the male figure, a new finding that extends previous research showing preferences for female faces in infancy. When presented with same-sex figures differing in characteristics associated with mate value, male and female infants looked longer at a low mate value male (i.e., an endomorphic body type) compared to a high mate value male (i.e., a mesomorphic body type), a finding that replicates the results of previous research. In addition, the novel use of high and low mate value female figures showed a sex difference in visual attention, such that female infants looked longer at the high mate value female figure compared to the low mate female figure whereas male infants showed the opposite pattern of results. In sum, these findings suggest that infants generally do not possess preferences for adult-defined attractive male body shapes. However, infant girls' greater attention to a female figure with an adult-preferred waist-to-hip ratio raises the possibility that evolved preferences for 0.7 waist-to-hip ratio influence girls' later preference for toys representing females with an hourglass shape, perhaps supporting elaboration of adult social behaviors that enhance reproductive success (e

  6. Support for healthy breastfeeding mothers with healthy term babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrew, Mary J; McCormick, Felicia M; Wade, Angela; Quinn, Beverley; Dowswell, Therese

    2014-01-01

    Background There is extensive evidence of important health risks for infants and mothers related to not breastfeeding. In 2003, the World Health Organization recommended infants be exclusively breastfed until six months of age, with breastfeeding continuing as an important part of the infant’s diet till at least two years of age. However, breastfeeding rates in many countries currently do not reflect this recommendation. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of support for breastfeeding mothers. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (3 October 2011). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing extra support for healthy breastfeeding mothers of healthy term babies with usual maternity care. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Main results Of the 67 studies that we assessed as eligible for inclusion, 52 contributed outcome data to the review (56,451 mother-infant pairs) from 21 countries. All forms of extra support analysed together showed an increase in duration of ‘any breastfeeding’ (includes partial and exclusive breastfeeding) (risk ratio (RR) for stopping any breastfeeding before six months 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88 to 0.96). All forms of extra support together also had a positive effect on duration of exclusive breastfeeding (RR at six months 0.86, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.91; RR at four to six weeks 0.74, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.89). Extra support by both lay and professionals had a positive impact on breastfeeding outcomes. Maternal satisfaction was poorly reported. Authors’ conclusions All women should be offered support to breastfeed their babies to increase the duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding. Support is likely to be more effective in settings with high initiation rates, so efforts to increase the uptake of breastfeeding should be in place. Support may be offered either by

  7. Speaker gaze increases information coupling between infant and adult brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Victoria; Byrne, Elizabeth; Clackson, Kaili; Georgieva, Stanimira; Lam, Sarah; Wass, Sam

    2017-12-12

    When infants and adults communicate, they exchange social signals of availability and communicative intention such as eye gaze. Previous research indicates that when communication is successful, close temporal dependencies arise between adult speakers' and listeners' neural activity. However, it is not known whether similar neural contingencies exist within adult-infant dyads. Here, we used dual-electroencephalography to assess whether direct gaze increases neural coupling between adults and infants during screen-based and live interactions. In experiment 1 ( n = 17), infants viewed videos of an adult who was singing nursery rhymes with ( i ) direct gaze (looking forward), ( ii ) indirect gaze (head and eyes averted by 20°), or ( iii ) direct-oblique gaze (head averted but eyes orientated forward). In experiment 2 ( n = 19), infants viewed the same adult in a live context, singing with direct or indirect gaze. Gaze-related changes in adult-infant neural network connectivity were measured using partial directed coherence. Across both experiments, the adult had a significant (Granger) causal influence on infants' neural activity, which was stronger during direct and direct-oblique gaze relative to indirect gaze. During live interactions, infants also influenced the adult more during direct than indirect gaze. Further, infants vocalized more frequently during live direct gaze, and individual infants who vocalized longer also elicited stronger synchronization from the adult. These results demonstrate that direct gaze strengthens bidirectional adult-infant neural connectivity during communication. Thus, ostensive social signals could act to bring brains into mutual temporal alignment, creating a joint-networked state that is structured to facilitate information transfer during early communication and learning. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  8. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  9. Four-Month-Old Infants' Visual Investigation of Cats and Dogs: Relations with Pet Experience and Attentional Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovack-Lesh, Kristine A.; McMurray, Bob; Oakes, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the eye-movements of 4-month-old infants (N = 38) as they visually inspected pairs of images of cats or dogs. In general, infants who had previous experience with pets exhibited more sophisticated inspection than did infants without pet experience, both directing more visual attention to the informative head regions of the animals,…

  10. Ethnicity and infant mortality in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, G

    1993-06-01

    Malaysian infant mortality differentials are a worthwhile subject for study, because socioeconomic development has very clearly had a differential impact by ethnic group. The Chinese rates of infant mortality are significantly lower than the Malay or Indian rates. Instead of examining the obvious access to care issues, this study considered factors related to the culture of infant care. Practices include the Chinese confinement of the mother in the first month after childbirth ("pe'i yue") and Pillsbury's 12 normative rules for Malaysian Chinese care. Malay practices vary widely by region and history. Indian mothers are restricted by diet. Data-recording flaws do not permit analysis of Sarawak or Sabah. The general assumption that Western medicine favors better health for mothers and infants is substantiated among peninsular communities, however, there are also negative impacts which affect infant mortality. The complex interaction of factors impacting on infant mortality reported in seven previous studies is discussed. A review of these studies reveals that immediate causes are infections, injuries, and dehydration. Indirect causes are birth weight or social and behavioral factors such as household income or maternal education. Indirect factors, which are amenable to planned change and influence the biological proximate determinants of infant mortality, are identified as birth weight, maternal age at birth, short pregnancy intervals or prior reproductive loss, sex of the child, birth order, duration of breast feeding and conditions of supplementation, types of household water and sanitation, year of child's birth, maternal education, household income and composition, institution of birth, ethnicity, and rural residence. Nine factors are identified empirically as not significant: maternal hours of work in the child's first year, maternal occupation, distance from home to workplace, presence of other children or servants, incidence of epidemics in the child's first

  11. Mother-to-infant transmission of intestinal bifidobacterial strains has an impact on the early development of vaginally delivered infant's microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Makino

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Bifidobacterium species are one of the major components of the infant's intestine microbiota. Colonization with bifidobacteria in early infancy is suggested to be important for health in later life. However, information remains limited regarding the source of these microbes. Here, we investigated whether specific strains of bifidobacteria in the maternal intestinal flora are transmitted to their infant's intestine. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fecal samples were collected from healthy 17 mother and infant pairs (Vaginal delivery: 12; Cesarean section delivery: 5. Mother's feces were collected twice before delivery. Infant's feces were collected at 0 (meconium, 3, 7, 30, 90 days after birth. Bifidobacteria isolated from feces were genotyped by multilocus sequencing typing, and the transitions of bifidobacteria counts in infant's feces were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS: Stains belonging to Bifidobacterium adolescentis, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, and Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum, were identified to be monophyletic between mother's and infant's intestine. Eleven out of 12 vaginal delivered infants carried at least one monophyletic strain. The bifidobacterial counts of the species to which the monophyletic strains belong, increased predominantly in the infant's intestine within 3 days after birth. Among infants delivered by C-section, monophyletic strains were not observed. Moreover, the bifidobacterial counts were significantly lower than the vaginal delivered infants until 7 days of age. CONCLUSIONS: Among infants born vaginally, several Bifidobacterium strains transmit from the mother and colonize the infant's intestine shortly after birth. Our data suggest that the mother's intestine is an important source for the vaginal delivered infant's intestinal microbiota.

  12. Having Healthy Babies (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-01-19

    Birth defects account for one of every five infant deaths in the United States. This podcast discusses the chances and ways for women to have healthy babies.  Created: 1/19/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/19/2017.

  13. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  14. Urine collection from disposable diapers in premature infants: biochemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratore, C; Dhanireddy, R

    1993-05-01

    Urine collection for analysis is commonly done in premature infants in sterile adhesive bags. Leakage due to poor adherence of the bag and irritation of the skin are frequent drawbacks with this technique. Urine retrieved from the fiber padding of disposable diapers has been shown to be reliable for biochemical analysis. However, the previous studies were done under laboratory conditions and the volume of urine used was much larger than a premature infant may void at one time. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of urine collected from disposable diapers for biochemical analysis in premature infants in the intensive care nursery.

  15. 76 FR 59885 - Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): Implementation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ...;Prices of new books are listed in the first FEDERAL REGISTER issue of each #0;week. #0; #0; #0; #0;#0... Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) several changes set forth in the Healthy, Hunger... regulations to implement five nondiscretionary provisions from Public Law 111-296, the Healthy, Hunger-Free...

  16. Stability of infants' preference for prosocial others: Implications for research based on single-choice paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nighbor, Tyler; Kohn, Carolynn; Normand, Matthew; Schlinger, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Some research suggests infants display a tendency to judge others' prosocial behavior, and in particular, that infants show a strong preference for prosocial others. For example, data from one frequently cited and well-publicized study showed that, after watching a puppet show with three puppets, 74% of infants chose the puppet that "helped" rather than the puppet that "hindered" a third puppet from attaining its goal. The purpose of the current investigation was to replicate these methods and extend them by including a within-subject measure of infant puppet choice across repeated trials to assess the stability of infants' choice. In the current study, 20 infants viewed a puppet show and chose between two puppets (i.e., helper or hinderer) immediately following the puppet show. Although results were similar to previously published work on the first-choice trial (65% of infants chose the helper puppet on the first trial), infants did not consistently choose the helper across trials; several infants demonstrated a side preference, with 9 infants almost exclusively choosing puppets presented on the right or left side. The current investigation addressed limitations of previous research by including a between-subjects (replication) as well as a within-subjects (extension) repeated measure of choice that allowed for the examination of the stability of the choice measure. Our results, particularly in light of other failed replications, raise questions regarding the robustness of infants' preference for prosocial others and the reliability and validity of the single-choice paradigm.

  17. Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Population Profiles > Asian American > Infant Health & Mortality Infant Mortality and Asians and Pacific Islanders Among Asian/Pacific ... as compared to non-Hispanic white mothers. Infant Mortality Rate Infant mortality rate per 1,000 live ...

  18. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  19. Severe Hypernatremic Dehydration and Lower Limb Gangrene in an Infant Exposed to Lamotrigine, Aripiprazole, and Sertraline in Breast Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Caroline; Chevalier, Isabelle

    Hypernatremic dehydration is well described in exclusively breastfed neonates, although life-threatening complications are rarely reported. The present article describes a case of severe hypernatremic dehydration in a previously healthy term neonate. Other published cases of severe complications of hypernatremic dehydration are discussed. The exclusively breastfed neonate described had severe hypernatremic dehydration because of inadequate milk intake, with disseminated intravascular coagulation and right lower limb gangrene that required amputation of all five toes and surgical debridement of the metatarsals. The usual etiology of hypernatremic dehydration in this age group is insufficient breast milk intake. Here, the infant's mother was treated for bipolar disorder with lamotrigine 250 mg orally once daily, aripiprazole 15 mg orally once daily, and sertraline 100 mg orally once daily. Awareness of these complications should prompt close follow-up of the infant with poor weight gain. The role of maternal medication as a risk factor for hypernatremic dehydration among exclusively breastfed infants needs to be further explored.

  20. Maternal nutrition and optimal infant feeding practices: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Kalhan, Satish C; Hay, William W

    2007-02-01

    Much recent attention has been paid to the effect of the fetal environment on not only healthy birth outcomes but also long-term health outcomes, including a role as an antecedent to adult diseases. A major gap in our understanding of these relations, however, is the effect of maternal nutrition and nutrient transport on healthy fetal growth and development. In addition, this gap precludes evidence-based recommendations about how to best feed preterm infants. The biological role of the mother and the effect of her nutritional status on infant feeding extend to postnatal infant feeding practices. Currently, evidence is incomplete about not only the composition of human milk, but also the maternal nutritional needs to support extended lactation and the appropriate nutrient composition of foods that will be used to complement breastfeeding at least through the first year of life. Consequently, a conference, organized by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements, and the US Department of Agriculture Children's Nutrition Research Center was held to explore current knowledge and develop a research agenda to address maternal nutrition and infant feeding practices. These proceedings contain presentations about the effect of maternal nutrition and the placental environment on fetal growth and birth outcomes, as well as issues pertaining to feeding preterm and full-term infants.

  1. Physiological and Relational Predictors of Mother-Infant Behavioral Coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sara F; Mendes, Wendy Berry

    2016-12-01

    Coordinated social behavior and positive affect shared between parent and child in early life provide a foundation for healthy social and emotional development. We examined physiological (cardiac vagal responses) and relational (attachment security) predictors of dyadic behavioral coordination in a sample of 13-month-old infants and their mothers ( N = 64). We tested whether cardiac vagal responses moderated the association between attachment security and behavioral coordination. The main effect of attachment on coordination was moderated by infant cardiac vagal tone (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA] during rest). Securely attached infants with lower cardiac vagal tone were more behaviorally coordinated with their mothers; there was no association between attachment and coordination for infants with high cardiac vagal tone. Infants with greater increases in cardiac vagal reactivity (i.e., RSA during social engagement) exhibited greater behavioral coordination with their mothers regardless of attachment status. There were no effects for maternal cardiac vagal responses. These results illustrate how individual differences in physiological responses inform healthy early social-emotional functioning.

  2. Biophysical behaviour of the infant Meibomian lipid layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaercher, T; Möbius, D; Welt, R

    1994-01-01

    Infants have been known occasionally to stare without blinking for almost a minute. This puts great demands on the stability of their tear-film. To verify the stability of infant tears, we performed biophysical experiments on Meibomian gland secretion, which forms the outermost layer of the tear-film. The secretion was taken from infants belonging to one of three age-groups (1.5 years, 4-5 years, 7-10 years). Under in vitro conditions we determined the surface pressure and the surface potential of the film by spreading the secretion over a water surface and subsequently compressing and decompressing it. Sufficient amounts of Meibomian gland secretion were expressed in all age-groups. The surface pressure and the surface potential of the tears in infants corresponded to those in healthy adults. It was also found that the younger the patient was, the better was the consistency of the surface potential under repeated periods of compression and expansion. In comparison with the secretion of healthy adults, the infant Meibomian gland secretion showed better biophysical characteristics and a correspondingly higher stability in the tear-film.

  3. Infants detect cross-modal cues to identity in speech and singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehub, Sandra E; Plantinga, Judy; Brcic, Jelena

    2009-07-01

    Little is known about infants' perception of cross-modal cues to identity, but the importance of recognizing familiar individuals makes it likely that this skill would be evident early in life. Infants 6-8 months of age were tested on their ability to link dynamic cross-modal cues to the identity of unfamiliar speakers and singers. After exposure to speech or singing, infants watched two silent videos, one featuring the previously heard speaker or singer. Infants looked significantly longer at the video of the person heard previously, which indicates that they can match auditory and visual cues to the identity of unfamiliar persons.

