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Sample records for previously characterized heme

  1. Structural Characterization of Heme Environmental Mutants of CgHmuT that Shuttles Heme Molecules to Heme Transporters

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    Norifumi Muraki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Corynebacteria contain a heme uptake system encoded in hmuTUV genes, in which HmuT protein acts as a heme binding protein to transport heme to the cognate transporter HmuUV. The crystal structure of HmuT from Corynebacterium glutamicum (CgHmuT reveals that heme is accommodated in the central cleft with His141 and Tyr240 as the axial ligands and that Tyr240 forms a hydrogen bond with Arg242. In this work, the crystal structures of H141A, Y240A, and R242A mutants were determined to understand the role of these residues for the heme binding of CgHmuT. Overall and heme environmental structures of these mutants were similar to those of the wild type, suggesting that there is little conformational change in the heme-binding cleft during heme transport reaction with binding and the dissociation of heme. A loss of one axial ligand or the hydrogen bonding interaction with Tyr240 resulted in an increase in the redox potential of the heme for CgHmuT to be reduced by dithionite, though the wild type was not reduced under physiological conditions. These results suggest that the heme environmental structure stabilizes the ferric heme binding in CgHmuT, which will be responsible for efficient heme uptake under aerobic conditions where Corynebacteria grow.

  2. Characterization of Human and Yeast Mitochondrial Glycine Carriers with Implications for Heme Biosynthesis and Anemia.

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    Lunetti, Paola; Damiano, Fabrizio; De Benedetto, Giuseppe; Siculella, Luisa; Pennetta, Antonio; Muto, Luigina; Paradies, Eleonora; Marobbio, Carlo Marya Thomas; Dolce, Vincenza; Capobianco, Loredana

    2016-09-16

    Heme is an essential molecule in many biological processes, such as transport and storage of oxygen and electron transfer as well as a structural component of hemoproteins. Defects of heme biosynthesis in developing erythroblasts have profound medical implications, as represented by sideroblastic anemia. The synthesis of heme requires the uptake of glycine into the mitochondrial matrix where glycine is condensed with succinyl coenzyme A to yield δ-aminolevulinic acid. Herein we describe the biochemical and molecular characterization of yeast Hem25p and human SLC25A38, providing evidence that they are mitochondrial carriers for glycine. In particular, the hem25Δ mutant manifests a defect in the biosynthesis of δ-aminolevulinic acid and displays reduced levels of downstream heme and mitochondrial cytochromes. The observed defects are rescued by complementation with yeast HEM25 or human SLC25A38 genes. Our results identify new proteins in the heme biosynthetic pathway and demonstrate that Hem25p and its human orthologue SLC25A38 are the main mitochondrial glycine transporters required for heme synthesis, providing definitive evidence of their previously proposed glycine transport function. Furthermore, our work may suggest new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Characterization of Heme Proteins Involved in Microbial Exoelectric Activity and Small Molecule-Sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Vogler, Malvina M.

    2018-01-01

    Heme proteins, also termed cytochromes, are a widespread class of metalloproteins containing an Fe-protoporphyrin IX cofactor. They perform numerous functions in nature such as oxygen-transport by hemoglobin, monooxygenation reactions catalyzed by Cytochrome P-450, and electron transfer reactions during photosynthesis. The differences between proteincofactor binding characteristics and the cofactor environment greatly influence the extensive range of functions. In this dissertation, proteins from the Mtr pathway of Shewanella oneidensis are characterized. These c-type cytochromes contain multiple heme cofactors per protein molecule that covalently attach to the protein amino acid sequence and are involved in electron transfer to extracellular metal oxides during anaerobic conditions. Successful recombinant expression of pathway components MtrC and MtrA is achieved in Escherichia coli. Heme-dependent gel staining and UV/Vis spectroscopy show characteristic c-type cytochrome characteristics. Mass spectrometry confirms that the correct extensive post-translational modifications were performed and the ten heme groups were incorporated per protein of MtrC and MtrA and the correct lipid-anchor was attached to extracellular MtrC. Raman spectroscopy measurements of MtrA provide intriguing structural information and highlight the strong influence of the heme cofactors within the protein structure. Next, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein is analyzed. It was previously identified via a motif search of the plant genome, based on conserved residues in the H4 NOX pocket. Here, the incorporation of a heme b cofactor is confirmed. UV/Vis spectroscopy under anaerobic conditions demonstrates reversible binding of nitric oxide to the heme iron and depicts the previously published characteristic absorption maxima for other H-NOX proteins.

  4. Characterization of heme binding to recombinant α1-microglobulin

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    Elena eKarnaukhova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha-1-microglobulin (A1M, a small lipocalin protein found in plasma and tissues, has been identified as a heme and radical scavenger that may participate in the mitigation of toxicities caused by degradation of hemoglobin. The objective of this work was to investigate heme interactions with A1M in vitro using various analytical techniques and to optimize analytical methodology suitable for rapid evaluation of the ligand binding properties of recombinant A1M versions. Methods: To examine heme binding properties of A1M we utilized UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy, visible circular dichroism (CD, catalase-like activity, migration shift electrophoresis, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR, which was specifically developed for the assessment of His-tagged A1M. Results: The results of this study confirm that A1M is a heme binding protein that can accommodate heme at more than one binding site and/or in coordination with different amino acid residues depending upon heme concentration and ligand-to-protein molar ratio. UV/Vis titration of A1M with heme revealed an unusually large bathochromic shift, up to 38 nm, observed for heme binding to a primary binding site. UV/Vis spectroscopy, visible CD and catalase-like activity suggested that heme is accommodated inside His-tagged (tgA1M and tagless A1M (ntA1M in a rather similar fashion although the His-tag is very likely involved into coordination with iron of the heme molecule. SPR data indicated kinetic rate constants and equilibrium binding constants with KD values in a uM range. Conclusions: This study provided experimental evidence of the A1M heme binding properties by aid of different techniques and suggested an analytical methodology for a rapid evaluation of ligand-binding properties of recombinant A1M versions, also suitable for other His-tagged proteins.

  5. Cloning and characterization of a heme oxygenase-2 gene from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

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    Fu, Guang-Qing; Jin, Qi-Jiang; Lin, Yu-Ting; Feng, Jian-Fei; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Zheng, Tian-Qing

    2011-11-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO, EC 1.14.99.3) catalyzes the oxidation of heme and performs vital roles in plant development and stress responses. Two HO isozymes exist in plants. Between these, HO-1 is an oxidative stress-response protein, and HO-2 usually exhibited constitutive expression. Although alfalfa HO-1 gene (MsHO1) has been investigated previously, HO2 is still poorly understood. In this study, we report the cloning and characterization of HO2 gene, MsHO2, from alfalfa (Medica sativa L.). The full-length cDNA of MsHO2 contains an ORF of 870 bp and encodes for 290 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 33.3 kDa. Similar to MsHO1, MsHO2 also appears to have an N-terminal transit peptide sequence for chloroplast import. Many conserved residues in plant HO were also conserved in MsHO2. However, unlike HO-1, the conserved histidine (His) required for heme-iron binding and HO activity was replaced by tyrosine (Tyr) in MsHO2. Further biochemical activity analysis of purified mature MsHO2 showed no HO activity, suggesting that MsHO2 may not be a true HO in nature. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed its maximum expression in the germinating seeds. Importantly, the expression levels of MsHO2 were up-regulated under sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and H(2)O(2) (especially) treatment, respectively.

  6. Heme transport and erythropoiesis

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    Yuan, Xiaojing; Fleming, Mark D.; Hamza, Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    In humans, systemic heme homeostasis is achieved via coordinated regulation of heme synthesis, transport and degradation. Although the heme biosynthesis and degradation pathways have been well characterized, the pathways for heme trafficking and incorporation into hemoproteins remains poorly understood. In the past few years, researchers have exploited genetic, cellular and biochemical tools, to identify heme transporters and, in the process, reveal unexpected functions for this elusive group of proteins. However, given the complexity of heme trafficking pathways, current knowledge of heme transporters is fragmented and sometimes contradictory. This review seeks to focus on recent studies on heme transporters with specific emphasis on their functions during erythropoiesis. PMID:23415705

  7. Characterization of a gene family encoding SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain proteins with lectin-like and heme-binding properties from Schistosoma japonicum.

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    Evaristus Chibunna Mbanefo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously identified a novel gene family dispersed in the genome of Schistosoma japonicum by retrotransposon-mediated gene duplication mechanism. Although many transcripts were identified, no homolog was readily identifiable from sequence information. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we utilized structural homology modeling and biochemical methods to identify remote homologs, and characterized the gene products as SEA (sea-urchin sperm protein, enterokinase and agrin-domain containing proteins. A common extracellular domain in this family was structurally similar to SEA-domain. SEA-domain is primarily a structural domain, known to assist or regulate binding to glycans. Recombinant proteins from three members of this gene family specifically interacted with glycosaminoglycans with high affinity, with potential implication in ligand acquisition and immune evasion. Similar approach was used to identify a heme-binding site on the SEA-domain. The heme-binding mode showed heme molecule inserted into a hydrophobic pocket, with heme iron putatively coordinated to two histidine axial ligands. Heme-binding properties were confirmed using biochemical assays and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, which showed high affinity heme-binding (K D = 1.605×10(-6 M and cognate spectroscopic attributes of hexa-coordinated heme iron. The native proteins were oligomers, antigenic, and are localized on adult worm teguments and gastrodermis; major host-parasite interfaces and site for heme detoxification and acquisition. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest potential role, at least in the nucleation step of heme crystallization (hemozoin formation, and as receptors for heme uptake. Survival strategies exploited by parasites, including heme homeostasis mechanism in hemoparasites, are paramount for successful parasitism. Thus, assessing prospects for application in disease intervention is warranted.

  8. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

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    Hye-Jung Yeom

    Full Text Available Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1, an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs. Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation.

  9. Heterologous expression and characterization of a new heme-catalase in Bacillus subtilis 168.

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    Philibert, Tuyishime; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Taowei; Zhou, Junping; Huang, Genshu; Irene, Komera; Samuel, Niyomukiza

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an inherent consequence to all aerobically living organisms that might lead to the cells being lethal and susceptible to oxidative stress. Bacillus pumilus is characterized by high-resistance oxidative stress that stimulated our interest to investigate the heterologous expression and characterization of heme-catalase as potential biocatalyst. Results indicated that recombinant enzyme significantly exhibited the high catalytic activity of 55,784 U/mg expressed in Bacillus subtilis 168 and 98.097 µmol/min/mg peroxidatic activity, the apparent K m of catalytic activity was 59.6 ± 13 mM with higher turnover rate (K cat = 322.651 × 10(3) s(-1)). The pH dependence of catalatic and peroxidatic activity was pH 7.0 and pH 4.5 respectively with temperature dependence of 40 °C and the recombinant heme-catalase exhibited a strong Fe(2+) preference. It was further revealed that catalase KatX2 improved the resistance oxidative stress of B. subtilis. These findings suggest that this B. pumilus heme-catalase can be considered among the industrially relevant biocatalysts due to its exceptional catalytic rate and high stability and it can be a potential candidate for the improvement of oxidative resistance of industrially produced strains.

  10. Characterization of a heme oxygenase of Clostridium tetani and its possible role in oxygen tolerance.

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    Brüggemann, Holger; Bauer, Rosalie; Raffestin, Stéphanie; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    In order to colonize mammalian wounds, the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium tetani must presumably cope with temporary oxic conditions. Therefore, the recently decoded genome sequence was searched for genes which could confer oxygen tolerance. A few identified systems such as superoxide dismutases and peroxidases are probably responsible for this protection against toxic oxygen species. Another system was detected, a heme oxygenase which could have a role in establishing or maintaining an anoxic microenvironment in the process of wound colonization. The hemT gene encoding the heme oxygenase is expressed in C. tetani, as shown by reverse transcription-PCR. When overexpressed in Escherichia coli, the enzyme converts heme to biliverdin under strict oxic conditions.

  11. Heme isomers substantially affect heme's electronic structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    Inspection of heme protein structures in the protein data bank reveals four isomers of heme characterized by different relative orientations of the vinyl side chains; remarkably, all these have been reported in multiple protein structures. Density functional theory computations explain this as due...

  12. Heme orientational disorder in human adult hemoglobin reconstituted with a ring fluorinated heme and its functional consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Satoshi; Hirai, Yueki; Kawano, Shin; Imai, Kiyohiro; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2007-01-01

    A ring fluorinated heme, 13,17-bis(2-carboxylatoethyl)-3,8-diethyl-2-fluoro-7,12, 18-trimethyl-porphyrin-atoiron(III), has been incorporated into human adult hemoglobin (Hb A). The heme orientational disorder in the individual subunits of the protein has been readily characterized using 19 F NMR and the O 2 binding properties of the protein have been evaluated through the oxygen equilibrium analysis. The equilibrated orientations of hemes in α- and β- subunits of the reconstituted protein were found to be almost completely opposite to each other, and hence were largely different from those of the native and the previously reported reconstituted proteins [T. Jue, G.N. La Mar, Heme orientational heterogeneity in deuterohemin-reconstituted horse and human hemoglobin characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 119 (1984) 640-645]. Despite the large difference in the degree of the heme orientational disorder in the subunits of the proteins, the O 2 affinity and the cooperativity of the protein reconstituted with 2-MF were similar to those of the proteins reconstituted with a series of hemes chemically modified at the heme 3- and 8-positions [K. Kawabe, K. Imaizumi, Z. Yoshida, K. Imai, I. Tyuma, Studies on reconstituted myoglobins and hemoglobins II. Role of the heme side chains in the oxygenation of hemoglobin, J. Biochem. 92 (1982) 1713-1722], whose O 2 affinity and cooperativity were higher and lower, respectively, relative to those of native protein. These results indicated that the heme orientational disorder could exert little effect, if any, on the O 2 affinity properties of Hb A. This finding provides new insights into structure-function relationship of Hb A

  13. Identification and characterization of the heme-binding proteins SeShp and SeHtsA of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi

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    Nygaard, Tyler K; Liu, Mengyao; McClure, Michael J; Lei, Benfang

    2006-01-01

    Background Heme is a preferred iron source of bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi is a bacterial pathogen that causes strangles in horses. Whether S. equi has a heme acquisition transporter is unknown. Results An S. equi genome database was blasted with the heme binding proteins Shp and HtsA of Streptococcus pyogenes, and found that S. equi has the homologue of Shp (designated SeShp) and HtsA (designated SeHtsA). Tag-free recombinant SeShp and SeHtsA and 6xHis-tagged SeHtsA (SeHtsAHis) were prepared and characterized. Purified holoSeShp and holoSeHtsA bind Fe(II)-protoporphyrin IX (heme) and Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX (hemin) in a 1:1 stoichiometry, respectively, and are designated hemoSeShp and hemiSeHtsA. HemiSeShp and hemiSeHtsAHis can be reconstituted from apoSeShp and apoSeHtsAHis and hemin. HemoSeShp is stable in air and can be oxidized to hemiSeShp by ferricyanide. HemiSeHtsA can be reduced into hemoSeHtsA, which autoxidizes readily. HemoSeShp rapidly transfers its heme to apoSeHtsAHis. In addition, hemoSeShp can also transfer its heme to apoHtsA, and hemoShp is able to donate heme to apoSeHtsAHis. Conclusion The primary structures, optical properties, oxidative stability, and in vitro heme transfer reaction of SeShp and SeHtsA are very similar to those of S. pyogenes Shp and HtsA. The data suggest that the putative cell surface protein SeShp and lipoprotein SeHtsA are part of the machinery to acquire heme in S. equi. The results also imply that the structure, function, and functional mechanism of the heme acquisition machinery are conserved in S. equi and S. pyogenes. PMID:17007644

  14. Identification and characterization of the heme-binding proteins SeShp and SeHtsA of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi

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    McClure Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme is a preferred iron source of bacterial pathogens. Streptococcus equi subspecies equi is a bacterial pathogen that causes strangles in horses. Whether S. equi has a heme acquisition transporter is unknown. Results An S. equi genome database was blasted with the heme binding proteins Shp and HtsA of Streptococcus pyogenes, and found that S. equi has the homologue of Shp (designated SeShp and HtsA (designated SeHtsA. Tag-free recombinant SeShp and SeHtsA and 6xHis-tagged SeHtsA (SeHtsAHis were prepared and characterized. Purified holoSeShp and holoSeHtsA bind Fe(II-protoporphyrin IX (heme and Fe(III-protoporphyrin IX (hemin in a 1:1 stoichiometry, respectively, and are designated hemoSeShp and hemiSeHtsA. HemiSeShp and hemiSeHtsAHis can be reconstituted from apoSeShp and apoSeHtsAHis and hemin. HemoSeShp is stable in air and can be oxidized to hemiSeShp by ferricyanide. HemiSeHtsA can be reduced into hemoSeHtsA, which autoxidizes readily. HemoSeShp rapidly transfers its heme to apoSeHtsAHis. In addition, hemoSeShp can also transfer its heme to apoHtsA, and hemoShp is able to donate heme to apoSeHtsAHis. Conclusion The primary structures, optical properties, oxidative stability, and in vitro heme transfer reaction of SeShp and SeHtsA are very similar to those of S. pyogenes Shp and HtsA. The data suggest that the putative cell surface protein SeShp and lipoprotein SeHtsA are part of the machinery to acquire heme in S. equi. The results also imply that the structure, function, and functional mechanism of the heme acquisition machinery are conserved in S. equi and S. pyogenes.

  15. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and Heme oxygenases

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    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number of transporters of heme and heme synthesis intermediates have been described. Here we review aspects of heme metabolism and discuss our current understanding of heme transporters, with emphasis on the function of the cell-surface heme exporter, FLVCR. Knockdown of Flvcr in mice leads to both defective erythropoiesis and disturbed systemic iron homeostasis, underscoring the critical role of heme transporters in mammalian physiology. PMID:21238504

  16. Characterization of Mononuclear Non-heme Iron(III)-Superoxo Complex with a Five-Azole Ligand Set.

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    Oddon, Frédéric; Chiba, Yosuke; Nakazawa, Jun; Ohta, Takehiro; Ogura, Takashi; Hikichi, Shiro

    2015-06-15

    Reaction of O2 with a high-spin mononuclear iron(II) complex supported by a five-azole donor set yields the corresponding mononuclear non-heme iron(III)-superoxo species, which was characterized by UV/Vis spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. (1)H NMR analysis reveals diamagnetic nature of the superoxo complex arising from antiferromagnetic coupling between the spins on the low-spin iron(III) and superoxide. This superoxo species reacts with H-atom donating reagents to give a low-spin iron(III)-hydroperoxo species showing characteristic UV/Vis, resonance Raman, and EPR spectra. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Characterization of a heme c nitrite reductase from a non-ammonifying microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

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    Pereira, I A; LeGall, J; Xavier, A V; Teixeira, M

    2000-08-31

    A cytochrome c nitrite reductase (NiR) was purified for the first time from a microorganism not capable of growing on nitrate, the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. It was isolated from the membranes as a large heterooligomeric complex of 760 kDa, containing two cytochrome c subunits of 56 and 18 kDa. This complex has nitrite and sulfite reductase activities of 685 micromol NH(4)(+)/min/mg and 1.0 micromol H(2)/min/mg. The enzyme was studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies. The overall redox behavior was determined through a visible redox titration. The data were analyzed with a set of four redox transitions, with an E(0)' of +160 mV (12% of total absorption), -5 mV (38% of total absorption), -110 mV (38% of total absorption) and -210 mV (12% of total absorption) at pH 7.6. The EPR spectra of oxidized and partially reduced NiR show a complex pattern, indicative of multiple heme-heme magnetic interactions. It was found that D. vulgaris Hildenborough is not capable of using nitrite as a terminal electron acceptor. These results indicate that in this organism the NiR is not involved in the dissimilative reduction of nitrite, as is the case with the other similar enzymes isolated so far. The possible role of this enzyme in the detoxification of nitrite and/or in the reduction of sulfite is discussed.

  18. Control of intracellular heme levels: Heme transporters and heme oxygenases

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    Khan, Anwar A.; Quigley, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Heme serves as a co-factor in proteins involved in fundamental biological processes including oxidative metabolism, oxygen storage and transport, signal transduction and drug metabolism. In addition, heme is important for systemic iron homeostasis in mammals. Heme has important regulatory roles in cell biology, yet excessive levels of intracellular heme are toxic; thus, mechanisms have evolved to control the acquisition, synthesis, catabolism and expulsion of cellular heme. Recently, a number...

  19. Functional Characterization of the Canine Heme-Regulated eIF2α Kinase: Regulation of Protein Synthesis

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    Kimon C. Kanelakis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI negatively regulates protein synthesis by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor-2α (eIF2α thereby inhibiting protein translation. The importance of HRI in regulating hemoglobin synthesis in erythroid cells makes it an attractive molecular target in need of further characterization. In this work, we have cloned and expressed the canine form of the HRI kinase. The canine nucleotide sequence has 86%, 82%, and 81% identity to the human, mouse, and rat HRI, respectively. It was noted that an isoleucine residue in the ATP binding site of human, rat, and mouse HRI is replaced by a valine in the canine kinase. The expression of canine HRI protein by in vitro translation using wheat germ lysate or in Sf9 cells using a baculovirus expression system was increased by the addition of hemin. Following purification, the canine protein was found to be 72 kD and showed kinase activity determined by its ability to phosphorylate a synthetic peptide substrate. Quercetin, a kinase inhibitor known to inhibit mouse and human HRI, inhibits canine HRI in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, quercetin is able to increase de novo protein synthesis in canine reticulocytes. We conclude that the canine is a suitable model species for studying the role of HRI in erythropoiesis.

  20. Red meat and colon cancer : how dietary heme initiates hyperproliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, N.

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths in Western countries. The risk to develop colorectal cancer is associated with the intake of red meat. Red meat contains the porphyrin pigment heme. Heme is an irritant for the colonic wall and it is previously shown that the addition of heme

  1. Analysis of Heme Iron Coordination in DGCR8: The Heme-Binding Component of the Microprocessor Complex.

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    Girvan, Hazel M; Bradley, Justin M; Cheesman, Myles R; Kincaid, James R; Liu, Yilin; Czarnecki, Kazimierz; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W

    2016-09-13

    DGCR8 is the RNA-binding partner of the nuclease Drosha. Their complex (the "Microprocessor") is essential for processing of long, primary microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) in the nucleus. Binding of heme to DGCR8 is essential for pri-miRNA processing. On the basis of the split Soret ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrum of ferric DGCR8, bis-thiolate sulfur (cysteinate, Cys(-)) heme iron coordination of DGCR8 heme iron was proposed. We have characterized DGCR8 heme ligation using the Δ276 DGCR8 variant and combined electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), electron nuclear double resonance, resonance Raman, and electronic absorption spectroscopy. These studies indicate DGCR8 bis-Cys heme iron ligation, with conversion from bis-thiolate (Cys(-)/Cys(-)) axial coordination in ferric DGCR8 to bis-thiol (CysH/CysH) coordination in ferrous DGCR8. Pri-miRNA binding does not perturb ferric DGCR8's optical spectrum, consistent with the axial ligand environment being separated from the substrate-binding site. UV-vis absorption spectra of the Fe(II) and Fe(II)-CO forms indicate discrete species exhibiting peaks with absorption coefficients substantially larger than those for ferric DGCR8 and that previously reported for a ferrous form of DGCR8. Electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy data exclude histidine or water as axial ligands for ferric DGCR8 and favor bis-thiolate coordination in this form. UV-vis MCD and near-infrared MCD provide data consistent with this conclusion. UV-vis MCD data for ferrous DGCR8 reveal features consistent with bis-thiol heme iron coordination, and resonance Raman data for the ferrous-CO form are consistent with a thiol ligand trans to the CO. These studies support retention of DGCR8 cysteine coordination upon reduction, a conclusion distinct from those of previous studies of a different ferrous DGCR8 isoform.

  2. Heme Sensor Proteins*

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    Girvan, Hazel M.; Munro, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group best known for roles in oxygen transport, oxidative catalysis, and respiratory electron transport. Recent years have seen the roles of heme extended to sensors of gases such as O2 and NO and cell redox state, and as mediators of cellular responses to changes in intracellular levels of these gases. The importance of heme is further evident from identification of proteins that bind heme reversibly, using it as a signal, e.g. to regulate gene expression in circadian rhythm pathways and control heme synthesis itself. In this minireview, we explore the current knowledge of the diverse roles of heme sensor proteins. PMID:23539616

  3. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

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    Wojtowicz, Halina [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Wojaczynski, Jacek [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Mariusz [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland); Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw [Laboratory of Biophysics, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, 50-148 Wroclaw (Poland); Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw [Department of Chemistry, University of Wroclaw, 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Olczak, Teresa, E-mail: Teresa.Olczak@biotech.uni.wroc.pl [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, Tamka 2, 50-137 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2009-05-29

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  4. Heme environment in HmuY, the heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtowicz, Halina; Wojaczynski, Jacek; Olczak, Mariusz; Kroliczewski, Jaroslaw; Latos-Grazynski, Lechoslaw; Olczak, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium implicated in the development and progression of chronic periodontitis, acquires heme for growth by a novel mechanism composed of HmuY and HmuR proteins. The aim of this study was to characterize the nature of heme binding to HmuY. The protein was expressed, purified and detailed investigations using UV-vis absorption, CD, MCD, and 1 H NMR spectroscopy were carried out. Ferric heme bound to HmuY may be reduced by sodium dithionite and re-oxidized by potassium ferricyanide. Heme complexed to HmuY, with a midpoint potential of 136 mV, is in a low-spin Fe(III) hexa-coordinate environment. Analysis of heme binding to several single and double HmuY mutants with the methionine, histidine, cysteine, or tyrosine residues replaced by an alanine residue identified histidines 134 and 166 as potential heme ligands.

  5. Heme and erythropoieis: more than a structural role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-06-01

    Erythropoiesis is the biological process that consumes the highest amount of body iron for heme synthesis. Heme synthesis in erythroid cells is finely coordinated with that of alpha (α) and beta (β)-globin, resulting in the production of hemoglobin, a tetramer of 2α- and 2β-globin chains, and heme as the prosthetic group. Heme is not only the structural component of hemoglobin, but it plays multiple regulatory roles during the differentiation of erythroid precursors since it controls its own synthesis and regulates the expression of several erythroid-specific genes. Heme is synthesized in developing erythroid progenitors by the stage of proerythroblast, through a series of eight enzymatic reactions divided between mitochondria and cytosol. Defects of heme synthesis in the erythroid lineage result in sideroblastic anemias, characterized by microcytic anemia associated to mitochondrial iron overload, or in erythropoietic porphyrias, characterized by porphyrin deposition in erythroid cells. Here, we focus on the heme biosynthetic pathway and on human erythroid disorders due to defective heme synthesis. The regulatory role of heme during erythroid differentiation is discussed as well as the heme-mediated regulatory mechanisms that allow the orchestration of the adaptive cell response to heme deficiency. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Heme A synthesis and CcO activity are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Marcelo L; Cirulli, Brenda A; Menéndez-Bravo, Simón M; Cricco, Julia A

    2017-06-27

    Trypanosoma cruzi , the causative agent of Chagas disease, presents a complex life cycle and adapts its metabolism to nutrients' availability. Although T. cruzi is an aerobic organism, it does not produce heme. This cofactor is acquired from the host and is distributed and inserted into different heme-proteins such as respiratory complexes in the parasite's mitochondrion. It has been proposed that T. cruzi's energy metabolism relies on a branched respiratory chain with a cytochrome c oxidase-type aa 3 (C c O) as the main terminal oxidase. Heme A, the cofactor for all eukaryotic C c O, is synthesized via two sequential enzymatic reactions catalyzed by heme O synthase (HOS) and heme A synthase (HAS). Previously, TcCox10 and TcCox15 ( Trypanosoma cruzi Cox10 and Cox15 proteins) were identified in T. cruzi They presented HOS and HAS activity, respectively, when they were expressed in yeast. Here, we present the first characterization of TcCox15 in T. cruzi , confirming its role as HAS. It was differentially detected in the different T. cruzi stages, being more abundant in the replicative forms. This regulation could reflect the necessity of more heme A synthesis, and therefore more C c O activity at the replicative stages. Overexpression of a non-functional mutant caused a reduction in heme A content. Moreover, our results clearly showed that this hindrance in the heme A synthesis provoked a reduction on C c O activity and, in consequence, an impairment on T. cruzi survival, proliferation and infectivity. This evidence supports that T. cruzi depends on the respiratory chain activity along its life cycle, being C c O an essential terminal oxidase. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  7. Insulin enhances the peroxidase activity of heme by forming heme-insulin complex: Relevance to type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Yang, Zhen; Xu, Huan; Zhang, Pengfei; Gao, Zhonghong; Li, Hailing

    2017-09-01

    Evidences have implicated the involvement of heme in the type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2Dm) pathogenesis, but possible mediators linking between heme and diabetes are still poorly understood. Here, we explored a potential mechanism that linked heme, insulin and diabetes. Our results demonstrated the formation of heme-insulin complex by two classical methods, i.e. UV-vis and capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis (CE-FA). UV-vis results implied heme binding insulin via bis-histidine sites, and CE-FA further revealed that, when insulin uses two sites binding with heme, this interaction occurs at high affinity (K d =3.13×10 -6 M). Molecule docking supported that histidine-B5 of insulin binds with heme-Fe. In addition to that, tyrosine-B26, phenylalanine-B1 and valine-B2 are also contributed to binding heme. The binding amplified the peroxidase activity of heme itself. Under oxidative and nitrative stress, it affects pathogenesis of diabetes from two aspects: promoting insulin cross-linking that leads to permanent loss of insulin functionality on one hand, and enhancing protein tyrosine nitration that may result in inactivation of proteins associated with diabetes on the other hand. This study suggested that the enhanced peroxidase activity of heme through binding with insulin might be a previously unrecognized contributor to the pathogenesis of T2Dm in some heme-associated disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  9. Is the calcium transporter a potential candidate for heme transport?

    OpenAIRE

    Latunde-Dada, Gladys O.

    2016-01-01

    Heme is of significant importance in iron nutrition and in systemic iron metabolism. The crux of the matter is that while much is known about non-heme metabolism, the vectorial import of exogenous porphyrin macromolecules into the enterocyte and possibly into blood circulation is still speculative. The inhibitory effect of calcium on heme iron absorption has been previously reported in the literature. This paper postulates that the gastrointestinal Ca transporter, TRPV6 might be a putative tr...

  10. Effects of heme degradation products on reactivation of latent HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, P; Madlenakova, M; Hajkova, V; Jilich, D; Svobodova, I; Horinek, A; Fujikura, Y; Melkova, Z

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection can be currently controlled by combined antiretroviral therapy, but a sterilizing cure is not achievable as this therapy does not target persistent HIV-1 in latent reservoirs. Therefore, different latency reversal agents are intensively explored in various models. We have previously observed that heme arginate, a drug approved for human use, reveals a strong synergism with PKC inducers in reactivation of the latent provirus. Heme is physiologically decomposed by heme oxygenases into 3 degradation products: iron (Fe2+), carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin which is further converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. In this paper, we have studied the effects of individual heme-degradation products on latent HIV-1 reactivation in ACH-2 cells harboring integrated HIV-1 provirus and in H12 clone of Jurkat cells harboring HIV-minivirus expressing EGFP. We employed addition of ascorbate to generate Fe2+, resulting in increased expression of both HIV-1 p24 Ag and EGFP in PMA-stimulated ACH-2 and H12 cells, respectively, as characterized on RNA and protein levels. On the other hand, addition of a CO-donor or bilirubin decreased the p24 expression. The reactivation of latent HIV-1 by iron or heme arginate was inhibited by antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, or by an iron chelator desferrioxamine, suggesting that the effects were mediated by iron- or heme-induced redox stress. Finally, we demonstrated the stimulatory effects of heme arginate and PMA on HIV-1 expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-infected patients cultured ex vivo. These results may constitute a new direction in the latent HIV-1 reactivation and therapy.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a heme oxygenase1 gene from sunflower and its expression profiles in salinity acclimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Samma, Muhammad Kaleem; Lin, Guoqing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-06-01

    Heme oxygenase1 (HO1) is involved in protecting plants from environmental stimuli. In this study, a sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) HO1 gene (HaHO1) was cloned and sequenced. It was confirmed that HaHO1 encodes a precursor protein of 32.93 kDa with an N-terminal plastid transit peptide which was validated by subcellular localization. The amino acid sequence of HaHO1 shared high homology with other plant HO1s. The predicted three-dimensional structure showed a high degree of structural conservation as compared to the known HO1 crystal structures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that HaHO1 clearly grouped with the plant HO1-like sequences. Moreover, the purified recombinant mature HaHO1 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits HO activity. Thus, it was concluded that HaHO1 encodes a functional HO1 in sunflower. Additionally, HaHO1 gene was ubiquitously expressed in all tested tissues, and induced differentially during different growth stages after germination, and could be differentially induced by several stresses and hemin treatment. For example, a pretreatment with a low concentration of NaCl (25 mM) could lead to the induction of HaHO1 gene expression and thereafter a salinity acclamatory response. Above cytoprotective effect could be impaired by the potent HO1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), which was further rescued by the addition of 50% carbon monoxide aqueous solution (in particular) or bilirubin, two catalytic by-products of HO1, respectively. Similarly, a HO1 inducer, hemin, could mimic the salinity acclamatory response. Together, these findings strongly suggested that the up-regulation of HaHO1 might be required for the observed salinity acclimation in sunflower plants.

  12. Structural mechanisms of nonplanar hemes in proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-05-01

    The objective is to assess the occurrence of nonplanar distortions of hemes and other tetrapyrroles in proteins and to determine the biological function of these distortions. Recently, these distortions were found by us to be conserved among proteins belonging to a functional class. Conservation of the conformation of the heme indicates a possible functional role. Researchers have suggested possible mechanisms by which heme distortions might influence biological properties; however, no heme distortion has yet been shown conclusively to participate in a structural mechanism of hemoprotein function. The specific aims of the proposed work are: (1) to characterize and quantify the distortions of the hemes in all of the more than 300 hemoprotein X-ray crystal structures in terms of displacements along the lowest-frequency normal coordinates, (2) to determine the structural features of the protein component that generate and control these nonplanar distortions by using spectroscopic studies and molecular-mechanics calculations for the native proteins, their mutants and heme-peptide fragments, and model porphyrins, (3) to determine spectroscopic markers for the various types of distortion, and, finally, (4) to discover the functional significance of the nonplanar distortions by correlating function with porphyrin conformation for proteins and model porphyrins.

  13. The antimalarial drug artemisinin alkylates heme in infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Anne; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Claparols, Catherine; Meunier, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Heme alkylation by the antimalarial drug artemisinin is reported in vivo, within infected mice that have been treated at pharmacologically relevant doses. Adducts resulting from the alkylation of heme by the drug were characterized in the spleen of treated mice, and their glucuroconjugated derivatives were present in the urine. Because these heme-artemisinin adducts were not observed in noninfected mice, this report confirms that the alkylating activity of this antimalarial drug is related to the presence of the parasite in infected animals. The identification of heme-artemisinin adducts in mice should be considered as the signature of the alkylation capacity of artemisinin in vivo. PMID:16155128

  14. Heme Gazing: Illuminating Eukaryotic Heme Trafficking, Dynamics, and Signaling with Fluorescent Heme Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, David A; Martinez-Guzman, Osiris; Reddi, Amit R

    2017-04-04

    Heme (iron protoporphyrin IX) is an essential protein prosthetic group and signaling molecule required for most life on Earth. All heme-dependent processes require the dynamic and rapid mobilization of heme from sites of synthesis or uptake to hemoproteins present in virtually every subcellular compartment. The cytotoxicity and hydrophobicity of heme necessitate that heme mobilization be carefully controlled to mitigate the deleterious effects of this essential toxin. Indeed, a number of disorders, including certain cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, are tied to defects in heme homeostasis. However, the molecules and mechanisms that mediate heme transport and trafficking, and the dynamics of these processes, are poorly understood. This is in large part due to the lack of physical tools for probing cellular heme. Herein, we discuss the recent development of fluorescent probes that can monitor and image kinetically labile heme with respect to its mobilization and role in signaling. In particular, we will highlight how heme gazing with these tools can uncover new heme trafficking factors upon being integrated with genetic screens and illuminate the concentration, subcellular distribution, and dynamics of labile heme in various physiological contexts. Altogether, the monitoring of labile heme, along with recent biochemical and cell biological studies demonstrating the reversible regulation of certain cellular processes by heme, is challenging us to reconceptualize heme from being a static cofactor buried in protein active sites to a dynamic and mobile signaling molecule.

  15. Physiological and Molecular Characterization of Salmonella Bacteriophages Previously Used in Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Hong, Y; Fealey, M; Singh, A; Walton, K; Martin, C; Harman, N J; Mahlie, J; Ebner, P D

    2015-12-01

    The use of bacteriophages as biocontrol agents to control Salmonella in food production has gained popularity over the last two decades. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that bacteriophages can be direct fed to limit Salmonella colonization and transmission in pigs. Here, we characterized the bacteriophages in our treatment cocktail in terms of lytic spectrum, growth kinetics, survivability under various conditions, and genomic sequencing. PCR-based fingerprinting indicated that 9 of the 10 phages, while related, were distinct isolates. Single-step growth kinetics analysis determined that the eclipse periods, latent periods, and burst sizes averaged 21.5 min, 31.5 min, and 43.3 particles, respectively. The viability of the phages was measured after exposure to various pH ranges, temperatures, digestive enzymes, UV light, and chlorinated water. Temperatures greater than 87.5°C, pH of 4.0 to 10.0. Genomic sequencing of the phage with the broadest spectrum in the collection (effectively lysed all four Salmonella serovars tested), vB_SalM_SJ2, revealed it to belong to the Viunalikevirus genus of the Myoviridae family. Of the 197 predicted open reading frames, no toxin-associated, lysogenic, Salmonella virulence, or antimicrobial resistance genes were identified. Taken together, these data indicate that phages, as biologicals, may require some manner of protection (e.g., microencapsulation) to remain viable under various physiological and manufacturing conditions. In addition, based on its ability to effectively lyse diverse Salmonella serovars, phage vB_SalM-SJ2 could be further developed as an important biocontrol agent in various aspects of food production when the exact serovar or strain of contaminating Salmonella is not yet known.

  16. Heme acquisition mechanisms of Porphyromonas gingivalis - strategies used in a polymicrobial community in a heme-limited host environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, J W; Olczak, T

    2017-02-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a main etiologic agent and key pathogen responsible for initiation and progression of chronic periodontitis requires heme as a source of iron and protoporphyrin IX for its survival and the ability to establish an infection. Porphyromonas gingivalis is able to accumulate a defensive cell-surface heme-containing pigment in the form of μ-oxo bisheme. The main sources of heme for P. gingivalis in vivo are hemoproteins present in saliva, gingival crevicular fluid, and erythrocytes. To acquire heme, P. gingivalis uses several mechanisms. Among them, the best characterized are those employing hemagglutinins, hemolysins, and gingipains (Kgp, RgpA, RgpB), TonB-dependent outer-membrane receptors (HmuR, HusB, IhtA), and hemophore-like proteins (HmuY, HusA). Proteins involved in intracellular heme transport, storage, and processing are less well characterized (e.g. PgDps). Importantly, P. gingivalis may also use the heme acquisition systems of other bacteria to fulfill its own heme requirements. Porphyromonas gingivalis displays a novel paradigm for heme acquisition from hemoglobin, whereby the Fe(II)-containing oxyhemoglobin molecule must first be oxidized to methemoglobin to facilitate heme release. This process not only involves P. gingivalis arginine- and lysine-specific gingipains, but other proteases (e.g. interpain A from Prevotella intermedia) or pyocyanin produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Porphyromonas gingivalis is then able to fully proteolyze the more susceptible methemoglobin substrate to release free heme or to wrest heme from it directly through the use of the HmuY hemophore. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mechanism-based inactivation of cytochromes P450 2E1 and 2E1 T303A by tert-butyl acetylenes: characterization of reactive intermediate adducts to the heme and apoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobaum, Anna L; Kent, Ute M; Alworth, William L; Hollenberg, Paul F

    2002-12-01

    The kinetics for the inactivation of cytochrome P450 2E1 and the mutant P450 2E1 T303A by tert-butyl acetylene (tBA) and tert-butyl 1-methyl-2-propynyl ether (tBMP) were investigated. The two acetylenes inactivated the 7-ethoxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)coumarin (7-EFC) O-deethylation activity of purified rabbit P450s 2E1 and 2E1 T303A in a reconstituted system in a time-, concentration-, and NADPH-dependent manner. The K(I) values for the inactivation of P450s 2E1 and 2E1 T303A by tBA were 1.0 and 2.0 mM, the k(inact) values were 0.20 and 0.38 min(-)(1), and the t(1/2) values were 3.5 and 1.8 min, respectively. The K(I) values for the tBMP-inactivated P450s were 0.1 and 1.0 mM, the k(inact) values were 0.12 and 0.07 min(-)(1), and the t(1/)(2) values were 5.9 and 10.2 min, respectively. Losses in enzyme activity occurred with concurrent losses in the P450 CO spectrum and P450 heme, which were accompanied by the appearance of two different tBA- or tBMP-modified heme products in each inactivated sample. LC-MS analysis of the adducts showed masses of 661 or 705 Da, consistent with the mass of an iron-depleted heme plus the masses of a tBA or tBMP reactive intermediate and one oxygen atom, respectively. Only the tBA-inactivated P450 2E1 revealed a tBA-adducted apoprotein with an increase in mass of 99 Da, corresponding to the mass of tBA plus one oxygen atom. Surprisingly, the inactivation, CO spectral and heme loss, and heme adduct formation of the tBA-inactivated T303A mutant were completely reversible after dialysis. In addition, metabolism of para-nitrophenol was not compromised by the tBA-inactivated T303A mutant. Therefore, our studies on the inactivation of P450s 2E1 and 2E1 T303A by tBA and tBMP suggest the existence of three distinct mechanisms for inactivation, among which includes a novel, reversible heme alkylation that has not been previously described with P450 enzymes.

  18. Kidney injury and heme oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-xing MAI

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available     Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is one of the main pathways to degrade heme in mammals, and the main degradation products are free iron (Fe2+, carbon monoxide (CO, and bilirubin. Heme plays an important role in promoting cell survival, circulation of intracellular substrates, and immune regulation. Previous studies suggest that HO-1 pathway is an important internal factor in determining the susceptibility and severity of acute kidney injury (AKI. The induction of HO-1 expression can attenuate the severity of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI, and the inhibition of HO-1 expression will aggravate IRI. The present article summarizes the latest advances in research abroad and at home on protective mechanism by which HO-1 prevents AKI to further deepen our understanding of the role of HO-1 in the treatment of AKI.   

  19. Synthesis and characterization of an iron complex bearing a cyclic tetra-N-heterocyclic carbene ligand: An artifical heme analogue?

    KAUST Repository

    Anneser, Markus R.

    2015-04-20

    An iron(II) complex with a cyclic tetradentate ligand containing four N-heterocyclic carbenes was synthesized and characterized by means of NMR and IR spectroscopies, as well as by single-crystal X-ray structure analysis. The iron center exhibits an octahedral coordination geometry with two acetonitrile ligands in axial positions, showing structural analogies with porphyrine-ligated iron complexes. The acetonitrile ligands can readily be substituted by other ligands, for instance, dimethyl sulfoxide, carbon monoxide, and nitric oxide. Cyclic voltammetry was used to examine the electronic properties of the synthesized compounds. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  20. Role of heme in bromine-induced lung injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Adam; Vetal, Nilam; Matalon, Sadis; Aggarwal, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Bromine (Br2) gas inhalation poses an environmental and occupational hazard resulting in high morbidity and mortality. In this review, we underline the acute lung pathology (within 24 hours of exposure) and potential therapeutic interventions that may be utilized to mitigate Br2-induced human toxicity. We will discuss our latest published data, which suggests that an increase in heme-dependent tissue injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Our study was based on previous findings that demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme-degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which converts toxic heme into billiverdin. Interestingly, following Br2 inhalation, heme levels were indeed elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, plasma, and whole lung tissue in C57BL/6 mice. High heme levels correlated with increased lung oxidative stress, lung inflammation, respiratory acidosis, lung edema, higher airway resistance, and mortality. However, therapeutic reduction of heme levels, by either scavenging with hemopexin or degradation by HO-1, improved lung function and survival. Therefore, heme attenuation may prove a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients after Br2 exposure. PMID:27244263

  1. Characterization of previously unidentified lunar pyroclastic deposits using Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, J. Olaf; Bell, James F.; Gaddis, Lisa R.R.; Hawke, B. Ray Ray; Giguere, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    We used a Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) global monochrome Wide-angle Camera (WAC) mosaic to conduct a survey of the Moon to search for previously unidentified pyroclastic deposits. Promising locations were examined in detail using LROC multispectral WAC mosaics, high-resolution LROC Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images, and Clementine multispectral (ultraviolet-visible or UVVIS) data. Out of 47 potential deposits chosen for closer examination, 12 were selected as probable newly identified pyroclastic deposits. Potential pyroclastic deposits were generally found in settings similar to previously identified deposits, including areas within or near mare deposits adjacent to highlands, within floor-fractured craters, and along fissures in mare deposits. However, a significant new finding is the discovery of localized pyroclastic deposits within floor-fractured craters Anderson E and F on the lunar farside, isolated from other known similar deposits. Our search confirms that most major regional and localized low-albedo pyroclastic deposits have been identified on the Moon down to ~100 m/pix resolution, and that additional newly identified deposits are likely to be either isolated small deposits or additional portions of discontinuous, patchy deposits.

  2. Molecular characterization of previously elusive badnaviruses associated with symptomatic cacao in the New World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chingandu, Nomatter; Zia-Ur-Rehman, Muhammad; Sreenivasan, Thyail N; Surujdeo-Maharaj, Surendra; Umaharan, Pathmanathan; Gutierrez, Osman A; Brown, Judith K

    2017-05-01

    Suspected virus-like symptoms were observed in cacao plants in Trinidad during 1943, and the viruses associated with these symptoms were designated as strains A and B of cacao Trinidad virus (CTV). However, viral etiology has not been demonstrated for either phenotype. Total DNA was isolated from symptomatic cacao leaves exhibiting the CTV A and B phenotypes and subjected to Illumina HiSeq and Sanger DNA sequencing. Based on de novo assembly, two apparently full-length badnavirus genomes of 7,533 and 7,454 nucleotides (nt) were associated with CTV strain A and B, respectively. The Trinidad badnaviral genomes contained four open reading frames, three of which are characteristic of other known badnaviruses, and a fourth that is present in only some badnaviruses. Both badnaviral genomes harbored hallmark caulimovirus-like features, including a tRNA Met priming site, a TATA box, and a polyadenylation-like signal. Pairwise comparisons of the RT-RNase H region indicated that the Trinidad isolates share 57-71% nt sequence identity with other known badnaviruses. Based on the system for badnavirus species demarcation in which viruses with less than 80% nt sequence identity in the RT-RNase gene are considered members of separate species, these isolates represent two previously unidentified badnaviruses, herein named cacao mild mosaic virus and cacao yellow vein banding virus, making them the first cacao-infecting badnaviruses identified thus far in the Western Hemisphere.

  3. Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase type 2 (mPGES2) is a glutathione-dependent heme protein, and dithiothreitol dissociates the bound heme to produce active prostaglandin E2 synthase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takusagawa, Fusao

    2013-04-05

    An x-ray study indicated that microsomal prostaglandin E synthase type 2 (mPGES2) is a heme-bound protein and catalyzes prostaglandin (PG) H2 degradation, but not PGE2 formation (Yamada, T., and Takusagawa, F. (2007) Biochemistry 46, 8414-8424). In response to the x-ray study, Watanabe et al. claimed that mPGES2 is a heme-free protein and that both the heme-free and heme-bound proteins have PGE2 synthesis activity in the presence of dithiothreitol (Watanabe, K., Ito, S., and Yamamoto, S. (2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 367, 782-786). To resolve the contradictory results, the heme-binding scheme of mPGES2 was further characterized in vivo and in vitro by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies. A substantial amount of heme-bound mPGES2 was detected in cell extracts. The heme content in mPGES2 was increased along with an increase in Fe(3+) in the culture medium. Heme-free mPGES2 was converted to the heme-bound form by mixing it with pig liver extract, indicating that mPGES2 is capable of forming a complex with heme in mammalian cells. Heme binds to mPGES2 only in the presence of glutathione. The newly determined heme dissociation constant (2.9 nM) supports strongly that mPGES2 is a heme-bound protein in vivo. The bound heme was not dissociated by oxidation by H2O2 or reduction by glutathione or 2-mercaptoethanol. However, reduction by dithiothreitol (an artificial reducing compound) induced the bound heme to dissociate from mPGES2 and released heme-free mPGES2, which exhibited PGE2 synthesis activity in vitro. Imidazole bound to mPGES2 by stacking on the bound heme and inhibited heme oxidation by H2O2 and reduction by dithiothreitol.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Three Previously Undescribed Crystal Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunjun; Zhao, Qiang; Ding, Xuezhi; Hu, Quanfang; Federici, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    The total protoxin complement in the parasporal body of mosquitocidal strain, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan 367, was determined by use of a polyacrylamide gel block coupled to mass spectrometry. A total of eight protoxins were identified from this strain, including five reported protoxins (Cry11Ba, Cry19Aa, Cry24Aa, Cry25Aa, and Cyt2Bb), as well as three previously undescribed (Cry30Ca, Cry60Aa, and Cry60Ba) in this isolate. It was interesting that the encoding genes of three new protoxins existed as cry30Ca-gap-orf2 and cry60Ba-gap-cry60Aa. The cry30Ca and a downstream orf2 gene were oriented in the same direction and separated by 114 bp, and cry60Ba was located 156 bp upstream from and in the same orientation to cry60Aa. The three new protoxin genes were cloned from B. thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan and expressed in an acrystalliferous strain under the control of cyt1A gene promoters and the STAB-SD stabilizer sequence. Recombinant strain containing only cry30Ca did not produce visible inclusion under microscope observation, while that containing both cry30Ca and orf2 could produce large inclusions. Cry60Aa and Cry60Ba synthesized either alone or together in the acrystalliferous host could yield large inclusions. In bioassays using the fourth-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Cry60Aa and Cry60Ba alone or together had estimated 50% lethal concentrations of 2.9 to 7.9 μg/ml; however, Cry30Ca with or without ORF2 was not toxic to this mosquito. PMID:23524673

  5. Inhibition of Heme Peroxidases by Melamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattaraporn Vanachayangkul

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 melamine-contaminated infant formula and dairy products in China led to over 50,000 hospitalizations of children due to renal injuries. In North America during 2007 and in Asia during 2004, melamine-contaminated pet food products resulted in numerous pet deaths due to renal failure. Animal studies have confirmed the potent renal toxicity of melamine combined with cyanuric acid. We showed previously that the solubility of melamine cyanurate is low at physiologic pH and ionic strength, provoking us to speculate how toxic levels of these compounds could be transported through the circulation without crystallizing until passing into the renal filtrate. We hypothesized that melamine might be sequestered by heme proteins, which could interfere with heme enzyme activity. Four heme peroxidase enzymes were selected for study: horseradish peroxidase (HRP, lactoperoxidase (LPO, and cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (COX-1 and -2. Melamine exhibited noncompetitive inhibition of HRP (9.5±0.7mM, and LPO showed a mixed model of inhibition (14.5±4.7mM. The inhibition of HRP and LPO was confirmed using a chemiluminescent peroxidase assay. Melamine also exhibited COX-1 inhibition, but inhibition of COX-2 was not detected. Thus, our results demonstrate that melamine inhibits the activity of three heme peroxidases.

  6. ATP-binding cassette B10 regulates early steps of heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayeva, Marina; Khechaduri, Arineh; Wu, Rongxue; Burke, Michael A; Wasserstrom, J Andrew; Singh, Neha; Liesa, Marc; Shirihai, Orian S; Langer, Nathaniel B; Paw, Barry H; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-07-19

    Heme plays a critical role in gas exchange, mitochondrial energy production, and antioxidant defense in cardiovascular system. The mitochondrial transporter ATP-binding cassette (ABC) B10 has been suggested to export heme out of the mitochondria and is required for normal hemoglobinization of erythropoietic cells and protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in the heart; however, its primary function has not been established. The aim of this study was to identify the function of ABCB10 in heme synthesis in cardiac cells. Knockdown of ABCB10 in cardiac myoblasts significantly reduced heme levels and the activities of heme-containing proteins, whereas supplementation with δ-aminolevulinic acid reversed these defects. Overexpression of mitochondrial δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2, the rate-limiting enzyme upstream of δ-aminolevulinic acid export, failed to restore heme levels in cells with ABCB10 downregulation. ABCB10 and heme levels were increased by hypoxia, and reversal of ABCB10 upregulation caused oxidative stress and cell death. Furthermore, ABCB10 knockdown in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant delay of calcium removal from the cytoplasm, suggesting a relaxation defect. Finally, ABCB10 expression and heme levels were altered in failing human hearts and mice with ischemic cardiomyopathy. ABCB10 plays a critical role in heme synthesis pathway by facilitating δ-aminolevulinic acid production or export from the mitochondria. In contrast to previous reports, we show that ABCB10 is not a heme exporter and instead is required for the early mitochondrial steps of heme biosynthesis.

  7. Dietary hemoglobin rescues young piglets from severe iron deficiency anemia: Duodenal expression profile of genes involved in heme iron absorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Staroń

    Full Text Available Heme is an efficient source of iron in the diet, and heme preparations are used to prevent and cure iron deficiency anemia in humans and animals. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for heme absorption remain only partially characterized. Here, we employed young iron-deficient piglets as a convenient animal model to determine the efficacy of oral heme iron supplementation and investigate the pathways of heme iron absorption. The use of bovine hemoglobin as a dietary source of heme iron was found to efficiently counteract the development of iron deficiency anemia in piglets, although it did not fully rebalance their iron status. Our results revealed a concerted increase in the expression of genes responsible for apical and basolateral heme transport in the duodenum of piglets fed a heme-enriched diet. In these animals the catalytic activity of heme oxygenase 1 contributed to the release of elemental iron from the protoporphyrin ring of heme within enterocytes, which may then be transported by the strongly expressed ferroportin across the basolateral membrane to the circulation. We hypothesize that the well-recognized high bioavailability of heme iron may depend on a split pathway mediating the transport of heme-derived elemental iron and intact heme from the interior of duodenal enterocytes to the bloodstream.

  8. Heme Synthesis and Acquisition in Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Choby, Jacob E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens require the iron-containing cofactor heme to cause disease. Heme is essential to the function of hemoproteins, which are involved in energy generation by the electron transport chain, detoxification of host immune effectors, and other processes. During infection, bacterial pathogens must synthesize heme or acquire heme from the host; however, host heme is sequestered in high-affinity hemoproteins. Pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to acquire heme from host source...

  9. Characterization of heme oxygenase and biliverdin reductase gene expression in zebrafish (Danio rerio): Basal expression and response to pro-oxidant exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holowiecki, Andrew; O'Shields, Britton; Jenny, Matthew J

    2016-11-15

    While heme is an important cofactor for numerous proteins, it is highly toxic in its unbound form and can perpetuate the formation of reactive oxygen species. Heme oxygenase enzymes (HMOX1 and HMOX2) degrade heme into biliverdin and carbon monoxide, with biliverdin subsequently being converted to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase (BVRa or BVRb). As a result of the teleost-specific genome duplication event, zebrafish have paralogs of hmox1 (hmox1a and hmox1b) and hmox2 (hmox2a and hmox2b). Expression of all four hmox paralogs and two bvr isoforms were measured in adult tissues (gill, brain and liver) and sexually dimorphic differences were observed, most notably in the basal expression of hmox1a, hmox2a, hmox2b and bvrb in liver samples. hmox1a, hmox2a and hmox2b were significantly induced in male liver tissues in response to 96h cadmium exposure (20μM). hmox2a and hmox2b were significantly induced in male brain samples, but only hmox2a was significantly reduced in male gill samples in response to the 96h cadmium exposure. hmox paralogs displayed significantly different levels of basal expression in most adult tissues, as well as during zebrafish development (24 to 120hpf). Furthermore, hmox1a, hmox1b and bvrb were significantly induced in zebrafish eleutheroembryos in response to multiple pro-oxidants (cadmium, hemin and tert-butylhydroquinone). Knockdown of Nrf2a, a transcriptional regulator of hmox1a, was demonstrated to inhibit the Cd-mediated induction of hmox1b and bvrb. These results demonstrate distinct mechanisms of hmox and bvr transcriptional regulation in zebrafish, providing initial evidence of the partitioning of function of the hmox paralogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Structure of the Complex between Yeast Frataxin and Ferrochelatase: CHARACTERIZATION AND PRE-STEADY STATE REACTION OF FERROUS IRON DELIVERY AND HEME SYNTHESIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Christopher; Gillam, Mallory E; Ahlgren, Eva-Christina; Hunter, Gregory A; Gakh, Oleksandr; Isaya, Grazia; Ferreira, Gloria C; Al-Karadaghi, Salam

    2016-05-27

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial iron-binding protein involved in iron storage, detoxification, and delivery for iron sulfur-cluster assembly and heme biosynthesis. The ability of frataxin from different organisms to populate multiple oligomeric states in the presence of metal ions, e.g. Fe(2+) and Co(2+), led to the suggestion that different oligomers contribute to the functions of frataxin. Here we report on the complex between yeast frataxin and ferrochelatase, the terminal enzyme of heme biosynthesis. Protein-protein docking and cross-linking in combination with mass spectroscopic analysis and single-particle reconstruction from negatively stained electron microscopic images were used to verify the Yfh1-ferrochelatase interactions. The model of the complex indicates that at the 2:1 Fe(2+)-to-protein ratio, when Yfh1 populates a trimeric state, there are two interaction interfaces between frataxin and the ferrochelatase dimer. Each interaction site involves one ferrochelatase monomer and one frataxin trimer, with conserved polar and charged amino acids of the two proteins positioned at hydrogen-bonding distances from each other. One of the subunits of the Yfh1 trimer interacts extensively with one subunit of the ferrochelatase dimer, contributing to the stability of the complex, whereas another trimer subunit is positioned for Fe(2+) delivery. Single-turnover stopped-flow kinetics experiments demonstrate that increased rates of heme production result from monomers, dimers, and trimers, indicating that these forms are most efficient in delivering Fe(2+) to ferrochelatase and sustaining porphyrin metalation. Furthermore, they support the proposal that frataxin-mediated delivery of this potentially toxic substrate overcomes formation of reactive oxygen species. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Distributions of particulate Heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gledhill, M.; Achterberg, E.P.; Honey, D.J.; Nielsdottir, M.C.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of heme b, the iron-containing component of b-type hemoproteins, ranged from?

  12. Malaria parasite-synthesized heme is essential in the mosquito and liver stages and complements host heme in the blood stages of infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswanathan Arun Nagaraj

    Full Text Available Heme metabolism is central to malaria parasite biology. The parasite acquires heme from host hemoglobin in the intraerythrocytic stages and stores it as hemozoin to prevent free heme toxicity. The parasite can also synthesize heme de novo, and all the enzymes in the pathway are characterized. To study the role of the dual heme sources in malaria parasite growth and development, we knocked out the first enzyme, δ-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS, and the last enzyme, ferrochelatase (FC, in the heme-biosynthetic pathway of Plasmodium berghei (Pb. The wild-type and knockout (KO parasites had similar intraerythrocytic growth patterns in mice. We carried out in vitro radiolabeling of heme in Pb-infected mouse reticulocytes and Plasmodium falciparum-infected human RBCs using [4-(14C] aminolevulinic acid (ALA. We found that the parasites incorporated both host hemoglobin-heme and parasite-synthesized heme into hemozoin and mitochondrial cytochromes. The similar fates of the two heme sources suggest that they may serve as backup mechanisms to provide heme in the intraerythrocytic stages. Nevertheless, the de novo pathway is absolutely essential for parasite development in the mosquito and liver stages. PbKO parasites formed drastically reduced oocysts and did not form sporozoites in the salivary glands. Oocyst production in PbALASKO parasites recovered when mosquitoes received an ALA supplement. PbALASKO sporozoites could infect mice only when the mice received an ALA supplement. Our results indicate the potential for new therapeutic interventions targeting the heme-biosynthetic pathway in the parasite during the mosquito and liver stages.

  13. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo L Merli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite's replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport, which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of bio-catalysis of heme extraction from hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakipov, Serzhan; Rafikova, Olga; Kurnikova, Maria G; Rafikov, Ruslan

    2017-04-01

    Red blood cell hemolysis in sickle cell disease (SCD) releases free hemoglobin. Extracellular hemoglobin and its degradation products, free heme and iron, are highly toxic due to oxidative stress induction and decrease in nitric oxide availability. We propose an approach that helps to eliminate extracellular hemoglobin toxicity in SCD by employing a bacterial protein system that evolved to extract heme from extracellular hemoglobin. NEAr heme Transporter (NEAT) domains from iron-regulated surface determinant proteins from Staphylococcus aureus specifically bind free heme as well as facilitate its extraction from hemoglobin. We demonstrate that a purified NEAT domain fused with human haptoglobin β-chain is able to remove heme from hemoglobin and reduce heme content and peroxidase activity of hemoglobin. We further use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to resolve molecular pathway of heme transfer from hemoglobin to NEAT, and to elucidate molecular mechanism of such heme transferring process. Our study is the first of its kind, in which simulations are employed to characterize the process of heme leaving hemoglobin and subsequent rebinding with a NEAT domain. Our MD results highlight important amino acid residues that facilitate heme transfer and will guide further studies for the selection of best NEAT candidate to attenuate free hemoglobin toxicity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In vivo heme scavenging by Staphylococcus aureus IsdC and IsdE proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, John; Vermeiren, Christie; Heinrichs, David E.; Stillman, Martin J.

    2004-01-01

    We report the first characterization of the in vivo porphyrin scavenging abilities of two components of a newly discovered heme scavenging system involving iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins. These proteins are present within the cell envelope of the Gram-positive human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. IsdC and IsdE, when expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli, efficiently scavenged intracellular heme and resulted in de novo heme synthesis in excess of 100-fold above background. Magnetic circular dichroism analyses showed that the heme-binding properties of the two proteins differ significantly from one another. IsdC bound almost exclusively free-base protoporphyrin IX, whereas the IsdE protein was associated with low spin Fe(III) and Fe(II) heme. These properties provide important insight into the possible mechanisms of iron scavenging from bound heme by Isd proteins

  16. Preparation and characterization of room temperature ionic liquid/single-walled carbon nanotube nanocomposites and their application to the direct electrochemistry of heme-containing proteins/enzymes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Pan; Liu, Shuna; Wu, Ping; Cai, Chenxin

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the formation and possible electrochemical application of a novel nanocomposite based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and imidazolium-based room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([bmim]BF 4 , a hydrophilic RTIL) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim]PF 6 , a hydrophobic RTIL). The nanocomposites ([bmim]BF 4 -SWNTs, and [bmim]PF 6 -SWNTs) were formed by simply grinding the SWNTs with the respective RTIL. The results of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy indicated that the nanocomposites were formed by adsorption of an imidazolium ion on the surface of SWNTs via the 'cation-π' interaction. SEM images showed that [bmim]BF 4 -SWNTs (or [bmim]PF 6 -SWNTs) nanocomposites could uniformly cover the surface of a glassy carbon (GC) electrode resulting in a RTILs-SWNTs/GC modified electrode with a high stability. The RTILs-SWNTs composite could be readily used as a matrix to immobilize heme-containing proteins/enzymes (myoglobin, cytochrome c, and horseradish peroxidase) without undergoing denaturation, as was verified by UV-vis and circular dichroic (CD) spectroscopic results. The voltammetric results showed that heme-containing proteins/enzymes entrapped in RTILs-SWNTs composites displayed a pair of well-defined, stable redox peaks, which were ascribed to their direct electron-transfer reactions. The results of controlled experiments showed that the positive charged imidazolium ion played a significant effect on the electrochemical parameters, such as the redox peak separation and the value of the formal potentials, etc., of the electron-transfer reaction of non-neutral species dissolved in solution or immobilized on the electrode surface. Further results demonstrated that the heme-containing proteins/enzymes entrapped in RTILs-SWNTs composites could still retain their bioelectrocatalytic activity toward the reduction of oxygen and hydrogen

  17. Heme Synthesis and Acquisition in Bacterial Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choby, Jacob E; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-28

    Bacterial pathogens require the iron-containing cofactor heme to cause disease. Heme is essential to the function of hemoproteins, which are involved in energy generation by the electron transport chain, detoxification of host immune effectors, and other processes. During infection, bacterial pathogens must synthesize heme or acquire heme from the host; however, host heme is sequestered in high-affinity hemoproteins. Pathogens have evolved elaborate strategies to acquire heme from host sources, particularly hemoglobin, and both heme acquisition and synthesis are important for pathogenesis. Paradoxically, excess heme is toxic to bacteria and pathogens must rely on heme detoxification strategies. Heme is a key nutrient in the struggle for survival between host and pathogen, and its study has offered significant insight into the molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dietary Heme Induces Gut Dysbiosis, Aggravates Colitis, and Potentiates the Development of Adenomas in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Constante

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Dietary heme can be used by colonic bacteria equipped with heme-uptake systems as a growth factor and thereby impact on the microbial community structure. The impact of heme on the gut microbiota composition may be particularly pertinent in chronic inflammation such as in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, where a strong association with gut dysbiosis has been consistently reported. In this study we investigated the influence of dietary heme on the gut microbiota and inferred metagenomic composition, and on chemically induced colitis and colitis-associated adenoma development in mice. Using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we found that mice fed a diet supplemented with heme significantly altered their microbiota composition, characterized by a decrease in α-diversity, a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase of Proteobacteria, particularly Enterobacteriaceae. These changes were similar to shifts seen in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-treated mice to induce colitis. In addition, dietary heme, but not systemically delivered heme, contributed to the exacerbation of DSS-induced colitis and facilitated adenoma formation in the azoxymethane/DSS colorectal cancer (CRC mouse model. Using inferred metagenomics, we found that the microbiota alterations elicited by dietary heme resulted in non-beneficial functional shifts, which were also characteristic of DSS-induced colitis. Furthermore, a reduction in fecal butyrate levels was found in mice fed the heme supplemented diet compared to mice fed the control diet. Iron metabolism genes known to contribute to heme release from red blood cells, heme uptake, and heme exporter proteins, were significantly enriched, indicating a shift toward favoring the growth of bacteria able to uptake heme and protect against its toxicity. In conclusion, our data suggest that luminal heme, originating from dietary components or gastrointestinal bleeding in IBD and, to lesser extent in CRC, directly contributes to microbiota dysbiosis

  19. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabianno Ferreira Dutra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prostetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, hemolytic anemias, ischemia-reperfusion and hemorrhage. The plasma scavanger proteins hemopexin and albumin reduce heme toxicity and are responsible for transporting free heme to intracellular compartments where it is catabolized by heme-oxygenase enzymes. Upon hemolysis or severe cellular damage the serum capacity to scavange heme may saturate and increase free heme to sufficient amounts to cause tissue damage in various organs. The mechanism by which heme causes reactive oxygen generation, activation of cells of the innate immune system and cell death are not fully understood. Although heme can directly promote lipid peroxidation by its iron atom, heme can also induce ROS generation and production of inflammatory mediators through the activation of selective signaling pathways. Heme activates innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils through activation of innate immune receptors. The importance of these events has been demonstrated in infectious and non-infectious diseases models. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms behind heme-induced citotoxicity and inflammation and the consequences of these events on different tissues and diseases.

  20. Heme Mobilization in Animals: A Metallolipid's Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddi, Amit R; Hamza, Iqbal

    2016-06-21

    Heme is universally recognized as an essential and ubiquitous prosthetic group that enables proteins to carry out a diverse array of functions. All heme-dependent processes, from protein hemylation to heme signaling, require the dynamic and rapid mobilization of heme to hemoproteins present in virtually every subcellular compartment. The cytotoxicity and hydrophobicity of heme necessitates that heme mobilization is carefully controlled at the cellular and systemic level. However, the molecules and mechanisms that mediate heme homeostasis are poorly understood. In this Account, we provide a heuristic paradigm with which to conceptualize heme trafficking and highlight the most recent developments in the mechanisms underlying heme trafficking. As an iron-containing tetrapyrrole, heme exhibits properties of both transition metals and lipids. Accordingly, we propose its transport and trafficking will reflect principles gleaned from the trafficking of both metals and lipids. Using this conceptual framework, we follow the flow of heme from the final step of heme synthesis in the mitochondria to hemoproteins present in various subcellular organelles. Further, given that many cells and animals that cannot make heme can assimilate it intact from nutritional sources, we propose that intercellular heme trafficking pathways must exist. This necessitates that heme be able to be imported and exported from cells, escorted between cells and organs, and regulated at the organismal level via a coordinated systemic process. In this Account, we highlight recently discovered heme transport and trafficking factors and provide the biochemical foundation for the cell and systems biology of heme. Altogether, we seek to reconceptualize heme from an exchange inert cofactor buried in hemoprotein active sites to an exchange labile and mobile metallonutrient.

  1. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of an alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) heme oxygenase-1 gene, MsHO1, which is pro-oxidants-regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guang-Qing; Xu, Sheng; Xie, Yan-Jie; Han, Bin; Nie, Li; Shen, Wen-Biao; Wang, Ren

    2011-07-01

    It has been documented that plant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; EC 1.14.99.3) is both development- and stress-regulated, thus it plays a vital role in light signalling and stress responses. In this study, an alfalfa (Medica sativa L.) HO-1 gene MsHO1 was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns within genomic DNA sequence and encodes a polypeptide with 283 amino acids. MsHO1 had a conserved HO signature sequence and showed high similarity to other HOs in plants, especially HO-1 isoform. The MsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Further biochemical activity analysis of mature MsHO1, which was expressed in Escherichia coli, showed that the Vmax was 48.78 nmol biliverdin-IXα (BV) h⁻¹ nmol⁻¹ protein with an apparent Km value for hemin of 2.33 μM, and the optimum Tm and pH were 37 °C and 7.2, respectively. Results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot showed that the expressions of MsHO1 were higher in alfalfa stems and leaves than those in germinating seeds and roots. Importantly, MsHO1 gene expression and protein level were induced significantly by some pro-oxidant compounds, including hemin and nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP). In conclusion, MsHO1 may play an important role in oxidative responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Hemoglobin and heme scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2010-01-01

    Heme, the functional group of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other hemoproteins, is a highly toxic substance when it appears in the extracellular milieu. To circumvent potential harmful effects of heme from hemoproteins released during physiological or pathological cell damage (such as hemolysis...... and rhabdomyolysis), specific high capacity scavenging systems have evolved in the mammalian organism. Two major systems, which essentially function in a similar way by means of a circulating latent plasma carrier protein that upon ligand binding is recognized by a receptor, are represented by a) the hemoglobin...

  3. Comparative Genomics of the Genus Porphyromonas Identifies Adaptations for Heme Synthesis within the Prevalent Canine Oral Species Porphyromonas cangingivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flynn, Ciaran; Deusch, Oliver; Darling, Aaron E; Eisen, Jonathan A; Wallis, Corrin; Davis, Ian J; Harris, Stephen J

    2015-11-13

    Porphyromonads play an important role in human periodontal disease and recently have been shown to be highly prevalent in canine mouths. Porphyromonas cangingivalis is the most prevalent canine oral bacterial species in both plaque from healthy gingiva and plaque from dogs with early periodontitis. The ability of P. cangingivalis to flourish in the different environmental conditions characterized by these two states suggests a degree of metabolic flexibility. To characterize the genes responsible for this, the genomes of 32 isolates (including 18 newly sequenced and assembled) from 18 Porphyromonad species from dogs, humans, and other mammals were compared. Phylogenetic trees inferred using core genes largely matched previous findings; however, comparative genomic analysis identified several genes and pathways relating to heme synthesis that were present in P. cangingivalis but not in other Porphyromonads. Porphyromonas cangingivalis has a complete protoporphyrin IX synthesis pathway potentially allowing it to synthesize its own heme unlike pathogenic Porphyromonads such as Porphyromonas gingivalis that acquire heme predominantly from blood. Other pathway differences such as the ability to synthesize siroheme and vitamin B12 point to enhanced metabolic flexibility for P. cangingivalis, which may underlie its prevalence in the canine oral cavity. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1, oxidation, inflammation and atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus A Araujo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory process of the vascular wall characterized by the infiltration of lipids and inflammatory cells. Oxidative modifications of infiltrating low density lipoproteins and induction of oxidative stress play a major role in lipid retention in the vascular wall, uptake by macrophages and generation of foam cells, a hallmark of this disorder. The vasculature has a plethora of protective resources against oxidation and inflammation, many of them regulated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a Nrf2-regulated gene that plays a critical role in the prevention of vascular inflammation. It is the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase, responsible for the oxidative cleavage of heme groups leading to the generation of biliverdin, carbon monoxide and release of ferrous iron. HO-1 has important antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, antiproliferative and immunomodulatory effects in vascular cells, most of which play a significant role in the protection against atherogenesis. HO-1 may also be an important feature in macrophage differentiation and polarization to certain subtypes. The biological effects of HO-1 are largely attributable to its enzymatic activity, which can be conceived as a system with three arms of action, corresponding to its three enzymatic byproducts. HO-1 mediated vascular protection may be due to a combination of systemic and vascular local effects. It is usually expressed at low levels but can be highly upregulated in the presence of several proatherogenic stimuli. The HO-1 system is amenable for use in the development of new therapies, some of them currently under experimental and clinical trials. Interestingly, in contrast to the HO-1 antiatherogenic actions, the expression of its transcriptional regulator Nrf2 leads to proatherogenic effects instead. This article reviews the evidence that supports the antiatherogenic role of HO-1, potential pathways and mechanisms mediating

  5. A dual component heme biosensor that integrates heme transport and synthesis in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Christopher L; Clark, Justin R; Green, Sabrina I; Maresso, Anthony W

    2015-11-01

    Bacterial pathogens acquire host iron to power cellular processes and replication. Heme, an iron-containing cofactor bound to hemoglobin, is scavenged by bacterial proteins to attain iron. Methods to measure intracellular heme are laborious, involve complex chemistry, or require radioactivity. Such drawbacks limit the study of the mechanistic steps of heme transport and breakdown. Hypothesizing heme homeostasis could be measured with fluorescent methods, we coupled the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXα (a product of heme catabolism) by heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) with the production of near-infrared light upon binding this verdin by infrared fluorescent protein (IFP1.4). The resultant heme sensor, IFP-HO1, was fluorescent in pathogenic E. coli exposed to heme but not in the absence of the heme transporter ChuA and membrane coupling protein TonB, thereby validating their long-standing proposed role in heme uptake. Fluorescence was abolished in a strain lacking hemE, the central gene in the heme biosynthetic pathway, but stimulated by iron, signifying the sensor reports on intracellular heme production. Finally, an invasive strain of E. coli harboring the sensor was fluorescent during an active infection. This work will allow researchers to expand the molecular toolbox used to study heme and iron acquisition in culture and during infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopic studies on heme-heme oxygenase complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J; Wilks, A; Ortiz de Montellano, P R; Loehr, T M

    1993-12-28

    The binding of ferrous and ferric hemes and manganese(II)- and manganese(III)-substituted hemes to heme oxygenase has been investigated by optical absorption, resonance Raman, and EPR spectroscopy. The results are consistent with the presence of a six-coordinate heme moiety ligated to an essential histidine ligand and a water molecule. The latter ionizes with a pKa approximately 8.0 to give a mixture of high-spin and low-spin six-coordinate hydroxo adducts. Addition of excess cyanide converts the heme to a hexacoordinate low-spin species. The resonance Raman spectrum of the ferrous heme-heme oxygenase complex and that of the Mn(II)protoporphyrin-heme oxygenase complex shows bands at 216 and 212 cm-1, respectively, that are assigned to the metal-histidine stretching mode. The EPR spectrum of the oxidized heme-heme oxygenase complex has a strongly axial signal with g parallel of approximately 6 and g perpendicular approximately 2. 14NO and 15NO adducts of ferrous heme-heme oxygenase exhibit EPR hyperfine splittings of approximately 20 and approximately 25 Gauss, respectively. In addition, both nitrosyl complexes show additional superhyperfine splittings of approximately 7 Gauss from spin-spin interaction with the proximal histidine nitrogen. The heme environment in the heme-heme oxygenase enzyme-substrate complex has spectroscopic properties similar to those of the heme in myoglobin. Hence, there is neither a strongly electron-donating fifth (proximal) ligand nor an electron-withdrawing network on the distal side of the heme moiety comparable to that for cytochromes P-450 and peroxidases. This observation has profound implications about the nature of the oxygen-activating process in the heme-->biliverdin reaction that are discussed in this paper.

  7. Heme Attenuation Ameliorates Irritant Gas Inhalation-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Lam, Adam; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Carlisle, Matthew A.; Traylor, Amie; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Exposure to irritant gases, such as bromine (Br2), poses an environmental and occupational hazard that results in severe lung and systemic injury. However, the mechanism(s) of Br2 toxicity and the therapeutic responses required to mitigate lung damage are not known. Previously, it was demonstrated that Br2 upregulates the heme degrading enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Since heme is a major inducer of HO-1, we determined whether an increase in heme and heme-dependent oxidative injury underlies the pathogenesis of Br2 toxicity. Results: C57BL/6 mice were exposed to Br2 gas (600 ppm, 30 min) and returned to room air. Thirty minutes postexposure, mice were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of the heme scavenging protein, hemopexin (Hx) (3 μg/gm body weight), or saline. Twenty-four hours postexposure, saline-treated mice had elevated total heme in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma and acute lung injury (ALI) culminating in 80% mortality after 10 days. Hx treatment significantly lowered heme, decreased evidence of ALI (lower protein and inflammatory cells in BALF, lower lung wet-to-dry weight ratios, and decreased airway hyperreactivity to methacholine), and reduced mortality. In addition, Br2 caused more severe ALI and mortality in mice with HO-1 gene deletion (HO-1−/−) compared to wild-type controls, while transgenic mice overexpressing the human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) showed significant protection. Innovation: This is the first study delineating the role of heme in ALI caused by Br2. Conclusion: The data suggest that attenuating heme may prove to be a useful adjuvant therapy to treat patients with ALI. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 99–112. PMID:26376667

  8. Characterization of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human cancer cells: the importance of enhanced BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Hannafon, Bethany N; Wolf, Roman F; Zhou, Jundong; Avery, Jori E; Wu, Jinchang; Lind, Stuart E; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2014-05-01

    The effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cancer cells has never been characterized. This study examines DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human cancer cell model systems. DHA enhanced HO-1 gene expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with maximal induction at 21 h of treatment. This induction of HO-1 expression was confirmed in vivo using a xenograft nude mouse model fed a fish-oil-enriched diet. The increase in HO-1 gene transcription induced by DHA was significantly attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. This was supported by direct measurement of lipid peroxide levels after DHA treatment. Using a human HO-1 gene promoter reporter construct, we identified two antioxidant response elements (AREs) that mediate the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription. Knockdown of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression compromised the DHA-induced increase in HO-1 gene transcription, indicating the importance of the Nrf2 pathway in this event. However, the nuclear protein levels of Nrf2 remained unchanged upon DHA treatment. Further studies demonstrated that DHA reduces nuclear Bach1 protein expression by promoting its degradation and attenuates Bach1 binding to the AREs in the HO-1 gene promoter. In contrast, DHA enhanced Nrf2 binding to the AREs without affecting nuclear Nrf2 expression levels, indicating a new cellular mechanism that mediates DHA's induction of HO-1 gene transcription. To our knowledge, this is the first characterization of DHA-induced HO-1 expression in human malignant cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mucosal pentraxin (Mptx), a novel rat gene 10-fold down-regulated in colon by dietary heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer - van Kraaij, van der C.; Lieshout, van E.M.M.; Kramer, E.H.M.; Meer, van der R.; Keijer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Consumption of red meat is associated with increased colon cancer risk. Our previous work indicated that this association might be due to the heme content of red meat. In rat studies, dietary heme increased colonic cytotoxicity and epithelial cell turnover, carcinogenesis biomarkers. Here we apply

  10. Heme and HO-1 inhibition of HCV, HBV, and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren N Schmidt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus, human immunodeficiency virus, and hepatitis B virus are chronic viral infections that cause considerable morbidity and mortality throughout the world. In the decades following the identification and sequencing of these viruses, in vitro experiments demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1, its oxidative products, and related compounds of the heme oxygenase system are virucidal for all three viruses. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate and summarize the seminal studies that described and characterized this remarkable behavior. It will also discuss more recent work that discovered the antiviral mechanisms and target sites of these unique antiviral agents. In spite of the fact that these viruses are diverse pathogens with quite profound differences in structure and life cycle, it is significant that heme and related compounds show striking similarity for viral target sites across all three species. Collectively, these findings strongly indicate that we should move forward and develop heme and related tetrapyrroles into versatile antiviral agents that could be used therapeutically in patients with single or multiple viral infections.

  11. Hemopexin therapy reverts heme-induced proinflammatory phenotypic switching of macrophages in a mouse model of sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinchi, Francesca; Costa da Silva, Milene; Ingoglia, Giada; Petrillo, Sara; Brinkman, Nathan; Zuercher, Adrian; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Tolosano, Emanuela; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2016-01-28

    Hemolytic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia and thalassemia, are characterized by enhanced release of hemoglobin and heme into the circulation, heme-iron loading of reticulo-endothelial system macrophages, and chronic inflammation. Here we show that in addition to activating the vascular endothelium, hemoglobin and heme excess alters the macrophage phenotype in sickle cell disease. We demonstrate that exposure of cultured macrophages to hemolytic aged red blood cells, heme, or iron causes their functional phenotypic change toward a proinflammatory state. In addition, hemolysis and macrophage heme/iron accumulation in a mouse model of sickle disease trigger similar proinflammatory phenotypic alterations in hepatic macrophages. On the mechanistic level, this critically depends on reactive oxygen species production and activation of the Toll-like receptor 4 signaling pathway. We further demonstrate that the heme scavenger hemopexin protects reticulo-endothelial macrophages from heme overload in heme-loaded Hx-null mice and reduces production of cytokines and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, in sickle mice, the administration of human exogenous hemopexin attenuates the inflammatory phenotype of macrophages. Taken together, our data suggest that therapeutic administration of hemopexin is beneficial to counteract heme-driven macrophage-mediated inflammation and its pathophysiologic consequences in sickle cell disease. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Heme binding in the NEAT domains of IsdA and IsdC of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluym, Mark; Muryoi, Naomi; Heinrichs, David E; Stillman, Martin J

    2008-03-01

    Absorption, magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), and electrospray mass spectral (ESI-MS) data are reported for the heme binding NEAr iron Transporter (NEAT) domains of IsdA and IsdC, two proteins involved in heme scavenging by Staphylococcus aureus. The mass spectrometry data show that the NEAT domains are globular in structure and efficiently bind a single heme molecule. In this work, the IsdA NEAT domain is referred to as NEAT-A, the IsdC NEAT domain is referred to as NEAT-C, heme-free NEAT-C is NEAT-A and NEAT-C are inaccessible to small anionic ligands. Reduction of the high-spin Fe(III) heme iron to 5-coordinate high-spin Fe(II) in NEAT-A results in coordination by histidine and opens access, allowing for CO axial ligation, yielding 6-coordinate low-spin Fe(II) heme. In contrast, reduction of the high-spin Fe(III) heme iron to 5-coordinate high-spin Fe(II) in NEAT-C results in loss of the heme from the binding site of the protein due to the absence of a proximal histidine. The absorption and MCD data for NEAT-A closely match those previously reported for the whole IsdA protein, providing evidence that heme binding is primarily a property of the NEAT domain.

  13. Heme-induced Trypanosoma cruzi proliferation is mediated by CaM kinase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.F. [Laboratorio de Imunomodulacao e Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz (Brazil); Carneiro, A.B.; Silveira, A.B. [Laboratorio de Sinalizacao Celular, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, UFRJ (Brazil); Laranja, G.A.T. [Laboratorio de Interacao Tripanosomatideos e Vetores, Departamento de Bioquimica, IBRAG, UERJ, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva-Neto, M.A.C. [Laboratorio de Sinalizacao Celular, Instituto de Bioquimica Medica, UFRJ (Brazil); INCT, Entomologia Molecular (Brazil); Costa, S.C. Goncalves da [Laboratorio de Imunomodulacao e Protozoologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fiocruz (Brazil); Paes, M.C., E-mail: mcpaes@uerj.br [Laboratorio de Interacao Tripanosomatideos e Vetores, Departamento de Bioquimica, IBRAG, UERJ, 20551-030 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); INCT, Entomologia Molecular (Brazil)

    2009-12-18

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted through triatomine vectors during their blood-meal on vertebrate hosts. These hematophagous insects usually ingest approximately 10 mM of heme bound to hemoglobin in a single meal. Blood forms of the parasite are transformed into epimastigotes in the crop which initiates a few hours after parasite ingestion. In a previous work, we investigated the role of heme in parasite cell proliferation and showed that the addition of heme significantly increased parasite proliferation in a dose-dependent manner . To investigate whether the heme effect is mediated by protein kinase signalling pathways, parasite proliferation was evaluated in the presence of several protein kinase (PK) inhibitors. We found that only KN-93, a classical inhibitor of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMKs), blocked heme-induced cell proliferation. KN-92, an inactive analogue of KN-93, was not able to block this effect. A T. cruzi CaMKII homologue is most likely the main enzyme involved in this process since parasite proliferation was also blocked when Myr-AIP, an inhibitory peptide for mammalian CaMKII, was included in the cell proliferation assay. Moreover, CaMK activity increased in parasite cells with the addition of heme as shown by immunological and biochemical assays. In conclusion, the present results are the first strong indications that CaMKII is involved in the heme-induced cell signalling pathway that mediates parasite proliferation.

  14. NMR-based phytochemical analysis of Vitis vinifera cv Falanghina leaves. Characterization of a previously undescribed biflavonoid with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglione, Luciana; Gambuti, Angelita; De Cicco, Paola; Ercolano, Giuseppe; Ianaro, Angela; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio; Moio, Luigi; Forino, Martino

    2018-03-01

    Vitis vinifera cv Falanghina is an ancient grape variety of Southern Italy. A thorough phytochemical analysis of the Falanghina leaves was conducted to investigate its specialised metabolite content. Along with already known molecules, such as caftaric acid, quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-β-d-glucuronide, kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside and kaempferol-3-O-β-d-glucuronide, a previously undescribed biflavonoid was identified. For this last compound, a moderate bioactivity against metastatic melanoma cells proliferation was discovered. This datum can be of some interest to researchers studying human melanoma. The high content in antioxidant glycosylated flavonoids supports the exploitation of grape vine leaves as an inexpensive source of natural products for the food industry and for both pharmaceutical and nutraceutical companies. Additionally, this study offers important insights into the plant physiology, thus prompting possible technological researches of genetic selection based on the vine adaptation to specific pedo-climatic environments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Allocation of Heme is Differentially Regulated by Ferrochelatase Isoforms in Arabidopsis Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Asuela Espinas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Heme is involved in various biological processes as a cofactor of hemoproteins located in various organelles. In plant cells, heme is synthesized by two isoforms of plastid-localized ferrochelatase, FC1 and FC2. In this study, by characterizing Arabidopsis T-DNA insertional mutants, we showed that the allocation of heme is differentially regulated by ferrochelatase isoforms in plant cells. Analyses of weak (fc1-1 and null (fc1-2 mutants suggest that FC1-producing heme is required for initial growth of seedling development. In contrast, weak (fc2-1 and null (fc2-2 mutants of FC2 showed pale green leaves and retarded growth, indicating that FC2-producing heme is necessary for chloroplast development. During the initial growth stage, FC2 deficiency caused reduction of plastid cytochromes. In addition, although FC2 deficiency marginally affected the assembly of photosynthetic reaction center complexes, it caused relatively larger but insufficient light-harvesting antenna to reaction centers, resulting in lower efficiency of photosynthesis. In the later vegetative growth, however, fc2-2 recovered photosynthetic growth, showing that FC1-producing heme may complement the FC2 deficiency. On the other hand, reduced level of cytochromes in microsomal fraction was discovered in fc1-1, suggesting that FC1-producing heme is mainly allocated to extraplastidic organelles. Furthermore, the expression of FC1 is induced by the treatment of an elicitor flg22 while that of FC2 was reduced, and fc1-1 abolished the flg22-dependent induction of FC1 expression and peroxidase activity. Consequently, our results clarified that FC2 produces heme for the photosynthetic machinery in the chloroplast, while FC1 is the housekeeping enzyme providing heme cofactor to the entire cell. In addition, FC1 can partly complement FC2 deficiency and is also involved in defense against stressful conditions.

  16. Molecular diagnosis and characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in turkeys and chickens in Germany reveals evidence for previously undetected parasite species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra A Helmy

    Full Text Available A total of 256 fecal specimens were randomly collected from farmed poultry in Germany and screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR and further characterized by direct automated DNA sequencing. Using a nested PCR amplifying approximately 830 bp 18S rDNA fragment, 7.03% (n = 18 of the samples were Cryptosporidium-positive. In detail, Cryptosporidium was detected in 9.3% (8/86 of turkeys, 5.7% (9/158 of broilers and 8.3% (1/12 of layers. After DNA sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum the most frequently observed species was identified in 5.1% (13/256 of all poultry species, including 8.1% (7/86 of turkeys, 3.2% (5/158 of broilers and 8.3% (1/12 of layers. Cryptosporidium baileyi was detected in 1.3% (2/256 of the broilers only. Three novel unclassified Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 1.2% (1/86 of turkeys and 1.3% (2/158 of broilers. The infection rate was high in 13-20 week old turkeys, 1-6 weeks old broilers and >20 weeks old layers but differences between age groups were not significant. This is the first study in Germany uses molecular methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in poultry. The results indicate that Cryptosporidium parasites are common among broilers and turkeys in Germany. Considering the large size of the poultry industry, the large amount of poultry meat that is consumed and the fact that C. parvum is also the most common Cryptosporidium parasite in humans, poultry might also be a source of human infections.

  17. Respiration triggers heme transfer from cytochrome c peroxidase to catalase in yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathiresan, Meena; Martins, Dorival; English, Ann M

    2014-12-09

    In exponentially growing yeast, the heme enzyme, cytochrome c peroxidase (Ccp1) is targeted to the mitochondrial intermembrane space. When the fermentable source (glucose) is depleted, cells switch to respiration and mitochondrial H2O2 levels rise. It has long been assumed that CCP activity detoxifies mitochondrial H2O2 because of the efficiency of this activity in vitro. However, we find that a large pool of Ccp1 exits the mitochondria of respiring cells. We detect no extramitochondrial CCP activity because Ccp1 crosses the outer mitochondrial membrane as the heme-free protein. In parallel with apoCcp1 export, cells exhibit increased activity of catalase A (Cta1), the mitochondrial and peroxisomal catalase isoform in yeast. This identifies Cta1 as a likely recipient of Ccp1 heme, which is supported by low Cta1 activity in ccp1Δ cells and the accumulation of holoCcp1 in cta1Δ mitochondria. We hypothesized that Ccp1's heme is labilized by hyperoxidation of the protein during the burst in H2O2 production as cells begin to respire. To test this hypothesis, recombinant Ccp1 was hyperoxidized with excess H2O2 in vitro, which accelerated heme transfer to apomyoglobin added as a surrogate heme acceptor. Furthermore, the proximal heme Fe ligand, His175, was found to be ∼ 85% oxidized to oxo-histidine in extramitochondrial Ccp1 isolated from 7-d cells, indicating that heme labilization results from oxidation of this ligand. We conclude that Ccp1 responds to respiration-derived H2O2 via a previously unidentified mechanism involving H2O2-activated heme transfer to apoCta1. Subsequently, the catalase activity of Cta1, not CCP activity, contributes to mitochondrial H2O2 detoxification.

  18. Bio-functionalization of electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface by heme enzyme using a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as synergetic immobilization matrix: Conformational characterization and electrocatalytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ElKaoutit, Mohammed, E-mail: elkaoutit@uca.es [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Naranjo-Rodriguez, Ignacio [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Dominguez, Manuel [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Hidalgo-Hidalgo-de-Cisneros, Jose Luis [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Use of a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as new immobilization matrix was described. The percentage of Nafion was optimized to prevent denaturation of horseradish peroxidase enzyme after its crosslinkage with glutaraldehyde on electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface. Topographic study by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) shows that the enzyme seems to have been introduced inside the ionic cluster of Nafion. The characterization of the resulting bio-interfaces by UV-vis and FT-IR shows that the intra-crosslinkage phenomena caused by the use of glutaraldehyde can be eliminated by the optimization of the concentration of Nafion additive. The secondary structure contents of native and immobilized enzyme were analyzed by a Gaussian curve fitting of the respective FT-IR spectra in the amide I region. Immobilized enzyme presented notable increasing percentages of globular and short helical structure compared with native enzyme. This indicates that immobilized enzyme was folded which is in accordance with AFM studies and supports the enzyme entrance inside ionic clutter of Nafion. Thanks to synergic effects of the polypyrrole conducting polymer and the perfluorosulfonic acid polymer Nafion, HRP enzyme was immobilized in its 'native' state, the resulting biosensor was able to sense peroxide without any chemical mediator and can be categorized as third generation.

  19. Bio-functionalization of electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface by heme enzyme using a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as synergetic immobilization matrix: Conformational characterization and electrocatalytic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElKaoutit, Mohammed; Naranjo-Rodriguez, Ignacio; Dominguez, Manuel; Hidalgo-Hidalgo-de-Cisneros, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    Use of a mixture of Nafion and glutaraldehyde as new immobilization matrix was described. The percentage of Nafion was optimized to prevent denaturation of horseradish peroxidase enzyme after its crosslinkage with glutaraldehyde on electro-synthesized polypyrrole surface. Topographic study by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) shows that the enzyme seems to have been introduced inside the ionic cluster of Nafion. The characterization of the resulting bio-interfaces by UV-vis and FT-IR shows that the intra-crosslinkage phenomena caused by the use of glutaraldehyde can be eliminated by the optimization of the concentration of Nafion additive. The secondary structure contents of native and immobilized enzyme were analyzed by a Gaussian curve fitting of the respective FT-IR spectra in the amide I region. Immobilized enzyme presented notable increasing percentages of globular and short helical structure compared with native enzyme. This indicates that immobilized enzyme was folded which is in accordance with AFM studies and supports the enzyme entrance inside ionic clutter of Nafion. Thanks to synergic effects of the polypyrrole conducting polymer and the perfluorosulfonic acid polymer Nafion, HRP enzyme was immobilized in its 'native' state, the resulting biosensor was able to sense peroxide without any chemical mediator and can be categorized as third generation.

  20. Structural characterization of the heme-based oxygen sensor, AfGcHK, its interactions with the cognate response regulator, and their combined mechanism of action in a bacterial two-component signaling system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stráňava, M.; Martínek, V.; Man, Petr; Fojtíková, V.; Kavan, Daniel; Vaněk, O.; Shimizu, T.; Martínková, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 10 (2016), s. 1375-1389 ISSN 1097-0134 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : heme-based oxygen sensor * histidine kinase * two-component signal transduction system Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  1. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  2. A role for heme in Alzheimer's disease: Heme binds amyloid β and has altered metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Atamna, Hani; Frey, William H.

    2004-01-01

    Heme is a common factor linking several metabolic perturbations in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including iron metabolism, mitochondrial complex IV, heme oxygenase, and bilirubin. Therefore, we determined whether heme metabolism was altered in temporal lobes obtained at autopsy from AD patients and age-matched nondemented subjects. AD brain demonstrated 2.5-fold more heme-b (P < 0.01) and 26% less heme-a (P = 0.16) compared with controls, resulting in a highly significant 2.9-fold decrease in he...

  3. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona N Rahman

    Full Text Available The development of heme oxygenase (HO inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308. Using a carbon monoxide (CO formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50 = 0.27±0.07 µM than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50 = 4.0±1.8 µM. The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  4. Effects of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane on hepatic heme synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, D.E.; Clawson, G.A.; Piper, W.N.; Smuckler, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies showed that 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) caused a decrease in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P-450 suggesting that hepatic heme metabolism may be affected by DBCP treatment. Various parameters of hepatic heme synthesis were measured at intervals ranging from 0 to 72 hr in male Sprague-Dawley rats given a single oral dose (200 mg/kg) of DBCP. Incorporation of the radiolabeled heme precursor [delta-14C]aminolevulinic acid (14C-ALA) into liver, protein, extracted heme, and subcellular fractions of liver homogenates was significantly decreased to 75, 58, and 81% of controls, respectively, at 24 hr. At 48 and 72 hr after DBCP treatment, the accumulation of 14C-ALA label after 4 hr in liver homogenates and subcellular fractions was significantly increased in comparison to controls. These changes in 14C-ALA uptake were accompanied by decreases in total liver and microsomal heme, but not mitochondrial heme. Decreases were found in the spectral content of two heme proteins, cytochromes P-450 and b5, and the activity of another heme protein, catalase. Heme oxygenase activity increased to 130, 151, 209, and 186% of control values at 12, 24, 48, and 72 hr after DBCP, respectively. A slight, but significant, increase in ALA-synthetase to 112% of controls occurred at 24 hr, and slight, but significant, decreases in ALA-dehydratase to 90 and 80% of control occurred at 12 and 24 hr, respectively. No significant changes in uroporphyrinogen-1-synthetase or ferrochelatase at the time points tested was noted. The porphyrin content of liver was increased to 130% of control, while the serum and urine porphyrin levels were decreased to 30% of the control values at 24 hr. Liver ALA content was not significantly altered through the time period studied, but serum and urine levels were increased at 24 hr to 176 and 130% of the control values, respectively. In conclusion, the decreases in liver heme proteins following a single oral dose of DBCP are accompanied by

  5. Identification of the Mitochondrial Heme Metabolism Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlock, Amy E; Shiferaw, Mesafint T; Marcero, Jason R; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Phillips, John D; Dailey, Harry A

    2015-01-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor for most organisms and all metazoans. While the individual enzymes involved in synthesis and utilization of heme are fairly well known, less is known about the intracellular trafficking of porphyrins and heme, or regulation of heme biosynthesis via protein complexes. To better understand this process we have undertaken a study of macromolecular assemblies associated with heme synthesis. Herein we have utilized mass spectrometry with coimmunoprecipitation of tagged enzymes of the heme biosynthetic pathway in a developing erythroid cell culture model to identify putative protein partners. The validity of these data obtained in the tagged protein system is confirmed by normal porphyrin/heme production by the engineered cells. Data obtained are consistent with the presence of a mitochondrial heme metabolism complex which minimally consists of ferrochelatase, protoporphyrinogen oxidase and aminolevulinic acid synthase-2. Additional proteins involved in iron and intermediary metabolism as well as mitochondrial transporters were identified as potential partners in this complex. The data are consistent with the known location of protein components and support a model of transient protein-protein interactions within a dynamic protein complex.

  6. The use and abuse of heme in apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dooren, Giel G; Kennedy, Alexander T; McFadden, Geoffrey I

    2012-08-15

    Heme is an essential prosthetic group for most life on Earth. It functions in numerous cellular redox reactions, including in antioxidant defenses and at several stages of the electron transport chain in prokaryotes and eukaryotic mitochondria. Heme also functions as a sensor and transport molecule for gases such as oxygen. Heme is a complex organic molecule and can only be synthesized through a multienzyme pathway from simpler precursors. Most free-living organisms synthesize their own heme by a broadly conserved metabolic pathway. Parasites are adept at scavenging molecules from their hosts, and heme is no exception. In this review we examine recent advances in understanding heme usage and acquisition in Apicomplexa, a group of parasites that include the causative agents of malaria, toxoplasmosis, and several major parasites of livestock. Heme is critical to the survival of Apicomplexa, although the functions of heme in these organisms remain poorly understood. Some Apicomplexa likely scavenge heme from their host organisms, while others retain the ability to synthesize heme. Surprisingly, some Apicomplexa may be able to both synthesize and scavenge heme. Several Apicomplexa live in intracellular environments that contain high levels of heme. Since heme is toxic at high concentrations, parasites must carefully regulate intracellular heme levels and develop mechanisms to detoxify excess heme. Indeed, drugs interfering with heme detoxification serve as major antimalarials. Understanding heme requirements and regulation in apicomplexan parasites promises to reveal multiple targets for much-needed therapeutic intervention against these parasites.

  7. Structural analysis of heme proteins: implications for design and prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonkovsky Herbert L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme is an essential molecule and plays vital roles in many biological processes. The structural determination of a large number of heme proteins has made it possible to study the detailed chemical and structural properties of heme binding environment. Knowledge of these characteristics can provide valuable guidelines in the design of novel heme proteins and help us predict unknown heme binding proteins. Results In this paper, we constructed a non-redundant dataset of 125 heme-binding protein chains and found that these heme proteins encompass at least 31 different structural folds with all-α class as the dominating scaffold. Heme binding pockets are enriched in aromatic and non-polar amino acids with fewer charged residues. The differences between apo and holo forms of heme proteins in terms of the structure and the binding pockets have been investigated. In most cases the proteins undergo small conformational changes upon heme binding. We also examined the CP (cysteine-proline heme regulatory motifs and demonstrated that the conserved dipeptide has structural implications in protein-heme interactions. Conclusions Our analysis revealed that heme binding pockets show special features and that most of the heme proteins undergo small conformational changes after heme binding, suggesting the apo structures can be used for structure-based heme protein prediction and as scaffolds for future heme protein design.

  8. Prebiotics increase heme iron bioavailability and do not affect non-heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinborn, Valerie; Valenzuela, Carolina; Olivares, Manuel; Arredondo, Miguel; Weill, Ricardo; Pizarro, Fernando

    2017-05-24

    The aim of this study was to establish the effect of a prebiotic mix on heme and non-heme iron (Fe) bioavailability in humans. To this purpose, twenty-four healthy women were randomized into one of two study groups. One group ate one yogurt per day for 12 days with a prebiotic mix (prebiotic group) and the other group received the same yogurt but without the prebiotic mix (control group). Before and after the intake period, the subjects participated in Fe absorption studies. These studies used 55 Fe and 59 Fe radioactive isotopes as markers of heme Fe and non-heme Fe, respectively, and Fe absorption was measured by the incorporation of radioactive Fe into erythrocytes. The results showed that there were no significant differences in heme and non-heme Fe bioavailability in the control group. Heme Fe bioavailability of the prebiotic group increased significantly by 56% post-prebiotic intake. There were no significant differences in non-heme Fe bioavailability in this group. We concluded that daily consumption of a prebiotic mix increases heme Fe bioavailability and does not affect non-heme iron bioavailability.

  9. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Heme oxygenase; heme degradation; coupled oxidation; variable temperature paramagnetic NMR. Abstract. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the only enzyme in mammals known to catalyse the physiological degradation of unwanted heme into biliverdin, Fe ion and CO. The process involves introduction of the hydroxyl ...

  10. HEME-HEME COMUNICATION DURING THE ALKALINE INDUCED STRUCTURAL TRANSITION IN CYTOCROME C OXIDASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong; Rousseau, Denis L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline induced conformational changes at pH 12.0 in the oxidized as well as the reduced state of cytochrome c oxidase have been systematically studied with time-resolved optical absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopies. In the reduced state, the heme a3 first converts from the native five-coordinate configuration to a six-coordinate bis-histidine intermediate as a result of the coordination of one of the CuB ligands, H290 or H291, to the heme iron. The coordination state change in the heme a3 causes the alteration in the microenvironment of the formyl group of the heme a3 and the disruption of the H-bond between R38 and the formyl group of the heme a. This structural transition, which occurs within 1 minute following the initiation of the pH jump, is followed by a slower reaction, in which Schiff base linkages are formed between the formyl groups of the two hemes and their nearby amino acid residues, presumably R38 and R302 for the heme a and a3, respectively. In the oxidized enzyme, a similar Schiff base modification on heme a and a3 was observed but it is triggered by the coordination of the H290 or H291 to heme a3 followed by the breakage of the native proximal H378-iron and H376-iron bonds in heme a and a3, respectively. In both oxidation states, the synchronous formation of the Schiff base linkages in heme a and a3 relies on the structural communication between the two hemes via the H-bonding network involving R438 and R439 and the propionate groups of the two hemes as well as the helix X housing the two proximal ligands, H378 and H376, of the hemes. The heme-heme communication mechanism revealed in this work may be important in controlling the coupling of the oxygen and redox chemistry in the heme sites to proton pumping during the enzymatic turnover of CcO. PMID:18187199

  11. A rapid, simple method for obtaining radiochemically pure hepatic heme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonkowski, H.L.; Bement, W.J.; Erny, R.

    1978-01-01

    Radioactively-labelled heme has usually been isolated from liver to which unlabelled carrier has been added by long, laborious techniques involving organic solvent extraction followed by crystallization. A simpler, rapid method is devised for obtaining radiochemically-pure heme synthesized in vivo in rat liver from delta-amino[4- 14 C]levulinate. This method, in which the heme is extracted into ethyl acetate/glacial acetic acid and in which porphyrins are removed from the heme-containing organic phase with HCl washes, does not require addition of carrier heme. The new method gives better heme recoveries than and heme specific activities identical to, those obtained using the crystallization method. In this new method heme must be synthesized from delta-amino[4- 14 C]levulinate; it is not satisfactory to use [2- 14 C]glycine substrate because non-heme counts are isolated in the heme fraction. (Auth.)

  12. Prokaryotic Heme Biosynthesis: Multiple Pathways to a Common Essential Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Harry A; Dailey, Tamara A; Gerdes, Svetlana; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina; O'Brian, Mark R; Warren, Martin J

    2017-03-01

    The advent of heme during evolution allowed organisms possessing this compound to safely and efficiently carry out a variety of chemical reactions that otherwise were difficult or impossible. While it was long assumed that a single heme biosynthetic pathway existed in nature, over the past decade, it has become clear that there are three distinct pathways among prokaryotes, although all three pathways utilize a common initial core of three enzymes to produce the intermediate uroporphyrinogen III. The most ancient pathway and the only one found in the Archaea converts siroheme to protoheme via an oxygen-independent four-enzyme-step process. Bacteria utilize the initial core pathway but then add one additional common step to produce coproporphyrinogen III. Following this step, Gram-positive organisms oxidize coproporphyrinogen III to coproporphyrin III, insert iron to make coproheme, and finally decarboxylate coproheme to protoheme, whereas Gram-negative bacteria first decarboxylate coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX and then oxidize this to protoporphyrin IX prior to metal insertion to make protoheme. In order to adapt to oxygen-deficient conditions, two steps in the bacterial pathways have multiple forms to accommodate oxidative reactions in an anaerobic environment. The regulation of these pathways reflects the diversity of bacterial metabolism. This diversity, along with the late recognition that three pathways exist, has significantly slowed advances in this field such that no single organism's heme synthesis pathway regulation is currently completely characterized. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Utility of heme analogues to intentionally modify heme-globin interactions in myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neya, Saburo; Nagai, Masako; Nagatomo, Shigenori; Hoshino, Tyuji; Yoneda, Tomoki; Kawaguchi, Akira T

    2016-05-01

    Myoglobin reconstitution with various synthetic heme analogues was reviewed to follow the consequences of modified heme-globin interactions. Utility of dimethyl sulfoxide as the solvent for water-insoluble hemes was emphasized. Proton NMR spectroscopy revealed that loose heme-globin contacts in the heme pocket eventually caused the dynamic heme rotation around the iron-histidine bond. The full rotational rate was estimated to be about 1400 s(-1) at room temperature for 1,4,5,8-tetramethylhemin. The X-ray analysis of the myoglobin containing iron porphine, the smallest heme without any side chains, showed that the original globin fold was well conserved despite the serious disruption of native heme-globin contacts. Comparison between the two myoglobins with static and rotatory prosthetic groups indicated that the oxygen and carbon monoxide binding profiles were almost unaffected by the heme motion. On the other hand, altered tetrapyrrole array of porphyrin dramatically changed the dissociation constant of oxygen from 0.0005 mm Hg of porphycene-myoglobin to ∞ in oxypyriporphyrin-myoglobin. Heme-globin interactions in myoglobin were also monitored with circular dichroism spectroscopy. The observation on several reconstituted protein revealed an unrecognized role of the propionate groups in protoheme. Shortening of heme 6,7-propionates to carboxylates resulted in almost complete disappearance of the positive circular dichroism band in the Soret region. The theoretical analysis suggested that the disappeared circular dichroism band reflected the cancellation effects between different conformers of the carboxyl groups directly attached to heme periphery. The above techniques were proposed to be applicable to other hemoproteins to create new biocatalysts. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson

  14. Insights on Heme Synthesis in the Malaria Parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Viswanathan A; Padmanaban, Govindarajan

    2017-08-01

    The malaria parasite has a functional heme-biosynthetic pathway, although it can access host hemoglobin-heme. The heme pathway is dispensable for blood stages, but essential in the mosquito stages which do not acquire hemoglobin-heme. We propose that the blood stage parasites maintain a dynamic heme pool through multiple back-up mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism governing heme synthesis reveals a GATA factor/heme circuit that controls differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, Nobuyuki; Miller, Eli; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Yang, David; Burstyn, Judith N; Dewey, Colin N; Bresnick, Emery H

    2016-02-01

    Metal ion-containing macromolecules have fundamental roles in essentially all biological processes throughout the evolutionary tree. For example, iron-containing heme is a cofactor in enzyme catalysis and electron transfer and an essential hemoglobin constituent. To meet the intense demand for hemoglobin assembly in red blood cells, the cell type-specific factor GATA-1 activates transcription of Alas2, encoding the rate-limiting enzyme in heme biosynthesis, 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase-2 (ALAS-2). Using genetic editing to unravel mechanisms governing heme biosynthesis, we discovered a GATA factor- and heme-dependent circuit that establishes the erythroid cell transcriptome. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ablation of two Alas2 intronic cis elements strongly reduces GATA-1-induced Alas2 transcription, heme biosynthesis, and surprisingly, GATA-1 regulation of other vital constituents of the erythroid cell transcriptome. Bypassing ALAS-2 function in Alas2 cis element-mutant cells by providing its catalytic product 5-aminolevulinic acid rescues heme biosynthesis and the GATA-1-dependent genetic network. Heme amplifies GATA-1 function by downregulating the heme-sensing transcriptional repressor Bach1 and via a Bach1-insensitive mechanism. Through this dual mechanism, heme and a master regulator collaborate to orchestrate a cell type-specific transcriptional program that promotes cellular differentiation. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland); Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH-3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  17. Measurement of Heme Synthesis Levels in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Alam, Maksudul; Zhang, Li

    2015-07-09

    Heme serves as the prosthetic group for a wide variety of proteins known as hemoproteins, such as hemoglobin, myoglobin and cytochromes. It is involved in various molecular and cellular processes such as gene transcription, translation, cell differentiation and cell proliferation. The biosynthesis levels of heme vary across different tissues and cell types and is altered in diseased conditions such as anemia, neuropathy and cancer. This technique uses [4-(14)C] 5-aminolevulinic acid ([(14)C] 5-ALA), one of the early precursors in the heme biosynthesis pathway to measure the levels of heme synthesis in mammalian cells. This assay involves incubation of cells with [(14)C] 5-ALA followed by extraction of heme and measurement of the radioactivity incorporated into heme. This procedure is accurate and quick. This method measures the relative levels of heme biosynthesis rather than the total heme content. To demonstrate the use of this technique the levels of heme biosynthesis were measured in several mammalian cell lines.

  18. A peroxidase mimic with atom transfer radical polymerization activity constructed through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Pan, Yue; Yang, Jiebing; Liu, Yong; Yang, Yan; Tang, Jun; Li, Quanshun

    2018-03-09

    Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) has been considered to be an efficient strategy for constructing functional macromolecules owing to its simple operation and versatile monomers, and thus it is of great significance to develop ideal catalysts with higher activity and perfect reusability. We constructed a peroxidase mimic through the grafting of heme onto metal-organic frameworks UiO-66-NH 2 (ZrMOF), namely Heme-ZrMOF. After the systematic characterization of structure, the composite Heme-ZrMOF was demonstrated to possess high peroxidase activity using 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate) and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine as substrates. The enzyme mimic was then used as catalysts in the ATRP reactions of different monomers, in which favorable monomer conversion (44.6-98.0%) and product molecular weight (8600-25,600 g/mol) could be obtained. Compared to free heme, Heme-ZrMOF could efficiently achieve the easy separation of heme from the catalytic system and facilitate the ATRP reaction in an aqueous environment to avoid the utilization of organic solvents. In conclusion, the enzyme mimic Heme-ZrMOF could be potentially used as an effective catalyst for preparing well-defined polymers with biomedical applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation : Toward understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Weert; P.J. Punt; Christien Lokman; C.A. van den Hondel; A.C. Franken; A.F. Ram

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  20. Heme biosynthesis and its regulation: Towards understanding and improvement of heme biosynthesis in filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, A.C.W.; Lokman, B.C.; Ram, A.F.J.; Punt, P.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Weert, S. de

    2011-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis in fungal host strains has acquired considerable interest in relation to the production of secreted heme-containing peroxidases. Class II peroxidase enzymes have been suggested as eco-friendly replacements of polluting chemical processes in industry. These peroxidases are naturally

  1. Zonation of heme synthesis enzymes in mouse liver and their regulation by β-catenin and Ha-ras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeuning, Albert; Schwarz, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) hemoproteins play an important role in hepatic biotransformation. Recently, β-catenin and Ha-ras signaling have been identified as players controlling transcription of various CYP genes in mouse liver. The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of β-catenin and Ha-ras in the regulation of heme synthesis. Heme synthesis-related gene expression was analyzed in normal liver, in transgenic mice expressing activated β-catenin or Ha-ras, and in hepatomas. Regulation of the aminolevulinate dehydratase promoter was studied in vitro. Elevated expression of mRNAs and proteins involved in heme biosynthesis was linked to β-catenin activation in perivenous hepatocytes, in transgenic hepatocytes, and in hepatocellular tumors. Stimulation of the aminolevulinate dehydratase promoter by β-catenin was independent of the β-catenin/T-cell-specific transcription factor dimer. By contrast, activation of Ha-ras repressed heme synthesis-related gene expression. The present data suggest that β-catenin enhances the expression of both CYPs and heme synthesis-related genes, thus coordinating the availability of CYP apoprotein and its prosthetic group heme. The reciprocal regulation of heme synthesis by β-catenin and Ha-ras-dependent signaling supports our previous hypothesis that antagonistic action of these pathways plays a major role in the control of zonal gene expression in healthy mouse liver and aberrant expression patterns in hepatocellular tumors.

  2. Investigations of ultrafast ligand rebinding to heme and heme proteins using temperature and strong magnetic field perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu

    This thesis is written to summarize investigations of the mechanisms that underlie the kinetics of diatomic ligand rebinding to the iron atom of the heme group, which is chelated inside heme proteins. The family of heme proteins is a major object of studies for several branches of scientific research activity. Understanding the ligand binding mechanisms and pathways is one of the major goals for biophysics. My interests mainly focus on the physics of this ligand binding process. Therefore, to investigate the problem, isolated from the influence of the protein matrix, Fe-protophorphyrin IX is chosen as the prototype system in my studies. Myoglobin, the most extensively and intensively studied protein, is another ideal system that allows coupling the protein polypeptide matrix into the investigation. A technique to synchro-lock two laser pulse trains electronically is applied to our pump-probe spectroscopic studies. Based on this technique, a two color, fs/ps pump-probe system is developed which extends the temporal window for our investigation to 13ns and fills a gap existing in previous pump-probe investigations. In order to apply this newly-developed pump-probe laser system to implement systematic studies on the kinetics of diatomic ligand (NO, CO, O2) rebinding to heme and heme proteins, several experimental setups are utilized. In Chapter 1, the essential background knowledge, which helps to understand the iron-ligand interaction, is briefly described. In Chapter 2, in addition to a description of the preparation protocols of protein samples and details of the method for data analysis, three home-made setups are described, which include: a picosecond laser regenerative amplifier, a pump-probe application along the bore (2-inch in diameter) of a superconducting magnet and a temperature-controllable cryostat for spinning sample cell. Chapter 3 presents high magnetic field studies of several heme-ligand or protein-ligand systems. Pump-probe spectroscopy is used to

  3. Heme synthesis in normal mouse liver and mouse liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hepatic cancers from mice and rats demonstrate decreased levels of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme synthetic pathway, and increased heme oxygenase, the heme-catabolizing enzyme. These findings suggest that diminution of P-450, b5, and catalase in these lesions may result from a heme supply that is limited by decreased heme synthesis and increased heme catabolism. Heme synthesis was measured in mouse liver tumors (MLT) and adjacent tumor-free lobes (BKG) by administering the radiolabeled heme precursors 55 FeCl3 and [2- 14 C]glycine and subsequently extracting the heme for determination of specific activity. Despite reduced delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase activity in MLT, both tissues incorporated [2-14C]glycine into heme at similar rates. At early time points, heme extracted from MLT contained less 55Fe than that from BKG. This was attributed to the findings that MLT took up 55Fe at a slower rate than BKG and had larger iron stores than BKG. The amount of heme per milligram of protein was also similar in both tissues. These findings militate against the hypothesis that diminished hemoprotein levels in MLT result from limited availability of heme. It is probable, therefore, that decreased hemoprotein levels in hepatic tumors are linked to a general program of dedifferentiation associated with the cancer phenotype. Diminution of hemoprotein in MLT may result in a relatively increased intracellular heme pool. delta-Aminolevulinic acid synthase and heme oxygenase are, respectively, negatively and positively regulated by heme. Thus, their alteration in MLT may be due to the regulatory influences of the heme pool

  4. Heme and non-heme iron transporters in non-polarized and polarized cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui Yumiko

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme and non-heme iron from diet, and recycled iron from hemoglobin are important products of the synthesis of iron-containing molecules. In excess, iron is potentially toxic because it can produce reactive oxygen species through the Fenton reaction. Humans can absorb, transport, store, and recycle iron without an excretory system to remove excess iron. Two candidate heme transporters and two iron transporters have been reported thus far. Heme incorporated into cells is degraded by heme oxygenases (HOs, and the iron product is reutilized by the body. To specify the processes of heme uptake and degradation, and the reutilization of iron, we determined the subcellular localizations of these transporters and HOs. Results In this study, we analyzed the subcellular localizations of 2 isoenzymes of HOs, 4 isoforms of divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1, and 2 candidate heme transporters--heme carrier protein 1 (HCP1 and heme responsive gene-1 (HRG-1--in non-polarized and polarized cells. In non-polarized cells, HCP1, HRG-1, and DMT1A-I are located in the plasma membrane. In polarized cells, they show distinct localizations: HCP1 and DMT1A-I are located in the apical membrane, whereas HRG-1 is located in the basolateral membrane and lysosome. 16Leu at DMT1A-I N-terminal cytosolic domain was found to be crucial for plasma membrane localization. HOs are located in smooth endoplasmic reticulum and colocalize with NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Conclusions HCP1 and DMT1A-I are localized to the apical membrane, and HRG-1 to the basolateral membrane and lysosome. These findings suggest that HCP1 and DMT1A-I have functions in the uptake of dietary heme and non-heme iron. HRG-1 can transport endocytosed heme from the lysosome into the cytosol. These localization studies support a model in which cytosolic heme can be degraded by HOs, and the resulting iron is exported into tissue fluids via the iron transporter ferroportin 1, which is

  5. The Quantum Mixed-Spin Heme State of Barley Peroxidase: A Paradigm for Class III Peroxidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howes, B.D.; Ma, J.; Marzocchi, M.P.; Schiodt, C.B.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Smulevich, G.; Welinder, K.G.; Zhang, J.

    1999-03-23

    Electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the ferric form of barley grain peroxidase (BP 1) at various pH values both at room temperature and 20 K are . reported, together with EPR spectra at 10 K. The ferrous forms and the ferric complex with fluoride have also been studied. A quantum mechanically mixed-spin (QS) state has been identified. The QS heme species co-exists with 6- and 5-cHS heroes; the relative populations of these three spin states are found to be dependent on pH and temperature. However, the QS species remains in all cases the dominant heme spin species. Barley peroxidase appears to be further characterized by a splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes, indicating that the vinyl groups are differently conjugated with the porphyrin. An analysis of the presently available spectroscopic data for proteins from all three peroxidase classes suggests that the simultaneous occurrence of the QS heme state as well as the splitting of the two vinyl stretching modes is confined to class III enzymes. The former point is discussed in terms of the possible influences of heme deformations on heme spin state. It is found that moderate saddling alone is probably not enough to cause the QS state, although some saddling maybe necessary for the QS state.

  6. Electrochemical and spectroscopic investigations of immobilized de novo designed heme proteins on metal electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, WW; Ulstrup, Jens

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of rational design principles, template-assisted four-helix-bundle proteins that include two histidines for coordinative binding of a heme were synthesized. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic characterization of the proteins in solution reveals the expected bis-histidine coordinated heme...... methods. For all proteins, immobilization causes a decrease in protein stability and a loosening of the helix packing, as reflected by a partial dissociation of a histidine ligand in the ferrous state and very low redox potentials. For the covalently attached MOP-C, the overall interfacial redox process...

  7. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ) is highly unusual since it uses heme as both its substrate and prosthetic group. Mammalian heme oxygenases are membrane-bound and are relatively difficult to purify and study.2–6. This makes investigation of the enzyme structure.

  8. Conversion of a heme-based oxygen sensor to a heme oxygenase by hydrogen sulfide: effects of mutations in the heme distal side of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase (Ec DOS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Du, Y.; Liu, G.; Yan, Y.; Huang, D.; Luo, W.; Martínková, M.; Man, Petr; Shimizu, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 5 (2013), s. 839-852 ISSN 0966-0844 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Heme oxygenase * Heme protein * Hydrogen sulfide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.689, year: 2013

  9. Molecular hijacking of siroheme for the synthesis of heme and d1 heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Shilpa; Lawrence, Andrew D; Lobo, Susana A; Saraiva, Lígia M; Golding, Bernard T; Palmer, David J; Howard, Mark J; Ferguson, Stuart J; Warren, Martin J

    2011-11-08

    Modified tetrapyrroles such as chlorophyll, heme, siroheme, vitamin B(12), coenzyme F(430), and heme d(1) underpin a wide range of essential biological functions in all domains of life, and it is therefore surprising that the syntheses of many of these life pigments remain poorly understood. It is known that the construction of the central molecular framework of modified tetrapyrroles is mediated via a common, core pathway. Herein a further branch of the modified tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway is described in denitrifying and sulfate-reducing bacteria as well as the Archaea. This process entails the hijacking of siroheme, the prosthetic group of sulfite and nitrite reductase, and its processing into heme and d(1) heme. The initial step in these transformations involves the decarboxylation of siroheme to give didecarboxysiroheme. For d(1) heme synthesis this intermediate has to undergo the replacement of two propionate side chains with oxygen functionalities and the introduction of a double bond into a further peripheral side chain. For heme synthesis didecarboxysiroheme is converted into Fe-coproporphyrin by oxidative loss of two acetic acid side chains. Fe-coproporphyrin is then transformed into heme by the oxidative decarboxylation of two propionate side chains. The mechanisms of these reactions are discussed and the evolutionary significance of another role for siroheme is examined.

  10. Effect of the hinge protein on the heme iron site of cytochrome c1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.H.; Yencha, A.J.; Bunker, G.; Zhang, G.; Chance, B.; King, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies on cytochrome c 1 from beef heart mitochondria were conducted to identify the effect of the hinge protein on the structure of the heme site in cytochrome c 1 . A comparison of XAS data of highly purified one-band and two-band cytochrome c 1 demonstrates that the hinge protein exerts a rather pronounced effect on the heme environment of the cytochrome c 1 : a conformational change occurs within a radius of approximately 5 angstrom from the heme iron in cytochrome c 1 when the hinge protein is bound to cytochrome c 1 . This result may be correlated with the previous observations that the structure and reactivity of cytochrome c 1 are affected by the hinge protein

  11. Heme compounds in dinosaur trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, M H; Marshall, M; Carron, K; Bohle, D S; Busse, S C; Arnold, E V; Barnard, D; Horner, J R; Starkey, J R

    1997-06-10

    Six independent lines of evidence point to the existence of heme-containing compounds and/or hemoglobin breakdown products in extracts of trabecular tissues of the large theropod dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. These include signatures from nuclear magnetic resonance and electron spin resonance that indicate the presence of a paramagnetic compound consistent with heme. In addition, UV/visible spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography data are consistent with the Soret absorbance characteristic of this molecule. Resonance Raman profiles are also consistent with a modified heme structure. Finally, when dinosaurian tissues were extracted for protein fragments and were used to immunize rats, the resulting antisera reacted positively with purified avian and mammalian hemoglobins. The most parsimonious explanation of this evidence is the presence of blood-derived hemoglobin compounds preserved in the dinosaurian tissues.