  4. Place of Residence Moderates the Risk of Infant Death in Kenya: Evidence from the Most Recent Census 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruebner, Oliver; Lautenbach, Sven; Khan, M M H; Kipruto, Samuel; Epprecht, Michael; Galea, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    who had previous born children who died, and who were better educated. However, living in urban areas also reduced the health promoting effects of better structural quality of housing (i.e. poor or good versus non-durable). Furthermore, durable housing quality in urban areas turned out to be a risk factor for infant death as compared to rural areas. Living in slum areas was also a protective factor for mothers with previous child death, however it also reduced the promoting effects of older ages in mothers. While urbanization and slum development continues in Kenya, public health interventions should invest in healthy environments that ideally would include improvements to access to safe water and sanitation, better structural quality of housing, and to access to education, health care, and family planning services, especially in urban slums and rural areas. In non-slum urban areas however, health education programs that target healthy diets and promote physical exercise may be an important adjunct to these structural interventions.

  5. Place of Residence Moderates the Risk of Infant Death in Kenya: Evidence from the Most Recent Census 2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Gruebner

    for mothers who had previous born children who died, and who were better educated. However, living in urban areas also reduced the health promoting effects of better structural quality of housing (i.e. poor or good versus non-durable. Furthermore, durable housing quality in urban areas turned out to be a risk factor for infant death as compared to rural areas. Living in slum areas was also a protective factor for mothers with previous child death, however it also reduced the promoting effects of older ages in mothers.While urbanization and slum development continues in Kenya, public health interventions should invest in healthy environments that ideally would include improvements to access to safe water and sanitation, better structural quality of housing, and to access to education, health care, and family planning services, especially in urban slums and rural areas. In non-slum urban areas however, health education programs that target healthy diets and promote physical exercise may be an important adjunct to these structural interventions.

  6. Changes over lactation in breast milk serum proteins involved in the maturation of immune and digestive system of the infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lina; de Waard, Marita; Verheijen, Hester; Boeren, Sjef; Hageman, Jos A; van Hooijdonk, Toon; Vervoort, Jacques; van Goudoever, Johannes B; Hettinga, Kasper

    2016-09-16

    To objective of this study was to better understand the biological functions of breast milk proteins in relation to the growth and development of infants over the first six months of life. Breast milk samples from four individual women collected at seven time points in the first six months after delivery were analyzed by filter aided sample preparation and dimethyl labeling combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 247 and 200 milk serum proteins were identified and quantified, respectively. The milk serum proteome showed a high similarity (80% overlap) on the qualitative level between women and over lactation. The quantitative changes in milk serum proteins were mainly caused by three groups of proteins, enzymes, and transport and immunity proteins. Of these 21 significantly changed proteins, 30% were transport proteins, such as serum albumin and fatty acid binding protein, which are both involved in transporting nutrients to the infant. The decrease of the enzyme bile salt-activated lipase as well as the immunity proteins immunoglobulins and lactoferrin coincide with the gradual maturation of the digestive and immune system of infants. The human milk serum proteome didn't differ qualitatively but it did quantitatively, both between mothers and as lactation advanced. The changes of the breast milk serum proteome over lactation corresponded with the development of the digestive and immune system of infants. Breast milk proteins provide nutrition, but also contribute to healthy development of infants. Despite the previously reported large number of identified breast milk proteins and their changes over lactation, less is known on the changes of these proteins in individual mothers. This study is the first to determine the qualitative and quantitative changes of milk proteome over lactation between individual mothers. The results indicate that the differences in the milk proteome between individual mothers are more related to the

  7. Infant nutrition in Saskatoon: barriers to infant food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partyka, Brendine; Whiting, Susan; Grunerud, Deanna; Archibald, Karen; Quennell, Kara

    2010-01-01

    We explored infant nutrition in Saskatoon by assessing current accessibility to all forms of infant nourishment, investigating challenges in terms of access to infant nutrition, and determining the use and effectiveness of infant nutrition programs and services. We also examined recommendations to improve infant food security in Saskatoon. Semi-structured community focus groups and stakeholder interviews were conducted between June 2006 and August 2006. Thematic analysis was used to identify themes related to infant feeding practices and barriers, as well as recommendations to improve infant food security in Saskatoon. Our study showed that infant food security is a concern among lower-income families in Saskatoon. Barriers that limited breastfeeding sustainability or nourishing infants through other means included knowledge of feeding practices, lack of breastfeeding support, access and affordability of infant formula, transportation, and poverty. Infant nutrition and food security should be improved by expanding education and programming opportunities, increasing breastfeeding support, and identifying acceptable ways to provide emergency formula. If infant food security is to be addressed successfully, discussion and change must occur in social policy and family food security contexts.

  8. Individual Variation in Fathers? Testosterone Reactivity to Infant Distress Predicts Parenting Behaviors with their 1-Year-Old Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, Patty X.; Saini, Ekjyot K.; Thomason, Elizabeth; Schultheiss, Oliver C.; Gonzalez, Richard; Volling, Brenda L.

    2015-01-01

    Positive father involvement is associated with positive child outcomes. There is great variation in fathers? involvement and fathering behaviors, and men?s testosterone (T) has been proposed as a potential biological contributor to paternal involvement. Previous studies investigating testosterone changes in response to father-infant interactions or exposure to infant cues are unclear as to whether individual variation in T is predictive of fathering behavior. We show that individual variation...

  9. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  10. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  11. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  12. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  13. Infants Generalize Representations of Statistically Segmented Words

    OpenAIRE

    Graf Estes, Katharine

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic variation in language presents learners with a substantial challenge. To learn by tracking statistical regularities in speech, infants must recognize words across tokens that differ based on characteristics such as the speaker’s voice, affect, or the sentence context. Previous statistical learning studies have not investigated how these types of non-phonemic surface form variation affect learning. The present experiments used tasks tailored to two distinct developmental levels to...

  14. Effect of body position on ventilation distribution in preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Judith L; Johnston, Leanne; Brauer, Sandy G; Woodgate, Paul G; Pham, Trang M T; Schibler, Andreas

    2012-07-01

    Although continuous positive airway pressure is used extensively in neonatal intensive care units, and despite the belief that positioning is considered vital to the maintenance of good lung ventilation, no data exist on regional ventilation distribution in infants on continuous positive airway pressure ventilatory support. To investigate the effect of body position on regional ventilation in preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure ventilatory support using electrical impedance tomography. Randomized crossover study design. Neonatal intensive care unit. Twenty-four preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure were compared to six spontaneously breathing preterm infants. Random assignment of the order of the positions supine, prone, and quarter prone. Changes in global and regional lung volume were measured with electrical impedance tomography. Although there were no differences between positions, regional tidal volume was increased in the posterior compared with the anterior lung (p positive airway pressure. The posterior lung filled earlier than the anterior lung in the spontaneously breathing infants (p positive airway pressure the right lung filled before the left lung (p positive airway pressure than in the healthy infants (p preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure using electrical impedance tomography. Gravity had little impact on regional ventilation distribution in preterm infants on continuous positive airway pressure or in spontaneously breathing infants in the supine or prone position, indicating that ventilation distribution in preterm infants is not gravity-dependent but follows an anatomical pattern. AUSTRALIA NEW ZEALAND CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRY:: ACTRN12606000210572.

  15. Infant Statistical Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Jenny R.; Kirkham, Natasha Z.

    2017-01-01

    Perception involves making sense of a dynamic, multimodal environment. In the absence of mechanisms capable of exploiting the statistical patterns in the natural world, infants would face an insurmountable computational problem. Infant statistical learning mechanisms facilitate the detection of structure. These abilities allow the infant to compute across elements in their environmental input, extracting patterns for further processing and subsequent learning. In this selective review, we summarize findings that show that statistical learning is both a broad and flexible mechanism (supporting learning from different modalities across many different content areas) and input specific (shifting computations depending on the type of input and goal of learning). We suggest that statistical learning not only provides a framework for studying language development and object knowledge in constrained laboratory settings, but also allows researchers to tackle real-world problems, such as multilingualism, the role of ever-changing learning environments, and differential developmental trajectories. PMID:28793812

  16. CDC WONDER: Mortality - Infant Deaths

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mortality - Infant Deaths (from Linked Birth / Infant Death Records) online databases on CDC WONDER provide counts and rates for deaths of children under 1 year...

  17. Breastfeeding the preterm infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its peculiar nutritional and non-nutritional contents, which include long-chain polyunsatured fatty acids (LC-PUFA, prebiotics, immunological factors, hormones and growth factors, breast milk shows significant advantages over infant formulas in nourishing preterm infants. Better neurocognitive outcomes, which are reported to persist far beyond the early childhood, have been largely observed in breastfed preterm infants; a role of LC-PUFA in promoting neural and retinal development is assumed. As far as the gastrointestinal tract is concerned, several evidences have reported a dose-related reduction in NEC incidence among preterm infants fed on human milk. Moreover, the higher amount of immunological factors as secretory IgA within preterm breast milk might play a remarkable role in reducing the overall infections. Despite breastfeeding in preterm infants is generally linked with lowered growth rates which might potentially affect neurocognitive outcomes, the beneficial effects of human milk on neurodevelopment prevail. Fortified human milk might better fulfill the particular nutritional needs of preterm infants. However, as breast milk fortification is difficult to carry out after the achievement of full oral feeding, some concerns on the nutritional adequacy of exclusive breastfeeding during hospitalization as well as after discharge have been raised. Finally, breastfeeding also entails maternal psychological beneficial effects, as promoting the motherhood process and the mother-child relationship, which could be undermined in those women experiencing preterm delivery. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  18. Evaluations of diapers containing absorbent gelling material with conventional disposable diapers in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, A T; Rehder, P A; Helm, K

    1990-03-01

    We evaluated 149 infants diapered in either conventional cellulose core disposable diapers or diapers containing cellulose core with absorbent gelling material. The infants were evaluated from 1 day of age to 14 weeks of age for the prevalence and severity of diaper dermatitis. We identified a low prevalence of diaper dermatitis throughout the study period. At 14 weeks of age, we noted that infants in diapers containing absorbent gelling material had significantly less diaper dermatitis than those in conventional disposable diapers. Despite the overall low prevalence of diaper dermatitis in the newborn period, 7 of 204 infants evaluated had small skin erosions in the diaper area noted within the first 4 days of age. Both diaper types were associated with infants with erosions. This surprisingly high incidence of erosions in newborn infants suggests previously undocumented increased skin fragility of full-term infants.

  19. Modification of stool's water content in constipated infants: management with an adapted infant formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez Marina M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Constipation is a common occurrence in formula-fed infants. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the impact of a formula with high levels of lactose and magnesium, in compliance with the official regulations, on stool water content, as well as a parental assessment of constipation. Materials and methods Thirty healthy term-born, formula-fed infants, aged 4-10 weeks, with functional constipation were included. All infants were full-term and fed standard formula. Exclusion criteria were preterm and/or low birth weight, organic constipation, being breast fed or fed a formula specially designed to treat constipation. Stool composition was measured by near-infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA and parents answered questions about crying associated with defecation and stool consistency at baseline and after two weeks of the adapted formula. Results After 2 weeks of the adapted formula, stool water content increased from 71 +/- 8.1% to 84 +/- 5.9%, (p Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that an adapted formula with high levels of lactose and magnesium increases stool water content and improves symptoms of constipation in term-born, formula-fed infants. A larger randomized placebo-controlled trial is indicated.

  20. Have a Healthy Pregnancy (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-22

    Moms are often worried if they’ll be up to the task of caring for a newborn baby. However, women can increase their chances of giving birth to a healthy infant and avoiding birth defects by taking several healthy steps during pregnancy. In this podcast, Dr. Cara Mai discusses ways to improve your chances of giving birth to a healthy baby.  Created: 1/22/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 1/22/2015.

  1. Sleep Patterns among South Korean Infants and Toddlers: Global Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Youngmin; Williamson, Ariel A; Seo, Hyun-Joo; Sadeh, Avi; Mindell, Jodi A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine sleep patterns in a large sample of infants and toddlers (ages birth to 36 months) in Korea, and to compare sleep patterns, sleep problems, sleep ecology, and parental behaviors to global sleep data on young children in both predominantly Asian (P-A) and predominantly Caucasian (P-C) countries/regions. We additionally examined parent and child demographic information, parental behaviors, and aspects of the sleep ecology as predictors of sleep patterns among infants and toddlers in Korea. Parents/caregivers of 1,036 Korean infants and toddlers completed an expanded, internet-based version of the brief infant sleep questionnaire. Consistent with other studies of sleep in early childhood, sleep/wake patterns became increasingly consolidated with older child age for the Korea sample. Compared to both P-A and P-C infants and toddlers, children in Korea had the latest bedtimes, shortest total sleep and daytime sleep durations, and the least frequent rates of napping. Even though half of parents perceive their children's sleep problematic, parental perceptions of severe child sleep problems were the lowest. Within Korea, breastfeeding and bottle-feeding at sleep resumption were associated with increased nocturnal awakenings. Evening television viewing was associated with later bedtimes, which may have implications for sleep hygiene recommendations in clinical practice. The current study provides important information about sleep/wake patterns, parental behaviors, and aspects of the sleep ecology for infants and toddlers for physicians to support healthy sleep in Korea.

  2. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in mothers of preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaboni Whitney Gondwe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PTS symptoms are a common negative emotional response of mothers of preterm infants. PTS symptoms are one of the least explored emotional responses in postpartum period and in mothers of preterm infants. Malawi has the highest preterm birth in the world, but little is known about PTS symptoms following preterm birth in Malawi. The purpose of this paper is to review evidence on the incidence, prevalence, and impact of PTS symptoms following preterm birth, predictors of PTS symptoms, screening and management, and to identify the gaps and the applicability of the evidence to developing countries such as Malawi. A literature search was conducted using PubMed, PsychINFO, CINAHL, and ERIC databases. Articles were limited to PTS symptoms in mothers after preterm birth and up to 24 months. A total of 23 articles were included in the analysis. Findings showed that most literature was from developed countries. Fifteen instruments were identified and the PPQ was the most commonly used instrument. Time points for measurement varied. Mothers of preterm infants presented with at least one PTS symptom and they had higher PTS symptoms than mothers of healthy full-term infants, but no significant differences were seen with mothers of sick full term infants. Maternal, infant, and external factors predicted the onsets of PTS symptoms. Psychoeducation and counseling significantly reduced PTS symptoms, although mothers were only referred if symptoms were severe. Research in developing or low-income countries like Malawi is needed and researchers need to engage more in longitudinal approaches.