  12. Heme and erythropoieis: more than a structural role

    OpenAIRE

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis is the biological process that consumes the highest amount of body iron for heme synthesis. Heme synthesis in erythroid cells is finely coordinated with that of alpha (α) and beta (β)-globin, resulting in the production of hemoglobin, a tetramer of 2α- and 2β-globin chains, and heme as the prosthetic group. Heme is not only the structural component of hemoglobin, but it plays multiple regulatory roles during the differentiation of erythroid precursors since it controls its own ...

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Cao

    Full Text Available Homeostatic erythropoiesis leads to the formation of mature red blood cells under non-stress conditions, and the production of new erythrocytes occurs as the need arises. In response to environmental stimuli, such as bone marrow transplantation, myelosuppression, or anemia, erythroid progenitors proliferate rapidly in a process referred to as stress erythropoiesis. We have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 deficiency leads to disrupted stress hematopoiesis. Here, we describe the specific effects of HO-1 deficiency on stress erythropoiesis.We used a transplant model to induce stress conditions. In irradiated recipients that received hmox(+/- or hmox(+/+ bone marrow cells, we evaluated (i the erythrocyte parameters in the peripheral blood; (ii the staining intensity of CD71-, Ter119-, and CD49d-specific surface markers during erythroblast differentiation; (iii the patterns of histological iron staining; and (iv the number of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α. In the spleens of mice that received hmox(+/- cells, we show (i decreases in the proerythroblast, basophilic, and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations; (ii increases in the insoluble iron levels and decreases in the soluble iron levels; (iii increased numbers of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α; and (iv decreased levels of CD49d expression in the basophilic and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations.As reflected by effects on secreted and cell surface proteins, HO-1 deletion likely affects stress erythropoiesis through the retention of erythroblasts in the erythroblastic islands of the spleen. Thus, HO-1 may serve as a therapeutic target for controlling erythropoiesis, and the dysregulation of HO-1 may be a predisposing condition for hematologic diseases.

  14. Heme detection in parasitic protists of the group Trypanosomatidae

    OpenAIRE

    KOVÁŘOVÁ, Julie

    2010-01-01

    This study deals with detection of heme in three different species of the group Trypanosomatidae: Trypanosoma brucei, Leishmania tarentolae and Phytomonas serpens. The main goal was to improve the current knowledge about heme metabolism in Phytomonas serpens. It was found that P. serpens does not require heme for growth, though it does ingest it if available.

  15. Heme Exporter FLVCR1a Regulates Heme Synthesis and Degradation and Controls Activity of Cytochromes P450

    OpenAIRE

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We inv...

  16. Regulation of heme biosynthesis and transport in metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, FengXiu; Cheng, YongJiao; Chen, CaiYong

    2015-08-01

    Heme is an iron-containing tetrapyrrole that plays a critical role in regulating a variety of biological processes including oxygen and electron transport, gas sensing, signal transduction, biological clock, and microRNA processing. Most metazoan cells synthesize heme via a conserved pathway comprised of eight enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Heme can also be acquired from food or extracellular environment. Cellular heme homeostasis is maintained through the coordinated regulation of synthesis, transport, and degradation. This review presents the current knowledge of the synthesis and transport of heme in metazoans and highlights recent advances in the regulation of these pathways.

  17. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 2. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate. Mallayan Palaniandavar Kusalendiran Visvaganesan.

  18. Heme pathway evolution in kinetoplastid protists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cenci, U.; Moog, D.; Curtis, B.A.; Tanifuji, G.; Eme, L.; Lukeš, Julius; Archibald, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, MAY 18 (2016), č. článku 109. ISSN 1471-2148 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : heme * kinetoplastea * Paramoeba pemaquidensis * Perkinsela * evolution * endosymbiosis * Prokinetoplastina * lateral gene transfer Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.221, year: 2016

  19. Comparative study of enzyme activity and heme reactivity in Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens cystathionine β-synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Majtan, Tomas; Freeman, Katherine M; Linck, Rachel; Ponter, Sarah; Kraus, Jan P; Burstyn, Judith N

    2013-01-29

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme in the transsulfuration pathway, which is critical for the synthesis of cysteine from methionine in eukaryotes. CBS uses coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) for catalysis, and S-adenosylmethionine regulates the activity of human CBS, but not yeast CBS. Human and fruit fly CBS contain heme; however, the role for heme is not clear. This paper reports biochemical and spectroscopic characterization of CBS from fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster (DmCBS) and the CO/NO gas binding reactions of DmCBS and human CBS. Like CBS enzymes from lower organisms (e.g., yeast), DmCBS is intrinsically highly active and is not regulated by AdoMet. The DmCBS heme coordination environment, the reactivity, and the accompanying effects on enzyme activity are similar to those of human CBS. The DmCBS heme bears histidine and cysteine axial ligands, and the enzyme becomes inactive when the cysteine ligand is replaced. The Fe(II) heme in DmCBS is less stable than that in human CBS, undergoing more facile reoxidation and ligand exchange. In both CBS proteins, the overall stability of the protein is correlated with the heme oxidation state. Human and DmCBS Fe(II) hemes react relatively slowly with CO and NO, and the rate of the CO binding reaction is faster at low pH than at high pH. Together, the results suggest that heme incorporation and AdoMet regulation in CBS are not correlated, possibly providing two independent means for regulating the enzyme.

  20. Shr of Group A Streptococcus is a new type of composite NEAT protein involved in sequestering heme from methemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Mahamoudou; Cunha, Elizabeth Bentley; Li, Xueru; Huang, Ya-Shu; Dixon, Dabney; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A growing body of evidence suggests that surface or secreted proteins with NEAr Transporter (NEAT) domains play a central role in heme acquisition and trafficking across the cell envelope of Gram-positive bacteria. Group A Streptococcus (GAS), a β-hemolytic human pathogen, expresses a NEAT protein, Shr, which binds several hemoproteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Shr is a complex, membrane-anchored protein, with a unique N-terminal domain (NTD) and two NEAT domains separated by a central leucine-rich repeat region. In this study we have carried out an analysis of the functional domains in Shr. We show that Shr obtains heme in solution and furthermore reduces the heme iron; this is the first report of heme reduction by a NEAT protein. More specifically, we demonstrate that both of the constituent NEAT domains of Shr are responsible for binding heme, although they are missing a critical tyrosine residue found in the ligand-binding pocket of other heme-binding NEAT domains. Further investigations show that a previously undescribed region within the Shr NTD interacts with methemoglobin. Shr NEAT domains, however, do not contribute significantly to the binding of methemoglobin but mediate binding to the ECM components fibronectin and laminin. A protein fragment containing the NTD plus the first NEAT domain was found to be sufficient to sequester heme directly from methemoglobin. Correlating these in vitro findings to in vivo biological function, mutants analysis establishes the role of Shr in GAS growth with methemoglobin as a sole source of iron, and indicates that at least one NEAT domain is necessary for the utilization of methemoglobin. We suggest that Shr is the prototype of a new group of NEAT composite proteins involved in heme uptake found in pyogenic streptococci and Clostridium novyi. PMID:20807204

  1. Measurement of Heme Ruffling Changes in MhuD Using UV-vis Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Amanda B; Graves, Max T; Liptak, Matthew D

    2016-04-28

    For decades it has been known that an out-of-plane ruffling distortion of heme perturbs its UV-vis absorption (Abs) spectrum, but whether increased ruffling induces a red or blue shift of the Soret band has remained a topic of debate. This debate has been resolved by the spectroscopic and computational characterization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis MhuD presented here, an enzyme that converts heme, oxygen, and reducing equivalents to nonheme iron and mycobilin. W66F and W66A MhuD have been characterized using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance, Abs, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopies, and the data have been used to develop an experimentally validated theoretical model of ruffled, ferric heme. The PBE density functional theory (DFT) model that has been developed accurately reproduces the observed spectral changes from wild type enzyme, and the underlying quantum mechanical origins of these ruffling-induced changes were revealed by analyzing the PBE DFT description of the electronic structure. Small amounts of heme ruffling have no influence on the energy of the Q-band and blue-shift the Soret band due to symmetry-allowed mixing of the Fe 3dxy and porphyrin a2u orbitals. Larger amounts of ruffling red-shift both the Q and Soret bands due to disruption of π-bonding within the porphyrin ring.

  2. The Chemistry and Biochemistry of Heme c: Functional Bases for Covalent Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, Sarah E. J.; Bren, Kara L.

    2008-01-01

    A discussion of the literature concerning the synthesis, function, and activity of heme c-containing proteins is presented. Comparison of the properties of heme c, which is covalently bound to protein, is made to heme b, which is bound noncovalently. A question of interest is why nature uses biochemically expensive heme c in many proteins when its properties are expected to be similar to heme b. Considering the effects of covalent heme attachment on heme conformation and on the proximal histi...

  3. NirN Protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Novel Electron-bifurcating Dehydrogenase Catalyzing the Last Step of Heme d1 Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczack, Julia; Hoffmann, Martin; Papke, Ulrich; Haufschildt, Kristin; Nicke, Tristan; Bröring, Martin; Sezer, Murat; Weimar, Rebecca; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Hildebrandt, Peter; Layer, Gunhild

    2014-01-01

    Heme d1 plays an important role in denitrification as the essential cofactor of the cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase NirS. At present, the biosynthesis of heme d1 is only partially understood. The last step of heme d1 biosynthesis requires a so far unknown enzyme that catalyzes the introduction of a double bond into one of the propionate side chains of the tetrapyrrole yielding the corresponding acrylate side chain. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 strain lacking the NirN protein does not produce heme d1. Instead, the NirS purified from this strain contains the heme d1 precursor dihydro-heme d1 lacking the acrylic double bond, as indicated by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, the dihydro-heme d1 was extracted from purified NirS and characterized by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and finally identified by high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Moreover, we show that purified NirN from P. aeruginosa binds the dihydro-heme d1 and catalyzes the introduction of the acrylic double bond in vitro. Strikingly, NirN uses an electron bifurcation mechanism for the two-electron oxidation reaction, during which one electron ends up on its heme c cofactor and the second electron reduces the substrate/product from the ferric to the ferrous state. On the basis of our results, we propose novel roles for the proteins NirN and NirF during the biosynthesis of heme d1. PMID:25204657

  4. Heme exporter FLVCR1a regulates heme synthesis and degradation and controls activity of cytochromes P450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-05-01

    The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1a(fl/fl);alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Heme Exporter FLVCR1a Regulates Heme Synthesis and Degradation and Controls Activity of Cytochromes P450

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinchi, Francesca; Ingoglia, Giada; Chiabrando, Deborah; Mercurio, Sonia; Turco, Emilia; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims The liver has one of the highest rates of heme synthesis of any organ. More than 50% of the heme synthesized in the liver is used for synthesis of P450 enzymes, which metabolize exogenous and endogenous compounds that include natural products, hormones, drugs, and carcinogens. Feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular receptor 1a (FLVCR1a) is plasma membrane heme exporter that is ubiquitously expressed and controls intracellular heme content in hematopoietic lineages. We investigated the role of Flvcr1a in liver function in mice. Methods We created mice with conditional disruption of Mfsd7b, which encodes Flvcr1a, in hepatocytes (Flvcr1afl/fl;alb-cre mice). Mice were analyzed under basal conditions, after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, and after induction of cytochromes P450 synthesis. Livers were collected and analyzed by histologic, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic P450 enzymatic activities were measured. Results Flvcr1afl/fl;alb-cre mice accumulated heme and iron in liver despite up-regulation of heme oxygenase 1, ferroportin, and ferritins. Hepatic heme export activity of Flvcr1a was closely associated with heme biosynthesis, which is required to sustain cytochrome induction. Upon cytochromes P450 stimulation, Flvcr1afl/fl;alb-cre mice had reduced cytochrome activity, associated with accumulation of heme in hepatocytes. The expansion of the cytosolic heme pool in these mice was likely responsible for the early inhibition of heme synthesis and increased degradation of heme, which reduced expression and activity of cytochromes P450. Conclusions In livers of mice, Flvcr1a maintains a free heme pool that regulates heme synthesis and degradation as well as cytochromes P450 expression and activity. These findings have important implications for drug metabolism. PMID:24486949

  6. Aerobic kinetoplastid flagellate Phytomonas does not require heme for viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kořený, Luděk; Sobotka, Roman; Kovářová, Julie; Gnipová, Anna; Flegontov, Pavel; Horváth, Anton; Oborník, Miroslav; Ayala, Francisco J; Lukeš, Julius

    2012-03-06

    Heme is an iron-coordinated porphyrin that is universally essential as a protein cofactor for fundamental cellular processes, such as electron transport in the respiratory chain, oxidative stress response, or redox reactions in various metabolic pathways. Parasitic kinetoplastid flagellates represent a rare example of organisms that depend on oxidative metabolism but are heme auxotrophs. Here, we show that heme is fully dispensable for the survival of Phytomonas serpens, a plant parasite. Seeking to understand the metabolism of this heme-free eukaryote, we searched for heme-containing proteins in its de novo sequenced genome and examined several cellular processes for which heme has so far been considered indispensable. We found that P. serpens lacks most of the known hemoproteins and does not require heme for electron transport in the respiratory chain, protection against oxidative stress, or desaturation of fatty acids. Although heme is still required for the synthesis of ergosterol, its precursor, lanosterol, is instead incorporated into the membranes of P. serpens grown in the absence of heme. In conclusion, P. serpens is a flagellate with unique metabolic adaptations that allow it to bypass all requirements for heme.

  7. Characterization of the hemin-sensitive eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha kinase from mouse nonerythroid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanga, J J; Herrero, S; de Haro, C

    1998-11-27

    The heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2alpha (eIF2alpha) kinase (heme-regulated inhibitor (HRI)) is activated by heme deficiency in reticulocytes and plays an important role in translational control in these cells. Previously, HRI was cloned from rabbit reticulocytes and rat brain, but a heme-regulated eIF2alpha kinase activity has only been purified from erythroid cells. In this study, we report the purification of a heme-sensitive eIF2alpha kinase activity from both mouse liver and NIH 3T3 cell extracts. Furthermore, we have cloned and characterized this mouse liver eIF2alpha kinase (mHRI), which exhibits 83 and 94% identities to rabbit and rat HRIs, respectively. Both the purified enzyme and recombinant mHRI exhibited an autokinase and an eIF2alpha kinase activity, and both activities were inhibited in vitro by hemin. In addition, wild-type mHRI, but not the inactive mHRI-K196R mutant, was autophosphorylated in vivo when it was expressed in 293 cells. Quantitation of mHRI mRNA expression in various mouse tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed relatively high levels in liver, kidney, and testis. These results provide strong evidence that mHRI is a ubiquitous eIF2alpha kinase of mammalian cells, suggesting that it could play important roles in the translational regulation of nonerythroid tissues.

  8. One ring to rule them all: trafficking of heme and heme synthesis intermediates in the metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Iqbal; Dailey, Harry A

    2012-09-01

    The appearance of heme, an organic ring surrounding an iron atom, in evolution forever changed the efficiency with which organisms were able to generate energy, utilize gasses and catalyze numerous reactions. Because of this, heme has become a near ubiquitous compound among living organisms. In this review we have attempted to assess the current state of heme synthesis and trafficking with a goal of identifying crucial missing information, and propose hypotheses related to trafficking that may generate discussion and research. The possibilities of spatially organized supramolecular enzyme complexes and organelle structures that facilitate efficient heme synthesis and subsequent trafficking are discussed and evaluated. Recently identified players in heme transport and trafficking are reviewed and placed in an organismal context. Additionally, older, well established data are reexamined in light of more recent studies on cellular organization and data available from newer model organisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The PAS Domain-Containing Protein HeuR Regulates Heme Uptake in Campylobacter jejuni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah G. Johnson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterially derived gastroenteritis. A previous mutant screen demonstrated that the heme uptake system (Chu is required for full colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract. Subsequent work identified a PAS domain-containing regulator, termed HeuR, as being required for chicken colonization. Here we confirm that both the heme uptake system and HeuR are required for full chicken gastrointestinal tract colonization, with the heuR mutant being particularly affected during competition with wild-type C. jejuni. Transcriptomic analysis identified the chu genes—and those encoding other iron uptake systems—as regulatory targets of HeuR. Purified HeuR bound the chuZA promoter region in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Consistent with a role for HeuR in chu expression, heuR mutants were unable to efficiently use heme as a source of iron under iron-limiting conditions, and mutants exhibited decreased levels of cell-associated iron by mass spectrometry. Finally, we demonstrate that an heuR mutant of C. jejuni is resistant to hydrogen peroxide and that this resistance correlates to elevated levels of catalase activity. These results indicate that HeuR directly and positively regulates iron acquisition from heme and negatively impacts catalase activity by an as yet unidentified mechanism in C. jejuni.

  10. Mitochondrial ClpX Activates a Key Enzyme for Heme Biosynthesis and Erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardon, Julia R; Yien, Yvette Y; Huston, Nicholas C; Branco, Diana S; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Rhee, Kyu Y; Paw, Barry H; Baker, Tania A

    2015-05-07

    The mitochondrion maintains and regulates its proteome with chaperones primarily inherited from its bacterial endosymbiont ancestor. Among these chaperones is the AAA+ unfoldase ClpX, an important regulator of prokaryotic physiology with poorly defined function in the eukaryotic mitochondrion. We observed phenotypic similarity in S. cerevisiae genetic interaction data between mitochondrial ClpX (mtClpX) and genes contributing to heme biosynthesis, an essential mitochondrial function. Metabolomic analysis revealed that 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), the first heme precursor, is 5-fold reduced in yeast lacking mtClpX activity and that total heme is reduced by half. mtClpX directly stimulates ALA synthase in vitro by catalyzing incorporation of its cofactor, pyridoxal phosphate. This activity is conserved in mammalian homologs; additionally, mtClpX depletion impairs vertebrate erythropoiesis, which requires massive upregulation of heme biosynthesis to supply hemoglobin. mtClpX, therefore, is a widely conserved stimulator of an essential biosynthetic pathway and uses a previously unrecognized mechanism for AAA+ unfoldases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Biosynthesis of heme in immature erythroid cells. The regulatory step for heme formation in the human erythron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, L.C.; Cox, T.M.

    1988-01-01

    Heme formation in reticulocytes from rabbits and rodents is subject to end product negative feedback regulation: intracellular free heme has been shown to control acquisition of transferrin iron for heme synthesis. To identify the site of control of heme biosynthesis in the human erythron, immature erythroid cells were obtained from peripheral blood and aspirated bone marrow. After incubation with human 59Fe transferrin, 2-[14C]glycine, or 4-[14C]delta-aminolevulinate, isotopic incorporation into extracted heme was determined. Addition of cycloheximide to increase endogenous free heme, reduced incorporation of labeled glycine and iron but not delta-aminolevulinate into cell heme. Incorporation of glycine and iron was also sensitive to inhibition by exogenous hematin (Ki, 30 and 45 microM, respectively) i.e. at concentrations in the range which affect cell-free protein synthesis in reticulocyte lysates. Hematin treatment rapidly diminished incorporation of intracellular 59Fe into heme by human erythroid cells but assimilation of 4-[14C]delta-aminolevulinate into heme was insensitive to inhibition by hematin (Ki greater than 100 microM). In human reticulocytes (unlike those from rabbits), addition of ferric salicylaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone, to increase the pre-heme iron pool independently of the transferrin cycle, failed to promote heme synthesis or modify feedback inhibition induced by hematin. In human erythroid cells (but not rabbit reticulocytes) pre-incubation with unlabeled delta-aminolevulinate or protoporphyrin IX greatly stimulated utilization of cell 59Fe for heme synthesis and also attenuated end product inhibition. In human erythroid cells heme biosynthesis is thus primarily regulated by feedback inhibition at one or more steps which lead to delta-aminolevulinate formation

  12. Role of Heme and Heme-Proteins in Trypanosomatid Essential Metabolic Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina E. J. Tripodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, trypanosomatids are known for being etiological agents of several highly disabling and often fatal diseases like Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp., and African trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma brucei. Throughout their life cycle, they must cope with diverse environmental conditions, and the mechanisms involved in these processes are crucial for their survival. In this review, we describe the role of heme in several essential metabolic pathways of these protozoans. Notwithstanding trypanosomatids lack of the complete heme biosynthetic pathway, we focus our discussion in the metabolic role played for important heme-proteins, like cytochromes. Although several genes for different types of cytochromes, involved in mitochondrial respiration, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and sterol biosynthesis, are annotated at the Tritryp Genome Project, the encoded proteins have not yet been deeply studied. We pointed our attention into relevant aspects of these protein functions that are amenable to be considered for rational design of trypanocidal agents.

  13. Resonance Raman, infrared, and EPR investigation on the binuclear site structure of the heme-copper ubiquinol oxidases from Acetobacter aceti: effect of the heme peripheral formyl group substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubaki, M; Matsushita, K; Adachi, O; Hirota, S; Kitagawa, T; Hori, H

    1997-10-21

    Acetobacter aceti produces two different terminal ubiquinol oxidases (cytochromes a1 and o) depending on the culture conditions. Two types of oxidases share a common protein moiety but with different heme components at the binuclear center (heme A for cytochrome a1 and heme O for cytochrome o). We investigated the structure of the binuclear site of the two oxidases using resonance Raman, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), and EPR spectroscopies to clarify the interactions of heme A formyl group with protein moiety. We found that the overall architecture and the electronic configuration at the binuclear center in the oxidized state seem to be well conserved irrespective of the heme peripheral group at position 8, except for the azide-inhibited state. In contrast, we observed great variations in the C-N stretching frequency and cyanide-binding affinity in the CN-reduced state, in addition to multiple C-O stretching bands in the CO-reduced state. Present and previous studies suggest that the conformational flexibility of the binuclear center in the reduced ligand-bound state may be a common feature among the heme-copper oxidase superfamily. In the CN-reduced state, a hydrogen bond network may be formed among the formyl group, water molecule(s), and the surrounding amino acid residue(s). This network may be very important to maintain proper orientations of the distal amino acid residues and/or the CuB1+ ion relative to the cyanide ion bound to the ferrous heme iron and could play a critical role for the high affinity in cyanide binding.

  14. Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Lipiński

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways – heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S] – is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  15. [Heme metabolism as an integral part of iron homeostasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipiński, Paweł; Starzyński, Rafał R; Styś, Agnieszka; Gajowiak, Anna; Staroń, Robert

    2014-01-02

    Heme, a ferrous iron protoporphyrin IX complex, is employed as a prosthetic group in a number of diverse heme proteins that participate in important cellular and systemic physiological processes. Provision of an adequate amount of iron for heme biosynthesis is one of the elemental hallmarks of intracellular iron homeostasis. In the cell the bioavailability of iron for the two main iron biological pathways--heme synthesis and the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters ([Fe-S])--is mainly regulated by the IRP/IRE posttranscriptional system. The biogenesis of [Fe-S] centers is crucial for heme synthesis because these co-factors determine the activity of IRP1 and that of ferrochelatase, an enzyme responsible for the insertion of an iron into protoporphyrin IX to produce heme. On the other hand, delivery of iron for heme and hemoglobin synthesis in erythroblasts, precursors of erythrocytes in bone marrow, is an indispensable element of body iron homeostasis. This process relies on the recovery of iron from senescent red blood cells through the enzymatic degradation of heme molecules and recycling of iron to the circulation. Molecular coordination of these processes involves the activity of heme oxygenase 1, IRP1 and IRP2 as well as the functioning of the hepcidin-ferroportin regulatory axis. Recent studies show in mammals the existence of an expanded system of proteins involved in the transport of intact heme molecules at the cellular and systemic levels. The biological role of this system is of particular importance when the concentration of free heme reaches a toxic level in the body (intravascular hemolysis) as well as locally in cells having intensive heme metabolism such as erythroblasts and macrophages.

  16. Histidine at Position 195 is Essential for Association of Heme-b in Lcp1VH2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetermann, Sylvia; Vivod, Robin; Hiessl, Sebastian; Hogeback, Jens; Holtkamp, Michael; Karst, Uwe; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    The latex clearing protein (Lcp) is the key enzyme of polyisoprene degradation in actinomycetes (Yikmis and Steinbüchel in Appl Environ Microbiol 78:4543-4551, https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00001-12, 2012). In this study it was shown that Lcp from Gordonia polyisoprenivorans VH2 (Lcp1VH2) harbors a non-covalently bound heme b as cofactor, which was identified by pyridine hemochrome spectra and confirmed by LC/ESI-ToF-MS. It contains iron, most likely in the Fe3+ state. We focused on the characterization of the heme-cofactor, its accessibility with respect to the conformation of Lcp1VH2, and the identification of putative histidine residues involved in the coordination of heme. A change was detectable in UV/Vis-spectra of reduced Lcp1VH2 when imidazole was added, showing that Lcp1VH2 "as isolated" occurs in an open state, directly being accessible for external ligands. In addition, three highly conserved histidines (H195, H200 and H228), presumably acting as ligands coordinating the heme within the heme pocket, were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. The effect of these changes on in vivo rubber-mineralization was investigated. The lcp- deletion mutant complemented with the H195A variant of lcp1 VH2 was unable to mineralize poly(cis-1,4-isoprene). In vitro analyses of purified, recombinant Lcp1VH2H195A confirmed the loss of enzyme activity, which could be ascribed to the loss of heme. Hence, H195 is essential for the association of heme-b in the central region of Lcp1VH2.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of polymer-bound heme complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Eishun; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hidenari; Shirai, Tsuneo.

    1984-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra were measured on the heme complexes of poly(1-vinyl- and 1-vinyl-2-methylimidazole)(PVI and PMI) and heme derivatives with covalently bound imidazoleligand (IH) and 2-methylimidazole-ligand (MIH) embedded in poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) film. Quadrupole splitting (ΔE sub(Q)) for the carbon monoxide adduct of PMI-heme indicated large electronic field gradient at the iron nucleus, probably due to steric hindrance of the polymer chain, and this behavior agreed with its low affinity with carbon monoxide. PMI-heme formed an oxygen adduct and its isomer shift and ΔE sub(Q) values were obtained. (author)

  18. Aldoxime dehydratase: probing the heme environment involved in the synthesis of the carbon-nitrogen triple bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinakoulaki, Eftychia; Koutsoupakis, Constantinos; Sawai, Hitomi; Pavlou, Andrea; Kato, Yasuo; Asano, Yasuhisa; Aono, Shigetoshi

    2011-11-10

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra, "light" minus "dark" difference FTIR spectra, and time-resolved step-scan (TRS(2)) FTIR spectra are reported for carbonmonoxy aldoxime dehydratase. Two C-O modes of heme at 1945 and 1964 cm(-1) have been identified and remained unchanged in H(2)O/D(2)O exchange and in the pH 5.6-8.5 range, suggesting the presence of two conformations at the active site. The observed C-O frequencies are 5 and 16 cm(-1) lower and higher, respectively, than that obtained previously (Oinuma, K.-I.; et al. FEBS Lett.2004, 568, 44-48). We suggest that the strength of the Fe-His bond and the neutralization of the negatively charged propionate groups modulate the ν(Fe-CO)/ν(CO) back-bonding correlation. The "light" minus "dark" difference FTIR spectra indicate that the heme propionates are in both the protonated and deprotonated forms, and the photolyzed CO becomes trapped within a ligand docking site (ν(CO) = 2138 cm(-1)). The TRS(2)-FTIR spectra show that the rate of recombination of CO to the heme is k(1945 cm(-1)) = 126 ± 20 s(-1) and k(1964 cm(-1)) = 122 ± 20 s(-1) at pH 5.6, and k(1945 cm(-1)) = 148 ± 30 s(-1) and k(1964 cm(-1)) = 158 ± 32 s(-1) at pH 8.5. The rate of decay of the heme propionate vibrations is on a time scale coincident with the rate of rebinding, suggesting that there is a coupling between ligation dynamics in the distal heme environment and the environment sensed by the heme propionates. The implications of these results with respect to the proximal His-Fe heme environment including the propionates and the positively charged or proton-donating residues in the distal pocket which are crucial for the synthesis of nitriles are discussed.

  19. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  20. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christides, Tatiana; Sharp, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55) increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  1. SapF-mediated heme iron utilization enhances persistence and coordinates biofilm architecture of Haemophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Vogel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI is a common commensal bacterium that resides in the human upper respiratory tract of healthy individuals. NTHI is also a known causative agent of multiple diseases including sinusitis, otitis media as well as exacerbates disease severity of patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We have previously shown that the Sap ABC transporter mediates resistance to host antimicrobial peptides (AMPs and import of the iron-containing compound heme. Here, we analyzed the contribution of the Sap structural ATPase protein, SapF, in these essential functions. SapF was dispensable for NTHI survival when exposed to AMPs in vitro. SapF was responsible for heme utilization and recovery of depleted internal heme iron stores. Further, a loss of SapF resulted in morphological plasticity and enhanced community development and biofilm architecture, suggesting the potential role of heme iron availability in coordinating the complexity of NTHI biofilm architecture. SapF was required for colonization of the nasopharynx and acute infection of the middle ear, as SapF deficiency correlated with a statistically significant decrease in NTHI persistence in vivo. These data suggest that SapF is required for proper heme utilization which directly impacts NTHI survival. Thus, these studies further support a role for the Sap complex in the transport of multiple substrates and further defines substrate specificity for the two ATPase subunits. Given the multiple essential functions provided by the Sap ABC transporter, this complex could prove to be an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of NTHI diseases.

  2. Protein oxidation mediated by heme-induced active site conversion specific for heme-regulated transcription factor, iron response regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitatsuji, Chihiro; Izumi, Kozue; Nambu, Shusuke; Kurogochi, Masaki; Uchida, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro; O'Brian, Mark R; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-05

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum transcriptional regulator Irr (iron response regulator) is a key regulator of the iron homeostasis, which is degraded in response to heme binding via a mechanism that involves oxidative modification of the protein. Here, we show that heme-bound Irr activates O2 to form highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the "active site conversion" from heme iron to non-heme iron to degrade itself. In the presence of heme and reductant, the ROS scavenging experiments show that Irr generates H2O2 from O2 as found for other hemoproteins, but H2O2 is less effective in oxidizing the peptide, and further activation of H2O2 is suggested. Interestingly, we find a time-dependent decrease of the intensity of the Soret band and appearance of the characteristic EPR signal at g = 4.3 during the oxidation, showing the heme degradation and the successive formation of a non-heme iron site. Together with the mutational studies, we here propose a novel "two-step self-oxidative modification" mechanism, during which O2 is activated to form H2O2 at the heme regulatory motif (HRM) site and the generated H2O2 is further converted into more reactive species such as ·OH at the non-heme iron site in the His-cluster region formed by the active site conversion.

  3. Coordination Chemistry of Linear Oligopyrrolic Fragments Inspired by Heme Metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritika

    Linear oligopyrroles are degradation products of heme, which is converted in the presence of heme oxygenase to bile pigments, such as biliverdin and bilirubin. These tetrapyrrolic oligopyrroles are ubiquitously present in biological systems and find applications in the fields of catalysis and sensing. These linear tetrapyrrolic scaffolds are further degraded into linear tripyrrolic and dipyrrolic fragments. Although these lower oligopyrroles are abundantly present, their coordination chemistry requires further characterization. This dissertation focuses mainly on two classes of bioinspired linear oligopyrroles, propentdyopent and tripyrrindione, and their transition metal complexes, which present a rich ligand-based redox chemistry. Chapter 1 offers an overview of heme degradation to different classes of linear oligopyrroles and properties of their transition metal complexes. Chapter 2 is focused on the tripyrrin-1,14-dione scaffold of the urinary pigment uroerythrin, which coordinates divalent transition metals palladium and copper with square planar geometry. Specifically, the tripyrrin-1, 14-dione ligand binds Cu(II) and Pd(II) as a dianionic organic radical under ambient conditions. The electrochemical study confirms the presence of ligand based redox chemistry, and one electron oxidation or reduction reactions do not alter the planar geometry around the metal center. The X-Ray analysis and the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of the complexes in the solid and solution phase reveals intermolecular interactions between the ligand based unpaired electrons and therefore formation of neutral pi-pi dimers. In Chapter 3, the antioxidant activity and the fluorescence sensor properties of the tripyrrin-1,14-dione ligand in the presence of superoxide are described. We found that the tripyrrindione ligand undergoes one-electron reduction in the presence of the superoxide radical anion (O2•- ) to form highly fluorescent H3TD1•- radical anion, which emits

  4. Relationship between natural and heme-mediated antibody polyreactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadzhieva, Maya; Vassilev, Tchavdar [Stephan Angelov Institute of Microbiology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srinivas; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Dimitrov, Jordan D., E-mail: jordan.dimitrov@crc.jussieu.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR-S 1138, Centre de Recherche des Cordeliers, F-75006 Paris (France); INSERM, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France); Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, UMR-S 1138, F-75006 Paris (France)

    2016-03-25

    Polyreactive antibodies represent a considerable fraction of the immune repertoires. Some antibodies acquire polyreactivity post-translationally after interaction with various redox-active substances, including heme. Recently we have demonstrated that heme binding to a naturally polyreactive antibody (SPE7) results in a considerable broadening of the repertoire of recognized antigens. A question remains whether the presence of certain level of natural polyreactivity of antibodies is a prerequisite for heme-induced further extension of antigen binding potential. Here we used a second monoclonal antibody (Hg32) with unknown specificity and absence of intrinsic polyreactivity as a model to study the potential of heme to induce polyreactivity of antibodies. We demonstrated that exposure to heme greatly extends the antigen binding potential of Hg32, suggesting that the intrinsic binding promiscuity is not a prerequisite for the induction of polyreactivity by heme. In addition we compared the kinetics and thermodynamics of the interaction of heme-exposed antibodies with a panel of unrelated antigens. These analyses revealed that the two heme-sensitive antibodies adopt different mechanisms of binding to the same set of antigens. This study contributes to understanding the phenomenon of induced antibody polyreactivity. The data may also be of importance for understanding of physiological and pathological roles of polyreactive antibodies. - Highlights: • Exposure of certain monoclonal IgE antibodies to heme results in gain of antigen binding polyreactivity. • Natural polyreactivity of antibodies is dispensable for acquisition of polyreactivity through interaction with heme. • Heme-induced monoclonal IgE antibodies differ in their thermodynamic mechanisms of antigen recognition.

  5. Heme Recognition By a Staphylococcus Aureus IsdE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, J.C.; Vermeiren, C.L.; Heinrichs, D.E.; Murphy, M.E.P.

    2009-06-03

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen and a leading cause of hospital acquired infections. Because the free iron concentration in the human body is too low to support growth, S. aureus must acquire iron from host sources. Heme iron is the most prevalent iron reservoir in the human body and a predominant source of iron for S. aureus. The iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd) system removes heme from host heme proteins and transfers it to IsdE, the cognate substrate-binding lipoprotein of an ATP-binding cassette transporter, for import and subsequent degradation. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the soluble portion of the IsdE lipoprotein in complex with heme. The structure reveals a bi-lobed topology formed by an N- and C-terminal domain bridged by a single {alpha}-helix. The structure places IsdE as a member of the helical backbone metal receptor superfamily. A six-coordinate heme molecule is bound in the groove established at the domain interface, and the heme iron is coordinated in a novel fashion for heme transporters by Met{sup 78} and His{sup 229}. Both heme propionate groups are secured by H-bonds to IsdE main chain and side chain groups. Of these residues, His{sup 299} is essential for IsdE-mediated heme uptake by S. aureus when growth on heme as a sole iron source is measured. Multiple sequence alignments of homologues from several other Gram-positive bacteria, including the human pathogens pyogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and Listeria monocytogenes, suggest that these other systems function equivalently to S. aureus IsdE with respect to heme binding and transport.

  6. Voltammetry and In Situ Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy of De Novo Designed Heme Protein Monolayers on Au(111)-Electrode Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, Tim; Li, Wu; Haehnel, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we report the electrochemical characterization and in situ scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) studies of monolayers of an artificial de novo designed heme protein MOP-C, covalently immobilized on modified Au(111) surfaces. The protein forms closely packed monolayers, which ...

  7. Inactivation of Dengue and Yellow Fever viruses by heme, cobalt-protoporphyrin IX and tin-protoporphyrin IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção-Miranda, I; Cruz-Oliveira, C; Neris, R L S; Figueiredo, C M; Pereira, L P S; Rodrigues, D; Araujo, D F F; Da Poian, A T; Bozza, M T

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effect of heme, cobalt-protoporphyrin IX and tin-protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX and SnPPIX), macrocyclic structures composed by a tetrapyrrole ring with a central metallic ion, on Dengue Virus (DENV) and Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) infection. Treatment of HepG2 cells with heme, CoPPIX and SnPPIX after DENV infection reduced infectious particles without affecting viral RNA contents in infected cells. The reduction of viral load occurs only with the direct contact of DENV with porphyrins, suggesting a direct effect on viral particles. Previously incubation of DENV and YFV with heme, CoPPIX and SnPPIX resulted in viral particles inactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Biliverdin, a noncyclical porphyrin, was unable to inactivate the viruses tested. Infection of HepG2 cells with porphyrin-pretreated DENV2 results in a reduced or abolished viral protein synthesis, RNA replication and cell death. Treatment of HepG2 or THP-1 cell lineage with heme or CoPPIX after DENV infection with a very low MOI resulted in a decreased DENV replication and protection from death. Heme, CoPPIX and SnPPIX possess a marked ability to inactivate DENV and YFV, impairing its ability to infect and induce cytopathic effects on target cells. These results open the possibility of therapeutic application of porphyrins or their use as models to design new antiviral drugs against DENV and YFV. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Administration of heme arginate ameliorates murine type 2 diabetes independently of heme oxygenase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet K Choudhary

    Full Text Available Amelioration of rodent type 2 diabetes by hemin has been linked to increased heme oxygenase (HO activity, however alternative mechanisms have recently been proposed for its anti-diabetic effect. We sought to determine the anti-diabetic efficacy of heme arginate (HA, a clinically licensed preparation of heme, and whether its predominant mode of action is via increased HO activity. Intravenous administration of HA reduced hyperglycemia in diabetic (db/db mice. Co-administration of the HO inhibitor stannous (IV mesoporphyrin IX dichloride (SM resulted unexpectedly in a further improvement in glycaemic control despite restoring HO activity to baseline levels. The anti-diabetic effects of HA±SM were associated with increased adiposity, increased serum adiponectin levels, reduced adipose tissue and islet inflammation and preservation of islet β-cell function. HO activity independent effects of HA on adipogenesis and β-cell inflammation were further confirmed in cell culture models using the 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte and MIN6 β-cell lines, respectively. In conclusion, our work demonstrates that the heme component of HA ameliorates experimental type 2 diabetes by promoting metabolically favourable adipogenesis and preserving islet β-cell function, but this is not mediated via increased HO activity.

  9. Heme-independent Redox Sensing by the Heme-Nitric Oxide/Oxygen-binding Protein (H-NOX) from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadyay, Roma; Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Schaub, Tanner; Yukl, Erik T

    2016-08-19

    Heme nitric oxide/oxygen (H-NOX)-binding proteins act as nitric oxide (NO) sensors among various bacterial species. In several cases, they act to mediate communal behavior such as biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and motility by influencing the activity of downstream signaling proteins such as histidine kinases (HisKa) in a NO-dependent manner. An H-NOX/HisKa regulatory circuit was recently identified in Vibrio cholerae, and the H-NOX protein has been spectroscopically characterized. However, the influence of the H-NOX protein on HisKa autophosphorylation has not been evaluated. This process may be important for persistence and pathogenicity in this organism. Here, we have expressed and purified the V. cholerae HisKa (HnoK) and H-NOX in its heme-bound (holo) and heme-free (apo) forms. Autophosphorylation assays of HnoK in the presence of H-NOX show that the holoprotein in the Fe(II)-NO and Fe(III) forms is a potent inhibitor of HnoK. Activity of the Fe(III) form and aerobic instability of the Fe(II) form suggested that Vibrio cholerae H-NOX may act as a sensor of the redox state as well as NO. Remarkably, the apoprotein also showed robust HnoK inhibition that was dependent on the oxidation of cysteine residues to form disulfide bonds at a highly conserved zinc site. The importance of cysteine in this process was confirmed by mutagenesis, which also showed that holo Fe(III), but not Fe(II)-NO, H-NOX relied heavily upon cysteine for activation. These results highlight a heme-independent mechanism for activation of V. cholerae H-NOX that implicates this protein as a dual redox/NO sensor. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Mechanisms of Peroxynitrite Interactions with Heme Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jia; Groves, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygenated hemoproteins are known to react rapidly with nitric oxide (NO) to produce peroxynitrite (PN) at the heme site. This process could lead either to attenuation of the effects of NO or to nitrosative protein damage. Peroxynitrite is a powerful nitrating and oxidizing agent that has been implicated in a variety of cell injuries. Accordingly, it is important to delineate the nature and variety of reaction mechanisms of PN reactions with heme proteins. In this Forum we survey the range of reactions of PN with heme proteins, with particular attention to myoglobin and cytochrome c. While these two proteins are textbook paradigms for oxygen binding and electron transfer, respectively, both have recently been shown to have other important functions that involve nitric oxide and peroxynitrite. We have recently described direct evidence that ferrylMb and NO2 are both produced during the reaction of PN and metmyolgobin (metMb). Kinetic evidence indicates that these products evolve from initial formation of a caged radical intermediate [FeIV=O .NO2]. This caged pair reacts mainly via internal return with a rate constant kr to form metMb and nitrate in an oxygen rebound scenario. Detectable amounts of ferrylMb are observed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry, appearing at a rate consistent with the rate, kobs of heme-mediated PN decomposition. Freely-diffusing NO2, which is liberated concomitantly from the radical pair (ke), preferentially nitrates myoglobin Tyr103 and added fluorescein. For cytochrome c, Raman spectroscopy has revealed that a substantial fraction of cytochrome c converts to a β-sheet structure, at the expense of turns and helices at low pH. It is proposed that a short β-sheet segment, comprising residues 37-39 and 58-61, extends itself into the large 37-61 loop when the latter is destabilized by protonation of H26, which forms an anchoring H-bond to loop residue P44. This conformation change ruptures the Met80-Fe bond, as revealed by changes in

  11. Dietary heme-mediated PPARα activation does not affect the heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia in mouse colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noortje Ijssennagger

    Full Text Available Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colon cancer risk. Heme, present in red meat, injures the colon surface epithelium by luminal cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species. This surface injury is overcompensated by hyperproliferation and hyperplasia of crypt cells. Transcriptome analysis of mucosa of heme-fed mice showed, besides stress- and proliferation-related genes, many upregulated lipid metabolism-related PPARα target genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PPARα in heme-induced hyperproliferation and hyperplasia. Male PPARα KO and WT mice received a purified diet with or without heme. As PPARα is proposed to protect against oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, we hypothesized that the absence of PPARα leads to more surface injury and crypt hyperproliferation in the colon upon heme-feeding. Heme induced luminal cytotoxicity and lipid peroxidation and colonic hyperproliferation and hyperplasia to the same extent in WT and KO mice. Transcriptome analysis of colonic mucosa confirmed similar heme-induced hyperproliferation in WT and KO mice. Stainings for alkaline phosphatase activity and expression levels of Vanin-1 and Nrf2-targets indicated a compromised antioxidant defense in heme-fed KO mice. Our results suggest that the protective role of PPARα in antioxidant defense involves the Nrf2-inhibitor Fosl1, which is upregulated by heme in PPARα KO mice. We conclude that PPARα plays a protective role in colon against oxidative stress, but PPARα does not mediate heme-induced hyperproliferation. This implies that oxidative stress of surface cells is not the main determinant of heme-induced hyperproliferation and hyperplasia.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, DJ; Ryter, SW; Choi, AMK

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of

  13. Tyrosine B10 and heme-ligand interactions of Lucina pectinata hemoglobin II: control of heme reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Ruth; Granell, Laura; Cruz, Anthony; De Jesús, Walleska; Lewis, Ariel; Leon, Ruth; Cadilla, Carmen L; Garriga, Juan López

    2005-03-14

    The distal pocket of hemoglobin II (HbII) from Lucina pectinata is characterized by the presence of a GlnE7 and a TyrB10. To elucidate the functional properties of HbII, biophysical studies were conducted on HbII and a HbI PheB10Tyr site-directed mutant. The pH titration data at neutral conditions showed visible bands at 486, 541, 577 and 605 nm for both proteins. This suggests the possible existence of a conformational equilibrium between an open and closed configuration due to the interactions of the TyrB10, ligand, and heme iron. The kinetic behavior for the reaction of both ferric proteins with H2O2 indicates that the rate for the formation of the ferryl intermediates species varies with pH, suggesting that the reaction is strongly dependent on the conformational states. At basic pH values, the barrier for the reaction increases as the tyrosine adopts a closed conformation and the ferric hydroxyl replaces the met-aquo species. The existence of these conformers is further supported by resonance Raman (RR) data, which indicate that in a neutral environment, the ferric HbII species is present as a possible mixture of coordination and spin states, with values at 1558 and 1580 cm(-1) for the nu2 marker, and 1479, 1492, and 1503 cm(-1) for the nu3 mode. Moreover, the presence of the A3 and A(o) conformers at 1924 and 1964 cm(-1) in the HbII-CO infrared spectra confirms the existence of an open and closed conformation due to the orientation of the TyrB10 with respect to the heme active center.

  14. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes, neurons......-heme complexes are removed by a receptor-mediated pathway showing striking similarities to the CD163-mediated haptoglobin-hemoglobin clearance in macrophages. Furthermore, the data indicate a hitherto unknown role of LRP/CD91 in inflammation......., and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of fluorescent hemopexin...

  15. Synthetic heme/copper assemblies: toward an understanding of cytochrome c oxidase interactions with dioxygen and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematian, Shabnam; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-08-18

    Our long-time niche in synthetic biological inorganic chemistry has been to design ligands and generate coordination complexes of copper or iron ions or both, those reacting with dioxygen (O2) or nitrogen oxides (e.g., nitric oxide (NO(g)) and nitrite (NO2(-))) or both. As inspiration for this work, we turn to mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, which is responsible for dioxygen consumption and is also the predominant target for NO(g) and nitrite within mitochondria. In this Account, we highlight recent advances in studying synthetic heme/Cu complexes in two respects. First, there is the design, synthesis, and characterization of new O2 adducts whose further study will add insights into O2 reductive cleavage chemistry. Second, we describe how related heme/Cu constructs reduce nitrite ion to NO(g) or the reverse, oxidize NO(g) to nitrite. The reactions of nitrogen oxides occur as part of CcO's function, which is intimately tied to cellular O2 balance. We had first discovered that reduced heme/Cu compounds react with O2 giving μ-oxo heme-Fe(III)-O-Cu(II)(L) products; their properties are discussed. The O-atom is derived from dioxygen, and interrogations of these systems led to the construction and characterization of three distinctive classes of heme-peroxo complexes, two high-spin and one low-spin species. Recent investigations include a new approach to the synthesis of low-spin heme-peroxo-Cu complexes, employing a "naked" synthon, where the copper ligand denticity and geometric types can be varied. The result is a collection of such complexes; spectroscopic and structural features (by DFT calculations) are described. Some of these compounds are reactive toward reductants/protons effecting subsequent O-O cleavage. This points to how subtle improvements in ligand environment lead to a desired local structure and resulting optimized reactivity, as known to occur at enzyme active sites. The other sector of research is focused on heme/Cu assemblies mediating the redox

  16. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  17. [Update on the biology of heme synthesis in erythroid cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group of hemoproteins playing important roles in oxygen transport, detoxification, circadian rhythm, microRNA processing, regulation of transcription, and translation. The majority of heme (-85%) is synthesized in red blood cells mainly for hemoglobin production, whereas hepatocytes account for most of the rest, functioning primarily in the synthesis of cytochrome P450 enzymes and mitochondrial respiratory enzymes. Thus, failure of heme biosynthesis causes severe inherited or acquired disorders in humans, including porphyria and sideroblastic anemia. The heme biosynthetic pathway is composed of eight enzymes that work in either mitochondria or the cytoplasm, which have been extensively researched and frequently reviewed. On the other hand, the mechanisms governing transport and intracellular trafficking of heme intermediates, as well as their potential links to human diseases, are poorly understood. Herein, we focus on recent understanding of the heme biosynthetic pathway and on human disorders due to defective heme synthesis in erythroid cells, such as X-linked sideroblastic anemia and erythropoietic protoporphyria.

  18. Heme requirement and intracellular trafficking in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, F.A.; Sant'Anna, C.; Lemos, D.; Laranja, G.A.T.; Coelho, M.G.P.; Reis Salles, I.; Michel, A.; Oliveira, P.L.; Cunha-e-Silva, N.; Salmon, D.; Paes, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Epimastigotes multiplies in the insect midgut by taking up nutrients present in the blood meal including heme bound to hemoglobin of red blood cell. During blood meal digestion by vector proteases in the posterior midgut, hemoglobin is clipped off into amino acids, peptides, and free heme. In this paper, we compared the heme and hemoglobin uptake kinetics and followed their intracellular trafficking. Addition of heme to culture medium increased epimastigote proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, while medium supplemented with hemoglobin enhanced growth after 3-day lag phase. Medium supplemented with globin-derived peptides stimulated cell proliferation in a dose-independent way. Using Palladium mesoporphyrin IX (Pd-mP) as a fluorescent heme-analog, we observed that heme internalization proceeded much faster than that observed by hemoglobin-rhodamine. Binding experiments showed that parasites accumulated the Pd-mP into the posterior region of the cell whereas hemoglobin-rhodamine stained the anterior region. Finally, using different specific inhibitors of ABC transporters we conclude that a P-glycoprotein homologue transporter is probably involved in heme transport through the plasma membrane

  19. CYB5D2 requires heme-binding to regulate HeLa cell growth and confer survival from chemotherapeutic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Bruce

    Full Text Available The cytochrome b5 domain containing 2 (CYB5D2; Neuferricin protein has been reported to bind heme, however, the critical residues responsible for heme-binding are undefined. Furthermore, the relationship between heme-binding and CYB5D2-mediated intracellular functions remains unknown. Previous studies examining heme-binding in two cytochrome b5 heme-binding domain-containing proteins, damage-associated protein 1 (Dap1; Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1, have revealed that conserved tyrosine (Y 73, Y79, aspartic acid (D 86, and Y127 residues present in human CYB5D2 may be involved in heme-binding. CYB5D2 binds to type b heme, however, only the substitution of glycine (G at D86 (D86G within its cytochrome b5 heme-binding (cyt-b5 domain abolished its heme-binding ability. Both CYB5D2 and CYB5D2(D86G localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. Ectopic CYB5D2 expression inhibited cell proliferation and anchorage-independent colony growth of HeLa cells. Conversely, CYB5D2 knockdown and ectopic CYB5D2(D86G expression increased cell proliferation and colony growth. As PGRMC1 has been reported to regulate the expression and activities of cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs, we examined the role of CYB5D2 in regulating the activities of CYPs involved in sterol synthesis (CYP51A1 and drug metabolism (CYP3A4. CYB5D2 co-localizes with cytochrome P450 reductase (CYPOR, while CYB5D2 knockdown reduced lanosterol demethylase (CYP51A1 levels and rendered HeLa cells sensitive to mevalonate. Additionally, knockdown of CYB5D2 reduced CYP3A4 activity. Lastly, CYB5D2 expression conferred HeLa cell survival from chemotherapeutic agents (paclitaxel, cisplatin and doxorubicin, with its ability to promote survival being dependent on its heme-binding ability. Taken together, this study provides evidence that heme-binding is critical for CYB5D2 in regulating HeLa cell growth and survival, with endogenous CYB5D2 being required to

  20. HEME and HEPA filter element dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant to remove volatile and semi-volatile effluents from the off-gases generated during the vitrification process. When removed, these filters are likely to contain radioactive contaminants, organics, and hazardous materials, which make their disposal by normal methods impractical. Hence, an alternative disposal method is needed. The alternative disposal method evaluated in this study is dissolution of the filters with caustic and acid solutions. Dissolution converts the waste into an aqueous stream, which can be transferred to the Tank Farm and disposed of by normal means. This process was shown to be effective on a small scale in earlier studies, but the results were not well documented and the studies were not performed on fouled filters

  1. Wearing red for signaling: the heme-bach axis in heme metabolism, oxidative stress response and iron immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki

    2014-04-01

    The connection between gene regulation and metabolism is an old issue that warrants revisiting in order to understand both normal as well as pathogenic processes in higher eukaryotes. Metabolites affect the gene expression by either binding to transcription factors or serving as donors for post-translational modification, such as that involving acetylation and methylation. The focus of this review is heme, a prosthetic group of proteins that includes hemoglobin and cytochromes. Heme has been shown to bind to several transcription factors, including Bach1 and Bach2, in higher eukaryotes. Heme inhibits the transcriptional repressor activity of Bach1, resulting in the derepression of its target genes, such as globin in erythroid cells and heme oxygenase-1 in diverse cell types. Since Bach2 is important for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes as well as regulatory and effector T cell differentiation and the macrophage function, the heme-Bach2 axis may regulate the immune response as a signaling cascade. We discuss future issues regarding the topic of the iron/heme-gene regulation network based on current understanding of the heme-Bach axis, including the concept of "iron immunology" as the synthesis of the iron metabolism and the immune response.

  2. Dietary heme iron does not prevent postgastrectomy anemia but fructooligosaccharides improve bioavailability of heme iron in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, A; Sakai, K; Takasaki, M; Uehara, M; Tokunaga, T; Adachi, T

    1999-09-01

    Gastrectomized rats exhibit iron deficiency anemia. We observed the effects of dietary heme-iron and short chain frucooligosaccharides (Sc-FOS) in relation to prevention of postgastrectomy anemia in rats. Twelve laparotomized (sham-operated) rats were fed iron-citrate (control) as iron source diet without or with Sc-FOS (75 g/kg of diet) and twenty four totally gastrectomized (Bilroth II) rats, were fed a iron-citrate (control) or heme-iron (heme) as iron source diet without or with Sc-FOS (75 g/kg of diet) for 4 weeks. All rats received an intramuscular injection of vitamin B-12 every two weeks. Tail blood was collected every other week for determination of hematocrit and hemoglobin concentration. At the end of the experiment, the rats were killed and whole blood was collected. The total gastrectomy induced the postgastrectomy anemia. Dietary Sc-FOS increase iron absorption and thereby prevented completely this anemia in gastrectomized rats fed the control diet but this effect of Sc-FOS in rats fed heme diet was not complete. Dietary heme iron could not prevent postgastrectomy anemia itself, but fructooligosaccharides improve bioavailability of not only non-heme iron such as iron-citrate, but also heme-iron in rats.

  3. Impairment of heme synthesis in myelin as potential trigger of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Alessandro; Ravera, Silvia; Calzia, Daniela; Panfoli, Isabella

    2012-06-01

    The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a disease characterized by demyelination and subsequent axonal degeneration, is as yet unknown. Also, the nature of the disease is as yet not established, since doubts have been cast on its autoimmune origin. Genetic and environmental factors have been implied in MS, leading to the idea of an overall multifactorial origin. An unexpected role in energizing the axon has been reported for myelin, supposed to be the site of consumption of most of oxygen in brain. Myelin would be able to perform oxidative phosphorylation to supply the axons with ATP, thanks to the expression therein of mitochondrial F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase, and respiratory chains. Interestingly, myelin expresses the pathway of heme synthesis, hence of cytochromes, that rely on heme group, in turn depending on Fe availability. Poisoning by these pollutants shares the common characteristic to bring about demyelination both in animal models and in man. Carbon monoxide (CO) and lead poisoning which cause functional imbalance of the heme group, as well as of heme synthesis, cause myelin damage. On the other hand, a lack of essential metals such as iron and copper, produces dramatic myelin decrease. Myelin is a primary target, of iron shortage, indicating that in myelin Fe-dependent processes are more active than in other tissues. The predominant spread of MS in industrialized countries where pollution by heavy metals, and CO poisoning is widespread, suggests a relationship among toxic action of metal pollutants and MS. According to the present hypothesis, MS can be primarily triggered by environmental factors acting on a genetic susceptibility, while the immune response may be a consequence of a primary oxidative damage due to reactive oxygen species produced consequently to an imbalance of cytochromes and respiratory chains in the sheath. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Explaining the atypical reaction profiles of heme enzymes with a novel mechanistic hypothesis and kinetic treatment.

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    Kelath Murali Manoj

    Full Text Available Many heme enzymes show remarkable versatility and atypical kinetics. The fungal extracellular enzyme chloroperoxidase (CPO characterizes a variety of one and two electron redox reactions in the presence of hydroperoxides. A structural counterpart, found in mammalian microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP, uses molecular oxygen plus NADPH for the oxidative metabolism (predominantly hydroxylation of substrate in conjunction with a redox partner enzyme, cytochrome P450 reductase. In this study, we employ the two above-mentioned heme-thiolate proteins to probe the reaction kinetics and mechanism of heme enzymes. Hitherto, a substrate inhibition model based upon non-productive binding of substrate (two-site model was used to account for the inhibition of reaction at higher substrate concentrations for the CYP reaction systems. Herein, the observation of substrate inhibition is shown for both peroxide and final substrate in CPO catalyzed peroxidations. Further, analogy is drawn in the "steady state kinetics" of CPO and CYP reaction systems. New experimental observations and analyses indicate that a scheme of competing reactions (involving primary product with enzyme or other reaction components/intermediates is relevant in such complex reaction mixtures. The presence of non-selective reactive intermediate(s affords alternate reaction routes at various substrate/product concentrations, thereby leading to a lowered detectable concentration of "the product of interest" in the reaction milieu. Occam's razor favors the new hypothesis. With the new hypothesis as foundation, a new biphasic treatment to analyze the kinetics is put forth. We also introduce a key concept of "substrate concentration at maximum observed rate". The new treatment affords a more acceptable fit for observable experimental kinetic data of heme redox enzymes.

  5. Expression and activity analysis reveal that heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 is associated with blue egg formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z P; Liu, R F; Wang, A R; Li, J Y; Deng, X M

    2011-04-01

    Biliverdin is responsible for the coloration of blue eggs and is secreted onto the eggshell by the shell gland. Previous studies confirmed that a significant difference exists in biliverdin content between blue eggs and brown eggs, although the reasons are still unknown. Because the pigment is derived from oxidative degradation of heme catalyzed by heme oxygenase (HO), this study compared heme oxygenase (decycling) 1 (HMOX1), the gene encoding HO expression and HO activity, in the shell glands of the Dongxiang blue-shelled chicken (n = 12) and the Dongxiang brown-shelled chicken (n = 12). Results showed that HMOX1 was highly expressed at the mRNA (1.58-fold; P 0.05). Taken together, these results show that blue egg formation is associated with high expression of HMOX1 in the shell gland of Dongxiang blue-shelled chickens, and suggest that differential expression of HMOX1 in the 2 groups of chickens is most likely to arise from an alteration in the trans-acting factor.

  6. Heme oxygenase is not involved in the anti-proliferative effects of statins on pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanova, K.; Boukalova, S.; Gbelcova, H.; Muchova, L.; Neuzil, J.; Gurlich, R.; Ruml, T.; Vitek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is recognized as one of the most fatal tumors due to its aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Statins were previously shown to inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells via various signaling pathways. In healthy tissues, statins activate the heme oxygenase pathway, nevertheless the role of heme oxygenase in pancreatic cancer is still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether anti-proliferative effects of statins in pancreatic cancer cells are mediated via the heme oxygenase pathway. In vitro effects of various statins and hemin, a heme oxygenase inducer, on cell proliferation were evaluated in PA-TU-8902, MiaPaCa-2 and BxPC-3 human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of statins on heme oxygenase activity was assessed and heme oxygenase-silenced cells were used for pancreatic cancer cell proliferation studies. Cell death rate and reactive oxygen species production were measured in PA-TU-8902 cells, followed by evaluation of the effect of cerivastatin on GFP-K-Ras trafficking and expression of markers of invasiveness, osteopontin (SPP1) and SOX2. While simvastatin and cerivastatin displayed major anti-proliferative properties in all cell lines tested, pravastatin did not affect the cell growth at all. Strong anti-proliferative effect was observed also for hemin. Co-treatment of cerivastatin and hemin increased anti-proliferative potential of these agents, via increased production of reactive oxygen species and cell death compared to individual treatment. Heme oxygenase silencing did not prevent pancreatic cancer cells from the tumor-suppressive effect of cerivastatin or hemin. Cerivastatin, but not pravastatin, protected Ras protein from trafficking to the cell membrane and significantly reduced expressions of SPP1 (p < 0.05) and SOX2 (p < 0.01). Anti-proliferative effects of statins and hemin on human pancreatic cancer cell lines do not seem to be related to the heme oxygenase pathway. While hemin triggers reactive

  7. Selection for tameness modulates the expression of heme related genes in silver foxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilà Carles

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic and molecular mechanisms of tameness are largely unknown. A line of silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes selected for non-aggressive behavior has been used in Russia since the 1960's to study the effect of domestication. We have previously compared descendants of these selected (S animals with a group of non-selected (NS silver foxes kept under identical conditions, and showed that changes in the brain transcriptome between the two groups are small. Unexpectedly, many of the genes showing evidence of differential expression between groups were related to hemoproteins. Results In this study, we use quantitative RT-PCR to demonstrate that the activity of heme related genes differ between S and NS foxes in three regions of the brain. Furthermore, our analyses also indicate that changes in mRNA levels of heme related genes can be well described by an additive polygenic effect. We also show that the difference in genetic background between the two lines of foxes is limited, as estimated by mitochondrial DNA divergence. Conclusion Our results indicate that selection for tameness can modify the expression of heme related genes in canid brain regions known to modulate emotions and behavior. The possible involvement of heme related genes in behavior is surprising. It is possible that hemoglobin modulates the behavior of canids by interaction with CO and NO signaling. Another possibility is that hemorphins, known to be produced after enzymatic cleavage of hemoglobin, are responsible for behavioral alterations. Thus, we hypothesize that hemoglobin metabolism can be a functionally relevant aspect of the domestic phenotype in foxes selected for tameness.

  8. Immunolocalization of heme oxygenase-1 in periodontal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Gayathri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of our study is an increasing evidence of involvement of antioxidant enzymes like heme oxygenase-1 in periodontal inflammation and their implication for treatment of chronic periodontitis.