  3. Doxapram treatment for apnea in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson-Smart, D; Steer, P

    2004-10-18

    Recurrent apnea is common in preterm infants, particularly at very early gestational ages. These episodes of loss of effective breathing can lead to hypoxemia and bradycardia which may be severe enough to require resuscitation including use of positive pressure ventilation. Doxapram has been used to stimulate breathing and so prevent apnea and its consequences. In preterm infants with recurrent apnea, does treatment with Doxapram lead to a clinically important reduction in apnea and use of intermittent positive airways pressure (IPPV), without clinically important side effects? Searches were made of the Oxford Database of Perinatal trials, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2004), MEDLINE from 1966 - June 2004, EMBASE from 1980 - June 2001, CINAHL from 1982- June 2004. Text words 'doxapram', 'apnea or apnoea' and the MeSH term 'infant, premature' were used. Previous reviews including cross references, abstracts from conferences and symposia proceedings were also examined. Abstracts of the Society for Pediatric Research were searched from 1996 - 2004 inclusive. All trials utilising random or quasi-random patient allocation, in which doxapram was used for the treatment of apnea in preterm infants were included. Each author evaluated the papers for quality and inclusion criteria. Independent data extraction was carried out. Only one trial, which randomized 11 infants to intravenous doxapram and 10 infants to placebo, was found. There were fewer treatment failures after 48 hours in the group of preterm infants treated with doxapram (4/11) compared with the group treated with placebo (8/10). The wide confidence intervals made this result non-significant [RR 0.45 (0.20, 1.05)]. Only one infant, who was from the placebo group, was given IPPV. Of the seven responders by 48 hours in the group of 11 who received doxapram, five failed to respond between 48 hours and seven days after commencement of therapy. This gives a

  4. Cerebral oxygenation in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Karinna L; Yiallourou, Stephanie R; Wong, Flora Y; Odoi, Alexsandria; Walker, Adrian M; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-09-01

    Prone sleeping is a major risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and preterm infants are at significantly increased risk. In term infants, prone sleeping is associated with reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP) and cerebral tissue oxygenation index (TOI). However, little is known about the effects of sleeping position on TOI and MAP in preterm infants. We aimed to examine TOI and MAP in preterm infants after term-equivalent age, during the period of greatest SIDS risk. Thirty-five preterm and 17 term infants underwent daytime polysomnography, including measurement of TOI (NIRO-200 spectrophotometer, Hamamatsu Photonics KK, Japan) and MAP (Finapress Medical Systems, Amsterdam, Netherlands) at 2 to 4 weeks, 2 to 3 months, and 5 to 6 months postterm age. Infants slept prone and supine in active and quiet sleep. The effects of sleep state and position were determined by using 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance and of preterm birth by using 2-way analysis of variance. In preterm infants, TOI was significantly lower when prone compared with supine in both sleep states at all ages (P preterm compared with term infants at 2 to 4 weeks, in both positions (P preterm infants in the prone position at 2 to 3 months (P position in preterm infants and is lower compared with age-matched term infants, predominantly in the prone position when MAP is also reduced. This may contribute to their increased SIDS risk. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read MoreDepression in Children and TeensRead MoreBMI Calculator Fever in Infants and ChildrenBecause young children are not ... Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants and Children Fever Fever in Infants and Children Foot Problems Genital ...

  6. Very high vitamin D supplementation rates among infants aged 2 months in Vancouver and Richmond, British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crocker Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin D deficiency during infancy may lead to rickets and possibly other poor health outcomes. The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months. Breast milk is the best food for infants but does not contain adequate vitamin D. Health Canada recommends all breastfed infants receive a daily vitamin D supplement of 400 IU; however, there appears to be limited current Canadian data as to whether parents or caregivers are following this advice. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of vitamin D supplementation among 2-month old infants in Vancouver and Richmond, British Columbia, Canada. Methods Mothers of all healthy infants born between April and May 2010 were approached to participate. Telephone surveys were conducted with 577 mothers (response rate 56% when their infants turned 2 months. Results Over half of the infants received only breast milk in the week prior to the survey. One third received a mixture of breast milk and infant formula and 10% received only formula. About 80% of the infants were supplemented with vitamin D at 2 months. Infants who received only breast milk were most likely to be supplemented with vitamin D (91%. Over 60% of the infants had a total vitamin D intake of 300- Conclusions About 90% of the infants received breast milk at 2 months of age. The vitamin D supplementation rate was 80%. Future studies are needed to monitor breastfeeding duration and vitamin D supplementation rates as infants get older.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus salivarius CECT 5713, a probiotic strain isolated from human milk and infant feces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Esther; Martín, Rocío; Maldonado, Antonio; Martín, Virginia; Gómez de Segura, Aranzazu; Fernández, Leonides; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2010-10-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius is a homofermentative lactic acid bacterium and is frequently isolated from mucosal surfaces of healthy humans. L. salivarius CECT 5713, a strain isolated simultaneously from breast milk and infant feces of a healthy mother-infant pair, has immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, and anti-infectious properties, as revealed by several in vitro and in vivo assays. Here, we report its complete and annotated genome sequence.

  8. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  9. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  10. Foundations of infants' social group evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Anthea; Ferera, Matar; Diesendruck, Gil; Kiley Hamlin, J; Baron, Andrew Scott

    2017-07-13

    Previous research has suggested that infants exhibit a preference for familiar over unfamiliar social groups (e.g., preferring individuals from their own language group over individuals from a foreign language group). However, because past studies often employ forced-choice procedures, it is not clear whether infants' intergroup preferences are driven by positivity toward members of familiar groups, negativity toward members of unfamiliar groups, or both. Across six experiments, we implemented a habituation procedure to independently measure infants' positive and negative evaluations of speakers of familiar and unfamiliar languages. We report that by 1 year of age, infants positively evaluate individuals who speak a familiar language, but do not negatively evaluate individuals who speak an unfamiliar language (Experiments 1 and 2). Several experiments rule out lower-level explanations (Experiments 3-6). Together these data suggest that children's early social group preferences may be shaped by positive evaluations of familiar group(s), rather than negative evaluations of unfamiliar groups. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Immunogenicity and safety of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine administered to older infants and children naïve to pneumococcal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Jacek; Brzostek, Jerzy; Szymański, Henryk; Tetiurka, Bogusław; Toporowska-Kowalska, Ewa; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Sarkozy, Denise A; Giardina, Peter C; Gruber, William C; Emini, Emilio A; Scott, Daniel A

    2015-03-30

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children vaccine (PCV13) has been developed and approved in many countries worldwide. Assess the safety and immunogenicity of PCV13 in healthy older infants and children naïve to previous pneumococcal vaccination. This was a phase 3, open-label, multicenter study conducted in Polish children (N=354) who were vaccinated according to 3 age-appropriate catch-up schedules: Group 1 (aged 7 to vaccine doses only; and Group 3 (aged 24 to vaccine, was determined for each vaccine serotype. In addition, antipolysaccharide immunoglobulin (Ig) G geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were calculated. Safety assessments included systemic and local reactions, and adverse events. The proportion of immunological responders was ≥88% across groups for all serotypes. Antipolysaccharide IgG GMCs were generally similar across groups. Each schedule elicited immune response levels against all 13 serotypes comparable to or greater than levels previously reported in infants after a 3-dose series. The 3 catch-up schedules had similar tolerability and safety profiles; a trend was present towards greater local tenderness with increasing age and subsequent dose administration. Immunological responses and safety results support the use of PCV13 for catch-up schedules in older infants and children naïve to pneumococcal vaccination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Otolaryngological aspects of sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Tal; Cinamon, Udi; Castellanos, Paul F; Cohen, Marta C

    2012-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is characterized by the sudden death of an apparently otherwise healthy infant, typically during sleep, and with no obvious case after a thorough post-mortem and scene death examination. To address the problem from the otolaryngologist's perspective, describe relevant pathologies, discuss controversies and suggest preventive measures in high-risk populations. A MEDLINE search and hand search were conducted to identify reports published between 1969 and 2011 in the English language on the pathophysiology of SIDS related to the head and neck organs. Search terms included SIDS (MeSH term), SIDS and pathophysiology (text words), and SIDS and autopsy (text words). A growing number of reports suggested head and neck organs involvement in SIDS autopsies. Laryngeal, oropharyngeal, maxillofacial, otologic, cervical vascular abnormalities and infectious etiologies, were recognized and discussed. Otolaryngologists should be aware of relevant pathologies, as some are treatable, if identified early enough in infancy. A proactive risk-management approach is warranted in infants presenting with certain abnormalities reviewed here. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tools for teen moms to reduce infant obesity: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horodynski, Mildred A; Silk, Kami; Hsieh, Gary; Hoffman, Alice; Robson, Mackenzie

    2015-01-21

    Unhealthy infant feeding practices, such as a combination of formula feeding and early introduction of solids may lead to rapid or excessive weight gain in early infancy. Adolescent mothers' feeding behaviors are most directly related to infant weight gain in the first year of life. Compared to adult mothers, adolescent mothers are less knowledgeable, less responsive, more controlling, and less skilled in infant feeding, which interferes with infants' healthy growth. The Tools for Teen Moms trial aims to compare the effect of a social media intervention for low-income adolescent, first-time mothers of infants 2 months of age or younger, versus standard care on infant weight, maternal responsiveness, and feeding style and practices. The intervention is conducted during the infant's first four months of life to promote healthy transition to solids during their first year. Tools for Teen Moms is an intervention delivered via a social media platform that actively engages and coaches low-income adolescent mothers in infant-centered feeding to reduce rapid/excessive infant weight gain in the first six months of life. We describe our study protocol for a randomized control trial with an anticipated sample of 100 low-income African- American and Caucasian adolescent, first-time mothers of infants. Participants are recruited through Maternal-Infant Health Programs in four counties in Michigan, USA. Participants are randomly assigned to the intervention or the control group. The intervention provides infant feeding information to mothers via a web-based application, and includes daily behavioral challenges, text message reminders, discussion forums, and website information as a comprehensive social media strategy over 6 weeks. Participants continue to receive usual care during the intervention. Main maternal outcomes include: (a) maternal responsiveness, (b) feeding style, and (c) feeding practices. The primary infant outcome is infant weight. Data collection occurs at

  14. NT-Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Infants with Failure to Thrive due to Caloric Deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Mänhardt

    2010-01-01

    Methods. In a retrospective cohort study, we compared N-BNP levels from all consecutive infants with FTT and bodyweight below the tenth percentile (caloric deprivation (CD group to infants with severe HF. Reference values from infants between 2 and 12 month were taken from the literature and healthy infants. Results. Our results show that infants with FTT (n=15 had significantly (P<.001 elevated N-BNP values compared with the healthy infants (n=23, 530 (119–3150 pg/mL versus 115 (15–1121 pg/mL. N-BNP values in this CD group are comparable to the median value of infants with severe HF (n=12 673 (408–11310 pg/mL. There is no statistical significant difference in age. Conclusion. Nutritional state has an important impact on N-BNP levels in infants with FTT. We could show comparable levels of N-BNP in infants with FTT and infants with severe HF.

  15. Gross motor development in full-term Greek infants assessed by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale: reference values and socioeconomic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrengelas, Dimitrios; Kalampoki, Vassiliki; Kleisiouni, Paraskevi; Konstantinou, Dimitrios; Siahanidou, Tania

    2014-07-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate gross motor development in Greek infants and establish AIMS percentile curves and to examine possible association of AIMS scores with socioeconomic parameters. Mean AIMS scores of 1068 healthy Greek full-term infants were compared at monthly age level with the respective mean scores of the Canadian normative sample. In a subgroup of 345 study participants, parents provided, via interview, information about family socioeconomic status. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship of infant motor development with socioeconomic parameters. Mean AIMS scores did not differ significantly between Greek and Canadian infants in any of the 19 monthly levels of age. In multiple linear regression analysis, the educational level of the mother and also whether the infant was being raised by grandparents/babysitter were significantly associated with gross motor development (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively), whereas there was no significant correlation of mean AIMS scores with gender, birth order, maternal age, paternal educational level and family monthly income. Gross motor development of healthy Greek full-term infants, assessed by AIMS during the first 19months of age, follows a similar course to that of the original Canadian sample. Specific socioeconomic factors are associated with the infants' motor development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Parents' beliefs about appropriate infant size, growth and feeding behaviour: implications for the prevention of childhood obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swift Judy A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of risk factors are associated with the development of childhood obesity which can be identified during infancy. These include infant feeding practices, parental response to infant temperament and parental perception of infant growth and appetite. Parental beliefs and understanding are crucial determinants of infant feeding behaviour; therefore any intervention would need to take account of their views. This study aimed to explore UK parents' beliefs concerning their infant's size, growth and feeding behaviour and parental receptiveness to early intervention aimed at reducing the risk of childhood obesity. Method Six focus groups were undertaken in a range of different demographic localities, with parents of infants less than one year of age. The focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis applied using an interpretative, inductive approach. Results 38 parents (n = 36 female, n = 2 male, age range 19-45 years (mean 30.1 years, SD 6.28 participated in the focus groups. 12/38 were overweight (BMI 25-29.99 and 8/38 obese (BMI >30. Five main themes were identified. These were a parental concern about breast milk, infant contentment and growth; b the belief that the main cause of infant distress is hunger is widespread and drives inappropriate feeding; c rationalisation for infants' larger size; d parental uncertainty about identifying and managing infants at risk of obesity and e intentions and behaviour in relation to a healthy lifestyle. Conclusions There are a number of barriers to early intervention with parents of infants at risk of developing obesity. Parents are receptive to prevention prior to weaning and need better support with best practice in infant feeding. In particular, this should focus on helping them understand the physiology of breast feeding, how to differentiate between infant distress caused by hunger and other causes and the timing of weaning. Some parents also need

  17. Growth and development of infants with asymptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Ruobing; Wang, Xiaoliang; Fu, Ping

    2009-10-31

    To observe changes in audiology, intellectual development, behavior development, and physical growth during systematic follow-up of infants with asymptomatic congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection. Fifty-two infants diagnosed with asymptomatic congenital HCMV infection from July 2003 to July 2007 served as the infection group, and 21 healthy infants served as the control group. All infants were confirmed to have HCMV infection by Fluorescent Quantative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR). In both the infection and control groups, the neonates and infants at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year of age underwent examinations. 1) 20 items of National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) scores of neonates 12-14 days after birth in 2 groups were 38.3 +/- 1.95 and 38.5 +/- 2.29, without significant differences. 2) Auditory test: 50 ears of 25 cases in the infection group showed abnormal auditory thresholds in V waves with an abnormal rate of 14%, while no abnormalities were found in 21 cases in the control group. 3) Mental and psychomotor development index scores in the control group (107.49 +/- 11.31 and 107.19 +/- 10.98) were compared with those in 41 asymptomatically infected infants at 1 year of age (107.21 +/- 9.96 and 108.31 +/- 11.25), and no statistically significant difference was noted. 1) An elevated threshold in the V wave was present in asymptomatically infected infants, but could not be detected through otoacoustic emission (OAE) screening. 2) Either in the neonatal or infant periods, asymptomatic congenital HCMV infection did not have a significant influence on nervous behavior or on physical and intellectual development.

  18. Infant formulas - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to cow's milk may also be allergic to soy milk. Soy-based formulas should be used for infants with galactosemia , a rare condition. These formulas can also be used ... have allergies to milk protein and for those with skin rashes or ...

  19. Colic in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucassen, Peter

    2010-02-05

    Colic in infants causes one in six families (17%) with children to consult a health professional. One systematic review of 15 community-based studies found a wide variation in prevalence, which depended on study design and method of recording. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for colic in infants? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 27 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: advice to increase carrying, advice to reduce stimulation, casein hydrolysate milk, cranial osteopathy, crib vibrator device, focused counselling, gripe water, infant massage, low-lactose milk, simethicone, soya-based infant feeds, spinal manipulation, and whey hydrolysate milk.

  20. Chikungunya infection in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria do Carmo Menezes Bezerra Duarte

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: the infection of chikungunya virus presents clinical manifestations variables, particularly in infants in which may present multiple cutaneous manifestations. Description: a case series study was carried out in an analytical character of 14 infants (>28 days to < 2 years old admitted in a hospital between November 2015 and January 2016 with suspected case of chikungunya, by a specific IgM reactive serology. Patients positive for dengue fever, Zika virus, bacterial infections and other exanthematic diseases were excluded. Fever and cutaneous alterations were the most frequent clinical manifestations in 100% of the cases, followed by irritability (64.3%, vomits and arthralgia/arthritis in 35.7% each. Three children presented alterations in the cerebrospinal fluid compatible to meningitis. Anemia frequency was 85.7%. The median white blood cells count was 7.700/mm3 (2.600 to 20.300/mm3. High levels of aminotransferases were observed in three cases (230 to 450 U/L. Antibiotic therapy was indicated in 64.3% of the cases. Two infants needed opioid derivatives for analgesia while others took acetaminophen and/or dipyrone. Discussion: the study shows evident multi-systemic involvement of chikungunya infection in infants. The treatment is supportive, giving special attention to hydration, analgesia, skin care, and rational use of antibiotic therapy.

  1. Parenting Your Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sing songs. Show and talk about simple picture books. This is the way your baby learns how to talk. Infants Love To Explore You may have noticed that your baby is becoming interested in everything within reach, especially simple toys with bright colors and ...

  2. Milk Allergy in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Milk Allergy in Infants KidsHealth / For Parents / Milk Allergy in ... Alergia a la leche en bebés About Milk Allergy People of any age can have a milk ...

  3. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the womb (breech position) babies with a family history of DDH Also, DDH occurs more frequently in girls than boys and among first-born infants. Doctors will consider all of these factors when deciding whether a baby's hips should be checked by ultrasound. In addition, a ...

  4. Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Faergeman

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The Bellagio Report on Healthy Agriculture, Healthy Nutrition, Healthy People is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  5. Bellagio report on Healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people⋆

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simopoulos Artemis P.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Bellagio Report on Healthy agriculture, healthy nutrition, healthy people is the result of the meeting held at the Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center in Lake Como, Italy, 29 October–2 November 2012. The meeting was science-based but policy-oriented. The role and amount of healthy and unhealthy fats, with attention to the relative content of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, sugar, and particularly fructose in foods that may underlie the epidemics of non-communicable diseases (NCD’s worldwide were extensively discussed. The report concludes that sugar consumption, especially in the form of high energy fructose in soft drinks, poses a major and insidious health threat, especially in children, and most diets, although with regional differences, are deficient in omega-3 fatty acids and too high in omega-6 fatty acids. Gene-nutrient interactions in growth and development and in disease prevention are fundamental to health, therefore regional Centers on Genetics, Nutrition and Fitness for Health should be established worldwide. Heads of state and government must elevate, as a matter of urgency, Nutrition as a national priority, that access to a healthy diet should be considered a human right and that the lead responsibility for Nutrition should be placed in Ministries of Health rather than agriculture so that the health requirements drive agricultural priorities, not vice versa. Nutritional security should be given the same priority as food security.

  6. Toward a fuzzy logic control of the infant incubator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Narender P; Mathur, Garima; Hariharan, S I

    2009-10-01

    Premature birth is a world wide problem. Thermo regulation is a major problem in premature infants. Premature infants are often kept in infant incubators providing convective heating. Currently either the incubator air temperature is sensed and used to control the heat flow, or infant's skin temperature is sensed and used in the close loop control. Skin control often leads to large fluctuations in the incubator air temperature. Air control also leads to skin temperature fluctuations. The question remains if both the infant's skin temperature and the incubator air temperature can be simultaneously used in the control. The purpose of the present study was to address this question by developing a fuzzy logic control which incorporates both incubator air temperature and infant's skin temperature to control the heating. The control was evaluated using a lumped parameter mathematical model of infant-incubator system (Simon, B. N., N. P. Reddy, and A. Kantak, J. Biomech. Eng. 116:263-266, 1994). Simulation results confirmed previous experimental results that the on-off skin control could lead to fluctuations in the incubator air temperature, and the air control could lead to too slow rise time in the core temperature. The fuzzy logic provides a smooth control with the desired rise time.

  7. Infants long-term memory for complex music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Beatriz; Polka, Linda; Costa-Giomi, Eugenia

    2002-05-01

    In this study we examined infants' long-term memory for two complex pieces of music. A group of thirty 7.5 month-old infants was exposed daily to one short piano piece (i.e., either the Prelude or the Forlane by Maurice Ravel) for ten consecutive days. Following the 10-day exposure period there was a two-week retention period in which no exposure to the piece occurred. After the retention period, infants were tested on the Headturn Preference Procedure. At test, 8 different excerpts of the familiar piece were mixed with 8 different foil excerpts of the unfamiliar one. Infants showed a significant preference for the familiar piece of music. A control group of fifteen nonexposed infants was also tested and showed no preferences for either piece of music. These results suggest that infants in the exposure group retained the familiar music in their long-term memory. This was demonstrated by their ability to discriminate between the different excerpts of both the familiar and the unfamiliar pieces of music, and by their preference for the familiar piece. Confirming previous findings (Jusczyk and Hohne, 1993; Saffran et al., 2000), in this study we suggest that infants can retain complex pieces of music in their long-term memory for two weeks.

  8. Antioxidants: Protecting Healthy Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Nutrients Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Print Email Antioxidants - Protecting Healthy Cells Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, ... to cardiovascular disease and certain types of cancers. Antioxidants — such as vitamins C and E and carotenoids, ...

  9. Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men Women Home Health Wellness Healthy Aging Healthy Aging 4 Types of Foods to Help Boost Your ... clean plate, there are many negative long-term consequences. Try these rewards instead. View More Articles Freshly ...

  10. Healthy Bones Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as healthy as they can be. Eating a balanced diet that includes calcium and vitamin D, getting plenty ... Vitamin D Quick Facts For information about a balanced diet, visit: ChooseMyPlate.gov Healthfinder.gov: Eat Healthy For ...

  11. Keep Your Kidneys Healthy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... healthy meals, and cut back on salt and added sugars. Aim for less than 2,300 milligrams of ... 10 percent of your daily calories come from added sugars. Choose foods that are healthy for your body. ...

  12. Healthy Air Outdoors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung.org > Our Initiatives > Healthy Air > Outdoor Healthy Air Outdoors The quality of the air we breathe ... families and can even shorten their lives. Outdoor Air Pollution and Health Outdoor air pollution continues to ...

  13. Tips for Healthy Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent voice problems and maintain a healthy voice: Drink water (stay well hydrated): Keeping your body well hydrated by drinking plenty of water each day (6-8 glasses) is essential to maintaining a healthy voice. The ...

  14. A Rare Cause of Metabolic Acidosis: Fatal Transdermal Methanol Intoxication in an Infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahbudak Bal, Zumrut; Can, Fulya Kamit; Anil, Ayse Berna; Bal, Alkan; Anil, Murat; Gokalp, Gamze; Yavascan, Onder; Aksu, Nejat

    2016-08-01

    Oral methanol intoxication is common, but dermal intoxication is rare. We report a previously healthy 19-month-old female infant admitted to the emergency department (ED) with vomiting and tonic-clonic seizure. On physical examination, she was comatose and presented signs of decompensated shock with Kussmaul breathing. Her left thigh was edematous, with purple coloration. Methanol intoxication was suspected due to high anion gap metabolic acidosis (pH, 6.89; HCO3, pediatric intensive care unit, and methanol levels decreased to 0 mg/dL after 12 hours. During follow-up, massive edema and subarachnoid hemorrhage in the occipital lobe were detected by computed tomography of the brain. The patient died after 7 days.Although methanol intoxication occurs predominantly in adults, it must be considered in children with high-anion gap metabolic acidosis. This case report demonstrates that fatal transdermal methanol intoxication can occur in children, and it is the second report in the English literature of transdermal methanol intoxication in an infant.

  15. Absence of increase in carotid artery intima-media thickness in infants of diabetic mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabek, Mehmet Emre; Çağan, Havva Hasret; Selver Eklioğlu, Beray; Oran, Bülent

    2011-01-01

    Infants of diabetic mothers (IDM) are considered as a risk group for atherosclerosis. Increased aortic intima-media thickness has been reported in IDM. The purpose of this study was to assess carotid artery intima-media thickness (CA-IMT), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and atherosclerotic risk factors in IDM. Thirty IDM and 25 healthy controls were included in the study. Of these infants, 14 were appropriate-for-gestational age (AGA) and 16 were large-for-gestational age (LGA). CA-IMT and LVMI were obtained by M-mode echocardiographic examination. The relationship between parameters of atherosclerosis and echocardiographic measurements was assessed by Pearson's correlation analysis. LVMI was higher in LGA IDM when compared to AGA IDM and controls. CA-IMT was not significantly different between the groups and was also not related to atherosclerotic risk factors. Serum lipid and insulin levels were higher in LGA IDM when compared with AGA IDM and controls. There were no correlations between CA-IMT, LVMI and atherosclerotic risk factors. In contrast to previous reports indicating an increase in CA-IMT in IDM, no differences were found between IDM and controls in this study. Our results indicate that macrosomic IDM are prone to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy but not to atherosclerotic changes in the blood vessels.

  16. [Septic shock secondary to non-congenital chikungunya fever in a young infant: A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Domínguez, Nina; Achach-Asaf, Jorge Augusto; Basso-García, Luis Manuel; Quiñones-Pacheco, Yazmín Berenice; Gómez-Carro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    A chikungunya outbreak took place in the State of Yucatan starting in the second half of 2015 OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical course of a case of chikungunya in a previously healthy infant, providing practical evidence to guide future diagnoses and treatment during outbreak seasons in endemic areas Clinical manifestation started with a sudden onset of fever and a diffuse macular-papillary erythema, originally treated in the community with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Two days later, the fever relapsed with hypoactivity, severe thrombocytopenia and neutropenia (without lymphopenia), respiratory distress, liver dysfunction, sepsis, followed by septic shock with a fatal outcome. IgM test was positive to chikungunya, while her mother tested negative. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the blood culture possible due to contamination, without ruling out the possibility of a mixed origin sepsis. Chikungunya is a disease in which the manifestations in neonates and young infants can be severe, and even fatal. It is important to suspect it in this age group at risk of vector contact, in the presence of fever without apparent source of infection and cutaneous manifestations. It is important to use the antipyretics cautiously, considering the possibility of aggravating the underlying infection, and the potential hepatic and haematological damage. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Head circumference in Iranian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeili

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Head circumference (HC measurement is one of the important parameter for diagnosis of neurological, developmental disorders and dysmorphic syndromes. Recognition of different disorders requires an understanding of normal variation for HC size, in particular, in infancy period with most rapid growth of the brain. Because of international and interracial standard chart differences about anthropometric indices, some differences from local to local, generation to generation and changes in ethnic mix of population and socioeconomic factors, periodic revolution of HC size is suggested. The aims of our study were presenting local HC standard for an Iranian infant population and comparison with the American national center of health statistics (NCHS charts accepted by WHO. Methods: 1003 subjects aged from birth to 24 months apparently healthy normal children enrolled randomly in this cross sectional study. HC size were measured and recorded. Tables and graphs were depicted by Excel Microsoft Office 2007. We use two tailed t-student test for statistical analysis. Results: The mean of HC size in boys was larger than girls. The curves were followed a similar pattern to NCHS based on a visual comparison. Overall our subjects in both sexes at birth time had smaller HC size than NCHS. In other ages our children had larger HC size than those of NCHS. Conclusion: Because of international and interracial difference of HC size. We recommend in each area of the world, local anthropometric indices are constructed and used clinically. In addition more extensive and longitudinally design comprehensive studies is suggested.

  18. Eosinophilic colitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Chebar Lozinsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To review the literature for clinical data on infants with allergic or eosinophilic colitis. DATA SOURCE: MEDLINE search of all indexes was performed using the words ''colitis or procto-colitis and eosinophilic'' or ''colitis or proctocolitis and allergic'' between 1966 and February of 2013. All articles that described patients' characteristics were selected. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 770 articles were identified, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. The 32 articles included a total of 314 infants. According to the available information, 61.6% of infants were male and 78.6% were younger than 6 months. Of the 314 patients, 49.0% were fed exclusively breast milk, 44.2% received cow's milk protein, and 6.8% received soy protein. Diarrheal stools were described in 28.3% of patients. Eosinophilia was found in 43.8% (115/263 of infants. Colonic or rectal biopsy showed infiltration by eosinophils (between 5 and 25 perhigh-power field in 89.3% (236/264 of patients. Most patients showed improvement with theremoval of the protein in cow's milk from their diet or the mother's diet. Allergy challenge tests with cow's milk protein were cited by 12 of the 32 articles (66 patients. CONCLUSIONS: Eosinophilic colitis occurs predominantly in the first six months of life and in males. Allergy to cow's milk was considered the main cause of eosinophilic colitis. Exclusion of cow'smilk from the diet of the lactating mother or from the infant's diet is generally an effective therapeutic measure.

  19. Infant Neurobehavioral Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Barry M.; Miller, Robin J.; Hawes, Katheleen; Salisbury, Amy; Bigsby, Rosemarie; Sullivan, Mary C.; Padbury, James F.