  9. Dynamics of the His79-heme Alkaline Transition of Yeast Iso-1-cytochrome c Probed by Conformationally-gated Electron Transfer with Co(II)bis(terpyridine)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Melisa M.; Junior, Carolyn C.; Bergquist, Bryan B.; Bowler, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Alkaline conformers of cytochrome c may be involved in both its electron transport and apoptotic functions. We use cobalt(II)bis(terpyridine), Co(terpy)22+, as a reagent for conformationally-gated electron transfer (gated ET) experiments to study the alkaline conformational transition of K79H variants of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c expressed in Escherichia coli, WT*K79H, with alanine at position 72, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yK79H, with trimethyllysine (Tml) at position 72. Co(terpy)22+ is well-suited to the 100 ms to 1 s time scale of the His79-mediated alkaline conformational transition of these variants. Reduction of the His79-heme alkaline conformer by Co(terpy)22+ occurs primarily by gated ET, which involves conversion to the native state followed by reduction, with a small fraction of the His79- heme alkaline conformer directly reduced by Co(terpy)22+. The gated ET experiments show that the mechanism of formation of the His79-heme alkaline conformer involves only two ionizable groups. In previous work, we showed that the mechanism of the His73-mediated alkaline conformational transition requires three ionizable groups. Thus, the mechanism of heme crevice opening depends upon the position of the ligand mediating the process. The microscopic rate constants provided by gated ET studies show that mutation of Tml72 (yK79H variant) in the heme crevice loop to Ala72 (WT*K79H variant) affects the dynamics of heme crevice opening through a small destabilization of both the native conformer and the transition state relative to the His79-heme alkaline conformer. Previous pH jump data had indicated that the Tml72→Ala mutation primarily stabilized the transition state for the His79-mediated alkaline conformational transition. PMID:23899348

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 in Tumors: Is It a False Friend?

    OpenAIRE

    JOZKOWICZ, ALICJA; WAS, HALINA; DULAK, JOZEF

    2007-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and ferrous iron. It participates in maintaining cellular homeostasis and plays an important protective role in the tissues by reducing oxidative injury, attenuating the inflammatory response, inhibiting cell apoptosis, and regulating cell proliferation. HO-1 is also an important proangiogenic mediator. Most studies have focused on the role of HO-1 in cardiovascular disea...

  11. Genome-wide analysis reveals novel genes essential for heme homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Scott Severance

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Heme is a cofactor in proteins that function in almost all sub-cellular compartments and in many diverse biological processes. Heme is produced by a conserved biosynthetic pathway that is highly regulated to prevent the accumulation of heme--a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole. Caenorhabditis elegans and related parasitic nematodes do not synthesize heme, but instead require environmental heme to grow and develop. Heme homeostasis in these auxotrophs is, therefore, regulated in accordance with available dietary heme. We have capitalized on this auxotrophy in C. elegans to study gene expression changes associated with precisely controlled dietary heme concentrations. RNA was isolated from cultures containing 4, 20, or 500 microM heme; derived cDNA probes were hybridized to Affymetrix C. elegans expression arrays. We identified 288 heme-responsive genes (hrgs that were differentially expressed under these conditions. Of these genes, 42% had putative homologs in humans, while genomes of medically relevant heme auxotrophs revealed homologs for 12% in both Trypanosoma and Leishmania and 24% in parasitic nematodes. Depletion of each of the 288 hrgs by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi in a transgenic heme-sensor worm strain identified six genes that regulated heme homeostasis. In addition, seven membrane-spanning transporters involved in heme uptake were identified by RNAi knockdown studies using a toxic heme analog. Comparison of genes that were positive in both of the RNAi screens resulted in the identification of three genes in common that were vital for organismal heme homeostasis in C. elegans. Collectively, our results provide a catalog of genes that are essential for metazoan heme homeostasis and demonstrate the power of C. elegans as a genetic animal model to dissect the regulatory circuits which mediate heme trafficking in both vertebrate hosts and their parasites, which depend on environmental heme for survival.

  12. Acquisition of iron from transferrin regulates reticulocyte heme synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponka, P.; Schulman, H.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fe-salicylaldehyde isonicotinoylhydrazone (SIH), which can donate iron to reticulocytes without transferrin as a mediator, has been utilized to test the hypothesis that the rate of iron uptake from transferrin limits the rate of heme synthesis in erythroid cells. Reticulocytes take up 59 Fe from [ 59 Fe]SIH and incorporate it into heme to a much greater extent than from saturating concentrations of [ 59 Fe]transferrin. Also, Fe-SIH stimulates [2- 14 C]glycine into heme when compared to the incorporation observed with saturating levels of Fe-transferrin. In addition, delta-aminolevulinic acid does not stimulate 59 Fe incorporation into heme from either [ 59 Fe]transferrin or [ 59 Fe]SIH but does reverse the inhibition of 59 Fe incorporation into heme caused by isoniazid, an inhibitor of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase. Taken together, these results suggest the hypothesis that some step(s) in the pathway of iron from extracellular transferrin to intracellular protoporphyrin limits the overall rate of heme synthesis in reticulocytes

  13. TMEM14C is required for erythroid mitochondrial heme metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yien, Yvette Y; Robledo, Raymond F; Schultz, Iman J; Takahashi-Makise, Naoko; Gwynn, Babette; Bauer, Daniel E; Dass, Abhishek; Yi, Gloria; Li, Liangtao; Hildick-Smith, Gordon J; Cooney, Jeffrey D; Pierce, Eric L; Mohler, Kyla; Dailey, Tamara A; Miyata, Non; Kingsley, Paul D; Garone, Caterina; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Huang, Hui; Chen, Wen; Keenan, Ellen M; Shah, Dhvanit I; Schlaeger, Thorsten M; DiMauro, Salvatore; Orkin, Stuart H; Cantor, Alan B; Palis, James; Koehler, Carla M; Lodish, Harvey F; Kaplan, Jerry; Ward, Diane M; Dailey, Harry A; Phillips, John D; Peters, Luanne L; Paw, Barry H

    2014-10-01

    The transport and intracellular trafficking of heme biosynthesis intermediates are crucial for hemoglobin production, which is a critical process in developing red cells. Here, we profiled gene expression in terminally differentiating murine fetal liver-derived erythroid cells to identify regulators of heme metabolism. We determined that TMEM14C, an inner mitochondrial membrane protein that is enriched in vertebrate hematopoietic tissues, is essential for erythropoiesis and heme synthesis in vivo and in cultured erythroid cells. In mice, TMEM14C deficiency resulted in porphyrin accumulation in the fetal liver, erythroid maturation arrest, and embryonic lethality due to profound anemia. Protoporphyrin IX synthesis in TMEM14C-deficient erythroid cells was blocked, leading to an accumulation of porphyrin precursors. The heme synthesis defect in TMEM14C-deficient cells was ameliorated with a protoporphyrin IX analog, indicating that TMEM14C primarily functions in the terminal steps of the heme synthesis pathway. Together, our data demonstrate that TMEM14C facilitates the import of protoporphyrinogen IX into the mitochondrial matrix for heme synthesis and subsequent hemoglobin production. Furthermore, the identification of TMEM14C as a protoporphyrinogen IX importer provides a genetic tool for further exploring erythropoiesis and congenital anemias.

  14. Deconvoluting heme biosynthesis to target blood-stage malaria parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigala, Paul A; Crowley, Jan R; Henderson, Jeffrey P; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Heme metabolism is central to blood-stage infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Parasites retain a heme biosynthesis pathway but do not require its activity during infection of heme-rich erythrocytes, where they can scavenge host heme to meet metabolic needs. Nevertheless, heme biosynthesis in parasite-infected erythrocytes can be potently stimulated by exogenous 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), resulting in accumulation of the phototoxic intermediate protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). Here we use photodynamic imaging, mass spectrometry, parasite gene disruption, and chemical probes to reveal that vestigial host enzymes in the cytoplasm of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes contribute to ALA-stimulated heme biosynthesis and that ALA uptake depends on parasite-established permeability pathways. We show that PPIX accumulation in infected erythrocytes can be harnessed for antimalarial chemotherapy using luminol-based chemiluminescence and combinatorial stimulation by low-dose artemisinin to photoactivate PPIX to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen. This photodynamic strategy has the advantage of exploiting host enzymes refractory to resistance-conferring mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09143.001 PMID:26173178

  15. Ginkgo biloba extract neuroprotective action is dependent on heme oxygenase 1 in ischemic reperfusion brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Sofiyan; Zhuang, Hean; Biswal, Shyam; Christen, Yves; Doré, Sylvain

    2008-12-01

    Ginkgo biloba extracts are now prescribed in several countries for their reported health benefits, particularly for medicinal properties in the brain. The standardized Ginkgo extract, EGb761, has been reported to protect neurons against oxidative stress, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. To characterize the oral consumption of EGb761 in transient ischemia, we performed the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) filament model in wild-type and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) knockouts. Mice were pretreated for 7 days before the transient occlusion or posttreated acutely during reperfusion; then neurobehavioral scores and infarct volumes were assessed. Furthermore, primary cortical neuronal cultures were used to investigate the contribution of the antioxidant enzyme HO-1 in the EGb761-associated cytoprotection. Mice that were pretreated with EGb761 had 50.9+/-5.6% less neurological dysfunction and 48.2+/-5.3% smaller infarct volumes than vehicle-treated mice; this effect was abolished in HO-1 knockouts. In addition to the prophylactic properties of EGb761, acute posttreatment 5 minutes and 4.5 hours after reperfusion also led to significant reduction in infarct size (P<0.01). After our previous demonstration that EGb761 significantly induced HO-1 levels in a dose- and time-dependent manner in neuronal cultures, here we revealed that this de novo HO-1 induction was required for neuroprotection against free radical damage and excitotoxicity as it was significantly attenuated by the enzyme inhibitor. These results demonstrate that EGb761 could be used as a preventive or therapeutic agent in cerebral ischemia and suggest that HO-1 contributes, at least in part, to EGb761 neuroprotection.

  16. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

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    Lingzhi Bao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Radioadaptive response (RAR is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells. Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy. Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2, which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells.

  17. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  18. HemeBIND: a novel method for heme binding residue prediction by combining structural and sequence information

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    Hu Jianjun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of binding residues involved in the interactions between proteins and small ligands is one of the major challenges in structural bioinformatics. Heme is an essential and commonly used ligand that plays critical roles in electron transfer, catalysis, signal transduction and gene expression. Although much effort has been devoted to the development of various generic algorithms for ligand binding site prediction over the last decade, no algorithm has been specifically designed to complement experimental techniques for identification of heme binding residues. Consequently, an urgent need is to develop a computational method for recognizing these important residues. Results Here we introduced an efficient algorithm HemeBIND for predicting heme binding residues by integrating structural and sequence information. We systematically investigated the characteristics of binding interfaces based on a non-redundant dataset of heme-protein complexes. It was found that several sequence and structural attributes such as evolutionary conservation, solvent accessibility, depth and protrusion clearly illustrate the differences between heme binding and non-binding residues. These features can then be separately used or combined to build the structure-based classifiers using support vector machine (SVM. The results showed that the information contained in these features is largely complementary and their combination achieved the best performance. To further improve the performance, an attempt has been made to develop a post-processing procedure to reduce the number of false positives. In addition, we built a sequence-based classifier based on SVM and sequence profile as an alternative when only sequence information can be used. Finally, we employed a voting method to combine the outputs of structure-based and sequence-based classifiers, which demonstrated remarkably better performance than the individual classifier alone

  19. HeLp, a heme-transporting lipoprotein with an antioxidant role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Alves, Liliane R; Pinhal, Nelson; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2004-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins involved in lipid transport are target for free radical-evoked pathological conditions in several mammalian models. The main hemolymphatic protein of Boophilus microplus is a heme-binding lipoprotein (HeLp, for Heme LipoProtein) that carries dietary heme produced from degradation of vertebrate hemoglobin to tissues of the tick. Addition of heme to phospholipid liposomes resulted in intense lipid peroxidation, which was inhibited by addition of HeLp. HeLp prevented lysis of red blood cells by heme. HeLp also inhibited reactions of heme with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH) or hydrogen peroxide. HeLp, quite differently from other lipoproteins, presents a protective intrinsic mechanism to counteract heme toxicity, while preserving the heme molecule to be reused by the tick. This is the first report of a lipoprotein acting as an antioxidant particle against heme-induced radical damage.

  20. SOUL in mouse eyes is a new hexameric heme-binding protein with characteristic optical absorption, resonance Raman spectral, and heme-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Emiko; Sagami, Ikuko; Uchida, Takeshi; Sato, Akira; Kitagawa, Teizo; Igarashi, Jotaro; Shimizu, Toru

    2004-11-09

    SOUL is specifically expressed in the retina and pineal gland and displays more than 40% sequence homology with p22HBP, a heme protein ubiquitously expressed in numerous tissues. SOUL was purified as a dimer in the absence of heme from the Escherichia coli expression system but displayed a hexameric structure upon heme binding. Heme-bound SOUL displayed optical absorption and resonance Raman spectra typical of 6-coordinate low-spin heme protein, with one heme per monomeric unit for both the Fe(III) and Fe(II) complexes. Spectral data additionally suggest that one of the axial ligands of the Fe(III) heme complex is His. Mutation of His42 (the only His of SOUL) to Ala resulted in loss of heme binding, confirming that this residue is an axial ligand of SOUL. The K(d) value of heme for SOUL was estimated as 4.8 x 10(-9) M from the association and dissociation rate constants, suggesting high binding affinity. On the other hand, p22HBP was obtained as a monomer containing one heme per subunit, with a K(d) value of 2.1 x 10(-11) M. Spectra of heme-bound p22HBP were different from those of SOUL but similar to those of heme-bound bovine serum albumin in which heme bound to a hydrophobic cavity with no specific axial ligand coordination. Therefore, the heme-binding properties and coordination structure of SOUL are distinct from those of p22HBP, despite high sequence homology. The physiological role of the new heme-binding protein, SOUL, is further discussed in this report.

  1. Insight into blocking heme transfer by exploiting molecular interactions in the core Isd heme transporters IsdA-NEAT, IsdC-NEAT, and IsdE of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, Michael T; Pinter, Tyler B J; Stillman, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus has adopted specialized mechanisms for scavenging iron from its host. The nine cell wall and membrane-associated iron regulated surface determinant (Isd) proteins (IsdH, IsdB, IsdA, IsdC, IsdDEF, IsdG and IsdI) allow Staphylococcus aureus to scavenge iron from the heme in hemoglobin and haptoglobin-hemoglobin. Of these, it is IsdE that chaperones the heme to the ATP binding cassette-type transmembrane transporter (IsdF). IsdH, IsdB, IsdA and IsdC contain at least one heme binding Near Transporter (NEAT) domain. Previous studies have shown that ferric heme is transferred unidirectionally in the sequence IsdA-NEAT (Tyr - proximal amino acid) → IsdC-NEAT (Tyr) → IsdE (His). IsdA-NEAT does not transfer heme directly to IsdE. In this paper we investigated PPIX transfer through the core cell wall proteins of the Isd system (IsdA-NEAT, IsdC-NEAT and IsdE) with FePPIX-dimethylester, and the metal substituted CoPPIX and MnPPIX using ESI-MS, UV-visible absorption and MCD spectroscopy. IsdA binds each of the rings but the subsequent transfer properties to IsdC-N or IsdE are not the same as found with heme. FePPIX-DME transfers from IsdA-N to IsdC-N but neither protein transfers the ring to IsdE. IsdA-N does not transfer CoPPIX to IsdC-N or IsdE. IsdA-N does transfer MnPPIX to both IsdC-N and IsdE. Significantly, it is possible that since CoPPIX and FePPIX-DME bind to IsdA-N, the lack of transfer to IsdC-N and subsequently to IsdE for CoPPIX could prove to be used as a potential disruption agent to the S. aureus heme transfer system and may identify a possible anti-microbial.

  2. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Holocytochrome c Synthase and the Key Roles Played by Cysteines and Histidine of the Heme Attachment Site, Cys-XX-Cys-His*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbitt, Shalon E.; San Francisco, Brian; Mendez, Deanna L.; Lukat-Rodgers, Gudrun S.; Rodgers, Kenton R.; Bretsnyder, Eric C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c assembly requires the covalent attachment of heme by thioether bonds between heme vinyl groups and a conserved CXXCH motif of cytochrome c/c1. The enzyme holocytochrome c synthase (HCCS) binds heme and apocytochrome c substrate to catalyze this attachment, subsequently releasing holocytochrome c for proper folding to its native structure. We address mechanisms of assembly using a functional Escherichia coli recombinant system expressing human HCCS. Human cytochrome c variants with individual cysteine, histidine, double cysteine, and triple cysteine/histidine substitutions (of CXXCH) were co-purified with HCCS. Single and double mutants form a complex with HCCS but not the triple mutant. Resonance Raman and UV-visible spectroscopy support the proposal that heme puckering induced by both thioether bonds facilitate release of holocytochrome c from the complex. His-19 (of CXXCH) supplies the second axial ligand to heme in the complex, the first axial ligand was previously shown to be from HCCS residue His-154. Substitutions of His-19 in cytochrome c to seven other residues (Gly, Ala, Met, Arg, Lys, Cys, and Tyr) were used with various approaches to establish other roles played by His-19. Three roles for His-19 in HCCS-mediated assembly are suggested: (i) to provide the second axial ligand to the heme iron in preparation for covalent attachment; (ii) to spatially position the two cysteinyl sulfurs adjacent to the two heme vinyl groups for thioether formation; and (iii) to aid in release of the holocytochrome c from the HCCS active site. Only H19M is able to carry out these three roles, albeit at lower efficiencies than the natural His-19. PMID:25170082

  3. The Role of Heme Chirality in the Circular Dichroism of Heme Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert W.; Pescitelli, Gennaro

    2014-07-01

    The rotational strength (R) of the Soret transition in sperm-whale myoglobin (SW Mb), the hemoglobin from Chironomus thummi thummi (CTT Hb), and human hemoglobin (hHb) has been calculated using 20 high-resolution ( Raro > Rpep. For CTT Hb and hHB, the orders were, respectively, Rint > Rpep > Raro and Rint > Raro ≈ Rpep. Human Hb ɑ chains showed the same trend as CTT Hb. Only in the hHb β chains did Raro predominate, with the order Raro > Rint > Rpep. The total predicted Rtot for SW Mb, CTT Hb, and hHb averaged +0.77±0.10 (0.56 - 0.80), -0.37±0.12 (-0.5), and +0.31±0.17 DBM (0.23 - 0.50), respectively. (Values in parentheses are experimental values.) Thus, contrary to the currently accepted view, coupling with aromatic side-chain or peptide transitions is not the dominant factor in the Soret circular dichroism (CD) of these proteins. The Soret CD is dominated by intrinsic CD of the heme chromophore, of which vinyl torsion is the major determinant. This result suggests an explanation for the large effect of heme isomerism on the Soret CD of Mb and Hb. Rotation about the ɑ-γ axis may be associated with large changes in vinyl torsion and thus substantially alter the intrinsic CD, even reversing its sign.

  4. Oxidative stress modulates heme synthesis and induces peroxiredoxin-2 as a novel cytoprotective response in β-thalassemic erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, Lucia; Bertoldi, Mariarita; De Falco, Luigia; Santos Franco, Sara; Ronzoni, Luisa; Turrini, Franco; Colancecco, Alessandra; Camaschella, Clara; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Iolascon, Achille

    2011-11-01

    β-thalassemic syndromes are inherited red cell disorders characterized by severe ineffective erythropoiesis and increased levels of reactive oxygen species whose contribution to β-thalassemic anemia is only partially understood. We studied erythroid precursors from normal and β-thalassemic peripheral CD34(+) cells in two-phase liquid culture by proteomic, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses. We measured intracellular reactive oxygen species, heme levels and the activity of δ-aminolevulinate-synthase-2. We exposed normal cells and K562 cells with silenced peroxiredoxin-2 to H(2)O(2) and generated a recombinant peroxiredoxin-2 for kinetic measurements in the presence of H(2)O(2) or hemin. In β-thalassemia the increased production of reactive oxygen species was associated with down-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 and biliverdin reductase and up-regulation of peroxiredoxin-2. In agreement with these observations in β-thalassemic cells we found decreased heme levels related to significantly reduced activity of the first enzyme of the heme pathway, δ-aminolevulinate synthase-2 without differences in its expression. We demonstrated that the activity of recombinant δ-aminolevulinate synthase-2 is inhibited by both reactive oxygen species and hemin as a protective mechanism in β-thalassemic cells. We then addressed the question of the protective role of peroxiredoxin-2 in erythropoiesis by exposing normal cells to oxidative stress and silencing peroxiredoxin-2 in human erythroleukemia K562 cells. We found that peroxiredoxin-2 expression is up-regulated in response to oxidative stress and required for K562 cells to survive oxidative stress. We then showed that peroxiredoxin-2 binds heme in erythroid precursors with high affinity, suggesting a possible multifunctional cytoprotective role of peroxiredoxin-2 in β-thalassemia. In β-thalassemic erythroid cells the reduction of δ-aminolevulinate synthase-2 activity and the increased

  5. Erythropoietin Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension through Interplay between Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Heme Oxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    van Loon, Rosa Laura E; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Affara, Nada; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; Takens, Janny; Berger, Rolf M F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a pulmonary vascular disease with a high mortality, characterized by typical angio-proliferative lesions. Erythropoietin (EPO) attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. We postulated that EPO acts through mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and activation of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). METHODS: Rats with flow-associated PAH, resembling pediatric PAH, were treated with HO-1 inducer EPO in the pre...

  6. Erythropoietin Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension through Interplay between Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Heme Oxygenase

    OpenAIRE

    van Loon, Rosa Laura E.; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.; Affara, Nada; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Pennings, Sebastiaan W. C.; Takens, Janny; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a pulmonary vascular disease with a high mortality, characterized by typical angio-proliferative lesions. Erythropoietin (EPO) attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. We postulated that EPO acts through mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and activation of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Methods Rats with flow-associated PAH, resembling pediatric PAH, were treated with HO-1 inducer EPO i...

  7. A Novel Heme-responsive Element Mediates Transcriptional Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jason; Hamza, Iqbal

    2010-01-01

    Hemes are prosthetic groups that participate in diverse biochemical pathways across phylogeny. Although heme can also regulate broad physiological processes by directly modulating gene expression in Metazoa, the regulatory pathways for sensing and responding to heme are not well defined. Caenorhabditis elegans is a heme auxotroph and relies solely on environmental heme for sustenance. Worms respond to heme availability by regulating heme-responsive genes such as hrg-1, an intestinal heme transporter that is up-regulated by >60-fold during heme depletion. To identify the mechanism for the heme-dependent regulation of hrg-1, we interrogated the hrg-1 promoter. Deletion and mutagenesis studies of the hrg-1 promoter revealed a 23-bp heme-responsive element that is both necessary and sufficient for heme-dependent regulation of hrg-1. Furthermore, our studies show that the heme regulation of hrg-1 is mediated by both activation and repression in conjunction with ELT-2 and ELT-4, transcription factors that specify intestinal expression. PMID:20938051

  8. Structure-Function Relationships in the Gas-Sensing Heme-Dependent Transcription Factors RcoM and DNR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Hannah E.

    Transition metals play an important role in many biological processes, however, they are also toxic at high concentrations. Therefore, the uptake and efflux of these metals must be tightly regulated by the cell. Bacteria have evolved a variety of pathways and regulatory systems to monitor the presence and concentration of metals in the cellular environment. A key component of those systems are transcription factors that either "sense metals" or use "metal sensors". The first class of these proteins have metals as their allosteric effector ligand. The second class of these proteins utilize transition metal containing cofactors to sense other environmental cues through the specific chemistry afforded by the cofactor. Chapter 1 reviews the current literature regarding both types of transcription factors. The focus of this work has been on two heme-containing, gas-sensing transcription factors found in bacteria, RcoM (regulator of CO metabolism) and DNR (dissimilative nitrate respiration regulator). RcoM is a CO-dependent protein found in Burkholderia xenovorans and sits upstream of the cox operon for oxidative CO metabolism. RcoM senses the presence of CO, as well as changes in redox potential, through a ligand switch process at its heme cofactor. Chapter 2 details spectroscopic characterization of several methionine mutants to identify the Fe(II) ligand trans to His 74. That study concludes that Met104 acts as the CO-replacable ligand. Met105, while not the ligand, does play an important role in reversibility of the ligand switch process. RcoM has a unique tertiary structure that combines a sensory domain and a DNA-binding domain normally found in two-component systems. Chapter 3 provides evidence that RcoM adopts a dimeric state. Further biophysical and structural characterization gives further insight into how the two domains are organized and the implications for the DNA-binding mechanism. DNR is a NO-sensing transcription factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and

  9. Hydride Attack on a Coordinated Ferric Nitrosyl: Experimental and DFT Evidence for the Formation of a Heme Model-HNO Derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abucayon, Erwin G.; Khade, Rahul L.; Powell, Douglas R.; Zhang, Yong; Richter-Addo, George B.

    2016-01-01

    Heme-HNO species are crucial intermediates in several biological processes. To date, no well-defined Fe heme-HNO model compounds have been reported. Hydride attack on the cationic ferric [(OEP)Fe(NO)(5-MeIm)]OTf (OEP = octaethylporphy-rinato dianion) generates the Fe-HNO product that has been characterized by IR and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Results of DFT calculations reveal a direct attack of the hydride on the N atom of the coordinated ferric nitrosyl. PMID:26678216

  10. Wiring of heme enzymes by methylene-blue labeled dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Álvarez-Martos, Isabel; Shahdost-fard, Faezeh; Ferapontova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures may be considered as perspective wires for electrical connection between redox enzymes and electrodes. Here, we studied electron transfer (ET) reactions and bioelectrocatalysis of heme-containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and heme- and moli......Redox-modified branched 3D dendrimeric nanostructures may be considered as perspective wires for electrical connection between redox enzymes and electrodes. Here, we studied electron transfer (ET) reactions and bioelectrocatalysis of heme-containing horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and heme......- and molibdopterin-containing sulfite oxidase (SOx), wired to gold by the methylene blue (MB)-labeled polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers. The enzymes’ electrochemical transformation and bioelectrocatalytic function could be followed at both unlabeled and MB-labeled dendrimer-modified electrodes with the formal redox...... potentials of the heme centers being at 341 mV for HRP and 185 mV for SOx. In contrast to the HRP-dendrimer and HRP-MB-dendrimer systems, which demonstrated very close bioelectrocatalytic patterns, multicofactor SOx wired to MB-dendrimer showed a bioelectrocatalysis superior to that based on direct ET...

  11. Dietary iron controls circadian hepatic glucose metabolism through heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simcox, Judith A; Mitchell, Thomas Creighton; Gao, Yan; Just, Steven F; Cooksey, Robert; Cox, James; Ajioka, Richard; Jones, Deborah; Lee, Soh-Hyun; King, Daniel; Huang, Jingyu; McClain, Donald A

    2015-04-01

    The circadian rhythm of the liver maintains glucose homeostasis, and disruption of this rhythm is associated with type 2 diabetes. Feeding is one factor that sets the circadian clock in peripheral tissues, but relatively little is known about the role of specific dietary components in that regard. We assessed the effects of dietary iron on circadian gluconeogenesis. Dietary iron affects circadian glucose metabolism through heme-mediated regulation of the interaction of nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group d member 1 (Rev-Erbα) with its cosuppressor nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCOR). Loss of regulated heme synthesis was achieved by aminolevulinic acid (ALA) treatment of mice or cultured cells to bypass the rate-limiting enzyme in hepatic heme synthesis, ALA synthase 1 (ALAS1). ALA treatment abolishes differences in hepatic glucose production and in the expression of gluconeogenic enzymes seen with variation of dietary iron. The differences among diets are also lost with inhibition of heme synthesis with isonicotinylhydrazine. Dietary iron modulates levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a transcriptional activator of ALAS1, to affect hepatic heme. Treatment of mice with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine diminishes PGC-1α variation observed among the iron diets, suggesting that iron is acting through reactive oxygen species signaling. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  12. Heme oxygenase activity correlates with serum indices of iron homeostasis in healthy nonsmokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. While the use of genetically altered animal models in investigation has established distinct associations between HO activity and systemic iron availability, studies have not yet confirm...

  13. The heme complex of Hmu O, a bacterial heme degradation enzyme from Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure of the catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, G C; Tomita, T; Sönnichsen, F D; Yoshida, T; Ikeda-Saito, M

    1999-08-27

    Hmu O, a heme degradation enzyme in Corynebacterium diphtheriae, forms a stoichiometric complex with iron protoporphyrin IX and catalyzes the oxygen-dependent conversion of hemin to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free iron. Using a multitude of spectroscopic techniques, we have determined the axial ligand coordination of the heme-Hmu O complex. The ferric complex shows a pH-dependent reversible transition between a water-bound hexacoordinate high spin neutral pH form and an alkaline form, having high spin and low spin states, with a pK(a) of 9. (1)H NMR, EPR, and resonance Raman of the heme-Hmu O complex establish that a neutral imidazole of a histidine residue is the proximal ligand of the complex, similar to mammalian heme oxygenase. EPR of the deoxy cobalt porphyrin IX-Hmu O complex confirms this proximal histidine coordination. Oxy cobalt-Hmu O EPR reveals a hydrogen-bonding interaction between the O(2) and an exchangeable proton in the Hmu O distal pocket and two distinct orientations for the bound O(2). Mammalian heme oxygenase has only one O(2) orientation. This difference and the mixed spin states at alkaline pH indicate structural differences in the distal environment between Hmu O and its mammalian counterpart.

  14. Novel Insights in Mammalian Catalase Heme Maturation: Effect of NO and Thioredoxin-1

    OpenAIRE

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorpo...

  15. Heme in pathophysiology: a matter of scavenging, metabolism and trafficking across cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Chiabrando, Deborah; Vinchi, Francesca; Fiorito, Veronica; Mercurio, Sonia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    Heme (iron-protoporphyrin IX) is an essential co-factor involved in multiple biological processes: oxygen transport and storage, electron transfer, drug and steroid metabolism, signal transduction, and micro RNA processing. However, excess free-heme is highly toxic due to its ability to promote oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation, thus leading to membrane injury and, ultimately, apoptosis. Thus, heme metabolism needs to be finely regulated. Intracellular heme amount is controlled at multi...

  16. Staphylococcus aureus HemX Modulates Glutamyl-tRNA Reductase Abundance To Regulate Heme Biosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob E. Choby; Caroline M. Grunenwald; Arianna I. Celis; Svetlana Y. Gerdes; Jennifer L. DuBois; Eric P. Skaar; Kimberly A. Kline

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a significant amount of devastating disease. Its ability to colonize the host and cause infection is supported by a variety of proteins that are dependent on the cofactor heme. Heme is a porphyrin used broadly across kingdoms and is synthesized de novo from common cellular precursors and iron. While heme is critical to bacterial physiology, it is also toxic in high concentrations, requiring that organisms encode regulatory processes to control heme hom...

  17. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates alcoholic liver steatosis: histopathological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palipoch, Sarawoot; Koomhin, Phanit; Punsawad, Chuchard; Na-Ek, Prasit; Sattayakhom, Apsorn; Suwannalert, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is one of the most important causes of hepatic steatosis, which involves oxidative stress. In particular, increased oxidative stress has been strongly linked to stimulation of the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This study aimed to investigate whether HO-1 could alleviates alcoholic steatosis in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: 1) the control group, 2) the EtOH group, 3) the EtOH + ZnPP-IX group and 4) the EtOH + Hemin group. Liver histopathology was investigated in weeks 1 and 4 after the start of the treatment period. Alcohol treatment significantly increased the hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, an oxidative stress marker. In addition, it increased the triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in both weeks. Gross examination demonstrated a yellowish and slightly enlarged liver in the alcohol-treated rats. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Oil Red O staining indicated hepatic steatosis, which was characterized by diffuse, extensive fatty accumulation and discrete lipid droplets of variable size in hepatocytes of the alcohol-treated rats. Administration of the HO-1 inducer hemin resulted in upregulation of hepatic HO-1 gene expression, reduced the MDA, triglyceride, ALT and AST levels and alleviated alcoholic hepatic steatosis, whereas administration of the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX) resulted in downregulation of hepatic HO-1 gene expression and could not alleviate alcoholic hepatic steatosis either week. In conclusion, HO-1 could alleviate alcoholic hepatic steatosis in male Wistar rats and may be useful in development of a new therapeutic approach. PMID:26989297

  18. Giardia intestinalis incorporates heme into cytosolic cytochrome b₅.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrih, Jan; Harant, Karel; Martincová, Eva; Sutak, Robert; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Hrdý, Ivan; Tachezy, Jan

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic intestinal pathogen Giardia intestinalis does not possess enzymes for heme synthesis, and it also lacks the typical set of hemoproteins that are involved in mitochondrial respiration and cellular oxygen stress management. Nevertheless, G. intestinalis may require heme for the function of particular hemoproteins, such as cytochrome b5 (cytb5). We have analyzed the sequences of eukaryotic cytb5 proteins and identified three distinct cytb5 groups: group I, which consists of C-tail membrane-anchored cytb5 proteins; group II, which includes soluble cytb5 proteins; and group III, which comprises the fungal cytb5 proteins. The majority of eukaryotes possess both group I and II cytb5 proteins, whereas three Giardia paralogs belong to group II. We have identified a fourth Giardia cytb5 paralog (gCYTb5-IV) that is rather divergent and possesses an unusual 134-residue N-terminal extension. Recombinant Giardia cytb5 proteins, including gCYTb5-IV, were expressed in Escherichia coli and exhibited characteristic UV-visible spectra that corresponded to heme-loaded cytb5 proteins. The expression of the recombinant gCYTb5-IV in G. intestinalis resulted in the increased import of extracellular heme and its incorporation into the protein, whereas this effect was not observed when gCYTb5-IV containing a mutated heme-binding site was expressed. The electrons for Giardia cytb5 proteins may be provided by the NADPH-dependent Tah18-like oxidoreductase GiOR-1. Therefore, GiOR-1 and cytb5 may constitute a novel redox system in G. intestinalis. To our knowledge, G. intestinalis is the first anaerobic eukaryote in which the presence of heme has been directly demonstrated.

  19. The heme-regulatory motif of nuclear receptor Rev-erbβ is a key mediator of heme and redox signaling in circadian rhythm maintenance and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eric L; Ramirez, Yanil; Ragsdale, Stephen W

    2017-07-07

    Rev-erbβ is a heme-responsive transcription factor that regulates genes involved in circadian rhythm maintenance and metabolism, effectively bridging these critical cellular processes. Heme binding to Rev-erbβ indirectly facilitates its interaction with the nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR1), resulting in repression of Rev-erbβ target genes. Fe 3+ -heme binds in a 6-coordinate complex with axial His and Cys ligands, the latter provided by a heme-regulatory motif (HRM). Rev-erbβ was thought to be a heme sensor based on a weak K d value for the Rev-erbβ·heme complex of 2 μm determined with isothermal titration calorimetry. However, our group demonstrated with UV-visible difference titrations that the K d value is in the low nanomolar range, and the Fe 3+ -heme off-rate is on the order of 10 -6 s -1 making Rev-erbβ ineffective as a sensor of Fe 3+ -heme. In this study, we dissected the kinetics of heme binding to Rev-erbβ and provided a K d for Fe 3+ -heme of ∼0.1 nm Loss of the HRM axial thiolate via redox processes, including oxidation to a disulfide with a neighboring cysteine or dissociation upon reduction of Fe 3+ - to Fe 2+ -heme, decreased binding affinity by >20-fold. Furthermore, as measured in a co-immunoprecipitation assay, substitution of the His or Cys heme ligands in Rev-erbβ was accompanied by a significant loss of NCoR1 binding. These results demonstrate the importance of the Rev-erbβ HRM in regulating interactions with heme and NCoR1 and advance our understanding of how signaling through HRMs affects the major cellular processes of circadian rhythm maintenance and metabolism. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Zinc protoporphyrin/heme in large-for-gestation newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Kelsey J; Blohowiak, Sharon E; Kling, Pamela J

    2007-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin/heme (ZnPP/H) ratios are indicators of incomplete erythrocyte iron delivery. ZnPP/H is more sensitive than measures of iron stores, such as plasma ferritin, in identifying early pre-anemic iron-deficient erythropoiesis. Cord ZnPP/H ratios are elevated in conditions associated with fetal hypoxia, such as diabetes mellitus during pregnancy. In chronic fetal hypoxemia, erythrocyte and hemoglobin syntheses are accelerated and iron is incorporated into erythrocytes. Cord ZnPP/H ratios are correlated with fetal size after diabetic pregnancy. Because fetal size is a surrogate for diabetes control, it is unclear whether glycemic control in diabetes mellitus or fetal size was the major determinant of ZnPP/H ratios and disturbed erythrocyte iron delivery. Our goal was to examine whether ZnPP/H ratios were elevated or were associated with growth in large-for-gestation newborns born to mothers without the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. In cord blood samples from large and appropriately grown healthy newborns, we measured ZnPP/H and indices of erythropoiesis and iron status. Analyses included simple linear regression, Fisher's exact, and unpaired t testing. In the absence of diabetes mellitus, ZnPP/H in 25 large and 24 appropriately grown healthy newborns was similar, and the ratios were within the limits of previously reported normal cord ZnPP/H. Ratios were not correlated with plasma ferritin levels. In large newborns, but not appropriately grown newborns, ZnPP/H ratios were positively correlated with fetal growth (p ZnPP/H was normal. Iron incorporation into erythrocytes in large newborns appears adequate. Because the association of ZnPP/H with size and estimated body hemoglobin was observed only in large newborns, factors determining ZnPP/H may differ between large and appropriately grown newborns.

  1. Kinetics of heme transfer by the Shr NEAT domains of Group A Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Mahamoudou; Pennati, Andrea; Devlin, Darius J; Huang, Ya-Shu; Gadda, Giovanni; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2013-10-15

    The hemolytic Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a notorious human pathogen. Shr protein of GAS participates in iron acquisition by obtaining heme from host hemoglobin and delivering it to the adjacent receptor on the surface, Shp. Heme is then conveyed to the SiaABC proteins for transport across the membrane. Using rapid kinetic studies, we investigated the role of the two heme binding NEAT modules of Shr. Stopped-flow analysis showed that holoNEAT1 quickly delivered heme to apoShp. HoloNEAT2 did not exhibit such activity; only little and slow transfer of heme from NEAT2 to apoShp was seen, suggesting that Shr NEAT domains have distinctive roles in heme transport. HoloNEAT1 also provided heme to apoNEAT2, by a fast and reversible process. To the best of our knowledge this is the first transfer observed between isolated NEAT domains of the same receptor. Sequence alignment revealed that Shr NEAT domains belong to two families of NEAT domains that are conserved in Shr orthologs from several species. Based on the heme transfer kinetics, we propose that Shr proteins modulate heme uptake according to heme availability by a mechanism where NEAT1 facilitates fast heme delivery to Shp, whereas NEAT2 serves as a temporary storage for heme on the bacterial surface. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Effects of Heme Electronic Structure and Distal Polar Interaction on Functional and Vibrational Properties of Myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yuki; Nishimura, Ryu; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Shibata, Tomokazu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ogura, Takashi; Matsuo, Takashi; Hirota, Shun; Neya, Saburo; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-02-15

    We analyzed the oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) binding properties, autoxidation reaction rate, and FeO2 and FeCO vibrational frequencies of the H64Q mutant of sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) reconstituted with chemically modified heme cofactors possessing a variety of heme Fe electron densities (ρ(Fe)), and the results were compared with those for the previously studied native [Shibata, T. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 6091-6098], and H64L [Nishimura, R. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 1091-1099], and L29F [Nishimura, R. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 9156-9165] mutants in order to elucidate the effect of changes in the heme electronic structure and distal polar interaction contributing to stabilization of the Fe-bound ligand on the functional and vibrational properties of the protein. The study revealed that, as in the cases of the previously studied native protein [Shibata, T. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 11955-11960], the O2 affinity and autoxidation reaction rate of the H64Q mutant decreased with a decrease in ρ(Fe), as expected from the effect of a change in ρ(Fe) on the resonance between the Fe(2+)-O2 bond and Fe(3+)-O2(-)-like species in the O2 form, while the CO affinity of the protein is independent of a change in ρ(Fe). We also found that the well-known inverse correlation between the frequencies of Fe-bound CO (ν(CO)) and Fe-C (ν(FeC)) stretching [Li, X.-Y.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988, 110, 6024-6033] is affected differently by changes in ρ(Fe) and the distal polar interaction, indicating that the effects of the two electronic perturbations due to the chemical modification of a heme cofactor and the replacement of nearby amino acid residues on the resonance between the two alternative canonical forms of the FeCO fragment in the protein are slightly different from each other. These findings provide a new insight for deeper understanding of the functional regulation of the protein.

  3. Altered activity of heme biosynthesis pathway enzymes in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zavala, A; Del Razo, L M; García-Vargas, G G; Aguilar, C; Borja, V H; Albores, A; Cebrián, M E

    1999-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the activities of some enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and their relationship with the profile of urinary porphyrin excretion in individuals exposed chronically to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We selected 17 individuals from each village studied: Benito Juarez, which has current exposure to 0.3 mg As/l; Santa Ana, where individuals have been exposed for more than 35 years to 0.4 mg As/l, but due to changes in the water supply (in 1992) exposure was reduced to its current level (0.1 mg As/l), and Nazareno, with 0.014 mg As/l. Average arsenic concentrations in urine were 2058, 398, and 88 microg As/g creatinine, respectively. The more evident alterations in heme metabolism observed in the highly exposed individuals were: (1) small but significant increases in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) activities in peripheral blood erythrocytes; (2) increases in the urinary excretion of total porphyrins, mainly due to coproporphyrin III (COPROIII) and uroporphyrin III (UROIII); and (3) increases in the COPRO/URO and COPROIII/COPROI ratios. No significant changes were observed in uroporphyrinogen III synthetase (UROIII-S) activity. The direct relationships between enzyme activities and urinary porphyrins, suggest that the increased porphyrin excretion was related to PBG-D, whereas the increased URO-D activity would enhance coproporphyrin synthesis and excretion at the expense of uroporphyrin. None of the human studies available have reported the marked porphyric response and enzyme inhibition observed in rodents. In conclusion, chronic As exposure alters human heme metabolism; however the severity of the effects appears to depend on characteristics of exposure not yet fully characterized.

  4. Altered activity of heme biosynthesis pathway enzymes in individuals chronically exposed to arsenic in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Zavala, A.; Del Razo, L.M.; Garcia-Vargas, G.G.; Aguilar, C.; Borja, V.H.; Albores, A.; Cebrian, M.E. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico (Mexico). Dept. de Farmacologia y Toxicologica

    1999-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the activities of some enzymes of the heme biosynthesis pathway and their relationship with the profile of urinary porphyrin excretion in individuals exposed chronically to arsenic (As) via drinking water in Region Lagunera, Mexico. We selected 17 individuals from each village studied: Benito Juarez, which has current exposure to 0.3 mg As/l; Santa Ana, where individuals have been exposed for more than 35 years to 0.4 mg As/l, but due to changes in the water supply (in 1992) exposure was reduced to its current level (0.1 mg As/l), and Nazareno, with 0.014 mg As/l. Average arsenic concentrations in urine were 2058, 398, and 88 {mu}g As/g creatinine, respectively. The more evident alterations in heme metabolism observed in the highly exposed individuals were: (1) small but significant increases in porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (URO-D) activities in peripheral blood erythrocytes; (2) increases in the urinary excretion of total porphyrins, mainly due to coproporphyrin III (COPROIII) and uroporphyrin III (UROIII); and (3) increases in the COPRO/URO and COPROIII/COPROI ratios. No significant changes were observed in uroporphyrinogen III synthetase (UROIII-S) activity. The direct relationships between enzyme activities and urinary porphyrins, suggest that the increased porphyrin excretion was related to PBG-D, whereas the increased URO-D activity would enhance coproporphyrin synthesis and excretion at the expense of uroporphyrin. None of the human studies available have reported the marked porphyric response and enzyme inhibition observed in rodents. In conclusion, chronic As exposure alters human heme metabolism; however the severity of the effects appears to depend on characteristics of exposure not yet fully characterized. (orig.) With 1 fig., 3 tabs., 20 refs.

  5. Functional identification of HugZ, a heme oxygenase from Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Bin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Iron is recognized as an important trace element, essential for most organisms including pathogenic bacteria. HugZ, a protein related to heme iron utilization, is involved in bacterial acquisition of iron from the host. We previously observed that a hugZ homologue is correlated with the adaptive colonization of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, a major gastro-enteric pathogen. However, its exact physiological role remains unclear. Results A gene homologous to hugZ, designated hp0318, identified in H. pylori ATCC 26695, exhibits 66% similarity to cj1613c of Campylobacter jejuni NCTC 11168. Soluble 6 × His fused-HugZ protein was expressed in vitro. Hemin-agrose affinity analysis indicated that the recombinant HugZ protein can bind to hemin. Absorption spectroscopy at 411 nm further revealed a heme:HugZ binding ratio of 1:1. Enzymatic assays showed that purified recombinant HugZ protein can degrade hemin into biliverdin and carbon monoxide in the presence of either ascorbic acid or NADPH and cytochrome P450 reductase. The biochemical and enzymatic characteristics agreed closely with those of Campylobacter jejuni Cj1613c protein, implying that hp0318 is a functional member of the HugZ family. A hugZ deletion mutant was obtained by homologous recombination. This mutant strain showed poor growth when hemoglobin was provided as the source of iron, partly because of its failure to utilize hemoglobin efficiently. Real-time quantitative PCR also confirmed that the expression of hugZ was regulated by iron levels. Conclusion These findings provide biochemical and genetic evidence that hugZ (hp0318 encodes a heme oxygenase involved in iron release/uptake in H. pylori.

  6. Mosaic origin of the heme biosynthesis pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oborník, Miroslav; Green, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 12 (2005), s. 2343-2353 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500220502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : heme biosynthetic pathway * algae * chloroplasts Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.233, year: 2005

  7. Dioxygen reactivity of meso-hydroxylated hemes: intermediates in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    radation of heme into biliverdin, CO (a potential neurotransmitter) and free iron in a reaction that re- quires O2, NADPH and cytochrome P450 reductase.2–6. It also provides a mechanism for the recovery and reutilization of the iron atom. This is important be- cause only 1–3% of the iron utilized daily in the synthesis of red ...

  8. Cysteine-independent activation/inhibition of heme oxygenase-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive thiols of cysteine (cys residues in proteins play a key role in transforming chemical reactivity into a biological response. The heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2 isozyme contains two cys residues that have been implicated in binding of heme and also the regulation of its activity. In this paper, we address the question of a role for cys residues for the HO-2 inhibitors or activators designed in our laboratory. We tested the activity of full length recombinant human heme oxygenase-2 (FL-hHO-2 and its analog in which cys265 and cys282 were both replaced by alanine to determine the effect on activation by menadione (MD and inhibition by QC-2350. Similar inhibition by QC-2350 and almost identical activation by MD was observed for both recombinant FL-hHO-2s. Our findings are interpreted to mean that thiols of FL-hHO-2s are not involved in HO-2 activation or inhibition by the compounds that have been designed and identified by us. Activation or inhibition of HO-2 by our compounds should be attributed to a mechanism other than altering binding affinity of HO-2 for heme through cys265 and cys282.

  9. Effect of a heme oxygenase-1 inducer on NADPH oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigated the effect of hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inducer, on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX) expression in rats with alcohol-induced liver injury. Methods: Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups consisting of the control group, the ethanol (EtOH) group, ...

  10. Identification of two genes potentially associated in iron-heme ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classic characteristics are poor predictors of the risk of thromboembolism. Thus, better markers for the carotid atheroma plaque formation and symptom causing are needed. Our objective was to study by microarray analysis gene expression of genes involved in homeostasis of iron and heme in carotid atheroma plaque ...

  11. Coordinate expression of heme and globin is essential for effective erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Raymond T; Phelps, Susan R; Shadle, Christina; Sanchez-Bonilla, Marilyn; Keel, Siobán B; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2015-12-01

    Erythropoiesis requires rapid and extensive hemoglobin production. Heme activates globin transcription and translation; therefore, heme synthesis must precede globin synthesis. As free heme is a potent inducer of oxidative damage, its levels within cellular compartments require stringent regulation. Mice lacking the heme exporter FLVCR1 have a severe macrocytic anemia; however, the mechanisms that underlie erythropoiesis dysfunction in these animals are unclear. Here, we determined that erythropoiesis failure occurs in these animals at the CFU-E/proerythroblast stage, a point at which the transferrin receptor (CD71) is upregulated, iron is imported, and heme is synthesized--before ample globin is produced. From the CFU-E/proerythroblast (CD71(+) Ter119(-) cells) stage onward, erythroid progenitors exhibited excess heme content, increased cytoplasmic ROS, and increased apoptosis. Reducing heme synthesis in FLVCR1-defient animals via genetic and biochemical approaches improved the anemia, implying that heme excess causes, and is not just associated with, the erythroid marrow failure. Expression of the cell surface FLVCR1 isoform, but not the mitochondrial FLVCR1 isoform, restored normal rbc production, demonstrating that cellular heme export is essential. Together, these studies provide insight into how heme is regulated to allow effective erythropoiesis, show that erythropoiesis fails when heme is excessive, and emphasize the importance of evaluating Ter119(-) erythroid cells when studying erythroid marrow failure in murine models.

  12. Circulating cell membrane microparticles transfer heme to endothelial cells and trigger vasoocclusions in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Stéphane M; De Moraes, João A; Bonnin, Philippe; Abbyad, Paul; Le Jeune, Sylvain; Lionnet, François; Loufrani, Laurent; Grimaud, Linda; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Charue, Dominique; Kiger, Laurent; Renard, Jean-Marie; Larroque, Claire; Le Clésiau, Hervé; Tedgui, Alain; Bruneval, Patrick; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Boulanger, Chantal M; Blanc-Brude, Olivier P

    2015-06-11

    Intravascular hemolysis describes the relocalization of heme and hemoglobin (Hb) from erythrocytes to plasma. We investigated the concept that erythrocyte membrane microparticles (MPs) concentrate cell-free heme in human hemolytic diseases, and that heme-laden MPs have a physiopathological impact. Up to one-third of cell-free heme in plasma from 47 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) was sequestered in circulating MPs. Erythrocyte vesiculation in vitro produced MPs loaded with heme. In silico analysis predicted that externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) in MPs may associate with and help retain heme at the cell surface. Immunohistology identified Hb-laden MPs adherent to capillary endothelium in kidney biopsies from hyperalbuminuric SCD patients. In addition, heme-laden erythrocyte MPs adhered and transferred heme to cultured endothelial cells, inducing oxidative stress and apoptosis. In transgenic SAD mice, infusion of heme-laden MPs triggered rapid vasoocclusions in kidneys and compromised microvascular dilation ex vivo. These vascular effects were largely blocked by heme-scavenging hemopexin and by the PS antagonist annexin-a5, in vitro and in vivo. Adversely remodeled MPs carrying heme may thus be a source of oxidant stress for the endothelium, linking hemolysis to vascular injury. This pathway might provide new targets for the therapeutic preservation of vascular function in SCD. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  13. Cytochrome c and c1 heme lyases are essential in Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posayapisit, Navaporn; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Koonyosying, Pongpisid; Falade, Mofolusho O; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Shaw, Philip J; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee

    Malaria parasites possess a de novo heme synthetic pathway. Interestingly, this pathway is dispensable during the blood stages of development in mammalian hosts. The assembly of the two most important hemeproteins, cytochromes c and c1, is mediated by cytochrome heme lyase enzymes. Plasmodium spp. possess two cytochrome heme lyases encoded by separate genes. Given the redundancy of heme synthesis, we sought to determine if heme lyase function also exhibits redundancy. To answer this question, we performed gene knockout experiments. We found that the PBANKA_143950 and PBANKA_0602600 Plasmodium berghei genes encoding cytochrome c (Pbcchl) and cytochrome c1 (Pbcc 1 hl) heme lyases, respectively, can only be disrupted when a complementary gene is present. In contrast, four genes in the de novo heme synthesis pathway can be disrupted without complementation. This work provides evidence that Pbcchl and Pbcc 1 hl are both essential and thus may be antimalarial targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic Characterization of a Novel HIV-1 Circulating Recombinant Form (CRF74_01B) Identified among Intravenous Drug Users in Malaysia: Recombination History and Phylogenetic Linkage with Previously Defined Recombinant Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Hui Ting; Chow, Wei Zhen; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Chan, Kok Gan; Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq Abed; Koh, Clayton; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2015-01-01

    In many parts of Southeast Asia, the HIV-1 epidemic has been driven by the sharing of needles and equipment among intravenous drug users (IDUs). Over the last few decades, many studies have proven time and again that the diversity of HIV-1 epidemics can often be linked to the route of infection transmission. That said, the diversity and complexity of HIV-1 molecular epidemics in the region have been increasing at an alarming rate, due in part to the high tendency of the viral RNA to recombine. This scenario was exemplified by the discovery of numerous circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), especially in Thailand and Malaysia. In this study, we characterized a novel CRF designated CRF74_01B, which was identified in six epidemiologically unlinked IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The near-full length genomes were composed of CRF01_AE and subtype B', with eight breakpoints dispersed in the gag-pol and nef regions. Remarkably, this CRF shared four and two recombination hotspots with the previously described CRF33_01B and the less prevalent CRF53_01B, respectively. Genealogy-based Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of CRF74_01B genomic regions showed that it is closely related to both CRF33_01B and CRF53_01B. This observation suggests that CRF74_01B was probably a direct descendent from specific lineages of CRF33_01B, CRF53_01B and subtype B' that could have emerged in the mid-1990s. Additionally, it illustrated the active recombination processes between prevalent HIV-1 subtypes and recombinants in Malaysia. In summary, we report a novel HIV-1 genotype designated CRF74_01B among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The characterization of the novel CRF74_01B is of considerable significance towards the understanding of the genetic diversity and population dynamics of HIV-1 circulating in the region.

  15. CYTOCHROME P450 REGULATION: THE INTERPLAY BETWEEN ITS HEME AND APOPROTEIN MOIETIES IN SYNTHESIS, ASSEMBLY, REPAIR AND DISPOSAL123

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Maria Almira; Sinclair, Peter R.; De Matteis, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Heme is vital to our aerobic universe. Heme cellular content is finely tuned through an exquisite control of synthesis and degradation. Heme deficiency is deleterious to cells, whereas excess heme is toxic. Most of the cellular heme serves as the prosthetic moiety of functionally diverse hemoproteins, including cytochromes P450 (P450s). In the liver, P450s are its major consumers with >50% of hepatic heme committed to their synthesis. Prosthetic heme is the sine qua non of P450 catalytic biot...

  16. A mononuclear non-heme manganese(IV)-oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N; Nam, Wonwoo

    2013-05-01

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal-oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)-oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc(3+) ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C-H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)-oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal-oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  17. A Mononuclear Non-Heme Manganese(IV)-Oxo Complex Binding Redox-Inactive Metal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Junying; Lee, Yong-Min; Davis, Katherine M.; Wu, Xiujuan; Seo, Mi Sook; Cho, Kyung-Bin; Yoon, Heejung; Park, Young Jun; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Pushkar, Yulia N.; Nam, Wonwoo [Ewha; (Purdue); (Osaka)

    2013-05-29

    Redox-inactive metal ions play pivotal roles in regulating the reactivities of high-valent metal–oxo species in a variety of enzymatic and chemical reactions. A mononuclear non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex bearing a pentadentate N5 ligand has been synthesized and used in the synthesis of a Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding scandium ions. The Mn(IV)–oxo complexes were characterized with various spectroscopic methods. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)–oxo complex are markedly influenced by binding of Sc3+ ions in oxidation reactions, such as a ~2200-fold increase in the rate of oxidation of thioanisole (i.e., oxygen atom transfer) but a ~180-fold decrease in the rate of C–H bond activation of 1,4-cyclohexadiene (i.e., hydrogen atom transfer). The present results provide the first example of a non-heme Mn(IV)–oxo complex binding redox-inactive metal ions that shows a contrasting effect of the redox-inactive metal ions on the reactivities of metal–oxo species in the oxygen atom transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions.

  18. Dietary heme-mediated PPARa activation does not affect the heme-induced epithelial hyperproliferation and hyperplasia in mouse colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Wit, de N.J.W.; Muller, M.R.; Meer, van der R.

    2012-01-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colon cancer risk. Heme, present in red meat, injures the colon surface epithelium by luminal cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species. This surface injury is overcompensated by hyperproliferation and hyperplasia of crypt cells. Transcriptome

  19. Bacterial Nitric Oxide Synthase Is Required for the Staphylococcus aureus Response to Heme Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdel, Matthew C; Dutter, Brendan F; Sulikowski, Gary A; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-08-12

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Within the vertebrate host, S. aureus requires heme as a nutrient iron source and as a cofactor for multiple cellular processes. Although required for pathogenesis, excess heme is toxic. S. aureus employs a two-component system, the heme sensor system (HssRS), to sense and protect against heme toxicity. Upon activation, HssRS induces the expression of the heme-regulated transporter (HrtAB), an efflux pump that alleviates heme toxicity. The ability to sense and respond to heme is critical for the pathogenesis of numerous Gram-positive organisms, yet the mechanism of heme sensing remains unknown. Compound '3981 was identified in a high-throughput screen as an activator of staphylococcal HssRS that triggers HssRS independently of heme accumulation. '3981 is toxic to S. aureus; however, derivatives of '3981 were synthesized that lack toxicity while retaining HssRS activation, enabling the interrogation of the heme stress response without confounding toxic effects of the parent molecule. Using '3981 derivatives as probes of the heme stress response, numerous genes required for '3981-induced activation of HssRS were uncovered. Specifically, multiple genes involved in the production of nitric oxide were identified, including the gene encoding bacterial nitric oxide synthase (bNOS). bNOS protects S. aureus from oxidative stress imposed by heme. Taken together, this work identifies bNOS as crucial for the S. aureus heme stress response, providing evidence that nitric oxide synthesis and heme sensing are intertwined.

  20. Binding analysis of ferritin with heme using α-casein and biotinylated-hemin: detection of heme-binding capacity of Dpr derived from heme synthesis-deficient Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieno, Ayako; Yamamoto, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Mukai, Takao; Orino, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial and mammalian ferritins are known to bind heme. The use of α-casein and biotinylated hemin could be applicable to detection of protein-bound heme and of proteins with heme-binding capacity, respectively. Although commercial horse spleen ferritin and purified horse spleen ferritin (L:H subunit ratio=4) bound to an α-casein-coated plate, and this binding could be inhibited by hemin, recombinant iron-binding protein (rDpr), derived from heme-deficient Streptococcus mutans and expressed in Escherichia coli, did not bind to an α-casein-coated plate. Both horse spleen ferritins bound to α-casein-immobilized beads. Commercial horse spleen ferritin and rDpr showed direct binding to hemin-agarose beads. After preincubation of commercial horse spleen ferritin or rDpr with biotinylated hemin, they showed indirect binding to avidin-immobilized beads through biotinylated hemin. These results demonstrate that α-casein is useful for detection of heme-binding ferritin and that both hemin-agarose and the combination of biotinylated hemin and avidin-beads are useful for detection of the heme-binding capacity of ferritin. In addition, this study also revealed that Dpr, a decameric iron-binding protein, from heme-deficient cells binds heme.

  1. Ibuprofen Impairs Allosterically Peroxynitrite Isomerization by Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra; Coletta, Massimo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P.; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fasano, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) participates in heme scavenging; in turn, heme endows HSA with myoglobin-like reactivity and spectroscopic properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen on peroxynitrite isomerization to NO3− catalyzed by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) is reported. Data were obtained at 22.0 °C. HSA-heme-Fe(III) catalyzes peroxynitrite isomerization in the absence and presence of CO2; the values of the second order catalytic rate constant (kon) are 4.1 × 105 and 4.5 × 105 m−1 s−1, respectively. Moreover, HSA-heme-Fe(III) prevents peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of free added l-tyrosine. The pH dependence of kon (pKa = 6.9) suggests that peroxynitrous acid reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III) atom, in the absence and presence of CO2. The HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite has been ascribed to the reactive pentacoordinated heme-Fe(III) atom. In the absence and presence of CO2, ibuprofen impairs dose-dependently peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III) and facilitates the nitration of free added l-tyrosine; the value of the dissociation equilibrium constant for ibuprofen binding to HSA-heme-Fe(III) (L) ranges between 7.7 × 10−4 and 9.7 × 10−4 m. Under conditions where [ibuprofen] is ≫L, the kinetics of HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite is superimposable to that obtained in the absence of HSA-heme-Fe(III) or in the presence of non-catalytic HSA-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex and HSA. Ibuprofen binding impairs allosterically peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), inducing the hexacoordination of the heme-Fe(III) atom. These results represent the first evidence for peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), highlighting the allosteric modulation of HSA-heme-Fe(III) reactivity by heterotropic interaction(s), and outlining the role of drugs in modulating HSA functions. The present results could be relevant for the drug-dependent protective role

  2. Hormonal fluctuations during the estrous cycle modulate Heme Oxygenase-1 expression in the uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Zenclussen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Deletion of the Heme Oxygenase-1 (Hmox1 locus in mice results in intrauterine lethality. The expression of the heme catabolyzing enzyme encoded by this gene, namely HO 1, is required to successfully support reproductive events. We have previously observed that HO-1 acts at several key events in reproduction ensuring pregnancy. HO-1 defines ovulation, positively influences implantation and placentation and ensures fetal growth and survival. Here, we embarked on a study aimed to determine whether hormonal changes during the estrous cycle in the mouse define HO-1 expression, thus influencing receptivity. We analyzed the serum levels of progesterone and estrogen by ELISA and HO-1 mRNA expression in uterus by real time RT-PCR at the metestrus, proestrus, estrus and diestrus phases of the estrous cycle. Further, we studied the HO-1 protein expression by Western Blot upon hormone addition to cultured uterine AN3 cells. We observed that HO-1 variations in uterine tissue correlated to changes in hormonal levels at different phases of the estrus cycle. In vitro, HO-1 protein levels in AN3 cells augmented after the addition of physiological concentrations of progesterone and estradiol, which confirmed our in vivo observations. Our data suggest an important role for hormones in HO-1 regulation in uterus that has a significant impact in receptivity and later on blastocyst implantation.