    2011-01-01

    The trend toward single-room neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is increasing; however scientific evidence is, at this point, mostly anecdotal. This is a critical time to assess the impact of the single-room NICU on improving medical and neurobehavioral outcomes of the preterm infant. We have developed a theoretical model that may be useful in studying how the change from an open-bay NICU to a single-room NICU could affect infant medical and neurobehavioral outcome. The model identifies mediating factors that are likely to accompany the change to a single-room NICU. These mediating factors include family centered care, developmental care, parenting and family factors, staff behavior and attitudes, and medical practices. Medical outcomes that plan to be measured are sepsis, length of stay, gestational age at discharge, weight gain, illness severity, gestational age at enteral feeding, and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Neurobehavioral outcomes include the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) scores, sleep state organization and sleep physiology, infant mother feeding interaction scores, and pain scores. Preliminary findings on the sample of 150 patients in the open-bay NICU showed a “baseline” of effects of family centered care, developmental care, parent satisfaction, maternal depression, and parenting stress on the neurobehavioral outcomes of the newborn. The single-room NICU has the potential to improve the neurobehavioral status of the infant at discharge. Neurobehavioral assessment can assist with early detection and therefore preventative intervention to maximize developmental outcome. We also present an epigenetic model of the potential effects of maternal care on improving infant neurobehavioral status. PMID:21255702

  20. Focused attention, heart rate deceleration, and cognitive development in preterm and full-term infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie Thomas, Julianne H; Whitfield, Michael F; Oberlander, Tim F; Synnes, Anne R; Grunau, Ruth E

    2012-05-01

    The majority of children who are born very preterm escape major impairment, yet more subtle cognitive and attention problems are very common in this population. Previous research has linked infant focused attention during exploratory play to later cognition in children born full-term and preterm. Infant focused attention can be indexed by sustained decreases in heart rate (HR). However there are no preterm studies that have jointly examined infant behavioral attention and concurrent HR response during exploratory play in relation to developing cognition. We recruited preterm infants free from neonatal conditions associated with major adverse outcomes, and further excluded infants with developmental delay (Bayley Mental Development Index [MDI attention and concurrent HR response were compared in 83 preterm infants (born 23-32 weeks gestational age [GA]) who escaped major impairment to 46 full-term infants. Focused attention and HR response were then examined in relation to Bayley MDI, after adjusting for neonatal risk. MDI did not differ by group, yet full-term infants displayed higher global focused attention ratings. Among the extremely preterm infants born attention episodes, accounted for 49% of adjusted variance in predicting concurrent MDI. There were no significant associations for later-born gestational age (29-32 weeks) or full-term infants. Among extremely preterm infants who escape major impairment, our findings suggest unique relationships between focused attention, HR deceleration, and developing cognition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Healthy worker effect in hairdressing apprentices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnhøj, Anne; Søsted, Heidi; Menné, Torkil

    2011-01-01

    potential healthy worker effect. Methods. During the first 2 weeks of training, 382 hairdressing apprentices were enrolled in this study. All apprentices completed a self-administered questionnaire, including previously validated questions regarding, for example, previous and present hand eczema, eczema...... and by 11.9% of the controls (p worker effect, as there was a lower reported incidence of hand eczema and eczema...

  2. Early infant feeding and type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savilahti, Erkki; Saarinen, Kristiina M

    2009-06-01

    Infant feeding practices, particularly the type of milk feeding, have been associated with the development of type 1 diabetes. We studied the relationship between early infant feeding (during the first year of life) and diabetes in a large population-based cohort. In 1994-1995, 6,209 healthy full-term newborns participated in a study examining the effect of supplementary feeding, on development of allergy to cow's milk, in maternity hospitals. All supplements in the maternity hospitals were known. Mothers recorded the feeding of infants prospectively at home. In August 2006, from a nationwide diabetes registry, 45 children from our cohort were listed as having type 1 diabetes. The distribution of cases was similar in the randomized feeding groups: 9/1,789 in the group that received adapted cow's milk-based formula; 12/1,737 in those who received extensively hydrolyzed formula; 16/1,859 in those who received banked human milk; and 8 among those 824 exclusively breast-fed in the hospital. When children who had received cow's milk-based formula in the maternity hospital were compared with those without such exposure, less number of children in the former group had diabetes by age 8 (P = 0.026), but by the end of the follow-up (11.5 years) the difference disappeared (P = 0.16). Length of breast-feeding and introduction of cereals and other solid foods were similar among those developing type 1 diabetes and those remaining healthy, while early regular daily feeding with cow's milk-based formula tended to associate with lower risk for type 1 diabetes (OR 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.38-1.13; P = 0.08). In an extended, secondary analysis of a population-based cohort, very early exposure to cow's milk is not a risk factor for type 1 diabetes; it may in fact diminish its appearance before age 8.

  3. Early exclusive breastfeeding and maternal attitudes towards infant feeding in a population of new mothers in San Francisco, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M; Gugig, Roberto; Tran, Cam; Kathiravan, Suganya; Holbrook, Katherine; Heyman, Melvin B

    2010-02-01

    Positive parental attitudes towards infant feeding are an important component in child nutritional health. Previous studies have found that participants in the Special Supplemental Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program have lower breastfeeding rates and attitudes that do not contribute towards healthy infant feeding in spite of breastfeeding and nutrition education programs targeting WIC participants. The objective of this study was to assess the frequency of exclusive breastfeeding in the early postpartum period and maternal attitudes towards breastfeeding in a population of mothers at two San Francisco hospitals and in relation to WIC participation status. We interviewed women who had recently delivered a healthy newborn using a structured interview. A high percentage (79.8%) of our sample was exclusively breastfeeding at 1-4 days postpartum. We did not find any significant differences in rates of formula or mixed feeding by WIC participant status. Independent risk factors for mixed or formula feeding at 1-3 days postpartum included Asian/Pacific Islander ethnicity (odds ratio [OR] 2.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17-7.19). Being a college graduate was associated with a decreased risk of formula/mixed feeding (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.10-0.79). We also found that thinking breastfeeding was physically painful and uncomfortable was independently associated with not breastfeeding (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.06-1.89). Future studies should be conducted with Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders to better understand the lower rates of exclusive breastfeeding in this population and should address negative attitudes towards breastfeeding such as the idea that breastfeeding is painful or uncomfortable.

  4. Immunogenicity and safety of a novel monovalent high-dose inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine in infants: a comparative, observer-blind, randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Clemens, Ralf; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Jimeno, José; Clemens, Sue Ann Costa; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Molina, Natanael; Bandyopadhyay, Ananda S

    2016-03-01

    Following the proposed worldwide switch from trivalent oral poliovirus vaccine (tOPV) to bivalent types 1 and 3 OPV (bOPV) in 2016, inactivated poliovirus vaccine (IPV) will be the only source of protection against poliovirus type 2. With most countries opting for one dose of IPV in routine immunisation schedules during this transition because of cost and manufacturing constraints, optimisation of protection against all poliovirus types will be a priority of the global eradication programme. We assessed the immunogenicity and safety of a novel monovalent high-dose inactivated poliovirus type 2 vaccine (mIPV2HD) in infants. This observer-blind, comparative, randomised controlled trial was done in a single centre in Panama. We enrolled healthy infants who had not received any previous vaccination against poliovirus. Infants were randomly assigned (1:1) by computer-generated randomisation sequence to receive a single dose of either mIPV2HD or standard trivalent IPV given concurrently with a third dose of bOPV at 14 weeks of age. At 18 weeks, all infants were challenged with one dose of monovalent type 2 OPV (mOPV2). Primary endpoints were seroconversion and median antibody titres to type 2 poliovirus 4 weeks after vaccination with mIPV2HD or IPV; and safety (as determined by the proportion and nature of serious adverse events and important medical events for 8 weeks after vaccination). The primary immunogenicity analyses included all participants for whom a post-vaccination blood sample was available. All randomised participants were included in the safety analyses. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02111135. Between April 14 and May 9, 2014, 233 children were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive mIPV2HD (117 infants) or IPV (116 infants). 4 weeks after vaccination with mIPV2HD or IPV, seroconversion to poliovirus type 2 was recorded in 107 (93·0%, 95% CI 86·8-96·9) of 115 infants in the mIPV2HD group compared with 86 (74·8%, 65·8

  5. Segurança, imunogenicidade e eficácia protetora de duas doses da vacina RIX4414 contendo rotavírus atenuado de origem humana Safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of two doses of RIX4414 live attenuated human rotavirus vaccine in healthy Brazilian infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete C. Araujo

    2007-06-01

    efficacy of two doses of rotavirus vaccine in healthy Brazilian infants. METHODS: A randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela. Infants received two oral doses of vaccine or placebo at 2 and 4 months of age, concurrently with routine immunizations, except for oral poliomyelitis vaccine (OPV. This paper reports results from Belém, Brazil, where the number of subjects per group and the viral vaccine titers were: 194 (10(4.7 focus forming units - FFU, 196 (10(5.2 FFU, 194 (10(5.8 FFU and 194 (placebo. Anti-rotavirus (anti-RV antibody response was assessed in 307 subjects. Clinical severity of gastroenteritis episodes was measured using a 20-point scoring system with a score of > 11 defined as severe GE. RESULTS: The rates of solicited general symptoms were similar in vaccine and placebo recipients. At 2 months after the second dose, a serum IgA response to RV occurred in 54.7 to 74.4% of vaccinees. No interference was seen in the immunogenicity of routine vaccines. Vaccine efficacy against any rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE was 63.5% (95%CI 20.8-84.4 for the highest concentration (10(5.8 FFU. Efficacy was 81.5% (95%CI 44.5-95.4 against severe RVGE. At its highest concentration (10(5.8 FFU, RIX4414 provided 79.8% (95%CI 26.4-96.3 protection against severe RVGE by G9 strain. CONCLUSIONS: RIX4414 was highly immunogenic with a low reactogenicity profile and did not interfere with seroresponse to diptheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and Hib antigens. Two doses of RIX4414 provided significant protection against severe GE caused by RV.

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in the placenta related to infant neurodevelopment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Barry M; Marsit, Carmen J

    2018-01-30

    As the 'third brain' the placenta links the developing fetal brain and the maternal brain enabling study of epigenetic process in placental genes that affect infant neurodevelopment. We described the characteristics and findings of the 17 studies on epigenetic processes in placental genes and human infant neurobehavior. Studies showed consistent findings in the same cohort of term healthy infants across epigenetic processes (DNA methylation, genome wide, gene and miRNA expression) genomic region (single and multiple genes, imprinted genes and miRNAs) using candidate gene and genome wide approaches and across biobehavioral systems (neurobehavior, cry acoustics and neuroendocrine). Despite limitations, studies support future work on molecular processes in placental genes related to neurodevelopmental trajectories including implications for intervention.

  7. Evaluation of thyroid status of infants in the intensive care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmati, F; Pishva, N

    2009-09-01

    Previous studies report the spectrum of thyroid function abnormalities in critically-ill neonates. In this study, we evaluated the thyroid status in critically-ill neonates, and determined whether thyroid function abnormalities are more common in sick neonatal infants. In a prospective cohort study, 67 critically-ill infants from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, were entered into our study. Of all the included neonates, 33 were premature and seven were under 28 weeks of gestation. In addition to the routine thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-screening (capillary specimen), serum free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4) and TSH were checked using radioimmunoassay kit twice (during critical illness and before discharge from the NICU). It was observed that abnormal TSH levels (screening test) were about 40-fold higher in critically-ill neonates compared with healthy neonates, while more than four-fifths of them were detected in the second sampling done after recovery. The mean FT3 was significantly lower during the critical illness and it increased after recovery (2.537 and 3.232 pg/ml, respectively). Mean FT4 and mean TSH during the illness and after recovery did not have any significant difference. Thyroid function abnormalities are more common in infants under intensive care and most of them manifested as "euthyroid sick syndrome"; abnormal screening tests may be due to the transient elevation of TSH during recovery from illness. Therefore, only in cases in which TSH rises more than 15-20 mIU/L or TSH remains high for a month or longer, that treatment is needed, while other cases must be followed up by serial determination of TSH and FT4. The levels of FT3 and FT4 during the illness were not affected by the duration and severity of the illness.

  8. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  9. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  10. Distinctive Intestinal Lactobacillus Communities in 6-Month-Old Infants From Rural Malawi and Southwestern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakko, Juhani; Endo, Akihito; Mangani, Charles; Maleta, Kenneth; Ashorn, Per; Isolauri, Erika; Salminen, Seppo

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to compare the composition and diversity of Lactobacillus microbiota in infants living in Malawi and Southwestern Finland. The composition and diversity of the Lactobacillus group was analyzed in the feces of healthy 6-month-old infants living in rural Malawi (n = 44) and Southwestern Finland (n = 31), using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction method and PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting. Malawian infants had higher counts of lactobacilli than their Finnish counterparts (7.45 log cells/g vs 6.86 log cells/g, P Lactobacillus community was richer and more diverse in the Malawian infants. Leuconostoc citreum and Weissella confusa were the predominant species in both study groups, but Malawian infants were more often colonized by these species (100% vs 74.2%, P Lactobacillus ruminis, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus acidophilus, and Lactobacillus mucosae were detected more often in the Malawian infants (59.1% vs 0.0%, P Lactobacillus casei group species, however, were only detected in the Finnish infants. Malawian infants have a more abundant Lactobacillus microbiota with a distinct composition compared with Finnish infants. The environment, including diet and hygiene, may be among the factors influencing these differences.

  11. Reduced infant response to a routine care procedure after sucrose analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti; Katz, Joel

    2009-03-01

    Sucrose has analgesic and calming effects in newborns. To date, it is not known whether the beneficial effects extend to caregiving procedures that are performed after painful procedures. Our objective was to determine the effect of sucrose analgesia for procedural pain on infant pain responses during a subsequent caregiving procedure. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial. Healthy neonates within 2 strata (normal infants and infants of diabetic mothers) were randomly assigned to a sucrose or placebo water group before all needle procedures after birth. Pain response during a diaper change performed after venipuncture for the newborn screening test was determined by using a validated multidimensional measure, the Premature Infant Pain Profile. The study was conducted between September 15, 2003, and July 27, 2004. Altogether, 412 parents were approached; 263 consented. Twenty-three infants were not assigned, leaving 240 for participation (n = 120 per group), with an equal number in each infant strata. Of those, 186 (78%) completed the study. There were no significant differences in birth characteristics between groups. During diaper change, sucrose-treated infants had lower pain scores than placebo-treated infants. The relative risk of having pain, defined as a Premature Infant Pain Profile score of >/=6, was 0.64 with sucrose compared with placebo. This study demonstrates that when used to manage pain, sucrose reduces the pain response to a subsequent routine caregiving procedure. Therefore, the benefits of sucrose analgesia extend beyond the painful event to other aversive and potentially painful procedures.