  3. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Branco, L.G.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leite-Panissi, C.R.A. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-19

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  4. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho-Costa, P.G.; Branco, L.G.S.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress

  5. Pharmacological Inhibition of Host Heme Oxygenase-1 Suppresses Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection In Vivo by a Mechanism Dependent on T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego L. Costa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a stress response antioxidant enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme released during inflammation. HO-1 expression is upregulated in both experimental and human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, and in patients it is a biomarker of active disease. Whether the enzyme plays a protective versus pathogenic role in tuberculosis has been the subject of debate. To address this controversy, we administered tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX, a well-characterized HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, to mice during acute M. tuberculosis infection. These SnPPIX-treated animals displayed a substantial reduction in pulmonary bacterial loads comparable to that achieved following conventional antibiotic therapy. Moreover, when administered adjunctively with antimycobacterial drugs, the HO-1 inhibitor markedly enhanced and accelerated pathogen clearance. Interestingly, both the pulmonary induction of HO-1 expression and the efficacy of SnPPIX treatment in reducing bacterial burden were dependent on the presence of host T lymphocytes. Although M. tuberculosis expresses its own heme-degrading enzyme, SnPPIX failed to inhibit its enzymatic activity or significantly restrict bacterial growth in liquid culture. Together, the above findings reveal mammalian HO-1 as a potential target for host-directed monotherapy and adjunctive therapy of tuberculosis and identify the immune response as a critical regulator of this function.

  6. Comparing and combining implicit ligand sampling with multiple steered molecular dynamics to study ligand migration processes in heme proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Flavio; Boechi, Leonardo; Estrin, Dario A; Marti, Marcelo A

    2011-07-30

    The ubiquitous heme proteins perform a wide variety of tasks that rely on the subtle regulation of their affinity for small ligands like O2, CO, and NO. Ligand affinity is characterized by kinetic association and dissociation rate constants, that partially depend on ligand migration between the solvent and active site, mediated by the presence of internal cavities or tunnels. Different computational methods have been developed to study these processes which can be roughly divided in two strategies: those costly methods in which the ligand is treated explicitly during the simulations, and the free energy landscape of the process is computed; and those faster methods that use prior computed Molecular Dynamics simulation without the ligand, and incorporate it afterwards, called implicit ligand sampling (ILS) methods. To compare both approaches performance and to provide a combined protocol to study ligand migration in heme proteins, we performed ILS and multiple steered molecular dynamics (MSMD) free energy calculations of the ligand migration process in three representative and well theoretically and experimentally studied cases that cover a wide range of complex situations presenting a challenging benchmark for the aim of the present work. Our results show that ILS provides a good description of the tunnel topology and a reasonable approximation to the free energy landscape, while MSMD provides more accurate and detailed free energy profile description of each tunnel. Based on these results, a combined strategy is presented for the study of internal ligand migration in heme proteins. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effect of dietary protein on heme iron uptake by Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Pía; Flores, Sebastián; Pizarro, Fernando; de Romaña, Daniel López; Arredondo, Miguel

    2011-12-01

    To study heme iron bioavailability and the role of dietary protein (animal and vegetable) on iron uptake using an in vitro model (Caco-2 cell line). Caco-2 cells were seeded in bicameral chambers with different animal (beef, chicken or fish) or vegetable (peas, lentils, and soybeans) proteins or with pure animal (collagen and casein) or vegetable (gliadin, zein, and glutein) protein extracts. The effect of each protein over heme iron absorption was assessed. Intact heme uptake was higher than either heme plus albumin or digested heme plus albumin, but lower than digested heme. White meal exerted the highest inhibitory effect on hemin uptake. Heme iron uptake decreased in the presence of all legume extracts, but was not significantly different among them (one-way ANOVA, NS). Pure animal (collagen and casein) and vegetable (zein and glutelin) proteins increased heme iron uptake, except for gliadin. Animal and vegetable protein in general decreased heme iron uptake. However, purified animal and vegetable protein induce an increase in heme iron uptake.

  8. Developing a heme iron database for meats according to meat type, cooking method and doneness level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Amanda J; Harnly, James M; Ferrucci, Leah M; Risch, Adam; Mayne, Susan T; Sinha, Rashmi

    2012-07-01

    Animal studies have demonstrated that iron may be related to carcinogenesis, and human studies found that heme iron can increase the formation of N -nitroso compounds, which are known carcinogens. One of the postulated mechanisms linking red meat intake to cancer risk involves iron. Epidemiologic studies attempt to investigate the association between heme iron intake and cancer by applying a standard factor to total iron from meat. However, laboratory studies suggest that heme iron levels in meat vary according to cooking method and doneness level. We measured heme iron in meats cooked by different cooking methods to a range of doneness levels to use in conjunction with a food frequency questionnaire to estimate heme iron intake. Composite meat samples were made to represent each meat type, cooking method and doneness level. Heme iron was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Steak and hamburgers contained the highest levels of heme iron, pork and chicken thigh meat had slightly lower levels, and chicken breast meat had the lowest. Although heme iron levels varied, there was no clear effect of cooking method or doneness level. We outline the methods used to create a heme iron database to be used in conjunction with food frequency questionnaires to estimate heme iron intake in relation to disease outcome.

  9. Heme degrading protein HemS is involved in oxidative stress response of Bartonella henselae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaFeng Liu

    Full Text Available Bartonellae are hemotropic bacteria, agents of emerging zoonoses. These bacteria are heme auxotroph Alphaproteobacteria which must import heme for supporting their growth, as they cannot synthesize it. Therefore, Bartonella genome encodes for a complete heme uptake system allowing the transportation of this compound across the outer membrane, the periplasm and the inner membranes. Heme has been proposed to be used as an iron source for Bartonella since these bacteria do not synthesize a complete system required for iron Fe³⁺ uptake. Similarly to other bacteria which use heme as an iron source, Bartonellae must transport this compound into the cytoplasm and degrade it to allow the release of iron from the tetrapyrrole ring. For Bartonella, the gene cluster devoted to the synthesis of the complete heme uptake system also contains a gene encoding for a polypeptide that shares homologies with heme trafficking or degrading enzymes. Using complementation of an E. coli mutant strain impaired in heme degradation, we demonstrated that HemS from Bartonella henselae expressed in E. coli allows the release of iron from heme. Purified HemS from B. henselae binds heme and can degrade it in the presence of a suitable electron donor, ascorbate or NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. Knocking down the expression of HemS in B. henselae reduces its ability to face H₂O₂ induced oxidative stress.

  10. Heme A synthase in bacteria depends on one pair of cysteinyls for activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Anna; Hederstedt, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Heme A is a prosthetic group unique for cytochrome a-type respiratory oxidases in mammals, plants and many microorganisms. The poorly understood integral membrane protein heme A synthase catalyzes the synthesis of heme A from heme O. In bacteria, but not in mitochondria, this enzyme contains one or two pairs of cysteine residues that are present in predicted hydrophilic polypeptide loops on the extracytoplasmic side of the membrane. We used heme A synthase from the eubacterium Bacillus subtilis and the hyperthermophilic archeon Aeropyrum pernix to investigate the functional role of these cysteine residues. Results with B. subtilis amino acid substituted proteins indicated the pair of cysteine residues in the loop connecting transmembrane segments I and II as being essential for catalysis but not required for binding of the enzyme substrate, heme O. Experiments with isolated A. pernix and B. subtilis heme A synthase demonstrated that a disulfide bond can form between the cysteine residues in the same loop and also between loops showing close proximity of the two loops in the folded enzyme protein. Based on the findings, we propose a classification scheme for the four discrete types of heme A synthase found so far in different organisms and propose that essential cysteinyls mediate transfer of reducing equivalents required for the oxygen-dependent catalysis of heme A synthesis from heme O. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased Heme Levels in the Heart Lead to Exacerbated Ischemic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Konrad Teodor; Shang, Meng; Wu, Rongxue; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Khechaduri, Arineh; Sato, Tatsuya; Kamide, Christine; Liu, Ting; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Ardehali, Hossein

    2015-07-31

    Heme is an essential iron-containing molecule for cardiovascular physiology, but in excess it may increase oxidative stress. Failing human hearts have increased heme levels, with upregulation of the rate-limiting enzyme in heme synthesis, δ-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), which is normally not expressed in cardiomyocytes. We hypothesized that increased heme accumulation (through cardiac overexpression of ALAS2) leads to increased oxidative stress and cell death in the heart. We first showed that ALAS2 and heme levels are increased in the hearts of mice subjected to coronary ligation. To determine the causative role of increased heme in the development of heart failure, we generated transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of ALAS2. While ALAS2 transgenic mice have normal cardiac function at baseline, their hearts display increased heme content, higher oxidative stress, exacerbated cell death, and worsened cardiac function after coronary ligation compared to nontransgenic littermates. We confirmed in cultured cardiomyoblasts that the increased oxidative stress and cell death observed with ALAS2 overexpression is mediated by increased heme accumulation. Furthermore, knockdown of ALAS2 in cultured cardiomyoblasts exposed to hypoxia reversed the increases in heme content and cell death. Administration of the mitochondrial antioxidant MitoTempo to ALAS2-overexpressing cardiomyoblasts normalized the elevated oxidative stress and cell death levels to baseline, indicating that the effects of increased ALAS2 and heme are through elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress. The clinical relevance of these findings was supported by the finding of increased ALAS2 induction and heme accumulation in failing human hearts from patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy compared to nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Heme accumulation is detrimental to cardiac function under ischemic conditions, and reducing heme in the heart may be a novel approach for protection against the

  12. Feasibility of combining spectra with texture data of multispectral imaging to predict heme and non-heme iron contents in pork sausages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Qin, Hao; Shi, Kefu; Zhou, Cunliu; Chen, Conggui; Hu, Xiaohua; Zheng, Lei

    2016-01-01

    To precisely determine heme and non-heme iron contents in meat product, the feasibility of combining spectral with texture features extracted from multispectral imaging data (405-970 nm) was assessed. In our study, spectra and textures of 120 pork sausages (PSs) treated by different temperatures (30-80 °C) were analyzed using different calibration models including partial least squares regression (PLSR) and LIB support vector machine (Lib-SVM) for predicting heme and non-heme iron contents in PSs. Based on a combination of spectral and textural features, optimized PLSR models were obtained with determination coefficient (R(2)) of 0.912 for heme and of 0.901 for non-heme iron prediction, which demonstrated the superiority of combining spectra with texture data. Results of satisfactory determination and visualization of heme and non-heme iron contents indicated that multispectral imaging could serve as a feasible approach for online industrial applications in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat; Alteracoes provocadas pela irradiacao e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter Arthur [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao]. E-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2007-04-15

    Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 deg C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses, except for the storage, and the total number of pigments was affected by the irradiation and the time, reducing the values with the increase of storage. Irradiation was shown to be a good method to conserve iron. (author)

  14. Challenging Density Functional Theory Calculations with Hemes and Porphyrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam P. de Visser

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review recent advances in computational chemistry and specifically focus on the chemical description of heme proteins and synthetic porphyrins that act as both mimics of natural processes and technological uses. These are challenging biochemical systems involved in electron transfer as well as biocatalysis processes. In recent years computational tools have improved considerably and now can reproduce experimental spectroscopic and reactivity studies within a reasonable error margin (several kcal·mol−1. This paper gives recent examples from our groups, where we investigated heme and synthetic metal-porphyrin systems. The four case studies highlight how computational modelling can correctly reproduce experimental product distributions, predicted reactivity trends and guide interpretation of electronic structures of complex systems. The case studies focus on the calculations of a variety of spectroscopic features of porphyrins and show how computational modelling gives important insight that explains the experimental spectra and can lead to the design of porphyrins with tuned properties.

  15. State preparation and excited electronic and vibrational behavior in hemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, J Reddy; Gunaratne, Tissa C; Simpson, M Cather

    2006-10-12

    The temporally overlapping, ultrafast electronic and vibrational dynamics of a model five-coordinate, high-spin heme in a nominally isotropic solvent environment has been studied for the first time with three complementary ultrafast techniques: transient absorption, time-resolved resonance Raman Stokes, and time-resolved resonance Raman anti-Stokes spectroscopies. Vibrational dynamics associated with an evolving ground-state species dominate the observations. Excitation into the blue side of the Soret band led to very rapid S2 --> S1 decay (sub-100 fs), followed by somewhat slower (800 fs) S1 --> S0 nonradiative decay. The initial vibrationally excited, non-Boltzmann S0 state was modeled as shifted to lower energy by 300 cm(-1) and broadened by 20%. On a approximately 10 ps time scale, the S0 state evolved into its room-temperature, thermal distribution S0 profile largely through VER. Anti-Stokes signals disappear very rapidly, indicating that the vibrational energy redistributes internally in about 1-3 ps from the initial accepting modes associated with S1 --> S0 internal conversion to the rest of the macrocycle. Comparisons of anti-Stokes mode intensities and lifetimes from TRARRS studies in which the initial excited state was prepared by ligand photolysis [Mizutani, T.; Kitagawa, T. Science 1997, 278, 443, and Chem. Rec. 2001, 1, 258] suggest that, while transient absorption studies appear to be relatively insensitive to initial preparation of the electronic excited state, the subsequent vibrational dynamics are not. Direct, time-resolved evaluation of vibrational lifetimes provides insight into fast internal conversion in hemes and the pathways of subsequent vibrational energy flow in the ground state. The overall similarity of the model heme electronic dynamics to those of biological systems may be a sign that the protein's influence upon the dynamics of the heme active site is rather subtle.

  16. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  17. Studying disorders of vertebrate iron and heme metabolism using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorm, Lisa N; Paw, Barry H

    2017-01-01

    Iron is a crucial component of heme- and iron-sulfur clusters, involved in vital cellular functions such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and respiration. Both excess and insufficient levels of iron and heme-precursors cause human disease, such as iron-deficiency anemia, hemochromatosis, and porphyrias. Hence, their levels must be tightly regulated, requiring a complex network of transporters and feedback mechanisms. The use of zebrafish to study these pathways and the underlying genetics offers many advantages, among others their optical transparency, ex-vivo development and high genetic and physiological conservations. This chapter first reviews well-established methods, such as large-scale mutagenesis screens that have led to the initial identification of a series of iron and heme transporters and the generation of a variety of mutant lines. Other widely used techniques are based on injection of RNA, including complementary morpholino knockdown and gene overexpression. In addition, we highlight several recently developed approaches, most notably endonuclease-based gene knockouts such as TALENs or the CRISPR/Cas9 system that have been used to study how loss of function can induce human disease phenocopies in zebrafish. Rescue by chemical complementation with iron-based compounds or small molecules can subsequently be used to confirm causality of the genetic defect for the observed phenotype. All together, zebrafish have proven to be - and will continue to serve as an ideal model to advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of human iron and heme-related diseases and to develop novel therapies to treat these conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado

    2002-01-01

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  19. Reductive Coupling of Nitrogen Monoxide (•NO) Facilitated by Heme/Copper Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Schopfer, Mark P.; Puiu, Simona C.; Sarjeant, Amy A. N.; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of nitrogen monoxide (•NO; nitric oxide) with transition metal centers continue to be of great interest, in part due to their importance in biochemical processes. Here, we describe •NO(g) reductive coupling chemistry of possible relevance to that process (i.e., nitric oxide reductase (NOR) biochemistry) which occurs at the heme/Cu active site of cytochrome c oxidases (CcOs). In this report, heme/Cu/•NO(g) activity is studied using 1:1 ratios of heme and copper complex components, (F8)Fe (F8 = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)porphyrinate(2-)) and [(tmpa)CuI(MeCN)]+ (TMPA = tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine). The starting point for heme chemistry is the mononitrosyl complex (F8)Fe(NO) (λmax = 399 (Soret), 541 nm in acetone). Variable temperature 1H- and 2H-NMR spectra reveal a broad peak at δ = 6.05 ppm (pyrrole) at RT, which gives rise to asymmetrically split pyrrole peaks at 9.12 and 8.54 ppm at −80°C. A new heme dinitrosyl species, (F8)Fe(NO)2, obtained by bubbling (F8)Fe(NO) with •NO(g) at −80 °C, could be reversibly formed, as monitored by UV-vis (λmax = 426 (Soret), 538 nm in acetone), EPR (silent), and NMR spectroscopies, i.e. the mono-NO complex was regenerated upon warming to RT. (F8)Fe(NO)2 reacts with [(tmpa)CuI(MeCN)]+ and two equiv of acid to give [(F8)FeIII]+, [(tmpa)CuII(solvent)]2+ and N2O(g), fitting the stoichiometric •NO(g) reductive coupling reaction: 2 •NO(g) + FeII + CuI + 2 H+ → N2O(g) + FeIII + CuII + H2O, equivalent to one enzyme turnover. Control reaction chemistry shows that both iron and copper centers are required for the NOR type chemistry observed, and that if acid is not present, half the •NO is trapped as a (F8)Fe(NO) complex, while the remaining nitrogen monoxide undergoes copper complex promoted disproportionation chemistry. As part of this study, [(F8)FeIII]SbF6 was synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, along with EPR (77 K: g = 5.84 and 6.12 in CH2Cl2 and THF, respectively) and

  20. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin from Cimex lectularius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christmann, R.; Auerbach, H., E-mail: auerbach@physik.uni-kl.de [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany); Berry, R. E.; Walker, F. A. [The University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Schünemann, V. [University of Kaiserslautern, Department of Physics (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    The nitrophorin from the bedbug Cimex lectularius (cNP) is a nitric oxide (NO) carrying protein. Like the nitrophorins (rNPs) from the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus, cNP forms a stable heme Fe(III)-NO complex, where the NO can be stored reversibly for a long period of time. In both cases, the NPs are found in the salivary glands of blood-sucking bugs. The insects use the nitrophorins to transport the NO to the victim’s tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. However, the structure of cNP is significantly different to those of the rNPs from Rhodnius prolixus. Furthermore, the cNP can bind a second NO molecule to the proximal heme cysteine when present at higher concentrations. High field Mössbauer spectroscopy on {sup 57}Fe enriched cNP complexed with NO shows reduction of the heme iron and formation of a ferrous nitric oxide (Fe(II)-NO) complex. Density functional theory calculations reproduce the experimental Mössbauer parameters and confirm this observation.

  1. Impact of higher-order heme degradation products on hepatic function and hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Raphael A; Claudel, Thierry; Schleser, Franziska A; Ojha, Navin K; Westerhausen, Matthias; Nietzsche, Sandor; Sponholz, Christoph; Cuperus, Frans; Coldewey, Sina M; Heinemann, Stefan H; Pohnert, Georg; Trauner, Michael; Bauer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Biliverdin and bilirubin were previously considered end products of heme catabolism; now, however, there is evidence for further degradation to diverse bioactive products. Z-BOX A and Z-BOX B arise upon oxidation with unknown implications for hepatocellular function and integrity. We studied the impact of Z-BOX A and B on hepatic functions and explored their alterations in health and cholestatic conditions. Functional implications and mechanisms were investigated in rats, hepatocytic HepG2 and HepaRG cells, human immortalized hepatocytes, and isolated perfused livers. Z-BOX A and B were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in acute and acute-on-chronic liver failure and hereditary unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Z-BOX A and B are found in similar amounts in humans and rodents under physiological conditions. Serum concentrations increased ∼20-fold during cholestatic liver failure in humans (p<0.001) and in hereditary deficiency of bilirubin glucuronidation in rats (p<0.001). Pharmacokinetic studies revealed shorter serum half-life of Z-BOX A compared to its regio-isomer Z-BOX B (p=0.035). While both compounds were taken up by hepatocytes, Z-BOX A was enriched ∼100-fold and excreted in bile. Despite their reported vasoconstrictive properties in the brain vasculature, BOXes did not affect portal hemodynamics. Both Z-BOX A and B showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity, affected the glutathione redox state, and differentially modulated activity of Rev-erbα and Rev-erbβ. Moreover, BOXes-triggered remodeling of the hepatocellular cytoskeleton. Our data provide evidence that higher-order heme degradation products, namely Z-BOX A and B, impair hepatocellular integrity and might mediate intra- and extrahepatic cytotoxic effects previously attributed to hyperbilirubinemia. Degradation of the blood pigment heme yields the bile pigment bilirubin and the oxidation products Z-BOX A and Z-BOX B. Serum concentrations of these bioactive molecules

  2. Temperature dependence of Q-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of nitrosyl heme proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, Marco; Wajnberg, Eliane; Bemski, George

    1997-11-01

    The Q-band (35 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitrosyl hemoglobin (Hb N O) and nitrosyl myoglobin (Mb NO) were studied as a function of temperature between 19 K and 200 K. The spectra of both heme proteins show classes of variations as a function of temperature. The first one has previously been associated with the existence of two paramagnetic species, one with rhombic and the other with axial symmetry. The second one manifests itself in changes in the g-factors and linewidths of each species. These changes are correlated with the conformational substates model and associate the variations of g-values with changes in the angle of the N(his)-Fe-N (NO) bond in the rhombic species and with changes in the distance between Fe and N of the proximal (F8) histidine in the axial species. (author) 24 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Zinc Protoporphyrin Regulates Cyclin D1 Expression Independent of Heme Oxygenase Inhibition*

    OpenAIRE

    La, Ping; Fernando, Amal P.; Wang, Zhi; Salahudeen, Ameen; Yang, Guang; Lin, Qing; Wright, Clyde J.; Dennery, Phyllis A.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an endogenous heme analogue that inhibits heme oxygenase (HO) activity, represses tumor growth. It can also translocate into the nucleus and up-regulate heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that tumor cell proliferation was inhibited by ZnPP, whereas tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), another equally potent HO-1 inhibitor, had no effect. Microarray analysis on 128 tumorigenesis related genes showed that ZnPP suppressed genes involved in cell pr...

  4. Irradiation of bovine meat: effect of heme-iron concentration.; Irradiacao de carne bovina: efeito na concentracao de ferro heme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado

    2002-07-01

    The irradiation is often used, nowadays, for meat conservation and it is important to know how much this process interferes with the nutritional quality of the meat. In this study round cut meat, ground and steaks (from a local supermarket) was irradiated with doses of O; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 7,5 and 10 kGy (JS-7500 Nordium Inc -Canada) and the interference of irradiation and the process of food preparation on heme-iron (H Fe) content was determined. Half of the sample was kept raw and the other half was grilled in a pre-warmed oven at 250 deg C for 9 min and a controlled humidity of 70%. The chemical composition, the total iron (T Fe) (EM) and the heme iron concentration were determined (Hornsey,1956) and the sensorial quality evaluated. The average T Fe concentration of raw and ground , ground and grilled, raw steaks and grilled steak meat, on dry and degreased basis was 113 mug/g, 121 mug/g , 91 mug/g and 77 mug/g; and the H Fe concentration 105 mug/g (93% of T Fe) , 88 mug/g (73% of T Fe), 90 mug/g (99% of T Fe) and 52 mug/g (68% of T Fe) respectively. Data were evaluated by ANOVA with fixed effects and multiple comparisons. The irradiation neither altered the chemical composition nor the proportion of heme iron of meat. The preparation conditions (temperature, cooking time, environment humidity, meat presentation) of the sample interfered more with the heme iron content than the irradiation. With the sensorial analysis we verified that meats irradiated with doses of 3 kGy were better evaluated in softness and succulency attributes than the others. Meat submitted to irradiation doses up to 3 kGy were accepted by the specialists' panel. (author)

  5. In vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation catalyzed by heme enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro S; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H; Wang, Zhan; Lewis, Jared C

    2015-03-31

    The present invention provides methods for catalyzing the conversion of an olefin to any compound containing one or more cyclopropane functional groups using heme enzymes. In certain aspects, the present invention provides a method for producing a cyclopropanation product comprising providing an olefinic substrate, a diazo reagent, and a heme enzyme; and admixing the components in a reaction for a time sufficient to produce a cyclopropanation product. In other aspects, the present invention provides heme enzymes including variants and fragments thereof that are capable of carrying out in vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation reactions. Expression vectors and host cells expressing the heme enzymes are also provided by the present invention.

  6. Heme, an Essential Nutrient from Dietary Proteins, Critically Impacts Diverse Physiological and Pathological Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagmohan Hooda

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Heme constitutes 95% of functional iron in the human body, as well as two-thirds of the average person’s iron intake in developed countries. Hence, a wide range of epidemiological studies have focused on examining the association of dietary heme intake, mainly from red meat, with the risks of common diseases. High heme intake is associated with increased risk of several cancers, including colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer and lung cancer. Likewise, the evidence for increased risks of type-2 diabetes and coronary heart disease associated with high heme intake is compelling. Furthermore, recent comparative metabolic and molecular studies of lung cancer cells showed that cancer cells require increased intracellular heme biosynthesis and uptake to meet the increased demand for oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins. Increased levels of hemoproteins in turn lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy generation, thereby fueling cancer cell progression. Together, both epidemiological and molecular studies support the idea that heme positively impacts cancer progression. However, it is also worth noting that heme deficiency can cause serious diseases in humans, such as anemia, porphyrias, and Alzheimer’s disease. This review attempts to summarize the latest literature in understanding the role of dietary heme intake and heme function in diverse diseases.

  7. In vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation catalyzed by heme enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Pedro S.; Brustad, Eric M.; Arnold, Frances H.; Wang, Zhan; Lewis, Jared C.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention provides methods for catalyzing the conversion of an olefin to any compound containing one or more cyclopropane functional groups using heme enzymes. In certain aspects, the present invention provides a method for producing a cyclopropanation product comprising providing an olefinic substrate, a diazo reagent, and a heme enzyme; and admixing the components in a reaction for a time sufficient to produce a cyclopropanation product. In other aspects, the present invention provides heme enzymes including variants and fragments thereof that are capable of carrying out in vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation reactions. Expression vectors and host cells expressing the heme enzymes are also provided by the present invention.

  8. Calcium-Dependent Conformation of a Heme and Fingerprint Peptide of the Di-Heme Cytochrome c Peroxidase from Paracoccus Pantotrophus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAULETA,SOFIA R.; LU,YI; GOODHEW,CELIA F.; MOURA,ISABEL; PETTIGREW,GRAHAM W.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-12-18

    The structural changes in the heme macrocycle and substituents caused by binding of Ca{sup 2+} to the diheme cytochrome c peroxidase from Paracoccuspantotrophus were clarified by resonance Raman spectroscopy of the inactive filly oxidized form of the enzyme. The changes in the macrocycle vibrational modes are consistent with a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent increase in the out-of-plane distortion of the low-potential heme, the proposed peroxidatic heme. Most of the increase in out-of-plane distortion occurs when the high affinity site I is occupied, but a small further increase in distortion occurs when site II is also occupied by Ca{sup 2+}or Mg{sup 2+}. This increase in the heme distortion also explains the red shift in the Soret absorption band that occurs upon Ca{sup 2+} binding. Changes also occur in the low frequency substituent modes of the heme, indicating that a structural change in the covalently attached fingerprint pentapeptide of the LP heme occurs upon CM{sup 2+} binding to site I. These structural changes, possibly enhanced in the semi-reduced form of the enzyme, may lead to loss of the sixth ligand at the peroxidatic heme and activation of the enzyme.

  9. The five near-iron transporter (NEAT) domain anthrax hemophore, IsdX2, scavenges heme from hemoglobin and transfers heme to the surface protein IsdC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsa, Erin Sarah; Fabian, Marian; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Olson, John S; Maresso, Anthony William

    2011-09-23

    Pathogenic bacteria require iron to replicate inside mammalian hosts. Recent studies indicate that heme acquisition in Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by proteins containing one or more near-iron transporter (NEAT) domains. Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming, Gram-positive pathogen and the causative agent of anthrax disease. The rapid, extensive, and efficient replication of B. anthracis in host tissues makes this pathogen an excellent model organism for the study of bacterial heme acquisition. B. anthracis secretes two NEAT hemophores, IsdX1 and IsdX2. IsdX1 contains a single NEAT domain, whereas IsdX2 has five, a novel property among hemophores. To understand the functional significance of harboring multiple, non-identical NEAT domains, we purified each individual NEAT domain of IsdX2 as a GST fusion and analyzed the specific function of each domain as it relates to heme acquisition and transport. NEAT domains 1, 3, 4, and 5 all bind heme, with domain 5 having the highest affinity. All NEATs associate with hemoglobin, but only NEAT1 and -5 can extract heme from hemoglobin, seemingly by a specific and active process. NEAT1, -3, and -4 transfer heme to IsdC, a cell wall-anchored anthrax NEAT protein. These results indicate that IsdX2 has all the features required to acquire heme from the host and transport heme to the bacterial cell wall. Additionally, these results suggest that IsdX2 may accelerate iron import rates by acting as a "heme sponge" that enhances B. anthracis replication in iron-starved environments.

  10. The Five Near-iron Transporter (NEAT) Domain Anthrax Hemophore, IsdX2, Scavenges Heme from Hemoglobin and Transfers Heme to the Surface Protein IsdC*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honsa, Erin Sarah; Fabian, Marian; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Olson, John S.; Maresso, Anthony William

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria require iron to replicate inside mammalian hosts. Recent studies indicate that heme acquisition in Gram-positive bacteria is mediated by proteins containing one or more near-iron transporter (NEAT) domains. Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming, Gram-positive pathogen and the causative agent of anthrax disease. The rapid, extensive, and efficient replication of B. anthracis in host tissues makes this pathogen an excellent model organism for the study of bacterial heme acquisition. B. anthracis secretes two NEAT hemophores, IsdX1 and IsdX2. IsdX1 contains a single NEAT domain, whereas IsdX2 has five, a novel property among hemophores. To understand the functional significance of harboring multiple, non-identical NEAT domains, we purified each individual NEAT domain of IsdX2 as a GST fusion and analyzed the specific function of each domain as it relates to heme acquisition and transport. NEAT domains 1, 3, 4, and 5 all bind heme, with domain 5 having the highest affinity. All NEATs associate with hemoglobin, but only NEAT1 and -5 can extract heme from hemoglobin, seemingly by a specific and active process. NEAT1, -3, and -4 transfer heme to IsdC, a cell wall-anchored anthrax NEAT protein. These results indicate that IsdX2 has all the features required to acquire heme from the host and transport heme to the bacterial cell wall. Additionally, these results suggest that IsdX2 may accelerate iron import rates by acting as a “heme sponge” that enhances B. anthracis replication in iron-starved environments. PMID:21808055

  11. O2-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin is limited by nitrogen monoxide dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Gullotta, Francesca; Gioia, Magda; Coletta, Massimo; Fasano, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Human serum heme-albumin displays globin-like properties. → O 2 -mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin. → Allosteric modulation of human serum heme-albumin reactivity. → Rifampicin is an allosteric effector of human serum heme-albumin. → Human serum heme-albumin is a ROS and NOS scavenger. -- Abstract: Human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, kinetics of O 2 -mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO) is reported. Values of the first-order rate constants for O 2 -mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for ferric HSA-heme-Fe formation) and for NO dissociation from HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for NO replacement by CO) are k = 9.8 x 10 -5 and 8.3 x 10 -4 s -1 , and h = 1.3 x 10 -4 and 8.5 x 10 -4 s -1 , in the absence and presence of rifampicin, respectively, at pH = 7.0 and T = 20.0 o C. The coincidence of values of k and h indicates that NO dissociation represents the rate limiting step of O 2 -mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO. Mixing HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO with O 2 does not lead to the formation of the transient adduct(s), but leads to the final ferric HSA-heme-Fe derivative. These results reflect the fast O 2 -mediated oxidation of ferrous HSA-heme-Fe and highlight the role of drugs in modulating allosterically the heme-Fe-atom reactivity.

  12. Iron-coordinating tyrosine is a key determinant of NEAT domain heme transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Jason C; Mao, Cherry X; Murphy, Michael E P

    2011-10-28

    In humans, heme iron is the most abundant iron source, and bacterial pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus acquire it for growth. IsdB of S. aureus acquires Fe(III)-protoporphyrin IX (heme) from hemoglobin for transfer to IsdC via IsdA. These three cell-wall-anchored Isd (iron-regulated surface determinant) proteins contain conserved NEAT (near iron transport) domains. The purpose of this work was to delineate the mechanism of heme binding and transfer between the NEAT domains of IsdA, IsdB, and IsdC using a combination of structural and spectroscopic studies. X-ray crystal structures of IsdA NEAT domain (IsdA-N1) variants reveal that removing the native heme-iron ligand Tyr166 is compensated for by iron coordination by His83 on the distal side and that no single mutation of distal loop residues is sufficient to perturb the IsdA-heme complex. Also, alternate heme-iron coordination was observed in structures of IsdA-N1 bound to reduced Fe(II)-protoporphyrin IX and Co(III)-protoporphyrin IX. The IsdA-N1 structural data were correlated with heme transfer kinetics from the NEAT domains of IsdB and IsdC. We demonstrated that the NEAT domains transfer heme at rates comparable to full-length proteins. The second-order rate constant for heme transfer from IsdA-N1 was modestly affected (15-fold (to 100-fold excess IsdC). We propose a heme transfer model wherein NEAT domain complexes pass heme iron directly from an iron-coordinating Tyr of the donor protein to the homologous Tyr residues of the acceptor protein. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heme-Oxygenase-1 Expression Contributes to the Immunoregulation Induced by Fasciola hepatica and Promotes Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carasi, Paula; Rodríguez, Ernesto; da Costa, Valeria; Frigerio, Sofía; Brossard, Natalie; Noya, Verónica; Robello, Carlos; Anegón, Ignacio; Freire, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica, also known as the liver fluke, is a trematode that infects livestock and humans causing fasciolosis, a zoonotic disease of increasing importance due to its worldwide distribution and high economic losses. This parasite immunoregulates the host immune system by inducing a strong Th2 and regulatory T immune response by immunomodulating dendritic cell (DC) maturation and alternative activation of macrophages. In this paper, we show that F. hepatica infection in mice induces the upregulation of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of free heme that regulates the host inflammatory response. We show and characterize two different populations of antigen presenting cells that express HO-1 during infection in the peritoneum of infected animals. Cells that expressed high levels of HO-1 expressed intermediate levels of F4/80 but high expression of CD11c, CD38, TGFβ, and IL-10 suggesting that they correspond to regulatory DCs. On the other hand, cells expressing intermediate levels of HO-1 expressed high levels of F4/80, CD68, Ly6C, and FIZZ-1, indicating that they might correspond to alternatively activated macrophages. Furthermore, the pharmacological induction of HO-1 with the synthetic metalloporphyrin CoPP promoted F. hepatica infection increasing the clinical signs associated with the disease. In contrast, treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor SnPP protected mice from parasite infection, indicating that HO-1 plays an essential role during F. hepatica infection. Finally, HO-1 expression during F. hepatica infection was associated with TGFβ and IL-10 levels in liver and peritoneum, suggesting that HO-1 controls the expression of these immunoregulatory cytokines during infection favoring parasite survival in the host. These results contribute to the elucidation of the immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by F. hepatica in the host and provide alternative checkpoints to control fasciolosis. PMID:28798750

  14. Heme-Oxygenase-1 Expression Contributes to the Immunoregulation Induced by Fasciola hepatica and Promotes Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fasciola hepatica, also known as the liver fluke, is a trematode that infects livestock and humans causing fasciolosis, a zoonotic disease of increasing importance due to its worldwide distribution and high economic losses. This parasite immunoregulates the host immune system by inducing a strong Th2 and regulatory T immune response by immunomodulating dendritic cell (DC maturation and alternative activation of macrophages. In this paper, we show that F. hepatica infection in mice induces the upregulation of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of free heme that regulates the host inflammatory response. We show and characterize two different populations of antigen presenting cells that express HO-1 during infection in the peritoneum of infected animals. Cells that expressed high levels of HO-1 expressed intermediate levels of F4/80 but high expression of CD11c, CD38, TGFβ, and IL-10 suggesting that they correspond to regulatory DCs. On the other hand, cells expressing intermediate levels of HO-1 expressed high levels of F4/80, CD68, Ly6C, and FIZZ-1, indicating that they might correspond to alternatively activated macrophages. Furthermore, the pharmacological induction of HO-1 with the synthetic metalloporphyrin CoPP promoted F. hepatica infection increasing the clinical signs associated with the disease. In contrast, treatment with the HO-1 inhibitor SnPP protected mice from parasite infection, indicating that HO-1 plays an essential role during F. hepatica infection. Finally, HO-1 expression during F. hepatica infection was associated with TGFβ and IL-10 levels in liver and peritoneum, suggesting that HO-1 controls the expression of these immunoregulatory cytokines during infection favoring parasite survival in the host. These results contribute to the elucidation of the immunoregulatory mechanisms induced by F. hepatica in the host and provide alternative checkpoints to control fasciolosis.

  15. Cytochrome P450 regulation: the interplay between its heme and apoprotein moieties in synthesis, assembly, repair, and disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Maria Almira; Sinclair, Peter R; De Matteis, Francesco

    2011-02-01

    Heme is vital to our aerobic universe. Heme cellular content is finely tuned through an exquisite control of synthesis and degradation. Heme deficiency is deleterious to cells, whereas excess heme is toxic. Most of the cellular heme serves as the prosthetic moiety of functionally diverse hemoproteins, including cytochromes P450 (P450s). In the liver, P450s are its major consumers, with >50% of hepatic heme committed to their synthesis. Prosthetic heme is the sine qua non of P450 catalytic biotransformation of both endo- and xenobiotics. This well-recognized functional role notwithstanding, heme also regulates P450 protein synthesis, assembly, repair, and disposal. These less well-appreciated aspects are reviewed herein.

  16. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  17. Drug-enhanced carbon monoxide production from heme by cytochrome P450 reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragic Vukomanovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO formed endogenously is considered to be cytoprotective, and the vast majority of CO formation is attributed to the degradation of heme by heme oxygenases-1 and -2 (HO-1, HO-2. Previously, we observed that brain microsomes containing HO-2 produced many-fold more CO in the presence of menadione and its congeners; herein we explored these observations further. We determined the effects of various drugs on CO production of rat brain microsomes and recombinant human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR; CO was measured by gas chromatography with reductive detection. Brain microsomes of Sprague-Dawley rats or recombinant human cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR were incubated with NADPH and various drugs in closed vials in phosphate buffer at pH 7.4 and 37°C. After 15 minutes, the reaction was stopped by cooling in dry ice, and the headspace gas was analyzed for CO production using gas chromatography with reductive (mercuric oxide detection. We observed drug-enhanced CO production in the presence of both microsomes and recombinant CPR alone; the presence of HO was not required. A range of structurally diverse drugs were capable of amplifying this CO formation; these molecules had structures consistent with redox cycling capability. The addition of catalase to a reaction mixture, that contained activating drugs, inhibited the production of CO. Drug-enhanced CO formation can be catalyzed by CPR. The mechanism of CPR activation was not through classical drug-receptor mediation. Redox cycling may be involved in the drug-induced amplification of CO production by CPR through the production of reactive oxygen species.

  18. Beneficial effect of prolonged heme oxygenase 1 activation in a rat model of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Collino

    2013-07-01

    We and others have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 induction by acute hemin administration exerts cardioprotective effects. Here, we developed a rat model of heart failure to investigate whether a long-term induction of HO-1 by chronic hemin administration exerted protective effects. Sprague Dawley rats that underwent permanent ligation of the left coronary artery were closely monitored for survival rate analysis and sacrificed on day 28 post-operation. Administration of hemin (4 mg/kg body weight every other day for 4 weeks induced a massive increase in HO-1 expression and activity, as shown by the increased levels of the two main metabolic products of heme degradation, bilirubin and carbon monoxide (CO. These effects were associated with significant improvement in survival and reduced the extension of myocardial damage. The ischemic hearts of the hemin-treated animals displayed reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis in comparison with the non-treated rats, as shown by the decreased levels of lipid peroxidation, free-radical-induced DNA damage, caspase-3 activity and Bax expression. Besides, chronic HO-1 activation suppressed the elevated levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO activity, interleukin 1β (IL-1β production and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα production that were evoked by the ischemic injury, and increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX; 1 mg/kg lowered bilirubin and CO concentrations to control values, thus abolishing all the cardioprotective effects of hemin. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that chronic HO-1 activation by prolonged administration of hemin improves survival and exerts protective effects in a rat model of myocardial ischemia by exerting a potent antioxidant activity and disrupting multiple levels of the apoptotic and inflammatory cascade.

  19. Dietary heme adversely affects experimental colitis in rats, despite heat-shock protein induction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepens, Marloes A. A.; Vink, Carolien; Schonewille, Arjan J.; Dijkstra, Gerard; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg M. J.

    Objective: Research on dietary modulation of inflammatory bowel disease is in its infancy. Dietary heme, mimicking red meat, is cytotoxic to colonic epithelium and thus may aggravate colitis. Alternatively, heme-induced colonic stress might also result in potential protective heat-shock proteins

  20. Natural chlorophyll but not chlorophyllin prevents heme-induced cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects in rat colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, de J.; Jonker-Termont, D.S.M.L.; Katan, M.B.; Meer, van der R.

    2005-01-01

    Diets high in red meat and low in green vegetables are associated with an increased risk of colon cancer. In rats, dietary heme, mimicking red meat, increases colonic cytotoxicity and proliferation of the colonocytes, whereas addition of chlorophyll from green vegetables inhibits these heme-induced

  1. The effect of irradiation and thermal process on beef heme iron concentration and color properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistura, Liliana Perazzini Furtado; Colli, Celia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao Experimental], e-mail: cecolli@usp.br

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of irradiation and thermal process on the heme iron (heme-Fe) concentration and color properties of Brazilian cattle beef. Beef samples (patties and steaks) were irradiated at 0-10 kGy and cooked in a combination oven at 250 deg C for 9 minutes with 70% humidity. Total iron and heme iron (heme-Fe) concentrations were determined. The data were compared by multiple comparisons and fixed- effects ANOVA. Irradiation at doses higher than 5 kGy significantly altered the heme-Fe concentration. However, the sample preparation conditions interfered more in the heme-Fe content than did the irradiation. Depending on the animal species, meat heme iron levels between 35 and 52% of the total iron are used for dietetic calculations. In this study the percentage of heme-iron was, on average, 70% of the total iron showing that humidity is an important factor for its preservation. The samples were analyzed instrumentally for CIE L{sup *}, a{sup *}, and b{sup *} values. (author)

  2. Long-term dietary heme iron and red meat intake in relation to endometrial cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genkinger, J.M.; Friberg, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Wolk, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Heme and total iron, present in meat, have been hypothesized to promote carcinogenesis. Few prospective studies have examined the associations between intakes of heme and total iron, types of meat, and endometrial cancer risk. Objective: We evaluated the associations between intakes of

  3. Stanniocalcin 1 binds hemin through a partially conserved heme regulatory motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westberg, Johan A., E-mail: johan.westberg@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki and HUSLAB, P.O. Box 21, Haartmaninkatu 3, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Jiang, Ji, E-mail: ji.jiang@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki and HUSLAB, P.O. Box 21, Haartmaninkatu 3, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Andersson, Leif C., E-mail: leif.andersson@helsinki.fi [Department of Pathology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki and HUSLAB, P.O. Box 21, Haartmaninkatu 3, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) binds heme through novel heme binding motif. {yields} Central iron atom of heme and cysteine-114 of STC1 are essential for binding. {yields} STC1 binds Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} heme. {yields} STC1 peptide prevents oxidative decay of heme. -- Abstract: Hemin (iron protoporphyrin IX) is a necessary component of many proteins, functioning either as a cofactor or an intracellular messenger. Hemoproteins have diverse functions, such as transportation of gases, gas detection, chemical catalysis and electron transfer. Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) is a protein involved in respiratory responses of the cell but whose mechanism of action is still undetermined. We examined the ability of STC1 to bind hemin in both its reduced and oxidized states and located Cys{sup 114} as the axial ligand of the central iron atom of hemin. The amino acid sequence differs from the established (Cys-Pro) heme regulatory motif (HRM) and therefore presents a novel heme binding motif (Cys-Ser). A STC1 peptide containing the heme binding sequence was able to inhibit both spontaneous and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induced decay of hemin. Binding of hemin does not affect the mitochondrial localization of STC1.

  4. Heme metabolism in stress regulation and protein production: from Cinderella to a key player

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Ruiz, José Luis; Petranovic, D.; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Heme biosynthesis is a highly conserved pathway which is present in all kingdoms, from Archaea to higher organisms such as plants and mammals. The heme molecule acts as a prosthetic group for different proteins and enzymes involved in energy metabolism and reactions involved in electron transfer....

  5. Self-cytoprotection against stress: feedback regulation of heme- dependent metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Schwartsburd, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    This minireview provides insight into feedback regulation of heme-dependent metabolism as a defensive cellular response against stress. Interactions among heme-, iron-, porphyrin-, and CO/NO-dependent metabolic pathways during the stress-induced response are emphasized in the context of feedback regulation. The hypothetical model of the latter interactions is presented as tightly controlled feedback cycles.

  6. Ironing out the Details: Exploring the Role of Iron and Heme in Blood-Sucking Arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiten, Shavonn R.; Eggleston, Heather; Adelman, Zach N.

    2018-01-01

    Heme and iron are essential molecules for many physiological processes and yet have the ability to cause oxidative damage such as lipid peroxidation, protein degradation, and ultimately cell death if not controlled. Blood-sucking arthropods have evolved diverse methods to protect themselves against iron/heme-related damage, as the act of bloodfeeding itself is high risk, high reward process. Protective mechanisms in medically important arthropods include the midgut peritrophic matrix in mosquitoes, heme aggregation into the crystalline structure hemozoin in kissing bugs and hemosomes in ticks. Once heme and iron pass these protective mechanisms they are presumed to enter the midgut epithelial cells via membrane-bound transporters, though relatively few iron or heme transporters have been identified in bloodsucking arthropods. Upon iron entry into midgut epithelial cells, ferritin serves as the universal storage protein and transport for dietary iron in many organisms including arthropods. In addition to its role as a nutrient, heme is also an important signaling molecule in the midgut epithelial cells for many physiological processes including vitellogenesis. This review article will summarize recent advancements in heme/iron uptake, detoxification and exportation in bloodfeeding arthropods. While initial strides have been made at ironing out the role of dietary iron and heme in arthropods, much still remains to be discovered as these molecules may serve as novel targets for the control of many arthropod pests. PMID:29387018

  7. Spectroscopic studies on peptides and proteins with cysteine-containing heme regulatory motifs (HRM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Erik; Florin, Nicole; Duthie, Fraser; Henning Brewitz, H; Kühl, Toni; Imhof, Diana; Hagelueken, Gregor; Schiemann, Olav

    2015-07-01

    The role of heme as a cofactor in enzymatic reactions has been studied for a long time and in great detail. Recently it was discovered that heme can also serve as a signalling molecule in cells but so far only few examples of this regulation have been studied. In order to discover new potentially heme-regulated proteins, we screened protein sequence databases for bacterial proteins that contain sequence features like a Cysteine-Proline (CP) motif, which is known for its heme-binding propensity. Based on this search we synthesized a series of these potential heme regulatory motifs (HRMs). We used cw EPR spectroscopy to investigate whether these sequences do indeed bind to heme and if the spin state of heme is changed upon interaction with the peptides. The corresponding proteins of two potential HRMs, FeoB and GlpF, were expressed and purified and their interaction with heme was studied by cw EPR and UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The haptoglobin-CD163-heme oxygenase-1 pathway for hemoglobin scavenging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jens Haugbølle; Etzerodt, Anders; Svendsen, Pia

    2013-01-01

    The haptoglobin- (Hp-) CD163-heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is an efficient captor-receptor-enzyme system to circumvent the hemoglobin (Hb)/heme-induced toxicity during physiological and pathological hemolyses. In this pathway, Hb tightly binds to Hp leading to CD163-mediated uptake of the complex...

  9. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parashar, Abhinav [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Venkatachalam, Avanthika [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India); Gideon, Daniel Andrew [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  10. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  11. Enhanced Heme Function and Mitochondrial Respiration Promote the Progression of Lung Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Sullivan, Laura A.; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 in tumors: is it a false friend?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozkowicz, Alicja; Was, Halina; Dulak, Jozef

    2007-12-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the oxidation of heme to biologically active products: carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin, and ferrous iron. It participates in maintaining cellular homeostasis and plays an important protective role in the tissues by reducing oxidative injury, attenuating the inflammatory response, inhibiting cell apoptosis, and regulating cell proliferation. HO-1 is also an important proangiogenic mediator. Most studies have focused on the role of HO-1 in cardiovascular diseases, in which its significant, beneficial activity is well recognized. A growing body of evidence indicates, however, that HO-1 activation may play a role in carcinogenesis and can potently influence the growth and metastasis of tumors. HO-1 is very often upregulated in tumor tissues, and its expression is further increased in response to therapies. Although the exact effect can be tissue specific, HO-1 can be regarded as an enzyme facilitating tumor progression. Accordingly, inhibition of HO-1 can be suggested as a potential therapeutic approach sensitizing tumors to radiation, chemotherapy, or photodynamic therapy.

  13. Energy transfer at the active sites of heme proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlott, D.D.; Hill, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments using a picosecond pump-probe apparatus at the Picosecond Free-electron Laser Center at Stanford University, were performed to investigate the relaxation of carbon monoxide bound to the active sites of heme proteins. The significance of these experiments is two-fold: (1) they provide detailed information about molecular dynamics occurring at the active sites of proteins; and (2) they provide insight into the nature of vibrational relaxation processes in condensed matter. Molecular engineering is used to construct various molecular systems which are studied with the FEL. We have studied native proteins, mainly myoglobin obtained from different species, mutant proteins produced by genetic engineering using recombinant DNA techniques, and a variety of model systems which mimic the structures of the active sites of native proteins, which are produced using molecular synthesis. Use of these different systems permits us to investigate how specific molecular structural changes affect dynamical processes occurring at the active sites. This research provides insight into the problems of how different species needs are fulfilled by heme proteins which have greatly different functionality, which is induced by rather small structural changes

  14. Heme and menaquinone induced electron transport in lactic acid bacteria

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    Santos Filipe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For some lactic acid bacteria higher biomass production as a result of aerobic respiration has been reported upon supplementation with heme and menaquinone. In this report, we have studied a large number of species among lactic acid bacteria for the existence of this trait. Results Heme- (and menaquinone stimulated aerobic growth was observed for several species and genera of lactic acid bacteria. These include Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacilllus brevis, Lactobacillus paralimentarius, Streptococcus entericus and Lactococcus garviae. The increased biomass production without further acidification, which are respiration associated traits, are suitable for high-throughput screening as demonstrated by the screening of 8000 Lactococcus lactis insertion mutants. Respiration-negative insertion-mutants were found with noxA, bd-type cytochrome and menaquinol biosynthesis gene-disruptions. Phenotypic screening and in silico genome analysis suggest that respiration can be considered characteristic for certain species. Conclusion We propose that the cyd-genes were present in the common ancestor of lactic acid bacteria, and that multiple gene-loss events best explains the observed distribution of these genes among the species.

  15. Endogenous Estrogen-Mediated Heme Oxygenase Regulation in Experimental Menopause

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    Anikó Pósa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency is one of the main causes of age-associated diseases in the cardiovascular system. Female Wistar rats were divided into four experimental groups: pharmacologically ovariectomized, surgically ovariectomized, and 24-month-old intact aging animals were compared with a control group. The activity and expression of heme oxygenases (HO in the cardiac left ventricle, the concentrations of cardiac interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, the myeloperoxidase (MPO activity in the cardiac left ventricle, and the effects of heme oxygenase blockade (by 24-hour and 1-hour pretreatment with tin-protoporphyrin IX, SnPP on the epinephrine and phentolamine-induced electrocardiogram ST segment changes in vivo were investigated. The cardiac HO activity and the expression of HO-1 and HO-2 were significantly decreased in the aged rats and after ovariectomy. Estrogen depletion was accompanied by significant increases in the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α. The aged and ovariectomized animals exhibited a significantly elevated MPO activity and a significant ST segment depression. After pretreatment with SnPP augmented ST segment changes were determined. These findings demonstrate that the sensitivity to cardiac ischemia in estrogen depletion models is associated with suppression of the activity and expression of the HO system and increases in the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers.

  16. Influences of the heme-lysine crosslink in cytochrome P460 over redox catalysis and nitric oxide sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilbert, Avery C; Caranto, Jonathan D; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2018-01-14

    Ammonia (NH 3 )-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) derive total energy for life from the multi-electron oxidation of NH 3 to nitrite (NO 2 - ). One obligate intermediate of this metabolism is hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH), which can be oxidized to the potent greenhouse agent nitrous oxide (N 2 O) by the AOB enzyme cytochrome (cyt) P460. We have now spectroscopically characterized a 6-coordinate (6c) {FeNO} 7 intermediate on the NH 2 OH oxidation pathway of cyt P460. This species has two fates: it can either be oxidized to the {FeNO} 6 that then undergoes attack by NH 2 OH to ultimately generate N 2 O, or it can lose its axial His ligand, thus generating a stable, off-pathway 5-coordinate (5c) {FeNO} 7 species. We show that the wild type (WT) cyt P460 exhibits a slow nitric oxide (NO)-independent conversion ( k His-off = 2.90 × 10 -3 s -1 ), whereas a cross-link-deficient Lys70Tyr cyt P460 mutant protein underwent His dissociation via both a NO-independent ( k His-off = 3.8 × 10 -4 s -1 ) and a NO-dependent pathway [ k His-off(NO) = 790 M -1 s -1 ]. Eyring analyses of the NO-independent pathways for these two proteins revealed a significantly larger ( ca. 27 cal mol -1 K -1 ) activation entropy (Δ S ‡ ) in the cross-link-deficient mutant. Our results suggest that the Lys-heme cross-link confers rigidity to the positioning of the heme P460 cofactor to avoid the fast NO-dependent His dissociation pathway and subsequent formation of the off-pathway 5c {FeNO} 7 species. The relevance of these findings to NO signaling proteins such as heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) is also discussed.

  17. Thermodynamic Characterization of a Triheme Cytochrome Family from Geobacter sulfurreducens Reveals Mechanistic and Functional Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Leonor; Bruix, Marta; Pessanha, Miguel; Londer, Yuri Y.; Salgueiro, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract A family of five periplasmic triheme cytochromes (PpcA-E) was identified in Geobacter sulfurreducens, where they play a crucial role by driving electron transfer from the cytoplasm to the cell exterior and assisting the reduction of extracellular acceptors. The thermodynamic characterization of PpcA using NMR and visible spectroscopies was previously achieved under experimental conditions identical to those used for the triheme cytochrome c7 from Desulfuromonas acetoxidans. Under such conditions, attempts to obtain NMR data were complicated by the relatively fast intermolecular electron exchange. This work reports the detailed thermodynamic characterization of PpcB, PpcD, and PpcE under optimal experimental conditions. The thermodynamic characterization of PpcA was redone under these new conditions to allow a proper comparison of the redox properties with those of other members of this family. The heme reduction potentials of the four proteins are negative, differ from each other, and cover different functional ranges. These reduction potentials are strongly modulated by heme-heme interactions and by interactions with protonated groups (the redox-Bohr effect) establishing different cooperative networks for each protein, which indicates that they are designed to perform different functions in the cell. PpcA and PpcD appear to be optimized to interact with specific redox partners involving e−/H+ transfer via different mechanisms. Although no evidence of preferential electron transfer pathway or e−/H+ coupling was found for PpcB and PpcE, the difference in their working potential ranges suggests that they may also have different physiological redox partners. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to characterize homologous cytochromes from the same microorganism and provide evidence of their different mechanistic and functional properties. These findings provide an explanation for the coexistence of five periplasmic triheme cytochromes in G

  18. Detergent-Mediated Formation of β-Hematin: Heme Crystallization Promoted by Detergents Implicates Nanostructure Formation for Use as a Biological Mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Hemozoin is a unique biomineral that results from the sequestration of toxic free heme liberated as a consequence of hemoglobin degradation in the malaria parasite. Synthetic neutral lipid droplets (SNLDs) and phospholipids were previously shown to support the rapid formation of β-hematin, abiological hemozoin, under physiologically relevant pH and temperature, though the mechanism by which heme crystallization occurs remains unclear. Detergents are particularly interesting as a template because they are amphiphilic molecules that spontaneously organize into nanostructures and have been previously shown to mediate β-hematin formation. Here, 11 detergents were investigated to elucidate the physicochemical properties that best recapitulate crystal formation in the parasite. A strong correlation between the detergent’s molecular structure and the corresponding kinetics of β-hematin formation was observed, where higher molecular weight polar chains promoted faster reactions. The larger hydrophilic chains correlated to the detergent’s ability to rapidly sequester heme into the lipophilic core, allowing for crystal nucleation to occur. The data presented here suggest that detergent nanostructures promote β-hematin formation in a similar manner to SNLDs and phospholipids. Through understanding mediator properties that promote optimal crystal formation, we are able to establish an in vitro assay to probe this drug target pathway. PMID:27175104

  19. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu; Takahashi, Kiwamu; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Ishizawa, Kenichi; Ichinohasama, Ryo; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru; Harigae, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Treatment with ALA induces erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. • Transportation of ALA into erythroid cells occurs predominantly via SLC36A1. • ALA restores defects in ALAS2 in human iPS cell-derived erythroblasts. • ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA caused by ALAS2 mutations. - Abstract: Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly

  20. Effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid on erythropoiesis: A preclinical in vitro characterization for the treatment of congenital sideroblastic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Tohru [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Okamoto, Koji; Niikuni, Ryoyu [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Takahashi, Kiwamu [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Ishizawa, Kenichi [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Clinical Research, Innovation and Education Center, Tohoku University Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Ichinohasama, Ryo [Department of Hematopathology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Nakamura, Yukio [Cell Engineering Division, RIKEN BioResource Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakajima, Motowo; Tanaka, Tohru [SBI Pharmaceuticals Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Harigae, Hideo, E-mail: harigae@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Hematology and Rheumatology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Hematology/Oncology, Tohoku University Graduate School, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Treatment with ALA induces erythroid differentiation of K562 cells. • Transportation of ALA into erythroid cells occurs predominantly via SLC36A1. • ALA restores defects in ALAS2 in human iPS cell-derived erythroblasts. • ALA may represent a novel therapeutic option for CSA caused by ALAS2 mutations. - Abstract: Congenital sideroblastic anemia (CSA) is a hereditary disorder characterized by microcytic anemia and bone marrow sideroblasts. The most common form of CSA is attributed to mutations in the X-linked gene 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2). ALAS2 is a mitochondrial enzyme, which utilizes glycine and succinyl-CoA to form 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA), a crucial precursor in heme synthesis. Therefore, ALA supplementation could be an effective therapeutic strategy to restore heme synthesis in CSA caused by ALAS2 defects. In a preclinical study, we examined the effects of ALA in human erythroid cells, including K562 cells and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived erythroid progenitor (HiDEP) cells. ALA treatment resulted in significant dose-dependent accumulation of heme in the K562 cell line. Concomitantly, the treatment substantially induced erythroid differentiation as assessed using benzidine staining. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed significant upregulation of heme-regulated genes, such as the globin genes [hemoglobin alpha (HBA) and hemoglobin gamma (HBG)] and the heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene, in K562 cells. Next, to investigate the mechanism by which ALA is transported into erythroid cells, quantitative RT-PCR analysis was performed on previously identified ALA transporters, including solute carrier family 15 (oligopeptide transporter), member (SLC15A) 1, SLC15A2, solute carrier family 36 (proton/amino acid symporter), member (SLC36A1), and solute carrier family 6 (neurotransmitter transporter), member 13 (SLC6A13). Our analysis revealed that SLC36A1 was abundantly

  1. A predictive model of the oxygen and heme regulatory network in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshul Kundaje

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deciphering gene regulatory mechanisms through the analysis of high-throughput expression data is a challenging computational problem. Previous computational studies have used large expression datasets in order to resolve fine patterns of coexpression, producing clusters or modules of potentially coregulated genes. These methods typically examine promoter sequence information, such as DNA motifs or transcription factor occupancy data, in a separate step after clustering. We needed an alternative and more integrative approach to study the oxygen regulatory network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a small dataset of perturbation experiments. Mechanisms of oxygen sensing and regulation underlie many physiological and pathological processes, and only a handful of oxygen regulators have been identified in previous studies. We used a new machine learning algorithm called MEDUSA to uncover detailed information about the oxygen regulatory network using genome-wide expression changes in response to perturbations in the levels of oxygen, heme, Hap1, and Co2+. MEDUSA integrates mRNA expression, promoter sequence, and ChIP-chip occupancy data to learn a model that accurately predicts the differential expression of target genes in held-out data. We used a novel margin-based score to extract significant condition-specific regulators and assemble a global map of the oxygen sensing and regulatory network. This network includes both known oxygen and heme regulators, such as Hap1, Mga2, Hap4, and Upc2, as well as many new candidate regulators. MEDUSA also identified many DNA motifs that are consistent with previous experimentally identified transcription factor binding sites. Because MEDUSA's regulatory program associates regulators to target genes through their promoter sequences, we directly tested the predicted regulators for OLE1, a gene specifically induced under hypoxia, by experimental analysis of the activity of its promoter. In each case, deletion of

  2. Homolytic Cleavage of Both Heme-Bound Hydrogen Peroxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Leads to the Formation of Sulfheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbelo-Lopez, Hector D; Simakov, Nikolay A; Smith, Jeremy C; Lopez-Garriga, Juan; Wymore, Troy

    2016-08-04

    Many heme-containing proteins with a histidine in the distal E7 (HisE7) position can form sulfheme in the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and a reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide. For reasons unknown, sulfheme derivatives are formed specifically on solvent-excluded heme pyrrole B. Sulfhemes severely decrease the oxygen-binding affinity in hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb). Here, use of hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical methods has permitted characterization of the entire process of sulfheme formation in the HisE7 mutant of hemoglobin I (HbI) from Lucina pectinata. This process includes a mechanism for H2S to enter the solvent-excluded active site through a hydrophobic channel to ultimately form a hydrogen bond with H2O2 bound to Fe(III). Proton transfer from H2O2 to His64 to form compound (Cpd) 0, followed by hydrogen transfer from H2S to the Fe(III)-H2O2 complex, results in homolytic cleavage of the O-O and S-H bonds to form a reactive thiyl radical (HS(•)), ferryl heme Cpd II, and a water molecule. Subsequently, the addition of HS(•) to Cpd II, followed by three proton transfer reactions, results in the formation of a three-membered ring ferric sulfheme that avoids migration of the radical to the protein matrix, in contrast to that in other peroxidative reactions. The transformation of this three-membered episulfide ring structure to the five-membered thiochlorin ring structure occurs through a significant potential energy barrier, although both structures are nearly isoenergetic. Both three- and five-membered ring structures reveal longer NB-Fe(III) bonds compared with other pyrrole nitrogen-Fe(III) bonds, which would lead to decreased oxygen binding. Overall, these results are in agreement with a wide range of experimental data and provide fertile ground for further investigations of sulfheme formation in other heme proteins and additional effects of H2S on cell signaling and reactivity.