  12. Mothers' different styles of involvement in preterm infant pain care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelin, Anna; Lehtonen, Liisa; Pelander, Tiina; Salanterä, Sanna

    2010-01-01

    To describe and understand how mothers utilize the opportunity to actively participate in their preterm infants' pain care using facilitated tucking by parents (FTP). Descriptive and exploratory study with postintervention interview. Finnish level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Twenty-three mothers who had preterm infants born at gestational ages of 32 to 34 weeks. The parents (N=45) of 29 preterm infants were taught to use FTP. In addition, all nurses in the NICU (N=76) received the same education to support the parents' use of FTP. After 2 to 4 weeks of FTP use, the mothers (n=23) were interviewed using the Clinical Interview for Parents of High-Risk Infants with additional questions related to the infants' pain care. The interviews were analyzed inductively with cross-case analysis and deductively with a previously developed coding scheme. Facilitated tucking by parents was perceived positively and was used by all participating mothers. Three different styles of involvement in preterm infants' pain care with FTP were identified. They formed a continuum from external to random and finally to internalized involvement. In external involvement, the pain care with FTP was triggered by outside factors such as nurses, whereas in random and internalized involvement the motivation emerged from a parent. Mothers with external involvement thought that any person could apply the FTP. In random involvement, mothers were mainly absent during painful procedures, although they saw themselves as the best caregivers. In internalized involvement, the responsibility for infant pain care was shared within the family. Mothers' NICU-related stress and maternal attachment were associated with this variation. This study showed that mothers' are willing to actively participate in their preterm infants' pain care. However, the participation is unique according to mother and her experiences before and during NICU admission. Nurses need to consider these differences in mothers

  13. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  14. Feasibility of repetitive lung function measurements by raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression during methacholine challenge in young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, L.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung function measurements by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RVRTC) technique during bronchial methacholine challenge in young infants. METHOD: Four hundred two healthy infants were tested at 1 month of age...... was successfully measured in 87% by transcutaneous oxygen pressure. No serious adverse events were observed during testing or after discharge from the clinic. The methacholine dose range was appropriate as PD could be determined in the majority of infants. FEV(0.5) values in 21% of infants dropped > 40% during...... the test. Short-lasting, self-limiting episodes of hypoxemia of

  15. Prevention of vitamin K deficiency bleeding in breastfed infants: lessons from the Dutch and Danish biliary atresia registries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselt, P.M. van; Koning, T.J. de; Vries, E. de

    2008-01-01

    in infants with biliary atresia. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From Dutch and Danish national biliary atresia registries, we retrieved infants who were either breastfed and received 1 mg of oral vitamin K at birth followed by 25 microg of daily oral vitamin K prophylaxis (Netherlands, 1991-2003), 2 mg of oral......: A daily dose of 25 microg of vitamin K fails to prevent bleedings in apparently healthy infants with unrecognized cholestasis because of biliary atresia. One milligram of weekly oral prophylaxis offers significantly higher protection to these infants and is of similar efficacy as 2 mg of intramuscular...

  16. Individual Variation in Fathers’ Testosterone Reactivity to Infant Distress Predicts Parenting Behaviors with their 1-Year-Old Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Patty X.; Saini, Ekjyot K.; Thomason, Elizabeth; Schultheiss, Oliver C.; Gonzalez, Richard; Volling, Brenda L.

    2015-01-01

    Positive father involvement is associated with positive child outcomes. There is great variation in fathers’ involvement and fathering behaviors, and men’s testosterone (T) has been proposed as a potential biological contributor to paternal involvement. Previous studies investigating testosterone changes in response to father-infant interactions or exposure to infant cues are unclear as to whether individual variation in T is predictive of fathering behavior. We show that individual variation in fathers’ T reactivity to their infants during a challenging laboratory paradigm (Strange Situation) uniquely predicted fathers’ positive parenting behaviors during a subsequent father-infant interaction, in addition to other psychosocial determinants of paternal involvement, such as dispositional empathy and marital quality. The findings have implications for understanding fathering behaviors and how fathers can contribute to their children’s socioemotional development. PMID:26497119

  17. Individual variation in fathers' testosterone reactivity to infant distress predicts parenting behaviors with their 1-year-old infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Patty X; Saini, Ekjyot K; Thomason, Elizabeth; Schultheiss, Oliver C; Gonzalez, Richard; Volling, Brenda L

    2016-04-01

    Positive father involvement is associated with positive child outcomes. There is great variation in fathers' involvement and fathering behaviors, and men's testosterone (T) has been proposed as a potential biological contributor to paternal involvement. Previous studies investigating testosterone changes in response to father-infant interactions or exposure to infant cues were unclear as to whether individual variation in T is predictive of fathering behavior. We show that individual variation in fathers' T reactivity to their infants during a challenging laboratory paradigm (Strange Situation) uniquely predicted fathers' positive parenting behaviors during a subsequent father-infant interaction, in addition to other psychosocial determinants of paternal involvement, such as dispositional empathy and marital quality. The findings have implications for understanding fathering behaviors and how fathers can contribute to their children's socioemotional development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cord Serum Lipid Profile of Infants of Diabetic Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasim Almusawi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infants of diabetic mothers (IDM is a critical issue in pediatrics, which is regarded as a major risk factor for birth trauma, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, birth asphyxia, transient tachypnea of the newborn (TTN and jaundice. IDM is also a risk factor for microvascular (e.g., ocular and renal complications and macrovascular complications (e.g., cerebrovascular accident, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular complications. Lipids are a heterogeneous group of hydrophobic organic molecules which can be extracted from tissues using non-polar solvents. Lipids, due to their hydrophobic property, are mainly found in membranes enclosing various cell organelles. Diabetes mellitus management with insulin (nowadays also with oral hypoglycemic medications has improved the outcomes of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM (most infants born to diabetic mother are large for gestational age. The neonatal mortality rate in IDM is over five times higher than that of infants of non-diabetic mothers. In this study, therefore, we aimed to assess the effect of maternal diabetes on cord serum lipid profile. Methods: This prospective (case-control study was carried out on 60 infants born in Al-Zahra teaching hospital during February 2014–October 2014. The study group consisted of 30 randomly chosen IDM, and the control group comprised 30 infants who were born to healthy mothers. Results: The results of this study demonstrated that there are significant differences between IDM and infants of healthy mothers regarding lipid profile and birth weight. Conclusion: This study confirms that cord serum lipid profile (serum cholesterol, serum triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein is higher at birth in IDM. Moreover, this study shows a significant association between lipid profile and body weight.

  19. Engaging Community With Promotores de Salud to Support Infant Nutrition and Breastfeeding Among Latinas Residing in Los Angeles County: Salud con Hyland's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Ellis, Britt; Nguyen-Rodriguez, Selena T; Espinoza, Lilia; Galvez, Gino; Garcia-Vega, Melawhy

    2015-01-01

    The Salud con Hyland's Project: Comienzo Saludable, Familia Sana [Health With Hyland's Project: Healthy Start, Healthy Family],was developed to provide education and support to Latina mothers regarding healthy infant feeding practices and maternal health. The promotora-delivered intervention was comprised of two charlas (educational sessions) and a supplemental, culturally and linguistically relevant infant feeding and care rolling calendar. Results indicate that the intervention increased intention to breastfeed exclusively, as well as to delay infant initiation of solids by 5 to 6 months. Qualitative feedback identified barriers to maternal and child health education as well as highlighted several benefits of the intervention.

  20. Digital camera image analysis of faeces in detection of cholestatic jaundice in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Parinya Parinyanut; Tai Bandisak; Piyawan Chiengkriwate; Sawit Tanthanuch; Surasak Sangkhathat

    2016-01-01

    Background: Stool colour assessment is a screening method for biliary tract obstruction in infants. This study is aimed to be a proof of concept work of digital photograph image analysis of stool colour compared to colour grading by a colour card, and the stool bilirubin level test. Materials and Methods: The total bilirubin (TB) level contents in stool samples from 17 infants aged less than 1 year, seven with confirmed cholestatic jaundice and ten healthy subjects was measured, and outcome c...

  1. Fermentation of carbohydrates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by intestinal microflora from infants.

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, L F; Shaffer, G P

    1989-01-01

    To determine how factors involved in infant carbohydrate metabolism could be effectively assayed in vitro, fecal materials from healthy infants were obtained and tested with fermentation mixtures incorporating glucose, fructose, and lactose incubated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The amounts of organic acids, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and methane produced were determined. Principal component analysis indicated that products of the three sugar systems produced very similar factor pat...

  2. The Longevity of Statistical Learning: When Infant Memory Decays, Isolated Words Come to the Rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ferhat; Hay, Jessica F.

    2018-01-01

    Research over the past 2 decades has demonstrated that infants are equipped with remarkable computational abilities that allow them to find words in continuous speech. Infants can encode information about the transitional probability (TP) between syllables to segment words from artificial and natural languages. As previous research has tested…

  3. Provincial differences in infant deaths in South Africa – an effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has previously been demonstrated that a peak in registered infant deaths, at 2 - 3 months of age at death, developed between 1997 and 2002 in South Africa, ... age distribution of post-neonatal infant deaths in South Africa by province, and relate the observed distributions to HIV and intervention characteristics. Design.

  4. Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demicheli, Vittorio; Jefferson, Tom; Ferroni, Eliana; Rivetti, Alessandro; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo

    2018-02-01

    The consequences of influenza in adults are mainly time off work. Vaccination of pregnant women is recommended internationally. This is an update of a review published in 2014. Future updates of this review will be made only when new trials or vaccines become available. Observational data included in previous versions of the review have been retained for historical reasons but have not been updated due to their lack of influence on the review conclusions. To assess the effects (efficacy, effectiveness, and harm) of vaccines against influenza in healthy adults, including pregnant women. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 31 December 2016), Embase (1990 to 31 December 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP; 1 July 2017), and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 July 2017), as well as checking the bibliographies of retrieved articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing influenza vaccines with placebo or no intervention in naturally occurring influenza in healthy individuals aged 16 to 65 years. Previous versions of this review included observational comparative studies assessing serious and rare harms cohort and case-control studies. Due to the uncertain quality of observational (i.e. non-randomised) studies and their lack of influence on the review conclusions, we decided to update only randomised evidence. The searches for observational comparative studies are no longer updated. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We rated certainty of evidence for key outcomes (influenza, influenza-like illness (ILI), hospitalisation, and adverse effects) using GRADE. We included 52 clinical trials of over 80,000 people assessing the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccines. We have presented findings from 25 studies comparing inactivated parenteral influenza vaccine against placebo or do-nothing control groups as the

  5. Distribution of haematological and chemical pathology values among infants in Malawi and Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumwenda, Newton I.; Khonje, Tiwonge; Mipando, Linda; Nkanaunena, Kondwani; Katundu, Pauline; Lubega, Irene; Elbireer, Ali; Bolton, Steve; Bagenda, Danstan; Mubiru, Michael; Fowler, Mary Glenn; Taha, Taha E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data on paediatric reference laboratory values are limited for sub-Saharan Africa. Objective To describe the distribution of haematological and chemical pathology values among healthy infants from Malawi and Uganda. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among healthy infants, 0–6 months old, born to HIV-uninfected mothers recruited from two settings in Blantyre, Malawi and Kampala, Uganda. Chemical pathology and haematology parameters were determined using standard methods on blood samples. Descriptive analyses by age-group were performed based on 2004 Division of AIDS Toxicity Table age categories. Mean values and interquartile ranges were compared by site and age-group. Results A total of 541 infants were included altogether, 294 from Malawi and 247 from Uganda. Overall, the mean laboratory values were comparable between the two sites. Mean alkaline phosphatase levels were lower among infants aged ≤21 days while aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, total bilirubin and gamma-glutamyl transferase were higher in those aged 0–7 days than in older infants. Mean haematocrit, haemoglobin and neutrophil counts were higher in the younger age-groups (<35 days) and overall were lower than US norms. Red and white blood cell counts tended to decrease after birth but increased after ~2 months of age. Mean basophil counts were higher in Malawi than in Uganda in infants aged 0–1 and 2–7 days; mean counts for eosinophils (for age groups 8–21 or older) and platelets (for all age groups) were higher in Ugandan than in Malawian infants. Absolute lymphocyte counts increased with infant age. Conclusion The chemical pathology and haematological values in healthy infants born to HIV-uninfected mothers were comparable in Malawi and Uganda and can serve as useful reference values in these settings. PMID:23164296

  6. Polysomnography for the management of oxygen supplementation therapy in infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gaurav; de Waal, Koert; Grahame, Sally; Collison, Adam; Roddick, Laurence; Hilton, Jodi; Gulliver, Tanya; Whitehead, Bruce; Mattes, Joerg

    2018-04-25

    Some infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) may require oxygen supplementation at home but a role for overnight polysomnography (PSG) in the management of home oxygen therapy has been rarely described. Forty-one infants with BPD born at less than 30 weeks gestational age were discharged with continuous home oxygen supplementation therapy between 2010 and 2013. PSG data were recorded on oxygen supplementation versus room air at median post conceptual age of 2 months (range 1-5.5 months) (first PSG after discharge to home). Those infants who continued oxygen supplementation therapy at home had at least one more PSG before oxygen therapy was discontinued (last PSG). We also collected PSG data in 10 healthy term infants (median age 3.5 months; range 2-4 months). In infants with BPD in room air, increased numbers of central apnoeas, hypopnoeas and SaO 2 desaturations were the predominant PSG features with a median apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) of 16.8 events per hour (range 0-155). On oxygen supplementation therapy, median AHI dramatically improved (2.2, range 0-22; p < 0.001) and was not different from control infants (2.0, range 0-3.9; p = 0.31). AHI on room air at the last PSG when home oxygen was ceased was 4.1 per hour (range 0-13.8) slightly higher than in healthy infants. Central sleep disordered breathing in infants with BPD dramatically normalises with low flow nasal cannula home oxygen therapy and improves with age. Mild central sleep disordered breathing remains detectable, although much improved, when compared to healthy infants at the time when the decision to cease home oxygen therapy was made by the physician.

  7. Parental Involvement in Infant Sleep Routines Predicts Differential Sleep Patterns in Children With and Without Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Jennifer; Palmer, Cara A; Hussain, Hira; Alfano, Candice A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared parents' retrospective reports of their involvement in infant settling strategies and their relation to current sleep patterns among children (N = 84, ages 7-11) with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and healthy controls. Parents of children with GAD were significantly more likely to report rocking their infants to sleep and putting infants down when they were already asleep than parents of healthy controls, even when accounting for infant health-related factors and parental anxiety. Greater involvement in infant sleep routines also predicted sleep patterns (measured via actigraphy) during childhood, though opposite relationships were observed in the two groups. Early involvement was related to poorer sleep in control children but better sleep for children with GAD even after controlling for current parenting practices. Findings suggest differential effects of early sleep-related parenting for children with and without later anxiety disorders with possible implications for early intervention.

  8. Milk consumption and hydration status of exclusively breast-fed infants in a warm climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K H; Creed de Kanashiro, H; del Aguila, R; Lopez de Romana, G; Black, R E

    1986-05-01

    To assess the hydration status of 40 exclusively breast-fed Peruvian infants, their milk intake and urinary volume and concentration were measured during 8-hour daytime observations. Maximum home temperatures ranged between 26 degrees and 33 degrees C; environmental relative humidity ranged between 49% and 96%. The infants consumed between 105 and 528 gm milk during the observation period; the standardized intakes ranged between 4.0 and 12.1 gm/kg body weight per hour (mean +/- SD 7.5 +/- 1.7 gm). The infants voided between 0.9 and 6.3 ml urine per kilogram of body weight per hour (mean +/- SD 3.4 +/- 1.3 ml). The maximum urinary specific gravity in each infant ranged between 1.003 and 1.017. We conclude that healthy infants can maintain adequate hydration status while exclusively breast-fed under these environmental conditions.

  9. Health-related quality of life for infants in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, R D; Kinsman, H I; Donohue, P K

    2012-12-01

    When discussing the benefits and burdens of medical interventions for critically ill infants, clinicians and families are challenged to weigh the uncertainties of treatment success with infant pain and suffering. Concrete measures of infant suffering or quality of life, which could inform infant care and decision-making are lacking. Although consistent and reliable health-related quality of life (HRQOL) definitions and measures have been extensively developed for adults and older children, they have not been relevant to neonates or infants. Advancing HRQOL research methodology is an objective of Healthy People 2020. This paper will review the evidence and practices relevant to HRQOL with a focus on intensive care and pediatric settings. We will highlight existing HRQOL measures, which could be adapted for neonates and existing neonatal intensive care unit measures and practices, which could inform new measures of HRQOL.

  10. Sweet babies: chocolate consumption during pregnancy and infant temperament at six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räikkönen, Katri; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Strandberg, Timo E

    2004-02-01

    Chocolate contains several biologically active components potentially having behavioral and psychological consequences. We tested whether chocolate consumption and stress experiences during pregnancy predict mother-rated infant temperament at 6 months. Prenatal frequency of chocolate consumption and intensity of psychological stress experience of the mothers, and temperament characteristics of the infants 6 months postpartum were evaluated in 305 consecutive, healthy mother-infant dyads. Mothers who reported daily consumption of chocolate rated more positively the temperament of their infants at 6 months. Maternal prenatal stress predicted more negatively tuned ratings of the infant temperament, particularly among those who reported never/seldom chocolate consumption. However, this effect was not observed among the mothers reporting weekly or daily chocolate consumption. In addition to producing subjective feelings of psychological well being, chocolate may have effects at multiple environmental and psychological levels.

  11. Optimal breastfeeding durations for HIV-exposed infants: the impact of maternal ART use, infant mortality and replacement feeding risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallampati, Divya; MacLean, Rachel L; Shapiro, Roger; Dabis, Francois; Engelsmann, Barbara; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Leroy, Valeriane; Lockman, Shahin; Walensky, Rochelle; Rollins, Nigel; Ciaranello, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    In 2010, the WHO recommended women living with HIV breastfeed for 12 months while taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) to balance breastfeeding benefits against HIV transmission risks. To inform the 2016 WHO guidelines, we updated prior research on the impact of breastfeeding duration on HIV-free infant survival (HFS) by incorporating maternal ART duration, infant/child mortality and mother-to-child transmission data. Using the Cost-Effectiveness of Preventing AIDS Complications (CEPAC)-Infant model, we simulated the impact of breastfeeding duration on 24-month HFS among HIV-exposed, uninfected infants. We defined "optimal" breastfeeding durations as those maximizing 24-month HFS. We varied maternal ART duration, mortality rates among breastfed infants/children, and relative risk of mortality associated with replacement feeding ("RRRF"), modelled as a multiplier on all-cause mortality for replacement-fed infants/children (range: 1 [no additional risk] to 6). The base-case simulated RRRF = 3, median infant mortality, and 24-month maternal ART duration. In the base-case, HFS ranged from 83.1% (no breastfeeding) to 90.2% (12-months breastfeeding). Optimal breastfeeding durations increased with higher RRRF values and longer maternal ART durations, but did not change substantially with variation in infant mortality rates. Optimal breastfeeding durations often exceeded the previous WHO recommendation of 12 months. In settings with high RRRF and long maternal ART durations, HFS is maximized when mothers breastfeed longer than the previously-recommended 12 months. In settings with low RRRF or short maternal ART durations, shorter breastfeeding durations optimize HFS. If mothers are supported to use ART for longer periods of time, it is possible to reduce transmission risks and gain the benefits of longer breastfeeding durations. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of the International AIDS Society.

  12. Factors Associated With Parents' Perceptions of Their Infants' Oral Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Jeanette M; Levy, Steven M; Xu, Yinghui; Jackson, Richard D; Eckert, George J; Levy, Barcey T; Fontana, Margherita

    2016-07-01

    Parents have an important role ensuring their infants receive oral and medical health care. Their decisions affect the well-being of their children. This study used data collected from a longitudinal, prospective study with the aim of developing and validating a caries risk assessment tool. The objectives of this study are to (a) compare parents' perceptions of how well they do in taking care of the infants' teeth and/or gums versus how well they do in taking care of the infants' medical health and (b) determine factors associated with parental perceptions of how well they do in taking care of the infants' teeth and/or gums. A total of 1323 parent/infant pairs were enrolled in the study at Duke University, Indiana University, and the University of Iowa. Through a survey, 283 (21%) of the parents perceived they did an excellent job of both taking care of both the infant's oral and medical health, while 861 (65%) perceived the care of their infant's medical health was better than their care of the teeth and/or gums. In the multivariable model, parents who perceived they provided excellent/very good/good care for the infants' teeth and/or gums were more likely to brush the infant's teeth daily, use toothpaste daily, clean inside the infant's mouth and/or gums daily, and not let the infant have something other than water after brushing and prior to bedtime. Also, those with infants having Medicaid or State Insurance, parents not eating sugary snacks frequently, and parents getting dental checkups at least annually were likely to perceive that they provided excellent/very good/good care for their infant's teeth and/or gums. Parents who provide good infant oral health care are more likely to perceive they provide good care and more likely to have better personal dental health behaviors. This agrees with previous studies concerning older children. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. [Breast- and bottle-feeding in preterm infants: a comparison of behavioral cues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chun; Lin, Chen-Hsiu; Zhang, Jia-Wen; Chen, Siao-Min; Chen, Chih-Ling; Huang, Mei-Chih

    2013-12-01

    Developmental care has been broadly applied to identify the behavioral cues and care needs of preterm infants. Past studies indicate a significantly higher level of physical distress in bottle-fed preterm infants than in preterm infants who are breastfed. However, no evidence has yet been reported that supports the influence of feeding methods on behavioral cues. This study compares differences in the type and frequency of behavioral cues between breast- and bottle-fed preterm infants. A comparison study design and secondary data analysis method were used to assess data from two previous research projects. Infant feeding behavioral cues were observed and compared between two groups: 7 preterm infants who were breastfed and 7 preterm infants who were bottle-fed. After cases were matched by infant gestational age, behavioral responses were coded according to the preterm feeding cues coding system (PFCCS) from 7 paired maternal-infant feeding videos that featured preterm infants of 25 to 32 weeks gestational age at birth. The PFCCS classifies 24 feeding behavioral cues into hunger cues, self-regulatory cues, stress cues, and satiety cues. Infants in the breastfeeding group had a higher hunger cue frequency than their bottle-fed peers (p = .013), while bottle-fed infants had a higher stress cue frequency than their breastfed peers (p = .041). Other significant differences in behavioral cues between the two feeding methods included "fluid spillage" (bottle- >breast-, p = .008), "central cyanosis" (bottle- >breast-, p = .024) and "hand pushing" (breast- >bottle-, p = .034). Preterm infants in this study who breastfed showed significantly fewer stress cues than those who bottle fed. These findings support the importance of enhancing care provider sensitivity with regard to behavioral-cue observation. Findings further support breastfeeding rather than bottle-feeding for preterm infants.

  14. NUCLEOTIDES IN INFANT FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Mamonova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the application of nucleotides-metabolites, playing a key role in many biological processes, for the infant feeding. The researcher provides the date on the nucleotides in the women's milk according to the lactation stages. She also analyzes the foreign experience in feeding newborns with nucleotides-containing milk formulas. The article gives a comparison of nucleotides in the adapted formulas represented in the domestic market of the given products.Key words: children, feeding, nucleotides.

  15. Infant and toddler nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Katie

    2015-12-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are often the first point of advice about nutrition and feeding concerns in infants and toddlers. The aim of this article is to discuss the assessment of breastfed infants and address commonly presenting issues such as regurgitation, vomiting and bowel habits. Recommendations for starting solids and management of fussy eating are also outlined in this article. Breastfeeding should be supported by all healthcare professionals. Intake is difficult to quantify, but can be assessed using growth and urine output, with support from lactation consultants and/or child and family health nurses. Regurgitation is common, and usually resolves itself. If there are clinical concerns about a child's vomiting, they should be investigated medically. Consti-pation can be caused by insufficient fluid intake and should be managed medically; dietary interventions are not recommended as first-line treatment. Solid foods should be introduced around six months of age, when the infant is developmentally ready. Delaying the introduction of solids or allergenic foods does not prevent allergies. Fussy eating is common in toddlers exerting their independence, and behavioural management is essential.

  16. An eye tracking investigation of color-location binding in infants' visual short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Lisa M; Baumgartner, Heidi A; Kanjlia, Shipra; Luck, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Two experiments examined 8- and 10-month-old infants' ( N = 71) binding of object identity (color) and location information in visual short-term memory (VSTM) using a one-shot change detection task . Building on previous work using the simultaneous streams change detection task, we confirmed that 8- and 10-month-old infants are sensitive to changes in binding between identity and location in VSTM. Further, we demonstrated that infants recognize specifically what changed in these events. Thus, infants' VSTM for binding is robust and can be observed in different procedures and with different stimuli.

  17. Frequency Modulation and Spatiotemporal Stability of the sCPG in Preterm Infants with RDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M. Barlow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonnutritive suck (NNS is an observable and accessible motor behavior which is often used to make inference about brain development and pre-feeding skill in preterm and term infants. The purpose of this study was to model NNS burst compression pressure dynamics in the frequency and time domain among two groups of preterm infants, including those with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, N=15 and 17 healthy controls. Digitized samples of NNS compression pressure waveforms recorded at a 1-week interval were collected 15 minutes prior to a scheduled feed. Regression analysis and ANOVA revealed that healthy preterm infants produced longer NNS bursts and the mean burst initiation cycle frequencies were higher when compared to the RDS group. Moreover, the initial 5 cycles of the NNS burst manifest a frequency modulated (FM segment which is a significant feature of the suck central pattern generator (sCPG, and differentially expressed in healthy and RDS infants. The NNS burst structure revealed significantly lower spatiotemporal index values for control versus RDS preterm infants during FM, and provides additional information on the microstructure of the sCPG which may be used to gauge the developmental status and progression of oromotor control systems among these fragile infants.

  18. Effect of music by Mozart on energy expenditure in growing preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubetzky, Ronit; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul; Reifen, Ram; Ashbel, Gina; Mandel, Dror

    2010-01-01

    The rate of weight gain in preterm infants who are exposed to music seems to improve. A potential mechanism could be increased metabolic efficiency; therefore, we conducted this study to test the hypothesis that music by Mozart reduces resting energy expenditure (REE) in growing healthy preterm infants. DESIGN. A prospective, randomized clinical trial with crossover was conducted in 20 healthy, appropriate-weight-for-gestational-age, gavage-fed preterm infants. Infants were randomly assigned to be exposed to a 30-minute period of Mozart music or no music on 2 consecutive days. Metabolic measurements were performed by indirect calorimetry. REE was similar during the first 10-minute period of both randomization groups. During the next 10-minute period, infants who were exposed to music had a significantly lower REE than when not exposed to music (P = .028). This was also true during the third 10-minute period (P = .03). Thus, on average, the effect size of music on REE is a reduction of approximately 10% to 13% from baseline, an effect obtained within 10 to 30 minutes. Exposure to Mozart music significantly lowers REE in healthy preterm infants. We speculate that this effect of music on REE might explain, in part, the improved weight gain that results from this "Mozart effect."

  19. Preference for infant-directed speech in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Samantha C; O'Sullivan, Laura P; Shah, Bhavesh L; Berthier, Neil E

    2014-11-01

    The current study explores the effects of exposure to maternal voice on infant sucking in preterm infants. Twenty-four preterm infants averaging 35 weeks gestational age were divided randomly into two groups. A contingency between high-amplitude sucking and presentation of maternal voice was instituted for one group while the other group served as a yoked control. No significant differences were observed in sucking of the two groups, but the degree of pitch modulation of the maternal voice predicted an increase in the rate of infant sucking. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. USE OF FOODSTUFFS WITH PRO-AND PREBIOTIC ACTIONS IN INFANT FOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Ladodo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the data about opportunity to enrich the modern infant foodstuffs with pro and prebiotics. The authors name the contents of the foodstuffs with pro and prebiotic properties, findings of the multicentric research according to the estimate of their clinical efficiency among healthy and ill infants. They show the safety and high efficiency of the use of the given healthful and dietary foodstuffs.Key words: infant food, foodstuffs, probiotics, prebiotics, bifidus bacteria, lactic acid bacilli, oligosaccharides, lactulose, inulin.