  3. A Heme-Sensing Mechanism in the Translational Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Myers, Richard S.; Hamel, Patrice; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Heme plays fundamental roles as cofactor and signaling molecule in multiple pathways devoted to oxygen sensing and utilization in aerobic organisms. For cellular respiration, heme serves as a prosthetic group in electron transfer proteins and redox enzymes. Here we report that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a heme-sensing mechanism translationally controls the biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme. We show that Mss51, a COX1 mRNA-specific translational activator and Cox1 chaperone, which coordinates Cox1 synthesis in mitoribosomes with its assembly in COX, is a heme-binding protein. Mss51 contains two heme regulatory motifs or Cys-Pro-X domains located in its N-terminus. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we have demonstrated that these motifs are important for heme binding and efficient performance of Mss51 functions. We conclude that heme sensing by Mss51 regulates COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production. PMID:23217259

  4. Regulation of heme metabolism in normal and sideroblastic bone marrow cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibraham, N.G.; Lutton, J.D.; Hoffman, R.; Levere, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Heme metabolism was examined in developing in vitro erythroid colonies (CFUE) and in bone marrow samples taken directly from four normal donors and four patients with sideroblastic anemia. Maximum activities of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase (ALAS), ALA dehydratase (ALAD), and 14 C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in normal marrow CFUE after 8 days of culture, whereas heme oxygenase progressively decreased to low levels of activity during the same period. Assays on nucleated bone marrow cells taken directly from patients revealed that ALAS activity was considerably reduced in idiopathic sideroblastic anemia (IASA) and X-linked sideroblastic anemia (X-SA) bone marrow specimens, whereas the activity increased more than twofold (normal levels) when cells were assayed from 8-day CFUE. In all cases, ALAD activity appeared to be within normal levels. Measurement of heme synthesis revealed that normal levels of 14 C-ALA incorporation into heme were achieved in IASA cells but were reduced in X-SA cells. In marked contrast to levels in normal cells, heme oxygenase was found to be significantly elevated (two- to fourfold) in bone marrow cells taken directly from patients with IASA and X-SA. Results from this study demonstrate that IASA and X-SA bone marrow cells have disturbances in ALAS and heme metabolism, and that erythropoiesis (CFUE) can be restored to normal levels when cells are cultured in methylcellulose

  5. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Brennan

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  6. Antibiotic suppression of intestinal microbiota reduces heme-induced lipoperoxidation associated with colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, O C B; Lin, C; Naud, N; Tache, S; Raymond-Letron, I; Corpet, D E; Pierre, F H

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies show that heme iron from red meat is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. In carcinogen-induced-rats, a heme iron-rich diet increases the number of precancerous lesions and raises associated fecal biomarkers. Heme-induced lipoperoxidation measured by fecal thiobarbituric acid reagents (TBARs) could explain the promotion of colon carcinogenesis by heme. Using a factorial design we studied if microbiota could be involved in heme-induced carcinogenesis, by modulating peroxidation. Rats treated or not with an antibiotic cocktail were given a control or a hemoglobin-diet. Fecal bacteria were counted on agar and TBARs concentration assayed in fecal water. The suppression of microbiota by antibiotics was associated with a reduction of crypt height and proliferation and with a cecum enlargement, which are characteristics of germ-free rats. Rats given hemoglobin diets had increased fecal TBARs, which were suppressed by the antibiotic treatment. A duplicate experiment in rats given dietary hemin yielded similar results. These data show that the intestinal microbiota is involved in enhancement of lipoperoxidation by heme iron. We thus suggest that microbiota could play a role in the heme-induced promotion of colorectal carcinogenesis.

  7. Effects of heme iron enriched peptide on iron deficiency anemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Chen, Le-qun; Zhuang, Hong

    2014-02-01

    The present study aims to investigate whether a daily intake of heme iron enriched peptide obtained from bovine hemoglobin is effective in alleviating iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups: a control group, an anemic group not treated, and anemic groups treated with FeSO4 or with the heme iron enriched peptide at low, moderate or high doses. The rats in the anemic groups were fed on a low-iron diet to establish the iron deficiency anemia model. After the model had been established, different doses of heme iron enriched peptide were given to the rats once a day via intragastric administration. After the iron supplement administration, it was observed that heme iron enriched peptide had effective restorative action returning the hemoglobin, red blood cells, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and serum iron in IDA animals to normal values or better. In addition, compared with FeSO4, higher Fe bioavailability and fewer side effects were observed. The rats in the moderate dose group had the highest apparent Fe absorption. Moreover, in vivo antioxidant activity was also observed, enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and reduced malondialdehyde levels in IDA rats. Furthermore, the heme iron enriched peptide also exhibited strong in vitro antioxidant activities. In conclusion, heme iron enriched peptide significantly alleviated iron deficiency anemia, and exhibited strong in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. This suggests that heme iron enriched peptide might be exploited as a safe, efficient new iron supplement.

  8. Heme Oxygenase, Inflammation, and Fibrosis: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Immenschuh, Stephan; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2012-01-01

    Upon injury, prolonged inflammation and oxidative stress may cause pathological wound healing and fibrosis, leading to formation of excessive scar tissue. Fibrogenesis can occur in most organs and tissues and may ultimately lead to organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms of pathological wound healing still remain unclear, and are considered to be multifactorial, but so far, no efficient anti-fibrotic therapies exist. Extra- and intracellular levels of free heme may be increased in a variety of pathological conditions due to release from hemoproteins. Free heme possesses pro-inflammatory and oxidative properties, and may act as a danger signal. Effects of free heme may be counteracted by heme-binding proteins or by heme degradation. Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase (HO) that exists as two isoforms: inducible HO-1 and constitutively expressed HO-2. HO generates the effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and free iron/ferritin. HO deficiency in mouse and man leads to exaggerated inflammation following mild insults, and accumulating epidemiological and preclinical studies support the widely recognized notion of the cytoprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects of the activity of the HO system and its effector molecules. In this review, we address the potential effects of targeted HO-1 induction or administration of HO-effector molecules as therapeutic targets in fibrotic conditions to counteract inflammatory and oxidative insults. This is exemplified by various clinically relevant conditions, such as hypertrophic scarring, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic pancreatitis, and chronic graft rejection in transplantation. PMID:22586396

  9. Non-heme iron availability of usual and improved meals from selected regions in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdez, D.H.; Trinidad, T.P.; Madriaga, J.R.; Cruz, E.M.; Sison, C.C.; Kuizon, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    The availability of non-heme iron in 12 usual and 12 improved meals from four selected regions in the Philippines was determined using in-vitro radiochemical method. Geometric mean values of 5.8 and 6.4% non-heme iron availability were obtained from one-day usual meals and meals improved to correct nutritional deficiencies, respectively. Comparison between usual and improved meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) for each region showed significant differences in non-heme iron availability for breakfast (Central Luzon, P .05). (author). 26 refs.; 3 tabs

  10. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME's) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump

  11. Uridine affects liver protein glycosylation, insulin signaling, and heme biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Urasaki

    Full Text Available Purines and pyrimidines are complementary bases of the genetic code. The roles of purines and their derivatives in cellular signal transduction and energy metabolism are well-known. In contrast, the roles of pyrimidines and their derivatives in cellular function remain poorly understood. In this study, the roles of uridine, a pyrimidine nucleoside, in liver metabolism are examined in mice. We report that short-term uridine administration in C57BL/6J mice increases liver protein glycosylation profiles, reduces phosphorylation level of insulin signaling proteins, and activates the HRI-eIF-2α-ATF4 heme-deficiency stress response pathway. Short-term uridine administration is also associated with reduced liver hemin level and reduced ability for insulin-stimulated blood glucose removal during an insulin tolerance test. Some of the short-term effects of exogenous uridine in C57BL/6J mice are conserved in transgenic UPase1-/- mice with long-term elevation of endogenous uridine level. UPase1-/- mice exhibit activation of the liver HRI-eIF-2α-ATF4 heme-deficiency stress response pathway. UPase1-/- mice also exhibit impaired ability for insulin-stimulated blood glucose removal. However, other short-term effects of exogenous uridine in C57BL/6J mice are not conserved in UPase1-/- mice. UPase1-/- mice exhibit normal phosphorylation level of liver insulin signaling proteins and increased liver hemin concentration compared to untreated control C57BL/6J mice. Contrasting short-term and long-term consequences of uridine on liver metabolism suggest that uridine exerts transient effects and elicits adaptive responses. Taken together, our data support potential roles of pyrimidines and their derivatives in the regulation of liver metabolism.

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 promoter polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Yang, Wei; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Zhao, Hui; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K; Shaw, Gary M

    2015-09-01

    Spina bifida is the most common form of neural tube defects (NTDs). Etiologies of NTDs are multifactorial, and oxidative stress is believed to play a key role in NTD development. Heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, has multiple protective properties including mediating antioxidant processes, making it an ideal candidate for study. The inducible HO isoform (HO-1) has two functional genetic polymorphisms: (GT)n dinucleotide repeats and A(-413)T SNP (rs2071746), both of which can affect its promoter activity. However, no study has investigated a possible association between HO-1 genetic polymorphisms and risk of NTDs. This case-control study included 152 spina bifida cases (all myelomeningoceles) and 148 non-malformed controls obtained from the California Birth Defects Monitoring Program reflecting births during 1990 to 1999. Genetic polymorphisms were determined by polymerase chain reaction and amplified fragment length polymorphisms/restriction fragment length polymorphisms using genomic DNA extracted from archived newborn blood spots. Genotype and haplotype frequencies of two HO-1 promoter polymorphisms between cases and controls were compared. For (GT)n dinucleotide repeat lengths and the A(-413)T SNP, no significant differences in allele frequencies or genotypes were found. Linkage disequilibrium was observed between the HO-1 polymorphisms (D': 0.833); however, haplotype analyses did not show increased risk of spina bifida overall or by race/ethnicity. Although, an association was not found between HO-1 polymorphisms and risk of spina bifida, we speculate that the combined effect of low HO-1 expression and exposures to known environmental oxidative stressors (low folate status or diabetes), may overwhelm antioxidant defenses and increase risk of NTDs and warrants further study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad: recent developments in enzymology and modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnincx, Pieter C A; van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Robertus J M

    2008-12-01

    Iron-containing enzymes are one of Nature's main means of effecting key biological transformations. The mononuclear non-heme iron oxygenases and oxidases have received the most attention recently, primarily because of the recent availability of crystal structures of many different enzymes and the stunningly diverse oxidative transformations that these enzymes catalyze. The wealth of available structural data has furthermore established the so-called 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad as a new common structural motif for the activation of dioxygen. This superfamily of mononuclear iron(ii) enzymes catalyzes a wide range of oxidative transformations, ranging from the cis-dihydroxylation of arenes to the biosynthesis of antibiotics such as isopenicillin and fosfomycin. The remarkable scope of oxidative transformations seems to be even broader than that associated with oxidative heme enzymes. Not only are many of these oxidative transformations of key biological importance, many of these selective oxidations are also unprecedented in synthetic organic chemistry. In this critical review, we wish to provide a concise background on the chemistry of the mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes characterized by the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad and to discuss the many recent developments in the field. New examples of enzymes with unique reactivities belonging to the superfamily have been reported. Furthermore, key insights into the intricate mechanistic details and reactive intermediates have been obtained from both enzyme and modeling studies. Sections of this review are devoted to each of these subjects, i.e. the enzymes, biomimetic models, and reactive intermediates (225 references).

  14. Bidirectional Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Ruthenium(II)-Tris-bipyridyl-Modified PpcA, a Multi-heme c -Type Cytochrome from Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokhan, Oleksandr; Ponomarenko, Nina S.; Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Schiffer, Marianne; Mulfort, Karen L.; Tiede, David. M.

    2015-06-18

    PpcA, a tri-heme cytochrome c7 from Geobacter sulfurreducens was investigated as a model for photosensitizer-initiated electron transfer within a multi-heme "molecular wire" protein architecture. E. coli expression of PpcA was found to be tolerant of cysteine site-directed mutagenesis, demonstrated by the successful expression of natively folded proteins bearing cysteine mutations at a series of sites selected to vary characteristically with respect to the three -CXXCH- heme binding domains. A preliminary survey of 5 selected mutants found that the introduced cysteines can be readily covalently linked to a Ru(II)-(2,2'-bpy)2(4-bromomethyl-4’-methyl-2,2'-bpy) photosensitizer (where bpy = bipyridine), and that the linked constructs support both photo-oxidative and photo-reductive quenching of the photosensitizer excited-state, depending upon the initial heme redox state. For photo-oxidative electron transfer, apparent heme reduction risetimes were found to vary from 7 x 10-12 s to 5 x 10-8 s, depending upon the site of photosensitizer linking. The excited-state electron transfers are about 103-fold faster than any previously reported photosensitizer-redox protein covalently linked construct. Preliminary conformational analysis using molecular dynamics simulations shows that rates for electron transfer track both the distance and pathways for electron transfer. Two mutants with the fastest charge transfer rates, A23C and K29C, showed a significant role of specific paths for electron transfer. While K29C labeled mutant was expected to have approximately 0.8Å greater donor-acceptor distance, it showed 20-fold faster charge separation rate. Clear evidence for inter-heme electron transfer within the multi-heme protein is not detected within the lifetimes of the charge separated states. These results demonstrate an opportunity to develop multi-heme c-cytochromes for investigation of electron transfer in protein "molecular wires" and to serve as frameworks for

  15. Localización, caracterización y delimitación de un tipo de momento electivo previo al mecanismo Location, characterization and delimiting of a type of elective moment previous to the mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Alomo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Destinamos este informe a la exposición de nuestros avances respecto de uno de los objetivos específicos del proyecto UBACyT P039: "Momentos electivos en el tratamiento psicoanalítico de las neurosis - En el servicio de Clínica de Adultos de la Facultad de Psicología, UBA", dirigido por Gabriel Lombardi. Tal objetivo declara:"definir y distinguir momentos electivos de otras situaciones que no serían tales". Procederemos a exponer ejemplos seleccionados de la literatura freudiana para distinguir en ellos qué es mecanismo y qué momento electivo previo. Luego, centraremos nuestros esfuerzos en cumplir los objetivos que el título enuncia, de acuerdo a los siguientes ejes de análisis: a la conceptualización lacaniana de la materialidad del símbolo; b la pragmática lingüística; c las auto-aplicaciones del lenguaje (Lombardi 2008a; d la temporalidad del modo de presentación clínica.We destine this report to the exhibition of our advances respect to one of the specific aims of the project UBACyT P039: "Elective moments in the psychoanalytic treatment of the neurosis - In the service of Adults' Clinic of the Faculty of Psychology, UBA ", directed by Gabriel Lombardi. Such an aim declares: "to define and to distinguish elective moments of other situations". We will proceed to expose examples selected of the freudian literature to distinguish in them what is mechanism and what previous elective moment. Then, we will centre our efforts in expiring the aims that the title enunciates, in agreement to the following axes of analysis: a the lacanian conceptualization of the symbol's materiality; b the linguistic pragmatics; c the auto-applications of the language (Lombardi 2008a; d temporality of the way of clinical presentation.

  16. Quinoline drug-heme interactions and implications for antimalarial cytostatic versus cytocidal activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Alexander P; de Dios, Angel; Roepe, Paul D

    2013-07-11

    Historically, the most successful molecular target for antimalarial drugs has been heme biomineralization within the malarial parasite digestive vacuole. Heme released from catabolized host red blood cell hemoglobin is toxic, so malarial parasites crystallize heme to nontoxic hemozoin. For years it has been accepted that a number of effective quinoline antimalarial drugs (e.g., chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine) function by preventing hemozoin crystallization. However, recent studies over the past decade have revealed a surprising molecular diversity in quinoline-heme molecular interactions. This diversity shows that even closely related quinoline drugs may have quite different molecular pharmacology. This paper reviews the molecular diversity and highlights important implications for understanding quinoline antimalarial drug resistance and for future drug design.

  17. Identification and phylogenetic analysis of heme synthesis genes in trypanosomatids and their bacterial endosymbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M P Alves

    Full Text Available It has been known for decades that some insect-infecting trypanosomatids can survive in culture without heme supplementation while others cannot, and that this capability is associated with the presence of a betaproteobacterial endosymbiont in the flagellate's cytoplasm. However, the specific mechanisms involved in this process remained obscure. In this work, we sequence and phylogenetically analyze the heme pathway genes from the symbionts and from their hosts, as well as from a number of heme synthesis-deficient Kinetoplastida. Our results show that the enzymes responsible for synthesis of heme are encoded on the symbiont genomes and produced in close cooperation with the flagellate host. Our evidence suggests that this synergistic relationship is the end result of a history of extensive gene loss and multiple lateral gene transfer events in different branches of the phylogeny of the Trypanosomatidae.

  18. Heme degradation upon production of endogenous hydrogen peroxide via interaction of hemoglobin with sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, N; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Fotouhi, L; Yousefinejad, S; Shourian, M; Hosseinzadeh, R; Sheibani, N; Habibi-Rezaei, M

    2014-04-05

    In this study the hemoglobin heme degradation upon interaction with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was investigated using UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, multivariate curve resolution analysis, and chemiluminescence method. Our results showed that heme degradation occurred during interaction of hemoglobin with SDS producing three fluorescent components. We showed that the hydrogen peroxide, produced during this interaction, caused heme degradation. In addition, the endogenous hydrogen peroxide was more effective in hemoglobin heme degradation compared to exogenously added hydrogen peroxide. The endogenous form of hydrogen peroxide altered oxyHb to aquamethemoglobin and hemichrome at low concentration. In contrast, the exogenous hydrogen peroxide lacked this ability under same conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  20. Process development for heme-enriched peptide by enzymatic hydrolysis of hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man-Jin In [Chungwoon University, Hongsung (Korea). Dept. of Human Nutrition and Food Science; Hee Jeong Chae [Hoseo University, Asan (Korea). Dept. of Food Science and Technology; Nam-Soon Oh [Kongju National University, Chungnam (Korea). Dept. of Food Science and Technology

    2002-08-01

    An efficient production method of heme-iron-enriched peptide was developed based on enzymatic hydrolysis. Hemoglobin hydrolysis, carried out stepwise with commercially available exopeptidase and endopeptidase, resulted in an increased degree of hydrolysis (DH). Exopeptidase-catalyzed protein hydrolysis formed low molecular weight peptides and amino acids. Different process parameters including dialysis and ultra- and diafiltration were evaluated. Heme/peptide ratio increased as molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of the dialysis membrane increased. When the hydrolysate was dialyzed against sodium phosphate buffer, a higher heme/peptide ratio was obtained. The heme/peptide ratio of the hydrolysate reached up to 25.4% when the dialysis was carried out with a membrane of 12-14 kDa MWCO. Also, the ratio was improved by the use of ultrafiltration and diafiltration on the pilot-scale. (author)

  1. Synthesis and Evaluation of Amyloid β Derived and Amyloid β Independent Enhancers of the Peroxidase-like Activity of Heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wißbrock, Amelie; Kühl, Toni; Silbermann, Katja; Becker, Albert J; Ohlenschläger, Oliver; Imhof, Diana

    2017-01-12

    Labile heme has been suggested to have an impact in several severe diseases. In the context of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, decreased levels of free heme have been reported. Therefore, we were looking for an assay system that can be used for heme concentration determination. From a biochemical point of view the peroxidase activity of the Aβ-heme complex seemed quite attractive to pursue this goal. As a consequence, a peptide that is able to increase the readout even in the case of a low heme concentration is favorable. The examination of Aβ- and non-Aβ-derived peptides in complex with heme revealed that the peroxidase-like activity significantly depends on the peptide sequence and length. A 23mer His-based peptide derived from human fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 in complex with heme exhibited a significantly higher peroxidase activity than Aβ(40)-heme. Structural modeling of both complexes demonstrated that heme binding via a histidine can be supported by hydrogen bond interactions of a basic residue near the propionate carboxyl function of protoporphyrin IX. Furthermore, the interplay of Aβ-heme and the lipoprotein LDL as a potential physiological effector of Aβ was examined.

  2. Faster heme loss from hemoglobin E than HbS, in acidic pH: Effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report studies on loss of heme at or below pH 3.0 from two clinically important hemoglobin variants, HbE and HbS, in the presence and absence of phopholipid membranes. The kinetics of heme loss has been studied at pH 3.0 to simulate the same at a faster rate than at physiological pH, for spectroscopic investigation.

  3. Effects of Zinc Deuteroporphyrin Bis Glycol on Newborn Mice After Heme-Loading

    OpenAIRE

    He, Cynthia X.; Campbell, Claire M.; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora S.; Schulz, Stephanie; Vreman, Hendrik J.; Wong, Ronald J.; Stevenson, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with hemolytic diseases frequently develop hyperbilirubinemia, but standard phototherapy only eliminates bilirubin after its production. A better strategy might be to directly inhibit heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in bilirubin production. Metalloporphyrins (Mps) are heme analogs that competitively inhibit HO activity in vitro and in vivo and suppress plasma bilirubin levels in vivo. A promising Mp, zinc deuteroporphyrin bis glycol (ZnBG), is orally absorbed and effecti...

  4. Control of heme synthesis during Friend cell differentiation: role of iron and transferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskey, J.D.; Ponka, P.; Schulman, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    In many types of cells the synthesis of σ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) limits the rate of heme formation. However, results from this laboratory with reticulocytes suggest that the rate of iron uptake from 125 I-transferrin (Tf), rather than ALA synthase activity, limits the rate of heme synthesis in erythroid cells. To determine whether changes occur in iron metabolism and the control of heme synthesis during erythroid cell development Friend erythroleukemia cells induced to erythroid differentiation by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) were studied. While added ALA stimulated heme synthesis in uninduced Friend cells (suggesting ALA synthase is limiting) it did not do so in induced cells. Therefore the possibility was investigated that, in induced cells, iron uptake from Tf limits and controls heme synthesis. Several aspects of iron metabolism were investigated using the synthetic iron chelator salicylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (SIH). Both induced and uninduced Friend cells take up and utilize Fe for heme synthesis directly from Fe-SIH without the involvement of transferrin and transferrin receptors and to a much greater extent than from saturating levels or 59 Fe-Tf (20 μM). Furthermore, in induced Friend cells 100 μM Fe-SIH stimulated 2- 14 C-glycine incorporation into heme up to 3.6-fold as compared to the incorporation observed with saturating concentrations of Fe-Tf. These results indicate that some step(s) in the pathway of iron from extracellular Tf to protoporphyrin, rather than the activity of ALA synthase, limits and controls the overall rate of heme and possibly hemoglobin synthesis in differentiating Friend erythroleukemia cells

  5. Heme-biosynthetic porphobilinogen deaminase protects Aspergillus nidulans from nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shengmin; Narukami, Toshiaki; Nameki, Misuzu; Ozawa, Tomoko; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Microorganisms have developed mechanisms to combat reactive nitrogen species (RNS); however, only a few of the fungal genes involved have been characterized. Here we screened RNS-resistant Aspergillus nidulans strains from fungal transformants obtained by introducing a genomic DNA library constructed in a multicopy vector. We found that the AN0121.3 gene (hemC) encodes a protein similar to the heme biosynthesis enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBG-D) and facilitates RNS-tolerant fungal growth. The overproduction of PBG-D in A. nidulans promoted RNS tolerance, whereas PBG-D repression caused growth that was hypersensitive to RNS. PBG-D levels were comparable to those of cellular protoheme synthesis as well as flavohemoglobin (FHb; encoded by fhbA and fhbB) and nitrite reductase (NiR; encoded by niiA) activities. Both FHb and NiR are hemoproteins that consume nitric oxide and nitrite, respectively, and we found that they are required for maximal growth in the presence of RNS. The transcription of hemC was upregulated by RNS. These results demonstrated that PBG-D is a novel NO-tolerant protein that modulates the reduction of environmental NO and nitrite levels by FHb and NiR.

  6. Dinitrosyl non-heme iron complexes at the gamma radiation treatment of animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, D.I.; Alieva, I.N.; Abilov, Z.G.; Gurbanov, I.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: At the present time there are a great number investigations dedicated to revealing of mechanism formation of 2,03 complexes at the some pathologies in an organism. These complexes are represented weakly bounded form of non-heme iron, including into beside iron two nitrogen oxide molecules (NO) and two paired RS- groups of proteins or low-molecular compounds. 2,03 complexes are characterized by an axial symmetrical tensory of the g-factor with g=2,037, g=2,012 and g=2,03. In this study the data testifying 2,03 complexes formation into liver of animal treated by the fatal dose of gamma-radiation are reported. The changing of the ESR signal form was observed. It was shown that the form and intensity of the 2,03 signal in healthy and irradiated animals are differ from each other. The analysis of the 2,03 signal parameters is confirm this fact, too. The conclusion was made that 2,03 complexes ESR signal may be considered as an indicator of integrity of intracellular membranes of the gamma-irradiated animals

  7. Protein Machineries Involved in the Attachment of Heme to Cytochrome c: Protein Structures and Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Travaglini-Allocatelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes c (Cyt c are ubiquitous heme-containing proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer processes, whose structure and functions have been and still are intensely studied. Surprisingly, our understanding of the molecular mechanism whereby the heme group is covalently attached to the apoprotein (apoCyt in the cell is still largely unknown. This posttranslational process, known as Cyt c biogenesis or Cyt c maturation, ensures the stereospecific formation of the thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the cysteine thiols of the apoCyt heme binding motif. To accomplish this task, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved distinctive protein machineries composed of different proteins. In this review, the structural and functional properties of the main maturation apparatuses found in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells will be presented, dissecting the Cyt c maturation process into three functional steps: (i heme translocation and delivery, (ii apoCyt thioreductive pathway, and (iii apoCyt chaperoning and heme ligation. Moreover, current hypotheses and open questions about the molecular mechanisms of each of the three steps will be discussed, with special attention to System I, the maturation apparatus found in gram-negative bacteria.

  8. Accelerated autoxidation and heme loss due to instability of sickle hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebbel, R.P.; Morgan, W.T.; Eaton, J.W.; Hedlund, B.E.

    1988-01-01

    The pleiotropic effect of the sickle gene suggests that factors in addition to polymerization of the mutant gene product might be involved in sickle disease pathobiology. The authors have examined rates of heme transfer to hemopexin from hemoglobin in dilute aqueous solution at 37/sup 0/C. HbO/sub 2/ S loses heme 1.7 times faster than HbO/sub 2/ A. In contrast, Hb A and Hb S behave identically in their MetHb forms and their HbCO forms. This indicates that the faster heme loss from HbO/sub 2/ S is due to accelerated autoxidation (HbO/sub 2/ ..-->.. MetHb) rather than to some other type of instability inherent in the relationship of sickle heme to its pocket in globin. This interpretation is supported by spectrophotometric measurement of initial rates of MetHb formation during incubation at 37/sup 0/C. This directly shows 1.7 times faster autoxidation, with apparent rate constants of 0.050 hr/sup -1/ for HbO/sub 2/ S and 0.029 hr/sup -1/ for HbO/sub 2/. While the participation of this process in the cellular pathobiology of sickle erythrocytes remains unproven, the present data are consistent with, and perhaps help explain, two prio observations: the excessive spontaneous generation of superoxide by sickle erythrocytes; and the abnormal deposition of heme and heme proteins on membranes of sickle erythrocytes.

  9. Human hemoglobin structural and functional alterations and heme degradation upon interaction with benzene: A spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali Akbar

    2016-03-15

    Here, the effect of benzene on hemoglobin structure, stability and heme prosthetic group integrity was studied by different methods. These included UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry, normal and synchronous fluorescence techniques, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Our results indicated that benzene has high hemolytic potential even at low concentrations. The UV-vis spectroscopic results demonstrated that benzene altered both the globin chain and the heme prosthetic group of hemoglobin increasing met- and deoxy-Hb, while decreasing oxy-Hb. However, with increasing benzene the concentration of all species decreased due to heme destruction. The spectrophotometric results show that benzene has a high potential for penetrating the hydrophobic pocket of hemoglobin. These results were consistent with the molecular docking simulation results of benzene-hHb. Aggregation and thermal denaturation studies show that the increased benzene concentration induced hemoglobin aggregation with a decrease in stability, which is consistent with the DSC results. Conventional fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the heme degradation species were produced in the presence of benzene. The results of constant wavelength synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (CWSFS) indicated that at least five heme-degraded species were produced. Together, our results indicated that benzene has adverse effects on hemoglobin structure and function, and heme degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeted expression of heme oxygenase-1 prevents the pulmonary inflammatory and vascular responses to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamino, Tohru; Christou, Helen; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Liu, Yuxiang; Dhawan, Vijender; Abraham, Nader G.; Perrella, Mark A.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2001-07-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension with smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix deposition in the wall of the pulmonary arterioles. We demonstrate here that hypoxia also induces a pronounced inflammation in the lung before the structural changes of the vessel wall. The proinflammatory action of hypoxia is mediated by the induction of distinct cytokines and chemokines and is independent of tumor necrosis factor- signaling. We have previously proposed a crucial role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxic stress, and potent anti-inflammatory properties of HO-1 have been reported in models of tissue injury. We thus established transgenic mice that constitutively express HO-1 in the lung and exposed them to chronic hypoxia. HO-1 transgenic mice were protected from the development of both pulmonary inflammation as well as hypertension and vessel wall hypertrophy induced by hypoxia. Significantly, the hypoxic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed in HO-1 transgenic mice. Our findings suggest an important protective function of enzymatic products of HO-1 activity as inhibitors of hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory pathways.

  11. Kinetics of Nitrite Reduction and Peroxynitrite Formation by Ferrous Heme in Human Cystathionine β-Synthase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballal, Sebastián; Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Yadav, Pramod K.; Gherasim, Carmen; Ballou, David P.; Alvarez, Beatriz; Banerjee, Ruma

    2016-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine or with cysteine to form cystathionine and either water or hydrogen sulfide, respectively. Human CBS possesses a noncatalytic heme cofactor with cysteine and histidine as ligands, which in its oxidized state is relatively unreactive. Ferric CBS (Fe(III)-CBS) can be reduced by strong chemical and biochemical reductants to Fe(II)-CBS, which can bind carbon monoxide (CO) or nitric oxide (NO•), leading to inactive enzyme. Alternatively, Fe(II)-CBS can be reoxidized by O2 to Fe(III)-CBS, forming superoxide radical anion (O2˙̄). In this study, we describe the kinetics of nitrite (NO2−) reduction by Fe(II)-CBS to form Fe(II)NO•-CBS. The second order rate constant for the reaction of Fe(II)-CBS with nitrite was obtained at low dithionite concentrations. Reoxidation of Fe(II)NO•-CBS by O2 showed complex kinetic behavior and led to peroxynitrite (ONOO−) formation, which was detected using the fluorescent probe, coumarin boronic acid. Thus, in addition to being a potential source of superoxide radical, CBS constitutes a previously unrecognized source of NO• and peroxynitrite. PMID:26867575

  12. Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Suppresses Midgut Immunity to Support Plasmodium Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Kakani, Parik; Choudhury, Tania Pal; Kumar, Vikas; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    The heme peroxidase HPX15 is an evolutionary conserved anopheline lineage-specific gene. Previously, we found that this gene is present in the genome of 19 worldwide distributed different species of Anopheles mosquito and its orthologs are absent in other mosquitoes, insects, or human. In addition, 65–99% amino acid identity among these 19 orthologs permitted us to hypothesize that the functional aspects of this gene might be also conserved in different anophelines. In this study, we found that Anopheles stephensi AsHPX15 gene is mainly expressed in the midgut and highly induced after uninfected or Plasmodium berghei-infected blood feeding. RNA interference-mediated silencing of midgut AsHPX15 gene drastically reduced the number of developing P. berghei oocysts. An antiplasmodial gene nitric oxide synthase was induced 13-fold in silenced midguts when compared to the unsilenced controls. Interestingly, the induction of antiplasmodial immunity in AsHPX15-silenced midguts is in absolute agreement with Anopheles gambiae. In A. gambiae, AgHPX15 catalyzes the formation of a dityrosine network at luminal side of the midgut that suppresses the activation of mosquito immunity against the bolus bacteria. Thus, a low-immunity zone created by this mechanism indirectly supports Plasmodium development inside the midgut lumen. These indistinguishable functional behaviors and conserved homology indicates that HPX15 might be a potent target to manipulate the antiplasmodial immunity of the anopheline midgut, and it will open new frontiers in the field of malaria control. PMID:28352267

  13. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well......-defined stoichiometry. The systems were investigated in homogeneous solution and at liquid/solid interface. Conjugation of cyt c results in a small but consistent broadening of the nanoparticle plasmon band. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of long-range electronic interactions between the gold nanoparticle...... of bioelectronics. A key challenge in molecular bioelectronics is to improve the efficiency of long-range charge transfer. The present work shows that this can be achieved by nanoparticle (NP) assisted assembly of cytochrome c (cyt c) on macroscopic single-crystalline electrode surfaces. We present the synthesis...

  14. Characterization of a novel PQQ-dependent quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea classified into auxiliary activities family 12 in carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouta Takeda

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper, which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18 from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall.

  15. Heme-coordinated histidine residues form non-specific functional "ferritin-heme" peroxidase system: Possible and partial mechanistic relevance to oxidative stress-mediated pathology in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Sajjad; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi; Asghari, Seyyed Mohsen; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Ferritin is a giant protein composed of 24 subunits which is able to sequester up to 4500 atoms of iron. We proposed two kinds of heme binding sites in mammalian ferritins and provided direct evidence for peroxidase activity of heme-ferritin, since there is the possibility that "ferritin-heme" systems display unexpected catalytic behavior like heme-containing enzymes. In the current study, peroxidase activity of heme-bound ferritin was studied using TMB(1), l-DOPA, serotonin, and dopamine, in the presence of H2O2, as oxidant substrate. The catalytic oxidation of TMB was consistent with first-order kinetics with respect to ferritin concentration. Perturbation of the binding affinity and catalytic behavior of heme-bound His-modified ferritin were also documented. We also discuss the importance of the peroxidase-/nitrative-mediated oxidation of vital molecules as well as ferritin-induced catalase inhibition using in vitro experimental system. Uncontrollable "heme-ferritin"-based enzyme activity as well as up-regulation of heme and ferritin may inspire that some oxidative stress-mediated cytotoxic effects in AD-affected cells could be correlated to ferritin-heme interaction and/or ferritin-induced catalase inhibition and describe its contribution as an important causative pathogenesis mechanism in some neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Alterações provocadas pela irradiação e armazenamento nos teores de ferro heme em carne de frango Alteration by irradiation and storage at amount of heme iron in poultry meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Régia Marques de Souza

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudos sobre o efeito da irradiação e do armazenamento em carnes de frango foram realizados para se conhecer melhor sua influência nos teores de ferro heme, não-heme, cor e pigmentos totais. Foram estudados coxa e filé de peito de frango. Estes foram irradiados a 0, 1 e 2 kGy e armazenados por 14 dias a 4 °C em câmara refrigerada. A determinação do conteúdo de heme e não-heme de carnes foi realizada através do método colorimétrico, empregando-se o reagente Ferrozine. Os valores de ferro heme foram influenciados tanto pela irradiação quanto pelo armazenamento, diminuindo seus teores com o passar do tempo. O ferro não-heme também foi influenciado tanto pelas doses empregadas quanto pelo tempo de estocagem, porém aumentou seus valores com o passar do tempo, devido à conversão do heme em não-heme. A cor não se mostrou influenciada pelas doses estudadas, somente pela estocagem, e os pigmentos totais foram afetados tanto pela irradiação quanto pelo tempo, diminuindo seus valores com o aumento do tempo de armazenamento. A irradiação se mostrou um bom método para conservação do ferro, visto que aumentou os teores de acordo com o aumento das doses.Studies of irradiation and storage effects in chicken were carried out to discover the influence in iron heme, non-heme amount, color and total pigments. Chicken thighs and chicken breast were studied. These were irradiated to 0, 1 and 2 kGy stored by 14 days to 4 °C in refrigerator. Determining the heme content and non-heme of meat was done using the colorimeter method and the Ferrozine reagent. The values of iron heme were influenced both by the irradiation and the storage, reducing the amount throughout the course of time. The iron non-heme was also influenced by the doses and the storage time, however the values increased throughout the course of time, because of the conversion of iron heme in non-heme. The color did not show that it was influenced by the studied doses

  17. Engineering Non-Heme Mono- and Dioxygenases for Biocatalysis

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    Adi Dror

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxygenases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze the introduction of one or two oxygen atoms to unreactive chemical compounds. They require reduction equivalents from NADH or NADPH and comprise metal ions, metal ion complexes, or coenzymes in their active site. Thus, for industrial purposes, oxygenases are most commonly employed using whole cell catalysis, to alleviate the need for co-factor regeneration. Biotechnological applications include bioremediation, chiral synthesis, biosensors, fine chemicals, biofuels, pharmaceuticals, food ingredients and polymers. Controlling activity and selectivity of oxygenases is therefore of great importance and of growing interest to the scientific community. This review focuses on protein engineering of non-heme monooxygenases and dioxygenases for generating improved or novel functionalities. Rational mutagenesis based on x-ray structures and sequence alignment, as well as random methods such as directed evolution, have been utilized. It is concluded that knowledge-based protein engineering accompanied with targeted libraries, is most efficient for the design and tuning of biocatalysts towards novel substrates and enhanced catalytic activity while minimizing the screening efforts.

  18. A product of heme catabolism modulates bacterial function and survival.

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    Christopher L Nobles

    Full Text Available Bilirubin is the terminal metabolite in heme catabolism in mammals. After deposition into bile, bilirubin is released in large quantities into the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI tract. We hypothesized that intestinal bilirubin may modulate the function of enteric bacteria. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect of bilirubin on two enteric pathogens; enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC, a Gram-negative that causes life-threatening intestinal infections, and E. faecalis, a Gram-positive human commensal bacterium known to be an opportunistic pathogen with broad-spectrum antibiotic resistance. We demonstrate that bilirubin can protect EHEC from exogenous and host-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS through the absorption of free radicals. In contrast, E. faecalis was highly susceptible to bilirubin, which causes significant membrane disruption and uncoupling of respiratory metabolism in this bacterium. Interestingly, similar results were observed for other Gram-positive bacteria, including B. cereus and S. aureus. A model is proposed whereby bilirubin places distinct selective pressure on enteric bacteria, with Gram-negative bacteria being protected from ROS (positive outcome and Gram-positive bacteria being susceptible to membrane disruption (negative outcome. This work suggests bilirubin has differential but biologically relevant effects on bacteria and justifies additional efforts to determine the role of this neglected waste catabolite in disease processes, including animal models.

  19. Increased Plasma Levels of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Human Brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Yu-Xue; Fu, Dong-Wei; Gao, Qing-Feng; Ge, Feng-Xia; Liu, Wei-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Brucellosis is associated with inflammation and the oxidative stress response. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective stress-responsive enzyme that has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. Nevertheless, the role of HO-1 in human brucellosis has not yet been studied. The aim of this study was to examine the plasma levels of HO-1 in patients with brucellosis and to evaluate the ability of plasma HO-1 levels as an auxiliary diagnosis, a severity predictor, and a monitor for brucellosis treatments. A total of 75 patients with brucellosis were divided into the acute, subacute, chronic active, and chronic stable groups. An additional 20 volunteers were included as the healthy control group. The plasma HO-1 levels and other laboratory parameters were measured in all groups. Furthermore, the plasma levels of HO-1 in the acute group were compared before and after treatment. The plasma HO-1 levels were considerably increased in the acute (4.97 ± 3.55), subacute (4.98 ± 3.23), and chronic active groups (4.43 ± 3.00) with brucellosis compared to the healthy control group (1.03 ± 0.63) (p brucellosis (r = 0.707, p brucellosis status and may be used as a supplementary plasma marker for diagnosing brucellosis and monitoring its treatment.

  20. The detection of iron protoporphyrin (heme b) in phytoplankton and marine particulate material by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry – comparison with diode array detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gledhill, Martha, E-mail: m.gledhill@geomar.de

    2014-09-02

    Highlights: • Mass spectrometry was applied to the analysis of heme b in biological material. • Optimal conditions involved selective reactant monitoring of the heme b product ion. • The isotopic signature for this iron tetrapyrrole further improved selectivity. • Mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry were compared for heme b analysis. • Combining techniques made a powerful tool for analysis of heme in marine microbes. - Abstract: A mass spectrometric (MS) method for the identification of iron protoporphyrin (IX) (FePTP, heme b) in marine particulate material and phytoplankton is described. Electrospray ionisation of FePTP produced the molecular Fe(III)PTP{sup +} ion (m/z = 616) or the pseudomolecular [Fe(II)PTP + H]{sup +} ion (m/z = 617), depending on the oxidation state of the central iron ion. Collision induced dissociation (CID) in the ion trap mass spectrometer resulted in a single detected product ion (m/z = 557) indicative of loss of ethanoic acid from a carboxylic acid side chain. Widening the isolation width to 616 ± 3 resulted in production of a mass spectrum demonstrating the distinctive isotopic ratio of the iron containing fragment, further increasing the specificity of the analysis. Selective reactant monitoring (SRM) of the fragment ion (m/z = 557) was applied to the detection of FePTP after chromatography of ammoniacal OGP extracts of marine samples. The detection limit for FePTP analysed by SRM after chromatography was 1.2 ± 0.5 fmol. For phytoplankton samples, reasonably good agreement was achieved between results obtained with SRM and those obtained by monitoring absorbance at λ = 400 nm using a diode array detector (DAD). Use of SRM for analysis of particulate material obtained from the high latitude North Atlantic allowed for the analysis of FePTP in the presence of a co-eluting compound that interfered with detection by DAD. Simultaneous collection of mass spectra from m/z = 300 to 1500 resulted in identification of the

  1. Oxidative stability of a heme iron-fortified bakery product: Effectiveness of ascorbyl palmitate and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Mercedes; Bou, Ricard; Tres, Alba; Polo, Javier; Codony, Rafael; Guardiola, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    Fortification of food products with iron is a common strategy to prevent or overcome iron deficiency. However, any form of iron is a pro-oxidant and its addition will cause off-flavours and reduce a product's shelf life. A highly bioavailable heme iron ingredient was selected to fortify a chocolate cream used to fill sandwich-type cookies. Two different strategies were assessed for avoiding the heme iron catalytic effect on lipid oxidation: ascorbyl palmitate addition and co-spray-drying of heme iron with calcium caseinate. Oxidation development and sensory acceptability were monitored in the cookies over one-year of storage at room temperature in the dark. The addition of ascorbyl palmitate provided protection against oxidation and loss of tocopherols and tocotrienols during the preparation of cookies. In general, ascorbyl palmitate, either alone or in combination with the co-spray-dried heme iron, prevented primary oxidation and hexanal formation during storage. The combination of both strategies resulted in cookies that were acceptable from a sensory point of view after 1year of storage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalytic enhancement of the heme-based oxygen-sensing phosphodiesterase EcDOS by hydrogen sulfide is caused by changes in heme coordination structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yang, F.; Fojtíková, V.; Man, Petr; Stráňava, M.; Martínková, M.; Du, Y.; Huang, D.; Shimizu, T.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 4 (2015), s. 637-652 ISSN 0966-0844 Grant - others:OPPC(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24023 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Heme * O-2 sensor * Phosphodiesterase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.134, year: 2015

  3. A Heme-based Redox Sensor in the Methanogenic Archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Bastian; Stassen, Marc; Modi, Anuja; El-Mashtoly, Samir F.; Laurich, Christoph; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Dawson, John H.; Rother, Michael; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Based on a bioinformatics study, the protein MA4561 from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina acetivorans was originally predicted to be a multidomain phytochrome-like photosensory kinase possibly binding open-chain tetrapyrroles. Although we were able to show that recombinantly produced and purified protein does not bind any known phytochrome chromophores, UV-visible spectroscopy revealed the presence of a heme tetrapyrrole cofactor. In contrast to many other known cytoplasmic heme-containing proteins, the heme was covalently attached via one vinyl side chain to cysteine 656 in the second GAF domain. This GAF domain by itself is sufficient for covalent attachment. Resonance Raman and magnetic circular dichroism data support a model of a six-coordinate heme species with additional features of a five-coordination structure. The heme cofactor is redox-active and able to coordinate various ligands like imidazole, dimethyl sulfide, and carbon monoxide depending on the redox state. Interestingly, the redox state of the heme cofactor has a substantial influence on autophosphorylation activity. Although reduced protein does not autophosphorylate, oxidized protein gives a strong autophosphorylation signal independent from bound external ligands. Based on its genomic localization, MA4561 is most likely a sensor kinase of a two-component system effecting regulation of the Mts system, a set of three homologous corrinoid/methyltransferase fusion protein isoforms involved in methyl sulfide metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, an M. acetivorans mutant devoid of MA4561 constitutively synthesized MtsF. On the basis of our results, we postulate a heme-based redox/dimethyl sulfide sensory function of MA4561 and propose to designate it MsmS (methyl sulfide methyltransferase-associated sensor). PMID:23661702

  4. Chemistry and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heme b-HemQ and Coproheme-HemQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Stefan; Dalla Sega, Marco; Scheiblbrandner, Stefan; Jandova, Zuzana; Schaffner, Irene; Mlynek, Georg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Oostenbrink, Chris; Obinger, Christian

    2016-09-27

    Recently, a novel pathway for heme b biosynthesis in Gram-positive bacteria has been proposed. The final poorly understood step is catalyzed by an enzyme called HemQ and includes two decarboxylation reactions leading from coproheme to heme b. Coproheme has been suggested to act as both substrate and redox active cofactor in this reaction. In the study presented here, we focus on HemQs from Listeria monocytogenes (LmHemQ) and Staphylococcus aureus (SaHemQ) recombinantly produced as apoproteins in Escherichia coli. We demonstrate the rapid and two-phase uptake of coproheme by both apo forms and the significant differences in thermal stability of the apo forms, coproheme-HemQ and heme b-HemQ. Reduction of ferric high-spin coproheme-HemQ to the ferrous form is shown to be enthalpically favored but entropically disfavored with standard reduction potentials of -205 ± 3 mV for LmHemQ and -207 ± 3 mV for SaHemQ versus the standard hydrogen electrode at pH 7.0. Redox thermodynamics suggests the presence of a pronounced H-bonding network and restricted solvent mobility in the heme cavity. Binding of cyanide to the sixth coproheme position is monophasic but relatively slow (∼1 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1)). On the basis of the available structures of apo-HemQ and modeling of both loaded forms, molecular dynamics simulation allowed analysis of the interaction of coproheme and heme b with the protein as well as the role of the flexibility at the proximal heme cavity and the substrate access channel for coproheme binding and heme b release. Obtained data are discussed with respect to the proposed function of HemQ in monoderm bacteria.

  5. PPE Surface Proteins Are Required for Heme Utilization by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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    Avishek Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but iron is efficiently sequestered in the human host during infection. Heme constitutes the largest iron reservoir in the human body and is utilized by many bacterial pathogens as an iron source. While heme acquisition is well studied in other bacterial pathogens, little is known in M. tuberculosis. To identify proteins involved in heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, a transposon mutant library was screened for resistance to the toxic heme analog gallium(III-porphyrin (Ga-PIX. Inactivation of the ppe36, ppe62, and rv0265c genes resulted in resistance to Ga-PIX. Growth experiments using isogenic M. tuberculosis deletion mutants showed that PPE36 is essential for heme utilization by M. tuberculosis, while the functions of PPE62 and Rv0265c are partially redundant. None of the genes restored growth of the heterologous M. tuberculosis mutants, indicating that the proteins encoded by the genes have separate functions. PPE36, PPE62, and Rv0265c bind heme as shown by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and are associated with membranes. Both PPE36 and PPE62 proteins are cell surface accessible, while the Rv0265c protein is probably located in the periplasm. PPE36 and PPE62 are, to our knowledge, the first proline-proline-glutamate (PPE proteins of M. tuberculosis that bind small molecules and are involved in nutrient acquisition. The absence of a virulence defect of the ppe36 deletion mutant indicates that the different iron acquisition pathways of M. tuberculosis may substitute for each other during growth and persistence in mice. The emerging model of heme utilization by M. tuberculosis as derived from this study is substantially different from those of other bacteria.

  6. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

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    Flavio Alves Lara

    Full Text Available In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA, a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may

  7. SCMHBP: prediction and analysis of heme binding proteins using propensity scores of dipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Yi-Fan; Charoenkwan, Phasit; Srinivasulu, Yerukala; Vasylenko, Tamara; Lai, Shih-Chung; Lee, Hua-Chin; Chen, Yi-Hsiung; Huang, Hui-Ling; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Heme binding proteins (HBPs) are metalloproteins that contain a heme ligand (an iron-porphyrin complex) as the prosthetic group. Several computational methods have been proposed to predict heme binding residues and thereby to understand the interactions between heme and its host proteins. However, few in silico methods for identifying HBPs have been proposed. This work proposes a scoring card method (SCM) based method (named SCMHBP) for predicting and analyzing HBPs from sequences. A balanced dataset of 747 HBPs (selected using a Gene Ontology term GO:0020037) and 747 non-HBPs (selected from 91,414 putative non-HBPs) with an identity of 25% was firstly established. Consequently, a set of scores that quantified the propensity of amino acids and dipeptides to be HBPs is estimated using SCM to maximize the predictive accuracy of SCMHBP. Finally, the informative physicochemical properties of 20 amino acids are identified by utilizing the estimated propensity scores to be used to categorize HBPs. The training and mean test accuracies of SCMHBP applied to three independent test datasets are 85.90% and 71.57%, respectively. SCMHBP performs well relative to comparison with such methods as support vector machine (SVM), decision tree J48, and Bayes classifiers. The putative non-HBPs with high sequence propensity scores are potential HBPs, which can be further validated by experimental confirmation. The propensity scores of individual amino acids and dipeptides are examined to elucidate the interactions between heme and its host proteins. The following characteristics of HBPs are derived from the propensity scores: 1) aromatic side chains are important to the effectiveness of specific HBP functions; 2) a hydrophobic environment is important in the interaction between heme and binding sites; and 3) the whole HBP has low flexibility whereas the heme binding residues are relatively flexible. SCMHBP yields knowledge that improves our understanding of HBPs rather than merely

  8. Heme oxygenase, inflammation, and fibrosis: the good, the bad, and the ugly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ditte M. S. Lundvig

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Upon injury, prolonged inflammation and oxidative stress may cause pathological wound healing and fibrosis, leading to formation of excessive scar tissue. Fibrogenesis can occur in most organs and tissues and may ultimately lead to organ dysfunction and failure. The underlying mechanisms of pathological wound healing still remains unclear, but are considered to have a multifactoral pathogenesis, and so far, no efficient anti-fibrotic therapies exists.Extra- and intracellular levels of free heme may be increased in a variety of pathological conditions due to heme-release from hemoproteins. Free heme possesses pro-inflammatory and oxidative effects, and may act as a danger signal, which counteracted by protein scavenging via various heme-binding proteins and by heme degradation. Heme is degraded by heme oxygenase (HO that exists as two isoforms: inducible HO-1 and constitutively expressed HO-2. This generates the effector molecules biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free iron. HO deficiency in mouse and man leads to exaggerated inflammation upon insults, and still accumulating epidemiological and preclinical studies support the widely recognized notion of the cytoprotective, anti-oxidative, and anti-inflammatory effects of the activity of the HO system and the generated effector molecules. In this review, we address the potential applications of targeted HO-1 induction or administration of its effector molecules as therapeutic targets in fibrotic and inflammatory conditions to counteract inflammatory and oxidative insults. This is shown in various clinically relevant conditions, such as hypertrophic scarring, chronic inflammatory liver disease, chronic pancreatitis, and chronic graft rejection in transplantation.

  9. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  11. Enzyme Activities of Two Recombinant Heme-Containing Peroxidases, TvDyP1 and TvVP2, Identified from the Secretome of Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Sawsan; Perrot, Thomas; Navarro, David; Deroy, Aurélie; Benkhelfallah, Amine; Chalak, Amani; Daou, Marianne; Chevret, Didier; Faulds, Craig B; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie; Gelhaye, Eric; Record, Eric

    2018-04-15

    Trametes versicolor is a wood-inhabiting agaricomycete known for its ability to cause strong white-rot decay on hardwood and for its high tolerance of phenolic compounds. The goal of the present work was to gain insights into the molecular biology and biochemistry of the heme-including class II and dye-decolorizing peroxidases secreted by this fungus. Proteomic analysis of the secretome of T. versicolor BRFM 1218 grown on oak wood revealed a set of 200 secreted proteins, among which were the dye-decolorizing peroxidase Tv DyP1 and the versatile peroxidase Tv VP2. Both peroxidases were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli , biochemically characterized, and tested for the ability to oxidize complex substrates. Both peroxidases were found to be active against several substrates under acidic conditions, and Tv DyP1 was very stable over a relatively large pH range of 2.0 to 6.0, while Tv VP2 was more stable at pH 5.0 to 6.0 only. The thermostability of both enzymes was also tested, and Tv DyP1 was globally found to be more stable than Tv VP2. After 180 min of incubation at temperatures ranging from 30 to 50°C, the activity of Tv VP2 drastically decreased, with 10 to 30% of the initial activity retained. Under the same conditions, Tv DyP1 retained 20 to 80% of its enzyme activity. The two proteins were catalytically characterized, and Tv VP2 was shown to accept a wider range of reducing substrates than Tv DyP1. Furthermore, both enzymes were found to be active against two flavonoids, quercetin and catechin, found in oak wood, with Tv VP2 displaying more rapid oxidation of the two compounds. They were tested for the ability to decolorize five industrial dyes, and Tv VP2 presented a greater ability to oxidize and decolorize the dye substrates than Tv DyP1. IMPORTANCE Trametes versicolor is a wood-inhabiting agaricomycete known for its ability to cause strong white-rot decay on hardwood and for its high tolerance of phenolic compounds. Among white-rot fungi, the

  12. Therapeutic Roles of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Metabolic Diseases: Curcumin and Resveratrol Analogues as Possible Inducers of Heme Oxygenase-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Son

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases, such as insulin resistance, type II diabetes, and obesity, are associated with a low-grade chronic inflammation (inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Because the integration of these stresses is critical to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases, agents and cellular molecules that can modulate these stress responses are emerging as potential targets for intervention and treatment of metabolic diseases. It has been recognized that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 plays an important role in cellular protection. Because HO-1 can reduce inflammatory stress, oxidative stress, and ER stress, in part by exerting antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiapoptotic effects, HO-1 has been suggested to play important roles in pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In the present review, we will explore our current understanding of the protective mechanisms of HO-1 in metabolic diseases and present some emerging therapeutic options for HO-1 expression in treating metabolic diseases, together with the therapeutic potential of curcumin and resveratrol analogues that have their ability to induce HO-1 expression.

  13. Reactions of a heme-superoxo complex toward a cuprous chelate and •NO(g): CcO and NOD chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita K; Rogler, Patrick J; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-01

    Following up on the characterization of a new (heme)Fe III -superoxide species formed from the cryogenic oxygenation of a ferrous-heme (P Py )Fe II ( 1 ) (P Py = a tetraarylporphyrinate with a covalently tethered pyridine group as a potential axial base), giving (P Py )Fe III -O 2 •- ( 2 ) ( Li Y et al., Polyhedron 2013; 58 : 60-64), we report here on (i) its use in forming a cytochrome c oxidase (C c O) model compound, or (ii) in a reaction with nitrogen monoxide (•NO; nitric oxide) to mimic nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) chemistry. Reaction of ( 2 ) with the cuprous chelate [Cu I (AN)][B(C 6 F 5 ) 4 ] (AN = bis[3-(dimethylamino) propyl]amine) gives a meta -stable product [(P Py )Fe III -([Formula: see text])-Cu II (AN)][B(C 6 F 5 )4] ( 3a ), possessing a high-spin iron(III) and Cu(II) side-on bridged peroxo moiety with a μ-η 2 :η 2 -binding motif. This complex thermally decays to a corresponding μ-oxo complex [(P Py )Fe III -(O 2- )-Cu II (AN)][B(C 6 F 5 )4] ( 3 ). Both ( 3 ) and ( 3a ) have been characterized by UV-vis, 2 H NMR and EPR spectroscopies. When ( 2 ) is exposed to •NO (g) , a ferric heme nitrato compound forms; if 2,4-di- tert -butylphenol is added prior to •NO (g) exposure, phenol ortho -nitration occurs with the iron product being the ferric hydroxide complex (P Py ) Fe III (OH) ( 5 ). The latter reactions mimic the action of NOD's.

  14. Curcumin-Induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Prevents H2O2-Induced Cell Death in Wild Type and Heme Oxygenase-2 Knockout Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels A. J. Cremers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC administration is a promising adjuvant therapy to treat tissue injury. However, MSC survival after administration is often hampered by oxidative stress at the site of injury. Heme oxygenase (HO generates the cytoprotective effector molecules biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide (CO and iron/ferritin by breaking down heme. Since HO-activity mediates anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidative effects, we hypothesized that modulation of the HO-system affects MSC survival. Adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs from wild type (WT and HO-2 knockout (KO mice were isolated and characterized with respect to ASC marker expression. In order to analyze potential modulatory effects of the HO-system on ASC survival, WT and HO-2 KO ASCs were pre-treated with HO-activity modulators, or downstream effector molecules biliverdin, bilirubin, and CO before co-exposure of ASCs to a toxic dose of H2O2. Surprisingly, sensitivity to H2O2-mediated cell death was similar in WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. However, pre-induction of HO-1 expression using curcumin increased ASC survival after H2O2 exposure in both WT and HO-2 KO ASCs. Simultaneous inhibition of HO-activity resulted in loss of curcumin-mediated protection. Co-treatment with glutathione precursor N-Acetylcysteine promoted ASC survival. However, co-incubation with HO-effector molecules bilirubin and biliverdin did not rescue from H2O2-mediated cell death, whereas co-exposure to CO-releasing molecules-2 (CORM-2 significantly increased cell survival, independently from HO-2 expression. Summarizing, our results show that curcumin protects via an HO-1 dependent mechanism against H2O2-mediated apoptosis, and likely through the generation of CO. HO-1 pre-induction or administration of CORMs may thus form an attractive strategy to improve MSC therapy.

  15. Clinically Important Features of Porphyrin and Heme Metabolism and the Porphyrias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddesh Besur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heme, like chlorophyll, is a primordial molecule and is one of the fundamental pigments of life. Disorders of normal heme synthesis may cause human diseases, including certain anemias (X-linked sideroblastic anemias and porphyrias. Porphyrias are classified as hepatic and erythropoietic porphyrias based on the organ system in which heme precursors (5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA, porphobilinogen and porphyrins are chiefly overproduced. The hepatic porphyrias are further subdivided into acute porphyrias and chronic hepatic porphyrias. The acute porphyrias include acute intermittent, hereditary copro-, variegate and ALA dehydratase deficiency porphyria. Chronic hepatic porphyrias include porphyria cutanea tarda and hepatoerythropoietic porphyria. The erythropoietic porphyrias include congenital erythropoietic porphyria (Gűnther’s disease and erythropoietic protoporphyria. In this review, we summarize the key features of normal heme synthesis and its differing regulation in liver versus bone marrow. In both organs, principal regulation is exerted at the level of the first and rate-controlling enzyme, but by different molecules (heme in the liver and iron in the bone marrow. We also describe salient clinical, laboratory and genetic features of the eight types of porphyria.

  16. Proton NMR investigation of heme pocket mobility in hemoglobin via hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic mobility of heme cavity, the active site of Hb, was investigated by analyzing the hydrogen isotope exchange kinetics of the proximal histidyl ring NH of various kinds of Hbs with the aid of the high field Fourier Transform 1 H NMR spectroscopy. The exchange reaction occurs faster in oxy or R-state Hb than in deoxy or T-state Hb and there exists a good correlation between the oxygen affinity of Hb and the heme pocket mobility reflected in the hydrogen exchange rate. The effect of pH on the exchange is dramatically different for the two subunits of Hb A. Studying the exchange characteristics of mutant Hbs and chemically modified Hbs not only showed the existence of three well-defined localized paths for transmission of conformational changes between different heme pockets through a 1 b 2 subunit interface, but also indicated that the heme pocket mobility is regulated by the quaternary state of Hb as well as by the ligation state of Hb. Finally, the effect of the quaternary state on the heme pocket mobility is separated from that of the ligation by following the exchange reactions in Hbs where only their quaternary structure transition can be achieved without changing their ligation states by adjusting experimental conditions such as adding inositol hexaphosphate

  17. Heme oxygenase 1-mediated neurogenesis is enhanced by Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761®) after permanent ischemic stroke in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Shadia E; Tulsulkar, Jatin; Shah, Zahoor A

    2014-04-01

    Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death and a major cause of disability in stroke survivors. Studies have underlined the importance of repair mechanisms in the recovery phase of stroke. Neurogenesis in response to brain injury is one of the regeneration processes that, if enhanced, may offer better stroke treatment alternatives. Previously, we have demonstrated antioxidant, neuritogenic, and angiogenic properties of Ginkgo biloba/EGb 761® (EGb 761) in different mouse models of stroke. In the present study, we were interested to study whether EGb 761 could protect mice from permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) and enhance neurogenesis. EGb 761 pre- and posttreated mice had lower infarct volume and improved motor skills with enhanced proliferation of neuronal stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) at 24 h and 7 days posttreatment. Netrin-1 and its receptors (DCC and UNC5B) that mediate axonal attraction and repulsion were observed to be overexpressed in NSPCs only, implying that netrin-1 and its receptors might have partly played a role in enhanced neurogenesis. Interestingly, in heme oxygenase 1 knockout mice (HO1(-/-)), neurogenesis was significantly lower than in vehicle-treated mice at day 8. Furthermore, EGb 761 posttreated mice also demonstrated heme oxygenase 1 (HO1)-activated pathway of phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3 α/β (p-GSK-3 α/β), collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2), semaphorin3A (SEMA3A), and Wnt, suggesting probable signaling pathways involved in proliferation, differentiation, and migration of NSPCs. Together, these results propose that EGb 761 not only has antioxidant, neuritogenic, and angiogenic properties, but can also augment the repair and regeneration mechanisms following stroke.

  18. Synthesis, delivery and regulation of eukaryotic heme and Fe-S cluster cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barupala, Dulmini P; Dzul, Stephen P; Riggs-Gelasco, Pamela Jo; Stemmler, Timothy L

    2016-02-15

    In humans, the bulk of iron in the body (over 75%) is directed towards heme- or Fe-S cluster cofactor synthesis, and the complex, highly regulated pathways in place to accomplish biosynthesis have evolved to safely assemble and load these cofactors into apoprotein partners. In eukaryotes, heme biosynthesis is both initiated and finalized within the mitochondria, while cellular Fe-S cluster assembly is controlled by correlated pathways both within the mitochondria and within the cytosol. Iron plays a vital role in a wide array of metabolic processes and defects in iron cofactor assembly leads to human diseases. This review describes progress towards our molecular-level understanding of cellular heme and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, focusing on the regulation and mechanistic details that are essential for understanding human disorders related to the breakdown in these essential pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 polymorphism is not associated with risk of colorectal cancer: a Danish prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Andersen, Vibeke; Christensen, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Intake of red and processed meat confers risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). We wanted to test whether heme in meat promotes carcinogenesis. Methods: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, HMOX1) A-413T (rs2071746) was assessed in a nested case–cohort study of 383 CRC cases and 763 randomly selected...... participants from a prospective study of 57 053 individuals. Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results: No association was found between the HO-1 polymorphism and CRC (P value for trend for the fully adjusted estimates=0.29). No interaction with meat intake was found (P value...... for interaction=0.55). Conclusion: The studied HO-1 polymorphism was not associated with risk of CRC suggesting that heme from meat is not important in CRC development....

  20. The Staphylococcus aureus Protein IsdH Inhibits Host Hemoglobin Scavenging to Promote Heme Acquisition by the Pathogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Sæderup (Madsen), Kirstine; Stødkilde, Kristian; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2016-01-01

    Hemolysis is a complication in septic infections with Staphylococcus aureus, which utilizes the released Hb as an iron source. S. aureus can acquire heme in vitro from hemoglobin (Hb) by a heme-sequestering mechanism that involves proteins from the S. aureus iron-regulated surface determinant (Isd...

  1. Heme oxygenase is not involved in the anti-proliferative effects of statins on pancreatic cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Váňová, K.; Boukalová, Štěpána; Gbelcová, H.; Muchová, L.; Neužil, Jiří; Gürlich, R.; Ruml, T.; Vítek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 16, May 12 (2016), č. článku 309. ISSN 1471-2407 R&D Projects: GA MZd NT14078; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Heme * Heme oxygenase * Pancreatic cancer * Statins Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2016

  2. Modeling and computations of the intramolecular electron transfer process in the two-heme protein cytochrome c4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natzmutdinov, Renat R.; Bronshtein, Michael D.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2012-01-01

    The di-heme protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c4 (cyt c4) has emerged as a useful model for studying long-range protein electron transfer (ET). Recent experimental observations have shown a dramatically different pattern of intramolecular ET between the two heme groups in different local...

  3. Mutation of trimethyllysine 72 to alanine enhances His79-heme-mediated dynamics of iso-1-cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Melisa M; Junior, Carolyn C; Bowler, Bruce E

    2013-02-05

    Trimethyllysine 72 (Tml72) of yeast iso-1-cytochrome c lies across the surface of the heme crevice loop (Ω-loop D, residues 70-85) like a brace. Lys72 is oriented similarly in horse cytochrome c (Cytc). To determine whether this residue affects the dynamics of opening the heme crevice loop, we have studied the effect of a Tml72 to Ala substitution on the formation of the His79-heme alkaline conformer near neutral pH using a variant of iso-1-Cytc including K72A and K79H mutations. Guanidine hydrochloride denaturation shows that the Tml72 to Ala substitution within error does not affect the global stability of the protein. The effect of the Tml72 to Ala substitution on the thermodynamics of the His79-heme alkaline transition is also small. However, pH-jump kinetic studies of the His79-heme alkaline transition show that both the forward and backward rates of conformational change are increased by the Tml72 to Ala substitution. The barrier for opening the heme crevice is reduced by 0.5 kcal/mol and for closing the heme crevice by 0.3 kcal/mol. The ability of Tml72 to modulate the heme crevice dynamics may indicate a crucial role in regulating function, such as in the peroxidase activity seen in the early stages of apoptosis.

  4. Interactions between 4-aminoquinoline and heme: Promising mechanism against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Guilherme Curty; Borges, Júlio Cesar; Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; de Araújo, Humberto Pinheiro; Zuma, Aline Araujo; do Nascimento, Samara Braga; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Bernardino, Alice Maria Rolim; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Bourguignon, Saulo Cabral

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The current drugs used to treat this disease have limited efficacy and produce severe side effects. Quinolines, nitrogen heterocycle compounds that form complexes with heme, have a broad spectrum of antiprotozoal activity and are a promising class of new compounds for Chagas disease chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the activity of a series of 4-arylaminoquinoline-3-carbonitrile derivatives against all forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. Compound 1g showed promising activity against epimastigote forms when combined with hemin (IC50<1 μM), with better performance than benznidazole, the reference drug. This compound also inhibited the viability of trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. The potency of 1g in combination with heme was enhanced against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, suggesting a similar mechanism of action that occurs in Plasmodium spp. The addition of hemin to the culture medium increased trypanocidal activity of analog 1g without changing the cytotoxicity of the host cell, reaching an IC50 of 11.7 μM for trypomastigotes. The mechanism of action was demonstrated by the interaction of compound 1g with hemin in solution and prevention of heme peroxidation. Compound 1g and heme treatment induced alterations of the mitochondrion-kinetoplast complex in epimastigotes and trypomastigotes and also, accumulation of electron-dense deposits in amastigotes as visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The trypanocidal activity of 4-aminoquinolines and the elucidation of the mechanism involving interaction with heme is a neglected field of research, given the parasite's lack of heme biosynthetic pathway and the importance of this cofactor for parasite survival and growth. The results of this study can improve and guide rational drug development and combination treatment strategies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  5. Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids Mediate Heme Crystallization: Biological Implications for Hemozoin Formation in the Kissing Bug Rhodnius prolixus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiebler, Renata; Majerowicz, David; Knudsen, Jens; Gondim, Katia C.; Wright, David W.; Egan, Timothy J.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2014-01-01

    Hemozoin (Hz) is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membranes (PMVM). Here, we investigated the role of commercial glycerophospholipids containing serine, choline and ethanolamine as headgroups and R. prolixus midgut lipids (RML) in heme crystallization. All commercial unsaturated forms of phospholipids, as well as RML, mediated fast and efficient β-hematin formation by means of two kinetically distinct mechanisms: an early and fast component, followed by a late and slow one. The fastest reactions observed were induced by unsaturated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine (uPE) and phosphatidylcholine (uPC), with half-lives of 0.04 and 0.7 minutes, respectively. β-hematin crystal morphologies were strikingly distinct among groups, with uPE producing homogeneous regular brick-shaped crystals. Interestingly, uPC-mediated reactions resulted in two morphologically distinct crystal populations: one less representative group of regular crystals, resembling those induced by uPE, and the other largely represented by crystals with numerous sharp edges and tapered ends. Heme crystallization reactions induced by RML were efficient, with a heme to β-hematin conversion rate higher than 70%, but clearly slower (t1/2 of 9.9–17.7 minutes) than those induced by uPC and uPE. Interestingly, crystals produced by RML were homogeneous in shape and quite similar to those mediated by uPE. Thus, β-hematin formation can be rapidly and efficiently induced by unsaturated glycerophospholipids, particularly uPE and uPC, and may play a role on biological heme crystallization in R. prolixus midgut. PMID:24586467

  6. Unsaturated glycerophospholipids mediate heme crystallization: biological implications for hemozoin formation in the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Stiebler

    Full Text Available Hemozoin (Hz is a heme crystal produced by some blood-feeding organisms, as an efficient way to detoxify heme derived from hemoglobin digestion. In the triatomine insect Rhodnius prolixus, Hz is essentially produced by midgut extracellular phospholipid membranes known as perimicrovillar membranes (PMVM. Here, we investigated the role of commercial glycerophospholipids containing serine, choline and ethanolamine as headgroups and R. prolixus midgut lipids (RML in heme crystallization. All commercial unsaturated forms of phospholipids, as well as RML, mediated fast and efficient β-hematin formation by means of two kinetically distinct mechanisms: an early and fast component, followed by a late and slow one. The fastest reactions observed were induced by unsaturated forms of phosphatidylethanolamine (uPE and phosphatidylcholine (uPC, with half-lives of 0.04 and 0.7 minutes, respectively. β-hematin crystal morphologies were strikingly distinct among groups, with uPE producing homogeneous regular brick-shaped crystals. Interestingly, uPC-mediated reactions resulted in two morphologically distinct crystal populations: one less representative group of regular crystals, resembling those induced by uPE, and the other largely represented by crystals with numerous sharp edges and tapered ends. Heme crystallization reactions induced by RML were efficient, with a heme to β-hematin conversion rate higher than 70%, but clearly slower (t1/2 of 9.9-17.7 minutes than those induced by uPC and uPE. Interestingly, crystals produced by RML were homogeneous in shape and quite similar to those mediated by uPE. Thus, β-hematin formation can be rapidly and efficiently induced by unsaturated glycerophospholipids, particularly uPE and uPC, and may play a role on biological heme crystallization in R. prolixus midgut.

  7. Characterization of Anammox Hydrazine Dehydrogenase, a Key N2-producing Enzyme in the Global Nitrogen Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalcke, Wouter J; Reimann, Joachim; de Vries, Simon; Butt, Julea N; Dietl, Andreas; Kip, Nardy; Mersdorf, Ulrike; Barends, Thomas R M; Jetten, Mike S M; Keltjens, Jan T; Kartal, Boran

    2016-08-12

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria derive their energy for growth from the oxidation of ammonium with nitrite as the electron acceptor. N2, the end product of this metabolism, is produced from the oxidation of the intermediate, hydrazine (N2H4). Previously, we identified N2-producing hydrazine dehydrogenase (KsHDH) from the anammox organism Kuenenia stuttgartiensis as the gene product of kustc0694 and determined some of its catalytic properties. In the genome of K. stuttgartiensis, kustc0694 is one of 10 paralogs related to octaheme hydroxylamine (NH2OH) oxidoreductase (HAO). Here, we characterized KsHDH as a covalently cross-linked homotrimeric octaheme protein as found for HAO and HAO-related hydroxylamine-oxidizing enzyme kustc1061 from K. stuttgartiensis Interestingly, the HDH trimers formed octamers in solution, each octamer harboring an amazing 192 c-type heme moieties. Whereas HAO and kustc1061 are capable of hydrazine oxidation as well, KsHDH was highly specific for this activity. To understand this specificity, we performed detailed amino acid sequence analyses and investigated the catalytic and spectroscopic (electronic absorbance, EPR) properties of KsHDH in comparison with the well defined HAO and kustc1061. We conclude that HDH specificity is most likely derived from structural changes around the catalytic heme 4 (P460) and of the electron-wiring circuit comprising seven His/His-ligated c-type hemes in each subunit. These nuances make HDH a globally prominent N2-producing enzyme, next to nitrous oxide (N2O) reductase from denitrifying microorganisms. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. In vivo antitumor activity of pegylated zinc protoporphyrin: targeted inhibition of heme oxygenase in solid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki; Akuta, Teruo; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K; Khaled, Greish; Hamada, Akinobu; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2003-07-01

    High expression of the inducible isoform of heme oxygenase (HO-1) is now well known in solid tumors in humans and experimental animal models. We reported previously that HO-1 may be involved in tumor growth (Tanaka et al., Br. J. Cancer, 88: 902-909, 2003), in that inhibition of HO activity in tumors by using zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) significantly reduced tumor growth in a rat model. We demonstrate here that poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated ZnPP (PEG-ZnPP), a water-soluble derivative of ZnPP, exhibited potent HO inhibitory activity and had an antitumor effect in vivo. In vitro studies with cultured SW480 cells, which express HO-1, showed that PEG-ZnPP induced oxidative stress, and consequently apoptotic death, of these cells. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that PEG-ZnPP-administered i.v. had a circulation time in blood that was 40 times longer than that for nonpegylated ZnPP. More important, PEG-ZnPP preferentially accumulated in solid tumor tissue in a murine model. In vivo treatment with PEG-ZnPP (equivalent to 1.5 or 5 mg of ZnPP/kg, i.v., injected daily for 6 days) remarkably suppressed the growth of Sarcoma 180 tumors implanted in the dorsal skin of ddY mice without any apparent side effects. In addition, this PEG-ZnPP treatment produced tumor-selective suppression of HO activity as well as induction of apoptosis. The major reason for tumor-selective targeting of PEG-ZnPP is attributed to the enhanced permeability and retention effect that is observed commonly in solid tumors for biocompatible macromolecular drugs. These findings suggest that tumor-targeted inhibition of HO activity could be achieved by using PEG-ZnPP, which induces apoptosis in solid tumors, probably through increased oxidative stress.

  9. O2 Binding to Heme is Strongly Facilitated by Near‐Degeneracy of Electronic States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the computed O2 binding to heme, which for the first time explains experimental enthalpies for this process of central importance to bioinorganic chemistry. All four spin states along the relaxed FeO2‐binding curves were optimized using the full heme system with dispersion......, thermodynamic, and scalar‐relativistic corrections, applying several density functionals. When including all these physical terms, the experimental enthalpy of O2 binding (−59 kJ mol−1) is closely reproduced by TPSSh‐D3 (−66 kJ mol−1). Dispersion changes the potential energy surfaces and leads to the correct...

  10. Exploring genome-wide - dietary heme iron intake interactions and the risk of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Robert Pasquale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims/hypothesis: Genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 new genetic loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D. Several studies conclude that higher dietary heme iron intake increases the risk of T2D. Therefore we assessed whether the relation between genetic loci and type 2 diabetes is modified by dietary heme iron intake. Methods: We used Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 6.0 array data (681,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and dietary information collected in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n=725 cases; n=1,273 controls and the Nurses’ Health Study (n=1,081 cases; n=1,692 controls. We assessed whether genome-wide SNPs or iron metabolism SNPs interacted with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D, testing for associations in each cohort separately and then meta-analyzing to pool the results. Finally, we created 1,000 synthetic pathways matched to an iron metabolism pathway on number of genes, and number of SNPs in each gene. We compared the iron metabolic pathway SNPs with these synthetic SNP assemblies in their relation to T2D to assess if the pathway as a whole interacts with dietary heme iron intake.Results: Using a genomic approach, we found no significant gene-environment interactions with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D (top SNP in pooled analysis: intergenic rs10980508; p=1.03E-06 > Bonferroni corrected p=7.33E-08. Furthermore, no SNP in the iron metabolic pathway significantly interacted with dietary heme iron intake (top SNP in pooled analysis: rs1805313; p=1.14E-03 > Bonferroni corrected p=2.10E-04. Finally, neither the main genetic effects (pooled empirical p by SNP=0.41, nor gene – dietary heme-iron interactions (pooled empirical p value for the interactions=0.72 were significant for the iron metabolic pathway as a whole. Conclusions: We found no significant interactions between dietary heme iron intake and common SNPs in relation to T2D.

  11. Exploring genome-wide - dietary heme iron intake interactions and the risk of type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Louis Robert Pasquale; Louis Robert Pasquale; Stephanie eLoomis; Stephanie eLoomis; Hugues eAschard; Jae Hee eKang; Marilyn C Cornelis; Marilyn C Cornelis; Lu eQi; Lu eQi; Peter eKraft; Peter eKraft; Frank eHu; Frank eHu; Frank eHu

    2013-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: Genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 new genetic loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Several studies conclude that higher dietary heme iron intake increases the risk of T2D. Therefore we assessed whether the relation between genetic loci and type 2 diabetes is modified by dietary heme iron intake. Methods: We used Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 6.0 array data (681,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and dietary information collected in the Health Profess...

  12. Exploring genome-wide - dietary heme iron intake interactions and the risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquale, Louis R; Loomis, Stephanie J; Aschard, Hugues; Kang, Jae H; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Qi, Lu; Kraft, Peter; Hu, Frank B

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified over 50 new genetic loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D). Several studies conclude that higher dietary heme iron intake increases the risk of T2D. Therefore we assessed whether the relation between genetic loci and T2D is modified by dietary heme iron intake. We used Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human 6.0 array data [681,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] and dietary information collected in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 725 cases; n = 1,273 controls) and the Nurses' Health Study (n = 1,081 cases; n = 1,692 controls). We assessed whether genome-wide SNPs or iron metabolism SNPs interacted with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D, testing for associations in each cohort separately and then meta-analyzing to pool the results. Finally, we created 1,000 synthetic pathways matched to an iron metabolism pathway on number of genes, and number of SNPs in each gene. We compared the iron metabolic pathway SNPs with these synthetic SNP assemblies in their relation to T2D to assess if the pathway as a whole interacts with dietary heme iron intake. Using a genomic approach, we found no significant gene-environment interactions with dietary heme iron intake in relation to T2D at a Bonferroni corrected genome-wide significance level of 7.33 ×10(-) (8) (top SNP in pooled analysis: intergenic rs10980508; p = 1.03 × 10(-) (6)). Furthermore, no SNP in the iron metabolic pathway significantly interacted with dietary heme iron intake at a Bonferroni corrected significance level of 2.10 × 10(-) (4) (top SNP in pooled analysis: rs1805313; p = 1.14 × 10(-) (3)). Finally, neither the main genetic effects (pooled empirical p by SNP = 0.41), nor gene - dietary heme-iron interactions (pooled empirical p-value for the interactions = 0.72) were significant for the iron metabolic pathway as a whole. We found no significant interactions between dietary heme iron intake and common SNPs in relation to T2D.

  13. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  14. Unique structure and stability of HmuY, a novel heme-binding protein of Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halina Wójtowicz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection, survival, and proliferation of pathogenic bacteria in humans depend on their capacity to impair host responses and acquire nutrients in a hostile environment. Among such nutrients is heme, a co-factor for oxygen storage, electron transport, photosynthesis, and redox biochemistry, which is indispensable for life. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major human bacterial pathogen responsible for severe periodontitis. It recruits heme through HmuY, which sequesters heme from host carriers and delivers it to its cognate outer-membrane transporter, the TonB-dependent receptor HmuR. Here we report that heme binding does not significantly affect the secondary structure of HmuY. The crystal structure of heme-bound HmuY reveals a new all-beta fold mimicking a right hand. The thumb and fingers pinch heme iron through two apical histidine residues, giving rise to highly symmetric octahedral iron co-ordination. The tetrameric quaternary arrangement of the protein found in the crystal structure is consistent with experiments in solution. It shows that thumbs and fingertips, and, by extension, the bound heme groups, are shielded from competing heme-binding proteins from the host. This may also facilitate heme transport to HmuR for internalization. HmuY, both in its apo- and in its heme-bound forms, is resistant to proteolytic digestion by trypsin and the major secreted proteases of P. gingivalis, gingipains K and R. It is also stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. In conclusion, these studies reveal novel molecular properties of HmuY that are consistent with its role as a putative virulence factor during bacterial infection.

  15. Effects of volatile anaesthetics on heme metabolism in a murine genetic model of acute intermittent porphyria. A comparative study with other porphyrinogenic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruspini, Silvina Fernanda; Zuccoli, Johanna Romina; Lavandera, Jimena Verónica; Del Carmen Martínez, Marìa; Olivieri, Leda María; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Del Carmen Batlle, Alcira María; Buzaleh, Ana María

    2018-02-21

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an inherited disease produced by a deficiency of Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD). The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of Isoflurane and Sevoflurane on heme metabolism in a mouse genetic model of AIP to further support our previous proposal for avoiding their use in porphyric patients. A comparative study was performed administering the porphyrinogenic drugs allylisopropylacetamide (AIA), barbital and ethanol, and also between sex and mutation using AIP (PBG-D activity 70% reduced) and T1 (PBG-D activity 50% diminished) mice. The activities of 5-Aminolevulinic synthetase (ALA-S), PBG-D, Heme oxygenase (HO) and CYP2E1; the expression of ALA-S and the levels of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) were measured in different tissues of mice treated with the drugs mentioned. Isoflurane increased liver, kidney and brain ALA-S activity of AIP females but only affected kidney AIP males. Sevoflurane induced ALA-S activity in kidney and brain of female AIP group. PBG-D activity was further reduced by Isoflurane in liver male T1; in AIP male mice activity remained in its low basal levels. Ethanol and barbital also caused biochemical alterations. Only AIA triggered neurological signs similar to those observed during human acute attacks in male AIP being the symptoms less pronounced in females although ALA-S induction was greater. Heme degradation was affected. Biochemical alterations caused by the porphyrinogenic drugs assayed were different in male and female mice and also between T1 and AIP being more affected the females of AIP group. This is the first study using volatile anaesthetics in an AIP genetic model confirming Isoflurane and Sevoflurane porphyrinogenicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Dry powder inhalation of hemin to induce heme oxygenase expression in the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, G.S.; Brandsma, C.; Harpe, M.F.H.; Van Dam, G.M.; Slebos, D.J.; Kerstjens, H.A.M.; de Boer, Anne; Frijlink, H.W.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to formulate hemin as a powder for inhalation and to show proof of concept of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression in the lungs of mice by inhalation of hemin. Hemin was spray dried from a neutralized sodium hydroxide solution. The particle size distribution of the powder

  17. ["Kuhu me siis läheme? - Eks ikka koju."] / M. J.

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jõgi, Mall, 1947-

    2016-01-01

    Tutvustus: „Kuhu me siis läheme? - Eks ikka koju.“ : sajandivahetus saksa kirjanduses 200 aastat tagasi : Goethe, Schiller, Tieck, Kleist, Hoffmann, Eichendorff, Büchner, Novalis, Hegel (Schelling? Hölderlin?), Schlegel / saksa keelest valinud ja tõlkinud Mati Sirkel. Tallinn : Eesti Keele Sihtasutus, 2015

  18. Effects of Zinc Deuteroporphyrin Bis Glycol on Newborn Mice After Heme-Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cynthia X.; Campbell, Claire M.; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora S.; Schulz, Stephanie; Vreman, Hendrik J.; Wong, Ronald J.; Stevenson, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with hemolytic diseases frequently develop hyperbilirubinemia, but standard phototherapy only eliminates bilirubin after its production. A better strategy might be to directly inhibit heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in bilirubin production. Metalloporphyrins (Mps) are heme analogs that competitively inhibit HO activity in vitro and in vivo and suppress plasma bilirubin levels in vivo. A promising Mp, zinc deuteroporphyrin bis glycol (ZnBG), is orally absorbed and effectively inhibits HO activity at relatively low doses. We determined the I50 (the dose needed to inhibit HO activity by 50%) of orally administered ZnBG in vivo and then evaluated ZnBG’s effects on in vivo bilirubin production, HO activity, HO protein levels, and HO-1 gene expression in newborn mice following heme-loading, a model analogous to a hemolytic infant. The I50 of ZnBG was found to be 4.0 μmol/kg body weight (BW). At a dose of 15-μmol/kg BW, ZnBG reduced in vivo bilirubin production, inhibited heme-induced liver HO activity and spleen HO activity to and below baseline, respectively, transiently induced liver and spleen HO-1 gene transcription, and induced liver and spleen HO-1 protein levels. We conclude that ZnBG may be an attractive compound for treating severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia caused by hemolytic disease. PMID:21785387

  19. 21 CFR 862.1410 - Iron (non-heme) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron (non-heme) test system. 862.1410 Section 862.1410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  20. Faster heme loss from hemoglobin E than HbS, in acidic pH: Effect ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is also of particular importance to membranes containing the aminophospholipid and cholesterol which are predominantly localized in .... pids and cholesterol, prevalent in erythrocyte membranes. The present work indicated faster ..... heme for egg lecithin vesicles is quite high, with the partition constant for going from ...

  1. Novel insights in mammalian catalase heme maturation: effect of NO and thioredoxin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Gupta, Karishma; Majors, Alana; Ruple, Lisa; Aronica, Mark; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-05-01

    Catalase is a tetrameric heme-containing enzyme with essential antioxidant functions in biology. Multiple factors including nitric oxide (NO) have been shown to attenuate its activity. However, the possible impact of NO in relation to the maturation of active catalase, including its heme acquisition and tetramer formation, has not been investigated. We found that NO attenuates heme insertion into catalase in both short-term and long-term incubations. The NO inhibition in catalase heme incorporation was associated with defective oligomerization of catalase, such that inactive catalase monomers and dimers accumulated in place of the mature tetrameric enzyme. We also found that GAPDH plays a key role in mediating these NO effects on the structure and activity of catalase. Moreover, the NO sensitivity of catalase maturation could be altered up or down by manipulating the cellular expression level or activity of thioredoxin-1, a known protein-SNO denitrosylase enzyme. In a mouse model of allergic inflammatory asthma, we found that lungs from allergen-challenged mice contained a greater percentage of dimeric catalase relative to tetrameric catalase in the unchallenged control, suggesting that the mechanisms described here are in play in the allergic asthma model. Together, our study shows how maturation of active catalase can be influenced by NO, S-nitrosylated GAPDH, and thioredoxin-1, and how maturation may become compromised in inflammatory conditions such as asthma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mononuclear non-heme iron (III) complexes of linear and tripodal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 2. Mononuclear non-heme iron(III) complexes of linear and tripodal tridentate ligands as functional models for catechol dioxygenases: Effect of -alkyl substitution on regioselectivity and reaction rate. Mallayan Palaniandavar Kusalendiran Visvaganesan.

  3. Interaction between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species, Heme Oxygenase, and Nitric Oxide Synthase Stimulates Phagocytosis in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Müllebner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMacrophages are cells of the innate immune system that populate every organ. They are required not only for defense against invading pathogens and tissue repair but also for maintenance of tissue homeostasis and iron homeostasis.AimThe aim of this study is to understand whether heme oxygenase (HO and nitric oxide synthase (NOS contribute to the regulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX activity and phagocytosis, two key components of macrophage function.MethodsThis study was carried out using resting J774A.1 macrophages treated with hemin or vehicle. Activity of NOS, HO, or NOX was inhibited using specific inhibitors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS formation was determined by Amplex® red assay, and phagocytosis was measured using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled bacteria. In addition, we analyzed the fate of the intracellular heme by using electron spin resonance.ResultsWe show that both enzymes NOS and HO are essential for phagocytic activity of macrophages. NOS does not directly affect phagocytosis, but stimulates NOX activity via nitric oxide-triggered ROS production of mitochondria. Treatment of macrophages with hemin results in intracellular accumulation of ferrous heme and an inhibition of phagocytosis. In contrast to NOS, HO products, including carbon monoxide, neither clearly affect NOX activity nor clearly affect phagocytosis, but phagocytosis is accelerated by HO-mediated degradation of heme.ConclusionBoth enzymes contribute to the bactericidal activity of macrophages independently, by controlling different pathways.

  4. In vitro studies on heme oxygenase-1 and P24 antigen HIV-1 level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a protein secreted by immune cells as a part of immune response mechanism.HO-1 can be induced by variety agents that causingoxidative stress, such as exposure to 100% oxygenat2,4 ATA pressure.It plays a vital role in maintaining cellular homeostasis.This study was ...

  5. Differential gene expression in rat colon by dietary heme and calcium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer - van Kraaij, van der C.; Kramer, E.H.M.; Jonker - Termont, D.; Katan, M.B.; Meer, van der R.; Keijzer, J.

    2005-01-01

    Dietary heme and calcium are alleged modulators of colon cancer risk. Little is known about the molecular and cellular changes in the colon epithelium that are induced by consumption of these unabsorbed nutrients. In this nutrigenomics study, we fed rats high- and low-calcium diets with or without

  6. Molecular insights into frataxin-mediated iron supply for heme biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Mielcarek

    Full Text Available Iron is required as an element to sustain life in all eukaryotes and most bacteria. Although several bacterial iron acquisition strategies have been well explored, little is known about the intracellular trafficking pathways of iron and its entry into the systems for co-factor biogenesis. In this study, we investigated the iron-dependent process of heme maturation in Bacillus subtilis and present, for the first time, structural evidence for the physical interaction of a frataxin homologue (Fra, which is suggested to act as a regulatory component as well as an iron chaperone in different cellular pathways, and a ferrochelatase (HemH, which catalyses the final step of heme b biogenesis. Specific interaction between Fra and HemH was observed upon co-purification from crude cell lysates and, further, by using the recombinant proteins for analytical size-exclusion chromatography. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange experiments identified the landscape of the Fra/HemH interaction interface and revealed Fra as a specific ferrous iron donor for the ferrochelatase HemH. The functional utilisation of the in vitro-generated heme b co-factor upon Fra-mediated iron transfer was confirmed by using the B. subtilis nitric oxide synthase bsNos as a metabolic target enzyme. Complementary mutational analyses confirmed that Fra acts as an essential component for maturation and subsequent targeting of the heme b co-factor, hence representing a key player in the iron-dependent physiology of B. subtilis.

  7. PCBP1 and NCOA4 regulate erythroid iron storage and heme biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Moon-Suhn; Zhang, Deliang; Protchenko, Olga; Shakoury-Elizeh, Minoo; Philpott, Caroline C

    2017-05-01

    Developing erythrocytes take up exceptionally large amounts of iron, which must be transferred to mitochondria for incorporation into heme. This massive iron flux must be precisely controlled to permit the coordinated synthesis of heme and hemoglobin while avoiding the toxic effects of chemically reactive iron. In cultured animal cells, iron chaperones poly rC-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) and PCBP2 deliver iron to ferritin, the sole cytosolic iron storage protein, and nuclear receptor coactivator 4 (NCOA4) mediates the autophagic turnover of ferritin. The roles of PCBP, ferritin, and NCOA4 in erythroid development remain unclear. Here, we show that PCBP1, NCOA4, and ferritin are critical for murine red cell development. Using a cultured cell model of erythroid differentiation, depletion of PCBP1 or NCOA4 impaired iron trafficking through ferritin, which resulted in reduced heme synthesis, reduced hemoglobin formation, and perturbation of erythroid regulatory systems. Mice lacking Pcbp1 exhibited microcytic anemia and activation of compensatory erythropoiesis via the regulators erythropoietin and erythroferrone. Ex vivo differentiation of erythroid precursors from Pcbp1-deficient mice confirmed defects in ferritin iron flux and heme synthesis. These studies demonstrate the importance of ferritin for the vectorial transfer of imported iron to mitochondria in developing red cells and of PCBP1 and NCOA4 in mediating iron flux through ferritin.

  8. Rapamycin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 in Liver but Inhibits Bile Flow Recovery after Ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kist, Alwine; Wakkie, Joris; Madu, Max; Versteeg, Ruth; ten Berge, Judith; Nikolic, Andrej; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Porte, Robert J.; Padbury, Robert T. A.; Barritt, Greg J.

    Background/Aims. Rapamycin, which is employed in the management of patients undergoing liver surgery, induces the synthesis of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in some non-liver cell types. The aim was to investigate whether rapamycin can induce HO-1 expression in the liver, and to test the effects of

  9. Red meat and colon cancer : The cytotoxic and hyperproliferative effects of dietary heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sesink, ALA; Termont, DSML; Kleibeuker, JH; Van der Meer, R

    1999-01-01

    The intake of a Western diet with a high amount of red meat is associated with a high risk for colon cancer. We hypothesize that heme, the iron carrier of red meat, is involved in diet-induced colonic epithelial damage, resulting in increased epithelial proliferation. Rats were fed purified control

  10. Quercetin suppressed CYP2E1-dependent ethanol hepatotoxicity via depleting heme pool and releasing CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuhan; Tian, Hongtao; Shi, Yanru; Gao, Chao; Xing, Mingyou; Yang, Wei; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2013-06-15

    Naturally occuring quercetin protects hepatocytes from ethanol-induced oxidative stress, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction and carbon monoxide (CO) metabolite may be implicated in the beneficial effect. However, the precise mechanism by which quercetin counteracts CYP2E1-mediated ethanol hepatotoxicity through HO-1 system is still remained unclear. To explore the potential mechanism, herein, ethanol (4.0 g/kg.bw.) was administrated to rats for 90 days. Our data showed that chronic ethanol over-activated CYP2E1 but suppressed HO-1 with concurrent hepatic oxidative damage, which was partially normalized by quercetin (100mg/kg.bw.). Quercetin (100 μM) induced HO-1 and depleted heme pool when incubated to human hepatocytes. Ethanol-stimulated (100mM) CYP2E1 upregulation was suppressed by quercetin but further enhanced by HO-1 inhibition with resultant heme accumulation. CO scavenging blocked the suppression of quercetin only on CYP2E1 activity. CO donor dose-dependently inactivated CYP2E1 of ethanol-incubated microsome, which was mimicked by HO-1 substrate but abolished by CO scavenger. Thus, CYP2E1-mediated ethanol hepatotoxicity was alleviated by quercetin through HO-1 induction. Depleted heme pool and CO releasing limited protein synthesis and inhibited enzymatic activity of CYP2E1, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary heme induces acute oxidative stress, but delayed cytotoxicity and compensatory hyperproliferation in mouse colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssenagger, N.; Rijnierse, A.; Wit, de N.J.W.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Dekker, J.; Schonewille, A.; Müller, M.R.; Meer, van der M.

    2013-01-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colon cancer risk. Heme, present in red meat, injures the colon surface epithelium by generating cytotoxic and oxidative stress. Recently, we found that this surface injury is compensated by hyperproliferation and hyperplasia of crypt cells, which

  12. Dietary heme induces instantaneous oxidative stress but delayed cytotoxicity and compensatory hyperproliferation in mouse colon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJssennagger, Noortje; Rijnierse, A.; Wit, de Nicole; Boekschoten, Mark; Dekker, Jan; Schonewille, Arjan; Muller, Michael; Meer, van der Roelof

    2013-01-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with an increased colon cancer risk. Heme, present in red meat, injures the colon surface epithelium by luminal cytotoxicity and reactive oxygen species. This surface injury is compensated by hyperproliferation and hyperplasia of crypt cells, which was induced by a

  13. Direct photochemical activation of non-heme Fe(IV)=O complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Juan; Draksharapu, Apparao; Harvey, Emma; Rasheed, Waqas; Que, Lawrence; Browne, Wesley R.

    2017-01-01

    Near-UV excitation of non-heme Fe-IV=O complexes results in light intensity dependent increase in reaction rates for the oxidation of C-H bonds even at low temperature (-30 degrees C). The enhancement of activity is ascribed to the ligand-to-[Fe-IV=O] charge transfer character of the near-UV bands

  14. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    functionally characterized. On the basis of prior work, we predicted that cTHAP4 is composed of a heme-binding nitrobindin domain, making THAP4 the only human THAP protein predicted to bind a cofactor. Nitrobindin, a recently characterized protein from Arabidopsis thaliana, is structurally similar and exhibits nitric oxide (NO)-binding properties that resemble the heme-binding nitrophorins. Nitrophorins use a heme moiety to store, transport, and release NO in a pH-specific manner. Although the exact function of nitrobindin is not fully known, the similarities between the well-characterized nitrophorins imply a role in NO transport, sensing, or metabolism. To better elucidate the possible function of THAP4, we solved the hemebound structure of cTHAP4 to a resolution of 1.79 {angstrom}.

  15. Relative to quinine and quinidine, their 9-epimers exhibit decreased cytostatic activity and altered heme binding but similar cytocidal activity versus Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Alexander P; Sherlach, Katy S; de Dios, Angel C; Roepe, Paul D

    2013-01-01

    The 9-epimers of quinine (QN) and quinidine (QD) are known to exhibit poor cytostatic potency against P. falciparum (Karle JM, Karle IL, Gerena L, Milhous WK, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 36:1538-1544, 1992). We synthesized 9-epi-QN (eQN) and 9-epi-QD (eQD) via Mitsunobu esterification-saponification and evaluated both cytostatic and cytocidal antimalarial activities. Relative to the cytostatic activity of QN and QD, we observed a large decrease in cytostatic activity (higher 50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)s]) against QN-sensitive strain HB3, QN-resistant strain Dd2, and QN-hypersensitive strain K76I, consistent with previous work. However, we observed relatively small changes in cytocidal activity (the 50% lethal dose), similar to observations with chloroquine (CQ) analogues with a wide range of IC(50)s (see the accompanying paper [A. P. Gorka, J. N. Alumasa, K. S. Sherlach, L. M. Jacobs, K. B. Nickley, J. P. Brower, A. C. de Dios, and P. D. Roepe, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 57:356-364, 2013]). Compared to QN and QD, the 9-epimers had significantly reduced hemozoin inhibition efficiency and did not affect pH-dependent aggregation of ferriprotoporphyrin IX (FPIX) heme. Magnetic susceptibility measurements showed that the 9-epimers perturb FPIX monomer-dimer equilibrium in favor of monomer, and UV-visible (VIS) titrations showed that eQN and eQD bind monomer with similar affinity relative to QN and QD. However, unique ring proton shifts in the presence of zinc(II) protoporphyrin IX (ZnPIX) indicate that binding of the 9-epimers to monomeric heme is via a distinct geometry. We isolated eQN- and eQD-FPIX complexes formed under aqueous conditions and analyzed them by mass, fluorescence, and UV-VIS spectroscopies. The 9-epimers produced low-fluorescent adducts with a 2:1 stoichiometry (drug to FPIX) which did not survive electrospray ionization, in contrast to QN and QD complexes. The data offer important insight into the relevance of heme interactions as a

  16. A central role for heme iron in colon carcinogenesis associated with red meat intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastide, Nadia M; Chenni, Fatima; Audebert, Marc; Santarelli, Raphaelle L; Taché, Sylviane; Naud, Nathalie; Baradat, Maryse; Jouanin, Isabelle; Surya, Reggie; Hobbs, Ditte A; Kuhnle, Gunter G; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Gueraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E; Pierre, Fabrice H F

    2015-03-01

    Epidemiology shows that red and processed meat intake is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Heme iron, heterocyclic amines, and endogenous N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are proposed to explain this effect, but their relative contribution is unknown. Our study aimed at determining, at nutritional doses, which is the main factor involved and proposing a mechanism of cancer promotion by red meat. The relative part of heme iron (1% in diet), heterocyclic amines (PhIP + MeIQx, 50 + 25 μg/kg in diet), and NOC (induced by NaNO₂+ NaNO₂; 0.17 + 0.23 g/L of drinking water) was determined by a factorial design and preneoplastic endpoints in chemically induced rats and validated on tumors in Min mice. The molecular mechanisms (genotoxicity, cytotoxicity) were analyzed in vitro in normal and Apc-deficient cell lines and confirmed on colon mucosa. Heme iron increased the number of preneoplastic lesions, but dietary heterocyclic amines and NOC had no effect on carcinogenesis in rats. Dietary hemoglobin increased tumor load in Min mice (control diet: 67 ± 39 mm²; 2.5% hemoglobin diet: 114 ± 47 mm², P = 0.004). In vitro, fecal water from rats given hemoglobin was rich in aldehydes and was cytotoxic to normal cells, but not to premalignant cells. The aldehydes 4-hydroxynonenal and 4-hydroxyhexenal were more toxic to normal versus mutated cells and were only genotoxic to normal cells. Genotoxicity was also observed in colon mucosa of mice given hemoglobin. These results highlight the role of heme iron in the promotion of colon cancer by red meat and suggest that heme iron could initiate carcinogenesis through lipid peroxidation. . ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. No changes in heme synthesis in human Friedreich´s ataxia erythroid progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Hannes; Singh, Himanshu Narayan; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Goldenberg, Hans; Moganty, Rajeswari R; Scheiber-Mojdehkar, Barbara; Sturm, Brigitte

    2017-07-20

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by reduced expression of the protein frataxin. Frataxin is thought to play a role in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and heme synthesis. In this study, we used erythroid progenitor stem cells obtained from FRDA patients and healthy donors to investigate the putative role, if any, of frataxin deficiency in heme synthesis. We used electrochemiluminescence and qRT-PCR for frataxin protein and mRNA quantification. We used atomic absorption spectrophotometry for iron levels and a photometric assay for hemoglobin levels. Protoporphyrin IX and Ferrochelatase were analyzed using auto-fluorescence. An "IronChip" microarray analysis followed by a protein-protein interaction analysis was performed. FRDA patient cells showed no significant changes in iron levels, hemoglobin synthesis, protoporphyrin IX levels, and ferrochelatase activity. Microarray analysis presented 11 genes that were significantly changed in all patients compared to controls. The genes are especially involved in oxidative stress, iron homeostasis and angiogenesis. The mystery about the involvement of frataxin on iron metabolism raises the question why frataxin deficiency in primary FRDA cells did not lead to changes in biochemical parameters of heme synthesis. It seems that alternative pathways can circumvent the impact of frataxin deficiency on heme synthesis. We show for the first time in primary FRDA patient cells that reduced frataxin levels are still sufficient for heme synthesis and possibly other mechanisms can overcome reduced frataxin levels in this process. Our data strongly support the fact that so far no anemia in FRDA patients was reported. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Heme-responsive Regulator Controls Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Holly A; Marolda, Cristina L; Pinter, Tyler B; Stillman, Martin J; Heinrichs, David E

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a multitude of mechanisms by which it can obtain iron during growth under iron starvation conditions. It expresses an effective heme acquisition system (the iron-regulated surface determinant system), it produces two carboxylate-type siderophores staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B (SB), and it expresses transporters for many other siderophores that it does not synthesize. The ferric uptake regulator protein regulates expression of genes encoding all of these systems. Mechanisms of fine-tuning expression of iron-regulated genes, beyond simple iron regulation via ferric uptake regulator, have not been uncovered in this organism. Here, we identify the ninth gene of the sbn operon, sbnI, as encoding a ParB/Spo0J-like protein that is required for expression of genes in the sbn operon from sbnD onward. Expression of sbnD-I is drastically decreased in an sbnI mutant, and the mutant does not synthesize detectable SB during early phases of growth. Thus, SB-mediated iron acquisition is impaired in an sbnI mutant strain. We show that the protein forms dimers and tetramers in solution and binds to DNA within the sbnC coding region. Moreover, we show that SbnI binds heme and that heme-bound SbnI does not bind DNA. Finally, we show that providing exogenous heme to S. aureus growing in an iron-free medium results in delayed synthesis of SB. This is the first study in S. aureus that identifies a DNA-binding regulatory protein that senses heme to control gene expression for siderophore synthesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. A Heme-responsive Regulator Controls Synthesis of Staphyloferrin B in Staphylococcus aureus*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Holly A.; Marolda, Cristina L.; Pinter, Tyler B.; Stillman, Martin J.; Heinrichs, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus possesses a multitude of mechanisms by which it can obtain iron during growth under iron starvation conditions. It expresses an effective heme acquisition system (the iron-regulated surface determinant system), it produces two carboxylate-type siderophores staphyloferrin A and staphyloferrin B (SB), and it expresses transporters for many other siderophores that it does not synthesize. The ferric uptake regulator protein regulates expression of genes encoding all of these systems. Mechanisms of fine-tuning expression of iron-regulated genes, beyond simple iron regulation via ferric uptake regulator, have not been uncovered in this organism. Here, we identify the ninth gene of the sbn operon, sbnI, as encoding a ParB/Spo0J-like protein that is required for expression of genes in the sbn operon from sbnD onward. Expression of sbnD–I is drastically decreased in an sbnI mutant, and the mutant does not synthesize detectable SB during early phases of growth. Thus, SB-mediated iron acquisition is impaired in an sbnI mutant strain. We show that the protein forms dimers and tetramers in solution and binds to DNA within the sbnC coding region. Moreover, we show that SbnI binds heme and that heme-bound SbnI does not bind DNA. Finally, we show that providing exogenous heme to S. aureus growing in an iron-free medium results in delayed synthesis of SB. This is the first study in S. aureus that identifies a DNA-binding regulatory protein that senses heme to control gene expression for siderophore synthesis. PMID:26534960

  20. Determinants of the heme-CO vibrational modes in the H-NOX family†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Rosalie; Weinert, Emily E.; Boon, Elizabeth M.; Mathies, Richard A.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The H-NOX family of proteins have important functions in gaseous ligand signaling in organisms from bacteria to humans, including nitric oxide (NO) sensing in mammals, and provide a model system for probing ligand selectivity in hemoproteins. A unique vibrational feature that is ubiquitous throughout the Heme-Nitric oxide/OXygen binding (H-NOX) family is the presence of a high C-O stretching frequency. To investigate the cause of this spectroscopic characteristic, the Fe-CO and C-O stretching frequencies were probed in the H-NOX domain from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis (Tt H-NOX) using resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy. Four classes of heme pocket mutants were generated to assess the changes in stretching frequency: (i) the distal H-bonding network, (ii) the proximal histidine ligand, (iii) modulation of the heme conformation via Ile-5 and Pro-115, and (iv) the conserved Tyr-Ser-Arg (YxSxR) motif. These mutations revealed important electrostatic interactions that dampen the back-donation of the FeII dπ electrons into the CO π* orbitals. The most significant change occurred upon disruption of the H-bonds between the strictly conserved YxSxR motif and the heme propionate groups, producing two dominant CO-bound heme conformations. One conformer was structurally similar to Tt H-NOX WT; whereas the other displayed a decrease in ν(C-O) of up to ~70 cm−1 relative to the WT protein, with minimal changes in ν(Fe-CO). Taken together, these results show that the electrostatic interactions in the Tt H-NOX binding pocket are primarily responsible for the high ν(C-O) by decreasing the Fe dπ → CO π* back-donation, and suggest that the dominant mechanism by which this family modulates the FeII-CO bond likely involves the YxSxR motif. PMID:21714509

  1. Effect of methionine80 heme coordination on domain swapping of cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Shun; Yamashiro, Nobuhiro; Wang, Zhonghua; Nagao, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    Cytochrome c (cyt c) forms oligomers by domain swapping. It exchanges the C-terminal α-helical region between protomers, and the Met80‒heme iron bond is perturbed significantly in domain-swapped oligomers. The peroxidase activity of cyt c increases by Met80 dissociation from the heme iron, which may trigger apoptosis. This study elucidates the effect of the Met80 heme coordination on cyt c domain swapping by obtaining oligomers for both wild-type (WT) and M80A human cyt c by an addition of ethanol to their monomers, followed by lyophilization and dissolution to buffer, and investigating their dimer properties. The absorption and circular dichroism spectra of WT and M80A cyt c exhibited similar changes upon dimerization, indicating that Met80 does not affect the oligomerization process significantly. According to differential scanning calorimetric measurements, Met80 coordination to the heme iron had an effect on the stabilization of the monomer (ΔH = 16 kcal/mol), whereas no large difference was observed between the dimer-to-monomer dissociation temperatures of WT and M80A cyt c (61.0 °C). The activation enthalpy values were similar and relatively large for the dissociation of both WT and M80A cyt c dimers (WT, 120 ± 10 kcal/mol; M80A, 110 ± 10 kcal/mol), indicating that the dimers suffered large structural changes upon dissociation to monomers independent of the Met80 coordination to the heme iron. These results indicate that cyt c domain swapping may occur regardless of the Met80 coordination, whereas the monomer is stabilized by Met80 but the domain-swapped dimer structure and stability are less affected by the Met80 coordination.

  2. Structural and mutational analyses of the Leptospira interrogans virulence-related heme oxygenase provide insights into its catalytic mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabel Soldano

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase from Leptospira interrogans is an important virulence factor. During catalysis, redox equivalents are provided to this enzyme by the plastidic-type ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase also found in L. interrogans. This process may have evolved to aid this bacterial pathogen to obtain heme-iron from their host and enable successful colonization. Herein we report the crystal structure of the heme oxygenase-heme complex at 1.73 Å resolution. The structure reveals several distinctive features related to its function. A hydrogen bonded network of structural water molecules that extends from the catalytic site to the protein surface was cleared observed. A depression on the surface appears to be the H+ network entrance from the aqueous environment to the catalytic site for O2 activation, a key step in the heme oxygenase reaction. We have performed a mutational analysis of the F157, located at the above-mentioned depression. The mutant enzymes were unable to carry out the complete degradation of heme to biliverdin since the reaction was arrested at the verdoheme stage. We also observed that the stability of the oxyferrous complex, the efficiency of heme hydroxylation and the subsequent conversion to verdoheme was adversely affected. These findings underscore a long-range communication between the outer fringes of the hydrogen-bonded network of structural waters and the heme active site during catalysis. Finally, by analyzing the crystal structures of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase and heme oxygenase, we propose a model for the productive association of these proteins.

  3. Synthesis and Heme Polymerization Inhibitory Activity (HPIA Assay of Antiplasmodium of (1-N-(3,4-Dimethoxybenzyl-1,10-Phenanthrolinium Bromide from Vanillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhina Fitriastuti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of (1-N-(3,4-dimethoxy-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium bromide had been conducted from vanillin. Heme polymerization inhibitory activity assay of the synthesized antiplasmodium has also been carried out. The first step of reaction was methylation of vanillin using dimethylsulfate and NaOH. The mixture was refluxed for 2 h to yield veratraldehyde in the form of light yellow solid (79% yield. Methylation product was reduced using sodium borohydride (NaBH4 with grinding method and yielded veratryl alcohol in the form of yellow liquid (98% yield. Veratryl alcohol was brominated using PBr3 to yield yellowish black liquid (85% yield. The final step was benzylation of 1,10-phenanthroline monohydrate with the synthesized veratryl bromide under reflux condition in acetone for 14 h to afford (1-N-(3,4-dimethoxy-benzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium bromide (84% as yellow solid with melting point of 166-177 °C. The structures of products were characterized by FT-IR, GC-MS and 1H-NMR spectrometers. The results of heme polymerization inhibitory activity assay of (1-N-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium bromide showed that it had IC50 HPIA of 3.63 mM, while chloroquine had IC50 of4.37 mM. These results indicated that (1-N-(3,4-dimethoxybenzyl-1,10-phenanthrolinium bromide was more potential antiplasmodium than chloroquine.

  4. Structure of a novel c7-type three-heme cytochrome domain from a multidomain cytochrome c polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Pokkuluri, P. Raj; Londer, Yuri Y.; Duke, Norma E.C.; Erickson, Jill; Pessanha, Miguel; Salgueiro, Carlos A.; Schiffer, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a novel c7-type cytochrome domain that has two bishistidine coordinated hemes and one heme with histidine, methionine coordination (where the sixth ligand is a methionine residue) was determined at 1.7 Å resolution. This domain is a representative of domains that form three polymers encoded by the Geobacter sulfurreducens genome. Two of these polymers consist of four and one protein of nine c7-type domains with a total of 12 and 27 hemes, respectively. Four individual domains...

  5. Influence of heme environment structure on dioxygen affinity for the dual function Amphitrite ornata hemoglobin/dehaloperoxidase. Insights into the evolutional structure-function adaptations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shengfang; Sono, Masanori; Wang, Chunxue; Du, Jing; Lebioda, Lukasz; Dawson, John H. [SC

    2014-05-15

    Sea worm, Amphitrite ornata, has evolved its globin (an O2 carrier) also to serves as a dehaloperoxidase (DHP) to detoxify haloaromatic pollutants generated by competing species. A previous mutagenesis study by our groups on both DHP and sperm whale myoglobin (SW Mb) revealed some structural factors that influence the dehaloperoxidase activities (significantly lower for Mb) of both proteins. Using an isocyanide/O2 partition constant measurement method in this study, we have examined the effects of these structural factors on the O2 equilibrium constants (KO2) of DHP, SW Mb, and their mutants. A clear trend of decreasing O2 affinity and increasing catalytic activity along with the increase in the distal His Nεheme iron distance is observed. An H93K/T95H Mb double mutant mimicking the DHP proximal His positioning exhibited markedly enhanced O2 affinity, confirming the essential effect of proximal His rotation on the globin function of DHP. For DHP, the L100F, T56G and M86E variants showed the effects of distal volume, distal His flexibility and proximal electronic push, respectively, on the O2 affinity. This study provides insights into how DHP has evolved its heme environment to gain significantly enhanced peroxidase capability without compromising its primary function as an O2 carrier.

  6. The protein inhibitor of nNOS (PIN/DLC1/LC8) binding does not inhibit the NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, a key step in NO synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhad, Swapnil S; Jaiswal, Deepa; Ray, Krishanu; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2016-03-25

    The neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is an essential enzyme involved in the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO), a potent neurotransmitter. Although previous studies have indicated that the dynein light chain 1 (DLC1) binding to nNOS could inhibit the NO synthesis, the claim is challenged by contradicting reports. Thus, the mechanism of nNOS regulation remained unclear. nNOS has a heme-bearing, Cytochrome P450 core, and the functional enzyme is a dimer. The electron flow from NADPH to Flavin, and finally to the heme of the paired nNOS subunit within a dimer, is facilitated upon calmodulin (CaM) binding. Here, we show that DLC1 binding to nNOS-CaM complex does not affect the electron transport from the reductase to the oxygenase domain. Therefore, it cannot inhibit the rate of NADPH-dependent heme reduction in nNOS, which results in l-Arginine oxidation. Also, the NO release activity does not decrease with increasing DLC1 concentration in the reaction mix, which further confirmed that DLC1 does not inhibit nNOS activity. These findings suggest that the DLC1 binding may have other implications for the nNOS function in the cell. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 induction improves cardiac function following myocardial ischemia by reducing oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Issan

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation.In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured.HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine phospho kinase (CK, decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05. CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01, reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively. CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05. The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05. CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05 in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects.HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart as proved by the increased levels of pAKT with

  9. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Lee, Ching-Tien; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  10. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Ya-Ni [Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiz-Yuh [Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ching-Tien [Department of Nursing, Hsin Sheng College of Medical Care and Management, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chih-Hung [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lai, Chien-Cheng [Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Department of Surgery, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jia-Yi, E-mail: jywang2010@tmu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences and Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  11. The Heme Biosynthesis Pathway Is Essential for Plasmodium falciparum Development in Mosquito Stage but Not in Blood Stages*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Hangjun; Sigala, Paul A.; Miura, Kazutoyo; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Mather, Michael W.; Crowley, Jan R.; Henderson, Jeffrey P.; Goldberg, Daniel E.; Long, Carole A.; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2014-01-01

    Heme is an essential cofactor for aerobic organisms. Its redox chemistry is central to a variety of biological functions mediated by hemoproteins. In blood stages, malaria parasites consume most of the hemoglobin inside the infected erythrocytes, forming nontoxic hemozoin crystals from large quantities of heme released during digestion. At the same time, the parasites possess a heme de novo biosynthetic pathway. This pathway in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum has been considered essential and is proposed as a potential drug target. However, we successfully disrupted the first and last genes of the pathway, individually and in combination. These knock-out parasite lines, lacking 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase and/or ferrochelatase (FC), grew normally in blood-stage culture and exhibited no changes in sensitivity to heme-related antimalarial drugs. We developed a sensitive LC-MS/MS assay to monitor stable isotope incorporation into heme from its precursor 5-[13C4]aminolevulinic acid, and this assay confirmed that de novo heme synthesis was ablated in FC knock-out parasites. Disrupting the FC gene also caused no defects in gametocyte generation or maturation but resulted in a greater than 70% reduction in male gamete formation and completely prevented oocyst formation in female Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Our data demonstrate that the heme biosynthesis pathway is not essential for asexual blood-stage growth of P. falciparum parasites but is required for mosquito transmission. Drug inhibition of pathway activity is therefore unlikely to provide successful antimalarial therapy. These data also suggest the existence of a parasite mechanism for scavenging host heme to meet metabolic needs. PMID:25352601

  12. The neuroprotective effect of heme oxygenase (HO) on oxidative stress in HO-1 siRNA-transfected HT22 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizaki, Asuka; Tanaka, Sachiko; Ishige, Kumiko; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2006-09-07

    To investigate the role of heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes, we used siRNA technology to suppress HO-1 expression. HO-1 siRNA-transfected HT22 cells were vulnerable to hydrogen peroxide- and 4-hydroxynonenal-induced cytotoxicity. Biliverdin and bilirubin, degradative products of heme catalyzed by HO, protected HT22 cells from the insult of these oxidative stressors. These results suggest that inducible HO-1 plays a protective role against oxidative stress in HT22 cells.

  13. Structural characterization of a non-heme iron active site in zeolites that hydroxylates methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Benjamin E R; Böttger, Lars H; Bols, Max L; Yan, James J; Rhoda, Hannah M; Jacobs, Ariel B; Hu, Michael Y; Zhao, Jiyong; Alp, E Ercan; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2018-04-02

    Iron-containing zeolites exhibit unprecedented reactivity in the low-temperature hydroxylation of methane to form methanol. Reactivity occurs at a mononuclear ferrous active site, α-Fe(II), that is activated by N 2 O to form the reactive intermediate α-O. This has been defined as an Fe(IV)=O species. Using nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy coupled to X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe the bonding interaction between the iron center, its zeolite lattice-derived ligands, and the reactive oxygen. α-O is found to contain an unusually strong Fe(IV)=O bond resulting from a constrained coordination geometry enforced by the zeolite lattice. Density functional theory calculations clarify how the experimentally determined geometric structure of the active site leads to an electronic structure that is highly activated to perform H-atom abstraction.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OF ISOLATED TOADFISH HEPATOCYTES FOR STUDIES OF HEME SYNTHESIS AND UTILIZATION. (R823889)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  15. Effect of a heme oxygenase-1 inducer on NADPH oxidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute alcohol consumption leads to fatty liver. Although fatty liver is a reversible injury, its progression can develop into more severe liver problems including steatohepatitis and cirrhosis [1]. Previous studies showed that oxidative stress is an important factor contributing to the development of alcohol-induced liver injury [2].

  16. Heme arginate improves reperfusion patterns after ischemia: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial in healthy male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Martin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heme arginate can induce heme oxygenase-1 to protect tissue against ischemia-reperfusion injury. Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging measures changes in tissue oxygenation with a high spatial and temporal resolution. BOLD imaging was applied to test the effect of heme arginate on experimental ischemia reperfusion injury in the calf muscles. Methods A two period, controlled, observer blinded, crossover trial was performed in 12 healthy male subjects. Heme arginate (1 mg/kg body weight or placebo were infused 24 h prior to a 20 min leg ischemia induced by a thigh cuff. 3 Tesla BOLD-imaging of the calf was performed and signal time courses from soleus, gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscle were available from 11 participants for technical reasons. Results Peak reactive hyperemia signal of the musculature was significantly increased and occurred earlier after heme arginate compared to placebo (106.2±0.6% at 175±16s vs. 104.5±0.6% at 221±19s; p = 0.025 for peak reperfusion and p = 0.012 for time to peak. Conclusions A single high dose of heme arginate improves reperfusion patterns during ischemia reperfusion injury in humans. BOLD sensitive, functional MRI is applicable for the assessment of experimental ischemia reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle. Trial registration ClinicalTrials: NCT01461512 EudraCT: 2008-006967-35

  17. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  18. 4-Aminoquinoline-pyrimidine hybrids: synthesis, antimalarial activity, heme binding and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Khan, Shabana I; Tekwani, Babu L; Ponnan, Prija; Rawat, Diwan S

    2015-01-07

    A series of novel 4-aminoquinoline-pyrimidine hybrids has been synthesized and evaluated for their antimalarial activity. Several compounds showed promising in vitro antimalarial activity against both CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant strains with high selectivity index. All the compounds were found to be non-toxic to the mammalian cell lines. Selected compound 7g exhibited significant suppression of parasitemia in the in vivo assay. The heme binding studies were conducted to determine the mode of action of these hybrid molecules. These compounds form a stable 1:1 complex with hematin suggesting that heme may be one of the possible targets of these hybrids. The interaction of these conjugate hybrids was also investigated by the molecular docking studies in the binding site of PfDHFR. The pharmacokinetic property analysis of best active compounds was also studied using ADMET prediction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westre, Tami E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Fe-K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to investigate the electronic and geometric structure of the iron active site in non-heme iron enzymes. A new theoretical extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis approach, called GNXAS, has been tested on data for iron model complexes to evaluate the utility and reliability of this new technique, especially with respect to the effects of multiple-scattering. In addition, a detailed analysis of the 1s→3d pre-edge feature has been developed as a tool for investigating the oxidation state, spin state, and geometry of iron sites. Edge and EXAFS analyses have then been applied to the study of non-heme iron enzyme active sites.

  20. Nrf2-dependent induction of innate host defense via heme oxygenase-1 inhibits Zika virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hanxia; Falgout, Barry; Takeda, Kazuyo; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2017-01-01

    We identified primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as vulnerable target cells for Zika virus (ZIKV) infection. We demonstrate dramatic effects of hemin, the natural inducer of the heme catabolic enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in the reduction of ZIKV replication in vitro. Both LLC-MK2 monkey kidney cells and primary MDM exhibited hemin-induced HO-1 expression with major reductions of > 90% in ZIKV replication, with little toxicity to infected cells. Silencing expression of HO-1 or its upstream regulatory gene, nuclear factor erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2), attenuated hemin-induced suppression of ZIKV infection, suggesting an important role for induction of these intracellular mediators in retarding ZIKV replication. The inverse correlation between hemin-induced HO-1 levels and ZIKV replication provides a potentially useful therapeutic modality based on stimulation of an innate cellular response against Zika virus infection. PMID:28068513

  1. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Hyman M.; Song, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders. PMID:25761244

  2. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman M. Schipper

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders.

  3. Unsaturated Glycerophospholipids Mediate Heme Crystallization: Biological Implications for Hemozoin Formation in the Kissing Bug Rhodnius prolixus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiebler, R.; Majerowicz, David; Knudsen, Jens

    2014-01-01

    (PMVM). Here, we investigated the role of commercial glycerophospholipids containing serine, choline and ethanolamine as headgroups and R. prolixus midgut lipids (RML) in heme crystallization. All commercial unsaturated forms of phospholipids, as well as RML, mediated fast and efficient beta....... beta-hematin crystal morphologies were strikingly distinct among groups, with uPE producing homogeneous regular brick-shaped crystals. Interestingly, uPC-mediated reactions resulted in two morphologically distinct crystal populations: one less representative group of regular crystals, resembling those......PE. Interestingly, crystals produced by RML were homogeneous in shape and quite similar to those mediated by uPE. Thus, beta-hematin formation can be rapidly and efficiently induced by unsaturated glycerophospholipids, particularly uPE and uPC, and may play a role on biological heme crystallization in R. prolixus...

  4. The NEAT Domain-Containing Proteins of Clostridium perfringens Bind Heme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jocelyn M; Cheung, Jackie K; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Steer, David L; Bulach, Dieter M; Hiscox, Thomas J; Chakravorty, Anjana; Smith, A Ian; Gell, David A; Rood, Julian I; Awad, Milena M

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a pathogenic bacterium to scavenge iron from its host is important for its growth and survival during an infection. Our studies on C. perfringens gas gangrene strain JIR325, a derivative of strain 13, showed that it is capable of utilizing both human hemoglobin and ferric chloride, but not human holo-transferrin, as an iron source for in vitro growth. Analysis of the C. perfringens strain 13 genome sequence identified a putative heme acquisition system encoded by an iron-regulated surface gene region that we have named the Cht (Clostridium perfringens heme transport) locus. This locus comprises eight genes that are co-transcribed and includes genes that encode NEAT domain-containing proteins (ChtD and ChtE) and a putative sortase (Srt). The ChtD, ChtE and Srt proteins were shown to be expressed in JIR325 cells grown under iron-limited conditions and were localized to the cell envelope. Moreover, the NEAT proteins, ChtD and ChtE, were found to bind heme. Both chtDE and srt mutants were constructed, but these mutants were not defective in hemoglobin or ferric chloride utilization. They were, however, attenuated for virulence when tested in a mouse myonecrosis model, although the virulence phenotype could not be restored via complementation and, as is common with such systems, secondary mutations were identified in these strains. In summary, this study provides evidence for the functional redundancies that occur in the heme transport pathways of this life threatening pathogen.