  1. Neurosciences of infant mental health development: recent findings and implications for counseling psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Adriana; Lifter, Karin

    2014-10-01

    This article is about the neural correlates of infant mental health and their correspondences to social emotional development. These correspondences are organized in terms of the definition of infant mental provided by Zero to Three (2001), centered on infants' capacities regarding the experience and expression of emotions, interpersonal relationships, and learning. We conclude with implications of these correspondences for counseling psychology-namely, working with children's caregivers to maximize children's healthy social and emotional development. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. The effectiveness of video interaction guidance in parents of premature infants: A multicenter randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tooten Anneke

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have consistently found a high incidence of neonatal medical problems, premature births and low birth weights in abused and neglected children. One of the explanations proposed for the relation between neonatal problems and adverse parenting is a possible delay or disturbance in the bonding process between the parent and infant. This hypothesis suggests that due to neonatal problems, the development of an affectionate bond between the parent and the infant is impeded. The disruption of an optimal parent-infant bond -on its turn- may predispose to distorted parent-infant interactions and thus facilitate abusive or neglectful behaviours. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG is expected to promote the bond between parents and newborns and is expected to diminish non-optimal parenting behaviour. Methods/design This study is a multi-center randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of Video Interaction Guidance in parents of premature infants. In this study 210 newborn infants with their parents will be included: n = 70 healthy term infants (>37 weeks GA, n = 70 moderate term infants (32–37 weeks GA which are recruited from maternity wards of 6 general hospitals and n = 70 extremely preterm infants or very low birth weight infants (i.e. full term infants and their parents, receiving care as usual, a control group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving care as usual and an intervention group (i.e. premature infants and their parents, receiving VIG. The data will be collected during the first six months after birth using observations of parent-infant interactions, questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcomes are the quality of parental bonding and parent-infant interactive behaviour. Parental secondary outcomes are (posttraumatic stress symptoms, depression, anxiety and feelings of anger and hostility. Infant secondary outcomes are behavioral aspects such as crying

  3. Comparison of respiratory physiologic features when infants are placed in car safety seats or car beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinane, T Bernard; Murphy, Joan; Bass, Joel L; Corwin, Michael J

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the respiratory physiologic features of healthy term infants placed in either a car bed or a car safety seat. Within the first 1 week of life, 67 healthy term infants were recruited and assigned randomly to be monitored in either a car bed (33 infants) or a car safety seat (34 infants). Physiologic data, including oxygen saturation and frequency and type of apnea, were obtained and analyzed in a blinded manner. The groups spent similar amounts of time in the devices (car bed: 71.6 minutes; car seat: 74.2 minutes). The mean oxygen saturation values were not different between the groups (car bed: 97.1%; car seat: 97.3%). The percentages of time with oxygen saturation of car bed: 11.8[corrected]%; car seat: 18.3[corrected]%). In both groups, a number of infants spent high percentages of study time with oxygen saturation of car safety seat group (54%-63% of study time). Values for the 6 infants in the car bed group with the most time at this level were lower (20%-42%). This difference in the duration of oxygen saturation of features of infants in the 2 car safety devices were observed to be similar. Of note, substantial periods of time with oxygen saturation of < 95% were surprisingly common in both groups.

  4. The Associations between Infant Homicide, Homicide, and Suicide Rates: An Analysis of World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, Matthew; Nielssen, Olav; Lackersteen, Steven; Smith, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have found that rates of homicide of children aged under one (infant homicide) are associated with rates of suicide, but not with rates of homicide. Linear regression was used to examine associations among infant homicide, homicide, and suicide in samples of regions in the United States and other countries. Infant homicide rates…

  5. Development of adaptive sensorimotor control in infant sitting posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chiou; Jeka, John; Clark, Jane E

    2016-03-01

    A reliable and adaptive relationship between action and perception is necessary for postural control. Our understanding of how this adaptive sensorimotor control develops during infancy is very limited. This study examines the dynamic visual-postural relationship during early development. Twenty healthy infants were divided into 4 developmental groups (each n=5): sitting onset, standing alone, walking onset, and 1-year post-walking. During the experiment, the infant sat independently in a virtual moving-room in which anterior-posterior oscillations of visual motion were presented using a sum-of-sines technique with five input frequencies (from 0.12 to 1.24 Hz). Infants were tested in five conditions that varied in the amplitude of visual motion (from 0 to 8.64 cm). Gain and phase responses of infants' postural sway were analyzed. Our results showed that infants, from a few months post-sitting to 1 year post-walking, were able to control their sitting posture in response to various frequency and amplitude properties of the visual motion. Infants showed an adult-like inverted-U pattern for the frequency response to visual inputs with the highest gain at 0.52 and 0.76 Hz. As the visual motion amplitude increased, the gain response decreased. For the phase response, an adult-like frequency-dependent pattern was observed in all amplitude conditions for the experienced walkers. Newly sitting infants, however, showed variable postural behavior and did not systemically respond to the visual stimulus. Our results suggest that visual-postural entrainment and sensory re-weighting are fundamental processes that are present after a few months post sitting. Sensorimotor refinement during early postural development may result from the interactions of improved self-motion control and enhanced perceptual abilities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Infant-Directed Speech Drives Social Preferences in 5-Month-Old Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schachner, Adena; Hannon, Erin E.

    2011-01-01

    Adults across cultures speak to infants in a specific infant-directed manner. We asked whether infants use this manner of speech (infant- or adult-directed) to guide their subsequent visual preferences for social partners. We found that 5-month-old infants encode an individuals' use of infant-directed speech and adult-directed speech, and use this…

  7. ADOLESCENTS’ HEALTHY EATING

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne

    This PhD thesis contributes with knowledge about adolescent healthy eating by studying consumer socialisation, social influence and behavioural change in relation to adolescent healthy eating. The introduction provides the important reasons for studying adolescents and healthy eating and explains...... relevant literature on consumer socialisation, social influence and behaviour change through interventions employing feedback in relation to adolescent healthy eating, it is argued that a socio-cognitive approach to consumer socialisation and behaviour change provides a richer and more nuanced...... understanding of adolescent healthy eating. Based on this, the thesis presents three research questions which are investigated in three research papers. The research questions are: 1. Which roles do parents and adolescents have in healthy eating socialisation? 2. How does the social influence from parents...

  8. [Healthy Cities projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Takehito

    2002-05-01

    This is a review article on "Healthy Cities". The Healthy Cities programme has been developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) to tackle urban health and environmental issues in a broad way. It is a kind of comprehensive policy package to carry out individual projects and activities effectively and efficiently. Its key aspects include healthy public policy, vision sharing, high political commitment, establishment of structural organization, strategic health planning, intersectoral collaboration, community participation, setting approach, development of supportive environment for health, formation of city health profile, national and international networking, participatory research, periodic monitoring and evaluation, and mechanisms for sustainability of projects. The present paper covered the Healthy Cities concept and approaches, rapid urbanization in the world, developments of WHO Healthy Cities, Healthy Cities developments in the Western Pacific Region, the health promotion viewpoint, and roles of research.

  9. Are there healthy obese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griera Borrás, José Luis; Contreras Gilbert, José

    2014-01-01

    It is currently postulated that not all obese individuals have to be considered as pathological subjects. From 10% to 20% of obese people studied do not show the metabolic changes common in obese patients. The term "healthy obese" has been coined to refer to these patients and differentiate them from the larger and more common group of pathological obese subjects. However, the definition of "healthy obese" is not clear. Use of "healthy obese" as a synonym for obese without metabolic complications is risky. Clinical markers such as insulin resistance are used to identify this pathology. It is not clear that healthy obese subjects have lower morbidity and mortality than pathologically obese patients. According to some authors, healthy obese would represent an early stage in evolution towards pathological obesity. There is no agreement as to the need to treat healthy obese subjects. Copyright © 2012 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. 24-hour antiplatelet effect of aspirin in patients with previous definite stent thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Morten; Hvas, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Lisette O

    2014-01-01

    : Platelet inhibition declined significantly during the 24-hour dosing interval in aspirin-treated patients with previous definite ST or stable coronary artery disease and in healthy individuals. Increased levels of immature platelets and thrombopoietin were observed in patients with previous definite ST....... through 24 h in patients with previous definite ST. Furthermore, we explored whether increased levels of immature platelets and thrombopoietin are associated with a particularly rapid recovery of platelet function. METHODS: This case-control study included 50 patients with previous definite ST matched...... with 100 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 50 healthy volunteers. All participants were on aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Platelet aggregation was measured 1 and 24 h after aspirin intake using platelet aggregometry (Multiplate® Analyzer). Cyclooxygenase-1 activity, platelet...

  11. Haemophilus is overrepresented in the nasopharynx of infants hospitalized with RSV infection and associated with increased viral load and enhanced mucosal CXCL8 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ederveen, Thomas H A; Ferwerda, Gerben; Ahout, Inge M; Vissers, Marloes; de Groot, Ronald; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Huynen, Martijn A; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; de Jonge, Marien I

    2018-01-11

    While almost all infants are infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) before the age of 2 years, only a small percentage develops severe disease. Previous studies suggest that the nasopharyngeal microbiome affects disease development. We therefore studied the effect of the nasopharyngeal microbiome on viral load and mucosal cytokine responses, two important factors influencing the pathophysiology of RSV disease. To determine the relation between (i) the microbiome of the upper respiratory tract, (ii) viral load, and (iii) host mucosal inflammation during an RSV infection, nasopharyngeal microbiota profiles of RSV infected infants (load was measured using qPCR. Nasopharyngeal CCL5, CXCL10, MMP9, IL6, and CXCL8 levels were determined with ELISA. Viral load in nasopharyngeal aspirates of patients associates significantly to total nasopharyngeal microbiota composition. Healthy infants (n = 21) and RSV patients (n = 54) display very distinct microbial patterns, primarily characterized by a loss in commensals like Veillonella and overrepresentation of opportunistic organisms like Haemophilus and Achromobacter in RSV-infected individuals. Furthermore, nasopharyngeal microbiota profiles are significantly different based on CXCL8 levels. CXCL8 is a chemokine that was previously found to be indicative for disease severity and for which we find Haemophilus abundance as the strongest predictor for CXCL8 levels. The nasopharyngeal microbiota in young infants with RSV infection is marked by an overrepresentation of the genus Haemophilus. We present that this bacterium is associated with viral load and mucosal CXCL8 responses, both which are involved in RSV disease pathogenesis.

  12. Novel Word Learning in Bilingual and Monolingual Infants: Evidence for a Bilingual Advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Leher; Fu, Charlene S L; Tay, Zhi Wen; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick

    2017-02-03

    Previous studies revealing that monolingual and bilingual infants learn similar sounding words with comparable success are largely based on prior investigations involving single-feature changes in the onset consonant of a word. There have been no investigations of bilingual infants' abilities to learn similar sounding words differentiated by vowels. In the current study, 18-month-old bilingual and monolingual infants (n = 90) were compared on their sensitivity to a vowel change when learning the meanings of words. Bilingual infants learned similar sounding words differing by a vowel contrast, whereas monolingual English- and Mandarin-learning infants did not. Findings are discussed in terms of early constraints on novel word learning in bilingual and monolingual infants. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  13. Infant mental health in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toran, Hasnah; Squires, Jane; Lawrence, Karen

    2011-03-01

    The Infant Mental Health system in Malaysia is described, beginning with cultural and religious practices that influence mental health practices. Second, a description of the Malaysian mental health system, including historical influences, is given. Third, policy and services for young children with mental health problems are described. Finally, recommendations for future steps for developing an effective infant mental health system are presented, including the development of infant mental health policies by the government, increased personnel training, increased community mental health resources, integration of culture into the mental health system, and finally, development of appropriate screening and assessment instruments and systems. Copyright © 2011 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  14. Infants prefer female body phenotypes; infant girls prefer they have an hourglass shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerianne M Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents and adults show preferences for male and female body shapes consistent with evolutionary theories of reproductive fitness and mate selection. However, when these preferences for females with narrow waists (i.e., 0.7 waist-to-hip ratio and men with broad shoulders (i.e., mesomorphic body shape emerge during the lifespan is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, eye-movements were tracked in 144 infants (3 to 18 months of age during computer presentation of three-dimensional human figures varying in body features thought relevant for reproductive success (e.g., secondary sex characteristics, waist-to-hip ratio. When presented with pairs of figures differing in apparent sex, male and female infants looked significantly longer at the female figure compared to the male figure, a new finding that extends previous research showing preferences for female faces in infancy. When presented with same-sex figures differing in characteristics associated with mate value, male and female infants looked longer at a low mate value male (i.e., an endomorphic body type compared to a high mate value male (i.e., a mesomorphic body type, a finding that replicates the results of previous research. In addition, the novel use of high and low mate value female figures showed a sex difference in visual attention, such that female infants looked longer at the high mate value female figure compared to the low mate female figure whereas male infants showed the opposite pattern of results. In sum, these findings suggest that infants generally do not possess preferences for adult-defined attractive male body shapes. However, infant girls’ greater attention to a female figure with an adult-preferred waist-to-hip ratio raises the possibility that evolved preferences for 0.7 waist-to-hip ratio influence girls’ later preference for toys representing females with an hourglass shape, perhaps supporting elaboration of adult social behaviors that enhance

  15. Exclusive 6 month-breastfeeding and associated factors among healthy newborns

    OpenAIRE

    Cairo Lavado, Javier

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine if factors such as maternal characteristics, hospital procedures and neonatal weight loss, were related to exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) up to 6 months among healthy newborns at the Navy Medical Center (NMC) in 1998. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Clinical histories of infants born in 1998 were reviewed, and was assessed the existence of a relationship between the up-to-6-month EBF and mother's parity and age, military rank of the navy member relative, infant gender, neonatal...

  16. Caribbean health: Healthy children, healthy nation

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Caribbean food groups, balanced diets and portion sizes, healthy snacking, nutrition label reading, physical activity, home gardening, food safety and hygiene as well as cooking methods. Two schools revived school gardens, providing an opportunity to consume their own produce and learn how to grow vegetables and ...

  17. Longitudinal plasma metabolic profiles, infant feeding, and islet autoimmunity in the MIDIA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgenrud, Benedicte; Stene, Lars C; Tapia, German

    2017-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal plasma metabolic profiles in healthy infants and the potential association with breastfeeding duration and islet autoantibodies predictive of type 1 diabetes. Method: Up to four longitudinal plasma samples from age 3 months from case......-chain amino acids, and lower levels of methionine and 3,4-dihydroxybutyric acid.......Aims: The aim of this study was to investigate the longitudinal plasma metabolic profiles in healthy infants and the potential association with breastfeeding duration and islet autoantibodies predictive of type 1 diabetes. Method: Up to four longitudinal plasma samples from age 3 months from case...

  18. Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Know Concentration Before Giving Acetaminophen to Infants Share Tweet Linkedin ... infants has only been available in a stronger concentration that doesn’t require giving the infants as ...

  19. Elimination Problems in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea Ear Problems Elimination Problems Elimination Problems in Infants and Children Eye Problems Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants ...

  20. Nausea and Vomiting in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infants and Children Chest Pain, Acute Chest Pain, Chronic Cold and Flu Cough Diarrhea Ear Problems Elimination Problems Elimination Problems in Infants and Children Eye Problems Facial Swelling Feeding Problems in Infants ...