  5. Heme oxygenase 1 improves glucoses metabolism and kidney histological alterations in diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ptilovanciv Ellen ON

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One important concern in the treatment of diabetes is the maintenance of glycemic levels and the prevention of diabetic nephropathy. Inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 is a rate-limiting enzyme thought to have antioxidant and cytoprotective roles. The goal of the present study was to analyze the effect of HO-1 induction in chronically hyperglycemic rats. The hyperglycemic rats were divided into two groups: one group, called STZ, was given a single injection of streptozotocin; and the other group was given a single streptozotocin injection as well as daily injections of hemin, an HO-1 inducer, over 60 days (STZ + HEME. A group of normoglycemic, untreated rats was used as the control (CTL. Body weight, diuresis, serum glucose levels, microalbuminuria, creatinine clearance rate, urea levels, sodium excretion, and lipid peroxidation were analyzed. Histological alterations and immunohistochemistry for HO-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS were assessed. After 60 days, the STZ group exhibited an increase in blood glucose, diuresis, urea, microalbuminuria, and sodium excretion. There was no weight gain, and there was a decrease in creatinine clearance in comparison to the CTL group. In the STZ + HEME group there was an improvement in the metabolic parameters and kidney function, a decrease in blood glucose, serum urea, and microalbuminuria, and an increase of creatinine clearance, in comparison to the STZ group. There was glomerulosclerosis, collagen deposition in the STZ rats and increase in iNOS and HO-1 expression. In the STZ + HEME group, the glomerulosclerosis and fibrosis was prevented and there was an increase in the expression of HO-1, but decrease in iNOS expression and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, our data suggest that chronic induction of HO-1 reduces hyperglycemia, improves glucose metabolism and, at least in part, protects the renal tissue from hyperglycemic injury, possibly through the antioxidant

  6. Rieske non-heme iron-dependent oxygenases catalyse diverse reactions in natural product biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Christopher; de Los Santos, Emmanuel L C; Alkhalaf, Lona M; Challis, Gregory L

    2018-04-13

    Covering: up to the end of 2017The roles played by Rieske non-heme iron-dependent oxygenases in natural product biosynthesis are reviewed, with particular focus on experimentally characterised examples. Enzymes belonging to this class are known to catalyse a range of transformations, including oxidative carbocyclisation, N-oxygenation, C-hydroxylation and C-C desaturation. Examples of such enzymes that have yet to be experimentally investigated are also briefly described and their likely functions are discussed.

  7. Tick iron and heme metabolism – New target for an anti-tick intervention

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajdušek, Ondřej; Šíma, Radek; Perner, Jan; Loosová, Gabriela; Harcubová, Adéla; Kopáček, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2016), s. 565-572 ISSN 1877-959X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11043S; GA ČR GP13-27630P; GA ČR GP13-12816P EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316304 - MODBIOLIN Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : tick * iron * heme * RNAi * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.230, year: 2016

  8. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  9. EPR spectral changes of nitrosil hemes and their relation to the hemoglobin T-R transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, S.R.W.; Ribeiro, P.C.; Bemski, G.

    1980-09-01

    EPR spectra of nitrosil-hemes were used to study the quaternary structure of hemoglobin. Human adult hemoglobin has been titrated with nitric oxide at pH 7.0 and 25 0 C. After the equilibration of NO among the α and β subunits the samples were frozen for EPR measurements. The spectra were fitted by linear combinations of three standard signals: the first arising from NO - β hemes and the other two arising from NO - α hemes of molecules in the high and low affinity conformations. The fractional amounts of α subunits exhibiting the high affinity spectrum fitted the two-state model with L = 7 x 10 6 , and csup(α) sub(NO) and csup(β) sub(NO) approximately 0.01. Hemoglobin has been marked with nitric oxide at one chain using low-saturation amounts of nitric oxide. The EPR spectra were studied as a function of oxygen saturation. Linear combinations of the three standard signals above fitted these spectra. The fractions of molecules exhibiting the high affinity spectrum fitted the two-state model with L = 7 x 10 6 , csub(O 2 ) = 0.0033 and csup(α) sub(NO) = 0.08, instead of csup(α) sub(NO) = 0.01.Thus, the two state model is not adequate to describe the conformational transition of these hybrids. The results are evidence of the nonequivalence between oxygen and nitric oxide as ligands. (Author) [pt

  10. Do pH and flavonoids influence hypochlorous acid-induced catalase inhibition and heme modification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krych-Madej, Justyna; Gebicka, Lidia

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), highly reactive oxidizing and chlorinating species, is formed in the immune response to invading pathogens by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride catalyzed by the enzyme myeloperoxidase. Catalase, an important antioxidant enzyme, catalyzing decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, hampers in vitro HOCl formation, but is also one of the main targets for HOCl. In this work we have investigated HOCl-induced catalase inhibition at different pH, and the influence of flavonoids (catechin, epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin) on this process. It has been shown that HOCl-induced catalase inhibition is independent on pH in the range 6.0-7.4. Preincubation of catalase with epigallocatechin gallate and quercetin before HOCl treatment enhances the degree of catalase inhibition, whereas catechin does not affect this process. Our rapid kinetic measurements of absorption changes around the heme group have revealed that heme modification by HOCl is mainly due to secondary, intramolecular processes. The presence of flavonoids, which reduce active catalase intermediate, Compound I to inactive Compound II have not influenced the kinetics of HOCl-induced heme modification. Possible mechanisms of the reaction of hypochlorous acid with catalase are proposed and the biological consequences are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Zinc protoporphyrin regulates cyclin D1 expression independent of heme oxygenase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Ping; Fernando, Amal P; Wang, Zhi; Salahudeen, Ameen; Yang, Guang; Lin, Qing; Wright, Clyde J; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2009-12-25

    Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an endogenous heme analogue that inhibits heme oxygenase (HO) activity, represses tumor growth. It can also translocate into the nucleus and up-regulate heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that tumor cell proliferation was inhibited by ZnPP, whereas tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), another equally potent HO-1 inhibitor, had no effect. Microarray analysis on 128 tumorigenesis related genes showed that ZnPP suppressed genes involved in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Among these genes, CYCLIN D1 (CCND1) was specifically inhibited as were its mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, ZnPP inhibited CCND1 promoter activity through an Sp1 and Egr1 overlapping binding site (S/E). We confirmed that ZnPP modulated the S/E site, at least partially by associating with Sp1 and Egr1 proteins rather than direct binding to DNA targets. Furthermore, administration of ZnPP significantly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and progression of a B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 tumor in mice by preferentially targeting tumor cells. These observations show HO independent effects of ZnPP on cyclin D1 expression and tumorigenesis.

  12. Zinc Protoporphyrin Regulates Cyclin D1 Expression Independent of Heme Oxygenase Inhibition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Ping; Fernando, Amal P.; Wang, Zhi; Salahudeen, Ameen; Yang, Guang; Lin, Qing; Wright, Clyde J.; Dennery, Phyllis A.

    2009-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an endogenous heme analogue that inhibits heme oxygenase (HO) activity, represses tumor growth. It can also translocate into the nucleus and up-regulate heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that tumor cell proliferation was inhibited by ZnPP, whereas tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), another equally potent HO-1 inhibitor, had no effect. Microarray analysis on 128 tumorigenesis related genes showed that ZnPP suppressed genes involved in cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Among these genes, CYCLIN D1 (CCND1) was specifically inhibited as were its mRNA and protein levels. Additionally, ZnPP inhibited CCND1 promoter activity through an Sp1 and Egr1 overlapping binding site (S/E). We confirmed that ZnPP modulated the S/E site, at least partially by associating with Sp1 and Egr1 proteins rather than direct binding to DNA targets. Furthermore, administration of ZnPP significantly inhibited cyclin D1 expression and progression of a B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 1 tumor in mice by preferentially targeting tumor cells. These observations show HO independent effects of ZnPP on cyclin D1 expression and tumorigenesis. PMID:19850937

  13. Diamond Blackfan Anemia at the Crossroad between Ribosome Biogenesis and Heme Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Chiabrando

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA is a rare, pure red-cell aplasia that presents during infancy. Approximately 40% of cases are associated with other congenital defects, particularly malformations of the upper limb or craniofacial region. Mutations in the gene coding for the ribosomal protein RPS19 have been identified in 25% of patients with DBA, with resulting impairment of 18S rRNA processing and 40S ribosomal subunit formation. Moreover, mutations in other ribosomal protein coding genes account for about 25% of other DBA cases. Recently, the analysis of mice from which the gene coding for the heme exporter Feline Leukemia Virus subgroup C Receptor (FLVCR1 is deleted suggested that this gene may be involved in the pathogenesis of DBA. FLVCR1-null mice show a phenotype resembling that of DBA patients, including erythroid failure and malformations. Interestingly, some DBA patients have disease linkage to chromosome 1q31, where FLVCR1 is mapped. Moreover, it has been reported that cells from DBA patients express alternatively spliced isoforms of FLVCR1 which encode non-functional proteins. Herein, we review the known roles of RPS19 and FLVCR1 in ribosome function and heme metabolism respectively, and discuss how the deficiency of a ribosomal protein or of a heme exporter may result in the same phenotype.

  14. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-03-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and beta thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias.

  15. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain induces a heme oxygenase dependent increase in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Karimi

    Full Text Available We investigated the consequences of feeding with a Lactobacillus species on the immune environment in GALT, and the role of dendritic cells and heme oxygenase-1 in mediating these responses. Feeding with a specific strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus induced a significant increase in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ functional regulatory T cells in GALT. This increase was greatest in the mesenteric lymph nodes and associated with a marked decrease in TNF and IFNγ production. Dendritic cell regulatory function and HO-1 expression was also increased. The increase in Foxp3+ T cells could be prevented by treatment with a heme oxygenase inhibitor. However, neither inhibition of heme oxygenase nor blockade of IL-10 and TGFβ prevented the inhibition of inflammatory cytokine production. In conclusion Lactobacillus feeding induced a tolerogenic environment in GALT. HO-1 was critical to the enhancement of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells while additional, as yet unknown, pathways were involved in the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokine production by T cells.

  16. A "naked" Fe(III)-(O₂²⁻)-Cu(II) species allows for structural and spectroscopic tuning of low-spin heme-peroxo-Cu complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Adam, Suzanne M; Schaefer, Andrew W; Sharma, Savita K; Peterson, Ryan L; Solomon, Edward I; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-01-28

    Here we describe a new approach for the generation of heme-peroxo-Cu compounds, using a "naked" complex synthon, [(F8)Fe(III)-(O2(2-))-Cu(II)(MeTHF)3](+) (MeTHF = 2-methyltetrahydrofuran; F8 = tetrakis(2,6-difluorophenyl)porphyrinate). Addition of varying ligands (L) for Cu allows the generation and spectroscopic characterization of a family of high- and low-spin Fe(III)-(O2(2-))-Cu(II)(L) complexes. These possess markedly varying Cu(II) coordination geometries, leading to tunable Fe-O, O-O, and Cu-O bond strengths. DFT calculations accompanied by vibrational data correlations give detailed structural insights.

  17. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing Peptides Using Non-Activated Immobilized Metal Affinity Cchromatography Resin Enrichment and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Yang, Feng; Qian, Weijun; Brown, Roslyn N.; Wang, Yuexi; Merkley, Eric D.; Park, Jea H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-10-01

    c-type cytochromes play essential roles in many biological activities of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including electron transfer, enzyme catalysis and induction of apoptosis. We report a novel enrichment strategy for identifying c-type heme-containing peptides that uses non-activated IMAC resin. The strategy demonstrated at least seven-fold enrichment for heme-containing peptides digested from a cytochrome c protein standard, and quantitative linear performance was also assessed for heme-containing peptide enrichment. Heme-containing peptides extracted from the periplasmic fraction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were further identified using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated the applicability of this enrichment strategy to identify c-type heme-containing peptides from a highly complex biological sample, and at the same time, confirmed the periplasmic localization of heme-containing proteins during suboxic respiration activities of S. oneidensis MR-1.

  18. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  19. Characterization of the Ala62Pro polymorphic variant of human cytochrome P450 1A1 using recombinant protein expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Heon; Kang, Sukmo [College of Veterinary Medicine, BK21plus Program for Creative Veterinary Science Research, and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Mi Sook [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung-Duck [College of Medicine, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinseo; Rhee, Sangkee [College of Agriculture of Life Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Doug-Young, E-mail: dyryu@snu.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, BK21plus Program for Creative Veterinary Science Research, and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 is a heme-containing enzyme involved in detoxification of hydrophobic pollutants. Its Ala62Pro variant has been identified previously. Ala62 is located in α-helix A of CYP1A1. Residues such as Pro and Gly are α-helix breakers. In this study, the Ala62Pro variant was characterized using heterologous expression. E. coli expressing the Ala62Pro variant, and the purified variant protein, had lower CYP (i.e. holoenzyme) contents than their wild-type (WT) equivalents. The CYP variant from E. coli and mammalian cells exhibited lower 7-ethoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (EROD) and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylation activities than the WT. Enhanced supplementation of a heme precursor during E. coli culture did not increase CYP content in E. coli expressing the variant, but did for the WT. As for Ala62Pro, E. coli expressing an Ala62Gly variant had a lower CYP content than the WT counterpart, but substitution of Ala62 with α-helix-compatible residues such as Ser and Val partially recovered the level of CYP produced. Microsomes from mammalian cells expressing Ala62Pro and Ala62Gly variants exhibited lower EROD activities than those expressing the WT or Ala62Val variant. A region harboring α-helix A has interactions with another region containing heme-interacting residues. Site-directed mutagenesis analyses suggest the importance of interactions between the two regions on holoenzyme expression. Together, these findings suggest that the Ala62Pro substitution leads to changes in protein characteristics and function of CYP1A1 via structural disturbance of the region where the residue is located. - Highlights: • Ala62 is located in α-helix A of the carcinogen-metabolizing enzyme CYP1A1. • Pro acts as an α-helix breaker. • A variant protein of CYP1A1, Ala62Pro, had lower heme content than the wild-type. • The variant of CYP1A1 had lower enzyme activities than the wild-type.

  20. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  1. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Activation of locus coeruleus heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway promoted an anxiolytic-like effect in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.G. Carvalho-Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway has been shown to play an important role in many physiological processes and is capable of altering nociception modulation in the nervous system by stimulating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC. In the central nervous system, the locus coeruleus (LC is known to be a region that expresses the heme oxygenase enzyme (HO, which catalyzes the metabolism of heme to carbon monoxide (CO. Additionally, several lines of evidence have suggested that the LC can be involved in the modulation of emotional states such as fear and anxiety. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the activation of the heme oxygenase-carbon monoxide pathway in the LC in the modulation of anxiety by using the elevated plus maze test (EPM and light-dark box test (LDB in rats. Experiments were performed on adult male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g (n=182. The results showed that the intra-LC microinjection of heme-lysinate (600 nmol, a substrate for the enzyme HO, increased the number of entries into the open arms and the percentage of time spent in open arms in the elevated plus maze test, indicating a decrease in anxiety. Additionally, in the LDB test, intra-LC administration of heme-lysinate promoted an increase on time spent in the light compartment of the box. The intracerebroventricular microinjection of guanylate cyclase, an sGC inhibitor followed by the intra-LC microinjection of the heme-lysinate blocked the anxiolytic-like reaction on the EPM test and LDB test. It can therefore be concluded that CO in the LC produced by the HO pathway and acting via cGMP plays an anxiolytic-like role in the LC of rats.

  3. Identification of Iron and Heme Utilization Genes in Aeromonas and their Role in the Colonization of the Leech Digestive Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eMaltz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is known that many pathogens produce high-affinity iron uptake systems like siderophores and/or genes for utilizing iron bound to heme-containing molecules, which facilitate iron-acquisition inside a host. In mutualistic digestive-tract associations, iron uptake systems have not been as well studied. We investigated the importance of two iron utilization systems within the beneficial digestive-tract association Aeromonas veronii and the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana. Siderophores were detected in A. veronii using chrome azurol S. Using a mTn5, a transposon insertion in viuB generated a mutant unable to acquire iron using siderophores. The A. veronii genome was then searched for genes potentially involved in iron utilization bound to heme-containing molecules. A putative outer membrane heme receptor (hgpB was identified with a transcriptional activator, termed hgpR, downstream. The hgpB gene was interrupted in both the parent strain and the viuB mutant with an antibiotic resistance cassette, yielding a hgpB mutant and a mutant with both iron uptake systems inactivated. In vitro assays indicated that hgpB is involved in utilizing iron bound to heme and that both iron utilization systems are important for A. veronii to grow in blood. In vivo colonization assays revealed that the ability to acquire iron from heme-containing molecules is critical for A.veronii to colonize the leech gut. Since iron and specifically heme utilization is important in this mutualistic relationship and has a role as a possible virulence factor in other organisms, genomes from different Aeromonas strains (both clinical and environmental were queried with iron utilization genes of A. veronii. This analysis revealed the heme utilization genes are widely distributed among aeromonads. In addition, aeromonads posses a suite of genes involved in iron acquisition. These data further confirm symbiotic and pathogenic relationships possess similar mechanisms for interacting with

  4. Autophosphorylation of heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase and the role of the modification in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Jotaro; Sasaki, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Noriko; Yoshioka, Shinji; Matsushita, Miyuki; Shimizu, Toru

    2011-04-01

    Heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) kinase (HRI), functions in response to heme shortage in reticulocytes and aids in the maintenance of a heme:globin ratio of 1:1. Under normal conditions, heme binds to HRI and blocks its function. However, during heme shortage, heme dissociates from the protein and autophosphorylation subsequently occurs. Autophosphorylation comprises a preliminary critical step before the execution of the intrinsic function of HRI; specifically, phosphorylation of Ser-51 of eIF2α to inhibit translation of the globin protein. The present study indicates that dephosphorylated mouse HRI exhibits strong intramolecular interactions (between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains) compared to phosphorylated HRI. It is therefore suggested that autophosphorylation reduces the intramolecular interaction, which induces irreversible catalytic flow to the intrinsic eIF2α kinase activity after heme dissociates from the protein. With the aid of MS, we identified 33 phosphorylated sites in mouse HRI overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Phosphorylated sites at Ser, Thr and Tyr were predominantly localized within the kinase insertion region (16 sites) and kinase domain (12 sites), whereas the N-terminal domain contained five sites. We further generated 30 enzymes with mutations at the phosphorylated residues and examined their catalytic activities. The activities of Y193F, T485A and T490A mutants were significantly lower than that of wild-type protein, whereas the other mutant proteins displayed essentially similar activity. Accordingly, we suggest that Tyr193, Thr485 and Thr490 are essential residues in the catalysis. © 2011 The Authors Journal compilation © 2011 FEBS.

  5. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  6. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  7. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  8. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  9. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  10. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  11. Autoxidation and Oxygen Binding Properties of Recombinant Hemoglobins with Substitutions at the αVal-62 or βVal-67 Position of the Distal Heme Pocket*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Ming F.; Rice, Natalie W.; Maillett, David H.; Simplaceanu, Virgil; Ho, Nancy T.; Tam, Tsuey Chyi S.; Shen, Tong-Jian; Ho, Chien

    2013-01-01

    The E11 valine in the distal heme pocket of either the α- or β-subunit of human adult hemoglobin (Hb A) was replaced by leucine, isoleucine, or phenylalanine. Recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for structural and functional studies. 1H NMR spectra were obtained for the CO and deoxy forms of Hb A and the mutants. The mutations did not disturb the α1β2 interface in either form, whereas the H-bond between αHis-103 and βGln-131 in the α1β1 interfaces of the deoxy α-subunit mutants was weakened. Localized structural changes in the mutated heme pocket were detected for the CO form of recombinant Hb (rHb) (αV62F), rHb (βV67I), and rHb (βV67F) compared with Hb A. In the deoxy form the proximal histidyl residue in the β-subunit of rHb (βV67F) has been altered. Furthermore, the interactions between the porphyrin ring and heme pocket residues have been perturbed in rHb (αV62I), rHb (αV62F), and rHb (βV67F). Functionally, the oxygen binding affinity (P50), cooperativity (n50), and the alkaline Bohr Effect of the three α-subunit mutants and rHb (βV67L) are similar to those of Hb A. rHb (βV67I) and rHb (βV67F) exhibit low and high oxygen affinity, respectively. rHb (βV67F) has P50 values lower that those reported for rHb (αL29F), a B10 mutant studied previously in our laboratory (Wiltrout, M. E., Giovannelli, J. L., Simplaceanu, V., Lukin, J. A., Ho, N. T., and Ho, C. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 7207–7217). These E11 mutations do not slow down the autoxidation and azide-induced oxidation rates of the recombinant proteins. Results from this study provide new insights into the roles of E11 mutants in the structure-function relationship in hemoglobin. PMID:23867463

  12. Inhibition of heme oxygenase activity using a microparticle formulation of zinc protoporphyrin in an acute hemolytic newborn mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kazumichi; Kalish, Flora; Wong, Ronald J; Stevenson, David K

    2016-02-01

    Increased bilirubin production due to hemolysis can lead to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, by metalloporphyrins (Mps) may be an ideal preventive strategy for neonatal hemolytic disease. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) is a naturally occurring Mp, potent, not phototoxic, with minimal HO-1 upregulation, but is not orally absorbed. Recently, we designed a lipid-based ZnPP formulation (ZnPP-Lipid), which is orally absorbed by newborn mice. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of ZnPP-Lipid in heme-loaded newborn mice, a model analogous to hemolytic infants. After 24 h of heme administration (30 µmol/kg s.c.), 4-d-old mice were given 30 µmol ZnPP-Lipid/kg via intragastric injections. After 3 h, liver and brain HO activity were measured. HO-1 upregulation was assessed by determinations of HO-1 protein, promoter activity, and mRNA by Western blot, in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and RT-PCR, respectively. After heme loading, liver HO activity significantly increased ~1.6-fold, which was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ZnPP-Lipid. A dose of 30 µmol/kg returned activity to control levels. Brain HO activity was not inhibited. No significant increases in liver and brain HO-1 protein, promoter activity, and mRNA were observed. ZnPP-Lipid is effective and thus has potential for treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia due to hemolysis.

  13. Effects of Metalloporphyrins on Heme Oxygenase-1 Transcription: Correlative Cell Culture Assays Guide in Vivo Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Hajdena-Dawson

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase (HO is the rate-limiting step in the heme degradation pathway and is a potential target for the control, or prevention, of pathologic jaundice in neonates. Metalloporphyrins (Mps, a diverse set of synthetic derivatives of heme, can competitively inhibit the HO enzymes. However, certain Mps are phototoxic and some increase transcription of HO-1, the inducible HO isozyme. Therefore, effective development of this class of compounds as therapeutics for treating pathologic jaundice will require rapid and integrated biological screens to identify the most efficacious and safe Mps. To study the safety of these compounds, we assessed their cytotoxic effects and measured luciferase activity by bioluminescent imaging (BLI as an index of HO-1 transcription, first in live cell cultures and then in living transgenic reporter mice. A total of 12 Mps were first evaluated in the correlative cell culture assay. Based on results from this study, 2 Mps, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP and zinc bis glycol porphyrin (ZnBG, were selected for further studies in the live animal model. In vitro BLI showed ZnPP to be a strong inducer of HO-1 transcription in comparison to ZnBG, which showed minimal induction. Cytotoxicity studies revealed that ZnPP was phototoxic, whereas ZnBG had no effect on cell viability. In vivo BLI showed that both ZnPP and ZnBG had minimal effects on the levels of HO-1 transcription in the animals. Furthermore, serum enzyme assays indicated that neither caused detectable liver toxicity. These findings, and especially those with ZnBG, support the use of selected Mps as therapies for pathologic jaundice. Coupling the high throughput advantage of cell culture with the capability of imaging for whole-body temporal analyses could accelerate and refine the preclinical phases of drug development. Thus, this study serves as a model for understanding the effects of specific compounds in relation to defined targets using an integrated approach.

  14. Pegylated zinc protoporphyrin: a water-soluble heme oxygenase inhibitor with tumor-targeting capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, S K; Sawa, T; Fang, J; Tanaka, S; Miyamoto, Y; Akaike, T; Maeda, H

    2002-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a key enzyme in heme metabolism; it oxidatively degrades heme to biliverdin, accompanied by formation of free iron and carbon monoxide. Biliverdin is subsequently reduced by cytosolic biliverdin reductase to form bilirubin, a potent antioxidant. We recently found that tumor cells utilize HO to protect themselves from oxidative stress by producing the antioxidant bilirubin. This result suggested an important potential therapeutic strategy: suppression of bilirubin production with the use of HO inhibitors; hence, cancer cells become vulnerable to oxidative stress induced by anticancer drugs or leukocytes of the host. This concept was validated by using the intraarterial administration of an HO inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin, in nonphysiological solution. In the present study, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) was conjugated with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with molecular weight of 5000, to make ZnPP, a water-soluble compound (PEG-ZnPP), and to improve its tumor-targeting efficiency. PEG was conjugated to ZnPP through newly introduced amino groups, where ethylenediamine residues were added at C6 and C7 of protoporphyrin. The divalent zinc cation was chelated into the protoporphyrin ring to obtain PEG-ZnPP. PEG-ZnPP did become highly water-soluble, and it formed multimolecular associations with molecules larger than 70 kDa in aqueous media. PEG-ZnPP inhibited splenic microsomal HO activity in vitro in a competitive manner in the presence of hemin, with an apparent inhibitory constant of 0.12 microM. Most important, PEG-ZnPP injected intravenously significantly suppressed intratumor HO activity in a murine solid tumor model, which suggests that tumor-targeted inhibition of HO is possible with the use of PEG-ZnPP.

  15. Epalrestat increases glutathione, thioredoxin, and heme oxygenase-1 by stimulating Nrf2 pathway in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Yama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epalrestat (EPS is the only aldose reductase inhibitor that is currently available for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. Recently, we found that EPS at near-plasma concentration increases the intracellular levels of glutathione (GSH in rat Schwann cells. GSH plays a crucial role in protecting endothelial cells from oxidative stress, thereby preventing vascular diseases. Here we show that EPS increases GSH levels in not only Schwann cells but also endothelial cells. Treatment of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs, an in vitro model of the vascular endothelium, with EPS caused a dramatic increase in intracellular GSH levels. This was concomitant with the up-regulation of glutamate cysteine ligase, an enzyme catalyzing the first and rate-limiting step in de novo GSH synthesis. Moreover, EPS stimulated the expression of thioredoxin and heme oxygenase-1, which have important redox regulatory functions in endothelial cells. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 is a key transcription factor that regulates the expression of antioxidant genes. EPS increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in BAECs. Nrf2 knockdown by siRNA suppressed the EPS-induced glutamate cysteine ligase, thioredoxin-1, and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Interestingly, LY294002, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, abolished the EPS-stimulated GSH synthesis, suggesting that the kinase is associated with Nrf2 activation induced by EPS. Furthermore, EPS reduced the cytotoxicity induced by H2O2 and tert-butylhydroperoxide, indicating that EPS plays a role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Taken together, the results provide evidence that EPS exerts new beneficial effects on endothelial cells by increasing GSH, thioredoxin, and heme oxygenase-1 levels through the activation of Nrf2. We suggest that EPS has the potential to prevent several vascular diseases caused by oxidative stress.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1: A new druggable target in the management of chronic and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Loredana; Romeo, Giuseppe; Modica, Maria N; Amata, Emanuele; Sorrenti, Valeria; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Pittalà, Valeria

    2017-12-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the enzyme catalyzing the rate-limiting oxidative degradation of cellular heme into free iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin, which is then rapidly converted into bilirubin. By means of these catabolic end-products and by removal of pro-oxidant heme, HO-1 exerts antioxidant, antiapoptotic, and immune-modulating effects, leading to overall cytoprotective and beneficial functions in mammalian cells. Therefore, HO-1 is considered a survival molecule in various stress-related conditions. By contrast, growing evidence suggests that HO-1 is a survival-enhancing molecule also in various solid and blood cancers, such as various types of leukemia, promoting carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and chemo-resistance. Among leukemias, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is currently therapeutically well treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as Imatinib (IM) and its congeners; nevertheless, resistance to all kinds of current drugs persist in a number of patients. Moreover, treatment outcomes for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain unsatisfactory, despite progress in chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Therefore, identification of new eligible targets that may improve leukemias therapy is of general interest. Several recent papers prove that inhibition of HO-1 through HO-1 inhibitors as well as modulation of other pathways involving HO-1 by a number of different new or known molecules, are critical for leukemia treatment. This review summarizes the current understanding of the pro-tumorigenic role of HO-1 and its potential as a molecular target for the treatment of leukemias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic analyses of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 in different forms of pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weis

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 is the rate limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of inflammatory processes. In animal models the course of pancreatitis was ameliorated by up-regulation of HMOX1 expression. Additionally, carbon monoxide released during heme breakdown inhibited proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells and might thereby prevent the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP. Transcription of HMOX1 in humans is influenced by a GT-repeat located in the promoter. As such, HMOX1 variants might be of importance in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.The GT-repeat and SNP rs2071746 were investigated with fluorescence labelled primers and by melting curve analysis in 285 patients with acute pancreatitis, 208 patients with alcoholic CP, 207 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and in 289 controls, respectively. GT-repeat analysis was extended to a total of 446 alcoholic CP patients. In addition, we performed DNA sequencing in 145 patients with alcoholic CP, 138 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and 151 controls. Exon 3 screening was extended to additional patients and controls.S- and L-alleles of the GT-repeat, genotypes and alleles of SNP rs2071746 and non-synonymous variants detected by sequencing were found with similar frequencies in all groups.Although functional data implicate a potential influence of HMOX1 variants on the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, we did not find any association. As rare non-synonymous HMOX1 variants were found in patients and controls, it is rather unlikely that they will have functional consequences essential for pancreatitis development.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates vascular remodeling following balloon injury in rat carotid arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulis, D A; Durante, W; Peyton, K J; Evans, A J; Schafer, A I

    2001-03-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system of heme catabolism has been proposed to exert protective actions upon the cardiovascular system. This investigation examined the influence of HO-1 induction on vascular remodeling following arterial injury. Rats were subjected to left carotid artery (LCA) balloon injury following pre-treatment with either vehicle, the HO-1 inducer hemin (50 mg/kg, SC), or concomitant treatment with hemin and the HO-1 inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP-IX; 50 micromol/kg, IP). Animals were injected daily for 14 days post-injury, after which animals were sacrificed and tissues obtained. Western blot analyses revealed vascular HO-1 induction after 2 and 16 days of hemin treatment. Positive immunostaining for HO-1 was detected in the endothelial and adventitial layers following 48 h of hemin treatment and positive medial staining for HO-1 after 16 days of hemin treatment. The injured LCA of hemin-treated animals demonstrated significantly attenuated neointimal (NI) area (-57%), NI thickness (-58%), and NI area/medial wall area ratio (-40%) compared to the injured LCA of vehicle controls. The cross-sectional medial wall areas of both LCA and uninjured RCA were also significantly reduced in the hemin-treated animals. SnPP-IX treatment, however, completely restored the NI area, NI thickness, NI area/medial wall area ratio, and partially restored the medial wall area towards control levels. These results directly implicate HO-1 and the products of heme catabolism in attenuating the arterial response to injury and ensuing vascular wall remodeling.

  19. Spirulina platensis and phycocyanobilin activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1: a possible implication for atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasky, Zbynek; Zemankova, Lenka; Nemeckova, Ivana; Rathouska, Jana; Wong, Ronald J; Muchova, Lucie; Subhanova, Iva; Vanikova, Jana; Vanova, Katerina; Vitek, Libor; Nachtigal, Petr

    2013-11-01

    Spirulina platensis, a water blue-green alga, has been associated with potent biological effects, which might have important relevance in atheroprotection. We investigated whether S. platensis or phycocyanobilin (PCB), its tetrapyrrolic chromophore, can activate atheroprotective heme oxygenase-1 (Hmox1), a key enzyme in the heme catabolic pathway responsible for generation of a potent antioxidant bilirubin, in endothelial cells and in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. In vitro experiments were performed on EA.hy926 endothelial cells exposed to extracts of S. platensis or PCB. In vivo studies were performed on ApoE-deficient mice fed a cholesterol diet and S. platensis. The effect of these treatments on Hmox1, as well as other markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, was then investigated. Both S. platensis and PCB markedly upregulated Hmox1 in vitro, and a substantial overexpression of Hmox1 was found in aortic atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice fed S. platensis. In addition, S. platensis treatment led to a significant increase in Hmox1 promoter activity in the spleens of Hmox-luc transgenic mice. Furthermore, both S. platensis and PCB were able to modulate important markers of oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction, such as eNOS, p22 NADPH oxidase subunit, and/or VCAM-1. Both S. platensis and PCB activate atheroprotective HMOX1 in endothelial cells and S. platensis increased the expression of Hmox1 in aortic atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-deficient mice, and also in Hmox-luc transgenic mice beyond the lipid lowering effect. Therefore, activation of HMOX1 and the heme catabolic pathway may represent an important mechanism of this food supplement for the reduction of atherosclerotic disease.

  20. Gut Microbiota Conversion of Dietary Ellagic Acid into Bioactive Phytoceutical Urolithin A Inhibits Heme Peroxidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piu Saha

    Full Text Available Numerous studies signify that diets rich in phytochemicals offer many beneficial functions specifically during pathologic conditions, yet their effects are often not uniform due to inter-individual variation. The host indigenous gut microbiota and their modifications of dietary phytochemicals have emerged as factors that greatly influence the efficacy of phytoceutical-based intervention. Here, we investigated the biological activities of one such active microbial metabolite, Urolithin A (UA or 3,8-dihydroxybenzo[c]chromen-6-one, which is derived from the ellagic acid (EA. Our study demonstrates that UA potently inhibits heme peroxidases i.e. myeloperoxidase (MPO and lactoperoxidase (LPO when compared to the parent compound EA. In addition, chrome azurol S (CAS assay suggests that EA, but not UA, is capable of binding to Fe3+, due to its catechol-like structure, although its modest heme peroxidase inhibitory activity is abrogated upon Fe3+-binding. Interestingly, UA-mediated MPO and LPO inhibition can be prevented by innate immune protein human NGAL or its murine ortholog lipocalin 2 (Lcn2, implying the complex nature of host innate immunity-microbiota interactions. Spectral analysis indicates that UA inhibits heme peroxidase-catalyzed reaction by reverting the peroxidase back to its inactive native state. In support of these in vitro results, UA significantly reduced phorbol myristate acetate (PMA-induced superoxide generation in neutrophils, however, EA failed to block the superoxide generation. Treatment with UA significantly reduced PMA-induced mouse ear edema and MPO activity compared to EA treated mice. Collectively, our results demonstrate that microbiota-mediated conversion of EA to UA is advantageous to both host and microbiota i.e. UA-mediated inhibition of pro-oxidant enzymes reduce tissue inflammation, mitigate non-specific killing of gut bacteria, and abrogate iron-binding property of EA, thus providing a competitive edge to the

  1. Electron transfer patterns of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Schmidt, L.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    We report kinetic data for the two-step electron transfer (ET) oxidation and reduction of the two-domain di-heme redox protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome (cyt) c(4) by [Co(bipy)(3)](2- 3-) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine). Following earlier reports, the data accord with both bi- and tri......) for which fast, ms to sub-ms intramolecular interheme ET is a crucial step. The rate constant dependence on the solvent viscosity has disclosed strong coupling to both a (set of) frictionally damped solvent/protein nuclear modes and intramolecular friction-less "ballistic" modes, indicative of notable...

  2. Heme arginate potentiates latent HIV-1 reactivation while inhibiting the acute infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Prakash; Vlkova, Lenka; Liskova, Jana; Melkova, Zora

    2011-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) successfully escapes from host immune surveillance, vaccines and antiretroviral agents. The available antiretroviral compounds can only control viremia, but it is impossible to eliminate the virus from the organism, namely because HIV-1 provirus persists in the reservoir cells from which the virus repeatedly disseminates into new cells. Current therapeutic approaches, however, do not specifically address the stage of virus reactivation. Heme has been demonstrated as very efficient in inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcription, while its derivative hemin ameliorated HIV-1 infection via induction of heme oxygenase-1. Normosang (heme arginate; HA) is a human hemin-containing compound used to treat acute porphyria. In this work, we studied the effects of HA in HIV-1-acutely infected T-cell lines, and in cell lines harboring either a complete HIV-1 provirus (ACH-2 cells) or an HIV-1 "mini-virus" (Jurkat clones expressing EGFP under control of HIV LTR). We demonstrate that HA inhibited HIV-1 replication during the acute infection, which was accompanied by the inhibition of reverse transcription. On the other hand, HA alone stimulated the reactivation of HIV-1 "mini-virus" and synergized with phorbol ester or TNF-α in the reactivation of HIV-1 provirus. The stimulatory effects of HA were inhibited by N-acetyl cysteine, suggesting an increased redox stress and activation of NF-κB. Further, HA induced expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in ACH-2 cells, while HO-1 was found expressed in untreated Jurkat clones. Inhibitor of HO-1 activity, tin protoporphyrin IX, further increased HA-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 "mini-virus" in Jurkat clones, and this effect was also inhibited by N-acetyl cysteine. The stimulatory effects of HA on HIV-1 reactivation thus seem to involve HO-1 and generation of free radicals. Additionally, the effective concentrations of HA did neither affect normal T-cell activation with PMA nor induce activation of the

  3. Heme oxygenase-2 gene deletion attenuates oxidative stress in neurons exposed to extracellular hemin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benvenisti-Zarom Luna

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemin, the oxidized form of heme, accumulates in intracranial hematomas and is a potent oxidant. Growing evidence suggests that it contributes to delayed injury to surrounding tissue, and that this process is affected by the heme oxygenase enzymes. In a prior study, heme oxygenase-2 gene deletion increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to hemin. The present study tested the effect of HO-2 gene deletion on protein oxidation, reactive oxygen species formation, and cell viability after mixed cortical neuron/astrocyte cultures were incubated with neurotoxic concentrations of hemin. Results Continuous exposure of wild-type cultures to 1–10 μM hemin for 14 h produced concentration-dependent neuronal death, as detected by both LDH release and fluorescence intensity after propidium iodide staining, with an EC50 of 1–2 μM; astrocytes were not injured by these low hemin concentrations. Cell death was consistently reduced by at least 60% in knockout cultures. Exposure to hemin for 4 hours, a time point that preceded cell lysis, increased protein oxidation in wild-type cultures, as detected by staining of immunoblots for protein carbonyl groups. At 10 μM hemin, carbonylation was increased 2.3-fold compared with control sister cultures subjected to medium exchanges only; this effect was reduced by about two-thirds in knockout cultures. Cellular reactive oxygen species, detected by fluorescence intensity after dihydrorhodamine 123 (DHR staining, was markedly increased by hemin in wild-type cultures and was localized to neuronal cell bodies and processes. In contrast, DHR fluorescence intensity in knockout cultures did not differ from that of sham-washed controls. Neuronal death in wild-type cultures was almost completely prevented by the lipid-soluble iron chelator phenanthroline; deferoxamine had a weaker but significant effect. Conclusions These results suggest that HO-2 gene deletion protects neurons in mixed

  4. Zinc Protoporphyrin Upregulates Heme Oxygenase-1 in PC-3 Cells via the Stress Response Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Kwok, Simon C. M.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a naturally occurring molecule formed in iron deficiency or lead poisoning, is a potent competitive inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). It also regulates expression of HO-1 at the transcriptional level. However, the effect of ZnPP on HO-1 expression is controversial. It was shown to induce HO-1 expression in some cells, but suppress it in others. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of ZnPP on HO-1 expression in prostate cancer PC-3 cells. ...

  5. Kinetics of reversible reductive carbonylation of heme in human cystathionine β-synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballal, Sebastián; Cuevasanta, Ernesto; Marmisolle, Inés; Kabil, Omer; Gherasim, Carmen; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma; Alvarez, Beatriz

    2013-07-02

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine or cysteine to form cystathionine and water or hydrogen sulfide (H2S), respectively. In addition to pyridoxal phosphate, human CBS has a heme cofactor with cysteine and histidine as ligands. While Fe(III)-CBS is inert to exogenous ligands, Fe(II)-CBS can be reversibly inhibited by carbon monoxide (CO) and reoxidized by O2 to yield superoxide radical. In this study, we have examined the kinetics of Fe(II)CO-CBS formation and reoxidation. Reduction of Fe(III)-CBS by dithionite showed a square root dependence on concentration, indicating that the reductant species was the sulfur dioxide radical anion (SO2(•-)) that exists in rapid equilibrium with S2O4(2-). Formation of Fe(II)CO-CBS from Fe(II)-CBS and 1 mM CO occurred with a rate constant of (3.1 ± 0.4) × 10(-3) s(-1) (pH 7.4, 25 °C). The reaction of Fe(III)-CBS with the reduced form of the flavoprotein methionine synthase reductase in the presence of CO and NADPH resulted in its reduction and carbonylation to form Fe(II)CO-CBS. Fe(II)-CBS was formed as an intermediate with a rate constant of (9.3 ± 2.5) × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1). Reoxidation of Fe(II)CO-CBS by O2 was multiphasic. The major phase showed a hyperbolic dependence on O2 concentration. Although H2S is a product of the CBS reaction and a potential heme ligand, we did not find evidence of an effect of exogenous H2S on activity or heme binding. Reversible reduction of CBS by a physiologically relevant oxidoreductase is consistent with a regulatory role for the heme and could constitute a mechanism for cross talk among the CO, H2S, and superoxide signaling pathways.

  6. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 protects genetically fat Zucker rat livers from ischemia/reperfusion injury

    OpenAIRE

    Amersi, Farin; Buelow, Roland; Kato, Hirohisa; Ke, Bibo; Coito, Ana J.; Shen, Xiu-Da; Zhao, Delai; Zaky, Joseph; Melinek, Judy; Lassman, Charles R.; Kolls, Jay K.; Alam, J.; Ritter, Thomas; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Farmer, Douglas G.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effects of upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in steatotic rat liver models of ex vivo cold ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In the model of ischemia/isolated perfusion, treatment of genetically obese Zucker rats with the HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or with adenoviral HO-1 (Ad-HO-1) significantly improved portal venous blood flow, increased bile production, and decreased hepatocyte injury. Unlike in untreated rats or those pretreated with the HO-1 inhibito...

  7. Mono- and binuclear non-heme iron chemistry from a theoretical perspective

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokob, T. A.; Chalupský, Jakub; Bím, Daniel; Andrikopoulos, Prokopis C.; Srnec, Martin; Rulíšek, Lubomír

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 21, 5/6 (2016), s. 619-644 ISSN 0949-8257 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31419S; GA ČR GA15-19143S Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1305 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : non-heme iron * density functional theory * multireference methods * dioxygen activation * reactivity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.894, year: 2016

  8. Meat, Dietary Heme Iron, and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei, Mohammad; Wang, Ye-Li; Yuan, Jian-Min; Pan, An; Koh, Woon-Puay

    2017-10-01

    We evaluated the relationships of red meat, poultry, fish, and shellfish intakes, as well as heme iron intake, with the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D).The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a population-based cohort study that recruited 63,257 Chinese adults aged 45-74 years from 1993 to 1998. Usual diet was evaluated using a validated 165-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire at recruitment. Physician-diagnosed T2D was self-reported during 2 follow-up interviews in 1999-2004 and 2006-2010. During a mean follow-up of 10.9 years, 5,207 incident cases of T2D were reported. When comparing persons in the highest intake quartiles with those in the lowest, the multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio for T2D was 1.23 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 1.33) for red meat intake (P for trend poultry intake (P for trend = 0.004), and 1.07 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.16) for fish/shellfish intake (P for trend = 0.12). After additional adjustment for heme iron, only red meat intake remained significantly associated with T2D risk (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.25; P for trend = 0.02). Heme iron was associated with a higher risk of T2D even after additional adjustment for red meat intake (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.28; P for trend = 0.03). In conclusion, red meat and poultry intakes were associated with a higher risk of T2D. These associations were mediated completely for poultry and partially for red meat by heme iron intake. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Synthesis, antimalarial activity, heme binding and docking studies of N-substituted 4-aminoquinoline-pyrimidine molecular hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Shiv Shyam; Khan, Shabana I; Bahuguna, Aparna; Kumar, Deepak; Rawat, Diwan S

    2017-03-31

    A series of novel N-substituted 4-aminoquinoline-pyrimidine hybrids have been synthesized via simple and economic route and evaluated for their antimalarial activity. Most compounds showed potent antimalarial activity against both CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant strains with high selectivity index. All the compounds were found to be non-toxic to the mammalian cell lines. The most active compound 7b was analysed for heme binding activity using UV-spectrophotometer. Compound was found to interact with heme and a complex formation between compound and heme in a 1:1 stoichiometry ratio was determined using job plots. The interaction of these hybrids was also investigated by the molecular docking studies in the binding site of wild type Pf-DHFR-TS and quadruple mutant Pf-DHFR-TS. The pharmacokinetic property analysis of best active compounds was also studied by ADMET prediction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Response to Wild Thyme Treatment Protects against Hypertension and Oxidative Stress.

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    Mihailovic-Stanojevic, Nevena; Miloradović, Zoran; Ivanov, Milan; Bugarski, Branko; Jovović, Đurđica; Karanović, Danijela; Vajić, Una-Jovana; Komes, Draženka; Grujić-Milanović, Jelica

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure is the most powerful contributor to the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and inverse correlation between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods or beverages and incidence of cardiovascular diseases gains more importance. Reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the development of hypertension. We found that wild thyme (a spice plant, rich in polyphenolic compounds) induced a significant decrease of blood pressure and vascular resistance in hypertensive rats. The inverse correlation between vascular resistance and plasma heme oxygenase-1 suggests that endogenous vasodilator carbon monoxide generated by heme oxidation could account for this normalization of blood pressure. Next product of heme oxidation, bilirubin (a chain-breaking antioxidant that acts as a lipid peroxyl radical scavenger), becomes significantly increased after wild thyme treatment and induces the reduction of plasma lipid peroxidation in hypertensive, but not in normotensive rats. The obtained results promote wild thyme as useful supplement for cardiovascular interventions.

  11. Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Response to Wild Thyme Treatment Protects against Hypertension and Oxidative Stress

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    Nevena Mihailovic-Stanojevic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High blood pressure is the most powerful contributor to the cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and inverse correlation between consumption of polyphenol-rich foods or beverages and incidence of cardiovascular diseases gains more importance. Reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the development of hypertension. We found that wild thyme (a spice plant, rich in polyphenolic compounds induced a significant decrease of blood pressure and vascular resistance in hypertensive rats. The inverse correlation between vascular resistance and plasma heme oxygenase-1 suggests that endogenous vasodilator carbon monoxide generated by heme oxidation could account for this normalization of blood pressure. Next product of heme oxidation, bilirubin (a chain-breaking antioxidant that acts as a lipid peroxyl radical scavenger, becomes significantly increased after wild thyme treatment and induces the reduction of plasma lipid peroxidation in hypertensive, but not in normotensive rats. The obtained results promote wild thyme as useful supplement for cardiovascular interventions.

  12. Glucocorticoids accelerate maturation of the heme pathway in fetal liver through effects on transcription and DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khulan, Batbayar; Liu, Lincoln; Rose, Catherine M; Boyle, Ashley K; Manning, Jonathan R; Drake, Amanda J

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely used in threatened preterm labor to promote maturation in many organ systems in preterm babies and have significant beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. We performed transcriptional profiling in fetal liver in a rat model of prenatal glucocorticoid exposure and identified marked gene expression changes in heme biosynthesis, utilization, and degradation pathways in late gestation. These changes in gene expression associated with alterations in DNA methylation and with a reduction in hepatic heme concentration. There were no persistent differences in gene expression, DNA methylation, or heme concentrations at 4 weeks of age, suggesting that these are transient effects. Our findings are consistent with glucocorticoid-induced accelerated maturation of the haematopoietic system and support the hypothesis that glucocorticoids can drive changes in gene expression in association with alterations in DNA methylation.

  13. Structural and Functional Models of Non-Heme Iron Enzymes : A Study of the 2-His-1-Carboxylate Facial Triad Structural Motif

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnincx, P.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The structural and functional modeling of a specific group of non-heme iron enzymes by the synthesis of small synthetic analogues is the topic of this thesis. The group of non-heme iron enzymes with the 2-His-1-carboxylate facial triad has recently been established as a common platform for the

  14. Westernized high-fat diet accelerates weight loss in dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice, which is further aggravated by supplementation of heme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Logt, Elise M. J.; Blokzijl, Tjasso; van der Meer, Roelof; Faber, Klaas Nico; Dijkstra, Gerard

    The Western diet, rich in fat and red meat, predisposes for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, little is known about mechanisms involved. Red meat contains high levels of heme, a well-known inducer of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Pharmacological induction of HO-1

  15. Heme Iron Content in Lamb Meat Is Differentially Altered upon Boiling, Grilling, or Frying as Assessed by Four Distinct Analytical Methods

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    Azin Pourkhalili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lamb meat is regarded as an important source of highly bioavailable iron (heme iron in the Iranians diet. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional cooking methods on the iron changes in lamb meat. Four published experimental methods for the determination of heme iron were assessed analytically and statistically. Samples were selected from lambs' loin. Standard methods (AOAC were used for proximate analysis. For measuring heme iron, the results of four experimental methods were compared regarding their compliance to Ferrozine method which was used for the determination of nonheme iron. Among three cooking methods, the lowest total iron and heme iron were found in boiling method. The heme iron proportions to the total iron in raw, boiled lamb meat and grilled, were counted as 65.70%, 67.75%, and 76.01%, receptively. Measuring the heme iron, the comparison of the methods in use showed that the method in which heme extraction solution was composed of 90% acetone, 18% water, and 2% hydrochloric acid was more appropriate and more correlated with the heme iron content calculated by the difference between total iron and nonheme iron.

  16. Erythropoietin attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension through interplay between endothelial progenitor cells and heme-oxygenase

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    Rosa L.E. Loon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH is a pulmonary vascular disease with a high mortality, characterized by typical angio-proliferative lesions. Erythropoietin (EPO attenuates pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH. We postulated that EPO acts through mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs and activation of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO1.MethodsRats with flow-associated PAH, resembling pediatric PAH, were treated with HO-1 inducer EPO in the presence or absence of the selective HO-activity-inhibitor tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP. HO-activity, circulating EPCs and pulmonary vascular lesions were assessed after 3 weeks.ResultsIn PAH-rats, circulating EPCs were decreased and HO-activity was increased compared to control. EPO-treatment restored circulating EPCs and improved pulmonary vascular remodeling, as shown by a reduced wall thickness and occlusion rate of the intra-acinar vessels. Inhibition of HO-activity with SnMP aggravated PAH. Moreover, SnMP treatment abrogated EPO-induced amelioration of pulmonary vascular remodeling, while surprisingly further increasing circulating EPCs as compared with EPO alone.ConclusionsIn experimental PAH, EPO treatment restored the number of circulating EPC’s to control level, improved pulmonary vascular remodeling, and showed important interplay with HO-activity. Inhibition of increased HO-activity in PAH-rats exacerbated progression of pulmonary vascular remodeling, despite the presence of restored numbers of circulating EPC’s. We suggest that both EPO-induced HO1 and EPCs are promising targets to ameliorate the pulmonary vasculature in PAH.

  17. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  18. Increased heme synthesis in yeast induces a metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration even under conditions of glucose repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Bu, Pengli; Zeng, Joey; Vancura, Ales

    2017-10-13

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and respiration is a complex process that involves several signaling pathways and transcription factors as well as communication between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Under aerobic conditions, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolizes glucose predominantly by glycolysis and fermentation. We have recently shown that altered chromatin structure in yeast induces respiration by a mechanism that requires transport and metabolism of pyruvate in mitochondria. However, how pyruvate controls the transcriptional responses underlying the metabolic switch from fermentation to respiration is unknown. Here, we report that this pyruvate effect involves heme. We found that heme induces transcription of HAP4 , the transcriptional activation subunit of the Hap2/3/4/5p complex, required for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources, in a Hap1p- and Hap2/3/4/5p-dependent manner. Increasing cellular heme levels by inactivating ROX1 , which encodes a repressor of many hypoxic genes, or by overexpressing HEM3 or HEM12 induced respiration and elevated ATP levels. Increased heme synthesis, even under conditions of glucose repression, activated Hap1p and the Hap2/3/4/5p complex and induced transcription of HAP4 and genes required for the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, electron transport chain, and oxidative phosphorylation, leading to a switch from fermentation to respiration. Conversely, inhibiting metabolic flux into the TCA cycle reduced cellular heme levels and HAP4 transcription. Together, our results indicate that the glucose-mediated repression of respiration in budding yeast is at least partly due to the low cellular heme level. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Dietary heme alters microbiota and mucosa of mouse colon without functional changes in host-microbe cross-talk.

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    Noortje IJssennagger

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer deaths in Western countries and is associated with diets high in red meat. Heme, the iron-porphyrin pigment of red meat, induces cytotoxicity of gut contents which injures surface cells leading to compensatory hyperproliferation of crypt cells. This hyperproliferation results in epithelial hyperplasia which increases the risk of colon cancer. In humans, a high red-meat diet increases Bacteroides spp in feces. Therefore, we simultaneously investigated the effects of dietary heme on colonic microbiota and on the host mucosa of mice. Whole genome microarrays showed that heme injured the colonic surface epithelium and induced hyperproliferation by changing the surface to crypt signaling. Using 16S rRNA phylogenetic microarrays, we investigated whether bacteria play a role in this changed signaling. Heme increased Bacteroidetes and decreased Firmicutes in colonic contents. This shift was most likely caused by a selective susceptibility of gram-positive bacteria to heme cytotoxic fecal water, which is not observed for gram-negative bacteria, allowing expansion of the gram-negative community. The increased amount of gram-negative bacteria most probably increased LPS exposure to colonocytes, however, there is no appreciable immune response detected in the heme-fed mice. There was no functional change in the sensing of the bacteria by the mucosa, as changes in inflammation pathways and Toll-like receptor signaling were not detected. This unaltered host-microbe cross-talk indicates that the changes in microbiota did not play a causal role in the observed hyperproliferation and hyperplasia.

  20. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

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    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  1. Role of the heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide pathway in the pathogenesis and prevention of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiu-Ming; Yin, Xue-Ying; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Guo, Shi-Bin; Sun, Xiao-Yu

    2013-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a severe complication of liver cirrhosis and its pathogenesis has yet to be fully elucidated. Previous studies have demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is important in the induction of liver cirrhosis. The present study aimed to investigate the role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis of HE. Rats were divided into 5 treatment groups; sham, bile duct ligation (BDL), HE, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). The levels of HO-1 were examined by western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Serum levels of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), ammonia levels in the plasma and brain, brain water content and portal vein pressure (PVP) were also quantified. Aquaporin-4 expression levels were measured by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR. The results demonstrated that the levels of HO-1 in the brain and the serum levels of COHb were significantly increased in the HE group compared with the BDL group. Brain water content, PVP and ammonia levels in the plasma and brain were increased in the HE and CoPP groups; however, these were reduced following the treatment with ZnPP. The levels of AQP-4 expression and oxidative stress in the brain were reduced following treatment with ZnPP and increased following treatment with CoPP. In conclusion, following the inhibition of HO-1 expression, treatment with ZnPP improved HE due to reducing the expression levels of AQP-4 and oxidative stress. Therefore, ZnPP treatment may represent a novel therapeutic approach for HE.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Is Dependent on Oxidative Stress and Reflects Treatment Outcomes

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    Neesha Rockwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis (TB and has been proposed as a biomarker of active disease. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb induces HO-1 as well as how its expression is affected by HIV-1 coinfection and successful antitubercular therapy (ATT are poorly understood. We found that HO-1 expression is markedly increased in rabbits, mice, and non-human primates during experimental Mtb infection and gradually decreased during ATT. In addition, we examined circulating concentrations of HO-1 in a cohort of 130 HIV-1 coinfected and uninfected pulmonary TB patients undergoing ATT to investigate changes in expression of this biomarker in relation to HIV-1 status, radiological disease severity, and treatment outcome. We found that plasma levels of HO-1 were elevated in untreated HIV-1 coinfected TB patients and correlated positively with HIV-1 viral load and negatively with CD4+ T cell count. In both HIV-1 coinfected and Mtb monoinfected patients, HO-1 levels were substantially reduced during successful TB treatment but not in those who experienced treatment failure or subsequently relapsed. To further delineate the molecular mechanisms involved in induction of HO-1 by Mtb, we performed a series of in vitro experiments using mouse and human macrophages. We found that Mtb-induced HO-1 expression requires NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species production induced by the early-secreted antigen ESAT-6, which in turn triggers nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NRF-2. These observations provide further insight into the utility of HO-1 as a biomarker of both disease and successful therapy in TB monoinfected and HIV-TB coinfected patients and reveal a previously undocumented pathway linking expression of the enzyme with oxidative stress.

  3. Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 deficiency stimulates heme oxygenase-1 expression via ROS-dependent and Nrf2 activation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Geun-Hee; Kim, Ki Young; Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr

    2016-05-13

    Methionine sulfoxide reductase B3 (MsrB3), which is primarily found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is an important protein repair enzyme that stereospecifically reduces methionine-R-sulfoxide residues. We previously found that MsrB3 deficiency arrests the cell cycle at the G{sub 1}/S stage through up-regulation of p21 and p27. In this study, we report a critical role of MsrB3 in gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which has an anti-proliferative effect associated with p21 up-regulation. Depletion of MsrB3 elevated HO-1 expression in mammalian cells, whereas MsrB3 overexpression had no effect. MsrB3 deficiency increased cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly in the mitochondria. ER stress, which is associated with up-regulation of HO-1, was also induced by depletion of MsrB3. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine as an ROS scavenger reduced augmented HO-1 levels in MsrB3-depleted cells. MsrB3 deficiency activated Nrf2 transcription factor by enhancing its expression and nuclear import. The activation of Nrf2 induced by MsrB3 depletion was confirmed by increased expression levels of its other target genes, such as γ-glutamylcysteine ligase. Taken together, these data suggest that MsrB3 attenuates HO-1 induction by inhibiting ROS production, ER stress, and Nrf2 activation. -- Highlights: •MsrB3 depletion induces HO-1 expression. •MsrB3 deficiency increases cellular ROS and ER stress. •MsrB3 deficiency activates Nrf2 by increasing its expression and nuclear import. •MsrB3 attenuates HO-1 induction by inhibiting ROS production and Nrf2 activation.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 expression in prostate cancer cells modulates the oxidative response in bone cells.

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    Mercedes Ferrando

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is a leading cause of death among males. It is currently estimated that inflammatory responses are linked to 15-20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. PCa is dominated by complications arising from metastasis to the bone where the tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment impairing the balance between bone formation and degradation. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is not completely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 counteracts oxidative damage and inflammation. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that HO-1 is implicated in PCa, demonstrating that endogenous HO-1 inhibits bone derived-prostate cancer cells proliferation, invasion and migration and decreases tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of HO-1 modulated PCa cells on osteoblasts proliferation in vitro and on bone remodeling in vivo. Using a co-culture system of PC3 cells with primary mice osteoblasts (PMOs, we demonstrated that HO-1 pharmacological induction (hemin treatment abrogated the diminution of PMOs proliferation induced by PCa cells and decreased the expression of osteoclast-modulating factors in osteoblasts. No changes were detected in the expression of genes involved in osteoblasts differentiation. However, co-culture of hemin pre-treated PC3 cells (PC3 Hem with PMOs provoked an oxidative status and activated FoxO signaling in osteoblasts. The percentage of active osteoblasts positive for HO-1 increased in calvarias explants co-cultured with PC3 Hem cells. Nuclear HO-1 expression was detected in tumors generated by in vivo bone injection of HO-1 stable transfected PC3 (PC3HO-1 cells in the femur of SCID mice. These results suggest that HO-1 has the potential to modify the bone microenvironment impacting on PCa bone metastasis.

  5. Treatment of Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Glatiramer Acetate Alters Expression of Heme-Oxygenase-1.

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    Antonia Janssen

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG synergizes with the immunomodulatory agent glatiramer acetate (GA in eliciting anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the relapsing-remitting EAE model. Thus, we hypothesized that mice with chronic EAE may also benefit from this combination therapy. We first assessed how a treatment with a single dose of GA together with daily application of EGCG may modulate EAE. Although single therapies with a suboptimal dose of GA or EGCG led to disease amelioration and reduced CNS inflammation, the combination therapy had no effects. While EGCG appeared to preserve axons and myelin, the single GA dose did not improve axonal damage or demyelination. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of EGCG was abolished when GA was applied in combination. To elucidate how a single dose of GA may interfere with EGCG, we focused on the anti-inflammatory, iron chelating and anti-oxidant properties of EGCG. Surprisingly, we observed that while EGCG induced a downregulation of the gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 in affected CNS areas, the combined therapy of GA+EGCG seems to promote an increased HO-1 expression. These data suggest that upregulation of HO-1 may contribute to diminish the neuroprotective benefits of EGCG alone in this EAE model. Altogether, our data indicate that neuroprotection by EGCG in chronic EAE may involve regulation of oxidative processes, including downmodulation of HO-1. Further investigation of the re-dox balance in chronic neuroinflammation and in particular functional studies on HO-1 are warranted to understand its role in disease progression.

  6. Modeling and computations of the intramolecular electron transfer process in the two-heme protein cytochrome c4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natzmutdinov, Renat R.; Bronshtein, Michael D.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.

    2012-01-01

    ligands in both low- and high-spin states by structure-optimized DFT. The computations enable estimating the intramolecular reorganization energy of the ET process for different combinations of low- and high-spin heme couples. Environmental reorganization free energies, work terms (‘‘gating’’) and driving...... performed computational modeling of the intramolecular ET process by a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and quantum mechanical charge transfer theory to disclose reasons for this difference. We first address the electronic structures of the model heme core with histidine and methionine axial...

  7. Exploring Genome-Wide – Dietary Heme Iron Intake Interactions and the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAI