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Sample records for previously acquired mutations

  1. A novel 5' ATRX mutation with splicing consequences in acquired alpha thalassemia-myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Maria E; Thurmes, Paul J; Hoyer, James D; Steensma, David P

    2005-11-01

    Acquired alpha thalassemia (hemoglobin H (HbH) disease) is a rare complication of neoplastic chronic myeloid disorders, especially myelodysplastic syndrome. Acquired HbH has recently been associated with mutations in an X-linked gene, ATRX, previously linked to inherited ATR-X syndrome (alpha thalassemia-retardation-X linked). A Swiss man with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia complicated by various autoimmune disorders and by strikingly microcytic, hypochromic anemia was analyzed for the presence of acquired HbH. After HbH detection, we sought an underlying genetic cause. We used denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography to screen for an ATRX mutation, and measured ATRX expression by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The patient had 50% HbH-containing cells on supravital staining. Marrow karyotype and the alpha globin cluster were normal. A clonally-restricted ATRX point mutation was detected in the conserved splice donor motif in intron 4 (IVS 4 +2 T-->C). Plasmid vector cloning of patient ATRX cDNA demonstrated both exon 4 skipping and partial intron retention with activation of a cryptic splice site, both outcomes resulting in frameshifts with premature stop codon generation in exon 5 and near-decimation of ATRX expression in myeloid cells. Normal exon 6 alternative splicing was retained. Intronic ATRX mutations with splicing consequences, uncommon in inherited ATR-X syndrome because of their devastating effect on expression of functional protein, should be routinely sought when undertaking molecular analysis of acquired HbH disease. Detection of an acquired ATRX mutation can help support clonality in karyotypically normal ambiguous myeloid disorders with HbH.

  2. Analysis of acquired mutations in transgenes arising in Ba/F3 transformation assays: findings and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Godil, Jamila; Agarwal, Anupriya; Tognon, Cristina; Druker, Brian

    2017-02-21

    The identification and functional validation of potentially oncogenic mutations in leukemia is an essential step toward a future of personalized targeted therapy. To assess the oncogenic capacity of individual mutations, reliable and scalable in vitro experimental approaches are required. Since 1988, researchers have used the IL-3 dependent Ba/F3 transformation assay to validate the oncogenic potential of mutations to drive factor-independent growth. Here we report a previously unrecognized phenomenon whereby Ba/F3 cells, engineered to express weakly transforming mutations, present with additional acquired mutations in the expressed transgene following factor withdrawal. Using four mutations with known transformative capacity in three cytokine receptors (CSF2RB, CSF3R and IL7R), we demonstrate that the mutated receptors are highly susceptible to acquiring additional mutations. These acquired mutations of unknown functional significance are selected by factor withdrawal but appear to exist prior to the removal of growth factor. This anomaly has the potential to confound efforts to both validate and characterize oncogenic mutations in leukemia, particularly when it is not standard practice to sequence validate cDNAs from transformed Ba/F3 lines. We present specific recommendations to detect and mitigate this phenomenon in future research using Ba/F3 transformation assays, along with methods to make the Ba/F3 assay more quantitative.

  3. Echinocandin Failure Case Due to a Previously Unreported FKS1 Mutation in Candida krusei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz; Rewes, Annika

    2014-01-01

    Echinocandins are the preferred therapy for invasive infections due to Candida krusei. We present here a case of clinical failure involving C. krusei with a characteristic FKS1 hot spot mutation not previously reported in C. krusei that was isolated after 14 days of treatment. Anidulafungin MICs ...... were elevated by ≥5 dilution steps above the clinical breakpoint but by only 1 step for a Candida albicans isolate harboring the corresponding mutation, suggesting a notable species-specific difference in the MIC increase conferred by this mutation.......Echinocandins are the preferred therapy for invasive infections due to Candida krusei. We present here a case of clinical failure involving C. krusei with a characteristic FKS1 hot spot mutation not previously reported in C. krusei that was isolated after 14 days of treatment. Anidulafungin MICs...

  4. Eight previously unidentified mutations found in the OA1 ocular albinism gene

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    Dufier Jean-Louis

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is an X-linked ocular disorder characterized by a severe reduction in visual acuity, nystagmus, hypopigmentation of the retinal pigmented epithelium, foveal hypoplasia, macromelanosomes in pigmented skin and eye cells, and misrouting of the optical tracts. This disease is primarily caused by mutations in the OA1 gene. Methods The ophthalmologic phenotype of the patients and their family members was characterized. We screened for mutations in the OA1 gene by direct sequencing of the nine PCR-amplified exons, and for genomic deletions by PCR-amplification of large DNA fragments. Results We sequenced the nine exons of the OA1 gene in 72 individuals and found ten different mutations in seven unrelated families and three sporadic cases. The ten mutations include an amino acid substitution and a premature stop codon previously reported by our team, and eight previously unidentified mutations: three amino acid substitutions, a duplication, a deletion, an insertion and two splice-site mutations. The use of a novel Taq polymerase enabled us to amplify large genomic fragments covering the OA1 gene. and to detect very likely six distinct large deletions. Furthermore, we were able to confirm that there was no deletion in twenty one patients where no mutation had been found. Conclusion The identified mutations affect highly conserved amino acids, cause frameshifts or alternative splicing, thus affecting folding of the OA1 G protein coupled receptor, interactions of OA1 with its G protein and/or binding with its ligand.

  5. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) and infantile autism: Absence of previously reported point mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fon, E.A.; Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Autism is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric syndrome of unknown etiology. There is evidence that a deficiency in the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), essential for de novo purine biosynthesis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of certain cases. A point mutation in the ADSL gene, resulting in a predicted serine-to-proline substitution and conferring structural instability to the mutant enzyme, has been reported previously in 3 affected siblings. In order to determine the prevalence of the mutation, we PCR-amplified the exon spanning the site of this mutation from the genomic DNA of patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for autistic disorder. None of the 119 patients tested were found to have this mutation. Furthermore, on preliminary screening using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), no novel mutations were detected in the coding sequence of four ADSL exons, spanning approximately 50% of the cDNA. In light of these findings, it appears that mutations in the ADSL gene represent a distinctly uncommon cause of autism. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) and infantile autism: absence of previously reported point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fon, E A; Sarrazin, J; Meunier, C; Alarcia, J; Shevell, M I; Philippe, A; Leboyer, M; Rouleau, G A

    1995-12-18

    Autism is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric syndrome of unknown etiology. There is evidence that a deficiency in the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), essential for de novo purine biosynthesis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of certain cases. A point mutation in the ADSL gene, resulting in a predicted serine-to-proline substitution and conferring structural instability to the mutant enzyme, has been reported previously in 3 affected siblings. In order to determine the prevalence of the mutation, we PCR-amplified the exon spanning the site of this mutation from the genomic DNA of patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for autistic disorder. None of the 119 patients tested were found to have this mutation. Furthermore, on preliminary screening using singlestrand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), no novel mutations were detected in the coding sequence of four ADSL exons, spanning approximately 50% of the cDNA. In light of these findings, it appears that mutations in the ADSL gene represent a distinctly uncommon cause of autism.

  7. TIPS Placement in Swine, Guided by Electromagnetic Real-Time Needle Tip Localization Displayed on Previously Acquired 3-D CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Stephen B.; Magee, Carolyn; Acker, David E.; Venbrux, Anthony C.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of guiding a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure with an electromagnetic real-time needle tip position sensor coupled to previously acquired 3-dimensional (3-D) computed tomography (CT) images. Methods: An electromagnetic position sensor was placed at the tip of a Colapinto needle. The real-time position and orientation of the needle tip was then displayed on previously acquired 3-D CT images which were registered with the five swine. Portal vein puncture was then attempted in all animals. Results: The computer calculated accuracy of the position sensor was on average 3 mm. Four of five portal vein punctures were successful. In the successes, only one or two attempts were necessary and success was achieved in minutes. Conclusion: A real-time position sensor attached to the tip of a Colapinto needle and coupled to previously acquired 3-D CT images may potentially aid in entering the portal vein during the TIPS procedure

  8. Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa-pneumonia in a previously healthy man occupationally exposed to metalworking fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is well known and frequently found in hospitals and nursing care facilities, many cases are also reported outside these boundaries. In general, this pathogen infects debilitated patients either by comorbidities or by any form of immunodeficiency. In cases of respiratory infection, tobacco abuse seems to play an important role as a risk factor. In previously healthy patients, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with P. aeruginosa as the etiological agent is extremely rare, and unlike the cases involving immunocompromised or hospitalized patients, the outcome is severe, and is fatal in up to 61.1% of cases. Aerosolized contaminated water or solutions are closely linked to the development of respiratory tract infection. In this setting, metalworking fluids used in factories may be implicated in CAP involving previously healthy people. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man who worked in a metalworking factory and presented a right upper lobar pneumonia with a rapid fatal outcome. P. aeruginosa was cultured from blood and tracheal aspirates. The autopsy findings confirmed a hemorrhagic necrotizing pneumonia with bacteria-invading vasculitis and thrombosis. A culture of the metalworking fluid of the factory was also positive for P. aeruginosa. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that both strains (blood culture and metalworking fluid were genetically indistinguishable. The authors highlight the occupational risk for the development of this P. aeruginosa-infection in healthy people.

  9. Phase II trial of veliparib in patients with previously treated BRCA-mutated pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; Kelsen, David P; Capanu, Marinela; Smith, Sloane C; Lee, Jonathan W; Stadler, Zsofia K; Moore, Malcolm J; Kindler, Hedy L; Golan, Talia; Segal, Amiel; Maynard, Hannah; Hollywood, Ellen; Moynahan, MaryEllen; Salo-Mullen, Erin E; Do, Richard Kinh Gian; Chen, Alice P; Yu, Kenneth H; Tang, Laura H; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2018-01-01

    BRCA-associated cancers have increased sensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPis). This single arm, non-randomised, multicentre phase II trial evaluated the response rate of veliparib in patients with previously treated BRCA1/2- or PALB2-mutant pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients with stage III/IV PDAC and known germline BRCA1/2 or PALB2 mutation, 1-2 lines of treatment, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0-2, were enrolled. Veliparib was dosed at a volume of 300 mg twice-daily (N = 3), then 400 mg twice-daily (N = 15) days 1-28. The primary end-point was to determine the response rate of veliparib; secondary end-points included progression-free survival (PFS), duration of response, overall survival (OS) and safety. Sixteen patients were enrolled; male N = 8 (50%). Median age was 52 years (range 43-77). Five (31%) had a BRCA1 and 11 (69%) had a BRCA2 mutation. Fourteen (88%) patients had received prior platinum-based therapy. No confirmed partial responses (PRs) were seen: one (6%) unconfirmed PR was observed at 4 months with disease progression (PD) at 6 months; four (25%) had stable disease (SD), whereas 11 (69%) had PD as best response including one with clinical PD. Median PFS was 1.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.57-1.83) and median OS was 3.1 months (95% CI 1.9-4.1). Six (38%) patients had grade III toxicity, including fatigue (N = 3), haematology (N = 2) and nausea (N = 1). Veliparib was well tolerated, but no confirmed response was observed although four (25%) patients remained on study with SD for ≥ 4 months. Additional strategies in this population are needed, and ongoing trials are evaluating PARPis combined with chemotherapy (NCT01585805) and as a maintenance strategy (NCT02184195). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinomas to gefitinib or erlotinib is associated with a second mutation in the EGFR kinase domain.

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    William Pao

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung adenocarcinomas from patients who respond to the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib (Iressa or erlotinib (Tarceva usually harbor somatic gain-of-function mutations in exons encoding the kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Despite initial responses, patients eventually progress by unknown mechanisms of "acquired" resistance.We show that in two of five patients with acquired resistance to gefitinib or erlotinib, progressing tumors contain, in addition to a primary drug-sensitive mutation in EGFR, a secondary mutation in exon 20, which leads to substitution of methionine for threonine at position 790 (T790M in the kinase domain. Tumor cells from a sixth patient with a drug-sensitive EGFR mutation whose tumor progressed on adjuvant gefitinib after complete resection also contained the T790M mutation. This mutation was not detected in untreated tumor samples. Moreover, no tumors with acquired resistance had KRAS mutations, which have been associated with primary resistance to these drugs. Biochemical analyses of transfected cells and growth inhibition studies with lung cancer cell lines demonstrate that the T790M mutation confers resistance to EGFR mutants usually sensitive to either gefitinib or erlotinib. Interestingly, a mutation analogous to T790M has been observed in other kinases with acquired resistance to another kinase inhibitor, imatinib (Gleevec.In patients with tumors bearing gefitinib- or erlotinib-sensitive EGFR mutations, resistant subclones containing an additional EGFR mutation emerge in the presence of drug. This observation should help guide the search for more effective therapy against a specific subset of lung cancers.

  11. Acquired RhD mosaicism identifies fibrotic transformation of thrombopoietin receptor-mutated essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montemayor-Garcia, Celina; Coward, Rebecca; Albitar, Maher; Udani, Rupa; Jain, Prachi; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Battiwalla, Minoo; Keel, Siobán; Klein, Harvey G; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa

    2017-09-01

    Acquired copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity has been described in myeloid malignant progression with an otherwise normal karyotype. A 65-year-old woman with MPL-mutated essential thrombocythemia and progression to myelofibrosis was noted upon routine pretransplant testing to have mixed field reactivity with anti-D and an historic discrepancy in RhD type. The patient had never received transfusions or transplantation. Gel immunoagglutination revealed group A red blood cells and a mixed-field reaction for the D phenotype, with a predominant D-negative population and a small subset of circulating red blood cells carrying the D antigen. Subsequent genomic microarray single nucleotide polymorphism profiling revealed copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity of chromosome 1 p36.33-p34.2, a known molecular mechanism underlying fibrotic progression of MPL-mutated essential thrombocythemia. The chromosomal region affected by this copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity encompassed the RHD, RHCE, and MPL genes. We propose a model of chronological molecular events that is supported by RHD zygosity assays in peripheral lymphoid and myeloid-derived cells. Copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity events that lead to clonal selection and myeloid malignant progression may also affect the expression of adjacent unrelated genes, including those encoding for blood group antigens. Detection of mixed-field reactions and investigation of discrepant blood typing results are important for proper transfusion support of these patients and can provide useful surrogate markers of myeloproliferative disease progression. © 2017 AABB.

  12. Structural analysis of eight novel and 112 previously reported missense mutations in the interactive FXI mutation database reveals new insight on FXI deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Rebecca E; Shiltagh, Nuha; Gomez, Keith; Mellars, Gillian; Cooper, Carolyn; Perry, David J; Tuddenham, Edward G; Perkins, Stephen J

    2009-08-01

    Factor XI (FXI) functions in blood coagulation. FXI is composed of four apple (Ap) domains and a serine protease (SP) domain. Deficiency of FXI leads to an injury-related bleeding disorder, which is remarkable for the lack of correlation between bleeding symptoms and FXI coagulant activity (FXI:C). The number of mutations previously reported in our interactive web database (http://www.FactorXI.org) is now significantly increased to 183 through our new patient studies and from literature surveys. Eight novel missense mutations give a total of 120 throughout the FXI gene (F11). The most abundant defects in FXI are revealed to be those from low-protein plasma levels (Type I: CRM-) that originate from protein misfolding, rather than from functional defects (Type II: CRM+). A total of 70 Ap missense mutations were analysed using a consensus Ap domain structure generated from the FXI dimer crystal structure. This showed that all parts of the Ap domain were affected. The 47 SP missense mutations were also distributed throughout the SP domain structure. The periphery of the Ap beta-sheet structure is sensitive to structural perturbation caused by residue changes throughout the Ap domain, yet this beta-sheet is crucial for FXI dimer formation. Residues located at the Ap4:Ap4 interface in the dimer are much less directly involved. We conclude that the abundance of Type I defects in FXI results from the sensitivity of the Ap domain folding to residue changes within this, and discuss how structural knowledge of the mutations improves our understanding of FXI deficiencies.

  13. Acquired mutations in ASXL1 in acute myeloid leukemia: Prevalence and prognostic value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pratcorona (Marta); S. Abbas (Saman); M.A. Sanders (Mathijs); J.E. Koenders (Jasper); F.G. Kavelaars (François); C.A.J. Erpelinck-Verschueren (C. A J); A. Zeilemakers (Annelieke); B. Löwenberg (Bob); P.J.M. Valk (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractSomatic mutations in the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene have been described in various types of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia. Analysis of novel markers, such as ASXL1 mutations, in independent clinical trials is indispensable before considering them for

  14. Mutations within ICP4 acquired during in vitro attenuation do not alter virulence of recombinant Marek's disease viruses in vivo

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    Evin Hildebrandt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Marek's disease (MD is a T-cell lymphoma of chickens caused by the oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV. MD is primarily controlled by live-attenuated vaccines generated by repeated in vitro serial passage. Previous efforts to characterize attenuated MDVs identified numerous mutations, particularly a convergence of high-frequency mutations around amino acids 60–63 within ICP4 (RS1, therefore, ICP4 was considered a candidate gene deserving further characterization. Recombinant MDVs were generated containing a single Q63H mutation or double Q63H + S1630P mutations. Despite the repetitive nature of mutations within ICP4, neither recombinant virus decreased virulence, although one mutant reduced in vivo replication and failed to transmit horizontally. Our results indicate that these mutations are insufficient to reduce disease incidence in infected birds, and suggest that variants in ICP4 do not directly alter virulence, but rather may enhance MDV replication rates in vitro, offering an explanation for the widespread occurrence of ICP4 mutations in a variety of attenuated herpesviruses.

  15. Mutational and acquired carbapenem resistance mechanisms in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolates from Recife, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Felipe Lira de Sá; Mirones, Cristina Rodríguez; Paucar, Elena Román; Montes, Laura Álvarez; Leal-Balbino, Tereza Cristina; Morais, Marcia Maria Camargo de; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain Antonio

    2015-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the genetic mechanisms responsible for multidrug resistance in nine carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from different hospitals in Recife, Brazil. Susceptibility to antimicrobial agents was determined by broth microdilution. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed to detect the presence of genes encoding β-lactamases, aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AMEs), 16S rRNA methylases, integron-related genes and OprD. Expression of genes coding for efflux pumps and AmpC cephalosporinase were assessed by quantitative PCR. The outer membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The blaSPM-1, blaKPC-2 and blaGES-1 genes were detected in P. aeruginosa isolates in addition to different AME genes. The loss of OprD in nine isolates was mainly due to frameshift mutations, premature stop codons and point mutations. An association of loss of OprD with the overexpression of MexAB-OprM and MexXY-OprM was observed in most isolates. Hyper-production of AmpC was also observed in three isolates. Clonal relationship of the isolates was determined by repetitive element palindromic-PCR and multilocus sequence typing. Our results show that the loss of OprD along with overexpression of efflux pumps and β-lactamase production were responsible for the multidrug resistance in the isolates analysed.

  16. Acquired resistance mechanisms to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer with activating epidermal growth factor receptor mutation--diversity, ductility, and destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Maehara, Yoshihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancers that harbor somatic activating mutations in the gene for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) depend on mutant EGFR for their proliferation and survival; therefore, lung cancer patients with EGFR mutations often dramatically respond to orally available EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, emergence of acquired resistance is virtually inevitable, thus limiting improvement in patient outcomes. To elucidate and overcome this acquired resistance, multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigational approaches have been applied, using in vitro cell line models or samples obtained from lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs. These efforts have revealed several acquired resistance mechanisms and candidates, including EGFR secondary mutations (T790M and other rare mutations), MET amplification, PTEN downregulation, CRKL amplification, high-level HGF expression, FAS-NFκB pathway activation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and conversion to small cell lung cancer. Interestingly, cancer cells harbor potential destiny and ductility together in acquiring resistance to EGFR-TKIs, as shown in in vitro acquired resistance models. Molecular mechanisms of "reversible EGFR-TKI tolerance" that occur in early phase EGFR-TKI exposure have been identified in cell line models. Furthermore, others have reported molecular markers that can predict response to EGFR-TKIs in clinical settings. Deeper understanding of acquired resistance mechanisms to EGFR-TKIs, followed by the development of molecular target drugs that can overcome the resistance, might turn this fatal disease into a chronic disorder.

  17. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta

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    Barbara Gasse

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene (MMP20 produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues, pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  18. Purulent pericarditis secondary to community-acquired, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in previously healthy children. A sign of the times?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutmer, Jeffrey E; Yates, Andrew R; Bannerman, Tammy L; Marcon, Mario J; Karsies, Todd J

    2013-06-01

    Purulent pericarditis secondary to community-acquired, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a potentially lethal infection that has yet to be described in the pediatric population. Only four cases of purulent pericarditis secondary to CA-MRSA have been described in the English literature, all of whom were adults. We report on the first two pediatric cases of purulent pericarditis secondary to CA-MRSA to increase awareness of this potentially fatal condition. Clinical data were obtained from an 8-year-old male patient and a 7-month-old female patient, both previously healthy, who presented to our hospital for treatment of severe shock and multiorgan failure. Literature review was performed using MEDLINE and Cochrane databases. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was performed to confirm the organism type. Our previously healthy patients presented with refractory shock and were found to have purulent pericarditis with tamponade secondary to CA-MRSA. Both patients required emergent pericardiocentesis and surgical pericardial debridement. Isolates from both patients were found to be MRSA USA type 300, a common type of CA-MRSA that has become the most frequent cause of skin and soft tissue infections in the United States. Purulent pericarditis survival hinges upon early empiric antibiotic therapy targeting resistant Staphylococcus, rapid diagnostic efforts, and expeditious pericardial drainage when diagnosed. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach provided for complete recovery in both cases, and both children were discharged with normal cardiac function. These two cases emphasize the need for consideration of CA-MRSA presenting with purulent pericarditis as an etiology for refractory shock.

  19. [Metatropic dysplasia in a girl with c.1811_1812delinsAT mutation in exon 11 of the TRPV4 gene not previously reported].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Matysiak-Scholze, Uta; Heinze, Jessica; Barrera, Albaro; Lacruz-Rengel, María Angelina; Bracho, Ana; Guerrero, Yudith

    2015-01-01

    Metatropic dysplasia is a skeletal disorder with clinical heterogeneity, characterized by craniofacial dysmorphy including frontal bossing and midface hypoplasia, short trunk,progressive kyphoscoliosis and shortened limbs. The TRPV4 gene is located on 12q24.11, coding a cation channel with nonselective permeability to calcium; it is expressed and involved in many physiological processes through responses to different stimuli. Over 50 mutations in TRPV4 have been described. We present a seven months old girl with heterozygous mutation c.1811_1812delinsAT; p.I604N in intron 11 not previously reported in the TRPV4 gene and with clinical findings compatible with metatropic dysplasia.

  20. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease, and interferon-based therapy cures only 40 to 80% of patients, depending on HCV genotype. Research was accelerated by genotype 2a (strain JFH1) infectious cell culture systems. We previously developed viable JFH1-based...... mutations did not adapt to culture. Universal adaptive effects of mutations in NS3 (Q1247L, I1312V, K1398Q, R1408W, and Q1496L) and NS5A (V2418L) were investigated for JFH1-based genotype 1 to 5 core-NS2 recombinants; several mutations conferred adaptation to H77C (1a), J4 (1b), S52 (3a), and SA13 (5a......-specific patterns in HCV disease and control....

  1. High incidence of BRCA1-2 germline mutations, previous breast cancer and familial cancer history in Jewish patients with uterine serous papillary carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biron-Shental, T; Drucker, L; Altaras, M; Bernheim, J; Fishman, A

    2006-12-01

    To test the carrier status of the three germline founder mutations in Jewish patients with uterine serous papillary carcinoma (USPC) and to evaluate its association to their personal and familial cancer records. Retrospective analysis of histologically confirmed USPC Jewish patients diagnosed between April 1, 1997 and December 31, 2003. All cases were genetically tested for the three BRCA1-2 founder germline mutations (185delAG and 5382insC in BRCA1 and 6174delT in BRCA2). The analysis was performed on genomic DNA extracted from whole blood or paraffin embedded normal tissue of these patients, employing PCR amplification of target sequences and differential digestion with restriction enzymes. The carrier frequency was compared to the known population frequency of these mutations. The study group comprised 22 Jewish patients with USPC diagnosed within this timeframe. The mean age was 71.8 years (range 56-79). FIGO surgical stage distribution revealed 59% at stages III-IV. Seven USPC patients (32%) with a previous diagnosis of breast cancer were identified. Familial cancer history was recorded in 23% of the patients (four with breast cancer and one with ovarian cancer). DNA analysis revealed six BRCA1-2 germline mutation carriers (27%) as follows: three with BRCA2-6174delT, two with BRCA1-185delAG, and one with BRCA1-5382insC mutation. Three of the carriers had a previous diagnosis of breast cancer. Four carriers had familial cancer history in first-degree relative (three with breast cancer and one with ovarian cancer). The high rate of BRCA germline mutations in USPC patients observed in the present study, coupled with the strong personal and familial cancer history as well as the histological and clinical resemblance to the ovarian cancer, may indicate that USPC is a part or an expression of the hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome. This option may have implications in our clinical recommendations for non-affected BRCA1-2 carriers.

  2. ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring family of surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, possesses an architecture previously unseen in this protein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Johnson, Steven; Kraiczy, Peter; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of ErpC, a member of the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein family from B. burgdorferi, has been solved, providing insights into the strategies of complement evasion by this zoonotic bacterium and suggesting a common architecture for other members of this protein family. Borrelia burgdorferi is a spirochete responsible for Lyme disease, the most commonly occurring vector-borne disease in Europe and North America. The bacterium utilizes a set of proteins, termed complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), to aid evasion of the human complement system by recruiting and presenting complement regulator factor H on its surface in a manner that mimics host cells. Presented here is the atomic resolution structure of a member of this protein family, ErpC. The structure provides new insights into the mechanism of recruitment of factor H and other factor H-related proteins by acting as a molecular mimic of host glycosaminoglycans. It also describes the architecture of other CRASP proteins belonging to the OspE/F-related paralogous protein family and suggests that they have evolved to bind specific complement proteins, aiding survival of the bacterium in different hosts

  3. Interplay between mutational and horizontally acquired resistance mechanisms and its association with carbapenem resistance amongst extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jwu-Ching; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Siu, Leung-Kei; Kuo, An-Jing; Huang, Shu-Huan; Su, Lin-Hui; Wu, Tsu-Lan

    2012-03-01

    Between 2003 and 2009, the prevalence of extensively drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (XDR-PA) increased significantly in northern Taiwan from 1.0% to 2.1%. Molecular methods were used to investigate the genetic relatedness and carbapenem resistance mechanisms of a collection of 203 non-repetitive XDR-PA isolates available for study. Using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 52 genotypes were observed; one predominant genotype (pulsotype 1) was found in 57.6% of the isolates. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses demonstrated that one horizontally acquired mechanism [metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) genes] and two mutational mechanisms (efflux and porins) accounted for the carbapenem resistance. The most predominant horizontally acquired mechanism was carriage of bla(VIM-3), which was found in 61.1% of isolates. Decreased expression of oprD was the most prevalent mutational mechanism and was found in 70.0% of the XDR-PA isolates, whereas overexpression of mexA was found in 27.6% of the isolates. The highlight of this study was the discovery of statistically significant relationships between certain horizontally acquired and mutational resistance mechanisms and their contribution to carbapenem susceptibility. MBL-producers expressed significantly lower MexAB and higher OprD than non-MBL-producers. Amongst isolates without an acquired β-lactamase gene, oprD expression was significantly reduced, whilst expression of efflux pumps was increased. Reduced OprD expression alone or the production of VIM-type MBLs showed similar contributions to a low to intermediate MIC(50) (minimum inhibitory concentration for 50% of the organisms) for carbapenems. Isolates with reduced OprD expression that simultaneously harboured bla(VIM) exhibited high levels of resistance to carbapenems, which implied that these two mechanisms had a synergistic effect on the MICs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International

  4. First report of OPA1 screening in Greek patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and identification of a previously undescribed OPA1 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakari, Smaragda; Koutsodontis, George; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Fitsios, Athanasios; Chrousos, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation in four Greek pedigrees with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and OPA1 mutations. Seven patients from four unrelated families (F1, F2, F3, F4) were clinically assessed for visual acuity, color vision, ptosis, afferent pupillary defects, and visual fields and underwent orthoptic assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and fundus examination to establish their clinical status. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples from all participants. The coding region (exons 1-28), including the intron-exon boundaries of the OPA1 gene, was screened in the probands of the four families, as well as in seven additional family members (four affected and three unaffected) with PCR and direct DNA sequencing. All patients presented bilateral decrease in best-corrected visual acuity and temporal pallor of the optic disc. The visual fields of the adult patients showed characteristic scotomata. Other signs were present in some patients such as decreased color discrimination and a gray crescent within the neuroretinal rim. After the OPA1 gene was sequenced, a previously undescribed heterozygous splice-site mutation c.784-1G>T in intron 7 was detected in family F2. In families F1, F3, and F4, a previously reported in-frame deletion c.876_878delTGT/p.(Val294del), the frameshift c.2366delA/p.(Asn789Metfs*11), and splice-site c.1140+5G>C mutations were detected, respectively. This is the first report of molecular characterization of Greek patients with ADOA. Our findings provide additional information regarding the genotype-phenotype correlation and establish the role of the OPA1 gene in Greek patients with ADOA.

  5. Acquired EGFR L718V mutation mediates resistance to osimertinib in non-small cell lung cancer but retains sensitivity to afatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yutao; Li, Yan; Ou, Qiuxiang; Wu, Xue; Wang, Xiaonan; Shao, Yang W; Ying, Jianming

    2018-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are promising targeted therapies for EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. However, acquired resistance inevitably develops. Comprehensive and dynamic companion genomic diagnosis can gain insights into underlying resistance mechanisms, thereby help oncologists and patients to make informed decision on the potential benefit of the treatment. A 67-year-old male who was initially diagnosed of EGFR L858R-mediated NSCLC received multiple lines of chemotherapy and EGFR TKI therapies after surgery. The EGFR mutational status of individual metastatic lesion was determined by genetic testing of the tumor tissue biopsies using next generation sequencing (NGS) throughout the patient's clinical course. An acquired potentially drug-resistant EGFR mutation was functionally validated in vitro and its sensitivity to different EGFR TKIs was assessed simultaneously. We have identified distinct resistance mechanisms to EGFR blockade in different metastatic lung lesions. Acquired EGFR T790M was first detected that leads to the resistance to the gefitinib treatment. Consequently, osimertinib was administrated and the response lasted until disease progressed. We identified a newly acquired EGFR L718V mutation in one lesion in conjunction with L858R, but not T790M, which showed stable disease on the following erlotinib treatment, while EGFR C797S together with L858R/T790M was detected in the other lesion that continuously progressed. In vitro functional studies demonstrated that EGFR-L858R/L718V confers resistance to osimertinib, but retains sensitivity to the second generation TKI afatinib. We reported that distinct resistance mechanisms could arise in different metastases within the same patient in response to EGFR blockade. We also demonstrated in vitro that EGFR L718V mutation mediates resistance to osimertinib, but retains sensitivity to afatinib. We evidenced that dynamic companion genomic

  6. Meta-analysis of the impact of de novo and acquired EGFR T790M mutations on the prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving EGFR-TKIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yang Liu, Li Sun, Zhi-Cheng Xiong, Xin Sun, Shu-Ling Zhang, Jie-Tao Ma, Cheng-Bo Han Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The purpose of this meta-analysis was to explore the influences of pretreatment de novo and posttreatment-acquired epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR T790M mutations in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC who had received tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs.Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure database for eligible literature. Data were extracted to assess the hazard ratios (HRs for progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS, and post-progression survival (PPS and the relative ratios (RRs for objective response rate (ORR.Results: This meta-analysis included 22 studies comprising 1,462 patients with NSCLC who harbored activating EGFR mutations and were treated with EGFR-TKIs. Compared to pretreatment T790M mutation-negative NSCLC, pretreatment T790M mutation-positive NSCLC was associated with decreased PFS (HR 2.23, P<0.001 and OS (HR 1.55, P=0.003. A trend toward significance of worsening ORR (RR 0.86, P=0.051 was evident. The acquired T790M mutation was correlated with improved PFS (HR 0.75, P=0.006 and PPS (HR 0.57, P<0.001, compared to patients without the T790M mutation who progressed after EGFR-TKI treatment. There were no significant differences in OS or ORR between patients with acquired T790M mutation-positive and T790M mutation-negative NSCLC. However, in the tumor tissue rebiopsy subgroup, patients with acquired T790M mutation had improved OS (HR 0.60, P<0.001 compared to T790M mutation-negative patients. In the plasma ctDNA subgroup, acquired T790M mutation decreased the OS (HR 1.87, P<0.001.Conclusion: Pretreatment T790M mutation was associated with worse PFS and OS in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with EGFR-TKIs, while acquired T790M mutation was

  7. Mutations within ICP4 acquired during in vitro attenuation do not alter virulence of recombinant Marek’s disease viruses in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a T-cell lymphoma of chickens caused by the oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV). MD is primarily controlled by live-attenuated vaccines generated by repeated in vitro serial passage. Previous efforts to characterize attenuated MDVs identified numerous mutations, particularl...

  8. Patient harboring a novel PIK3CA point mutation after acquired resistance to crizotinib in an adenocarcinoma with ROS1 rearrangement: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chun-Wei; Wang, Wen-Xian; Huang, Rong-Fang; He, Cheng; Liao, Xing-Hui; Zhu, You-Cai; Du, Kai-Qi; Zhuang, Wu; Chen, Yan-Ping; Chen, Gang; Fang, Mei-Yu

    2017-11-01

    ROS1 rearrangement occurs in 1-2% of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases. These patients would benefit from treatment with the anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor, crizotinib; however, resistance to crizotinib inevitably develops in such patients despite an initial response. The mechanism of acquired resistance to crizotinib in patients with NSCLC with ROS1 rearrangement has not yet been identified. Herein, we report a case of a 66-year-old woman diagnosed with adenocarcinoma. PCR revealed no EGFR or ALK mutations. After the patient underwent several rounds of chemotherapy, crizotinib was administered. The disease explosively progressed six months later. A novel PIK3CA gene point mutation (p.L531P) was detected by next generation sequencing. This case is the second report of bypass activation conferred crizotinib resistance in a patient with NSCLC with ROS1-rearrangement, but is the first to confirm that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway leads to acquired crizotinib resistance. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) Acquisita in an Adult Patient with Previously Unrecognized Mild Dystrophic EB and Biallelic COL7A1 Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Liliana; Giuseppe Condorelli, Angelo; Fortugno, Paola; Calabresi, Valentina; Pedicelli, Cristina; Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Castiglia, Daniele

    2018-04-16

    Circulating anti-type VII collagen autoantibodies are frequently detected in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB). However, evidence supporting their pathogenic role in inducing epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA) has been provided for only one individual with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DDEB). We describe here a patient who presented with dystrophic toenails since early childhood and developed trauma-induced skin blisters and oral erosions at age 26 years. Direct immunofluorescence showed IgG deposits with a u-serrated pattern along the cutaneous basement membrane zone, while no change in the expression of collagen VII could be detected by antigen mapping. High-titre anti-collagen VII antibodies were detected by enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). In parallel, sequencing of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) genes identified compound heterozygous COL7A1 missense c.410G>A (p.Arg137Gln) and splicing c.3674C>T (p.Ala1225_Gln1241del) mutations, previously unrecognized in dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB). Thus, our patient had RDEB "nails-only" and developed mechanobullous EBA in adulthood. These data support a pathogenic role of circulating autoantibodies to collagen VII in inducing EBA in selected patients with DEB. Unforeseen worsening of skin symptoms in DEB should prompt laboratory investigations for EBA.

  10. Challenges in the management of EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer patients with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Justine L; Smit, Egbert F

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation have a median progression-free survival of 12 months on treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Clearly, the introduction of these agents had major implications for the treatment of NSCLC, but new questions and challenges arise as well. Traditionally, response assessments of anti-cancer treatment are conducted according to the RECIST criteria. Progressive disease is usually indicative of a change of therapy. In the current era of targeted therapies, it has become clear that different patterns of progressive disease are observed with TKI treatment in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients, with potential consequences for therapeutic decision-making. In this review, we will discuss whether the RECIST criteria are still optimal for response evaluation. Rebiopsy studies have provided more insight into different resistance mechanisms at the time of acquired resistance to TKIs. These mechanisms, as well as the role of rebiopsy in daily clinical practice, will subsequently be covered. Finally, treatment strategies for different types of progressive disease will be discussed. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. First report of OPA1 screening in Greek patients with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and identification of a previously undescribed OPA1 mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Kamakari, Smaragda; Koutsodontis, George; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis; Fitsios, Athanasios; Chrousos, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the genotype–phenotype correlation in four Greek pedigrees with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and OPA1 mutations. Methods Seven patients from four unrelated families (F1, F2, F3, F4) were clinically assessed for visual acuity, color vision, ptosis, afferent pupillary defects, and visual fields and underwent orthoptic assessment, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and fundus examination to establish their clinical status. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samp...

  12. A Comparison Between Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography in Detecting Mutations in Genes Associated with Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC and the Identification of 9 New Mutations Previously Unidentified by DGGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meldrum Cliff J

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography is a relatively new method by which heteroduplex structures formed during the PCR amplification of heterozygote samples can be rapidly identified. The use of this technology for mutation detection in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC has the potential to appreciably shorten the time it takes to analyze genes associated with this disorder. Prior to acceptance of this method for screening genes associated with HNPCC, assessment of the reliability of this method should be performed. In this report we have compared mutation and polymorphism detection by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE with denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC in a set of 130 families. All mutations/polymorphisms representing base substitutions, deletions, insertions and a 23 base pair inversion were detected by DHPLC whereas DGGE failed to identify four single base substitutions and a single base pair deletion. In addition, we show that DHPLC has been used for the identification of 5 different mutations in exon 7 of hMSH2 that could not be detected by DGGE. From this study we conclude that DHPLC is a more effective and rapid alternative to the detection of mutations in hMSH2 and hMLH1 with the same or better accuracy than DGGE. Furthermore, this technique offers opportunities for automation, which have not been realised for the majority of other methods of gene analysis.

  13. Emergence of novel and dominant acquired EGFR solvent-front mutations at Gly796 (G796S/R) together with C797S/R and L792F/H mutations in one EGFR (L858R/T790M) NSCLC patient who progressed on osimertinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Cui, Jean; Schrock, Alexa B; Goldberg, Michael E; Zhu, Viola W; Albacker, Lee; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M

    2017-06-01

    Acquired epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) resistance mutations to osimertinib are common, including the EGFR C797S that abolishes the covalent binding of osimertinib to EGFR. Here we report the emergence of novel EGFR solvent front mutations at Gly796 (G796S/R) in addition to a hinge pocket L792F/H mutations, and C797S/G all in cis with T790M in a single patient on progression on osimertinib as detected by plasma circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) assay in the course of clinical care. A 69-year-old Caucasian female former light-smoker presented with stage IV EGFR L858R positive adenocarcinoma who developed EGFR T790M mutation after 8 month treatment of erlotinib. The patient was initiated on osimertinib with disease shrinkage after 2 months, but tumor regrowth was observed after 5 months of osimertinib treatment. Assay of plasma ctDNA at this time revealed these different secondary resistance mutations all in trans with each other including distinct mutations at the same codon producing different amino acid changes: G796S/R (mutant allele frequency [MAF]; 14.4%), C797S/G (MAF: 2.26%), L792F/H (MAF: 0.36%), and V802F (MAF: 0.40%), in addition to the pre-existing L858R (MAF:17.9%) and T790M (MAF:18.2%) but all in cis with T790M. The G796S/R mutations are homologous with known reported solvent front mutations in ALK G1202R, ROS1 G2032R, TrkA G595R and TrkC G623R, all of which are associated with acquired resistance to type I TKIs. In silico modeling revealed mutation at G796 interferes with osimertinib binding to the EGFR kinase domain at the phenyl aromatic ring position as this residue forms a narrow "hydrophobic sandwich" with L718, while L792F/H mutation interferes with osimertinib binding at the methoxyl group on the phenyl ring. Multiple resistance mutations at differing allele frequencies including novel EGFR solvent front mutations can emerge in a single patient with progression on osimertinib potentially due to tumor hetereogeneity and definitely present a

  14. Substitution of arginine for glycine at position 154 of the {alpha}1 chain of type I collagen in a variant of osteogenesis imperfecta: Comparison to previous cases with the same mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, J.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Castells, S. [Univ. Hospital of Brooklyn, NY (United States)

    1996-01-11

    A substitution of arginine for glycine at amino acid position 154 of the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain was found in a father and his three children. The phenotype of the patients includes manifestations of types I and III/IV osteogenesis imperfecta, but appears to be milder than that of the previously described two unrelated patients that had the identical mutation in the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain. The variability in the phenotype raises the possibility of epistatic loci or environmental effects on expression of the disorder. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Mutation in the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase domain or inactivation of PTEN is associated with acquired resistance to FGFR inhibitors in FGFR1-driven leukemia/lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, John K; Qin, Haiyan; Hu, Tianxiang; Wu, Qing; Bhole, Aaron; Ren, Mingqiang

    2017-11-01

    Stem cell leukemia/lymphoma syndrome (SCLL) is driven by constitutive activation of chimeric FGFR1 kinases generated by chromosome translocations. We have shown that FGFR inhibitors significantly suppress leukemia and lymphoma development in vivo, and cell viability in vitro. Since resistance to targeted therapies is a major reason for relapse, we developed FGFR1-overexpressing mouse and human cell lines that are resistant to the specific FGFR inhibitors AZD4547 and BGJ398, as well as non-specific inhibitors, such as ponatinib, TKI258 and E3810. Two mutually exclusive mechanisms for resistance were demonstrated; an activating V561M mutation in the FGFR1 kinase domain and mutational inactivation of PTEN resulting in increased PI3K/AKT activity. Ectopic expression of PTEN in the PTEN-mutant cells resensitizes them to FGFR inhibitors. Treatment of resistant cells with BGJ398, in combination with the BEZ235 PI3K inhibitor, shows an additive effect on growth in vitro and prolongs survival in xenograft models in vivo. These studies provide the first direct evidence for both the involvement of the FGFR1 V561M mutation and PTEN inactivation in the development of resistance in leukemias overexpressing chimeric FGFR1. These studies also provide a potential strategy to treat leukemias and lymphomas driven by FGFR1 activation that become resistant to FGFR1 inhibitors. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Efficacy and safety of afatinib in Chinese patients with EGFR-mutated metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) previously responsive to first-generation tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) and chemotherapy: comparison with historical cohort using erlotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Victor H. F.; Leung, Dennis K. C.; Choy, Tim-Shing; Lam, Ka-On; Lam, Pui-Mei; Leung, To-Wai; Kwong, Dora L. W.

    2016-01-01

    Afaitnib has shown anti-tumor activity against metastatic EGFR-mutated NSCLC after prior failure to first generation EGFR-TKI and chemotherapy. We prospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of afatinib in Chinese patients who previously failed first-generation TKI and chemotherapy under a compassionate use program (CUP) and compared to the erlotinib cohort. Patients who suffered from metastatic EGFR-mutated NSCLC previously responsive to first-generation TKI and chemotherapy received afatinib until progression, loss of clinical benefits or intolerable toxicity. Treatment response, survival and safety were evaluated and compared to the erlotinib cohort. Twenty-five and 28 patients received afatinib and erlotinib respectively. More patients in the afatinib group had worse performance status (ECOG 2) than the erlotinib group (p = 0.008). After a median follow-up of 12.1 months, afatinib demonstrated comparable objective response rate (ORR) (20.0 % vs. 7.1 %, p = 0.17) but significantly higher disease control rate (DCR) (68.0 % vs. 39.3 %, p = 0.04) compared to erlotinib. Median progression-free survival (PFS) (4.1 months [95 % CI, 2.7–5.5 months] vs. 3.3 months [95 % CI, 2.2–4.3 months], p = 0.97) and overall survival (OS) were not different between the two groups (10.3 months [95 % CI, 7.5–13.0 months] vs. 10.8 months [95 % CI, 7.4–14.2 months], p = 0.51). Multivariate analyses revealed that age ≤70 years and time to progression (TTP) ≥18 months for the 1 st TKI therapy were prognostic of PFS (p = 0.006 and p = 0.008 respectively). Afatinib caused less rash (60.0 % vs. 67.9 %, p = 0.04) but more diarrhea (60.0 % vs. 10.7 %, p = 0.002) compared to erlotinib. Afatinib produced encouraging clinical efficacy as 2 nd TKI therapy with manageable safety profiles in our Chinese patients after failure to another TKI and systemic chemotherapy. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT02625168) on 3 December 2015

  17. Urine circulating-tumor DNA (ctDNA) detection of acquired EGFR T790M mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer: An outcomes and total cost-of-care analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Jacob; Li, Qianyi; Hornberger, John

    2017-08-01

    Third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have proven effective in patients with the acquired EGFR T790M resistance mutation who progress on prior EGFR TKI therapy. Median progression-free survival (PFS) on a 3rd-gen TKI was 9-10 months for T790M+ patients compared to 2.8 months for T790M- patients. PFS is similar regardless of the specimen used to assess T790M, such as tissue, plasma, or urine ctDNA. This study aimed to assess the total cost of care of a urine-testing strategy (UTS) versus a tissue-testing strategy (TTS) for T790M detection, in patients with EGFR-mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma and progression on prior TKI therapy. Long-term outcomes and economic implications were assessed from a US payer perspective. Endpoints were PFS, overall survival (OS), medical resource use and related costs. We included published randomized drug trials and Medicare fee schedules. A state-transition analysis and Markov model tracked patients from stable disease to progression and death. Univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of findings and identify factors that most influenced outcomes and costs. UTS increased the rate of detection of patients with T790M mutation eligible for treatment with 3rd generation TKI by 7% compared with TTS; urine ctDNA testing detected T790M mutation in some patients for whom biopsy could not be performed or when tissue testing yielded indeterminate results. Due to enhanced targeting of TKI therapy, UTS increased PFS and OS by 0.44 and 0.35 months, respectively. UTS yields a savings of $1243-$1680 per patient due to avoidance of biopsy, potential biopsy-associated complications, and tissue-based molecular testing in approximately 55.6% of patients. Probability of T790M detection by tissue and cost of biopsy procedure were the most influential factors. UTS prolonged PFS/OS due to increased detection of T790M mutation and decreased biopsies and complication-related costs. Copyright

  18. Acquired Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde Nielsen, Espen; Halse, Karianne

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Techniques - a Leap into the Archive, at Aarhus School of Architecture. In collaboration with Karianne Halse, James Martin and Mika K. Friis. Following the footsteps of past travelers this is a journey into tools and techniques of the architectural process. The workshop will focus upon...

  19. Yeasts acquire resistance secondary to antifungal drug treatment by adaptive mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Quinto-Alemany

    Full Text Available Acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment both by microorganisms and by tumor cells is a major public health concern. Several species of bacteria acquire resistance to various antibiotics through stress-induced responses that have an adaptive mutagenesis effect. So far, adaptive mutagenesis in yeast has only been described when the stress is nutrient deprivation. Here, we hypothesized that adaptive mutagenesis in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans as model organisms would also take place in response to antifungal agents (5-fluorocytosine or flucytosine, 5-FC, and caspofungin, CSP, giving rise to resistance secondary to treatment with these agents. We have developed a clinically relevant model where both yeasts acquire resistance when exposed to these agents. Stressful lifestyle associated mutation (SLAM experiments show that the adaptive mutation frequencies are 20 (S. cerevisiae -5-FC, 600 (C. albicans -5-FC or 1000 (S. cerevisiae--CSP fold higher than the spontaneous mutation frequency, the experimental data for C. albicans -5-FC being in agreement with the clinical data of acquisition of resistance secondary to treatment. The spectrum of mutations in the S. cerevisiae -5-FC model differs between spontaneous and acquired, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that generate them are different. Remarkably, in the acquired mutations, an ectopic intrachromosomal recombination with an 87% homologous gene takes place with a high frequency. In conclusion, we present here a clinically relevant adaptive mutation model that fulfils the conditions reported previously.

  20. Whole Exome Sequencing and Segregation Analysis Confirms That a Mutation in COL17A1 Is the Cause of Epithelial Recurrent Erosion Dystrophy in a Large Dominant Pedigree Previously Mapped to Chromosome 10q23-q24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Lin

    Full Text Available To report identification of a COL17A1 mutation in a family with a corneal dystrophy previously mapped to chromosome 10q23-q24.Whole-exome sequencing was performed on DNA samples from five affected family members and two unrelated, unaffected individuals. Identified variants were filtered for those that were: located in the linked interval on chromosome 10q23-q24; novel or rare (minor allele frequency ≤0.01; heterozygous; present in all affected individuals and not in controls; and present in genes that encode proteins expressed in human corneal epithelial cells (reads per kilobase per million ≥1. Sanger sequencing of identified variants (SNVs was performed in additional family members. In silico analysis was used to predict the functional impact of non-synonymous variants.Three SNVs located in two genes were identified that met the filtering criteria: one rare synonymous c.3156C>T variant in the collagen, type XVII, alpha I (COL17A1 gene; and two rare variants, one synonymous and one missense, in the dynamin binding protein (DNMBP gene. Sanger sequencing of additional family members determined that only the COL17A1 variant segregates with the affected phenotype. In silico analysis predicts that the missense variant in DNMBP would be tolerated.The corneal dystrophy mapped to chromosome 10q23-q24 is associated with the c.3156C>T variant in COL17A1. As this variant has recently been identified in five other families with early onset recurrent corneal erosions, and has been shown in vitro to introduce a cryptic splice donor site, this dystrophy is likely caused by aberrant splicing of COL17A1 and should be classified as epithelial recurrent erosion dystrophy.

  1. Acquired ichthyosis with hoffman's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana B

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with features of acquired ichthyosis with Hoffman's syndrome. Laboratory tests support hypothyodism. Myoedema and hypertrophy of muscles were present. Patient was previously treated for Pellagra.

  2. Acquired ichthyosis with hoffman's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathyanarayana B

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A middle aged man presented with features of acquired ichthyosis with Hoffman's syndrome. Laboratory tests support hypothyodism. Myoedema and hypertrophy of muscles were present. Patient was previously treated for Pellagra.

  3. Acquired amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Camilla N; Golden, Hannah L; Warren, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the cognitive neuroscience of music suggest that a further review of the topic of amusia is timely. In this chapter, we first consider previous taxonomies of amusia and propose a fresh framework for understanding the amusias, essentially as disorders of cognitive information processing. We critically review current cognitive and neuroanatomic findings in the published literature on amusia. We assess the extent to which the clinical and neuropsychologic evidence in amusia can be reconciled; both with the information-processing framework we propose, and with the picture of the brain organization of music and language processing emerging from cognitive neuroscience and functional neuroimaging studies. The balance of evidence suggests that the amusias can be understood as disorders of musical object cognition targeting separable levels of an information-processing hierarchy and underpinned by specific brain network dysfunction. The neuroanatomic associations of the amusias show substantial overlap with brain networks that process speech; however, this convergence leaves scope for separable brain mechanisms based on altered connectivity and dynamics across culprit networks. The study of the amusias contributes to an increasingly complex picture of the musical brain that transcends any simple dichotomy between music and speech or other complex sounds. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A rare disease-associated mutation in the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene changes a conserved arginine, previously shown to be functionally essential in short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Bross, P; Jensen, T G

    1993-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) deficiency is a serious and potentially fatal inherited defect in the beta-oxidation of fatty acids. Approximately 80% of patients with MCAD deficiency are homozygous for a single disease-causing mutation (G985). The remaining patients (except for a few ......-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) gene of a patient with SCAD deficiency, suggesting that the conserved arginine is crucial for formation of active enzyme in the straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases....

  5. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  6. Analysis of the fitness effect of compensatory mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liqing; Watson, Layne T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper extends previous work on the Darwinian evolutionary fitness effect of the fixation of deleterious mutations by incorporating compensatory mutations, which are mutations (deleterious by themselves) that ameliorate other deleterious mutations, thus reducing the genetic load of populations. Since having compensatory mutations essentially changes the distributional shapes of deleterious mutations, the effect of compensatory mutations is studied by comparing distributions of deleterious...

  7. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  8. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  9. Recurrent episodes of Candidemia due to Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida albicans with acquired echinocandin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Grosset

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed fungal infection and acquired echinocandin resistance of Candida spp. remain infrequent. In this study we have reported the case of a patient hospitalized for tuberculosis who experienced multiple infections due to three common Candida species (C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis. Furthermore, consecutive isolates from blood cultures and heart valve were found resistant to azoles (C. tropicalis and to echinocandin with either novel (C. tropicalis or previously described (C. albicans missense mutations in the Fks gene.

  10. Potential Therapeutic Strategies to Overcome Acquired Resistance to BRAF or MEK Inhibitors in BRAF Mutant Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Ryan B.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical trials with selective inhibitors of the BRAF and MEK kinases have shown promising results in patients with tumors harboring BRAF V600 mutations. However, as has been observed previously with similarly successful targeted therapies, acquired resistance to these agents is an emerging problem that limits their clinical benefit. Several recent studies from our laboratory and others have investigated the causes of acquired resistance to BRAF and MEK inhibitors, and multiple resistance mechanisms have been identified. Here, we review these mechanisms and suggest that they can be broadly grouped into two main classes: ERK-dependent and ERK-independent. We also propose distinct therapeutic strategies that might be employed to overcome each class of acquired resistance. PMID:21505228

  11. Presence of the minor EGFR T790M mutation is associated with drug-sensitive EGFR mutations in lung adenocarcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashida, Shinsuke; Soh, Junichi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Furukawa, Masashi; Shien, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Hiromasa; Asano, Hiroaki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Hagiwara, Koichi; Miyoshi, Shinichiro

    2014-07-01

    The T790M mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene is known to be associated with the acquired resistance of lung adenocarcinoma patients to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). The minor T790M mutant allele is occasionally detected in EGFR-TKI-naive tumor samples, yet findings concerning the clinical impact of the minor T790M mutation vary among previous studies. In the present study, we assessed the clinical impact of the minor T790M mutation using a novel, highly sensitive assay combining high-resolution melting (HRM), mutant-enriched PCR and co-amplification at a lower denaturation temperature (COLD)-PCR. We determined the T790M mutational status in 146 surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas without a history of EGFR-TKI treatment using mutant-enriched COLD-HRM (MEC-HRM) and standard HRM assays. The sensitivities of the MEC-HRM and standard HRM assays for the detection of T790M-mutant alleles among wild-type alleles were 0.01 and 10%, respectively. Although the T790M mutation was not detected using a standard HRM assay, we identified 19 (13%) T790M mutations using the MEC-HRM assay and defined these 19 mutations as minor T790M mutations. The proportion of T790M alleles was mutation was significantly associated with the presence of EGFR exon 19 deletions or the L858R mutation (both of which are drug-sensitive EGFR mutations) (P=0.04). In conclusion, the minor EGFR T790M mutations were present in 13% of EGFR-TKI-naive surgically resected lung adenocarcinomas and were associated with drug-sensitive EGFR mutations.

  12. Intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms in enterococcus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brian L.; Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    Enterococci have the potential for resistance to virtually all clinically useful antibiotics. Their emergence as important nosocomial pathogens has coincided with increased expression of antimicrobial resistance by members of the genus. The mechanisms underlying antibiotic resistance in enterococci may be intrinsic to the species or acquired through mutation of intrinsic genes or horizontal exchange of genetic material encoding resistance determinants. This paper reviews the antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis and discusses treatment options. PMID:23076243

  13. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lachance, Daniel H; Molinaro, Annette M; Walsh, Kyle M; Decker, Paul A; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L; Smirnov, Ivan V; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A; Kollmeyer, Thomas M; Praska, Corinne E; Chada, Anisha R; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M; McCoy, Lucie S; Bracci, Paige M; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F; Pico, Alexander R; O'Neill, Brian P; Buckner, Jan C; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S; Chang, Susan M; Prados, Michael D; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K; Wrensch, Margaret R; Jenkins, Robert B

    2015-06-25

    The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triple-positive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  14. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  15. Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for PKD Race, Ethnicity, & Kidney Disease Renal Artery Stenosis Renal Tubular Acidosis Simple Kidney Cysts ... kidneys to develop multiple cysts. Acquired cystic kidney disease occurs in children and adults who have chronic kidney disease (CKD) — ...

  16. Acquired Neurologic Mutism

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1997-01-01

    The behavioral features of four children with acquired neurologic mutism are reported from the Department of Neurology, University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, Rotterdam; and Department of Medical Psychology, Ziekenhuis Walcheren, Vlissingen, The Netherlands.

  17. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  18. KIT mutation analysis in mast cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arock, M; Sotlar, K; Akin, C

    2015-01-01

    Although acquired mutations in KIT are commonly detected in various categories of mastocytosis, the methodologies applied to detect and quantify the mutant type and allele burden in various cells and tissues are poorly defined. We here propose a consensus on methodologies used to detect KIT mutat...

  19. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  20. Role of heterozygous APC mutation in niche succession and initiation of colorectal cancer--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roschen Sasikumar

    Full Text Available Mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are found in most colorectal cancers. They cause constitutive activation of proliferative pathways when both alleles of the gene are mutated. However studies on individuals with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP have shown that a single mutated APC allele can also create changes in the precancerous colon crypt, like increased number of stem cells, increased crypt fission, greater variability of DNA methylation patterns, and higher somatic mutation rates. In this paper, using a computational model of colon crypt dynamics, we evolve and investigate a hypothesis on the effect of heterozygous APC mutation that explains these different observations. Based on previous reports and the results from the computational model we propose the hypothesis that heterozygous APC mutation has the effect of increasing the chances for a stem cell to divide symmetrically, producing two stem cell daughters. We incorporate this hypothesis into the model and perform simulation experiments to investigate the consequences of the hypothesis. Simulations show that this hypothesis links together the changes in FAP crypts observed in previous studies. The simulations also show that an APC(+/- stem cell gets selective advantages for dominating the crypt and progressing to cancer. This explains why most colon cancers are initiated by APC mutation. The results could have implications for preventing or retarding the onset of colon cancer in people with inherited or acquired mutation of one APC allele. Experimental validation of the hypothesis as well as investigation into the molecular mechanisms of this effect may therefore be worth undertaking.

  1. Acquired Duodenal Obstruction in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hung Chien

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic intramural hematoma of the duodenum is a rare cause of acquired duodenal obstruction in children, and a high degree of suspicion is therefore required to make an early and accurate diagnosis. We report a 6-year-old boy whose epigastrium was impacted by the handlebar of his bicycle during a traffic accident. The boy then experienced epigastralgia. Six days later, progressive bilious vomiting suggestive of gastrointestinal obstruction was noted. Imaging studies revealed a large hematoma extending from the fourth portion of the duodenum to the jejunum. Conservative methods of treatment failed to manage his condition. He underwent laparoscopic surgery to evacuate the hematoma. We also report a case of duodenal obstruction in a previously healthy 2-year-old girl who presented for the first time with acute symptoms of proximal intestinal obstruction. Contrast examinations showed apparent barium retention over the stomach and proximal duodenum. She underwent surgery due to persistent obstruction, and a mushroom-like foreign body was detected embedded in the orifice of the windsock duodenal web. After duodenoduodenostomy and removal of the bezoar, she had a smooth recovery and tolerated feeding well. We conclude that blunt abdominal trauma and incomplete duodenal obstruction, such as that caused by duodenal web, should be considered as possible causes of acquired proximal gastrointestinal obstruction in previously healthy children, despite their rarity.

  2. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  3. "Ready to Acquire"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yetton, Philip; Henningsson, Stefan; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of Danisco (a global food ingredients company) as it followed a growth-by-acquisition business strategy, focusing on how a new CIO built the IT resources to ensure the IT organization was "ready to acquire." We illustrate how these IT capabilities expedited...

  4. Acquired hypertrichosis lanuginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hypertirichosis lanuginose developed rapidly in a patient with no detectable malignancy. Soft, fine, downy hair growth was noticed on the face, ears, limbs and trunk. Bilaterally symmetrical vitiliginous macules were present on the ear and preauricular region. This case is reported because of its rarity, absence of any detectable malignancy and development of vitiligo, which to our knowledge has not been reported earlier.

  5. The importance of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations in breast cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrgou, Amir; Akouchekian, Mansoureh

    2016-01-01

    Many factors including genetic, environmental, and acquired are involved in breast cancer development across various societies. Among all of these factors in families with a history of breast cancer throughout several generations, genetics, like predisposing genes to develop this disease, should be considered more. Early detection of mutation carriers in these genes, in turn, can play an important role in its prevention. Because this disease has a high prevalence in half of the global population, female screening of reported mutations in predisposing genes, which have been seen in breast cancer patients, seems necessary. In this review, a number of mutations in two predisposing genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) that occurred in patients with a family history was investigated. We studied published articles about mutations in genes predisposed to breast cancer between 2000 and 2015. We then summarized and classified reported mutations in these two genes to recommend some exons which have a high potential to mutate. According to previous studies, exons have been reported as most mutated exons presented in this article. Considering the large size and high cost of screening all exons in these two genes in patients with a family history, especially in developing countries, the results of this review article can be beneficial and helpful in the selection of exon to screen for patients with this disease.

  6. Utility of KRAS mutation detection using circulating cell-free DNA from patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takeshi; Iwai, Takuma; Takahashi, Goro; Kan, Hayato; Koizumi, Michihiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Shinji, Seiichi; Yamagishi, Aya; Yokoyama, Yasuyuki; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Kawagoe, Tatsuro; Kitano, Shiro; Nakayama, Masato; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the clinical utility of detecting KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free (ccf)DNA of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We prospectively recruited 94 metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Circulating cell-free DNA was extracted from plasma samples and analyzed for the presence of seven KRAS point mutations. Using the Invader Plus assay with peptide nucleic acid clamping method and digital PCR, KRAS mutations were detected in the ccfDNA in 35 of 39 patients previously determined to have primary tumors containing KRAS mutations using the Luminex method, and in 5 of 55 patients with tumors containing wild-type KRAS. Curative resection was undertaken in 7 of 34 patients with primary and ccfDNA KRAS mutations, resulting in the disappearance of the mutation from the cell-free DNA in five of seven patients. Three of these patients had tumor recurrence and KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA reappeared. Epidermal growth factor receptor blockade was administered to 24 of the KRAS tumor wild-type patients. Of the 24 patients with wild-type KRAS in their primary tumors, three patients had KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA and did not respond to treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We also detected a new KRAS mutation in five patients during chemotherapy with EGFR blockade, before disease progression was detectable with imaging. The detection of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA is an attractive approach for predicting both treatment response and acquired resistance to EGFR blockade, and for detecting disease recurrence. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Sucar Batista

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis bullosa is a group of diseases or skin disorders genetically transmitted and it is characterized by the appearance of bullae, ulcers and skin wounds. It usually appears at birth or in the first months of life. This is a case of a 72-year-old female patient who comes to the dermatology department with skin lesions of 6 months of evolution. A skin biopsy was performed, taking a sample for direct and indirect immunofluorescence. Acquired epidermolysis bullosa of unknown etiology was diagnosed. Treatment was started with low-dose colchicine to increase it later, according to the patient’s tolerance and disease progression.

  8. The acquired hyperostosis syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Sterno-costo-clavicular hyperostosis (SCCH) is the most common manifestation of a syndrome, consisting of increased bone metabolism, mostly new bone formation and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue, which we have characterised as the acquired hyperostosis syndrome. In part I we discuss the terminology, radiological appearances, scintigraphy, clinical and laboratory findings, bacteriology, histology, nosology, complications, treatment and differential diagnosis of SCCH. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is regarded as a phaenotype of SCCH, depending on the age. CRMO occurs in children, adolescents and young adults, SCCH predominantly in middleaged and elderly adults. (orig.) [de

  9. The evaluation of disphagic syndrome, in patients with previously acquired brain damages

    OpenAIRE

    BARTULI, F. N.; LUCIANI, F.; MARINO, S.; BRAMANTI, E.; CECCHETTI, F.; ARCURI, C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently clinical studies have proved without doubts that in patients affect by neurological diseases, like stroke, parkinsonism syndromes and others neurodegenerative pathologies, there is a very elevated incidence of swallowing disorders even severe. The disease can show up in a full blown way, with clinical evident signs like suffocation or frequent and sudden cough, at the moment in which the patient tries to feed or to drink; or it can appear in a less clear way, through an unable protec...

  10. The evaluation of disphagic syndrome, in patients with previously acquired brain damages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartuli, F N; Luciani, F; Marino, S; Bramanti, E; Cecchetti, F; Arcuri, C

    2010-04-01

    Recently clinical studies have proved without doubts that in patients affect by neurological diseases, like stroke, parkinsonism syndromes and others neurodegenerative pathologies, there is a very elevated incidence of swallowing disorders even severe. The disease can show up in a full blown way, with clinical evident signs like suffocation or frequent and sudden cough, at the moment in which the patient tries to feed or to drink; or it can appear in a less clear way, through an unable protection of the low airway and with possible pathologies ab ingestis. The first signals are represented by frequent resulting of cough reflex at nutrition or hydratation. Important is to assess the validity of this reflection, monitoring the amount of food reflux in the mouth after swallowing, which then could be perceived like foreign body and be aspired. The main diagnostic tests are the pHmetry in 24h, ultrasound, esophagography, videofluoroscopy, endoscopic examination and scintigraphy. Through the FEES (Fiberoptic Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing) we can then identify the time of swallowing deficit. Early diagnosis of Dysphagia Syndrome is important to improve living condition and survival of patients.

  11. 12 CFR 225.140 - Disposition of property acquired in satisfaction of debts previously contracted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... relation to the overall financial position of the company, and the company has made good faith efforts to... (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BANK HOLDING COMPANIES AND CHANGE IN BANK CONTROL (REGULATION Y) Regulations Financial Holding Companies Interpretations § 225.140 Disposition of...

  12. Learning-by-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo Gaetano; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    2016-01-01

    of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms-and assess the impact of this integration action in the period that immediately follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors......’ use of the prior stock of technological knowledge of the acquiring firm after the acquisition. Furthermore, this effect is enhanced if the focal acquired inventor has high relative innovation ability but is weakened for acquired inventors with high ingroup collaborative strength. We construct a sample...

  13. Learning-By-Being-Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    In this paper we study post-acquisition integration in terms of R&D team reorganization—i.e., the creation of new teams with both inventors of the acquiring and acquired firms—and assess its impact on knowledge transfer in the period that follows the acquisition. Drawing on social identity and self......-categorization theories, we argue that R&D team reorganization increases the acquired inventors’ use of the prior stock of technological knowledge of the acquiring firm after the acquisition. Furthermore, this effect is enhanced if acquired inventors have higher innovation ability relative to their acquiring peers...

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, H A; Niederman, M S

    1998-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially the elderly, which is a patient population that continues to grow. Recently the spectrum and clinical picture of pneumonia has been changing as a reflection of this aging population; this requires a reassessment of and a new approach to the patient with pneumonia. Currently, pneumonia patients are classified as having either community-acquired or hospital-acquired infection rather than typical versus atypical. Patients who have CAP are categorized by age, presence of a coexisting medical illness, and the severity of the pneumonia. The rationale behind categorizing patients is to stratify them in terms of mortality risk to help determine the location of therapy (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit) and focus the choice of initial antimicrobial therapy. Once the decision to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia is made, the next step is to decide on an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and antibiotic therapy. Both decisions have evolved over the last several years since the publication of the American Thoracic Society's CAP guidelines. The current approach to the diagnostic work-up of pneumonia stresses a limited role of diagnostic tests and procedures. The antimicrobial regimen has now evolved into one that is empiric in nature and based on the age of the patient, the presence of coexisting medical disease, and the overall severity of the pneumonia. This process is a dynamic once because bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics can further complicate the course of pneumonia therapy, but the impact of resistance on outcome is less clear. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin is a prime example of this growing problem, and adjustment to pneumonia therapy may be required. A difficult but not uncommon problem in pneumonia patients is slow recovery and delayed resolution of radiographic infiltrates. Factors that impact

  15. On the Mutation Rate of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Hwang, Charles B. C.

    2005-01-01

    All seven DNA-based microbes for which carefully established mutation rates and mutational spectra were previously available displayed a genomic mutation rate in the neighborhood of 0.003 per chromosome replication. The pathogenic mammalian DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 has an estimated genomic mutation rate compatible with that value.

  16. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intercontrole acquiring by Framatome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Framatome group, as the worldwide leader in nuclear power plant construction, has reinforced his competences in nuclear services thanks to the acquiring of the Intercontrole company, specialized in non-destructive testing in nuclear and industrial environments. After a presentation of the functioning principle and of the safety aspects of a PWR reactor, this press dossier presents in a first part the role of nuclear services and in particular of non-destructive testing in nuclear power plants (in-service inspection, regulatory aspects, testing processes). This part is illustrated with some examples of inspection performed on some components of the primary coolant loop (steam generators, reactor vessel, pressurizer, pipes, primary pumps). A second part presents the technical centres and units of Framatome in charge of performing non-destructive inspections, while a third part describes the industrial policy and strategy of the group in this domain (market of nuclear park maintenance in France, in the USA and worldwide, creation of the 'inspection and control' centre of Framatome). A last part presents the activities of the Intercontrole company and of its daughter companies with some examples of actions realized in the nuclear and natural gas domains. (J.S.)

  18. Acquiring specific interpreting competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Zidar Forte

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In postgraduate interpreter training, the main objective of the course is to help trainees develop various competences, from linguistic, textual and cultural competence, to professional and specific interpreting competence. For simultaneous interpreting (SI, the main focus is on mastering the SI technique and strategies as well as on developing and strengthening communicative skills, which is discussed and illustrated with examples in the present paper. First, a brief overview is given of all the necessary competences of a professional interpreter with greater emphasis on specific interpreting competence for SI. In the second part of the paper, various approaches are described in terms of acquiring specific skills and strategies, specifically through a range of exercises. Besides interpreting entire speeches, practical courses should also consist of targeted exercises, which help trainees develop suitable coping strategies and mechanisms (later on almost automatisms, while at the same time "force" them to reflect on their individual learning process and interpreting performance. This provides a solid base on which trained interpreters can progress and develop their skills also after joining the professional sphere.

  19. Gene expression profiling and candidate gene resequencing identifies pathways and mutations important for malignant transformation caused by leukemogenic fusion genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Rachel L; Harper, David P; Caudell, David; Slape, Christopher; Beachy, Sarah H; Aplan, Peter D

    2012-12-01

    NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) and CALM-AF10 (CA10) are oncogenic fusion proteins produced by recurrent chromosomal translocations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transgenic mice that express these fusions develop AML with a long latency and incomplete penetrance, suggesting that collaborating genetic events are required for leukemic transformation. We employed genetic techniques to identify both preleukemic abnormalities in healthy transgenic mice as well as collaborating events leading to leukemic transformation. Candidate gene resequencing revealed that 6 of 27 (22%) CA10 AMLs spontaneously acquired a Ras pathway mutation and 8 of 27 (30%) acquired an Flt3 mutation. Two CA10 AMLs acquired an Flt3 internal-tandem duplication, demonstrating that these mutations can be acquired in murine as well as human AML. Gene expression profiles revealed a marked upregulation of Hox genes, particularly Hoxa5, Hoxa9, and Hoxa10 in both NHD13 and CA10 mice. Furthermore, mir196b, which is embedded within the Hoxa locus, was overexpressed in both CA10 and NHD13 samples. In contrast, the Hox cofactors Meis1 and Pbx3 were differentially expressed; Meis1 was increased in CA10 AMLs but not NHD13 AMLs, whereas Pbx3 was consistently increased in NHD13 but not CA10 AMLs. Silencing of Pbx3 in NHD13 cells led to decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and decreased colony formation in vitro, suggesting a previously unexpected role for Pbx3 in leukemic transformation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  1. The case of Geely acquiring Volvo Car : A study on low brand equity acquiring high brand equity

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Xiaoshu; Shi, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Much previous research has studied high brand equity acquiring high brand equity or high brand equity acquiring low brand equity. However, very little research has been conducted to understand how that low brand equity acquiring high brand equity changes the low brand equity especially in China. This paper is on the case of Geely Group acquiring Volvo Car which was a typical acquisition of a high brand equity company by a low brand equity company. The aim of the paper is to verify whether thi...

  2. Sequential acquisition of mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makishima, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in next-generation sequencing technologies allows us to discover frequent mutations throughout the coding regions of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), potentially providing us with virtually a complete spectrum of driver mutations in this disease. As shown by many study groups these days, such driver mutations are acquired in a gene-specific fashion. For instance, DDX41 mutations are observed in germline cells long before MDS presentation. In blood samples from healthy elderly individuals, somatic DNMT3A and TET2 mutations are detected as age-related clonal hematopoiesis and are believed to be a risk factor for hematological neoplasms. In MDS, mutations of genes such as NRAS and FLT3, designated as Type-1 genes, may be significantly associated with leukemic evolution. Another type (Type-2) of genes, including RUNX1 and GATA2, are related to progression from low-risk to high-risk MDS. Overall, various driver mutations are sequentially acquired in MDS, at a specific time, in either germline cells, normal hematopoietic cells, or clonal MDS cells.

  3. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  4. Free Radicals Mediate Systemic Acquired Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is a form of resistance that protects plants against a broad spectrum of secondary infections. However, exploiting SAR for the protection of agriculturally important plants warrants a thorough investigation of the mutual interrelationships among the various signals that mediate SAR. Here, we show that nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS serve as inducers of SAR in a concentration-dependent manner. Thus, genetic mutations that either inhibit NO/ROS production or increase NO accumulation (e.g., a mutation in S-nitrosoglutathione reductase [GSNOR] abrogate SAR. Different ROS function additively to generate the fatty-acid-derived azelaic acid (AzA, which in turn induces production of the SAR inducer glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P. Notably, this NO/ROS→AzA→G3P-induced signaling functions in parallel with salicylic acid-derived signaling. We propose that the parallel operation of NO/ROS and SA pathways facilitates coordinated regulation in order to ensure optimal induction of SAR.

  5. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  6. Maternally acquired runt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A E; Billingham, R E

    1973-01-19

    Without altering the structural integrity of the placenta by irradiation or drugs, we have shown that it is possible to immunize females both adoptively and actively against the paternally inherited transplantation antigens of their fetuses. Such immunization causes a high incidence of runt disease among the litters. Although the putative chimeric status of the affected offspring has yet to be confirmed, the results of our experiments support the thesis that runt disease is caused by the activities of "unwanted" immigrant lymphocytes from the maternal circulation. Our results suggest that immunologically activated cells are more likely to cross the placenta than normal cells and that this greater mobility may not be related to the immunologic specificity of the activated cells. Two factors may have contributed to the apparent failure of numerous previous attempts to demonstrate the capacity of transplantation immunity to affect the well-being of a fetus or, more correctly, its placenta, in the way that might be expected of a homograft. (i) Investigators were preoccupied with obtaining a classic type of rejection, in utero, analogous to the rejection of an orthotopic skin homograft. The birth of consistently healthy-looking litters, interpreted as a failure of the experiment, convinced the investigators of the efficacy of nature's solution of the homograft problem and there was no reason for them to suspect its possible limitations. Observation of the litters for several weeks might have uncovered the phenomenon of maternally induced runt disease. (ii) Most investigators resorted to hyperimmunization of the mothers. This would have facilitated the synthesis of protective isoantibodies capable of interfering with the expression of the potentially harmful cellular immune response (6). Ever since the abnormalities of runt disease were first described they have repeatedly been compared to those observed in patients with certain lymphomas (17). Various theories have been

  7. Resistance mutations against dolutegravir in HIV integrase impair the emergence of resistance against reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Maureen; Mesplède, Thibault; Quashie, Peter K; Moïsi, Daniela; Wainberg, Mark A

    2014-03-27

    Among 1222 antiretroviral-naive patients who received dolutegravir (DTG) as part of first-line therapy, none has developed resistance against this compound after 48-96 weeks of follow-up. Moreover, only four occurrences of virological failure with resistance mutations have been documented in previously drug-experienced patients who received DTG as a first time integrase inhibitor as a component of a second-line regimen. The R263K integrase resistance mutation was observed in two of these individuals who received suboptimal background regimens. We have previously selected mutations at position R263K, G118R, H51Y, and E138K as being associated with low-level resistance to DTG. Now, we sought to investigate the facility with which resistance on the part of R263K-containing viruses might develop. We tested the ability of DTG-resistant viruses containing either the R263K or G118R and/or H51Y mutations to develop further resistance against several reverse transcriptase inhibitors during in-vitro selection experiments. Our results show that DTG-resistant viruses are impaired in their ability to acquire further resistance to each of nevirapine and lamivudine as a consequence of their relative inability to develop resistance mutations associated with these two compounds. Our findings provide an explanation for the fact that no individual has yet progressed to virological failure with resistance mutations associated with dolutegravir in clinical trials in which patients received dolutegravir together with an optimized background regimen.

  8. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T

  9. Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Marie; Comio, Emilie; Gay, Valerie; Baroudi, Noureddine; Meyer, Pascal; Chuniaud-Louche, Christine; Hacini, Maya; Pica, Gian Matteo

    2016-05-07

    Myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A is a rare association. To the best of our knowledge only one case of myelofibrosis and acquired hemophilia A has been previously described. A 66-year-old Caucasian man diagnosed with myelofibrosis evolving in acute myeloid leukemia was referred to us for postoperative bleeding. Hemostatic studies showed prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, decreased factor VIII coagulation, and a high factor VIII inhibitor titer; these findings led to a diagnosis of acquired hemophilia A for which he was treated with methylprednisolone and recombinant activated factor VII on admission. Due to a lack of response he was subsequently treated with rituximab combined with activated prothrombin complex concentrates. Furthermore, he received azacytidine to treat the underlying hematological malignancies. Immunosuppressive rituximab therapy resolved acquired hemophilia A with marked efficacy. Rapid and accurate diagnosis, effective hemostatic therapy, and timely treatment for underlying disease are important in the management of acquired hemophilia A secondary to hematological malignancy.

  10. Acquired resistance to macrolides inPseudomonas aeruginosafrom cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Muhammad-Hariri; Khandekar, Shaunak; Tunney, Michael M; Elborn, J Stuart; Kahl, Barbara C; Denis, Olivier; Plésiat, Patrick; Traore, Hamidou; Tulkens, Paul M; Vanderbist, Francis; Van Bambeke, Françoise

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients receive chronic treatment with macrolides for their antivirulence and anti-inflammatory properties. We, however, previously showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa , considered as naturally resistant to macrolides, becomes susceptible when tested in a eukaryotic medium rather than a conventional broth.We therefore looked for specific macrolide resistance determinants in 333 CF isolates from four European CF centres in comparison with 48 isolates from patients suffering from hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP).Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of macrolides and ketolides measured in eukaryotic medium (RPMI-1640) were higher towards CF than HAP isolates. Gene sequencing revealed mutations at three positions (2045, 2046 and 2598) in domain V of 23S rRNA of 43% of sequenced CF isolates, but none in HAP isolates. Enzymes degrading extracellular polymeric substances also reduced MICs, highlighting a role of the mucoid, biofilm-forming phenotype in resistance. An association between high MICs and chronic azithromycin administration was evidenced, which was statistically significant for patients infected by the Liverpool Epidemic Strain.Thus, ribosomal mutations are highly prevalent in CF isolates and may spread in epidemic clones, arguing for prudent use of oral macrolides in these patients. Measuring MICs in RPMI-1640 could be easily implemented in microbiology laboratories to phenotypically detect resistance. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  11. Acquired Credit Unions: Drivers of Takeover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Raymond Sant

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study acquired credit unions and analyze their financial performance up to six years prior to merger, on a quarterly basis. The primary focus is on balance sheet (asset liability management and profitability variables (return on assets. We find that acquired credit unions during the period 2008 (third quarter to 2014 (first quarter experienced negative return on assets for several quarters prior to their takeover. This was the result of a declining loan portfolio and increasing charge offs. In spite of decreasing lending activity, such credit unions continued to increase their deposits, i.e., adding to their cost base. Due to declining loans, their net interest margin as a proportion of deposits was also in decline. We argue that this is an indicator of poor management ability. Furthermore, our analysis finds that operating expenses were increasing over time, something that has been documented in previous literature also for smaller credit unions and is attributable to lack of economies of scale. The average asset size of the acquired credit unions in our sample is about $22 million just before acquisition. We attribute our findings to poor business strategy followed by such credit unions. We also conclude that signs of trouble are evident up to two years before merger on average and regulatory policy may have to become more proactive to manage the consolidation challenge faced by the credit union industry in general.

  12. MRI of fetal acquired brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prayer, Daniela; Brugger, Peter C.; Kasprian, Gregor; Witzani, Linde; Helmer, Hanns; Dietrich, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Langer, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Acquired fetal brain damage is suspected in cases of destruction of previously normally formed tissue, the primary cause of which is hypoxia. Fetal brain damage may occur as a consequence of acute or chronic maternal diseases, with acute diseases causing impairment of oxygen delivery to the fetal brain, and chronic diseases interfering with normal, placental development. Infections, metabolic diseases, feto-fetal transfusion syndrome, toxic agents, mechanical traumatic events, iatrogenic accidents, and space-occupying lesions may also qualify as pathologic conditions that initiate intrauterine brain damage. MR manifestations of acute fetal brain injury (such as hemorrhage or acute ischemic lesions) can easily be recognized, as they are hardly different from postnatal lesions. The availability of diffusion-weighted sequences enhances the sensitivity in recognizing acute ischemic lesions. Recent hemorrhages are usually readily depicted on T2 (*) sequences, where they display hypointense signals. Chronic fetal brain injury may be characterized by nonspecific changes that must be attributable to the presence of an acquired cerebral pathology. The workup in suspected acquired fetal brain injury also includes the assessment of extra-CNS organs that may be affected by an underlying pathology. Finally, the placenta, as the organ that mediates oxygen delivery from the maternal circulation to the fetus, must be examined on MR images

  13. Acquiring taste in home economics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbak Larsen, Christian

    Objective: To explore how home economics was taught in Denmark before the recent Danish school reform, which also revised the objectives and content of home economics, naming it Food Knowledge (Madkundskab) Methods: Participant observation was done in home economic lessons in two case schools...... appreciated by the group of boys, and others again learned to stick with their idiosyncrasies when pressured by the teacher. Conclusions: Children were acquiring taste in the home economic lessons, but not only the kind of tastes that the teacher had planned for. This leads to reflections on the very complex...... process of taste acquiring and to a call for further research into taste acquiring in complex real life contexts as home economics lessons....

  14. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bayley, J.P.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Cascon, A.; Sampietro, M.L.; Gaal, J.; Korpershoek, E.; Hinojar-Gutierrez, A.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Hermsen, M.A.; Suarez, C.; Hussain, A.K.; Vriends, A.H.; Hes, F.J.; Jansen, J.C.; Tops, C.M.; Corssmit, E.P.; Knijff, P. de; Lenders, J.W.M.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Devilee, P.; Dinjens, W.N.; Krijger, R.R. de; Robledo, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation

  15. The Acquirement of Technical Nursing Skills by New Graduates : The Process of Acquirement of Skills Considering Graduates' Voluntarity

    OpenAIRE

    稲垣, 美紀; 土居, 洋子; 西上, あゆみ; Inagaki, Miki; Doi, Yoko; Nishigami, Ayumi

    2003-01-01

    The first research have performed the technical nursing skills (29 skills) by new graduates (30 students) . The purpose of this study was to continue to clarify the acquirement of technical nursing skills, which new graduates learned in clinical nursing skills seminars add to the previous 29 skills, their attitude toward seminars and practical trainings, how their attitude effected the acquirement of technical nursing skills and the new graduates' demands of the seminar and practical training...

  16. Systematic molecular genetic analysis of congenital sideroblastic anemia: evidence for genetic heterogeneity and identification of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Anke K; Campagna, Dean R; McLoughlin, Erin M; Agarwal, Suneet; Fleming, Mark D; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Neufeld, Ellis J

    2010-02-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are heterogeneous congenital and acquired bone marrow disorders characterized by pathologic iron deposits in mitochondria of erythroid precursors. Among the congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs), the most common form is X-linked sideroblastic anemia, due to mutations in 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS2). A novel autosomal recessive CSA, caused by mutations in the erythroid specific mitochondrial transporter SLC25A38, was recently defined. Other known etiologies include mutations in genes encoding the thiamine transporter SLC19A2, the RNA-modifying enzyme pseudouridine synthase 1 (PUS1), a mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCB7), glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions. Despite these known diverse causes, in a substantial portion of CSA cases a presumed genetic defect remains unknown. In the context of the recent discovery of SLC25A38 as a major novel cause, we systematically analyzed a large cohort of previously unreported CSA patients. Sixty CSA probands (28 females, 32 males) were examined for ALAS2, SLC25A38, PUS1, GLRX5, and ABCB7 mutations. SLC19A2 and mitochondrial DNA were only analyzed if characteristic syndromic features were apparent. Twelve probands had biallelic mutations in SLC25A38. Seven ALAS2 mutations were detected in eight sporadic CSA cases, two being novel. We also identified a novel homozygous null PUS1 mutation and novel mitochondrial DNA deletions in two patients with Pearson syndrome. No mutations were encountered in GLRX5, ABCB7, or SLC19A2. The remaining undefined probands (43%) can be grouped according to gender, family, and clinical characteristics, suggesting novel X-linked and autosomal recessive forms of CSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Acquired tracheo-oesophageal fistula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah C

    1994-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquired tracheo-oesophageal fistula is rare. The most common causes are tuberculosis and malignancy. Here we report a patient who had come with dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia with paratracheal lymphnodes on X-ray chest and was diagnosed to have a tracheo-bronchial fistula on barium studies. Transtumoral intubation by pull-through method was carried out.

  18. Somatically acquired structural genetic differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magaard Koldby, Kristina; Nygaard, Marianne; Christensen, Kaare

    2016-01-01

    twin pairs. Furthermore, the presence of mosaic structural variants was explored. We identified four mosaic acquired uniparental disomy events on chromosome 4q and 14q in the follow-up samples from four individuals, and our study thereby supports the increasing prevalence of somatic mosaic variants...

  19. MTHFR variants reduce the risk of G:C->A:T transition mutations within the p53 tumor suppressor gene in colon tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, C M; Curtin, K; Samowitz, W; Bigler, J; Potter, J D; Caan, B; Slattery, M L

    2005-10-01

    5,10-Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key enzyme in folate-mediated 1-carbon metabolism. Reduced MTHFR activity has been associated with genomic DNA hypomethylation. Methylated cytosines at CpG sites are easily mutated and have been implicated in G:C-->A:T transitions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene. We investigated 2 polymorphisms in the MTHFR gene (C677T and A1298C) and their associations with colon tumor characteristics, including acquired mutations in Ki-ras and p53 genes and microsatellite instability (MSI). The study population comprised 1248 colon cancer cases and 1972 controls, who participated in a population-based case-control study and had been analyzed previously for MSI, acquired mutations in Ki-ras, p53, and germline MTHFR polymorphisms. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios are presented. Overall, MTHFR genotypes were not associated with MSI status or the presence of any p53 or Ki-ras mutation. Individuals with homozygous variant MTHFR genotypes had a significantly reduced risk of G:C-->A:T transition mutations within the p53 gene, yet, as hypothesized, only at CpG-associated sites [677TT vs. 677CC (referent group) OR = 0.4 (95% CI: 0.1-0.8) for CpG-associated sites; OR = 1.5 (0.7-3.6) for non-CpG associated sites]. Genotypes conferring reduced MTHFR activity were associated with a decreased risk of acquired G:C-->A:T mutations within the p53 gene occurring at CpG sites. Consistent with evidence on the phenotypic effect of the MTHFR C677T variant, we hypothesize that this relation may be explained by modestly reduced genomic DNA methylation, resulting in a lower probability of spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine to thymidine. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which MTHFR polymorphisms can affect the risk of colon cancer.

  20. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  1. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    A distinct mutational spectrum for the p53 tumor suppressor gene in bladder carcinomas was established in patients with known exposures to cigarette smoke. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of exons 5 through 8 of the p53 gene showed inactivating mutations in 16 of 40 (40%) bladder...... tumors from smokers and 13 of 40 (33%) tumors from lifetime nonsmokers. Overall, 13 of the 50 (26%) total point mutations discovered in this and previous work were G:C-->C:G transversions, a relatively rare mutational type in human tumors. In six tumors, identical AGA (Arg)-->ACA (Thr) point mutations...... double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl...

  2. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Robert P.; Peng, Wenjie; Grant, Oliver C.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Zhu, Xueyong; Bouwman, Kim M.; de la Pena, Alba T. Torrents; van Breemen, Marielle J.; Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Yu, Wenli; McBride, Ryan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Woods, Robert J.; Verheije, Monique H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Paulson, James C.; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana

    2017-06-15

    The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA) mutation (Q226L) that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal) to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal), as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2) and 1968 (H3N2) human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  3. One-step noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for autosomal recessive homozygous point mutations using digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mun Young; Ahn, Soyeon; Kim, Min Young; Han, Jin Hee; Park, Hye-Rim; Seo, Han Kyu; Yoon, Jinsun; Lee, Seungmin; Oh, Doo-Yi; Kang, Changsoo; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2018-02-13

    Previously, we introduced a noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) protocol for diagnosing compound heterozygous autosomal recessive point mutations via maternal plasma DNA and simulated control genomic DNA sampling based on fetal DNA fraction. In our present study, we have improved our NIPT protocol to make it possible to diagnose homozygous autosomal recessive point mutations without the need to acquire fetal DNA fraction. Moreover, chi-squared test and empirical statistical range based on the proportion of mutant allele reads among the total reads served as the gatekeeping method. If this method yielded inconclusive results, then the Bayesian method was performed; final conclusion was drawn from the results of both methods. This protocol was applied to three families co-segregating congenital sensorineural hearing loss with monogenic homozygous mutations in prevalent deafness genes. This protocol successfully predicted the fetal genotypes from all families without the information about fetal DNA fraction using one-step dPCR reactions at least for these three families. Furthermore, we suspect that confirmatory diagnosis under this protocol is possible, not only by using picodroplet dPCR, but also by using the more readily available chip-based dPCR, making our NIPT protocol more useful in the diagnosis of autosomal recessive point mutations in the future.

  4. Three mutations switch H7N9 influenza to human-type receptor specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P de Vries

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian H7N9 influenza outbreak in 2013 resulted from an unprecedented incidence of influenza transmission to humans from infected poultry. The majority of human H7N9 isolates contained a hemagglutinin (HA mutation (Q226L that has previously been associated with a switch in receptor specificity from avian-type (NeuAcα2-3Gal to human-type (NeuAcα2-6Gal, as documented for the avian progenitors of the 1957 (H2N2 and 1968 (H3N2 human influenza pandemic viruses. While this raised concern that the H7N9 virus was adapting to humans, the mutation was not sufficient to switch the receptor specificity of H7N9, and has not resulted in sustained transmission in humans. To determine if the H7 HA was capable of acquiring human-type receptor specificity, we conducted mutation analyses. Remarkably, three amino acid mutations conferred a switch in specificity for human-type receptors that resembled the specificity of the 2009 human H1 pandemic virus, and promoted binding to human trachea epithelial cells.

  5. Acquired Flucytosine Resistance during Combination Therapy with Caspofungin and Flucytosine for Candida glabrata Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlier, Caroline; El Sissy, Carine; Bachelier-Bassi, Sophie; Scemla, Anne; Quesne, Gilles; Sitterlé, Emilie; Legendre, Christophe; Lortholary, Olivier; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Candida glabrata cystitis remains a therapeutic challenge, and an antifungal combination using flucytosine is one option. We describe two patients with refractory C. glabrata cystitis who failed flucytosine combined with caspofungin with early-acquired high-level resistance to flucytosine due to nonsense mutations in the FUR1 gene. Rapidly acquired flucytosine resistance with microbiological failure should discourage combination of caspofungin and flucytosine during urinary candidiasis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. P53 gene mutations in pituitary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yoshinori; Jin, Long; Scheithauer, Bernd W; Kovacs, Kalman; Roncaroli, Federico; Lloyd, Ricard V

    2007-01-01

    Although p53 overexpression detected by immunohistochemistry has been reported in pituitary adenomas and carcinomas, genetic mutations in the p53 gene have not been previously detected in these tumors. We analyzed a series of eight pituitary adenomas and six pituitary carcinomas by immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction amplification, and sequencing of p53 exon 5 through exon 8 for genetic mutations. Three carcinomas showed more than 20% expression of p53 protein in the tumor cells. One of these tumors with 60% overexpression of p53 protein had a mutation in codon 248, a common "hot spot" for p53 mutation, while the other carcinoma with 90% overexpression of p53 protein had a mutation in codon 135. All adenomas were negative for p53 mutations and had 15% of the cells expressing the p53 protein. Analysis of control tumors including four lung carcinomas with proven p53 mutations also had greater than 85% of the tumor cells overexpressing p53 protein. Two breast carcinoma cell lines with known p53 mutations, MBA-MD 231 and MBA-MD-486, also showed greater than 85% of the tumor cells overexpressing p53. These results show that p53 mutations are present in a subset of pituitary carcinomas and are usually associated with a high percentage of tumor cells overexpressing the p53 protein.

  7. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Visher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16 than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24, and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects.

  8. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Edileuza Felinto de Brito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL: one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE. Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis.

  9. Universal acquired melanosis (Carbon baby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviarasan P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 3-year-old girl born with fair complexion which became darker. The color change was insidious in onset at the age of 5 months, asymptomatic and progressive involving the entire body surface. Histopathology revealed increased pigmentation of the epidermal basal layer. Universal acquired melanosis is a rare form of hypermelanosis which was synonymously referred to as "Carbon baby". This is a rare presentation with only one earlier case report.

  10. Musicality: instinct or acquired skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Gary F

    2012-10-01

    Is the human tendency toward musicality better thought of as the product of a specific, evolved instinct or an acquired skill? Developmental and evolutionary arguments are considered, along with issues of domain-specificity. The article also considers the question of why humans might be consistently and intensely drawn to music if musicality is not in fact the product of a specifically evolved instinct. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  11. [Acquired disorders of color vision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascu, Lidia; Balaş, Mihaela

    2002-01-01

    This article is a general view of acquired disorders of color vision. The revision of the best known methods and of the etiopathogenic classification is not very important in ophthalmology but on the other hand, the detection of the blue defect advertise and associated ocular pathology. There is a major interest in serious diseases as multiple sclerosis, AIDS, diabetes melitus, when the first ocular sign can be a defect in the color vision.

  12. Human mobility networks and persistence of rapidly mutating pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleta, Alberto; Hisi, Andreia N S; Meloni, Sandro; Poletto, Chiara; Colizza, Vittoria; Moreno, Yamir

    2017-03-01

    Rapidly mutating pathogens may be able to persist in the population and reach an endemic equilibrium by escaping hosts' acquired immunity. For such diseases, multiple biological, environmental and population-level mechanisms determine the dynamics of the outbreak, including pathogen's epidemiological traits (e.g. transmissibility, infectious period and duration of immunity), seasonality, interaction with other circulating strains and hosts' mixing and spatial fragmentation. Here, we study a susceptible-infected-recovered-susceptible model on a metapopulation where individuals are distributed in sub-populations connected via a network of mobility flows. Through extensive numerical simulations, we explore the phase space of pathogen's persistence and map the dynamical regimes of the pathogen following emergence. Our results show that spatial fragmentation and mobility play a key role in the persistence of the disease whose maximum is reached at intermediate mobility values. We describe the occurrence of different phenomena including local extinction and emergence of epidemic waves, and assess the conditions for large-scale spreading. Findings are highlighted in reference to previous studies and to real scenarios. Our work uncovers the crucial role of hosts' mobility on the ecological dynamics of rapidly mutating pathogens, opening the path for further studies on disease ecology in the presence of a complex and heterogeneous environment.

  13. Strategies for Overcoming Resistance in Tumours Harboring BRAF Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourah Mohammad Obaid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of resistance to previously effective treatments has been a challenge for health care providers and a fear for patients undergoing cancer therapy. This is an unfortunately frequent occurrence for patients undergoing targeted therapy for tumours harboring the activating V600E mutation of the BRAF gene. Since the initial identification of the BRAF mutation in 2002, a series of small molecular inhibitors that target the BRAFV600E have been developed, but intrinsic and acquired resistance to these drugs has presented an ongoing challenge. More recently, improvements in therapy have been achieved by combining the use of BRAF inhibitors with other drugs, such as inhibitors of the downstream effector mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK/extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK. Despite improved success in response rates and in delaying resistance using combination therapy, ultimately, the acquisition of resistance remains a concern. Recent research articles have shed light on some of the underlying mechanisms of this resistance and have proposed numerous strategies that might be employed to overcome or avoid resistance to targeted therapies. This review will explore some of the resistance mechanisms, compare what is known in melanoma cancer to colorectal cancer, and discuss strategies under development to manage the development of resistance.

  14. Previously unreported abnormalities in Wolfram Syndrome Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akturk, Halis Kaan; Yasa, Seda

    2017-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease with non-autoimmune childhood onset insulin dependent diabetes and optic atrophy. WFS type 2 (WFS2) differs from WFS type 1 (WFS1) with upper intestinal ulcers, bleeding tendency and the lack ofdiabetes insipidus. Li-fespan is short due to related comorbidities. Only a few familieshave been reported with this syndrome with the CISD2 mutation. Here we report two siblings with a clinical diagnosis of WFS2, previously misdiagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus and diabetic retinopathy-related blindness. We report possible additional clinical and laboratory findings that have not been pre-viously reported, such as asymptomatic hypoparathyroidism, osteomalacia, growth hormone (GH) deficiency and hepatomegaly. Even though not a requirement for the diagnosis of WFS2 currently, our case series confirm hypogonadotropic hypogonadism to be also a feature of this syndrome, as reported before. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  15. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  16. Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce CCL20 up-regulation promoting tumorigenic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sligh, James [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Janda, Jaroslav [University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States); Jandova, Jana, E-mail: jjandova@email.arizona.edu [Department of Medicine—Dermatology Division, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ 85724 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Alterations in mitochondrial DNA are commonly found in various human cancers. • Mutations in BALB mitochondrial DNA induce up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. • Increased growth and motility of mtBALB cells is associated with CCL20 levels. • mtDNA changes in BALB induce in vivo tumor growth through CCL20 up-regulation. • Mutations in mitochondrial DNA play important roles in keratinocyte neoplasia. - Abstract: mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF

  17. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  18. Calpain-3 mutations in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Burcu; Aurino, Stefania; Haliloglu, Göknur; Talim, Beril; Erdem, Sevim; Akcören, Zuhal; Tan, Ersin; Caglar, Melda; Richard, Isabelle; Nigro, Vincenzo; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2006-05-01

    Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD2s) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by progressive involvement of the proximal limb girdle muscles; the group includes at least 10 different genetic entities. The calpainopathies (LGMD2A), a subgroup of LGMD2s, are estimated to be the most common forms of LGMD2 in all populations so far investigated. LGMD2A is usually characterized by symmetrical and selective atrophy of pelvic, scapular and trunk muscles and a moderate to gross elevation of serum CK. However, the course is highly variable. It is caused by mutations in the CAPN3 gene, which encodes for the calpain-3 protein. Until now, 161 pathogenic mutations have been found in the CAPN3 gene. In the present study, through screening of 93 unrelated LGMD2 families, we identified 29 families with LGMD2A, 21 (22.6%) of which were identified as having CAPN3 gene mutations. We detected six novel (p.K211N, p.D230G, p.Y322H, p.R698S, p.Q738X, c.2257delGinsAA) and nine previously reported mutations (c.550delA, c.19_23del, c.1746-20C>G, p.R49H, p.R490Q, p.Y336N, p.A702V, p.Y537X, p.R541Q) in the CAPN3 gene. There may be a wide variety of mutations, but clustering of specific mutations (c.550delA: 40%, p.R490Q: 10%) could be used in the diagnostic scheme in Turkey.

  19. GATA2 mutations in patients with acute myeloid leukemia-paired samples analyses show that the mutation is unstable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hsin-An; Lin, Yun-Chu; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Chou, Wen-Chien; Lin, Chien-Chin; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lin, Liang-In; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Hsu, Szu-Chun; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2015-02-01

    Recently, mutations of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene were identified in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with CEBPA double mutations (CEBPA (double-mut)), but the interaction of this mutation with other genetic alterations and its dynamic changes during disease progression remain to be determined. In this study, 14 different missense GATA2 mutations, which were all clustered in the highly conserved N-terminal zinc finger 1 domain, were identified in 27.4, 6.7, and 1 % of patients with CEBPA (double-mut), CEBPA (single-mut), and CEBPA wild type, respectively. All but one patient with GATA2 mutation had concurrent CEBPA mutation. GATA2 mutations were closely associated with younger age, FAB M1 subtype, intermediate-risk cytogenetics, expression of HLA-DR, CD7, CD15, or CD34 on leukemic cells, and CEBPA mutation, but negatively associated with FAB M4 subtype, favorable-risk cytogenetics, and NPM1 mutation. Patients with GATA2 mutation had significantly better overall survival and relapse-free survival than those without GATA2 mutation. Sequential analysis showed that the original GATA2 mutations might be lost during disease progression in GATA2-mutated patients, while novel GATA2 mutations might be acquired at relapse in GATA2-wild patients. In conclusion, AML patients with GATA2 mutations had distinct clinic-biological features and a favorable prognosis. GATA2 mutations might be lost or acquired at disease progression, implying that it was a second hit in the leukemogenesis of AML, especially those with CEBPA mutation.

  20. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  1. Complement's participation in acquired immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2002-01-01

    in which antigen is seen, be it alone or in association with natural or induced antibodies and/or C3-complement fragments. The aim of this review is to describe the present status of our understanding of complement's participation in acquired immunity and the regulation of autoimmune responses........ It is now clear that complement serves as a regulator of several B cell functions, including specific antibody production, antigen uptake, processing and presentation, and shaping of the B cell repertoire. Of key importance, in this respect, is the role played by the B cell-signaling triad consisting...

  2. Whole-genome sequencing of spermatocytic tumors provides insights into the mutational processes operating in the male germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Giannoulatou

    Full Text Available Adult male germline stem cells (spermatogonia proliferate by mitosis and, after puberty, generate spermatocytes that undertake meiosis to produce haploid spermatozoa. Germ cells are under evolutionary constraint to curtail mutations and maintain genome integrity. Despite constant turnover, spermatogonia very rarely form tumors, so-called spermatocytic tumors (SpT. In line with the previous identification of FGFR3 and HRAS selfish mutations in a subset of cases, candidate gene screening of 29 SpTs identified an oncogenic NRAS mutation in two cases. To gain insights in the etiology of SpT and into properties of the male germline, we performed whole-genome sequencing of five tumors (4/5 with matched normal tissue. The acquired single nucleotide variant load was extremely low (~0.2 per Mb, with an average of 6 (2-9 non-synonymous variants per tumor, none of which is likely to be oncogenic. The observed mutational signature of SpTs is strikingly similar to that of germline de novo mutations, mostly involving C>T transitions with a significant enrichment in the ACG trinucleotide context. The tumors exhibited extensive aneuploidy (50-99 autosomes/tumor involving whole-chromosomes, with recurrent gains of chr9 and chr20 and loss of chr7, suggesting that aneuploidy itself represents the initiating oncogenic event. We propose that SpT etiology recapitulates the unique properties of male germ cells; because of evolutionary constraints to maintain low point mutation rate, rare tumorigenic driver events are caused by a combination of gene imbalance mediated via whole-chromosome aneuploidy. Finally, we propose a general framework of male germ cell tumor pathology that accounts for their mutational landscape, timing and cellular origin.

  3. Guidelines for success in mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    There is renewed interest to induce mutations and to use them in plant breeding for crop improvement. But, often the projects on mutation breeding remain incomplete without achieving the desired specific objectives. A thorough knowledge of the various aspects of this technology is imperative to benefit from these experiments. With this in view, the essential basic information regarding mutagens, their mode of action, mutagenic treatment, sample size, handling the M 1 and M 2 generations, screening the mutants and their use in basic and applied fields are dealt with in this paper. This is meant to help those who are entering this field of plant breeding without previous experience in mutation breeding. (author)

  4. Cortical atrophy in presymptomatic Alzheimer's disease presenilin 1 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Yakeel T; Stern, Chantal E; Reiman, Eric M; Brickhouse, Michael; Ruiz, Adriana; Sperling, Reisa A; Lopera, Francisco; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2013-05-01

    Sporadic late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia has been associated with a 'signature' of cortical atrophy in paralimbic and heteromodal association regions measured with MRI. To investigate whether a similar pattern of cortical atrophy is present in presymptomatic presenilin 1 E280A mutation carriers an average of 6 years before clinical symptom onset. 40 cognitively normal volunteers from a Colombian population with familial AD were included; 18 were positive for the AD-associated presenilin 1 mutation (carriers, mean age=38) whereas 22 were non-carriers. T1-weighted volumetric MRI images were acquired and cortical thickness was measured. A priori regions of interest from our previous work were used to obtain thickness from AD-signature regions. Compared to non-carriers, presymptomatic presenilin 1 mutation carriers exhibited thinner cortex within the AD-signature summary measure (p<0.008). Analyses of individual regions demonstrated thinner angular gyrus, precuneus and superior parietal lobule in carriers compared to non-carriers, with trend-level effects in the medial temporal lobe. Results demonstrate that cognitively normal individuals genetically determined to develop AD have a thinner cerebral cortex than non-carriers in regions known to be affected by typical late-onset sporadic AD. These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that cortical atrophy is present in preclinical AD more than 5 years prior to symptom onset. Further research is needed to determine whether this method could be used to characterise the age-dependent trajectory of cortical atrophy in presymptomatic stages of AD.

  5. Expanding the keratin mutation database: novel and recurrent mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in 28 patients with epidermolytic ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, M J; Oji, V; Emmert, S; Hausser, I; Traupe, H; Krieg, T; Grimberg, G

    2011-02-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) is a hereditary keratinization disorder caused by mutations in the keratin 1 (KRT1) or keratin 10 (KRT10) genes. In most cases of severe EI, heterozygous single point mutations are found at the highly conserved helix boundary motifs of KRT1 and KRT10 that play a critical role in filament formation. The presence of palmoplantar keratoderma suggests KRT1 mutations, whereas KRT10 mutations in most instances give rise to the nonpalmoplantar variants. To identify the underlying mutations in patients with EI and to correlate genotype and phenotype. Mutation analysis was performed in 28 patients with EI by direct sequencing of KRT1 and KRT10 genes. We identified 14 different mutations, of which four have not been published previously. Identification of novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in EI allows improved understanding of disease pathogenesis as well as better patient management. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. A comprehensive study of oculocutaneous albinism type 1 reveals three previously unidentified alleles on the TYR gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ying; Wei, Ai-Hua; He, Xin; Zhou, Zhi-Yong; Lian, Shi; Zhu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a congenital genetic disorder characterized by defects in melanin production. OCA type 1 (OCA1) is the most serious and common type of OCA. This study characterized mutations associated with OCA1 in a series of Chinese patients. We recruited 41 unrelated patients with OCA and 100 healthy subjects from the Chinese Han population. Genomic DNA was extracted from their blood samples. Mutational analysis of tyrosinase (TYR) genes was conducted using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing, specifically to test the 100 control subjects and exclude the possibility of polymorphism. Mutational analysis and bioinformatics study were performed in TYR mutations. Among the 24 (58.5%) patients with OCA1, 21 different TYR mutations were identified, including three previously unidentified alleles (PUAs): one frameshift mutation (c.216delA) and two missense mutations (A241T and N364K). The proband mutation A241T carries three possible mutations in complex OCA. The findings of this study expand current knowledge and data of mutations associated with OCA1 in China and allow us to estimate or explore the mutation spectrum and relative frequencies of the TYR gene in the Chinese population.

  7. WAYS OF ACQUIRING FLYING PHOBIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Bettina; Vriends, Noortje; Margraf, Jürgen; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    The few studies that have explored how flying phobia is acquired have produced contradictory results. We hypothesized that classical conditioning plays a role in acquiring flying phobia and investigated if vicarious (model) learning, informational learning through media, and experiencing stressful life events at the time of onset of phobia also play a role. Thirty patients with flying phobia and thirty healthy controls matched on age, sex, and education were interviewed with the Mini-DIPS, the short German version of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) and the Fear-of-Flying History Interview. Fifty Percent of patients with flying phobia and 53% of healthy controls reported frightening events in the air. There was no significant difference between the two samples. Thus there were not more classical conditioning events for patients with flying phobia. There also was no significant difference between the two samples for vicarious (model) learning: 37% of flying phobia patients and 23% of healthy controls felt influenced by model learning. The influence of informational learning through media was significantly higher for the clinical sample (70%) than for the control group (37%). Patients with flying phobia experienced significantly more stressful life events in the period of their frightening flight experience (60%) than healthy controls (19%). Frightening experiences while flying are quite common, but not everybody develops a flying phobia. Stressful life events and other factors might enhance conditionability. Informational learning through negative media reports probably reinforces the development of flying phobia. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Demographic and clinical data in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoebl, P.; Marco, P.; Baudo, F.; Collins, P.; Huth-Kühne, A.; Nemes, L.; Pellegrini, F.; Tengborn, L.; Lévesque, H.; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lévesque, Hervé; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, László; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Sartori, Roberto; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolini, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Pascual, Marco; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII and characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage in patients with no previous family or personal history of bleeding. Although data on several AHA cohorts have been collected,

  9. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  10. Intensive care unit-acquired weakness in the burn population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, Jonathan J; Davies, Menna; Lye, George; Evans, Janine; Combellack, Tom; Dickson, William; Nguyen, Dai Q

    2016-05-01

    Intensive care unit-acquired weakness is an evolving problem in the burn population. As patients are surviving injuries that previously would have been fatal, the focus of treatment is shifting from survival to long-term outcome. The rehabilitation of burn patients can be challenging; however, a certain subgroup of patients have worse outcomes than others. These patients may suffer from intensive care unit-acquired weakness, and their treatment, physiotherapy and expectations need to be adjusted accordingly. This study investigates the condition of intensive care unit-acquired weakness in our burn centre. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all the admissions to our burn centre between 2008 and 2012 and identified 22 patients who suffered from intensive care unit-acquired weakness. These patients were significantly younger with significantly larger burns than those without intensive care unit-acquired weakness. The known risk factors for intensive care unit-acquired weakness are commonplace in the burn population. The recovery of these patients is significantly affected by their weakness. Copyright © 2016 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. UV Signature Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  12. Efficacy and Molecular Mechanisms of Differentiated Response to the Aurora and Angiogenic Kinase Inhibitor ENMD-2076 in Preclinical Models of p53-Mutated Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A. Ionkina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available PurposeTriple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is a subtype associated with poor prognosis and for which there are limited therapeutic options. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ENMD-2076 in p53-mutated TNBC patient-derived xenograft (PDX models and describe patterns of terminal cell fate in models demonstrating sensitivity, intrinsic resistance, and acquired resistance to ENMD-2076.Experimental designp53-mutated, TNBC PDX models were treated with ENMD-2076 and evaluated for mechanisms of sensitivity or resistance to treatment. Correlative tissue testing was performed on tumor tissue to assess for markers of proliferation, apoptosis, senescence, and pathways of resistance after treatment and at the time of acquired resistance.ResultsSensitivity to ENMD-2076 200 mg/kg daily was associated with induction of apoptosis while models exhibiting intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment presented with a senescent phenotype. Response to ENMD-2076 was accompanied by an increase in p53 and p73 levels, even within the background of mutant p53. Treatment with ENMD-2076 resulted in a decrease in pAurA and an increase in pHH3. We observed a TNBC subtype switch from the luminal androgen receptor to the basal-like subtype at acquired resistance.ConclusionENMD-2076 has antitumor activity in preclinical models of p53-mutated TNBC. Increased levels of p53 and p73 correlated with sensitivity whereas senescence was associated with resistance to ENMD-2076. The novel finding of a TNBC subtype switch at time of acquired resistance may provide mechanistic insights into the biologic effects of selective pressure of anticancer treatments on TNBC. ENMD-2076 is currently being evaluated in a Phase 2 clinical trial in patients with metastatic, previously treated TNBC where these biologic correlates can be further explored.

  13. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  14. Acquired Functional Asplenia in Sarcoidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Richard W.; McDaniel, Willie R.; Armstrong, Earl M.; Young, Roscoe C.; Higginbotham-Ford, Edith A.

    1985-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a recently identified cause of functional asplenia that can be diagnosed by radionuclide imaging. A 31-year-old woman with a five-year history of histologically compatible sarcoidosis was found to have nonvisualization of the spleen on technetium 99m sulfur colloid (radiopharmaceutical) liver-spleen scan. This scintigraphic finding was accompanied by poikilocytosis and Howell-Jolly bodies in the peripheral blood smear. A subsequent gallium 67 citrate scan reflected an abnormal increase in concentration of activity in the spleen, suggesting an active inflammatory process. Based upon this constellation of findings, it was concluded that acquired functional asplenia is the result of reticuloendothelial cell replacement via infiltration of the spleen by epithelioid cell granulomas of active sarcoidosis. This case also illustrates the reversibility of functional asplenia of sarcoidosis following adrenocorticosteroid therapy. Functional asplenia in sarcoidosis is now found to have a recognizable radionuclide imaging pattern. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:3908697

  15. And the Winner is - Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    New entrants to a market tend to be superior to incumbents in originating radical innovations. We provide a new explanation for this phenomenon, based on markets for technology. It applies in industries where successful entrepreneurial firms, or their technologies, are acquired by incumbents...... that then commercialize the innovation. To this end we analyze an innovation game between one incumbent and a large number of entrants. In the first stage, firms compete to develop innovations of high quality. They do so by choosing, at equal cost, the success probability of their R&D approach, where a lower probability...... the incumbent performs the least radical project. Entrants pick pairwise different projects; the bigger the number of entrants, the more radical the most radical project. Generally, entrants tend to choose more radical R&D approaches and generate the highest value innovation in case of success. We illustrate...

  16. Mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juby Mathew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase B gene (ARSB and consequent deficient activity of ARSB, a lysosomal enzyme. We present here the results of a study undertaken to identify the mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India. Around 160 ARSB mutations, of which just 4 are from India, have been reported in the literature. Our study covered nine MPS VI patients from eight families. Both familial mutations were found in seven families, and only one mutation was found in one family. Seven mutations were found — four novel (p.G38_G40del3, p.C91R, p.L98R and p.R315P, two previously reported from India (p.D53N and p.W450C, and one reported from outside India (p.R160Q. One mutation, p.W450C, was present in two families, and the other six mutations were present in one family each. Analysis of the molecular structure of the enzyme revealed that most of these mutations either cause loss of an active site residue or destabilize the structure of the enzyme. The only previous study on mutations in ARSB in Indian MPS VI patients, by Kantaputra et al. 2014 [1], reported four novel mutations of which two (p.D53N and p.W450C were found in our study as well. Till date, nine mutations have been reported from India, through our study and the Kantaputra study. Eight out of these nine mutations have been found only in India. This suggests that the population studied by us might have its own typical set of mutations, with other populations equally likely to have their own set of mutations.

  17. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  18. Mitochondrial mutations in maternally inherited hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutai, Hideki; Watabe, Takahisa; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Ogawa, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2017-03-20

    Although the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G are the primary causes of maternally inherited sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), several other mtDNA mutations are also reported to be associated with SNHL. Screening of m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G mutations was performed for 145 probands. Nine probands fulfilled the following criteria: 1) bilateral and symmetric SNHL, 2) ≥ 4 family members with SNHL with a maternal trait of inheritance in ≥ 2 generations, 3) onset of SNHL before the age of 40 years, 4) high-frequency SNHL, and 5) no record of environmental factors related to SNHL. Sequencing of additional mtDNA regions was performed for five subjects meeting the clinical criteria, but the screening results were negative. Among the nine cases meeting the five clinical criteria detailed above, three had the m.1555A > G mutation in MTRNR1, one had a m.3243A > G mutation in MTTL1, and one case had a m.7511T > C mutation in MTTS1. In the family with the m.7511T > C mutation, penetrance of SNHL among maternally related subjects was 9/17 (53%). The age at onset varied from birth (congenital) to adulthood. Hearing levels varied from normal to moderately impaired, unlike previously reported subjects with this mutation, where some maternal family members presented with profound SNHL. Family members with the m.7511T > C mutation and SNHL did not exhibit any specific clinical characteristics distinct from those of other individuals with SNHL and different mtDNA mutations. Among the 136 probands who did not meet the criteria detailed above, one case had the m.1555A > G mutation, and three cases had the m.3243A > G mutation. Since five of nine probands with the clinical criteria used in this study had mtDNA mutations, these criteria may be helpful for identification of candidate patients likely to have mtDNA mutations.

  19. Are Prothrombotic Mutations a Time-to-Event Risk Factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomic, Branko V; Gvozdenov, Maja Z; Pruner, Iva B; Simic, Jelena M; Kovac, Mirjana K; Radojkovic, Dragica P; Djordjevic, Valentina J

    2017-11-08

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) represents a common disorder involving genetic and acquired risk factors. It has been proposed that acquired risk factors are more important with aging than genetic factors, indicating different prevalence of prothrombotic mutations throughout the lifespan. To determine the role of the most frequent prothrombotic genetic risk factors (Factor V [FV] Leiden and Factor II [FII] G20210A mutations) in first-time DVT etiology in patients of different ages. This retrospective study included 701 patients living in Serbia with diagnosed DVT as a first-time thrombotic event. Risk assessment for mutations as age-related markers showed no statistical difference (FV Leiden mutation-OR, 1.027; 95% confidence interval [CI], .87-1.22; P = .76 and FII G20210A mutation-OR, 0.940, 95% CI, .74-1.19; P = .61). Our results show similar mutation prevalence regardless of how old the patients were at the time of the first DVT occurrence. Our results indicate that these 2 mutations cannot be used as prognostic marker for time-to-event first DVT in the Serbian population; however, further studies are required. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  1. RNAmute: RNA secondary structure mutation analysis tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barash Danny

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNAMute is an interactive Java application that calculates the secondary structure of all single point mutations, given an RNA sequence, and organizes them into categories according to their similarity with respect to the wild type predicted structure. The secondary structure predictions are performed using the Vienna RNA package. Several alternatives are used for the categorization of single point mutations: Vienna's RNAdistance based on dot-bracket representation, as well as tree edit distance and second eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix based on Shapiro's coarse grain tree graph representation. Results Selecting a category in each one of the processed tables lists all single point mutations belonging to that category. Selecting a mutation displays a graphical drawing of the single point mutation and the wild type, and includes basic information such as associated energies, representations and distances. RNAMute can be used successfully with very little previous experience and without choosing any parameter value alongside the initial RNA sequence. The package runs under LINUX operating system. Conclusion RNAMute is a user friendly tool that can be used to predict single point mutations leading to conformational rearrangements in the secondary structure of RNAs. In several cases of substantial interest, notably in virology, a point mutation may lead to a loss of important functionality such as the RNA virus replication and translation initiation because of a conformational rearrangement in the secondary structure.

  2. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  3. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bijlsma, Merijn W; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and is associated with a high disease burden. We reviewed recent progress in the management of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. The worldwide burden of disease of bacterial meningitis remains high, despite the decreasing incidence following introduction of routine vaccination campaigns. Delay in diagnosis and treatment remain major concerns in the management of acute bacterial meningitis. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases guidelines strive for a door-to-antibiotic-time less than 1 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as an important diagnostic tool to identify the causative organism. Point-of-care tests using fast multiplex PCR have been developed, but additional value has not been proven. Although anecdotal observations advocate pressure-based management, a randomized controlled trial will need to be performed first to determine efficacy and safety of such an aggressive treatment approach. Adjunctive dexamethasone remains the only adjunctive therapy with proven efficacy. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has been decreasing after the implementation of effective vaccines. Treatment should be administered as soon as possible and time to treatment should not exceed 1 h.

  4. The Versatile Mutational Resistome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla López-Causapé

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking features of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its outstanding capacity for developing antimicrobial resistance to nearly all available antipseudomonal agents through the selection of chromosomal mutations, leading to the failure of the treatment of severe hospital-acquired or chronic infections. Recent whole-genome sequencing (WGS data obtained from in vitro assays on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, in vivo monitoring of antimicrobial resistance development, analysis of sequential cystic fibrosis isolates, and characterization of widespread epidemic high-risk clones have provided new insights into the evolutionary dynamics and mechanisms of P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance, thus motivating this review. Indeed, the analysis of the WGS mutational resistome has proven to be useful for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of classical resistance pathways and to describe new mechanisms for the majority of antipseudomonal classes, including β-lactams, aminoglycosides, fluoroquinolones, or polymixins. Beyond addressing a relevant scientific question, the analysis of the P. aeruginosa mutational resistome is expected to be useful, together with the analysis of the horizontally-acquired resistance determinants, for establishing the antibiotic resistance genotype, which should correlate with the antibiotic resistance phenotype and as such, it should be useful for the design of therapeutic strategies and for monitoring the efficacy of administered antibiotic treatments. However, further experimental research and new bioinformatics tools are still needed to overcome the interpretation limitations imposed by the complex interactions (including those leading to collateral resistance or susceptibility between the 100s of genes involved in the mutational resistome, as well as the frequent difficulties for differentiating relevant mutations from simple natural polymorphisms.

  5. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  6. 12 CFR 617.7610 - What should the System institution do when it decides to sell acquired agricultural real estate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... decides to sell acquired agricultural real estate? 617.7610 Section 617.7610 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT... institution do when it decides to sell acquired agricultural real estate? (a) Notify the previous owner, (1) Within 15 days of the System institution's decision to sell acquired agricultural real estate, it must...

  7. Short barb: a feather structure mutation in Japanese quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J E; Roberts, C W; Nichols, C R; Cheng, K M

    1982-12-01

    A type of feather structure abnormality in Japanese quail resulting in shortened barbs on contour feathers was found to be controlled by a single autosomal recessive gene, sh (short barb). The mutation was first identified in a full-sib family from the University of British Columbia wild type line. Unlike other feather structure mutations in Japanese quail reported previously in literature, the short barb mutation is not associated with poor reproduction.

  8. A cognitive chameleon: Lessons from a novel MAPT mutation case.

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Y.; Gordon, E.; Rohrer, J.; Downey, L.; de Silva, R.; Jäger, H. R.; Nicholas, J.; Modat, M.; Cardoso, M. J.; Mahoney, C.; Warren, J.; Rossor, M.; Fox, N.; Caine, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of frontotemporal dementia caused by a novel MAPT mutation (Q351R) with a remarkably long amnestic presentation mimicking familial Alzheimer’s disease. Longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and imaging data provide convergent evidence for predominantly bilateral anterior medial temporal lobe involvement consistent with previously established neuroanatomical signatures of MAPT mutations. This case supports the notion that the neural network affected in MAPT mutations is de...

  9. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  10. Characterization of pathogenic germline mutations in human Protein Kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orengo Christine A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Kinases are a superfamily of proteins involved in crucial cellular processes such as cell cycle regulation and signal transduction. Accordingly, they play an important role in cancer biology. To contribute to the study of the relation between kinases and disease we compared pathogenic mutations to neutral mutations as an extension to our previous analysis of cancer somatic mutations. First, we analyzed native and mutant proteins in terms of amino acid composition. Secondly, mutations were characterized according to their potential structural effects and finally, we assessed the location of the different classes of polymorphisms with respect to kinase-relevant positions in terms of subfamily specificity, conservation, accessibility and functional sites. Results Pathogenic Protein Kinase mutations perturb essential aspects of protein function, including disruption of substrate binding and/or effector recognition at family-specific positions. Interestingly these mutations in Protein Kinases display a tendency to avoid structurally relevant positions, what represents a significant difference with respect to the average distribution of pathogenic mutations in other protein families. Conclusions Disease-associated mutations display sound differences with respect to neutral mutations: several amino acids are specific of each mutation type, different structural properties characterize each class and the distribution of pathogenic mutations within the consensus structure of the Protein Kinase domain is substantially different to that for non-pathogenic mutations. This preferential distribution confirms previous observations about the functional and structural distribution of the controversial cancer driver and passenger somatic mutations and their use as a proxy for the study of the involvement of somatic mutations in cancer development.

  11. FLT3 mutation incidence and timing of origin in a population case series of pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jeffrey

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in FLT3 result in activated tyrosine kinase activity, cell growth stimulation, and a poor prognosis among various subtypes of leukemia. The causes and timing of the mutations are not currently known. We evaluated the prevalence and timing of origin of FLT3 mutations in a population series of childhood leukemia patients from Northern California. Methods We screened and sequenced FLT3 mutations (point mutations and internal tandem duplications, ITDs among 517 childhood leukemia patients, and assessed whether these mutations occurred before or after birth using sensitive "backtracking" methods. Results We determined a mutation prevalence of 9 of 73 acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs, 12% and 9 of 441 acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALLs, 2%. Among AMLs, FLT3 mutations were more common in older patients, and among ALLs, FLT3 mutations were more common in patients with high hyperdiploidy (3.7% than those without this cytogenetic feature (1.4%. Five FLT3 ITDs, one deletion mutation, and 3 point mutations were assessed for their presence in neonatal Guthrie spots using sensitive real-time PCR techniques, and no patients were found to harbor FLT3 mutations at birth. Conclusions FLT3 mutations were not common in our population-based patient series in California, and patients who harbor FLT3 mutations most likely acquire them after they are born.

  12. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  13. 17 CFR 210.8-06 - Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. 210.8-06 Section 210.8-06 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND... Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-06 Real estate operations acquired or to be acquired. If...

  14. Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation

    OpenAIRE

    JORDI SALAS; NURIA LASO; SERGI MAS; M. JOSE LAFUENTE; XAVIER CASTERAD; MANUEL TRIAS; ANTONIO BALLESTA; RAFAEL MOLINA; CARLOS ASCASO; SHICHUN ZHENG; JOHN K. WIENCKE; AMALIA LAFUENTE

    2004-01-01

    Decrease in specific micronutrient intake in colorectal cancer patients with tumors presenting Ki-ras mutation BACKGROUND: The diversity of the Mediterranean diet and the heterogeneity of acquired genetic alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) led us to examine the possible association between dietary factors and mutations, such as Ki-ras mutations, in genes implicated in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study was based on 246 cases and 296 controls. For th...

  15. Identification of mutations including de novo mutations in Korean patients with hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S H; Kim, U K; Chae, J J; Kim, D J; Oh, H Y; Kim, B J; Lee, C C

    2001-05-01

    Hypokalaemic periodic paralysis (hypoPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder involving the abnormal function of ion channels and it is characterized by paralysis attacks of varying severity, accompanied by a fall in blood potassium levels. Linkage analysis showed that the candidate locus responsible for hypoPP was localized to chromosome 1q31-32, and this locus encoded the muscle dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel alpha(1)-subunit (CACNA1S). So far, three different mutations in CACNA1S gene have been identified in patients with hypoPP: Arg528His, Arg1239His and Arg1239Gly in Caucasian patients. However, there are few reports about the mutations of CACNA1S gene in other races. In this study, four Korean families with five hypoPP patients were screened for mutations of CACNA1S gene with polymerase chain reaction-based restriction analysis and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. To determine the mode of inheritance, haplotype analysis was done with three microsatellite markers (D1S1726, CACNL1A3, and D1S1723). Arg528His mutation was detected in three families, and one family had no known mutations. Moreover, for the first time, we detected de novo Arg528His mutations in two out of three families with hypoPP. Haplotype analysis using three microsatellite markers (D1S1726, CACNL1A3, and D1S1723) suggested the occurrence of de novo Arg528His mutations in two of the three families with Arg528His mutation. Arg528His mutations of CACNA1S, including de novo Arg528His mutations, were found in Korean patients with hypoPP. These results imply that de novo mutation, in addition to non-penetrance, is one of the genetic mechanisms that can explain the previous clinical observation that hypoPP occurs sporadically without family history.

  16. The three faces of riboviral spontaneous mutation: spectrum, mode of genome replication, and mutation rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libertad García-Villada

    Full Text Available Riboviruses (RNA viruses without DNA replication intermediates are the most abundant pathogens infecting animals and plants. Only a few riboviral infections can be controlled with antiviral drugs, mainly because of the rapid appearance of resistance mutations. Little reliable information is available concerning i kinds and relative frequencies of mutations (the mutational spectrum, ii mode of genome replication and mutation accumulation, and iii rates of spontaneous mutation. To illuminate these issues, we developed a model in vivo system based on phage Qß infecting its natural host, Escherichia coli. The Qß RT gene encoding the Read-Through protein was used as a mutation reporter. To reduce uncertainties in mutation frequencies due to selection, the experimental Qß populations were established after a single cycle of infection and selection against RT(- mutants during phage growth was ameliorated by plasmid-based RT complementation in trans. The dynamics of Qß genome replication were confirmed to reflect the linear process of iterative copying (the stamping-machine mode. A total of 32 RT mutants were detected among 7,517 Qß isolates. Sequencing analysis of 45 RT mutations revealed a spectrum dominated by 39 transitions, plus 4 transversions and 2 indels. A clear template•primer mismatch bias was observed: A•C>C•A>U•G>G•U> transversion mismatches. The average mutation rate per base replication was ≈9.1×10(-6 for base substitutions and ≈2.3×10(-7 for indels. The estimated mutation rate per genome replication, μ(g, was ≈0.04 (or, per phage generation, ≈0.08, although secondary RT mutations arose during the growth of some RT mutants at a rate about 7-fold higher, signaling the possible impact of transitory bouts of hypermutation. These results are contrasted with those previously reported for other riboviruses to depict the current state of the art in riboviral mutagenesis.

  17. Stalled replication forks generate a distinct mutational signature in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B.; Liberti, Sascha E.; Vogel, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells acquire genome alterations during the act of DNA replication. This leads to mutation accumulation and somatic cell mosaicism in multicellular organisms, and is also implicated as an underlying cause of aging and tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms of DNA replication-associ...

  18. Familial hypercholesterolemia mutations in Petrozavodsk: no similarity to St. Petersburg mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana Yu; Korneva, Victoria A; Kuznetsova, Tatiana Yu; Golovina, Alexandra S; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Mandelshtam, Michail Yu

    2013-12-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a human monogenic disease induced by a variety of mutations with striking genetic diversity. Despite this variability recurrent mutations occur in each population studied, which allows both elucidating prevalent mutations and developing DNA diagnostic tools for the disease. Recent research of FH in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Novosibirsk (major cities in Russia) demonstrates that each megapolis has its own FH mutation spectrum sharing only small part of mutations with other populations in Russia and Europe. In order to optimize molecular-genetic diagnostic protocols for FH in Russia we studied mutation spectrum in other regions including Petrozavodsk, a smaller town in relatively close proximity to St. Petersburg. The principal method was automated detection of single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by direct PCR amplified DNA sequencing. Twelve different mutations of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were detected in the Petrozavodsk sample (80 patients). Out of these twelve mutations, seven have never been described before (c.192_201delinsGGACTTCA, c. 195_196insT, c. 618 T > G, c. 1340C > G, c. 1686_1693delinsT, c. 1936C > A, c. 2191delG). Other five mutations (c. 58G > A, c. 925_931del, c. 1194C > T, c. 1532 T > C, c. 1920C > T) were previously characterized elsewhere. All new mutations are considered to be a probable cause of the FH in their carriers. Direct evidence of the neutral character of c.58G > A or p. (Gly20Arg) is provided for the first time. Each pathogenic mutation was a trait of its own unique pedigree and so far has not been found in other patients. Strikingly, out of twelve mutations characterized in the Petrozavodsk sample only one mutation, c. 925_931del, has previously been found in patients from St. Petersburg and Finland (most closely located studied populations), suggesting some common roots in origin of these populations in the past or limited

  19. Clinicopathological associations of acquired erythroblastopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Gursel; Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Yasar, Hatime Arzu; Eliacik, Eylem; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Demiroglu, Haluk; Sayinalp, Nilgun; Aksu, Salih; Etgul, Sezgin; Aslan, Tuncay; Goker, Hakan; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Acquired erythroblastopenia (AE) is a rare clinical situation. It is characterized by the reduction of erythroid precursors in the bone marrow together with the low reticulocyte counts in the peripheral blood. Main secondary causes of AE are drugs, Parvovirus B19 and other infectious reasons, lymphoid and myeloid neoplasia, autoimmune diseases, thymoma and pregnancy. The aim of this study is to assess the frequencies and clinical associations of AE via analyzing 12340 bone marrow samples in a retrospective manner. Bone marrow aspirations which were obtained from patients who applied to Hacettepe University Hematology Clinic between 2002 and 2013, were analyzed retrospectively. Thirty four erythroblastopenia cases were found. Patients ranged in age from 16 to 80 years with a median of 38 years. Fifteen patients were men (44%) and nineteen were women (56%). In these patients, detected causes of erythroblastopenia were MDS, idiopathic pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), parvovirus infection, post chemotherapy aplasia, plasma proliferative diseases, copper deficiency due to secondary amyloidosis, fever of unknown origin, hemophagocytic syndrome, enteric fever and legionella pneumonia. We found that between those reasons the most common causes of erythroblastopenia are MDS (17.7%) and idiopathic PRCA (17.7%). As a result, erythroblastopenia in the bone marrow may be an early sign of MDS. In those AE cases possibility of being MDS must be kept in mind as it can be mistaken for PRCA. To conclude, in adults MDS without excess blast is one of the most common causes of erythroblastopenia in clinical practice and in case of erythroblastopenia the presence of MDS should be investigated.

  20. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  1. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  2. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  3. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  4. Failure of levofloxacin treatment in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossi Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. High global incidence of macrolide and penicillin resistance has been reported, whereas fluoroquinolone resistance is uncommon. Current guidelines for suspected CAP in patients with co-morbidity factors and recent antibiotic therapy recommend initial empiric therapy using one fluoroquinolone or one macrolide associated to other drugs (amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Resistance to fluoroquinolones is determined by efflux mechanisms and/or mutations in the parC and parE genes coding for topoisomerase IV and/or gyrA and gyrB genes coding for DNA gyrase. No clinical cases due to fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae strains have been yet reported from Italy. Case presentation A 72-year-old patient with long history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple fluoroquinolone treatments for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections developed fever, increased sputum production, and dyspnea. He was treated with oral levofloxacin (500 mg bid. Three days later, because of acute respiratory insufficiency, the patient was hospitalized. Levofloxacin treatment was supplemented with piperacillin/tazobactam. Microbiological tests detected a S. pneumoniae strain intermediate to penicillin (MIC, 1 mg/L and resistant to macrolides (MIC >256 mg/L and fluoroquinolones (MIC >32 mg/L. Point mutations were detected in gyrA (Ser81-Phe, parE (Ile460-Val, and parC gene (Ser79-Phe; Lys137-Asn. Complete clinical response followed treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion This is the first Italian case of community-acquired pneumonia due to a fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate where treatment failure of levofloxacin was documented. Molecular analysis showed a group of mutations that have not yet been reported from Italy and has been detected only twice in Europe. Treatment with piperacillin

  5. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  6. Non-progressive cerebellar ataxia and previous undetermined acute cerebellar injury: a mysterious clinical condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir Bocca Vieira de Rezende Pinto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar ataxias represent a wide group of neurological diseases secondary to dysfunctions of cerebellum or its associated pathways, rarely coursing with acute-onset acquired etiologies and chronic non-progressive presentation. We evaluated patients with acquired non-progressive cerebellar ataxia that presented previous acute or subacute onset. Clinical and neuroimaging characterization of adult patients with acquired non-progressive ataxia were performed. Five patients were identified with the phenotype of acquired non-progressive ataxia. Most patients presented with a juvenile to adult-onset acute to subacute appendicular and truncal cerebellar ataxia with mild to moderate cerebellar or olivopontocerebellar atrophy. Establishing the etiology of the acute triggering events of such ataxias is complex. Non-progressive ataxia in adults must be distinguished from hereditary ataxias.

  7. Prothrombotic gene mutations in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss and cardiovascular thrombotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaccio, Pasquale; Cuccarini, Valeria; Ottaviani, Francesco; Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano; Bossi, Anna; Pignataro, Lorenzo

    2009-03-01

    Impaired cochlear perfusion seems to be an important event in sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prothrombotic gene mutations have been related to vascular disorders and sudden hearing loss. We assessed the prothrombotic risk in 10 patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss who had previously experienced cardiovascular events to support its vascular pathogenesis. Ten patients underwent hematologic tests (MTHFR C677T/A1298C, prothrombin G20210A, platelet GlyIIIaA1/A2, and V Leiden G1691A genotyping; fibrinogenemia; cholesterolemia: homocysteinemia; folatemia). The results were compared with those of 100 previously investigated patients with sudden hearing loss alone and those of 200 healthy controls. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes, and the gene mutations were investigated by polymerase chain reaction and a LightCycler DNA analyzer. Two patients had 2 mutant alleles, 6 had 3, and 2 had 4. The mean homocysteine, cholesterol, and fibrinogen levels were above the upper limit of normal; the mean folate levels were slightly above the lower limit of normal. Multiple mutations were more frequent in the patient group than in the previously analyzed patients and healthy controls. The association between inherited and acquired prothrombotic factors in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss and thrombotic diseases in other sites suggests that a multifactorial mechanism may underlie microvascular cochlear impairment. Hematologic investigation, including MTHFR, prothrombin, platelet, and V Leiden genotyping, may help to detect patients at potential risk of recurrent hearing loss and multiple microvascular diseases, and could be usefully performed in otherwise idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  8. TP53 mutations in de novo acute myeloid leukemia patients: longitudinal follow-ups show the mutation is stable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Kuo, Y-Y; Liu, C-Y; Lin, L-I; Tseng, M-H; Chiang, Y-C; Liu, M-C; Liu, C-W; Tang, J-L; Yao, M; Li, C-C; Huang, S-Y; Ko, B-S; Hsu, S-C; Chen, C-Y; Lin, C-T; Wu, S-J; Tsay, W; Chen, Y-C; Tien, H-F

    2015-07-31

    The TP53 mutation is frequently detected in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with complex karyotype (CK), but the stability of this mutation during the clinical course remains unclear. In this study, TP53 mutations were identified in 7% of 500 patients with de novo AML and 58.8% of patients with CK. TP53 mutations were closely associated with older age, lower white blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts, FAB M6 subtype, unfavorable-risk cytogenetics and CK, but negatively associated with NPM1 mutation, FLT3/ITD and DNMT3A mutation. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that TP53 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for overall survival and disease-free survival among the total cohort and the subgroup of patients with CK. A scoring system incorporating TP53 mutation and nine other prognostic factors, including age, WBC counts, cytogenetics and gene mutations, into survival analysis proved to be very useful to stratify AML patients. Sequential study of 420 samples showed that TP53 mutations were stable during AML evolution, whereas the mutation was acquired only in 1 of the 126 TP53 wild-type patients when therapy-related AML originated from different clone emerged. In conclusion, TP53 mutations are associated with distinct clinic-biological features and poor prognosis in de novo AML patients and are rather stable during disease progression.

  9. Biomarkers in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskresenska Natalja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information on pneumonia (P patients with features of oxidative stress (OS. Identifying features of OS in patients with P is of interest not only for diagnosis, but also for monitoring of treatment efficiency. We recruited 73 patients with community-acquired P (CAP, previously healthy adults, both males and females with mean age of 68.0 ± 15.2, hospitalised, and 61 healthy control patients matched for age. For quantitative evaluation of lipid peroxidation in CAP patients, the levels of aldehydic lipid peroxidation products like malondialdehyde (MDA and 4- hydroxynon-2-enal (HNE were quantified. Furthermore, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH and several antioxidant enzymes and selenium in plasma were determined. In CAP patients, decreased levels of GSH and plasma selenium were observed. Plasma levels of MDA, and HNE did significantly differ between patient and control groups. We also noted reduced activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely, glutation peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Low antioxidant enzymes activity was associated with a more severe CAP pattern. Both GSH and antioxidant enzymes may serve as markers for inflammation-related OS in CAP patients, and measurement of these biomarkers may be a valid indentifier for its management.

  10. Hyperthyroidism caused by acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-J; Zhou, J-J; Yuan, X-L; Li, C-Y; Sheng, H; Su, B; Sheng, C-J; Qu, S; Li, H

    2014-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is an immune deficiency disease. The etiology of hyperthyroidism, which can also be immune-related, is usually divided into six classical categories, including hypophyseal, hypothalamic, thyroid, neoplastic, autoimmune and inflammatory hyperthyroidism. Hyperthyroidism is a rare complication of highly active antimicrobial therapy (HAART) for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Hyperthyroidism caused directly by AIDS has not been previously reported. A 29-year-old man who complained of dyspnea and asthenia for 1 month, recurrent fever for more than 20 days, and breathlessness for 1 week was admitted to our hospital. The thyroid function test showed that the level of free thyroxine (FT4) was higher than normal and that the level of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was below normal. He was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism. Additional investigations revealed a low serum albumin level and chest infection, along with diffuse lung fibrosis. Within 1 month, he experienced significant weight loss, no hand tremors, intolerance of heat, and perspiration proneness. We recommended an HIV examination; subsequently, AIDS was diagnosed based on the laboratory parameters. This is the first reported case of hyperthyroidism caused by AIDS. AIDS may cause hyperthyroidism by immunization regulation with complex, atypical, and easily ignored symptoms. Although hyperthyroidism is rare in patients with AIDS, clinicians should be aware of this potential interaction and should carefully monitor thyroid function in HIV-positive patients.

  11. An unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii, which is rarely reported in the northeastern United States. Previously reported cases originate from tropical and subtropical climates, and infection tends to have an aggressive course with a poor outcome. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial; however, the associated systemic inflammatory response may overwhelm host defenses, especially in patients with certain co-morbidities.

  12. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Wang

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas (AS are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA, that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma.Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3 demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage.Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  13. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guannan; Wu, Ming; Maloneyhuss, Martha A; Wojcik, John; Durham, Amy C; Mason, Nicola J; Roth, David B

    2017-01-01

    Angiosarcomas (AS) are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA), that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma. Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3) demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage. Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  14. Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis and ZSWIM6 mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Ousager, Lilian Bomme; Miller, Kerry A

    2016-01-01

    Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis (AFND) is a distinctive and rare frontonasal malformation that presents in combination with brain and limb abnormalities. A single recurrent heterozygous missense substitution in ZSWIM6, encoding a protein of unknown function, was previously shown to underlie this...... sequencing of DNA isolated from a variety of tissues, which each contain different levels of mutation. This has important implications for genetic counselling....

  15. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  16. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  17. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type IX: prevalence of deletion mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-04-21

    Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) is important to enable accurate diagnoses and make appropriate therapeutic plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD type IX. Thirteen Korean patients were tested for PHKA2 mutations using direct sequencing and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. A comprehensive review of the literature on previously reported PHKA2 mutations in other ethnic populations was conducted for comparison. Among 13 patients tested, six unrelated male patients with GSD IX aged 2 to 6 years at the first diagnostic work-up for hepatomegaly with elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were found to have PHKA2 mutations. These patients had different PHKA2 mutations: five were known mutations (c.537 + 5G > A, c.884G > A [p.Arg295His], c.3210_3212delGAG [p.Arg1072del], exon 8 deletion, and exons 27-33 deletion) and one was a novel mutation (exons 18-33 deletion). Notably, the most common type of mutation was gross deletion, in contrast to other ethnic populations in which the most common mutation type was sequence variant. This study expands our knowledge of the PHKA2 mutation spectrum of GSD IX. Considering the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD IX, molecular diagnostic methods for deletions should be conducted in conjunction with direct sequence analysis to enable accurate molecular diagnosis of this disease in the Korean population.

  19. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G; O'Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C P; Green, Anthony R; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-11-21

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic "predestination," in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application.

  20. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  3. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States)); Cohen, M.P. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Sexauer, C.L. (Children' s Hospital, Oklahoma City, OK (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  4. Mutation analysis in 54 propionic acidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, J P; Spector, E; Venezia, S; Estes, P; Chiang, P W; Creadon-Swindell, G; Müllerleile, S; de Silva, L; Barth, M; Walter, M; Walter, K; Meissner, T; Lindner, M; Ensenauer, R; Santer, R; Bodamer, O A; Baumgartner, M R; Brunner-Krainz, M; Karall, D; Haase, C; Knerr, I; Marquardt, T; Hennermann, J B; Steinfeld, R; Beblo, S; Koch, H G; Konstantopoulou, V; Scholl-Bürgi, S; van Teeffelen-Heithoff, A; Suormala, T; Ugarte, M; Sperl, W; Superti-Furga, A; Schwab, K O; Grünert, S C; Sass, J O

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCC), a dodecamer of alpha and beta subunits, causes inherited propionic acidemia. We have studied, at the molecular level, PCC in 54 patients from 48 families comprised of 96 independent alleles. These patients of various ethnic backgrounds came from research centers and hospitals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The thorough clinical characterization of these patients was described in the accompanying paper (Grünert et al. 2012). In all 54 patients, many of whom originated from consanguineous families, the entire PCCB gene was examined by genomic DNA sequencing and in 39 individuals the PCCA gene was also studied. In three patients we found mutations in both PCC genes. In addition, in many patients RT-PCR analysis of lymphoblast RNA, lymphoblast enzyme assays, and expression of new mutations in E.coli were carried out. Eight new and eight previously detected mutations were identified in the PCCA gene while 15 new and 13 previously detected mutations were found in the PCCB gene. One missense mutation, p.V288I in the PCCB gene, when expressed in E.coli, yielded 134% of control activity and was consequently classified as a polymorphism in the coding region. Numerous new intronic polymorphisms in both PCC genes were identified. This study adds a considerable amount of new molecular data to the studies of this disease.

  5. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carolyn C; Dickson, Mark A; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus-8 (HHV-8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single-gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV-8. © 2015 The Authors. Pediatric Blood & Cancer, published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Kaposi Sarcoma of Childhood: Inborn or Acquired Immunodeficiency to Oncogenic HHV‐8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Mark A.; Sadjadi, Mahan; Gessain, Antoine; Abel, Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean‐Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is an endothelial malignancy caused by human herpes virus‐8 (HHV‐8) infection. The epidemic and iatrogenic forms of childhood KS result from a profound and acquired T cell deficiency. Recent studies have shown that classic KS of childhood can result from rare single‐gene inborn errors of immunity, with mutations in WAS, IFNGR1, STIM1, and TNFRSF4. The pathogenesis of the endemic form of childhood KS has remained elusive. We review childhood KS pathogenesis and its relationship to inherited and acquired immunodeficiency to oncogenic HHV‐8. PMID:26469702

  7. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  8. Splice site mutations in the ATP7A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Skjørringe

    Full Text Available Menkes disease (MD is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12 mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations identified in 12 patients with milder phenotypes were predicted to have no significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the presence of wild-type transcript in 7 out of 9 patients investigated in vivo. Both the in silico predictions and the in vivo results support the hypothesis previously suggested by us and others, that the presence of some wild-type transcript is correlated to a milder phenotype.

  9. And the Winner is – Acquired

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henkel, Joachim; Rønde, Thomas; Wagner, Marcus

    value in case of success—that is, a more radical innovation. In the second stage, successful entrants bid to be acquired by the incumbent. We assume that entrants cannot survive on their own, so being acquired amounts to a ‘prize’ in a contest. We identify an equilibrium in which the incumbent chooses...

  10. Acquired Inventors’ Productivity after Horizontal Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    Effective integration of the R&D functions of the acquired and acquiring firms is essential for knowledge recombination after acquisition. However, prior research suggests that the post-acquisition integration process often damages the inventive labor force. We argue that an examination of the mu...

  11. A common Greenlandic Inuit BRCA1 RING domain founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.v.O.; Ejlertsen, B.; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. We examined 32 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. Whereas no mutations were identified in 19 families, 13 families exhibited a BRCA1...... exon 3 nucleotide 234 T > G mutation, which has not previously been reported in the breast cancer information core (BIC) database. The mutation changes a conserved cysteine 39 to a glycine in the Zn(2+) site II of the RING domain, which is essential for BRCA1 ubiquitin ligase activity. Eight...... of the families had members with ovarian cancer, suggesting that the RING domain may be an ovarian cancer hotspot. By SNP array analysis, we find that all 13 families share a 4.5 Mb genomic fragment containing the BRCA1 gene, showing that the mutation originates from a founder. Finally, analysis of 1152 Inuit...

  12. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  13. DMD mutation spectrum analysis in 613 Chinese patients with dystrophinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ruolan; Zhu, Guosheng; Zhu, Huimin; Ma, Ruiyu; Peng, Ying; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-08-01

    Dystrophinopathy is a group of inherited diseases caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Within the dystrophinopathy spectrum, Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are common X-linked recessive disorders that mainly feature striated muscle necrosis. We combined multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification with Sanger sequencing to detect large deletions/duplications and point mutations in the DMD gene in 613 Chinese patients. A total of 571 (93.1%) patients were diagnosed, including 428 (69.8%) with large deletions/duplications and 143 (23.3%) with point mutations. Deletion/duplication breakpoints gathered mostly in introns 44-55. Reading frame rules could explain 88.6% of deletion mutations. We identified seventy novel point mutations that had not been previously reported. Spectrum expansion and genotype-phenotype analysis of DMD mutations on such a large sample size in Han Chinese population would provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanism underlying dystrophinopathies.

  14. Training Pseudoword Reading in Acquired Dyslexia: A Phonological Complexity Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Ellyn A.; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Individuals with acquired phonological dyslexia experience difficulty associating written letters with corresponding sounds, especially in pseudowords. Previous studies have shown that reading can be improved in these individuals by training letter-sound correspondence, practicing phonological skills, or using combined approaches. However, generalization to untrained items is typically limited. Aims We investigated whether principles of phonological complexity can be applied to training letter-sound correspondence reading in acquired phonological dyslexia to improve generalization to untrained words. Based on previous work in other linguistic domains, we hypothesized that training phonologically “more complex” material (i.e., consonant clusters with small sonority differences) would result in generalization to phonologically “less complex” material (i.e., consonant clusters with larger sonority differences), but this generalization pattern would not be demonstrated when training the “less complex” material. Methods & Procedures We used a single-participant, multiple baseline design across participants and behaviors to examine phonological complexity as a training variable in five individuals. Based on participants' error data from a previous experiment, a “more complex” onset and a “less complex” onset were selected for training for each participant. Training order assignment was pseudo-randomized and counterbalanced across participants. Three participants were trained in the “more complex” condition and two in the “less complex” condition while tracking oral reading accuracy of both onsets. Outcomes & Results As predicted, participants trained in the “more complex” condition demonstrated improved pseudoword reading of the trained cluster and generalization to pseudowords with the untrained, “simple” onset, but not vice versa. Conclusions These findings suggest phonological complexity can be used to improve

  15. Induced mutation of soy by ionization mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, C.L.; Hsu, H.L.

    1975-09-01

    This article presents the results of experiments dealing with how 14 different doses of three types of ionization irradiation-roentgen rays, /sup 60/Co gamma rays, and thermal neutrons affect mutation of 14 types of soy beans and their hybrids. It was learned that with an increased dose the coefficient of seed germination decreases, the cotyledon becomes increasingly thicker, shoots develop more and more slowly, various deformities arise in the stalk, and fertility decreases. As far as M/sub 2/ mutation is concerned, a great variety has been discovered with regard to the height of the stem, the leaf formation, the color of the bloom, the color of the edge, the characteristics of the pod, the size of the seed and the color of the cicatrix. At the same time some specific characteristics having an important economic significance are being revealed, as for example, dwarf stems, the ability to withstand lodging, great pod density, increased inflorescence and short sprouts.

  16. Detection of a novel silent deletion, a missense mutation and a nonsense mutation in TCOF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Hirotaka; Ariga, Tadashi; Horiuchi, Katsumi; Ishikiriyama, Satoshi; Oyama, Kimie; Otsu, Makoto; Kawashima, Kunihiro; Yamamoto, Yuhei; Sugihara, Tsuneki; Sakiyama, Yukio

    2008-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a disorder of craniofacial development, that is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene. TCS is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, and haploinsufficiency of the TCOF1 gene product treacle is proposed to be etiologically involved. Mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene was done in 10 patients diagnosed with TCS using single-strand conformation polymorphism and direct sequencing. Among these 10 patients, a novel 9 bp deletion was found, together with a previously reported 2 bp deletion, a novel missense mutation and a novel nonsense mutation in three different families. Familial studies allowed judgment of whether these abnormal findings were responsible for the TCS phenotype, or not. The 9 bp deletion of three amino acids Lys-Glu-Lys (1378-1380), which was located in the nuclear localization domain of treacle, seemed not essential for the treacle function. In contrast, the novel mutation of Ala26Val is considered to affect the LisH domain, an important domain of treacle. All of the mutations thus far detected in exon 5 have resulted in frameshift, but a nonsense mutation was detected (Lys159Stop). The information obtained in the present study provides additional insights into the functional domains of treacle.

  17. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  18. Management of Acquired Atresia of the External Auditory Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajin, Münir Demir; Yılmaz, Taner; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Kuşçu, Oğuz; Sözen, Tevfik; Jafarov, Shamkal

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate surgical techniques and their relationship to postoperative success rate and hearing outcomes in acquired atresia of the external auditory canal. In this article, 24 patients with acquired atresia of the external auditory canal were retrospectively evaluated regarding their canal status, hearing, and postoperative success. Acquired stenosis occurs more commonly in males with a male: female ratio of 2-3:1; it seems to be a disorder affecting young adults. Previous ear surgery (13 patients, 54.2%) and external ear trauma (11 patients, 45.8%) were the main etiological factors of acquired ear canal stenosis. Mastoidectomy (12/13) and traffic accidents (8/11) comprise the majority of these etiological factors. Endaural incision is performed in 79.2% and postauricular incision for 20.8% of cases during the operation. As types of surgical approach, transcanal (70.8%), transmastoid (20.8%), and combined (8.4%) approaches are chosen. The atretic plate is generally located at the bony-cartilaginous junction (37.5%) and in the cartilaginous canal (33.3%); the bony canal is involved in a few cases only. Preserved healthy canal skin, split- or full-thickness skin grafts, or pre- or postauricular skin flaps are used to line the ear canal, but preserved healthy canal skin is preferred. The results of surgery are generally satisfactory, and complications are few if surgical principles are followed.

  19. Mutation analysis in adenylosuccinate lyase deficiency: eight novel mutations in the re-evaluated full ADSL coding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, S; Cuppens, H; Heuterspreute, M; Jaspers, M; Tola, E Z; Gu, X X; Legius, E; Vincent, M F; Jaeken, J; Cassiman, J J; Van den Berghe, G

    1999-01-01

    The deficiency of adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL, also termed adenylosuccinase) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the accumulation in body fluids of succinylaminoimidazole-carboxamide riboside (SAICA-riboside) and succinyladenosine (S-Ado). Most ADSL-deficient children display marked psychomotor delay, often accompanied by epilepsy or autistic features, or both, although some patients may be less profoundly retarded. Occasionally, growth retardation and muscular wasting are also present. Up to now, nine missense mutations of the ADSL gene had been reported in six apparently unrelated sibships. In the present study of 10 additional patients with ADSL deficiency, nine point mutations, among which seven unreported missense mutations, and the first splicing error reported in this disorder, have been identified. These mutations have been characterized, taking into account the finding that the cDNA of human ADSL is 75 nucleotides longer at its 5'-end, and encodes a protein of 484 rather than 459 amino acids as previously reported. Five apparently unrelated patients were found to carry a R426H mutation. With the exceptions of the latter mutation, of a R190Q mutation that had been reported previously, and of a K246E mutation that was found in two unrelated patients, all other mutations were found only in a single family.

  20. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  1. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  2. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  3. IDH mutations are closely associated with mutations of DNMT3A, ASXL1 and SRSF2 in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and are stable during disease evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Chin; Hou, Hsin-An; Chou, Wen-Chien; Kuo, Yuan-Yeh; Liu, Chieh-Yu; Chen, Chien-Yuan; Lai, Yan-Jun; Tseng, Mei-Hsuan; Huang, Chi-Fei; Chiang, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Fen-Yu; Liu, Ming-Chih; Liu, Chia-Wen; Tang, Jih-Luh; Yao, Ming; Huang, Shang-Yi; Ko, Bor-Sheng; Wu, Shang-Ju; Tsay, Woei; Chen, Yao-Chang; Tien, Hwei-Fang

    2014-02-01

    Current information about clinical significance of IDH mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), their association with other genetic alterations and the stability during disease progression is limited. In this study, IDH mutations were identified in 4.6% of 477 patients with MDS based on the FAB classification and in 2.2 % of 368 patients based on the 2008 WHO classification. IDH mutations were closely associated with older age, higher platelet counts, and mutations of DNMT3A (36.4% vs. 8.7%, P IDH2 mutation was a poor prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with lower-risk MDS, based on international prognosis scoring system (IPSS), FAB classification, WHO classification, or revised IPSS (all P ≦ 0.001), but not in higher-risk groups. Sequential studies in 151 patients demonstrated that all IDH-mutated patients retained the same mutation during disease evolution while none of the IDH-wild patients acquired a novel mutation during follow-ups. In conclusion, IDH mutation is a useful biomarker for risk stratification of patients with lower-risk MDS. IDH mutations are stable during the clinical course. The mutation, in association with other genetic alterations, may play a role in the development, but not progression of MDS. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  5. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Molecular Clock of Neutral Mutations in a Fitness-Increasing Evolutionary Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Leo; Suzuki, Shingo; Hashimoto, Tomomi; Oyake, Ayana; Kobayashi, Hisaka; Someya, Yuki; Narisawa, Dai; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The molecular clock of neutral mutations, which represents linear mutation fixation over generations, is theoretically explained by genetic drift in fitness-steady evolution or hitchhiking in adaptive evolution. The present study is the first experimental demonstration for the molecular clock of neutral mutations in a fitness-increasing evolutionary process. The dynamics of genome mutation fixation in the thermal adaptive evolution of Escherichia coli were evaluated in a prolonged evolution experiment in duplicated lineages. The cells from the continuously fitness-increasing evolutionary process were subjected to genome sequencing and analyzed at both the population and single-colony levels. Although the dynamics of genome mutation fixation were complicated by the combination of the stochastic appearance of adaptive mutations and clonal interference, the mutation fixation in the population was simply linear over generations. Each genome in the population accumulated 1.6 synonymous and 3.1 non-synonymous neutral mutations, on average, by the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate, while only a single genome in the population occasionally acquired an adaptive mutation. The neutral mutations that preexisted on the single genome hitchhiked on the domination of the adaptive mutation. The successive fixation processes of the 128 mutations demonstrated that hitchhiking and not genetic drift were responsible for the coincidence of the spontaneous mutation accumulation rate in the genome with the fixation rate of neutral mutations in the population. The molecular clock of neutral mutations to the fitness-increasing evolution suggests that the numerous neutral mutations observed in molecular phylogenetic trees may not always have been fixed in fitness-steady evolution but in adaptive evolution. PMID:26177190

  7. Screening for duplications, deletions and a common intronic mutation detects 35% of second mutations in patients with USH2A monoallelic mutations on Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Luxon, Linda M; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2013-08-08

    Usher Syndrome is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is divided into three subtypes, of which the most common is Usher type 2, and the USH2A gene accounts for 75-80% of cases. Despite recent sequencing strategies, in our cohort a significant proportion of individuals with Usher type 2 have just one heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A, or no convincing disease-causing mutations across nine Usher genes. The purpose of this study was to improve the molecular diagnosis in these families by screening USH2A for duplications, heterozygous deletions and a common pathogenic deep intronic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. Forty-nine Usher type 2 or atypical Usher families who had missing mutations (mono-allelic USH2A or no mutations following Sanger sequencing of nine Usher genes) were screened for duplications/deletions using the USH2A SALSA MLPA reagent kit (MRC-Holland). Identification of USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was achieved by Sanger sequencing. Mutations were confirmed by a combination of reverse transcription PCR using RNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells or fibroblasts, and by array comparative genomic hybridisation with sequencing across the genomic breakpoints. Eight mutations were identified in 23 Usher type 2 families (35%) with one previously identified heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A. These consisted of five heterozygous deletions, one duplication, and two heterozygous instances of the pathogenic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. No variants were found in the 15 Usher type 2 families with no previously identified disease-causing mutations. In 11 atypical families, none of whom had any previously identified convincing disease-causing mutations, the mutation USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was identified in a heterozygous state in one family. All five deletions and the heterozygous duplication we report here are novel. This is the first time that a duplication in USH2A has been reported as a cause of Usher syndrome. We found that 8 of

  8. Verizon acquired Vodafone: Analysis of market reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Pal Netra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent big tickets in telecom industry include Microsoft acquiring part of Nokia for US$ 7.2 billion, Verizon buying 45% stake in Vodafone for US$130 billion, Google acquiring Motorola for 12.5 billion, and Lenovo acquiring Motorola mobility from Google for US$ 3 billion. These buyouts are analyzed and commented by experts of the industry. This research paper is an attempt to analyze and collate their views with respect to Verizon and Vodafone deal. The analysis includes reasons for buyout, size of the deal, general comments in the media, what is in the deal for Verizon and Vodafone, impact on the eco-system, etc.

  9. Wilson disease mutation pattern with genotype-phenotype correlations from Western India: confirmation of p.C271* as a common Indian mutation and identification of 14 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Annu; Chandhok, Gursimran; Todorov, Theodor; Parekh, Saloni; Tilve, Sharada; Zibert, Andree; Bhatt, Mohit; Schmidt, Hartmut H-J

    2013-07-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the ATP7B gene, with over 600 mutations described. Identification of mutations has made genetic diagnosis of WD feasible in many countries. The heterogeneity of ATP7B mutants is, however, yet to be identified in the Indian population. We analyzed the mutational pattern of WD in a large region of Western India. We studied patients (n = 52) for ATP7B gene mutations in a cohort of families with WD and also in first-degree relatives (n = 126). All 21 exon-intron boundaries of the WD gene were amplified and directly sequenced. We identified 36 different disease-causing mutations (31 exonic and five intronic splice site variants). Fourteen novel mutations were identified. Exons 2, 8, 13, 14, and 18 accounted for the majority of mutations (86.4%). A previously recognized mutation, p.C271*, and the novel mutation p.E122fs, were the most common mutations with allelic frequencies of 20.2% and 10.6%, respectively. Frequent homozygous mutations (58.9%) and disease severity assessments allowed analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations. Our study significantly adds to the emerging data from other parts of India suggesting that p.C271* may be the most frequent mutation across India, and may harbor a moderate to severely disabling phenotype with limited variability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  10. Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In October 2014, CMS began reducing Medicare payments for subsection (d) hospitals that rank in the worst performing quartile with respect to hospital-acquired...

  11. Acquiring New Competencies Through Continuing Library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , specify core competencies to be acquired by all practicing librarians, that the Nigerian Library Association must take the issue of library continuing education seriously to enable librarians to retain their jobs and global job mobility and that ...

  12. Enhancing Medicares Hospital Acquired Conditions Policy

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The current Medicare policy of non-payment to hospitals for Hospital Acquired Conditions (HAC) seeks to avoid payment for preventable complications identified within...

  13. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  14. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  15. Acquired pure red cell aplasia in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujata R Dafale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired Pure Red Cell Aplasia (PRCA is a rare occurrence in children.This is a case of an eight year old girl child who developed acquired PRCA secondary to long term intake of sodium Valproate. This case is reported to review the causes of PRCA in children and to reconsider the use of drugs of longer duration in children and adults.

  16. Method to acquire regions of fruit, branch and leaf from image of red apple in orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jidong; Xu, Liming

    2017-07-01

    This work proposed a method to acquire regions of fruit, branch and leaf from red apple image in orchard. To acquire fruit image, R-G image was extracted from the RGB image for corrosive working, hole filling, subregion removal, expansive working and opening operation in order. Finally, fruit image was acquired by threshold segmentation. To acquire leaf image, fruit image was subtracted from RGB image before extracting 2G-R-B image. Then, leaf image was acquired by subregion removal and threshold segmentation. To acquire branch image, dynamic threshold segmentation was conducted in the R-G image. Then, the segmented image was added to fruit image to acquire adding fruit image which was subtracted from RGB image with leaf image. Finally, branch image was acquired by opening operation, subregion removal and threshold segmentation after extracting the R-G image from the subtracting image. Compared with previous methods, more complete image of fruit, leaf and branch can be acquired from red apple image with this method.

  17. Detecting clusters of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available Positive selection for protein function can lead to multiple mutations within a small stretch of DNA, i.e., to a cluster of mutations. Recently, Wagner proposed a method to detect such mutation clusters. His method, however, did not take into account that residues with high solvent accessibility are inherently more variable than residues with low solvent accessibility. Here, we propose a new algorithm to detect clustered evolution. Our algorithm controls for different substitution probabilities at buried and exposed sites in the tertiary protein structure, and uses random permutations to calculate accurate P values for inferred clusters. We apply the algorithm to genomes of bacteria, fly, and mammals, and find several clusters of mutations in functionally important regions of proteins. Surprisingly, clustered evolution is a relatively rare phenomenon. Only between 2% and 10% of the genes we analyze contain a statistically significant mutation cluster. We also find that not controlling for solvent accessibility leads to an excess of clusters in terminal and solvent-exposed regions of proteins. Our algorithm provides a novel method to identify functionally relevant divergence between groups of species. Moreover, it could also be useful to detect artifacts in automatically assembled genomes.

  18. Two novel AIRE mutations in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) among Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, G; Sahu, R P; Zhang, L; George, G; Bhavani, N; Shah, N; Bhatia, V; Bhansali, A; Jevalikar, G; Jayakumar, R V; Eisenbarth, G S; Bhatia, E

    2009-11-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. There is no information on AIRE mutations in Indians. In a cross-sectional study, nine patients (eight families), from four referral hospitals in India, were studied for AIRE mutations by direct sequencing. We screened for new mutations in 150 controls by allele-specific PCR. The patients had 1-7 known components of APECED. Three patients had unusual manifestations: presentation with type 1 diabetes; chronic sinusitis and otitis media; and facial dysmorphism. All patients carried homozygous, probably recessive, AIRE mutations. Two unrelated patients from a small in-bred community (Vanika Vaisya) in south India carried an unreported missense mutation, p.V80G, in the N-terminal caspase recruitment domain. Another unique mutation, p.C302X, resulting in a truncated protein with deletion of both zinc-finger domains, was detected in a patient from Gujarat. Neither mutation was detected in controls. Other mutations, previously described in Caucasians, were: 13 base pair deletion (p.C322fsX372) in 4 (38%), and Finn-major (p.R257X) and p.R139X (Sardinian) mutation in one subject each. In conclusion, in this first series of APECED in Indians, we detected AIRE mutations previously reported in Caucasians, as well as unique mutations. Of these, p.V80G is possibly an ancestral mutation in an in-bred community.

  19. Mutation rates at 42 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats in Chinese Han population in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weiwei; Ren, Wenyan; Hao, Honglei; Nan, Hailun; He, Xin; Liu, Qiuling; Lu, Dejian

    2018-01-31

    Mutation analysis of 42 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) loci was performed using a sample of 1160 father-son pairs from the Chinese Han population in Eastern China. The results showed that the average mutation rate across the 42 Y-STR loci was 0.0041 (95% CI 0.0036-0.0047) per locus per generation. The locus-specific mutation rates varied from 0.000 to 0.0190. No mutation was found at DYS388, DYS437, DYS448, DYS531, and GATA_H4. DYS627, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS449 could be classified as rapidly mutating Y-STRs, with mutation rates higher than 1.0 × 10 -2 . DYS458, DYS630, and DYS518 were moderately mutating Y-STRs, with mutation rates ranging from 8 × 10 -3 to 1 × 10 -2 . Although the characteristics of the Y-STR mutations were consistent with those in previous studies, mutation rate differences between our data and previous published data were found at some rapidly mutating Y-STRs. The single-copy loci located on the short arm of the Y chromosome (Yp) showed relatively higher mutation rates more frequently than the multi-copy loci. These results will not only extend the data for Y-STR mutations but also be important for kinship analysis, paternal lineage identification, and family relationship reconstruction in forensic Y-STR analysis.

  20. Dynamics of ASXL1 mutation and other associated genetic alterations during disease progression in patients with primary myelodysplastic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T-C; Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Tang, J-L; Kuo, Y-Y; Chen, C-Y; Tseng, M-H; Huang, C-F; Lai, Y-J; Chiang, Y-C; Lee, F-Y; Liu, M-C; Liu, C-W; Liu, C-Y; Yao, M; Huang, S-Y; Ko, B-S; Hsu, S-C; Wu, S-J; Tsay, W; Chen, Y-C; Tien, H-F

    2014-01-01

    Recently, mutations of the additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1) gene were identified in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but the interaction of this mutation with other genetic alterations and its dynamic changes during disease progression remain to be determined. In this study, ASXL1 mutations were identified in 106 (22.7%) of the 466 patients with primary MDS based on the French-American-British (FAB) classification and 62 (17.1%) of the 362 patients based on the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. ASXL1 mutation was closely associated with trisomy 8 and mutations of RUNX1, EZH2, IDH, NRAS, JAK2, SETBP1 and SRSF2, but was negatively associated with SF3B1 mutation. Most ASXL1-mutated patients (85%) had concurrent other gene mutations at diagnosis. ASXL1 mutation was an independent poor prognostic factor for survival. Sequential studies showed that the original ASXL1 mutation remained unchanged at disease progression in all 32 ASXL1-mutated patients but were frequently accompanied with acquisition of mutations of other genes, including RUNX1, NRAS, KRAS, SF3B1, SETBP1 and chromosomal evolution. On the other side, among the 80 ASXL1-wild patients, only one acquired ASXL1 mutation at leukemia transformation. In conclusion, ASXL1 mutations in association with other genetic alterations may have a role in the development of MDS but contribute little to disease progression

  1. Mutation analysis in Norwegian families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: founder mutations in ACVRL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdal, K; Dalhus, B; Rødningen, O K; Kroken, M; Eiklid, K; Dheyauldeen, S; Røysland, T; Andersen, R; Kulseth, M A

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease defined by the presence of epistaxis and mucocutaneous telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in internal organs. In most families (~85%), HHT is caused by mutations in the ENG (HHT1) or the ACVRL1 (HHT2) genes. Here, we report the results of genetic testing of 113 Norwegian families with suspected or definite HHT. Variants in ENG and ACVRL1 were found in 105 families (42 ENG, 63 ACVRL1), including six novel variants of uncertain pathogenic significance. Mutation types were similar to previous reports with more missense variants in ACVRL1 and more nonsense, frameshift and splice-site mutations in ENG. Thirty-two variants were novel in this study. The preponderance of ACVRL1 mutations was due to founder mutations, specifically, c.830C>A (p.Thr277Lys), which was found in 24 families from the same geographical area of Norway. We discuss the importance of founder mutations and present a thorough evaluation of missense and splice-site variants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Germinal and somatic mutations in cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, A.G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The role of germinal and somatic mutations in carcinogenesis leads to the conclusion that environmental carcinogens probably exert their effects via somatic mutations. Susceptibility to this process may itself be genetically determined, so we may deduce that two groups, one genetic and one non-genetic, are included in the 'environmental' class. Other individuals seem to acquire cancer even in the absence of such environmental agents, and these too may be classified into a genetic and a non-genetic group. It has been estimated that in industrial countries, the environmental groups include 70-80% of all cancer cases, but we are only beginning to know how to separate the genetic and non-genetic subgroups. The genetic subgroup of the 'non-environmental' group is very small, probably of the order of magnitude of 1-2% for cancer as a whole. The remainder, about 25%, comprises a non-genetic, non-environmental subgroup that seems to arise as a consequence of 'spontaneous' somatic mutations. The incidence of these 'background' cancers is what we should combat with preventive and therapeutic measures

  3. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  4. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  5. Non-Target Gene Mutations in the Development of Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, W. V.; Oethinger, M.; Jellen-Ritter, A. S.; Levy, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    Mutations in loci other than genes for the target topoisomerases of fluoroquinolones, gyrA and parC, may play a role in the development of fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli. A series of mutants with increasing resistance to ofloxacin was obtained from an E. coli K-12 strain and five clinical isolates. First-step mutants acquired a gyrA mutation. Second-step mutants reproducibly acquired a phenotype of multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) and organic solvent tolerance and showed enhanced fluoroquinolone efflux. None of the second-step mutants showed additional topoisomerase mutations. All second-step mutants showed constitutive expression of marA and/or overexpressed soxS. In some third-step mutants, fluoroquinolone efflux was further enhanced compared to that for second-step mutants, even when the mutant had acquired additional topoisomerase mutations. Attempts to circumvent the second-step Mar mutation by induction of the mar locus with sodium salicylate and thus to select for pure topoisomerase mutants at the second step were not successful. At least in vitro, non-target gene mutations accumulate in second- and third-step mutants upon exposure to a fluoroquinolone and typically include, but do not appear to be limited to, mutations in the mar or sox regulons with consequent increased drug efflux. PMID:10722475

  6. Point mutations in human guanylate kinase account for acquired resistance to anticancer nucleotide analogue PMEG

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Rumlová, Michaela; Tloušťová, Eva; Procházková, Eliška; Holý, Antonín; Votruba, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2011), s. 131-138 ISSN 0006-2952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : resistance * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * PMEG * PMEDAP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.705, year: 2011

  7. The pathogenicity of genetic variants previously associated with left ventricular non-compaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasi, Yeganeh; Jabbari, Javad; Jabbari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    an updated list of previously reported LVNC-associated variants with biologic description and investigate the prevalence of LVNC variants in healthy general population to find false-positive LVNC-associated variants. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Human Gene Mutation Database and PubMed were systematically...... searched to identify all previously reported LVNC-associated variants. Thereafter, the Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), that both represent the background population, was searched for all variants. Four in silico prediction tools were assessed to determine...

  8. Rates of induced abortion in Denmark according to age, previous births and previous abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise H. Hansen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whereas the effects of various socio-demographic determinants on a woman's risk of having an abortion are relatively well-documented, less attention has been given to the effect of previous abortions and births. Objective: To study the effect of previous abortions and births on Danish women's risk of an abortion, in addition to a number of demographic and personal characteristics. Data and methods: From the Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset we obtained data on the number of live births and induced abortions by year (1981-2001, age (16-39, county of residence and marital status. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of the explanatory variables on the probability of having an abortion in a relevant year. Main findings and conclusion: A woman's risk of having an abortion increases with the number of previous births and previous abortions. Some interactions were was found in the way a woman's risk of abortion varies with calendar year, age and parity. The risk of an abortion for women with no children decreases while the risk of an abortion for women with children increases over time. Furthermore, the risk of an abortion decreases with age, but relatively more so for women with children compared to childless women. Trends for teenagers are discussed in a separate section.

  9. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  10. NIPA1 mutation in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenstrup, K; Møller, R S; Christensen, J

    2011-01-01

    or signs are found. Mutations in the NIPA1 gene have been reported to cause spastic paraplegia type 6 (SPG6) in 10 families. SPG6 is a rare form of autosomal dominantly inherited HSP associated with a pure phenotype; however, in one complex SPG6 family, idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) has been...... described and in addition, recurrent microdeletions at 15q11.2 including NIPA1 have been identified in patients with IGE. The purpose was to identify NIPA1 mutations in patients with pure and complex HSP. Methods: Fifty-two patients with HSP were screened for mutations in NIPA1. Results: One previously...... reported missense mutation c.316G>A, p.Gly106Arg, was identified in a complex HSP patient with spastic dysarthria, facial dystonia, atrophy of the small hand muscles, upper limb spasticity, and presumably IGE. The epilepsy co-segregated with HSP in the family. Conclusion: NIPA1 mutations were rare in our...

  11. Nuclear topology modulates the mutational landscapes of cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S; Liu, Lin L; Ganesan, Shridar; Michor, Franziska; De, Subhajyoti

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear organization of genomic DNA affects processes of DNA damage and repair, yet its effects on mutational landscapes in cancer genomes remain unclear. Here we analyzed genome-wide somatic mutations from 366 samples of six cancer types. We found that lamina-associated regions, which are typically localized at the nuclear periphery, displayed higher somatic mutation frequencies than did the interlamina regions at the nuclear core. This effect was observed even after adjustment for features such as GC percentage, chromatin, and replication timing. Furthermore, mutational signatures differed between the nuclear core and periphery, thus indicating differences in the patterns of DNA-damage or DNA-repair processes. For instance, smoking and UV-related signatures, as well as substitutions at certain motifs, were more enriched in the nuclear periphery. Thus, the nuclear architecture may influence mutational landscapes in cancer genomes beyond the previously described effects of chromatin structure and replication timing.

  12. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, Barbara; Nagore, Eduardo; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Traves, Victor; Becker, Jürgen; Soufir, Nadem; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2014-02-26

    We previously reported a disease segregating causal germline mutation in a melanoma family and recurrent somatic mutations in metastasized tumours from unrelated patients in the core promoter region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. Here we show that the TERT promoter mutations, besides causing an increased gene expression, associate with increased patient age, increased Breslow thickness and tumour ulceration in 287 primary melanomas. The mutations are more frequent at both intermittently and chronically sun-exposed sites than non-exposed sites and tend to co-occur with BRAF and CDKN2A alterations. The association with parameters generally connected with poor outcome, coupled with high recurrence and mechanistic relevance, raises the possibility of the eventual use of TERT promoter mutations in the disease management.

  13. Identification of seven novel mutations including the first two genomic rearrangements in SLC26A3 mutated in congenital chloride diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, P; Sormaala, M; Haila, S; Socha, J; Rajaram, U; Scheurlen, W; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, H; Holmberg, C; Yoshikawa, H; Kere, J

    2001-09-01

    Congenital chloride diarrhea (CLD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by defective intestinal electrolyte absorption, resulting in voluminous osmotic diarrhea with high chloride content. A variety of mutations in the solute carrier family 26, member 3 gene (SLC26A3, previously known as CLD or DRA) are responsible for the disease. Since the identification of the SLC26A3 gene and the determination of its genomic structure, altogether three founder and 17 private mutations have been characterized within miscellaneous ethnic groups. We screened for mutations in seven unrelated families with CLD. The diagnoses were confirmed by fecal chloride measurements. The combined PCR-SSCP and sequencing analyses revealed altogether seven novel mutations including two missense mutations (S206P, D468V), two splicing defects (IVS12-1G>C, IVS13-2delA), one nonsense mutation (Q436X), one insertion/deletion mutation (2104-2105delGGins29-bp), and an intragenic deletion of SLC26A3 exons 7 and 8. Two previously identified mutations were also found. This is the first report of rearrangement mutations in SLC26A3. Molecular features predisposing SLC26A3 for the two rearrangements may include repetitive elements and palindromic-like sequences. The increasingly wide diversity of SLC26A3 mutations suggests that mutations in the SLC26A3 gene may not be rare events. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Acquired Inventors’ Productivity after Horizontal Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Massimo G.; Moreira, Solon; Rabbiosi, Larissa

    of the multifaceted nature of the integration process further enhances our understanding of which conditions will be more or less detrimental for corporate inventors. We focus on R&D teams which are the immediate organizational context in which inventors operate and drawing on insights from learning theory...... and evolutionary economics we posit and find that the reorganization of R&D teams after acquisition harms acquired inventors? innovative performance. Though, the implementation of other integration decisions can mitigate or aggravate this negative effect.......Effective integration of the R&D functions of the acquired and acquiring firms is essential for knowledge recombination after acquisition. However, prior research suggests that the post-acquisition integration process often damages the inventive labor force. We argue that an examination...

  15. Colon and endometrial cancers with mismatch repair deficiency can arise from somatic, rather than germline, mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Tomsic, Jerneja; Frankel, Wendy L; Pearlman, Rachel; de la Chapelle, Albert; Pritchard, Colin C

    2014-12-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome carry germline mutations in single alleles of genes encoding the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2; when the second allele becomes mutated, cancer can develop. Increased screening for Lynch syndrome has identified patients with tumors that have deficiency in MMR, but no germline mutations in genes encoding MMR proteins. We investigated whether tumors with deficient MMR had acquired somatic mutations in patients without germline mutations in MMR genes using next-generation sequencing. We analyzed blood and tumor samples from 32 patients with colorectal or endometrial cancer who participated in Lynch syndrome screening studies in Ohio and were found to have tumors with MMR deficiency (based on microsatellite instability and/or absence of MMR proteins in immunohistochemical analysis, without hypermethylation of MLH1), but no germline mutations in MMR genes. Tumor DNA was sequenced for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, EPCAM, POLE, and POLD1 with ColoSeq and mutation frequencies were established. Twenty-two of 32 patients (69%) were found to have 2 somatic (tumor) mutations in MMR genes encoding proteins that were lost from tumor samples, based on immunohistochemistry. Of the 10 remaining tumors 3 had one somatic mutation in a MMR gene, with possible loss of heterozygosity that could lead to MMR deficiency, 6 were found to be false-positive results (19%), and 1 had only one mutation in a MMR gene and remained unexplained. All of the tumors found to have somatic MMR mutations were of the hypermutated phenotype (>12 mutations/megabase); 6 had mutation frequencies >200/megabase, and 5 of these had somatic mutations in POLE, which encodes a DNA polymerase. Some patients are found to have tumors with MMR defects during screening for Lynch syndrome, yet have no identifiable germline mutations in MMR genes. We found that almost 70% of these patients acquire somatic mutations in MMR genes, leading to a hypermutated phenotype of tumor

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    This issue of the Mutation Breeding newsletter contains 39 articles dealing with radiation induced mutations and chemical mutagenesis techniques in plant breeding programs with the aims of improving crop productivity and disease resistance as well as exploring genetic variabilities

  18. In vivo mechanisms of acquired thymic tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W; Issazadeh-Navikas, Shohreh; Sayegh, M H

    1997-01-01

    expansion of transferred CD4+ TCR transgenic cells in tolerant mice in vivo. There was an increase in clonotype-positive T cells in the thymus after immunization, confirming that activated T cells circulate through the thymus. Furthermore, thymectomy after intrathymic injection abrogates the effect...... of acquired thymic tolerance and restores antigen-dependent clonal expansion in vivo. We conclude that intrathymic injection of antigen induces Th1 cell unresponsiveness and prevents the peripheral expansion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells in vivo. This is the first demonstration that in acquired thymic...

  19. Novel mutation in CNTNAP1 results in congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Paulomi; Küspert, Melanie; Bale, Tejus; Brownstein, Catherine A; Towne, Meghan C; De Girolami, Umberto; Shi, Jiahai; Beggs, Alan H; Darras, Basil T; Wegner, Michael; Piao, Xianhua; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2017-05-01

    Congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy (CHN) is a rare congenital neuropathy that presents in the neonatal period and has been linked previously to mutations in several genes associated with myelination. A recent study has linked 4 homozygous frameshift mutations in the contactin-associated protein 1 (CNTNAP1) gene with this condition. We report a neonate with CHN who was found to have absent sensory nerve and compound muscle action potentials and hypomyelination on nerve biopsy. On whole exome sequencing, we identified a novel CNTNAP1 homozygous missense mutation (p.Arg388Pro) in the proband, and both parents were carriers. Molecular modeling suggests that this variant disrupts a β-strand to cause an unstable structure and likely significant changes in protein function. This report links a missense CNTNAP1 variant to the disease phenotype previously associated only with frameshift mutations. Muscle Nerve 55: 761-765, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Peter D; Mort, Matthew; Ball, Edward V; Shaw, Katy; Phillips, Andrew; Cooper, David N

    2014-01-01

    The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  1. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations ofTMPRSS3Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xue; Yuan, Yong-Yi; Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu; Lin, Xi; Dai, Pu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3 , one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family.

  2. Congruency sequence effects are driven by previous-trial congruency, not previous-trial response conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Weissman, Daniel H.; Carp, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Congruency effects in distracter interference tasks are often smaller after incongruent trials than after congruent trials. However, the sources of such congruency sequence effects (CSEs) are controversial. The conflict monitoring model of cognitive control links CSEs to the detection and resolution of response conflict. In contrast, competing theories attribute CSEs to attentional or affective processes that vary with previous-trial congruency (incongruent vs. congruent). The present study s...

  3. A high frequent BRCA1 founder mutation identified in the Greenlandic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Theresa Larriba; Eiberg, Hans; Kern, Peder

    2009-01-01

    occurring mutations, but founder mutations have been described. In this study we describe a founder mutation with wide spread presence in the Inuit population. We have screened 2,869 persons from Greenland for the presence of a BRCA1 mutation (p.Cys39Gly) only found in the Inuit population. The overall...... carrier frequency was 1.6% in the general population, but the frequency differs geographically from 0.6% on the West coast to 9.7% in the previously isolated population of the East coast. This is to our knowledge the highest population frequency of a BRCA1 mutation ever to be described. To determine...... the clinical relevance of the mutation, we have examined ten breast cancer patients and nine ovarian cancer patients from Greenland for the presence of the p.Cys39Gly mutation. We found three ovarian cancer patients (33%) and one breast cancer patient (10%) carrying the mutation. The high number of women...

  4. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun Hyun; Hirohata, Kensen; Kohrn, Brendan F.; Fox, Edward J.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic) mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS), which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G) are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G) are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles. PMID:26305705

  5. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  6. Role of mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim C R Conibear

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The survival of bacteria in nature is greatly enhanced by their ability to grow within surface-associated communities called biofilms. Commonly, biofilms generate proliferations of bacterial cells, called microcolonies, which are highly recalcitrant, 3-dimensional foci of bacterial growth. Microcolony growth is initiated by only a subpopulation of bacteria within biofilms, but processes responsible for this differentiation remain poorly understood. Under conditions of crowding and intense competition between bacteria within biofilms, microevolutionary processes such as mutation selection may be important for growth; however their influence on microcolony-based biofilm growth and architecture have not previously been explored. To study mutation in-situ within biofilms, we transformed Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells with a green fluorescent protein gene containing a +1 frameshift mutation. Transformed P. aeruginosa cells were non-fluorescent until a mutation causing reversion to the wildtype sequence occurs. Fluorescence-inducing mutations were observed in microcolony structures, but not in other biofilm cells, or in planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa cells. Thus microcolonies may represent important foci for mutation and evolution within biofilms. We calculated that microcolony-specific increases in mutation frequency were at least 100-fold compared with planktonically grown cultures. We also observed that mutator phenotypes can enhance microcolony-based growth of P. aeruginosa cells. For P. aeruginosa strains defective in DNA fidelity and error repair, we found that microcolony initiation and growth was enhanced with increased mutation frequency of the organism. We suggest that microcolony-based growth can involve mutation and subsequent selection of mutants better adapted to grow on surfaces within crowded-cell environments. This model for biofilm growth is analogous to mutation selection that occurs during neoplastic progression and tumor

  7. Reversible optic neuropathy with OPA1 exon 5b mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornille, K.; Milea, D.; Amati-Bonneau, P.

    2008-01-01

    A new c.740G>A (R247H) mutation in OPA1 alternate spliced exon 5b was found in a patient presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy followed by partial, spontaneous visual recovery. R247H fibroblasts from the patient and his unaffected father presented unusual highly tubular mitochondrial network......, significant increased susceptibility to apoptosis, oxidative phosphorylation uncoupling, and altered OPA1 protein profile, supporting the pathogenicity of this mutation. These results suggest that the clinical spectrum of the OPA1-associated optic neuropathies may be larger than previously described......, and that spontaneous recovery may occur in cases harboring an exon 5b mutation Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  8. A cognitive chameleon: lessons from a novel MAPT mutation case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuying; Gordon, Elizabeth; Rohrer, Jonathan; Downey, Laura; de Silva, Rohan; Jäger, Hans Rolf; Nicholas, Jennifer; Modat, Marc; Cardoso, M Jorge; Mahoney, Colin; Warren, Jason; Rossor, Martin; Fox, Nick; Caine, Diana

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of frontotemporal dementia caused by a novel MAPT mutation (Q351R) with a remarkably long amnestic presentation mimicking familial Alzheimer's disease. Longitudinal clinical, neuropsychological and imaging data provide convergent evidence for predominantly bilateral anterior medial temporal lobe involvement consistent with previously established neuroanatomical signatures of MAPT mutations. This case supports the notion that the neural network affected in MAPT mutations is determined to a large extent by the underlying molecular pathology. We discuss the diagnostic significance of anomia in the context of atypical amnesia and the impact of impaired episodic and semantic memory systems on autobiographical memory.

  9. Revising the human mutation rate: implications for understanding human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scally, Aylwyn; Durbin, Richard

    2012-10-01

    It is now possible to make direct measurements of the mutation rate in modern humans using next-generation sequencing. These measurements reveal a value that is approximately half of that previously derived from fossil calibration, and this has implications for our understanding of demographic events in human evolution and other aspects of population genetics. Here, we discuss the implications of a lower-than-expected mutation rate in relation to the timescale of human evolution.

  10. 17 CFR 210.8-04 - Financial statements of businesses acquired or to be acquired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Article 8 Financial Statements of Smaller Reporting Companies § 210.8-04 Financial statements of... financial statements of the business acquired or to be acquired and the smaller reporting company's most...) of this section and the pro forma financial information required by § 210.8-05, the determination of...

  11. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ki Yong; Noh, Byeong-Joo; Sung, Ji-Youn; Kim, Youn Wha; Santini Araujo, Eduardo; Park, Yong-Koo

    2015-05-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs.

  12. IDH Mutation Analysis in Ewing Sarcoma Family Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki Yong Na

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to yield α-ketoglutarate (α-KG with production of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH. Dysfunctional IDH leads to reduced production of α-KG and NADH and increased production of 2-hydroxyglutarate, an oncometabolite. This results in increased oxidative damage and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor α, causing cells to be prone to tumorigenesis. Methods: This study investigated IDH mutations in 61 Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, using a pentose nucleic acid clamping method and direct sequencing. Results: We identified four cases of ESFTs harboring IDH mutations. The number of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations was equal and the subtype of IDH mutations was variable. Clinicopathologic analysis according to IDH mutation status did not reveal significant results. Conclusions: This study is the first to report IDH mutations in ESFTs. The results indicate that ESFTs can harbor IDH mutations in previously known hot-spot regions, although their incidence is rare. Further validation with a larger case-based study would establish more reliable and significant data on prevalence rate and the biological significance of IDH mutations in ESFTs.

  13. Mutations in KCNT1 cause a spectrum of focal epilepsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Heron, Sarah E.; Larsen, Line H. G.; Lim, Chiao Xin; Ricos, Michael G.; Bayly, Marta A.; van Kempen, Marjan J. A.; Klinkenberg, Sylvia; Andrews, Ian; Kelley, Kent; Ronen, Gabriel M.; Callen, David; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Yendle, Simone C.; Carvill, Gemma L.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nabbout, Rima; Poduri, Annapurna; Striano, Pasquale; Baglietto, Maria G.; Zara, Federico; Smith, Nicholas J.; Pridmore, Clair; Gardella, Elena; Nikanorova, Marina; Dahl, Hans Atli; Gellert, Pia; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Gunning, Boudewijn; Kragh-Olsen, Bente; Dibbens, Leanne M.

    2018-01-01

    Summary Autosomal dominant mutations in the sodium-gated potassium channel subunit gene KCNT1 have been associated with two distinct seizure syndromes, nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) and malignant migrating focal seizures of infancy (MMFSI). To further explore the phenotypic spectrum associated with KCNT1, we examined individuals affected with focal epilepsy or an epileptic encephalopathy for mutations in the gene. We identified KCNT1 mutations in 12 previously unreported patients with focal epilepsy, multifocal epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and in a family with sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), in addition to patients with NFLE and MMFSI. In contrast to the 100% penetrance so far reported for KCNT1 mutations, we observed incomplete penetrance. It is notable that we report that the one KCNT1 mutation, p.Arg398Gln, can lead to either of the two distinct phenotypes, ADNFLE or MMFSI, even within the same family. This indicates that genotype–phenotype relationships for KCNT1 mutations are not straightforward. We demonstrate that KCNT1 mutations are highly pleiotropic and are associated with phenotypes other than ADNFLE and MMFSI. KCNT1 mutations are now associated with Ohtahara syndrome, MMFSI, and nocturnal focal epilepsy. They may also be associated with multifocal epilepsy and cardiac disturbances. PMID:26122718

  14. FGFR3 mutations and the skin: report of a patient with a FGFR3 gene mutation, acanthosis nigricans, hypochondroplasia and hyperinsulinemia and review of the literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, M; Jeppesen, E M; Skovby, F

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene mutations in the germline are well-known causes of skeletal syndromes. Somatic FGFR3 mutations have been found in malignant neoplasms and more recently in several cutaneous elements. We present a 14-year-old girl with mild hypochondroplasia who...... developed acanthosis nigricans. The report of a K650Q mutation in the FGFR3 gene in a similar case prompted us to conduct a point mutation analysis. The K650Q mutation was confirmed, but in contrast to the previous case, we additionally report findings of hyperinsulinemia. In the recent literature...... genetic background. Our case shows that FGFR3 mutation analysis should be considered in case of the coexistence of acanthosis nigricans and a skeletal dysplasia. Testing for hyperinsulinemia is essential, also if a gene mutation is confirmed....

  15. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  16. Acquired dysfibrinogenemia secondary to multiple myeloma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotlín, R.; Sobotková, A.; Riedel, Tomáš; Salaj, P.; Suttnar, J.; Reicheltová, Z.; Májek, P.; Khaznadar, T.; Dyr, J. E.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 2 (2008), s. 75-81 ISSN 0001-5792 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200670701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : acquired dysfibrinogenemia * amorphous clot * fibrinogen Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.191, year: 2008

  17. Neutrophil Segmentation Index Anomaly in Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neutrophil lobe count was conducted on the blood films of 262 patients with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Virus (AIDS) and 204 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) antibody-negative apparently healthy controls. The count for each group was evaluated for neutrophil segmentation index by standard method.

  18. Beliefs and perceptions about Acquired Immunodeficieny Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This should include town cry, health talk at their worship centres and local gatherings. The electronic and print media are not the best based on their peculiarities. Keywords: Beliefs; Perceptions; Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Microbiology Vol. 8 (1) 2007: pp. 40-48 ...

  19. How Did Light Acquire a Velocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauginie, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how light acquired a velocity through history, from the ancient Greeks to the early modern era. Combining abstract debates, models of light, practical needs, planned research and chance, this history illustrates several key points that should be brought out in science education.

  20. Perceptions and knowledge about the acquired immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using an anonymous questionnaire to obtain baseline data on sexual behaviour and knowledge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) among students in university residences, the following information was obtained: Knowledge of AIDS was found to be high, although misconceptions regarding transmission ...

  1. Beliefs and perceptions about Acquired Immunodeficieny Syndrome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acquired Immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) has assumed a disease of epidemic dimension both in Nigeria's rural and urban communities. Different people have varying knowledge and beliefs about this disease. This study was designed to assess the beliefs and perceptions of the people of Ihugh community in that ...

  2. Some Characteristics of Patients with Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a dearth of studies relating the information from the history of patients with community-acquired pneumonia to the mortality of the disease. The relationship between age, sex, occupation, marital status, smoking history, alcohol use, concomitant COPD / bronchial asthma, source of referral and the mortality of patients ...

  3. Radiological pulmonary manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchiori, Edson; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Ossa, Alfonso Jaramillo

    1999-01-01

    In this article are reviewed the principal radiologic manifestations of inflammatory and tumoral diseases the compromise the lungs of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. In the group of inflammatory diseases the radiologic aspects of pneumocystosis, cytomegalovirus disease, cryptococcosis, tuberculosis and bacterial pneumonias are emphasized. In the neoplasic diseases' group the aspects of lymphoma and Kaposi's sarcoma are specially presented. (author)

  4. Perceptions and knowledge about the acquired immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... The acquired immunodeficiency sydrome (AIDS) is becoming a major health care priority and a threat to all South Africans. Since the diagnosis of the first case of AIDS in South Africa in March 19821 over 430 cases have been reported to 21 June. 1990 (information courtesy the AIDS Advisory Group). At.

  5. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory

  6. Somatic mutations of the histone H3K27 demethylase, UTX, in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaften, Gijs; Dalgliesh, Gillian L; Davies, Helen; Chen, Lina; Bignell, Graham; Greenman, Chris; Edkins, Sarah; Hardy, Claire; O’Meara, Sarah; Teague, Jon; Butler, Adam; Hinton, Jonathan; Latimer, Calli; Andrews, Jenny; Barthorpe, Syd; Beare, Dave; Buck, Gemma; Campbell, Peter J; Cole, Jennifer; Dunmore, Rebecca; Forbes, Simon; Jia, Mingming; Jones, David; Kok, Chai Yin; Leroy, Catherine; Lin, Meng-Lay; McBride, David J; Maddison, Mark; Maquire, Simon; McLay, Kirsten; Menzies, Andrew; Mironenko, Tatiana; Lee, Mulderrig; Mudie, Laura; Pleasance, Erin; Shepherd, Rebecca; Smith, Raffaella; Stebbings, Lucy; Stephens, Philip; Tang, Gurpreet; Tarpey, Patrick S; Turner, Rachel; Turrell, Kelly; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Wray, Paul; Collins, V Peter; Ichimura, Koichi; Law, Simon; Wong, John; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi; Tonon, Giovanni; DePinho, Ronald A; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Kahnoski, Richard J.; Massie, Aaron; Khoo, Sok Kean; Teh, Bin Tean; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Somatically acquired epigenetic changes are present in many cancers. Epigenetic regulation is maintained via post-translational modifications of core histones. Here, we describe inactivating somatic mutations in the histone lysine demethylase, UTX, pointing to histone H3 lysine methylation deregulation in multiple tumour types. UTX reintroduction into cancer cells with inactivating UTX mutations resulted in slowing of proliferation and marked transcriptional changes. These data identify UTX as a new human cancer gene. PMID:19330029

  7. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerda Saxer

    Full Text Available Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9, with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9 - 9.5×10(-9, per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11, with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13 to 1.6×10(-10, is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes.

  8. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Tomar

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma (RB is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59 while only 42.4% (25/59 of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9% of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1% in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41 of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59 of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and

  9. Mutation spectrum of RB1 mutations in retinoblastoma cases from Singapore with implications for genetic management and counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Swati; Sethi, Raman; Sundar, Gangadhara; Quah, Thuan Chong; Quah, Boon Long; Lai, Poh San

    2017-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is a rare childhood malignant disorder caused by the biallelic inactivation of RB1 gene. Early diagnosis and identification of carriers of heritable RB1 mutations can improve disease outcome and management. In this study, mutational analysis was conducted on fifty-nine matched tumor and peripheral blood samples from 18 bilateral and 41 unilateral unrelated RB cases by a combinatorial approach of Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) assay, deletion screening, direct sequencing, copy number gene dosage analysis and methylation assays. Screening of both blood and tumor samples yielded a mutation detection rate of 94.9% (56/59) while only 42.4% (25/59) of mutations were detected if blood samples alone were analyzed. Biallelic mutations were observed in 43/59 (72.9%) of tumors screened. There were 3 cases (5.1%) in which no mutations could be detected and germline mutations were detected in 19.5% (8/41) of unilateral cases. A total of 61 point mutations were identified, of which 10 were novel. There was a high incidence of previously reported recurrent mutations, occurring at 38.98% (23/59) of all cases. Of interest were three cases of mosaic RB1 mutations detected in the blood from patients with unilateral retinoblastoma. Additionally, two germline mutations previously reported to be associated with low-penetrance phenotypes: missense-c.1981C>T and splice variant-c.607+1G>T, were observed in a bilateral and a unilateral proband, respectively. These findings have implications for genetic counselling and risk prediction for the affected families. This is the first published report on the spectrum of mutations in RB patients from Singapore and shows that further improved mutation screening strategies are required in order to provide a definitive molecular diagnosis for every case of RB. Our findings also underscore the importance of genetic testing in supporting individualized disease management plans for patients and asymptomatic

  10. Mutation breeding in pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daskalov, S.

    1986-01-01

    Pepper (Capsicum sp.) is an important vegetable and spice crop widely grown in tropical as well as in temperate regions. Until recently the improvement programmes were based mainly on using natural sources of germ plasma, crossbreeding and exploiting the heterosis of F 1 hybrids. However, interest in using induced mutations is growing. A great number of agronomically useful mutants as well as mutants valuable for genetic, cytological and physiological studies have been induced and described. In this review information is presented about suitable mutagen treatment procedures with radiation as well as chemicals, M 1 effects, handling the treated material in M 1 , M 2 and subsequent generations, and mutant screening procedures. This is supplemented by a description of reported useful mutants and released cultivars. Finally, general advice is given on when and how to incorporate mutation induction in Capsicum improvement programmes. (author)

  11. SRSF2-p95 hotspot mutation is highly associated with advanced forms of mastocytosis and mutations in epigenetic regulator genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssens, Katia; Brenet, Fabienne; Agopian, Julie; Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Damaj, Gandhi; Cabaret, Laure; Chandesris, Maria Olivia; de Sepulveda, Paulo; Hermine, Olivier; Dubreuil, Patrice; Soucie, Erinn

    2014-05-01

    Mastocytosis is a rare and chronic disease with phenotypes ranging from indolent to severe. Prognosis for this disease is variable and very few biomarkers to predict disease evolution or outcome are currently known. We have performed comprehensive screening in our large cohort of mastocytosis patients for mutations previously found in other myeloid diseases and that could serve as prognostic indicators. KIT, SRSF2-P95 and TET2 mutations were by far the most frequent, detected in 81%, 24% and 21% of patients, respectively. Where TET2 and SRSF2-P95 mutation both correlated with advanced disease phenotypes, SRSF2-P95 hotspot mutation was found almost exclusively in patients diagnosed with associated clonal hematologic non-mast cell disease. Statistically, TET2 and SRSF2-P95 mutations were highly associated, suggesting a mechanistic link between these two factors. Finally, analysis of both clonal and sorted cell populations from patients confirms the presence of these mutations in the mast cell component of the disease, suggests an ontological mutation hierarchy and provides evidence for the expansion of multiple clones. This highlights the prognostic potential of such approaches, if applied systematically, for delineating the roles of specific mutations in predisposing and/or driving distinct disease phenotypes.

  12. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria...

  13. Molecular landscape of acquired resistance to targeted therapy combinations in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Daniele; Sennott, Erin M.; Barault, Ludovic; Valtorta, Emanuele; Arena, Sabrina; Cassingena, Andrea; Filiciotto, Genny; Marzolla, Giulia; Elez, Elena; van Geel, Robin M.J.M.; Bartolini, Alice; Crisafulli, Giovanni; Boscaro, Valentina; Godfrey, Jason T.; Buscarino, Michela; Cancelliere, Carlotta; Linnebacher, Michael; Corti, Giorgio; Truini, Mauro; Siravegna, Giulia; Grasselli, Julieta; Gallicchio, Margherita; Bernards, René; Schellens, Jan H.M.; Tabernero, Josep; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Bardelli, Alberto; Siena, Salvatore; Corcoran, Ryan B.; Di Nicolantonio, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Summary Although recent clinical trials of BRAF inhibitor combinations have demonstrated improved efficacy in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer, emergence of acquired resistance limits clinical benefit. Here, we undertook a comprehensive effort to define mechanisms underlying drug resistance with the goal of guiding development of therapeutic strategies to overcome this limitation. We generated a broad panel of BRAF mutant resistant cell line models across seven different clinically-relevant drug combinations. Combinatorial drug treatments were able to abrogate ERK1/2 phosphorylation in parental sensitive cells, but not in their resistant counterparts, indicating that resistant cells escaped drug treatments through one or more mechanisms leading to biochemical reactivation of the MAPK signaling pathway. Genotyping of resistant cells identified gene amplification of EGFR, KRAS and mutant BRAF, as well as acquired mutations in KRAS, EGFR, and MAP2K1. These mechanisms were clinically relevant, as we identified emergence of a KRAS G12C mutation and increase of mutant BRAF V600E allele frequency in the circulating tumor DNA of a patient at relapse from combined treatment with BRAF and MEK inhibitors. In order to identify therapeutic combinations capable of overcoming drug resistance, we performed a systematic assessment of candidate therapies across the panel of resistant cell lines. Independent of the molecular alteration acquired upon drug pressure, most resistant cells retained sensitivity to vertical MAPK pathway suppression when combinations of ERK, BRAF, and EGFR inhibitors were applied. These therapeutic combinations represent promising strategies for future clinical trials in BRAF mutant colorectal cancer. PMID:27312529

  14. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakupciak, John P; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sidransky, David; O'Connell, Catherine D; Maragh, Samantha; Markowitz, Maura E; Greenberg, Alissa K; Hoque, Mohammad O; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E; Wagner, Paul D; Rom, William N

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy). The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney) and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid) from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum) from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip ® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17%) contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with potential applications for cancer detection, but it is

  15. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Paul D

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy. The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. Methods We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Results Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17% contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Conclusion Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with

  16. Mutation selection of strawberries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repka, F.; Tsaganova, I.

    1986-01-01

    A brief account is given of the preliminary results of selection work carried out with the aim of deriving a variety of strawberry suitable for mechanized picking. Mutation selection based on irradiation by gamma rays, fast neutrons and a laser beam has been used. The irradiation was performed on strawberry seedlings grown under field conditions and on in vitro cultures at different stages of development. The studies are continuing. (author)

  17. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  18. Molecular biological aspects of acquired bullous diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1998-01-01

    Bullous diseases of the oral mucosa and skin were originally classified on the basis of clinical and histological criteria. The discovery of autoantibodies in some of these patients and the introduction of molecular biology have resulted in a new understanding of the pathological mechanisms of many...... to be the target for mutations seen in patients with the inherited type of epidermolysis bullosa in which bullous lesions are a prominent clinical feature....

  19. Genetic engineering and therapy for inherited and acquired cardiomyopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Sharlene; Davis, Jennifer; Westfall, Margaret; Metzger, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    The cardiac myofilaments consist of a highly ordered assembly of proteins that collectively generate force in a calcium-dependent manner. Defects in myofilament function and its regulation have been implicated in various forms of acquired and inherited human heart disease. For example, during cardiac ischemia, cardiac myocyte contractile performance is dramatically downregulated due in part to a reduced sensitivity of the myofilaments to calcium under acidic pH conditions. Over the last several years, the thin filament regulatory protein, troponin I, has been identified as an important mediator of this response. Mutations in troponin I and other sarcomere genes are also linked to several distinct inherited cardiomyopathic phenotypes, including hypertrophic, dilated, and restrictive cardiomyopathies. With the cardiac sarcomere emerging as a central player for such a diverse array of human heart diseases, genetic-based strategies that target the myofilament will likely have broad therapeutic potential. The development of safe vector systems for efficient gene delivery will be a critical hurdle to overcome before these types of therapies can be successfully applied. Nonetheless, studies focusing on the principles of acute genetic engineering of the sarcomere hold value as they lay the essential foundation on which to build potential gene-based therapies for heart disease.

  20. DNA-Mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT): a catalog of clinically relevant cancer mutations to enable genome-directed anticancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Paul; Chen, Heidi; Andrews, Jenny; Naser, Riyad; Pao, William; Horn, Leora

    2013-04-01

    Tumor gene mutation status is becoming increasingly important in the treatment of patients with cancer. A comprehensive catalog of tumor gene-response outcomes from individual patients is needed, especially for actionable mutations and rare variants. We created a proof-of-principle database [DNA-mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT)], starting with lung cancer-associated EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations, to provide a resource for clinicians to prioritize treatment decisions based on a patient's tumor mutations at the point of care. A systematic search of literature published between June 2005 and May 2011 was conducted through PubMed to identify patient-level, mutation-drug response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutant tumors. Minimum inclusion criteria included patient's EGFR mutation, corresponding treatment, and an associated radiographic outcome. A total of 1,021 patients with 1,070 separate EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy responses from 116 different publications were included. About 188 unique EGFR mutations occurring in 207 different combinations were identified: 149 different mutation combinations were associated with disease control and 42 were associated with disease progression. Four secondary mutations, in 16 different combinations, were associated with acquired resistance. As tumor sequencing becomes more common in oncology, this comprehensive electronic catalog can enable genome-directed anticancer therapy. DIRECT will eventually encompass all tumor mutations associated with clinical outcomes on targeted therapies. Users can make specific queries at http://www.mycancergenome.org/about/direct to obtain clinically relevant data associated with various mutations. ©2013 AACR.

  1. Fetal origin of brain damage in 2 infants with a COL4A1 mutation: fetal and neonatal MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, R. J.; Peeters-Scholte, C.; van Vugt, J. J. M.; van Vught, J. J. M. G.; Barkhof, F.; Rizzu, P.; van der Schoor, S. R. D.; van der Knaap, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene COL4A1, encoding collagen IV A1, are associated with familial porencephaly. Previously, COL4A1 mutation-associated antenatal hemorrhages have been suggested by early post-natal imaging. We describe 2 children with fetal intracerebral hemorrhages and a COL4A1 mutation. There was

  2. Novel mutations including deletions of the entire OFD1 gene in 30 families with type 1 orofaciodigital syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisschoff, Izak J; Zeschnigk, Christine; Horn, Denise

    2013-01-01

    have studied 55 sporadic and six familial cases of suspected OFD1. Comprehensive mutation analysis in OFD1 revealed mutations in 37 female patients from 30 families; 22 mutations have not been previously described including two heterozygous deletions spanning OFD1 and neighbouring genes. Analysis...

  3. Mutations in endoglin and in activin receptor-like kinase 1 among Danish patients with hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, K; Kjeldsen, A D; Poulsen, L

    2004-01-01

    protocol for mutation scanning of the two loci. Twenty-five Danish HHT families were tested. A total of eight new as well as seven previously reported mutations were identified. A founder mutation was characterized present in seven families and possibly introduced around 350 years ago. In one individual...

  4. Two pathways act in an additive rather than obligatorily synergistic fashion to induce systemic acquired resistance and PR gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro Allan D

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local infection with necrotizing pathogens induces whole plant immunity to secondary challenge. Pathogenesis-related genes are induced in parallel with this systemic acquired resistance response and thought to be co-regulated. The hypothesis of co-regulation has been challenged by induction of Arabidopsis PR-1 but not systemic acquired resistance in npr1 mutant plants responding to Pseudomonas syringae carrying the avirulence gene avrRpt2. However, experiments with ndr1 mutant plants have revealed major differences between avirulence genes. The ndr1-1 mutation prevents hypersensitive cell death, systemic acquired resistance and PR-1 induction elicited by bacteria carrying avrRpt2. This mutation does not prevent these responses to bacteria carrying avrB. Results Systemic acquired resistance, PR-1 induction and PR-5 induction were assessed in comparisons of npr1-2 and ndr1-1 mutant plants, double mutant plants, and wild-type plants. Systemic acquired resistance was displayed by all four plant lines in response to Pseudomonas syringae bacteria carrying avrB. PR-1 induction was partially impaired by either single mutation in response to either bacterial strain, but only fully impaired in the double mutant in response to avrRpt2. PR-5 induction was not fully impaired in any of the mutants in response to either avirulence gene. Conclusion Two pathways act additively, rather than in an obligatorily synergistic fashion, to induce systemic acquired resistance, PR-1 and PR-5. One of these pathways is NPR1-independent and depends on signals associated with hypersensitive cell death. The other pathway is dependent on salicylic acid accumulation and acts through NPR1. At least two other pathways also contribute additively to PR-5 induction.

  5. ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Carrie N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a compendium of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mouse mutations, identified in our laboratory over a period of 10 years either on the basis of phenotype or whole genome and/or whole exome sequencing, and archived in the Mutagenetix database. Our purpose is threefold: 1 to formally describe many point mutations, including those that were not previously disclosed in peer-reviewed publications; 2 to assess the characteristics of these mutations; and 3 to estimate the likelihood that a missense mutation induced by ENU will create a detectable phenotype. Findings In the context of an ENU mutagenesis program for C57BL/6J mice, a total of 185 phenotypes were tracked to mutations in 129 genes. In addition, 402 incidental mutations were identified and predicted to affect 390 genes. As previously reported, ENU shows strand asymmetry in its induction of mutations, particularly favoring T to A rather than A to T in the sense strand of coding regions and splice junctions. Some amino acid substitutions are far more likely to be damaging than others, and some are far more likely to be observed. Indeed, from among a total of 494 non-synonymous coding mutations, ENU was observed to create only 114 of the 182 possible amino acid substitutions that single base changes can achieve. Based on differences in overt null allele frequencies observed in phenotypic vs. non-phenotypic mutation sets, we infer that ENU-induced missense mutations create detectable phenotype only about 1 in 4.7 times. While the remaining mutations may not be functionally neutral, they are, on average, beneath the limits of detection of the phenotypic assays we applied. Conclusions Collectively, these mutations add to our understanding of the chemical specificity of ENU, the types of amino acid substitutions it creates, and its efficiency in causing phenovariance. Our data support the validity of computational algorithms for the prediction of damage caused by

  6. A pathway-centric survey of somatic mutations in Chinese patients with colorectal carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Ling

    Full Text Available Previous genetic studies on colorectal carcinomas (CRC have identified multiple somatic mutations in four candidate pathways (TGF-β, Wnt, P53 and RTK-RAS pathways on populations of European ancestry. However, it is under-studied whether other populations harbor different sets of hot-spot somatic mutations in these pathways and other oncogenes. In this study, to evaluate the mutational spectrum of novel somatic mutations, we assessed 41 pairs of tumor-stroma tissues from Chinese patients with CRC, including 29 colon carcinomas and 12 rectal carcinomas. We designed Illumina Custom Amplicon panel to target 43 genes, including genes in the four candidate pathways, as well as several known oncogenes for other cancers. Candidate mutations were validated by Sanger sequencing, and we further used SIFT and PolyPhen-2 to assess potentially functional mutations. We discovered 3 new somatic mutations in gene APC, TCF7L2, and PIK3CA that had never been reported in the COSMIC or NCI-60 databases. Additionally, we confirmed 6 known somatic mutations in gene SMAD4, APC, FBXW7, BRAF and PTEN in Chinese CRC patients. While most were previously reported in CRC, one mutation in PTEN was reported only in malignant endometrium cancer. Our study confirmed the existence of known somatic mutations in the four candidate pathways for CRC in Chinese patients. We also discovered a number of novel somatic mutations in these pathways, which may have implications for the pathogenesis of CRC.

  7. The 'patient journey' of adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchaiah, V K C; Stephens, D

    2012-05-01

    A previous study examined the 'patient journey' of adults with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. This study examined the same for adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, and assessed differences. Data were collected from 16 audiologists, using the Ida Institute template, and from four adults with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, through semi-structured interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and presented using a process mapping model. A patient journey template for sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment was developed based on the professionals' and patients' perspectives. The main difference between these two groups' perspectives was seen in the self-evaluation phase: some stages within this phase were recognised by the patients but not by the professionals. The main difference between the current and the previous study was the absence of a pre-awareness phase in the journey described by patients with sudden-onset acquired hearing impairment, compared with that described by patients with gradual-onset acquired hearing impairment. Patient journey templates could be useful counselling tools for ear and hearing healthcare specialists. However, such templates should be used only as a baseline; it is important to take a detailed case history to understand each patient's unique experience, including the psychosocial impact of hearing impairment.

  8. Co-inheritance of novel ATRX gene mutation and globin (α & β) gene mutations in transfusion dependent beta-thalassemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nafie, Awatif N; Borgio, J Francis; AbdulAzeez, Sayed; Al-Suliman, Ahmed M; Qaw, Fuad S; Naserullah, Zaki A; Al-Jarrash, Sana; Al-Madan, Mohammed S; Al-Ali, Rudaynah A; AlKhalifah, Mohammed A; Al-Muhanna, Fahad; Steinberg, Martin H; Al-Ali, Amein K

    2015-06-01

    α-Thalassemia X-linked mental retardation syndrome is a rare inherited intellectual disability disorder due to mutations in the ATRX gene. In our previous study of the prevalence of β-thalassemia mutations in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia, we confirmed the widespread coinheritance of α-thalassemia mutation. Some of these subjects have a family history of mental retardation, the cause of which is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the presence or absence of mutations in the ATRX gene in these patients. Three exons of the ATRX gene and their flanking regions were directly sequenced. Only four female transfusion dependent β-thalassemia patients were found to be carriers of a novel mutation in the ATRX gene. Two of the ATRX gene mutations, c.623delA and c.848T>C were present in patients homozygous for IVS I-5(G→C) and homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation, respectively. While the other two that were located in the intronic region (flanking regions), were present in patients homozygous for Cd39(C → T) β-thalassemia mutation. The two subjects with the mutations in the coding region had family members with mental retardation, which suggests that the novel frame shift mutation and the missense mutation at coding region of ATRX gene are involved in ATRX syndrome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acquired preferences for piquant foods by chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, P; Kennel, K

    1983-06-01

    Humans frequently develop likings for innately unpalatable substances, while this occurs very rarely in non-humans. In this study, we establish a preference for crackers seasoned with chili pepper in two domesticated chimpanzees. Chimps were offered a series of increasingly piquant crackers by their caretaker, and gradually came to prefer these crackers to unseasoned crackers. The preferences were stable over months, and generalized to a different piquant cracker. Available evidence suggests that these are acquired likes rather than preferences maintained because of positive consequences that follow ingestion. We note that all existing instances of acquired likings for innately aversive foods in animals (including some informal results from dogs presented in this paper) involve animals with a close personal relationship with humans, suggesting an important role for social-affective factors in the reversal of innate aversions.

  10. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  11. Acquired portosystemic collaterals: anatomy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; Mota Junior, Americo, E-mail: andreafariasm@gmail.com [Instituto de Medicina Integral Professor Fernando Figueira de Pernambuco (IMIP), Recife, PE (Brazil); Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete [Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias Junior, Jorge; Muglia, Valdair Francisco [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-07-15

    Portosystemic shunts are enlarged vessels that form collateral pathological pathways between the splanchnic circulation and the systemic circulation. Although their causes are multifactorial, portosystemic shunts all have one mechanism in common - increased portal venous pressure, which diverts the blood flow from the gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Congenital and acquired collateral pathways have both been described in the literature. The aim of this pictorial essay was to discuss the distinct anatomic and imaging features of portosystemic shunts, as well as to provide a robust method of differentiating between acquired portosystemic shunts and similar pathologies, through the use of illustrations and schematic drawings. Imaging of portosystemic shunts provides subclinical markers of increased portal venous pressure. Therefore, radiologists play a crucial role in the identification of portosystemic shunts. Early detection of portosystemic shunts can allow ample time to perform endovascular shunt operations, which can relieve portal hypertension and prevent acute or chronic complications in at-risk patient populations. (author)

  12. Postpartum Acquired Hemophilia. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Antonia Cabezas Poblet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Periparturient hemorrhages are the leading cause of extremely serious maternal morbidity and maternal death in Cuba and the world. Acquired Hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by the presence of antibodies against circulating factor VIII (FVIII. We present the case of a 36 years old pregnant woman with term pregnancy and vaginal delivery that suffers from hemorrhagic manifestations in the immediate postpartum secondary to raffia hematoma, requiring blood transfusion. Then she presents a bruise in the right upper limb secondary to stroke that requires surgical repair. The postpartum torpid evolution characterized by sustained bleeding raffia and the surgically treated arm, makes us suspect of the presence of a blood disorder. We observed a decrease in the FVIII factor, which involves the diagnosis of acquired hemophilia and requires treatment with recombinant VIIa factor (FVIIar concentrate and cyclophosphamide. Posterior evolution was favorable. The patient was discharged without sequelae.

  13. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Rattray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3 placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts. Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  14. Human SOD1 ALS Mutations in a Drosophila Knock-In Model Cause Severe Phenotypes and Reveal Dosage-Sensitive Gain- and Loss-of-Function Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Aslı; Held, Aaron; Bredvik, Kirsten; Major, Paxton; Achilli, Toni-Marie; Kerson, Abigail G; Wharton, Kristi; Stilwell, Geoff; Reenan, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and familial forms can be caused by numerous dominant mutations of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Substantial efforts have been invested in studying SOD1-ALS transgenic animal models; yet, the molecular mechanisms by which ALS-mutant SOD1 protein acquires toxicity are not well understood. ALS-like phenotypes in animal models are highly dependent on transgene dosage. Thus, issues of whether the ALS-like phenotypes of these models stem from overexpression of mutant alleles or from aspects of the SOD1 mutation itself are not easily deconvolved. To address concerns about levels of mutant SOD1 in disease pathogenesis, we have genetically engineered four human ALS-causing SOD1 point mutations (G37R, H48R, H71Y, and G85R) into the endogenous locus of Drosophila SOD1 (dsod) via ends-out homologous recombination and analyzed the resulting molecular, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes. Contrary to previous transgenic models, we have recapitulated ALS-like phenotypes without overexpression of the mutant protein. Drosophila carrying homozygous mutations rendering SOD1 protein enzymatically inactive (G85R, H48R, and H71Y) exhibited neurodegeneration, locomotor deficits, and shortened life span. The mutation retaining enzymatic activity (G37R) was phenotypically indistinguishable from controls. While the observed mutant dsod phenotypes were recessive, a gain-of-function component was uncovered through dosage studies and comparisons with age-matched dsod null animals, which failed to show severe locomotor defects or nerve degeneration. We conclude that the Drosophila knock-in model captures important aspects of human SOD1-based ALS and provides a powerful and useful tool for further genetic studies. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. Mutations in PAX3 that cause Waardenburg syndrome type I: Ten new mutations and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, C.T.; Hoth, C.F.; Milunsky, A. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, dystopia canthorum, and pigmentary disturbances, and it represents the most common form of inherited deafness in infants. WS type I is characterized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, while individuals with WS type II have normally-located canthi. WS type III is similar to WS type I but is also characterized by musculoskeletal abnormalities. Defects in the PAX3 gene, a transcription factor expressed during embryonic development, have been shown to cause WS types I and III in several families. In contrast, mutations in PAX3 do not cause WS type II, and linkage of the disease to other chromosomal regions has been demonstrated. We describe 10 additional mutations in the PAX3 gene in families with WS type I. Eight of these mutations are in the region of PAX3, where only one mutation has been previously described. These mutations, together with those previously reported, cover essentially the entire PAX3 gene and represent a wide spectrum of mutations that can cause WS type I. Thus far, all but one of the mutations are private; only one mutation has been reported in two apparently unrelated families. Our analysis thus far demonstrates little correlation between genotype and phenotype; deletions of the entire PAX3 gene result in phenotypes indistinguishable from those associated with single-base substitutions in the paired domain or homeodomain of PAX3. Moreover, two similar mutations in close proximity can result in significantly different phenotypes, WS type I in one family and WS type III in another. 47 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Mitochondrial Mutation Rate, Spectrum and Heteroplasmy in Caenorhabditis elegans Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines of Differing Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Anke; Thompson, Owen; Waterston, Robert H; Moerman, Donald G; Keightley, Peter D; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of metazoans, given their elevated rates of evolution, have served as pivotal markers for phylogeographic studies and recent phylogenetic events. In order to determine the dynamics of spontaneous mitochondrial mutations in small populations in the absence and presence of selection, we evolved mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Caenorhabditis elegans in parallel over 409 consecutive generations at three varying population sizes of N = 1, 10, and 100 hermaphrodites. The N =1 populations should have a minimal influence of natural selection to provide the spontaneous mutation rate and the expected rate of neutral evolution, whereas larger population sizes should experience increasing intensity of selection. New mutations were identified by Illumina paired-end sequencing of 86 mtDNA genomes across 35 experimental lines and compared with published genomes of natural isolates. The spontaneous mitochondrial mutation rate was estimated at 1.05 × 10-7/site/generation. A strong G/C→A/T mutational bias was observed in both the MA lines and the natural isolates. This suggests that the low G + C content at synonymous sites is the product of mutation bias rather than selection as previously proposed. The mitochondrial effective population size per worm generation was estimated to be 62. Although it was previously concluded that heteroplasmy was rare in C. elegans, the vast majority of mutations in this study were heteroplasmic despite an experimental regime exceeding 400 generations. The frequencies of frameshift and nonsynonymous mutations were negatively correlated with population size, which suggests their deleterious effects on fitness and a potent role for selection in their eradication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Phylogenetically Acquired Representations and Evolutionary Algorithms.

    OpenAIRE

    Wozniak , Adrianna

    2006-01-01

    First, we explain why Genetic Algorithms (GAs), inspired by the Modern Synthesis, do not accurately model biological evolution, being rather an artificial version of artificial, rather than natural selection. Being focused on optimisation, we propose two improvements of GAs, with the aim to successfully generate adapted, desired behaviour. The first one concerns phylogenetic grounding of meaning, a way to avoid the Symbol Grounding Problem. We give a definition of Phylogenetically Acquired Re...

  18. Acquired flat foot deformity: postoperative imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmick, Simon; Chhabra, Avneesh; Grujic, Leslie; Linklater, James M

    2012-07-01

    Flat foot (pes planus) is a progressive and disabling pathology that is treated initially with conservative measures and often followed by a variety of surgeries. This article briefly reviews the pathology in acquired flat foot deformity, the classification of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, discusses surgical techniques for the management of adult flat foot deformity, and reviews potential complications and their relevant imaging appearances. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  20. Orchidopexy in late childhood often associated with previously normal testicular position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Evelyn; Zijp, Gerda; Froeling, Frank; de Wilde, Jeroen; van der Voort, Laszla; Hack, Wilfried

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine retrospectively, the prevalence of acquired undescended testis (UDT) in boys who underwent late orchidopexies, that is, performed after the age of 2 years. We included all patients who were 2 years or older when they underwent orchidopexy (ORP) for UDT at the Juliana Children's Hospital during 1996 to 2009. Previous testis position from birth until the date of ORP was obtained from youth health care records. We identified 660 boys who underwent ORP after the age of 2 years for undescended testis. For 421 of these 660 boys, the previous testicular position could be retrieved from the health records. In 143 of these 421 boys (34%), the operated testis had never been scrotal (congenital UDT), whereas in the other 278 boys (66%), a previous scrotal position had been documented twice or more (acquired UDT). Our results show that two-thirds of the boys that underwent ORP after the age of 2 had previously normal descended testes. This finding may offer an additional explanation for the discrepancy between the incidence of congenital UDT and the high rate of ORP in mid and late childhood. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. SDHAF2 mutations in familial and sporadic paraganglioma and phaeochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Jean-Pierre; Kunst, Henricus P M; Cascon, Alberto; Sampietro, Maria Lourdes; Gaal, José; Korpershoek, Esther; Hinojar-Gutierrez, Adolfo; Timmers, Henri J L M; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Hermsen, Mario A; Suárez, Carlos; Hussain, A Karim; Vriends, Annette H J T; Hes, Frederik J; Jansen, Jeroen C; Tops, Carli M; Corssmit, Eleonora P; de Knijff, Peter; Lenders, Jacques W M; Cremers, Cor W R J; Devilee, Peter; Dinjens, Winand N M; de Krijger, Ronald R; Robledo, Mercedes

    2010-04-01

    Paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas are neuroendocrine tumours associated frequently with germline mutations of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB. Previous studies have shown the imprinted SDHAF2 gene to be mutated in a large Dutch kindred with paragangliomas. We aimed to identify SDHAF2 mutation carriers, assess the clinical genetic significance of SDHAF2, and describe the associated clinical phenotype. We undertook a multicentre study in Spain and The Netherlands in 443 apparently sporadic patients with paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas who did not have mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB. We analysed DNA of 315 patients for germline mutations of SDHAF2; a subset (n=200) was investigated for gross gene deletions. DNA from a group of 128 tumours was studied for somatic mutations. We also examined a Spanish family with head and neck paragangliomas with a young age of onset for the presence of SDHAF2 mutations, undertook haplotype analysis in this kindred, and assessed their clinical phenotype. We did not identify any germline or somatic mutations of SDHAF2, and no gross gene deletions were noted in the subset of apparently sporadic patients analysed. Investigation of the Spanish family identified a pathogenic germline DNA mutation of SDHAF2, 232G-->A (Gly78Arg), identical to the Dutch kindred. SDHAF2 mutations do not have an important role in phaeochromocytoma and are rare in head and neck paraganglioma. Identification of a second family with the Gly78Arg mutation suggests that this is a crucial residue for the function of SDHAF2. We conclude that SDHAF2 mutation analysis is justified in very young patients with isolated head and neck paraganglioma without mutations in SDHD, SDHC, or SDHB, and in individuals with familial antecedents who are negative for mutations in all other risk genes. Dutch Cancer Society, European Union 6th Framework Program, Fondo Investigaciones Sanitarias, Fundación Mutua Madrileña, and Red Temática de Investigación Cooperativa en Cáncer. 2010

  2. Consistent absence of BRAF mutations in salivary gland carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Mohtasham

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malignant salivary gland tumors are rare entities. Despite advances in surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy, the rate of the mortality and five-year survival has not been improved markedly over the last few decades. The activation of EGFR- RAS-RAF signaling pathway contributes to the initiation and progression of many human cancers, promising a key pathway for therapeutic molecules. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate BRAF mutations in salivary gland carcinomas. Methods: We designed PCR- RFLP (Polymerase Chain Reaction -Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism and screened 50 salivary gland carcinomas (SGCs including mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC, adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC and polymorphous low grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA for the BRAF V600E mutation. Results: PCR-RFLP analyses demonstrated no mutation in BRAF exon 15 for SGC samples at position V600, which is the most commonly mutated site for BRAF in human cancer. Conclusions: According to our results SGCs didn’t acquire BRAF mutations that result in a constitutive activation of the signaling cascade downstream of EGFR, hence SGCs can be a good candidate for anti EGFR therapies.

  3. The effect of one additional driver mutation on tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Johannes G; Bozic, Ivana; Allen, Benjamin; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Nowak, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Tumor growth is caused by the acquisition of driver mutations, which enhance the net reproductive rate of cells. Driver mutations may increase cell division, reduce cell death, or allow cells to overcome density-limiting effects. We study the dynamics of tumor growth as one additional driver mutation is acquired. Our models are based on two-type branching processes that terminate in either tumor disappearance or tumor detection. In our first model, both cell types grow exponentially, with a faster rate for cells carrying the additional driver. We find that the additional driver mutation does not affect the survival probability of the lesion, but can substantially reduce the time to reach the detectable size if the lesion is slow growing. In our second model, cells lacking the additional driver cannot exceed a fixed carrying capacity, due to density limitations. In this case, the time to detection depends strongly on this carrying capacity. Our model provides a quantitative framework for studying tumor dynamics during different stages of progression. We observe that early, small lesions need additional drivers, while late stage metastases are only marginally affected by them. These results help to explain why additional driver mutations are typically not detected in fast-growing metastases. PMID:23396615

  4. Prognostic value of severity indicators of nursing-home-acquired pneumonia versus community-acquired pneumonia in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugajin M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Motoi Ugajin, Kenichi Yamaki, Natsuko Hirasawa, Takanori Kobayashi, Takeo Yagi Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ichinomiya-Nishi Hospital, Ichinomiya City, Japan Background: The credibility of prognostic indicators in nursing-home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP is not clear. We previously reported a simple prognostic indicator in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP: blood urea nitrogen to serum albumin (B/A ratio. This retrospective study investigated the prognostic value of severity indicators in NHAP versus CAP in elderly patients. Methods: Patients aged ≥65 years and hospitalized because of NHAP or CAP within the previous 3 years were enrolled. Demographics, coexisting illnesses, laboratory and microbiological findings, and severity scores (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age ≥65 [CURB-65] scale; age, dehydration, respiratory failure, orientation disturbance, and pressure [A-DROP] scale; and pneumonia severity index [PSI] were retrieved from medical records. The primary outcome was mortality within 28 days of admission. Results: In total, 138 NHAP and 307 CAP patients were enrolled. Mortality was higher in NHAP (18.1% than in CAP (4.6% (P<0.001. Patients with NHAP were older and had lower functional status and a higher rate of do-not-resuscitate orders, heart failure, and cerebrovascular diseases. The NHAP patients more frequently had typical bacterial pathogens. Using the receiver-operating characteristics curve for predicting mortality, the area under the curve in NHAP was 0.70 for the A-DROP scale, 0.69 for the CURB-65 scale, 0.67 for the PSI class, and 0.65 for the B/A ratio. The area under the curve in CAP was 0.73 for the A-DROP scale, 0.76 for the CURB-65 scale, 0.81 for the PSI class, and 0.83 for the B/A ratio. Conclusion: Patient mortality was greater in NHAP than in CAP. Patient characteristics, coexisting illnesses, and detected pathogens differed greatly between NHAP and CAP. The existing severity indicators

  5. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. The most widely known characteristic of chickpea is that it is an important vegetable protein source used in human and animal nutrition. However, the dry grains of chickpea, has 2-3 times more protein than our traditional food of wheat. In addition, cheakpea is also energy source because of its high carbohydrate content. It is very rich in some vitamin and mineral basis. In the plant breeding, mutation induction has become an effective way of supplementing existing germplasm and improving cultivars. Many successful examples of mutation induction have proved that mutation breeding is an effective and important approach to food legume improvement. The induced mutation technique in chickpea has proved successful and good results have been attained. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoey Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parents varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 (9 % seed moisture content and germination percentage 98 %) in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, 400, 500 ve 600 Gy for greenhouse experiments and 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 ve 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. One thousand seeds for per treatment were sown in the field for the M 1 . At maturity, 3500 single plants were harvested and 20 seeds were taken from each M 1 plant and planted in the following season. During plant growth

  6. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and treatment strategies for breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godet, Inês; Gilkes, Daniele M.

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is a global burden with a woman's lifetime risk of developing breast cancer at 1 in 8. Although breast cancer is a disease that affects mostly women, the lifetime risk in men is about 1 in 1000. Most cases of breast cancer are associated with somatic mutations in breast cells that are acquired during a person's lifetime. In this scenario, the mutations are not inherited and they do not cluster in families. In hereditary breast cancer, the specific genetic factors involved will determine the inherited cancer risk. Inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have been well-described, but mutations in ATM, CDH1, CHEK2, PALB2, PTEN, STK11, and TP53 also confer breast cancer risk. Understanding the functional significance of hereditary mutations has opened new paths for breast cancer prevention and is uncovering promising treatment strategies PMID:28706734

  7. MED12 exon 2 mutations in phyllodes tumors of the breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Satoi; Maeda, Ichiro; Fukuda, Takayo; Wu, Wenwen; Hayami, Ryosuke; Kojima, Yasuyuki; Tsugawa, Ko-ichiro; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    Exon 2 of MED12, a subunit of the transcriptional mediator complex, has been frequently mutated in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas; however, it has been rarely mutated in other tumors. Although the mutations were also found in uterine leiomyosarcomas, the frequency was significantly lower than in uterine leiomyomas. Here, we examined the MED12 mutation in phyllodes tumors, another biphasic tumor with epithelial and stromal components related to breast fibroadenomas. Mutations in MED12 exon 2 were analyzed in nine fibroadenomas and eleven phyllodes tumors via Sanger sequencing. A panel of cancer- and sarcoma-related genes was also analyzed using Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing. Six mutations in fibroadenomas, including those previously reported (6/9, 67%), and five mutations in phyllodes tumors (5/11, 45%) were observed. Three mutations in the phyllodes tumors were missense mutations at Gly44, which is common in uterine leiomyomas and breast fibroadenomas. In addition, two deletion mutations (in-frame c.133-144del12 and loss of splice acceptor c.100-68-137del106) were observed in the phyllodes tumors. No other recurrent mutation was observed with next-generation sequencing. Frequent mutations in MED12 exon 2 in the phyllodes tumors suggest that it may share genetic etiology with uterine leiomyoma, a subgroup of uterine leiomyosarcomas and breast fibroadenoma

  8. Recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Mexican women with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Royer, Robert; Llacuachaqui, Marcia; Akbari, Mohammad R.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Martínez-Matsushita, Louis; Angeles-Llerenas, Angélica; Ortega-Olvera, Carolina; Ziv, Elad; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Germline mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes confer an estimated 58–80% lifetime risk of breast cancer. In general, screening is done for cancer patients if a relative has been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. There are few data on the prevalence of mutations in these genes in Mexican women with breast cancer and this hampers efforts to develop screening policies in Mexico. Methods We screened 810 unselected women with breast cancer from three cities in Mexico (Mexico City, Veracruz and Monterrey) for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a panel of 26 previously reported mutations. Results Thirty-five mutations were identified in 34 women (4.3% of total) including 20 BRCA1 mutations and 15 BRCA2 mutations. Twenty-two of the 35 mutations were recurrent mutations (62.8%). Only five of the 34 mutation carriers had a first-degree relative with breast cancer (three with BRCA1 and two with BRCA2 mutations). Conclusion These results support the rationale for a strategy of screening for recurrent mutations in all women with breast cancer in Mexico, as opposed to restricting screening to those with a sister or mother with breast or ovarian cancer. Impact These results will impact cancer genetic testing in Mexico and the identification of at-risk individuals who will benefit from increased surveillance. PMID:25371446

  9. Novel SLC37A4 Mutations in Korean Patients With Glycogen Storage Disease Ib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung Doo; Ko, Jung Min; Lee, Jeongho; Lee, Dong Hwan; Hong, Suk Jin; Ki, Chang Seok; Lee, Soo Youn; Kim, Jong Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2017-05-01

    Molecular techniques are fundamental for establishing an accurate diagnosis and therapeutic approach of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs). We aimed to evaluate SLC37A4 mutation spectrum in Korean GSD Ib patients. Nine Korean patients from eight unrelated families with GSD Ib were included. SLC37A4 mutations were detected in all patients with direct sequencing using a PCR method and/or whole-exome sequencing. A comprehensive review of previously reported SLC37A4 mutations was also conducted. Nine different pathogenic SLC37A4 mutations were identified in the nine patients with GSD Ib. Among them, four novel mutations were identified: c.148G>A (pGly50Arg), c.320G>A (p.Trp107*), c.412T>C (p.Trp138Arg), and c.818G>A (p.Gly273Asp). The most common mutation type was missense mutations (66.7%, 6/9), followed by nonsense mutations (22.2%, 2/9) and small deletion mutations (11.1%, 1/9). The most common mutation identified in the Korean population was c.443C>T (p.Ala148Val), which comprised 39.9% (7/18) of all tested alleles. This mutation has not been reported in GSD Ib patients in other ethnic populations. This study expands knowledge of the SLC37A4 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD Ib. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine

  10. Mutations in POGLUT1, Encoding Protein O-Glucosyltransferase 1, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Dowling-Degos Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Basmanav, F. Buket; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Pasternack, Sandra M.; Thiele, Holger; Fritz, Günter; Wenzel, Jörg; Größer, Leopold; Wehner, Maria; Wolf, Sabrina; Fagerberg, Christina; Bygum, Anette; Altmüller, Janine; Rütten, Arno; Parmentier, Laurent; El Shabrawi-Caelen, Laila

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by progressive and disfiguring reticulate hyperpigmentation. We previously identified loss-of-function mutations in KRT5 but were only able to detect pathogenic mutations in fewer than half of our subjects. To identify additional causes of DDD, we performed exome sequencing in five unrelated affected individuals without mutations in KRT5. Data analysis identified three heterozygous mutations from these individua...

  11. Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) analysis of point mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, S

    2001-05-01

    The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base changes or small deletions. ARMS is based on the use of sequence-specific PCR primers that allow amplification of test DNA only when the target allele is contained within the sample. Following an ARMS reaction the presence or absence of a PCR product is diagnostic for the presence or absence of the target allele. The protocols detailed here outline methods that can be used to analyze human genomic DNA for one or more mutations. The Basic Protocol describes the development and application of an ARMS test for a single mutation; the Alternate Protocol extends this to multiplex ARMS for the analysis of two or more mutations. The Support Protocol describes a rapid DNA extraction method from blood or mouthwash samples that yields DNA compatible with the type of tests described. The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base change The amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) is a simple method for detecting any mutation involving single base change.

  12. Quality of life, fatigue and mental health in patients with the m.3243A > G mutation and its correlates with genetic characteristics and disease manifestation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, Christianne; de Laat, Paul; Koene, Saskia; Tibosch, Marijke; Rodenburg, Richard; de Groot, Imelda; Knoop, Hans; Janssen, Mirian; Smeitink, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial disorders belong to the most prevalent inherited metabolic diseases with the m.3243A > G mutation reflecting being one of the most common mutations in mitochondrial DNA. Previous studies showed little relationship between mitochondrial genetics and disease manifestation.

  13. Cornelia de Lange individuals with new and recurrent SMC1A mutations enhance delineation of mutation repertoire and phenotypic spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasini, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Cereda, Anna; Parenti, Ilaria; Masciadri, Maura; Azzollini, Jacopo; Melis, Daniela; Aravena, Teresa; Doray, Bérénice; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Garavelli, Livia; Selicorni, Angelo; Larizza, Lidia

    2013-11-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of eight patients, one male and seven females, with clinical diagnosis of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), who were found to carry distinct mutations of the SMC1A gene. Five of the eight mutations are novel, with two involving amino acid residues previously described as altered in a different way. The other three have been reported each in a single case. Comparison of pairs of individuals with the same mutation indicates only partial overlap of their clinical phenotypes. The following novel missense mutations, all affecting highly conserved amino acid residues, were found: p.R398G in the N-terminal coiled-coil domain, p.V651M in the C-terminal coiled-coil/hinge junction, p.R693G in the C-terminal coiled-coil, and p.N1166T and p.L1189F in the C-terminal ABC cassette. The latter is localized in the H-loop, and represents the first mutation involving a functional motif of SMC1A protein. The effect of the mutations on SMC1A protein function has been predicted using four bioinformatic tools. All mutations except p.V651M were scored as pathogenic by three or four of the tools. p.V651M was found in the only male individual of our cohort, who presented with the most severe phenotype. This raises the issue of gender effect when addressing mutation-phenotype correlation for genes such as SMC1A, which incompletely escapes X-inactivation. Our clinical and molecular findings expand the total number of characterized SMC1A-mutated patients (from 44 to 52) and the restricted repertoire of SMC1A mutations (from 29 to 34), contributing to the molecular and clinical signature of SMC1A-based CdLS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mutational analysis of EGFR and related signaling pathway genes in lung adenocarcinomas identifies a novel somatic kinase domain mutation in FGFR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer L Marks

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Fifty percent of lung adenocarcinomas harbor somatic mutations in six genes that encode proteins in the EGFR signaling pathway, i.e., EGFR, HER2/ERBB2, HER4/ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, and KRAS. We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this signaling pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis.We analyzed genomic DNA from a total of 261 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. The coding sequences of 39 genes were screened for somatic mutations via high-throughput dideoxynucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified gene products. Mutations were considered to be somatic only if they were found in an independent tumor-derived PCR product but not in matched normal tissue. Sequencing of 9MB of tumor sequence identified 239 putative genetic variants. We further examined 22 variants found in RAS family genes and 135 variants localized to exons encoding the kinase domain of respective proteins. We identified a total of 37 non-synonymous somatic mutations; 36 were found collectively in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. One somatic mutation was a previously unreported mutation in the kinase domain (exon 16 of FGFR4 (Glu681Lys, identified in 1 of 158 tumors. The FGFR4 mutation is analogous to a reported tumor-specific somatic mutation in ERBB2 and is located in the same exon as a previously reported kinase domain mutation in FGFR4 (Pro712Thr in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line.This study is one of the first comprehensive mutational analyses of major genes in a specific signaling pathway in a sizeable cohort of lung adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest the majority of gain-of-function mutations within kinase genes in the EGFR signaling pathway have already been identified. Our findings also implicate FGFR4 in the pathogenesis of a subset of lung adenocarcinomas.

  15. Acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin and tilmicosin by Mycoplasma bovis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Uri; Amram, Eytan; Ayling, Roger D; Mikula, Inna; Gerchman, Irena; Harrus, Shimon; Teff, Dina; Yogev, David; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2014-01-31

    The molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides tylosin (Ty) and tilmicosin (Tm) was investigated in Mycoplasma bovis field isolates. Sequence analysis of domains II and V of the two 23S rRNA alleles and ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 was performed on 54 M. bovis isolates showing different minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The presence of any one of the point mutations G748A, C752T, A2058G, A2059G or A2059C (Escherichia coli numbering) in one or both alleles of the 23S rRNAs was correlated with decreased susceptibility to Ty (8-1024 μg/ml) and to Tm (32 to >256 μg/ml) in 27/27 and 27/31 M. bovis isolates, respectively. Although a single mutation in domain II or V could be sufficient to cause decreased susceptibility to Ty, our data imply that a combination of mutations in two domains is necessary to achieve higher MICs (≥ 128 μg/ml). The influence of a combination of mutations in two domains II and V on enhancement of resistance to Tm was less clear. In addition, the amino acid (aa) substitution L22-Q90H was found in 24/32 representative M. bovis isolates with different MICs, but no correlation with decreased susceptibility to Ty or Tm was identified. Multiple aa substitutions were also identified in the L4 protein, including at positions 185-186 (positions 64 and 65 in E. coli) which are adjacent to the macrolide-binding site. This is the first description of the molecular mechanism of acquired resistance to the 16-membered macrolides in M. bovis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Induced mutations in citrus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel-Roy, P.; Vardi, Aliza

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Parthenocarpic tendency is an important prerequisite for successful induction of seedlessness in breeding and especially in mutation breeding. A gene for asynapsis and accompanying seedless fruit has been found by us in inbred progeny of cv. 'Wilking'. Using budwood irradiation by gamma rays, seedless mutants of 'Eureka' and 'Villafranca' lemon (original clone of the latter has 25 seeds) and 'Minneola' tangelo have been obtained. Ovule sterility of the three mutants is nearly complete, with some pollen fertility still remaining. A semi-compact mutant of Shamouti orange has been obtained by irradiation. A programme for inducing seedlessness in easy peeling citrus varieties and selections has been initiated. (author)

  17. Convergent Akt activation drives acquired EGFR inhibitor resistance in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Molina, Miguel Angel

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations typically benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. However, virtually all patients succumb to acquired EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance that occurs via diverse mechanisms....... The diversity and unpredictability of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mechanisms presents a challenge for developing new treatments to overcome EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance. Here, we show that Akt activation is a convergent feature of acquired EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance......, across a spectrum of diverse, established upstream resistance mechanisms. Combined treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and Akt inhibitor causes apoptosis and synergistic growth inhibition in multiple EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer models. Moreover...

  18. Recurrent KIF2A mutations are responsible for classic lissencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallin, Mara; Bijlsma, Emilia K; El Morjani, Adrienne; Moutton, Sébastien; Peeters, Els A J; Maillard, Camille; Pedespan, Jean Michel; Guerrot, Anne-Marie; Drouin-Garaud, Valérie; Coubes, Christine; Genevieve, David; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Fourrage, Cecile; Steffann, Julie; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia

    2017-04-01

    Kinesins play a critical role in the organization and dynamics of the microtubule cytoskeleton, making them central players in neuronal proliferation, neuronal migration, and postmigrational development. Recently, KIF2A mutations were identified in cortical malformation syndromes associated with microcephaly. Here, we detected two de novo p.Ser317Asn and p.His321Pro mutations in KIF2A in two patients with lissencephaly and microcephaly. In parallel, we re-evaluated the two previously reported cases showing de novo mutations of the same residues. The identification of mutations only in the residues Ser317 and His321 suggests these are hotspots for de novo mutations. Both mutations lead to a classic form of lissencephaly, with a posterior to anterior gradient, almost indistinguishable from LIS1-related lissencephaly. However, three fourths of patients also showed variable congenital and postnatal microcephaly, up to -5 SD. Located in the motor domain of the KIF2A protein, the Ser317 and His321 alterations are expected to disrupt binding or hydrolysis of ATP and consequently the MT depolymerizing activity. This report also establishes that KIF2A mutations represent significant causes of classic lissencephaly with microcephaly.

  19. Variation in RNA virus mutation rates across host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Combe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that RNA viruses exhibit higher rates of spontaneous mutation than DNA viruses and microorganisms. However, their mutation rates vary amply, from 10(-6 to 10(-4 substitutions per nucleotide per round of copying (s/n/r and the causes of this variability remain poorly understood. In addition to differences in intrinsic fidelity or error correction capability, viral mutation rates may be dependent on host factors. Here, we assessed the effect of the cellular environment on the rate of spontaneous mutation of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, which has a broad host range and cell tropism. Luria-Delbrück fluctuation tests and sequencing showed that VSV mutated similarly in baby hamster kidney, murine embryonic fibroblasts, colon cancer, and neuroblastoma cells (approx. 10(-5 s/n/r. Cell immortalization through p53 inactivation and oxygen levels (1-21% did not have a significant impact on viral replication fidelity. This shows that previously published mutation rates can be considered reliable despite being based on a narrow and artificial set of laboratory conditions. Interestingly, we also found that VSV mutated approximately four times more slowly in various insect cells compared with mammalian cells. This may contribute to explaining the relatively slow evolution of VSV and other arthropod-borne viruses in nature.

  20. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This newsletter contains brief articles on the use of radiation to induce mutations in plants; radiation-induced mutants in Chrysanthemum; disrupting the association between oil and protein content in soybean seeds; mutation studies on bougainvillea; a new pepper cultivar; and the use of mutation induction to improve the quality of yam beans. A short review of the seminar on the use of mutation and related biotechnology for crop improvement in the Middle East and Mediterranean regions, and a description of a Co-ordinated Research Programme on the application of DNA-based marker mutations for the improvement of cereals and other sexually reproduced crop species are also included. Two tables are given: these are based on the ''FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database'' and show the number of mutated varieties and the number of officially released mutant varieties in particular crops/species. Refs and tabs

  1. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  2. Determining optimal treatment strategy for diffuse glioma: the emerging role of IDH mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Tareq A; Cahill, Daniel P; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2015-06-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes mutate frequently in gliomas, and it has become increasingly apparent that IDH mutation status accounts for much of the prognostic information previously rendered by histological grading. Most glioblastomas (90-95%) are IDH wild-type and most lower-grade diffuse gliomas (80%) are IDH-mutant. We examine here how IDH mutation status interacts with treatments known to influence survival (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) in patients with gliomas, and the impact of the IDH mutations on patients' survival after such treatments. IDH mutations is associated with more complete surgical resection of enhancing disease, and with a better response to RT. In addition, there is increasing clinical evidence that, in certain contexts, IDH mutations predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Mutations in IDH and other genes are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for diffuse gliomas and will likely allow tailoring of treatment by molecular profile in the future.

  3. Disease-associated mutations prevent GPR56-collagen III interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Luo

    Full Text Available GPR56 is a member of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Mutations in GPR56 cause a devastating human brain malformation called bilateral frontoparietal polymicrogyria (BFPP. Using the N-terminal fragment of GPR56 (GPR56(N as a probe, we have recently demonstrated that collagen III is the ligand of GPR56 in the developing brain. In this report, we discover a new functional domain in GPR56(N, the ligand binding domain. This domain contains four disease-associated mutations and two N-glycosylation sites. Our study reveals that although glycosylation is not required for ligand binding, each of the four disease-associated mutations completely abolish the ligand binding ability of GPR56. Our data indicates that these four single missense mutations cause BFPP mostly by abolishing the ability of GPR56 to bind to its ligand, collagen III, in addition to affecting GPR56 protein surface expression as previously shown.

  4. Common filaggrin gene mutations and risk of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Peter; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Sørensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As carriers of filaggrin gene (FLG) mutations may have a compromised cervical mucosal barrier against human papillomavirus infection, our primary objective was to study their risk of cervical cancer. METHODS: We genotyped 586 cervical cancer patients for the two most common FLG...... mutations, R501X and 2282del4, using blood from the Copenhagen Hospital Biobank, Denmark. Controls (n = 8050) were genotyped in previous population-based studies. Information on cervical cancer, mortality and emigration were obtained from national registers. Odds ratios (OR) were estimated by logistic...... and stratification by cancer stage. RESULTS: The primary results showed that FLG mutations were not associated with the risk of cervical cancer (6.3% of cases and 7.7% of controls were carriers; OR adjusted 0.81, 95% CI 0.57-1.14; OR adjusted+ weighted 0.96, 95% CI 0.58-1.57). Among cases, FLG mutations increased...

  5. Mutation breeding in mangosteen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Khalid Mohd Zain

    2002-01-01

    Mangosteen the queen of the tropical fruits is apomitic and only a cultivar is reported and it reproduces asexually. Conventional breeding is not possible and the other methods to create variabilities are through genetic engineering and mutation breeding. The former technique is still in the infantry stage in mangosteen research while the latter has been an established tool in breeding to improve cultivars. In this mutation breeding seeds of mangosteen were irradiated using gamma rays and the LD 50 for mangosteen was determined and noted to be very low at 10 Gy. After sowing in the seedbed, the seedlings were transplanted in polybags and observed in the nursery bed for about one year before planted in the field under old oil palm trees in Station MARDI, Kluang. After evaluation and screening, about 120 mutant mangosteen plants were selected and planted in Kluang. The plants were observed and some growth data taken. There were some mutant plants that have good growth vigour and more vigorous that the control plants. The trial are now in the fourth year and the plants are still in the juvenile stage. (Author)

  6. Mutation breeding in chickpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagel, Z.; Tutluer, M. I.; Peskircioglu, H.; Kantoglu, Y.; Kunter, B.

    2009-01-01

    Chickpea is an important food legume in Turkey. Turkey is one of the most important gene centers in the world for legumes. Realizing the potential of induced mutations, a mutation breeding programme was initiated at the Nuclear Agriculture Section of the Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center in 1994. The purpose of the study was to obtain high yielding chickpea mutants with large seeds, good cooking quality and high protein content. Beside this some characters such as higher adaptation ability, tolerant to cold and drought, increased machinery harvest type, higher yield, resistant to diseases especially to antracnose and pest were investigated too. Parent varieties were ILC-482, AK-7114 and AKCIN-91 had been used in these experiments. The irradiation doses were 0 (control), 50, 100, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350 and 400 Gy for field experiments, respectively. As a result of these experiments, two promising mutant lines were chosen and given to the Seed Registration and Certification Center for official registration These two promising mutants were tested at five different locations of Turkey, in 2004 and 2005 years. After 2 years of registration experiments one of outstanding mutants was officially released as mutant chickpea variety under the name TAEK-SAGEL, in 2006. Some basic characteristics of this mutant are; earliness (95-100 day), high yield capacity (180-220 kg/da), high seed protein (22-25 %), first pot height (20-25 cm), 100 seeds weight (42-48 g), cooking time (35-40 min) and resistance to Ascochyta blight.

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 43

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter includes articles dealing with radiation induced mutation based plant breeding research findings aimed at improving productivity, disease resistance and tolerance of stress conditions

  8. The BRCA1-Δ11q Alternative Splice Isoform Bypasses Germline Mutations and Promotes Therapeutic Resistance to PARP Inhibition and Cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yifan; Bernhardy, Andrea J; Cruz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Breast and ovarian cancer patients harboring BRCA1/2 germline mutations have clinically benefitted from therapy with PARP inhibitor (PARPi) or platinum compounds, but acquired resistance limits clinical impact. In this study, we investigated the impact of mutations on BRCA1 isoform expression and...

  9. [Acquired ichthyosis and haematological malignancies: five cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrady, R; Baybay, H; Khammar, Z; Lahlou, M; Lamchachti, L; Gallouj, S; El Hatimi, A; Mernissi, F-Z; Bono, W

    2012-01-01

    Acquired ichthyosis is a rare condition that can reveal an unsuspected haematological malignancy, thus allowing early diagnosis and management. If ichthyosis regresses under treatment for the haematological disorder, its recurrence reflects a turning point in the course of the disease and implies worsening of the prognosis. The patients were examined at a joint dermatology/haematology consultation. The diagnosis of ichthyosis was based on clinical examination alone with no patients undergoing skin biopsy. Our series included three men and two women aged 38 to 65 years consulting for a variety of reasons including asthenia, anaemia and adenopathy. Ichthyosis occurred 2 to 9 months after the initial symptoms of the blood disease. Lesions consisted of diffuse brown scales. The disease was associated with lymphadenopathy and biological inflammatory syndrome. Two patients were presenting non-Hodgkin lymphoma, one had Hodgkin's disease, one had chronic myeloid leukaemia in progression and one had an undifferentiated lymphomatous process. Treatment was based on chemotherapy and emollients. The ichthyosis progressed in step with the underlying malignancy in all cases, with regression being complete in three cases, partial in one case and absent in one case. In rare cases, acquired ichthyosis reveals systemic disease, and may be of infectious, endocrine or drug origin; it may also be idiopathic. However, it is most often a paraneoplastic syndrome with cutaneous expression encountered during haematological malignancies. Because of the variety of causative blood dyscrasias, ichthyosis cannot be used to guide their diagnosis, although it remains a reliable monitoring tool. Acquired ichthyosis should prompt the clinician to search for a neoplastic condition, primarily a haematological disorder, guided by other associated signs, given that in our study, skin lesions generally appear to precede signs of the blood disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Sigmoid plate dehiscence: Congenital or acquired condition?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhaohui, E-mail: lzhtrhos@163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, No 1 Dong Jiao Min Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: lijingxbh@yahoo.com.cn [Capital Medical University, Beijing Tongren Hospital, No 1 Dong Jiao Min Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhao, Pengfei, E-mail: zhaopengf05@163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Lv, Han, E-mail: chrislvhan@126.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Dong, Cheng, E-mail: derc007@sina.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China); Liu, Wenjuan, E-mail: wenjuanliu@163.com [Jining No. 1 People' s Hospital, No. 6 Health Street, Jining 272100 (China); Wang, Zhenchang, E-mail: cjr.wzhch@vip.163.com [Capital Medical University, Beijing Friendship Hospital, No 95 Yongan Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • CT with multiplanar reformations can accurately display the sigmoid platet dehiscence. • The prevalence of sigmoid plate dehiscence was no significant difference among different age groups. • The size of sigmoid plate bony defects were not statistically different among different age groups. • The sigmoid plate dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition. - Abstract: Background and purpose: The imaging features of sigmoid plate dehiscence-induced pulsatile tinnitus have been presented. The origin of the sigmoid plate dehiscence, however, remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence on computed tomography (CT) images in multiple age groups to determine whether this condition is more likely to be congenital or acquired. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of sigmoid plates of temporal bones in 504 patients. Each temporal bone was characterized as normal or dehiscent. Patients were then subcategorized into four age groups, and the prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates in each group were calculated and compared. Results: Overall, 80 patients had sigmoid plate dehiscence, nine of whom had it bilaterally. In successively older age groups, the prevalences of sigmoid plate dehiscence were 18.9%, 20.1%, 14.5%, and 12.7%, respectively. Respective average anteroposterior bony defect diameters were 3.7 ± 1.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm. Respective average vertical bony defect diameters were 3.6 ± 2.3, 2.6 ± 1.2, 3.2 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.7 mm. The prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence were not statistically different among the four age groups. Conclusions: The similar radiologic prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates among the age groups suggest that the dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition.

  11. Sigmoid plate dehiscence: Congenital or acquired condition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Li, Jing; Zhao, Pengfei; Lv, Han; Dong, Cheng; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhenchang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • CT with multiplanar reformations can accurately display the sigmoid platet dehiscence. • The prevalence of sigmoid plate dehiscence was no significant difference among different age groups. • The size of sigmoid plate bony defects were not statistically different among different age groups. • The sigmoid plate dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition. - Abstract: Background and purpose: The imaging features of sigmoid plate dehiscence-induced pulsatile tinnitus have been presented. The origin of the sigmoid plate dehiscence, however, remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence on computed tomography (CT) images in multiple age groups to determine whether this condition is more likely to be congenital or acquired. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed contrast-enhanced CT images of sigmoid plates of temporal bones in 504 patients. Each temporal bone was characterized as normal or dehiscent. Patients were then subcategorized into four age groups, and the prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates in each group were calculated and compared. Results: Overall, 80 patients had sigmoid plate dehiscence, nine of whom had it bilaterally. In successively older age groups, the prevalences of sigmoid plate dehiscence were 18.9%, 20.1%, 14.5%, and 12.7%, respectively. Respective average anteroposterior bony defect diameters were 3.7 ± 1.7, 3.0 ± 1.3, 3.1 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.1 mm. Respective average vertical bony defect diameters were 3.6 ± 2.3, 2.6 ± 1.2, 3.2 ± 1.5, and 3.0 ± 1.7 mm. The prevalence and extent of sigmoid plate dehiscence were not statistically different among the four age groups. Conclusions: The similar radiologic prevalence and extent of dehiscent sigmoid plates among the age groups suggest that the dehiscence is more commonly a congenital than an acquired condition

  12. Functionality predictors in acquired brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas Hoyas, E; Pedrero Pérez, E J; Águila Maturana, A M; García López-Alberca, S; González Alted, C

    2015-01-01

    Most individuals who have survived an acquired brain injury present consequences affecting the sensorimotor, cognitive, affective or behavioural components. These deficits affect the proper performance of daily living activities. The aim of this study is to identify functional differences between individuals with unilateral acquired brain injury using functional independence, capacity, and performance of daily activities. Descriptive cross-sectional design with a sample of 58 people, with right-sided injury (n=14 TBI; n=15 stroke) or left-sided injury (n = 14 TBI, n = 15 stroke), right handed, and with a mean age of 47 years and time since onset of 4 ± 3.65 years. The functional assessment/functional independence measure (FIM/FAM) and the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) were used for the study. The data showed significant differences (P<.000), and a large size effect (dr=0.78) in the cross-sectional estimates, and point to fewer restrictions for patients with a lesion on their right side. The major differences were in the variables 'speaking' and 'receiving spoken messages' (ICF variables), and 'Expression', 'Writing' and 'intelligible speech' (FIM/FAM variables). In the linear regression analysis, the results showed that only 4 FIM/FAM variables, taken together, predict 44% of the ICF variance, which measures the ability of the individual, and up to 52% of the ICF, which measures the individual's performance. Gait alone predicts a 28% of the variance. It seems that individuals with acquired brain injury in the left hemisphere display important differences regarding functional and communication variables. The motor aspects are an important prognostic factor in functional rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Anthracyclines and Acquired Long QT Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodríguez Armada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquired long QT syndrome results from secondary causes and can be caused by more than 100 non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Cardiac arrest due to Torsades de pointes induced by drugs causing prolonged QT syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal event, even in hospitals. The case of a 47-year-old patient diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma admitted to the hematology department of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos is presented. The patient had been previously treated with anthracyclines and developed episodes of palpitations and syncope later. The treatment included monitoring the patient, avoiding other QT prolonging agents and administrating magnesium sulfate and potassium chloride with a proper maintenance of the fluid and acid-base balance. The presentation of this case aims at motivating interest in new reports on the subject and establishing a direct causal relationship through the evidence provided by new experiences.

  14. Acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a dog with leptospirosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A 5 year old male neutered Cairn Terrier was evaluated for signs of polyuria and polydipsia. Initial hematology and chemistry panels were unremarkable and urinalysis showed a persistent hyposthenuria. Eleven days later, the dog became lethargic, inappetent and had developed acute renal failure. The dog was ultimately euthanized due to a poor response to treatment. Microscopic agglutination titres were consistent with a diagnosis of leptospirosis. The initial hyposthenuria in this case was consistent with acquired nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. This is an uncommon presentation of leptospirosis that has not previously been described to progress to acute renal failure. Leptospirosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in any dog presenting with polyuria and polydipsia and these patients should be treated as a zoonotic risk. PMID:24739820

  15. Syntactic versus Lexical Therapy for Anomia in Acquired Aphasia: Differential Effects on Narrative and Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Ruth; Gregory, Emma; Best, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies of therapy for acquired anomia have treated nouns in isolation. The effect on nouns in connected speech remains unclear. In a recent study in 2012, we used a novel noun syntax therapy and found an increase in the number of determiner plus noun constructions in narrative after therapy. Aims: Two aims arose from the…

  16. Role of Atypical Bacteria in Hospitalized Patients With Nursing Home-Acquired Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Junco, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) has been identified as one of the leading causes of mortality and hospitalization for long-term care residents. However, current and previous pneumonia guidelines differ on the appropriate management of NHAP in hospitalized patients, specifically in regard to the role of atypical bacteria such as Chlamydiae pneumonia, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella.

  17. Acquired generalised neuromyotonia, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and alopecia areata in a patient with myasthenia gravis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S S

    2012-02-03

    We describe a patient with the diagnoses of acquired neuromyotonia, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and alopecia areata, occurring many years after a thymectomy for myasthenia gravis associated with a thymoma. We review the current literature on autoimmune conditions associated with myasthenia gravis and thymectomy. To our knowledge, this combination of multiple autoimmune conditions has not been reported previously.

  18. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hypopigmentary disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha B Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired hypopigmentary disorders comprise a significant group of disorders that affect Indians and Asians. The pigment disturbance in darker skin individuals can be very distressing to the patient and the family. These disorders cover a wide array of pathologies including infections, autoimmune processes, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sclerosing diseases. Histological diagnosis is particularly important because treatments for these diseases are varied and specific. This review will focus on histopathological diagnosis based on clinicopathological correlation for commonly encountered disorders such as leprosy, vitiligo, lichen sclerosus, pityriasis alba (PA, and pityriasis versicolor (PV. Atypical or uncommon clinical presentation of classic diseases such as hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF and hypopigmented sarcoidosis are also included.

  19. Acanthamoeba endophthalmitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffler, K F; Eckhardt, T J; Reboli, A C; Stieritz, D

    1996-10-01

    To report the findings of Acanthamoeba endophthalmitis in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). A 35-year-old man with AIDS and Acanthamoeba infection of the skin and lungs was treated for a granulomatous uveitis in the left eye. The left eye developed mutton-fat keratic precipitates, iris granulomas, cataract, hypotony, and choroidal infiltrates. Aqueous and vitreous specimens were positive for Acanthamoeba cysts. Topical and systemic antiamebic medications decreased the inflammation but failed to control the infection. Acanthamoeba infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of uveitis in patients with AIDS.

  20. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome manifested as disseminated cryptococcosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, G; Seger, D

    1985-01-01

    A 32-year-old male homosexual presented to the emergency department (ED) with the clinical picture of a nonspecific illness. While in the ED, he experienced a first-time seizure. Computed tomography (CT) showed an enhancing mass lesion. Antibacterial therapy was started and continued until a second lumbar puncture (LP), 36 hours after admission, showed distinct yeast forms. Subsequent institution of appropriate therapy did not prevent the patient's death. The cause of death was disseminated cryptococcosis secondary to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  1. Origins of species: acquired genomes and individuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.

    1993-01-01

    Entire genomes with their accompanying protein synthetic systems are transferred throughout the biosphere primarily as bacteria and protists which become symbionts as they irreversibly integrate into pre-existing organisms to form more complex individuals. Individualization is stabilized by simultaneous transmission of once-separate heterologous genetic systems. The origin of new species is hypothesized to correlate with the acquisition, integration and subsequent inheritance of such acquired microbial genomes. These processes were recognized by Mereschkovsky ("Symbiogenesis" in Russian, 1909) and by Wallin ("Symbionticism", see p. 181, this issue).

  2. Clinicopathological correlation of acquired hypopigmentary disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anisha B; Kubba, Raj; Kubba, Asha

    2013-01-01

    Acquired hypopigmentary disorders comprise a significant group of disorders that affect Indians and Asians. The pigment disturbance in darker skin individuals can be very distressing to the patient and the family. These disorders cover a wide array of pathologies including infections, autoimmune processes, lymphoproliferative disorders, and sclerosing diseases. Histological diagnosis is particularly important because treatments for these diseases are varied and specific. This review will focus on histopathological diagnosis based on clinicopathological correlation for commonly encountered disorders such as leprosy, vitiligo, lichen sclerosus, pityriasis alba (PA), and pityriasis versicolor (PV). Atypical or uncommon clinical presentation of classic diseases such as hypopigmented mycosis fungoides (HMF) and hypopigmented sarcoidosis are also included.

  3. Cerebral involvement in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Juergens, R.; Steinbrich, W.; Diederich, N.; Koeln Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is usually due to opportunistic infections; these frequently offer a difficult differential diagnostic problem. Imaging methods play an important part in the elucidation of symptoms. CT and MR findings were analysed in 13 patients with AIDS and neurological symptoms. Some infections of the central nervous system (encephalitis of unknown aetiology, cytomegalic encephalitis, meningitis) may show cerebral atrophy or even no morphological changes. Toxoplasmosis and PML are the most common opportunistic infections typical changes on CT and MR may lead to diagnosis. MR offers advantages compared with CT in its higher sensitivity for the demonstration even of small lesions. (orig.) [de

  4. Psychological issues in acquired facial trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sousa Avinash

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The face is a vital component of one′s personality and body image. There are a vast number of variables that influence recovery and rehabilitation from acquired facial trauma many of which are psychological in nature. The present paper presents the various psychological issues one comes across in facial trauma patients. These may range from body image issues to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms accompanied by anxiety and depression. Issues related to facial and body image affecting social life and general quality of life are vital and the plastic surgeon should be aware of such issues and competent to deal with them in patients and families.

  5. Acquired apraxia of speech: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knollman-Porter, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is an acquired adult neurogenic communication disorder that often occurs following stroke. The purpose of this article is to review current research studies addressing the diagnostic and therapeutic management of AOS. Traditional definitions and characteristics are compared with current features that assist in the differential diagnosis of AOS. Prognostic indicators are reviewed in addition to how neuroplasticity may impact treatment in chronic AOS. Treatment techniques discussed include the articulatory kinematic approach (AKA), use of augmentative/alternative communication devices, intersystemic facilitation/reorganization, and constraint-induced therapy. Finally, the need to address functional communication through support groups, outside the therapeutic environment, is discussed.

  6. Prevention of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunøe, Mathilde; Overgaard-Steensen, C

    2015-01-01

    . In the hospitalised patient, non-osmotic antidiuretic hormone secretion is frequent and results in a reduced renal electrolyte-free water clearance (EFWC). This condition puts the patient at risk of hyponatraemia upon infusion of fluids that are hypotonic such as 5% glucose, Darrow-glucose, NaKglucose and 0.45% Na...... like Ringer-acetate/Ringer-lactate can increase the intracranial pressure dramatically. Consequently, 0.9 % NaCl is recommended as first-line fluid for such patients. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of hospital-acquired hyponatraemia may be reduced by prescribing fluids, type and amount, with the same...

  7. [Iris heterochromia in acquired Horner's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beynat, J; Soichot, P; Bidot, S; Dugas, B; Creuzot-Garcher, C; Bron, A

    2007-09-01

    Horner's syndrome (HS) is related to an interruption of the oculosympathetic nerve pathway. The classic clinical findings associated with this condition are ptosis, miosis, and enophthalmos. Heterochromia is typically described in congenital HS, but it is an uncommon finding in acquired HS. We report a case of post-traumatic HS associated with heterochromia. A literature review indicates that this type of heterochromia may be related to a reduction in the number of iris melanocytes. This mechanism may be the same in the physiological iris color modifications in adulthood.

  8. Acquired CNS lesions in fetal MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Pogledic, I.

    2013-01-01

    Acquired central nervous system (CNS) lesions are often subtle; therefore, the prenatal diagnosis of these lesions is extremely important. The fetal ultrasound examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are two important imaging methods that give an insight into these types lesions. The method of choice during pregnancy is still fetal ultrasound; however, fetal MRI is important when there are certain pathologies, e.g. periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) or malformations of the vein of Galen. In this manner clinicians can plan further therapy after childbirth in advance (e.g. cerebral angiography or embolization). (orig.) [de

  9. A BRCA2 mutation incorrectly mapped in the original BRCA2 reference sequence, is a common West Danish founder mutation disrupting mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Vogel, Ida

    2011-01-01

    Inherited mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose carriers to breast and ovarian cancer. The authors have identified a mutation in BRCA2, 7845+1G>A (c.7617+1G>A), not previously regarded as deleterious because of incorrect mapping of the splice junction in the originally...... published genomic reference sequence. This reference sequence is generally used in many laboratories and it maps the mutation 16 base pairs inside intron 15. However, according to the recent reference sequences the mutation is located in the consensus donor splice sequence. By reverse transcriptase analysis......, loss of exon 15 in the final transcript interrupting the open reading frame was demonstrated. Furthermore, the mutation segregates with a cancer phenotype in 18 Danish families. By genetic analysis of more than 3,500 Danish breast/ovarian cancer risk families, the mutation was identified as the most...

  10. Neural Basis of Acquired Amusia and Its Recovery after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihvonen, Aleksi J; Ripollés, Pablo; Leo, Vera; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Soinila, Seppo; Särkämö, Teppo

    2016-08-24

    Although acquired amusia is a relatively common disorder after stroke, its precise neuroanatomical basis is still unknown. To evaluate which brain regions form the neural substrate for acquired amusia and its recovery, we performed a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) and morphometry (VBM) study with 77 human stroke subjects. Structural MRIs were acquired at acute and 6 month poststroke stages. Amusia and aphasia were behaviorally assessed at acute and 3 month poststroke stages using the Scale and Rhythm subtests of the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and language tests. VLSM analyses indicated that amusia was associated with a lesion area comprising the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, insula, and striatum in the right hemisphere, clearly different from the lesion pattern associated with aphasia. Parametric analyses of MBEA Pitch and Rhythm scores showed extensive lesion overlap in the right striatum, as well as in the right Heschl's gyrus and superior temporal gyrus. Lesions associated with Rhythm scores extended more superiorly and posterolaterally. VBM analysis of volume changes from the acute to the 6 month stage showed a clear decrease in gray matter volume in the right superior and middle temporal gyri in nonrecovered amusic patients compared with nonamusic patients. This increased atrophy was more evident in anterior temporal areas in rhythm amusia and in posterior temporal and temporoparietal areas in pitch amusia. Overall, the results implicate right temporal and subcortical regions as the crucial neural substrate for acquired amusia and highlight the importance of different temporal lobe regions for the recovery of amusia after stroke. Lesion studies are essential in uncovering the brain regions causally linked to a given behavior or skill. For music perception ability, previous lesion studies of amusia have been methodologically limited in both spatial accuracy and time domain as well as by small sample sizes, providing

  11. Demographic and clinical data in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoebl, P; Marco, P; Baudo, F; Collins, P; Huth-Kühne, A; Nemes, L; Pellegrini, F; Tengborn, L; Lévesque, H

    2012-04-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease caused by autoantibodies against coagulation factor VIII and characterized by spontaneous hemorrhage in patients with no previous family or personal history of bleeding. Although data on several AHA cohorts have been collected, limited information is available on the optimal management of AHA. The European Acquired Hemophilia Registry (EACH2) was established to generate a prospective, large-scale, pan-European database on demographics, diagnosis, underlying disorders, bleeding characteristics, treatment and outcome of AHA patients. Five hundred and one (266 male, 235 female) patients from 117 centers and 13 European countries were included in the registry between 2003 and 2008. In 467 cases, hemostasis investigations and AHA diagnosis were triggered by a bleeding event. At diagnosis, patients were a median of 73.9 years. AHA was idiopathic in 51.9%; malignancy or autoimmune diseases were associated with 11.8% and 11.6% of cases. Fifty-seven per cent of the non-pregnancy-related cases were male. Four hundred and seventy-four bleeding episodes were reported at presentation, and hemostatic therapy initiated in 70.5% of patients. Delayed diagnosis significantly impacted treatment initiation in 33.5%. Four hundred and seventy-seven patients underwent immunosuppression, and 72.6% achieved complete remission. Representing the largest collection of consecutive AHA cases to date, EACH2 facilitates the analysis of a variety of open questions in AHA. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  12. Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes IDH1 and IDH2 in tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, Frank G.; French, Pim J.; Bovée, Judith V. M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Heterozygous hotspot mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH) IDH1 or IDH2 are frequently observed in specific types of cartilaginous tumors, gliomas, and leukemias. Mutant IDH enzyme loses its normal activity to convert isocitrate into α-ketoglutarate (αKG) and instead acquires the ability to

  13. A novel ABCD1 gene mutation in a Chinese-Taiwanese patient with adrenomyeloneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yo-Tsen; Lin, Kang-Hsu; Soong, Bing-Wen; Liao, Kwong-Kum; Lin, Kon-Ping

    2007-05-01

    The ABCD1 gene mutation (previously ALD) has been reported in China, but not previously in Taiwan. This case report describes one Taiwanese patient whose clinical manifestations were compatible with adrenomyeloneuropathy. Direct sequencing for the ABCD1 gene of this patient and his mother detected a novel missense mutation, K513Q, in exon 6, the first such detected in a Taiwanese patient. Previous studies have suggested exon 6 as a possible hot segment of ABCD1 gene mutations in Chinese populations; however, most of the mutations in exon 6 presented as childhood cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy. K513Q is also the first novel mutation located within exon 6 and presenting with adult-onset adrenomyeloneuropathy in Chinese-Taiwanese.

  14. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... mutation detection. Haplotype analysis with polymorphisms on both sides of the FH2 mutation indicated that the identical LDLR gene mutations found in two different South ... amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)" and single- .... point mutations that cause familial defective apolipoprotein. 8-100 ...

  15. Studies on mutation techniques in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    Synthetical techniques for improving rice mutation breeding efficiency were studied. The techniques consist of corresponding relationship between radiosensitivity and mutation frequency, choosing appropriate materials, combination of physical and chemical mutagens, mutagenic effects of the new mutagenic agents as proton, ions, synchronous irradiation and space mutation. These techniques and methods for inducing mutations are very valuable to increase inducing mutation efficiency and breeding level

  16. ERK2, but not ERK1, mediates acquired and "de novo" resistance to imatinib mesylate: implication for CML therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara I Aceves-Luquero

    Full Text Available Resistance to Imatinib Mesylate (IM is a major problem in Chronic Myelogenous Leukaemia management. Most of the studies about resistance have focused on point mutations on BCR/ABL. However, other types of resistance that do not imply mutations in BCR/ABL have been also described. In the present report we aim to study the role of several MAPK in IM resistance not associate to BCR/ABL mutations. Therefore we used an experimental system of resistant cell lines generated by co-culturing with IM (K562, Lama 84 as well as primary material from resistant and responder patient without BCR/ABL mutations. Here we demonstrate that Erk5 and p38MAPK signaling pathways are not implicated in the acquired resistance phenotype. However, Erk2, but not Erk1, is critical for the acquired resistance to IM. In fact, Bcr/Abl activates preferentially Erk2 in transient transfection in a dose dependent fashion through the c-Abl part of the chimeric protein. Finally, we present evidences demonstrating how constitutive activation of Erk2 is a de novo mechanism of resistance to IM. In summary our data support the use of therapeutic approaches based on Erk2 inhibition, which could be added to the therapeutic armamentarium to fight CML, especially when IM resistance develops secondary to Erk2 activation.

  17. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  18. Asian elephants acquire inaccessible food by blowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Kaori; Irie, Naoko; Hiraiwa-Hasegawa, Mariko; Kutsukake, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Many animals acquire otherwise inaccessible food with the aid of sticks and occasionally water. As an exception, some reports suggest that elephants manipulate breathing through their trunks to acquire inaccessible food. Here, we report on two female Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Kamine Zoo, Japan, who regularly blew to drive food within their reach. We experimentally investigated this behaviour by placing foods in inaccessible places. The elephants blew the food until it came within accessible range. Once the food was within range, the elephants were increasingly less likely to blow as the distance to the food became shorter. One subject manipulated her blowing duration based on food distance: longer when the food was distant. These results suggest that the elephants used their breath to achieve goals: that is, they used it not only to retrieve the food but also to fine-tune the food position for easy grasping. We also observed individual differences in the elephants' aptitude for this technique, which altered the efficiency of food acquisition. Thus, we added a new example of spontaneous behaviour for achieving a goal in animals. The use of breath to drive food is probably unique to elephants, with their dexterous trunks and familiarity with manipulating the act of blowing, which is commonly employed for self-comfort and acoustic communication.

  19. Active citizenship and acquired neurological communication difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Bennett, Amanda; Cairney, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    People with communication impairments may face barriers to civic participation, with resulting marginalisation of individuals who wish to be actively involved. The investigation aimed to explore the experience of civically engaged adults with acquired neurological communication difficulties. Six people with acquired neurological communication difficulties were interviewed. Discussion included the definition of active citizenship, their civic involvement, motivations, related barriers and facilitators. Qualitative analysis was undertaken, with data categorised, coded and examined for recurring themes. All participants were active in disability-related organisations and four undertook wider civic roles. Motivations included activity being out with the home and wanting to effect change for themselves and the populations they represented. Disability group meetings were more positive experiences than broader community activities, which were associated with fatigue and frustration, commonly resulting from communication difficulties and unmet support needs. All participants identified a need for professional and public educational about disability and communication and made recommendations on content, methods and priority groups. For these participants civic engagement had positive and negative dimensions. Speech and language therapists should promote reduction of the barriers that impede the active citizenship rights of people with communication support needs. Civic participation may be a relevant measure of outcome in communication impaired populations.

  20. [Acquired hemophilia A after an early abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wullen, B; Mühlhöfer, A; Luz, H; Zoller, W G

    2002-05-17

    A 30-year-old woman was referred to our clinic because she had developed recurrent spontaneous hematomas of both calves within the last 2 months. 6 months earlier the patient had developed an ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome after ovarian stimulation treatment and intrauterine insemination. Shortly afterwards a missed abortion (8 (th) week) had been diagnosed. A curettage was carried out. Routine coagulation tests confirmed a prolongation of aPTT to 90 s and a lupus anticoagulant. A high-titre factor VIII inhibitor (56 Bethesda units) was identified. Given these facts an acquired post-partum hemophilia was diagnosed. The patient was treated with prednisolone and immunoglobulins. The aPTT shortened to normal values. The factor VIII inhibitor and lupus anticoagulant disappeared. There were no further hematomas. The simultaneous occurrence of antibodies in an altered immune state such as pregnancy is well known. In our case, acquired factor VIII inhibitor was found after an early abortion. Treatment with steroids and immunoglobulines led to the disappearance of factor VIII inhibitor and lupus anticoagulant.

  1. Living with acquired dysarthria: the speaker's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Margaret; Miller, Nick

    2011-01-01

    To explore the speaker's experience of living with acquired chronic dysarthria. Ten people with dysarthria and progressive neurological illness and one person with dysarthria following stroke were interviewed in depth about their experience of living with dysarthria. They covered a range of ages, time post-onset and dysarthria severity levels. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using Framework Method of Analysis. Acquired dysarthria can negatively impact on speakers' lives. Findings here suggest that the experience of living with dysarthria is highly individual. There were some common perspectives. Six key themes emerged from interviews: 'dysarthria as only part of the picture', 'communication has changed', 'people treat me differently', 'dysarthria resulting in negative emotions', 'barriers to communication' and 'life is different now. The impact of co-existing physical disability and the need to consider dysarthria in context was emphasised by all participants. Findings re-emphasise the need to consider the individual experience in clinical practice. The findings provide direction for assessment and intervention in the area.

  2. Software for Acquiring Image Data for PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Cheung, H. M.; Kressler, Brian

    2003-01-01

    PIV Acquisition (PIVACQ) is a computer program for acquisition of data for particle-image velocimetry (PIV). In the PIV system for which PIVACQ was developed, small particles entrained in a flow are illuminated with a sheet of light from a pulsed laser. The illuminated region is monitored by a charge-coupled-device camera that operates in conjunction with a data-acquisition system that includes a frame grabber and a counter-timer board, both installed in a single computer. The camera operates in "frame-straddle" mode where a pair of images can be obtained closely spaced in time (on the order of microseconds). The frame grabber acquires image data from the camera and stores the data in the computer memory. The counter/timer board triggers the camera and synchronizes the pulsing of the laser with acquisition of data from the camera. PIVPROC coordinates all of these functions and provides a graphical user interface, through which the user can control the PIV data-acquisition system. PIVACQ enables the user to acquire a sequence of single-exposure images, display the images, process the images, and then save the images to the computer hard drive. PIVACQ works in conjunction with the PIVPROC program which processes the images of particles into the velocity field in the illuminated plane.

  3. Investigation of CYP21A2 mutations in Turkish patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and a novel founder mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Bayram; Ökten, Ayşenur; Kalay, Ersan; Karagüzel, Gülay; Dinçer, Tuba; Açıkgöz, Emel Gül; Karagüzel, Ahmet

    2013-01-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by impaired production of adrenal steroids. Approximately 95% of all CAH are caused by mutations of the CYP21A2 that encodes 21-hydroxylase. In this study, mutation analyses of CYP21A2 were performed in 48 CAH patients from 45 Turkish families with the clinical diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). While in 39 (86.7%) of 21OHD patients, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were identified in both alleles, in two 21OHD patients CYP21A2 mutations were identified only in one allele. In four patients, mutation was not detected at all. In total, seventeen known and one novel, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were observed. Among identified mutations, previously described c.293-13C/A>G, large rearrangements and p.Q319X mutations were the most common mutations accounting for 33.3%, 14.4% and 12.2% of all evaluated chromosomes, respectively. In six families (13.3%) a novel founder mutation, c.2T>C (p.M1?), inactivating the translation initiation codon was found. This mutation is not present in pseudogene CYP21A1P and causes the classical form of the disease in six patients. In addition, depending on the nature of the rearrangements CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras were further classified as CH(c/d), and CH-1(c) was shown to be the most prominent chimera in our study group. In conclusion, with this study we identified a novel founder CYP21A2 mutation and suggest a further classification for CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras depending on the combination of junction site position and whether it is occurred as a result of deletion or conversion. Absence of disease causing mutation of CYP21A2 in ten of screened ninety chromosomes suggests the contribution of regulatory elements in occurrences of CAH due to the 21OHD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Venous thrombosis with both heterozygous factor V Leiden (R507Q) and factor II (G20210A) mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaijee, Feriyl; Jordan, Brenda; Pepper, Dominique J; Leacock, Rodney; Rock, William A

    2012-01-01

    Both hereditary and acquired factors increase the risk of venous thromboembolism, thus the clinical management of affected patients involves evaluation of genetic factors that predispose to hypercoagulability. Factor V Leiden (R507Q) and factor II (prothrombin) mutation (G20210A) are the two most common inherited hypercoagulability disorders among populations of European origin. Both factor V Leiden and factor II mutation (G20210A) represent gain-of-function mutations: factor V Leiden causes resistance to activated protein C, and factor II mutation (G20210A) results in higher levels of plasma prothrombin. Herein, we present an uncommon case of combined factor V Leiden mutation (R507Q) and factor II mutation (G20210A), and discuss the prevalence and features of each entity, as well as their role in the clinical management of affected patients.

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. Mutation breeding in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradjanegara, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In Indonesia, soybean is one of the important crop after rice. It is generally cultivated in the lowlands and rarely in the highlands. Seeds of soybean variety ORBA were treated with various doses of fast neutrons, gamma rays, EMS and NaN 3 with the aims of studying the mutagen effects in M-1 and M-2 generations and also to select mutants adapted to highland conditions. D-50 doses for gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS were around 23 krad, 2,300 rad, 0.3%, respectively. Much higher chlorophyll mutation frequency was observed in EMS treatment of 0.3%. Seven mutants were shorter and four early mutants matured from 4 to 20 days earlier than the control plants. Two early mutants were quite adaptable in both the low and highlands and produced better yields than the parental material. (author)

  7. Discordancy in BRAF mutations among primary and metastatic melanoma lesions: clinical implications for targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Post, Kristin M; Meehan, Kari; Sen, Joyashree D; Malek, Amanda J; Katona, Terrence M; Warren, Simon; Logan, Theodore F; Fecher, Leslie A; Cheng, Liang

    2015-04-01

    Systemic targeted molecular therapy, in the form of a selective BRAF inhibitor with or without a MEK inhibitor, is a standard treatment for patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive melanoma with unresectable stage III and IV disease. Patients with BRAF mutation-negative primary tumors may manifest BRAF mutation-positive metastatic disease. It is unclear whether all metastatic lesions carry the same BRAF mutation status found in the primary tumor and if discordancy exists, in what frequency it occurs. Primary and matched metastatic lesions in 25 melanoma patients were tested for the BRAF V600E/Ec, V600K, V600D, and V600R mutations using a BRAF RGQ PCR kit (Qiagen). Four patients (16%) had discrepancies between their primary and metastatic melanoma BRAF status. Of these patients, 2 (8%) had BRAF mutation-positive primary melanomas with BRAF mutation-negative metastatic lesions and 2 (8%) patient had BRAF mutation-negative melanoma with a BRAF mutation-positive metastatic lesion. In summary, discordancy of BRAF mutation status is not an infrequent finding between primary and metastatic melanoma. It may be prudent in previously negative patients to determine BRAF mutation status of new metastatic tumors for proper allocation of BRAF inhibitor therapy. Discordant BRAF status may have a role in the varying patterns of response and inevitable resistance seen with BRAF inhibitor therapies.

  8. The spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in breast cancer patients in the Bahamas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, M R; Donenberg, T; Lunn, J; Curling, D; Turnquest, T; Krill-Jackson, E; Zhang, S; Narod, S A; Hurley, J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to identify the full range of founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 in the Bahamas and to estimate the proportion of all BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations that are accounted for by founder mutations. We studied 214 Bahamian women with invasive breast cancer, unselected for age or family history. A founder mutation had previously been identified in 49 patients. We conducted full sequencing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) for 156 patients. A novel founder mutation in BRCA2 (exon 17 818delA) was seen in four different patients and five other unique mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, including a large deletion (exons 8-9) in BRCA1. In total, a mutation was seen in 58 of the 214 patients (27%); 92% of carriers carried one of the seven founder mutations. Approximately 27% of unselected cases of breast cancer in the Bahamian population are attributable to a mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2, a prevalence which far exceeds that of any other country. The majority of women who carry a mutation in the Bahamas, carry one of the seven founder mutations, making it possible to offer genetic testing to all women at risk for breast cancer in the Bahamas. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A recurrent germline BAP1 mutation and extension of the BAP1 tumor predisposition spectrum to include basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, K A W; Aoude, L G; Johansson, P

    2015-01-01

    ) and mesothelioma, as previously reported for germline BAP1 mutations. However, mutation carriers from three new families, and one previously reported family, developed basal cell carcinoma (BCC), thus suggesting inclusion of BCC in the phenotypic spectrum of the BAP1 tumor syndrome. This notion is supported...

  10. Filaggrin loss-of-function mutations, atopic dermatitis and risk of actinic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Y M F; Egeberg, A; Balslev, E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Common loss-of-function mutations in filaggrin gene (FLG) represent a strong genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD). Homozygous mutation carriers typically display ichthyosis vulgaris (IV) and many have concomitant AD. Previously, homozygous, but not heterozygous, filaggrin gene...

  11. 'North Sea' progressive myoclonus epilepsy: phenotype of subjects with GOSR2 mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boisse Lomax, L.; Bayly, M.A.; Hjalgrim, H.; Moller, R.S.; Vlaar, A.M.M.; Aaberg, K.M.; Marquardt, I.; Gandolfo, L.C.; Willemsen, M.A.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; O'Sullivan, J.D.; Korenke, G.C.; Bloem, B.R.; Coo, I.F. de; Verhagen, J.M.A.; Said, I.; Prescott, T.; Stray-Pedersen, A.; Rasmussen, M.; Vears, D.F.; Lehesjoki, A.E.; Corbett, M.A.; Bahlo, M.; Gecz, J.; Dibbens, L.M.; Berkovic, S.F.

    2013-01-01

    We previously identified a homozygous mutation in the Golgi SNAP receptor complex 2 gene (GOSR2) in six patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. To define the syndrome better we analysed the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype in 12 patients with GOSR2 mutations, including six new

  12. Novel dnaG mutation in a dnaP mutant of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Y; Nagata, T; Schwarz, W; Wada, C; Yura, T

    1985-01-01

    Reexamination of the dnaP18 mutant strain of Escherichia coli revealed that the mutation responsible for the arrest of DNA replication and cell growth at high temperatures resides in the dnaG gene rather than in the dnaP locus as previously thought; this mutation has been designated dnaG2903.

  13. De novo mutations in synaptic transmission genes including DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the "classical" epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1...

  14. Muir-Torre syndrome-associated pleomorphic liposarcoma arising in a previous radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozu, Masato; Symmans, Pennie; Dray, Michael; Griffin, Jennifer; Han, Catherine; Ng, Daniel; Parry, Susan; Wong, Kp

    2013-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a variant of Lynch syndrome, characterised by sebaceous neoplasia and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Muir-Torre syndrome is caused by germline mutations of one of the mismatch repair genes, frequently MSH2 and less frequently MLH1 and MSH6. Visceral malignancies associated with Muir-Torre syndrome and Lynch syndrome include colorectal, endometrial and other gastrointestinal, urological and gynaecological malignancies. Small numbers of Lynch syndrome-associated soft tissue sarcomas have been reported, but there are no reported cases of soft tissue sarcomas in Muir-Torre syndrome. In this study, we report a 74-year-old man with known Muir-Torre syndrome with confirmed MSH2 germline mutation, diagnosed with pleomorphic liposarcoma of the right buttock in a previous radiation field. The tumour showed loss of expression of MSH2 and MSH6 on immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on another pleomorphic liposarcoma in a different patient with no previous history of Muir-Torre syndrome or Lynch syndrome showed no loss of expression of mismatch repair proteins. This is the first report of Muir-Torre syndrome-associated sarcoma and the first case of post-radiation sarcoma in Lynch syndrome.

  15. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  16. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  17. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Shingo; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%)], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6%) and oral bacteria (15.6%) than previous reports. Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  18. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  19. Evolutionary Accessibility of Mutational Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Jasper; Klözer, Alexander; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Krug, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Functional effects of different mutations are known to combine to the total effect in highly nontrivial ways. For the trait under evolutionary selection (‘fitness’), measured values over all possible combinations of a set of mutations yield a fitness landscape that determines which mutational states can be reached from a given initial genotype. Understanding the accessibility properties of fitness landscapes is conceptually important in answering questions about the predictability and repeatability of evolutionary adaptation. Here we theoretically investigate accessibility of the globally optimal state on a wide variety of model landscapes, including landscapes with tunable ruggedness as well as neutral ‘holey’ landscapes. We define a mutational pathway to be accessible if it contains the minimal number of mutations required to reach the target genotype, and if fitness increases in each mutational step. Under this definition accessibility is high, in the sense that at least one accessible pathway exists with a substantial probability that approaches unity as the dimensionality of the fitness landscape (set by the number of mutational loci) becomes large. At the same time the number of alternative accessible pathways grows without bounds. We test the model predictions against an empirical 8-locus fitness landscape obtained for the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. By analyzing subgraphs of the full landscape containing different subsets of mutations, we are able to probe the mutational distance scale in the empirical data. The predicted effect of high accessibility is supported by the empirical data and is very robust, which we argue reflects the generic topology of sequence spaces. Together with the restrictive assumptions that lie in our definition of accessibility, this implies that the globally optimal configuration should be accessible to genome wide evolution, but the repeatability of evolutionary trajectories is limited owing to the presence of a

  20. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . METHODS: We used a real-time PCR based method to determine KRAS mutations in 136 colorectal cancers with mutations identified in 53 (39%) tumors. RESULTS: KRAS mutations were significantly more often found in rectal cancer (21/38, 55%) than in colon cancer (32/98, 33%) (P = 0.02). This finding...... was explained by marked differences mutation rates in female patients who showed mutations in 33% of the colon cancers and in 67% of the rectal cancers (P = 0.01). Concurrent KRAS mutations were identified in three tumors; two colorectal cancers harbored Gly12Asp/Gly13Asp and Gly12Cys/Gly13Asp and a third tumor...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti...

  1. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive

  2. Mechanisms of Mutation in Non-Dividing Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrosino, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    .... Previously, our laboratory discovered that RecA (an hRAD51 homolog) and RecBCD recombination repair proteins are necessary for the acquisition of 13-lactam drug-resistant mutations in the Escherichia coli chromosome during stationary-phase...

  3. FOXL2 mutations in Indian families with blepharophimosis–ptosis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sling surgery in both the eyes for ptosis and Y-V plasty for telecanthus correction. Mutation analysis. Blood samples were collected from consenting individuals followed by extraction of genomic DNA following a stan- dard protocol. The coding region of the FOXL2 gene was. PCR amplified using previously reported primers ...

  4. Analysis of the mutations inducedd by conazole fungicides in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazo1e fungicides triadimefon and propiconazo1e have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazo1e myc1obutani1 ...

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Fitness-compensatory mutations facilitate the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2016-12-23

    Dec 23, 2016 ... associated with a fitness 'cost' as mutations may affect the normal function of target genes, thereby reducing .... in the grcC1 gene (Rv0562) of X162, encoding polyprenyl-diphosphate synthase, was not detected in ... previously shown to have increased expression during nutrient starvation, with plausible.

  6. 22 CFR 40.91 - Certain aliens previously removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens previously removed. 40.91... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Aliens Previously Removed § 40.91 Certain aliens previously removed. (a) 5-year bar. An alien who has been found inadmissible, whether as a result...

  7. Synesthetic colors for Japanese late acquired graphemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Michiko; Yokosawa, Kazuhiko

    2012-06-01

    Determinants of synesthetic color choice for the Japanese logographic script, Kanji, were studied. The study investigated how synesthetic colors for Kanji characters, which are usually acquired later in life than other types of graphemes in Japanese language (phonetic characters called Hiragana and Katakana, and Arabic digits), are influenced by linguistic properties such as phonology, orthography, and meaning. Of central interest was a hypothesized generalization process from synesthetic colors for graphemes, learned prior to acquisition of Kanji, to Kanji characters learned later. Results revealed that color choices for Kanji characters depend on meaning and phonological information. Some results suggested that colors are generalized from Hiragana characters and Arabic digits to Kanji characters via phonology and meaning, respectively. Little influence of orthographic information was observed. The findings and approach of this study contributes to a clarification of the mechanism underlying grapheme-color synesthesia, especially in terms of its relationship to normal language processing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dendritic ion channelopathy in acquired epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, Nicholas P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Summary Ion channel dysfunction or “channelopathy” is a proven cause of epilepsy in the relatively uncommon genetic epilepsies with Mendelian inheritance. But numerous examples of acquired channelopathy in experimental animal models of epilepsy following brain injury have also been demonstrated. Our understanding of channelopathy has grown due to advances in electrophysiology techniques that have allowed the study of ion channels in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons comprise the vast majority of neuronal surface membrane area, and thus the majority of the neuronal ion channel population. Investigation of dendritic ion channels has demonstrated remarkable plasticity in ion channel localization and biophysical properties in epilepsy, many of which produce hyperexcitability and may contribute to the development and maintenance of the epileptic state. Here we review recent advances in dendritic physiology and cell biology, and their relevance to epilepsy. PMID:23216577

  9. Monitoring Agitated Behavior After acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadal, Lena; Mortensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbaek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the onset, duration, intensity, and nursing shift variation of agitated behavior in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) at a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Methods: A total of 11 patients with agitated behavior were included. Agitated...... behavior was registered with the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS). The nurse or therapist allocated the individual patient assessed ABS during each shift. Intensity of agitated behavior was tested using exact test. A within-subject shift effect was analyzed with repeated-measure ANOVA. Findings: The onset...... of agitated behavior was at a median of 14 (1–28) days from admission. Seven patients remained agitated beyond 3 weeks from onset. Severe intensity of agitation was observed in 86 of 453 nursing shifts. Differences in agitated behavior between day, evening, and night shifts were found, F(2.20) = 7.90, p...

  10. Contemporary Management of Adult Acquired Buried Penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, M S; Gallegos, M A; Santucci, R A

    2018-04-06

    In 2014, The World Health Organization reported that 1.9 billion adults, 39% of the population, were overweight or obese [1]. Unlike most complications of obesity, adult acquired buried penis is an uncomfortable topic which may be overlooked. Patients are often encouraged to lose weight, but this is futile. Simple weight loss will not cure buried penis, as it is a multifactorial condition caused by a combination of: a) overhanging escutcheon from overweight, b) lichen sclerosus, which often contracts and destroys the penile shaft skin, and c) loss of normal penile shaft attachments to the penile skin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica ePiras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with acquired brain injuries in key cerebral areas recently implicated in human studies of timing. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will definitively answer the question of whether time distortions are manifestations of cognitive and behavioral symptoms of brain damage and definitively clarify their mechanisms.

  12. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  13. The acquired hyperostosis syndrome. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dihlmann, W.; Hering, L.; Bargon, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    In the second part of this publication, we describe some additional findings in cases of sternocostoclavicular hyperostosis (SCCH). These include focal hyperostosis of the spine, in the pelvis and in the extremities and psoriatric skin lesions and severe forms of acne (acne conglobata, acne fulminans). An analysis of our 13 patients and of the relevant literature indicates that the hyperostosis is due to increased bone metabolism and heterotopic ossification of fibrous tissue and that these are the pathogenic bases of the changes in the axial skeleton, the pelvis and the bones of the extremities. We have suggested a scheme which would categorise the syndrom into complete, incomplete and possibly acquired forms. (orig./GDG) [de

  14. The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, H W; Hardy, A M; Morgan, W M; Darrow, W W

    1985-11-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major health problem for gay men in the United States. About three fourths of all reported cases have occurred in this population, and the number is projected to double in the next year. In Manhattan and San Francisco, AIDS is now the leading cause of premature mortality in men aged 25 to 44 years who have never married. In a sample of a cohort of gay men enrolled in a San Francisco clinic, 2.7% of the men had the syndrome and 26% had related conditions in 1984. Antibody to human T-lymphotropic virus, type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus was found in sera from 67% of the men, including 58% of asymptomatic men. Behavioral factors associated with an increased risk of AIDS include large numbers of sexual partners, receptive anal intercourse, and "fisting." The adoption of safer lifestyles is currently the basis of attempts to control the syndrome in gay men.

  15. The first USH2A mutation analysis of Japanese autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa patients: a totally different mutation profile with the lack of frequent mutations found in Caucasian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Suto, Kimiko; Ishigami, Chie; Arai, Yuuki; Hikoya, Akiko; Hirami, Yasuhiko; Ohtsubo, Masafumi; Ueno, Shinji; Terasaki, Hiroko; Sato, Miho; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Endo, Shiori; Mizuta, Kunihiro; Mineta, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Mineo; Takahashi, Masayo; Minoshima, Shinsei; Hotta, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a highly heterogeneous genetic disease. The USH2A gene, which accounts for approximately 74-90% of Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2) cases, is also one of the major autosomal recessive RP (arRP) causative genes among Caucasian populations. To identify disease-causing USH2A gene mutations in Japanese RP patients, all 73 exons were screened for mutations by direct sequencing. In total, 100 unrelated Japanese RP patients with no systemic manifestations were identified, excluding families with obvious autosomal dominant inheritance. Of these 100 patients, 82 were included in this present study after 18 RP patients with very likely pathogenic EYS (eyes shut homolog) mutations were excluded. The mutation analysis of the USH2A revealed five very likely pathogenic mutations in four patients. A patient had only one very likely pathogenic mutation and the others had two of them. Caucasian frequent mutations p.C759F in arRP and p.E767fs in USH2 were not found. All the four patients exhibited typical clinical features of RP. The observed prevalence of USH2A gene mutations was approximately 4% among Japanese arRP patients, and the profile of the USH2A gene mutations differed largely between Japanese patients and previously reported Caucasian populations.

  16. Monoallelic mutation analysis (MAMA) for identifying germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N; Leach, F S; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1995-09-01

    Dissection of germline mutations in a sensitive and specific manner presents a continuing challenge. In dominantly inherited diseases, mutations occur in only one allele and are often masked by the normal allele. Here we report the development of a sensitive and specific diagnostic strategy based on somatic cell hybridization termed MAMA (monoallelic mutation analysis). We have demonstrated the utility of this strategy in two different hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, one caused by a defective tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 5 (familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP) and the other caused by a defective mismatch repair gene on chromosome 2 (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, HNPCC).

  17. Hospital-acquired pneumonia in critically ill children: Incidence, risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mervat Gamal Eldin Mansour

    2012-02-21

    acquired infection in critically ill patients. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) system reported that. HAP accounts for as much as 31% of all nosocomial infections acquired in medical intensive care units. (ICU).

  18. Mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia | Tanimowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquired pneumonia to themedicalwards of Ladoke Akintola University ofTeaching Hospital between Jan. 2003 andDec. 2005. The case notes of 65 patients admitted for community-acquired pneumoniawere studiedwith respect to their admission ...

  19. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Does Acquired Hypothyroidism Affect the Hearing Functions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Arduç

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: It is well known that congenital hypothyroidism can cause hearing loss. However, conflicting results were found in studies investigating hearing functions in acquired hypothyroidism. Therefore, we evaluated the audiometric findings in patients with acquired hypothyroidism. Material and Method: The study included 58 patients with hypothyroidism and age- and gender-matched 34 healthy controls. Twenty eight (48.27% patients had subclinical hypothyroidism, and 30 (51.73% had obvious hypothyroidism. All subjects had a normal otoscopic examination and tympanometry. Pure tone audiometry at 250, 500, 1000, 2000, 4000, 6000, and 8000 Hertz (Hz was performed in both groups. Blood pressure measurements and the levels of plasma electrolytes, lipids and vitamin B12 were available in all subjects. Results: Hypothyroidism group and control group were similar with respect to systolic and diastolic blood pressures and plasma glucose, lipid, vitamin B12, calcium, sodium, potassium, and chloride levels. Significantly higher audiometric thresholds (dB at 250 (10 (0-45 vs. 5 (0-15, p<0.001 and 500 Hz (10 (0-40 vs. 10 (-5-15, p=0.003 were recorded in hypothyroid patients compared to that in healthy controls. Hearing thresholds at 250 and 500 Hz correlated positively with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, and negatively with free triiodothyronine and free thyroxine. Subclinical hypothyroid patients had a higher hearing threshold at 250 Hz than healthy controls (p=0.001. Discussion: Our study demonstrated that hearing ability decreases in hypothyroidism, even in subclinical hypothyroidism. The changes in TSH and thyroid hormone levels seem to be directly related to the hearing loss in this population of patients.

  1. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate...... that this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with severe...... community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  2. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A : results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Levesque, Herve; Nemes, Laszlo; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kuehne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knobl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; Andre, Helene; Aouba, A; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; dOiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valerie; Girault, Stephane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hezard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Levesque, Herve; Lifermann, Francois; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, J.; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quemeneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sebastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Huth-Kuhne, Angela; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Nemes, Laszlo; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Baudo, Francesco; Caimi, T.; Contino, L.; D'Angelo, Armando; Crippa, Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario; D'inca, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; De Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyak, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W.G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P.W.G; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; Del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Arguelles, M.; Gonzalez Boullosa, Rosario; Gutierrez Pimentel, Maria Jose; Jimenez-Yuste, Victor [No Value; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Marco, Pascual; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia z; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana Maria; Maranon, HGUG [No Value; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Tengborn, Lilian; Boehlen, Francoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Collins, Peter; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  3. Management of bleeding in acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia (EACH2) Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Lévesque, Hervé; Marco, Pascual; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Tengborn, Lilian; Knoebl, Paul; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, Jacques; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; D'Angelo Armando, Crippa Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia Z.; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation FVIII. Bleeding episodes at presentation are spontaneous and severe in most cases. Optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial, and available data are from observational and retrospective studies only. The

  4. Immunosuppression for acquired hemophilia A: results from the European Acquired Haemophilia Registry (EACH2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collins, Peter; Baudo, Francesco; Knoebl, Paul; Lévesque, Hervé; Nemes, László; Pellegrini, Fabio; Marco, Pascual; Tengborn, Lilian; Huth-Kühne, Angela; Aspoeck, Gerold; Heistinger, Max; Knöbl, Paul; Makipernaa, Anne; André, Hélène; Aouba, Achille; Bellucci, Sylvia; Beurrier, Philippe; Borg, Jeanne Yvonne; Darnige, Luc; Devignes, Jean; d'Oiron, Roseline; Gautier, Philippe; Gay, Valérie; Girault, Stéphane; Gruel, Yves; Guerin, Viviane; Hézard, Nathalie; Khellaf, Mehdi; Koenig, Martial; Lifermann, François; Marlu, Raphael; Ninet, Jacques; Peynet, Jocelyne; Quéméneur, Thomas; Rothschild, Chantal; Schleinitz, Nicolas; Sigaud, Marianne; Trouillier, Sébastien; Voisin, Sophie; Giebl, Andreas; Holstein, Katharina; Loreth, Ralph M.; Steigerwald, Udo; Tiede, Andreas; Theodossiades, George; Radvanyi, Gaspar; Schlammadinger, Agota; Barillari, Giovanni; Pasca, Samantha; Caimi, Teresa; Contino, Laura; D'Angelo Armando, Crippa Luciano; Fattorini, Annalisa; Di Minno, Giovanni; Cerbone, Anna Maria; Di Minno, Dario; D'incà, Marco; Falanga, Anna; Maggioni, Anna; Lerede, Teresa; Franchini, Massimo; Gaidano, Gianluca; de Paoli, Lorenzo; Gamba, Gabriella; Ghirardi, Raffaele; Girotto, Mauro; Tasca, Delios; Grandone, Elvira; Tiscia, Giovanni; Imberti, Davide; Iorio, Alfonso; Landolfi, Raffaele; Di Gennaro, Leonardo; Novarese, Linda; Mariani, Guglielmo; Lapecorella, Mario; Marietta, Marco; Pedrazzi, Paola; Mazzucconi, Maria Gabriella; Santoro, Cristina; Morfini, Massimo; Linari, Silvia; Moratelli, Stefano; Paolini, Rossella; Piseddu, Gavino; Poggio, Renzo; Pogliani, Enrico; Carpenedo, Monica; Remiddi, Chiara; Santagostino, Elena; Mancuso, Maria Elisa; Santoro, Rita; Papaleo, Giuseppina; Schinco, Piercarla; Borchiellini, Alessandra; Valeri, Federica; Scortechini, Anna Rita; Siragusa, Sergio; Sottilotta, Gianluca; Squizzato, Alessandro; Tagariello, Giuseppe; Sartori, Roberto; Tagliaferri, Anna Rita; Di Perna, Caterina; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Testa, Sophie; Paoletti, Oriana; Toschi, Vincenzo; Zanon, Ezio; Brandolin, Barbara; Hamulyák, Karly; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Laros-van Gorkom, Britta; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Marten, Nijziel; Novakova, Irena; Schutgens, Roger; van der Linden, P. W. G.; van Esser, Joost; van der Meer, J.; Ypma, Paula; Campos, Manuel; Aguilar, Carlos; Altisent, Carmen; Bermejo, Nuria; del Campo, Raquel; Ferreiro Argüelles, María; González Boullosa, Rosario; Gutiérrez Pimentel, María José; Jiménez-Yuste, Victor; Jose-Felix, Lucia; Mingot, Maria Eva; Perez Garrido, Rosario; Perez Gonzale, Noelia Z.; Prieto Garcia, Manuel; Rodriguez-Huerta, Ana María; Sedano, Carmen; Tolosa Munoz, Alexandra; Baghaei, Fariba; Boehlen, Françoise; Korte, Wolfgang; Chowdary, Pratima; Evans, Gillian; Pavord, Suzanne; Rangarajan, Savita; Wilde, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is an autoimmune disease caused by an autoantibody to factor VIII. Patients are at risk of severe and fatal hemorrhage until the inhibitor is eradicated, and guidelines recommend immunosuppression as soon as the diagnosis has been made. The optimal immunosuppressive

  5. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-09-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. © 2014 Harris and Nielsen; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. Homozygosity for dominant mutations increases severity of muscle channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzel-Hézode, Marianne; Sternberg, Damien; Tabti, Nacira; Vicart, Savine; Goizet, Cyril; Eymard, Bruno; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fournier, Emmanuel

    2010-04-01

    Muscle channelopathies caused by mutations in the SCN4A gene that encodes the muscle sodium channel are transmitted by autosomal-dominant inheritance. We report herein the first cases of homozygous patients for sodium channel mutations responsible for paramyotonia congenita (I1393T) or hypokalemic periodic paralysis (R1132Q). A parallel was drawn between this unprecedented situation and that of myotonia congenita by including patients homozygous or heterozygous for the CLCN1 I556N channel mutation, which is known for incomplete dominance and penetrance. Standardized electromyographic (EMG) protocols combining exercise and cold served as provocative tests to compare homozygotes with heterozygotes for each of the three mutations. Surface-recorded compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) were used to monitor muscle electrical activity, and myotonic discharges were evaluated by needle EMG. In heterozygous patients, exercise tests disclosed abnormal patterns of CMAP changes, which matched those previously described for similar dominant sodium and chloride channel mutations. Homozygotes showed much more severe clinical features and CMAP changes. We hypothesized that the presence of 100% defective ion channels in the homozygotes could account for the most severe phenotype. This suggests that the severity of muscle channelopathies depends both on the degree of channel impairment caused by the mutation and on the number of mutant channels engaged in the pathophysiological process. Overall, this study has practical consequences for the diagnosis of muscle channelopathies and raises new questions about their pathophysiology.

  7. Near-ultraviolet mutation of transforming DNA irradiated in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera-Juarez, E.; Setlow, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Our previous work has demonstrated that whereas near-UV radiation is not a mutagen for Haemophilus influenzae cells, it does induce mutations in purified transforming DNA. In order to test various hypotheses concerning this difference. We have irradiated cells at 334 and 365 nm, then lysed them and assayed the DNA for induced mutations and for inactivation of transforming ability. The inactivation was only a little lower than observed with highly purified transforming DNA. The DNA irradiated in vivo was mutated at both wavelengths, but with considerably lower efficiency than was purified DNA. Neither incubation of the cells after irradiation and before lysis nor freezing and thawing the cells significantly changed the amount of mutation. It is concluded that there is some protection of the DNA against premutational lesions by the in vivo environment, but that it is not enough to account for the total lack of mutation of the cells. A probable explanation of this lack of cell mutation is that lethal lesions in the cells are induced much more readily than premutational lesions. (orig.)

  8. Determining root correspondence between previously and newly detected objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglieroni, David W.; Beer, N Reginald

    2014-06-17

    A system that applies attribute and topology based change detection to networks of objects that were detected on previous scans of a structure, roadway, or area of interest. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The topology of the network of previously detected objects is maintained in a constellation database that stores attributes of previously detected objects and implicitly captures the geometrical structure of the network. A change detection system detects change by comparing the attributes and topology of new objects detected on the latest scan to the constellation database of previously detected objects.

  9. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...... without mutations in familial HLH (FHL) causing genes or an established diagnosis of GS2. In addition, we report three patients with known GS2. Moreover, neurological involvement and RAB27A mutations in previously published patients with genetically verified GS2 are reviewed....

  10. Mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase gene of Pneumocystis jiroveci isolates from Portuguese patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costa, M C; Helweg-Larsen, J; Lundgren, Bettina

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of mutations of the P. jiroveci dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene in an immunocompromised Portuguese population and to investigate the possible association between DHPS mutations and sulpha exposure. In the studied population, DHPS gene...... mutations were not significantly more frequent in patients exposed to sulpha drugs compared with patients not exposed (P=0.390). The results of this study suggest that DHPS gene mutations are frequent in the Portuguese immunocompromised population but do not seem associated with previous sulpha exposure...

  11. Law-medicine interfacing: patenting of human genes and mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialho, Arsenio M; Chakrabarty, Ananda M

    2011-08-01

    Mutations, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), deletions and genetic rearrangements in specific genes in the human genome account for not only our physical characteristics and behavior, but can lead to many in-born and acquired diseases. Such changes in the genome can also predispose people to cancers, as well as significantly affect the metabolism and efficacy of many drugs, resulting in some cases in acute toxicity to the drug. The testing of the presence of such genetic mutations and rearrangements is of great practical and commercial value, leading many of these genes and their mutations/deletions and genetic rearrangements to be patented. A recent decision by a judge in the Federal District Court in the Southern District of New York, has created major uncertainties, based on the revocation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene patents, in the eligibility of all human and presumably other gene patents. This article argues that while patents on BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes could be challenged based on a lack of utility, the patenting of the mutations and genetic rearrangements is of great importance to further development and commercialization of genetic tests that can save human lives and prevent suffering, and should be allowed.

  12. PointFinder: a novel web tool for WGS-based detection of antimicrobial resistance associated with chromosomal point mutations in bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Allesøe, Rosa Lundbye; Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major health problem, as drugs that were once highly effective no longer cure bacterial infections. WGS has previously been shown to be an alternative method for detecting horizontally acquired antimicrobial resistance genes. However, suitable bioinformatics...... methods that can provide easily interpretable, accurate and fast results for antimicrobial resistance associated with chromosomal point mutations are still lacking. Methods Phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed on 150 isolates covering three different bacterial species: Salmonella...... were compared with phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing results. Results A total of 685 different phenotypic tests associated with chromosomal resistance to quinolones, polymyxin, rifampicin, macrolides and tetracyclines resulted in 98.4% concordance. Eleven cases of disagreement between...

  13. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  14. 7 CFR 1779.90 - Disposition of acquired property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Disposition of acquired property. (a) General. When the lender acquires title to the collateral and the final... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of acquired property. 1779.90 Section... develop a plan to fully protect the collateral, and the lender must dispose of the collateral without...

  15. 19 CFR 148.33 - Articles acquired abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... combined with the duty in determining which rates are highest. (c) Gifts. An article acquired abroad by a... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Articles acquired abroad. 148.33 Section 148.33... Articles acquired abroad. (a) Exemption. Each returning resident is entitled to bring in free of duty and...

  16. Preschoolers Acquire General Knowledge by Sharing in Pretense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2012-01-01

    Children acquire general knowledge about many kinds of things, but there are few known means by which this knowledge is acquired. In this article, it is proposed that children acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play. In Experiment 1, twenty-two 3- to 4-year-olds watched pretense in which a puppet represented a "nerp" (an unfamiliar…

  17. Cerebral Vein Thrombosis:Screening of Acquired and Hereditary Thrombophilic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarraf Payam

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral vein thrombosis (CVT is an infrequent condition with a large variety of causes that can lead to serious disabilities. However, in 20% to 35% of cases, no cause is found. In this study we evaluated the hereditary (P & C Proteins, antithrombin, mutation of prothrombin G20210A and factor V Leiden, other risk factors (hyperhomocycteinemia, factor VIII, ACL-ab, APL-ab, and OCP and clinical manifestations among a population of Iranian patients with CVT. 18 women and 10 men aged 16 to 50 years with CVT were screened for inherited and acquired coagulation risk factors. No one had an abnormal ACL-ab, APL-ab or antithrombin III deficiency. One had prothrombin G20210A mutation (heterozygot (3.6%. Hyperhomocycteinemia was observed in 5 patients (17.9%. APC-R was decreased in 3 (10.7%. 2 had positive factor V Leiden mutation (heterozygot (7.1%. 17 had an increased of factor VIII (60.7. PS and PC deficiencies were each detected in two cases (7.1%. Conclusion: Our study suggests that screening for inherited thrombophilia may be an integral part in the diagnostic workup and duration of treatment in patients with CVT.

  18. Echocardiographic strain imaging to assess early and late consequences of sarcomere mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Carolyn Y; Carlsen, Christian; Thune, Jens Jakob

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic testing identifies sarcomere mutation carriers (G+) before clinical diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), allowing characterization of initial disease manifestations. Previous studies demonstrated that impaired relaxation develops before left ventricular hypertrophy...

  19. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  20. Profiling of Somatic Mutations in Phaeochromocytoma and Paraganglioma by Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At least 12 genes (FH, HIF2A, MAX, NF1, RET, SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, SDHAF2, TMEM127, and VHL have been implicated in inherited predisposition to phaeochromocytoma (PCC, paraganglioma (PGL, or head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL and a germline mutation may be detected in more than 30% of cases. Knowledge of somatic mutations contributing to PCC/PGL/HNPGL pathogenesis has received less attention though mutations in HRAS, HIF2A, NF1, RET, and VHL have been reported. To further elucidate the role of somatic mutation in PCC/PGL/HNPGL tumourigenesis, we employed a next generation sequencing strategy to analyse “mutation hotspots” in 50 human cancer genes. Mutations were identified for HRAS (c.37G>C; p.G13R and c.182A>G; p.Q61R in 7.1% (6/85; for BRAF (c.1799T>A; p.V600E in 1.2% (1/85 of tumours; and for TP53 (c.1010G>A; p.R337H in 2.35% (2/85 of cases. Twenty-one tumours harboured mutations in inherited PCC/PGL/HNPGL genes and no HRAS, BRAF, or TP53 mutations occurred in this group. Combining our data with previous reports of HRAS mutations in PCC/PGL we find that the mean frequency of HRAS/BRAF mutations in sporadic PCC/PGL is 8.9% (24/269 and in PCC/PGL with an inherited gene mutation 0% (0/148 suggesting that HRAS/BRAF mutations and inherited PCC/PGL genes mutations might be mutually exclusive. We report the first evidence for BRAF mutations in the pathogenesis of PCC/PGL/HNPGL.

  1. Evolutionary Comparison Provides Evidence for Pathogenicity of RMRP Mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH is a pleiotropic disease caused by recessive mutations in the RMRP gene that result in a wide spectrum of manifestations including short stature, sparse hair, metaphyseal dysplasia, anemia, immune deficiency, and increased incidence of cancer. Molecular diagnosis of CHH has implications for management, prognosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling of affected patients and their families. We report 20 novel mutations in 36 patients with CHH and describe the associated phenotypic spectrum. Given the high mutational heterogeneity (62 mutations reported to date, the high frequency of variations in the region (eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in and around RMRP, and the fact that RMRP is not translated into protein, prediction of mutation pathogenicity is difficult. We addressed this issue by a comparative genomic approach and aligned the genomic sequences of RMRP gene in the entire class of mammals. We found that putative pathogenic mutations are located in highly conserved nucleotides, whereas polymorphisms are located in non-conserved positions. We conclude that the abundance of variations in this small gene is remarkable and at odds with its high conservation through species; it is unclear whether these variations are caused by a high local mutation rate, a failure of repair mechanisms, or a relaxed selective pressure. The marked diversity of mutations in RMRP and the low homozygosity rate in our patient population indicate that CHH is more common than previously estimated, but may go unrecognized because of its variable clinical presentation. Thus, RMRP molecular testing may be indicated in individuals with isolated metaphyseal dysplasia, anemia, or immune dysregulation.

  2. Evolutionary comparison provides evidence for pathogenicity of RMRP mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Bonafé

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage-hair hypoplasia (CHH is a pleiotropic disease caused by recessive mutations in the RMRP gene that result in a wide spectrum of manifestations including short stature, sparse hair, metaphyseal dysplasia, anemia, immune deficiency, and increased incidence of cancer. Molecular diagnosis of CHH has implications for management, prognosis, follow-up, and genetic counseling of affected patients and their families. We report 20 novel mutations in 36 patients with CHH and describe the associated phenotypic spectrum. Given the high mutational heterogeneity (62 mutations reported to date, the high frequency of variations in the region (eight single nucleotide polymorphisms in and around RMRP, and the fact that RMRP is not translated into protein, prediction of mutation pathogenicity is difficult. We addressed this issue by a comparative genomic approach and aligned the genomic sequences of RMRP gene in the entire class of mammals. We found that putative pathogenic mutations are located in highly conserved nucleotides, whereas polymorphisms are located in non-conserved positions. We conclude that the abundance of variations in this small gene is remarkable and at odds with its high conservation through species; it is unclear whether these variations are caused by a high local mutation rate, a failure of repair mechanisms, or a relaxed selective pressure. The marked diversity of mutations in RMRP and the low homozygosity rate in our patient population indicate that CHH is more common than previously estimated, but may go unrecognized because of its variable clinical presentation. Thus, RMRP molecular testing may be indicated in individuals with isolated metaphyseal dysplasia, anemia, or immune dysregulation.

  3. Feline polycystic kidney disease mutation identified in PKD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Leslie A; Biller, David S; Erdman, Carolyn A; Lipinski, Monika J; Young, Amy E; Roe, Bruce A; Qin, Baifang; Grahn, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a commonly inherited disorder in humans that causes the formation of fluid-filled renal cysts, often leading to renal failure. PKD1 mutations cause 85% of ADPKD. Feline PKD is autosomal dominant and has clinical presentations similar to humans. PKD affects approximately 38% of Persian cats worldwide, which is approximately 6% of cats, making it the most prominent inherited feline disease. Previous analyses have shown significant linkage between the PKD phenotype and microsatellite markers linked to the feline homolog for PKD1. In this report, the feline PKD1 gene was scanned for causative mutations and a C>A transversion was identified at c.10063 (human ref NM_000296) in exon 29, resulting in a stop mutation at position 3284, which suggests a loss of approximately 25% of the C-terminus of the protein. The same mutation has not been identified in humans, although similar regions of the protein are truncated. The C>A transversion has been identified in the heterozygous state in 48 affected cats examined, including 41 Persians, a Siamese, and several other breeds that have been known to outcross with Persians. In addition, the mutation is segregating concordantly in all available PKD families. No unaffected cats have been identified with the mutation. No homozygous cats have been identified, supporting the suggestion that the mutation is embryonic lethal. These data suggest that the stop mutation causes feline PKD, providing a test to identify cats that will develop PKD and demonstrating that the domestic cat is an ideal model for human PKD.

  4. Mutation network-based understanding of pleiotropic and epistatic mutational behavior of Enterococcus faecalis FMN-dependent azoreductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyan Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified a highly active homodimeric FMN-dependent NADH-preferred azoreductase (AzoA from Enterococcus faecalis, which cleaves the azo bonds (R-N˭N-R of diverse azo dyes, and determined its crystal structure. The preliminary network-based mutational analysis suggested that the two residues, Arg-21 and Asn-121, have an apparent mutational potential for fine-tuning of AzoA, based on their beneficial pleiotropic feedbacks. However, epistasis between the two promising mutational spots in AzoA has not been obtained in terms of substrate binding and azoreductase activity. In this study, we further quantified, visualized, and described the pleiotropic and/or epistatic behavior of six single or double mutations at the positions, Arg-21 and Asn-121, as a further research endeavor for beneficial fine-tuning of AzoA. Based on this network-based mutational analysis, we showed that pleiotropy and epistasis are common, sensitive, and complex mutational behaviors, depending mainly on the structural and functional responsibility and the physicochemical properties of the residue(s in AzoA.

  5. Characterization of in vivo-acquired resistance to macrolides of Mycoplasma gallisepticum strains isolated from poultry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerchman Irena

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The macrolide class of antibiotics, including tylosin and tilmicosin, is widely used in the veterinary field for prophylaxis and treatment of mycoplasmosis. In vitro susceptibility testing of 50 strains of M. gallisepticum isolated in Israel during the period 1997-2010 revealed that acquired resistance to tylosin as well as to tilmicosin was present in 50% of them. Moreover, 72% (13/18 of the strains isolated from clinical samples since 2006 showed acquired resistance to enrofloxacin, tylosin and tilmicosin. Molecular typing of the field isolates, performed by gene-target sequencing (GTS, detected 13 molecular types (I-XIII. Type II was the predominant type prior to 2006 whereas type X, first detected in 2008, is currently prevalent. All ten type X strains were resistant to both fluoroquinolones and macrolides, suggesting selective pressure leading to clonal dissemination of resistance. However, this was not a unique event since resistant strains with other GTS molecular types were also found. Concurrently, the molecular basis for macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum was identified. Our results revealed a clear-cut correlation between single point mutations A2058G or A2059G in domain V of the gene encoding 23S rRNA (rrnA, MGA_01 and acquired macrolide resistance in M. gallisepticum. Indeed, all isolates with MIC ≥ 0.63 μg/mL to tylosin and with MIC ≥ 1.25 μg/mL to tilmicosin possess one of these mutations, suggesting an essential role in decreased susceptibility of M. gallisepticum to 16-membered macrolides.

  6. Induced mutations in castor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, K.; Javad Hussain, H.S.; Vindhiyavarman, P.

    2001-01-01

    Castor (Ricinus communis L.) is an important oilseed crop in India. To create variability mutations were induced in two cultivars 'TMV5' (maturing in 130-140 days) and 'CO1' (perennial type). Gamma rays and diethyl sulphate and ethidium bromide were used for seed treatment. Ten doses, from 100 to 1000 Gy were employed. For chemical mutagenesis five concentrations of mutagenes from 10 to 50 mM were tried. No economic mutants could be isolated after treatment with the chemical mutagens. The following economic mutants were identified in the dose 300 Gy of gamma rays. Annual types from perennial CO 1 castor CO 1 is a perennial variety (8-10 years) with bold seeds (100 seed weight 90 g) and high oil content (57%). Twenty-one lines were isolated with annual types (160-180 days) with high yield potential as well as bold seeds and high oil content. These mutants, identified in M 3 generation were bred true in subsequent generations up to M 8 generation. Critical evaluation of the mutants in yield evaluation trials is in progress

  7. [Identification of a novel GPR143 mutation in a Chinese family affected with X-linked ocular albinism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Guan, Menglong; Wang, Ling; Liao, Yong; Li-Ling, Jesse; Wan, Huajing

    2017-04-10

    To detect mutation of GPR143 gene in a Chinese patient affected with ocular albinism. Peripheral blood samples were collected from the proband and his parents. The coding regions of the GPR143 gene were subjected to PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing. A previously unreported mutation (c.758T>A) was found in exon 6 of the GPR143 gene in the proband and his mother. The same mutation was not found in his father. As predicted, the mutation has resulted in a stop codon, causing premature termination of protein translation. A novel mutation of the GPR143 gene related to X-linked ocular albinism has been identified.

  8. Carbon disulfide mediates socially-acquired nicotine self-administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Wang

    Full Text Available The social environment plays a critical role in smoking initiation as well as relapse. We previously reported that rats acquired nicotine self-administration with an olfactogustatory cue only when another rat consuming the same cue was present during self-administration. Because carbon disulfide (CS2 mediates social learning of food preference in rodents, we hypothesized that socially acquired nicotine self-administration is also mediated by CS2. We tested this hypothesis by placing female adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats in operant chambers equipped with two lickometers. Licking on the active spout meeting a fixed-ratio 10 schedule triggered the concurrent delivery of an i.v. infusion (saline, or 30 µg/kg nicotine, free base and an appetitive olfactogustatory cue containing CS2 (0-500 ppm. Rats that self-administered nicotine with the olfactogustatory cue alone licked less on the active spout than on the inactive spout. Adding CS2 to the olfactogustatory cue reversed the preference for the spouts. The group that received 500 ppm CS2 and the olfactogustatory cue obtained a significantly greater number of nicotine infusions than other groups. After extinction training, the original self-administration context reinstated nicotine-seeking behavior in all nicotine groups. In addition, in rats that received the olfactogustatory cue and 500 ppm CS2 during SA, a social environment where the nicotine-associated olfactory cue is present, induced much stronger drug-seeking behavior compared to a social environment lacking the olfactogustatory cue. These data established that CS2 is a critical signal that mediates social learning of nicotine self-administration with olfactogustatory cues in rodents. Additionally, these data showed that the social context can further enhance the drug-seeking behavior induced by the drug-taking environment.

  9. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  10. Progressive muscle atrophy with hypokalemic periodic paralysis and calcium channel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas; Jurkat-Rott, Karin; Huebner, Angela; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Linke, Peter; Van Landeghem, Frank; Dullinger, Jörn S; Spuler, Simone

    2008-01-01

    A family with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) and motor neuron degeneration is reported. In conjunction with HypoPP, the index patient developed progressive muscle atrophy. The calcium channel gene CACNA1S showed a mutation encoding p.R528H, which has been related previously to HypoPP. We propose that CACNA1S mutations may comprise a previously unrecognized genetic risk factor in a greater spectrum of motor unit disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  11. Major contribution from recurrent alterations and MSH6 mutations in the Danish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Wikman, Friedrik P; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of mismatch-repair (MMR) gene mutations have been identified in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch syndrome. This study presents the population-based Danish MMR gene mutation profile, which contains 138 different MMR gene alterations. Among these, 88...... mutations in 164 families are considered pathogenic and an additional 50 variants from 76 families are considered to represent variants of unknown pathogenicity. The different MMR genes contribute to 40% (MSH2), 29% (MLH1), and 22% (MSH6) of the mutations and the Danish population thus shows a considerably......+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT was identified in 14/58 (24%) MLH1 mutant families. The Danish Lynch syndrome population thus demonstrates that MSH6 mutations and recurrent/founder mutations have a larger contribution than previously recognized, which implies that the MSH6 gene should be included in routine diagnostics...

  12. Magnetic Oculomotor Prosthetics for Acquired Nystagmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachev, Parashkev; Rose, Geoff E; Verity, David H; Manohar, Sanjay G; MacKenzie, Kelly; Adams, Gill; Theodorou, Maria; Pankhurst, Quentin A; Kennard, Christopher

    2017-10-01

    Acquired nystagmus, a highly symptomatic consequence of damage to the substrates of oculomotor control, often is resistant to pharmacotherapy. Although heterogeneous in its neural cause, its expression is unified at the effector-the eye muscles themselves-where physical damping of the oscillation offers an alternative approach. Because direct surgical fixation would immobilize the globe, action at a distance is required to damp the oscillation at the point of fixation, allowing unhindered gaze shifts at other times. Implementing this idea magnetically, herein we describe the successful implantation of a novel magnetic oculomotor prosthesis in a patient. Case report of a pilot, experimental intervention. A 49-year-old man with longstanding, medication-resistant, upbeat nystagmus resulting from a paraneoplastic syndrome caused by stage 2A, grade I, nodular sclerosing Hodgkin's lymphoma. We designed a 2-part, titanium-encased, rare-earth magnet oculomotor prosthesis, powered to damp nystagmus without interfering with the larger forces involved in saccades. Its damping effects were confirmed when applied externally. We proceeded to implant the device in the patient, comparing visual functions and high-resolution oculography before and after implantation and monitoring the patient for more than 4 years after surgery. We recorded Snellen visual acuity before and after intervention, as well as the amplitude, drift velocity, frequency, and intensity of the nystagmus in each eye. The patient reported a clinically significant improvement of 1 line of Snellen acuity (from 6/9 bilaterally to 6/6 on the left and 6/5-2 on the right), reflecting an objectively measured reduction in the amplitude, drift velocity, frequency, and intensity of the nystagmus. These improvements were maintained throughout a follow-up of 4 years and enabled him to return to paid employment. This work opens a new field of implantable therapeutic devices-oculomotor prosthetics-designed to modify eye

  13. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  14. Music therapy for acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Magee, Wendy L; Dileo, Cheryl; Wheeler, Barbara L; McGilloway, Emer

    2010-07-07

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) can result in impairments in motor function, language, cognition, sensory processing and emotional disturbances. This may severely reduce a survivor's quality of life. Music therapy has been used in rehabilitation to stimulate brain functions involved in movement, cognition, speech, emotions and sensory perceptions. A systematic review is needed to gauge the efficacy of music therapy as a rehabilitation intervention for people with ABI. To examine the effects of music therapy with standard care versus standard care alone or standard care combined with other therapies on gait, upper extremity function, communication, mood and emotions, social skills, pain, behavioral outcomes, activities of daily living and adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2009), MEDLINE (July 2009), EMBASE (August 2009), CINAHL (March 2010), PsycINFO (July 2009), LILACS (August 2009), AMED (August 2009) and Science Citation Index (August 2009). We handsearched music therapy journals and conference proceedings, searched dissertation and specialist music databases, trials and research registers, reference lists, and contacted experts and music therapy associations. There was no language restriction. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials that compared music therapy interventions and standard care with standard care alone or combined with other therapies for people older than 16 years of age who had acquired brain damage of a non-degenerative nature and were participating in treatment programs offered in hospital, outpatient or community settings. Two review authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. We present results using mean differences (using post-test scores) as all outcomes were measured with the same scale. We included seven studies (184 participants). The results suggest that rhythmic

  15. Acquired ventricular septal defect due to infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi E Durden

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired intracardiac left-to-right shunts are rare occurrences. Chest trauma and myocardial infection are well-known causes of acquired ventricular septal defect (VSD. There have been several case reports describing left ventricle to right atrium shunt after infective endocarditis (IE. We present here a patient found to have an acquired VSD secondary to IE of the aortic and tricuspid valves in the setting of a known bicuspid aortic valve. This is the first case reported of acquired VSD in a pediatric patient in the setting of IE along with literature review of acquired left-to-right shunts.

  16. Changes in mutational status during third-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund

    2014-01-01

    KRAS and BRAF mutations are responsible for primary resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) MoAbs in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), but it is unknown what causes wildtype (wt) patients to develop resistance during treatment. We measured circulating free DNA (cfDNA), KRAS...... and BRAF in plasma and report the changes during third line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. One-hundred-and-eight patients received irinotecan 350 mg/m2 q3w and weekly cetuximab (250 mg/m2) until progression (RECIST) or unacceptable toxicity. cfDNA and number of mutated KRAS/BRAF alleles in plasma...... appeared in plasma before radiological evidence of progression. Loss of mutations may explain observed benefit of treatment in primary mutant disease, whereas appearance of mutations during therapy may be responsible for acquired resistance in primary wt disease. Benefit from EGFR MoAbs may be influenced...

  17. Parkinson disease: α-synuclein mutational screening and new clinical insight into the p.E46K mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Márcia M G; Rodrigues, Fabíola C; Leite, Marco Antônio A; Campos Júnior, Mário; Rosso, Ana Lucia; Nicaretta, Denise H; Pereira, João S; Silva, Delson José; Della Coletta, Marcus V; Vasconcellos, Luiz Felipe R; Abreu, Gabriella M; Dos Santos, Jussara M; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia B

    2015-06-01

    Amongst Parkinson's disease-causing genetic factors, missense mutations and genomic multiplications in the gene encoding α-synuclein are well established causes of the disease, although genetic data in populations with a high degree of admixture, such as the Brazilian one, are still scarce. In this study, we conducted a molecular screening of α-synuclein point mutations and copy number variation in the largest cohort of Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 549) and also in twelve Portuguese and one Bolivian immigrants. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes or saliva, and the mutational screening was performed by quantitative and qualitative real-time PCR. The only alteration identified was the p.E46K mutation in a 60-year-old man, born in Bolivia, with a familial history of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. This is the second family ever reported, in which this rare pathogenic mutation is segregating. The same mutation was firstly described ten years ago in a Spanish family with a neurodegenerative syndrome combining parkinsonism, dementia and visual hallucinations. The clinical condition of our proband reveals a less aggressive phenotype than previously described and reinforces that marked phenotypic heterogeneity is common among patients with Parkinson's disease, even among those carriers sharing the same mutation. Our findings add new insight into the preexisting information about α-synuclein p.E46K, improving our understanding about the endophenotypes associated to this mutation and corroborate that missense alterations and multiplications in α-synuclein are uncommon among Brazilian patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Posttransplantation Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis Acquired from Donor Lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Melissa B.; Hendren, Ryan; Gilligan, Peter H.

    2004-01-01

    A North Carolinian developed fatal coccidioidomycosis immediately after bilateral lung transplantation. The donor had previously traveled to Mexico, and the recipient had no travel history to an area where Coccidioides immitis is endemic. Immunosuppresive therapy of the transplant recipient likely reactivated latent Coccidioides infection in the donor lungs, leading to posttransplant coccidioidomycosis.

  19. Convergent Akt activation drives acquired EGFR inhibitor resistance in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Kirstine; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Molina, Miguel Angel; Teixidó, Cristina; Karachaliou, Niki; Pedersen, Martin Haar; Castellví, Josep; Garzón, Mónica; Codony-Servat, Carles; Codony-Servat, Jordi; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Drozdowskyj, Ana; Viteri, Santiago; Larsen, Martin R; Lassen, Ulrik; Felip, Enriqueta; Bivona, Trever G; Ditzel, Henrik J; Rosell, Rafael

    2017-09-04

    Non-small-cell lung cancer patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations typically benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. However, virtually all patients succumb to acquired EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance that occurs via diverse mechanisms. The diversity and unpredictability of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mechanisms presents a challenge for developing new treatments to overcome EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance. Here, we show that Akt activation is a convergent feature of acquired EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance, across a spectrum of diverse, established upstream resistance mechanisms. Combined treatment with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and Akt inhibitor causes apoptosis and synergistic growth inhibition in multiple EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor-resistant non-small-cell lung cancer models. Moreover, phospho-Akt levels are increased in most clinical specimens obtained from EGFR-mutant non-small-cell lung cancer patients with acquired EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance. Our findings provide a rationale for clinical trials testing Akt and EGFR inhibitor co-treatment in patients with elevated phospho-Akt levels to therapeutically combat the heterogeneity of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance mechanisms.EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer are often resistant to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. In this study, the authors show that resistant tumors display high Akt activation and that a combined treatment with AKT inhibitors causes synergistic tumour growth inhibition in vitro and in vivo.

  20. Spectrum of Molecular Defects in 216 Chinese Families With Hemophilia A: Identification of Noninversion Mutation Hot Spots and 42 Novel Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiping; Yang, Linhua; Qin, Xiuyu; Liu, Xiue; Zhang, Yaofang

    2018-01-01

    Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by heterogeneous mutations in the factor VIII gene ( F8). Our aim is to identify the causative mutations in a large HA cohort from China. We studied 216 unrelated HA families. Molecular analyses of F8 were performed using a combination of molecular techniques, including polymerase chain reaction, direct sequencing, and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The deleterious consequences of the unreported missense mutations were evaluated using various bioinformatics approaches. Causative mutations in F8 were identified in 209 families, intron 22 inversion (Inv22) was identified in 89 severe families, and intron 1 inversion (Inv1) was positive in 5 severe families; 95 mutations were detected among 115 noninversion families, of which 42 were novel, including 29 null variations and 13 missense mutations for which causality was demonstrated via bioinformatics. Among the 53 previously reported mutations, more nonsense (5 of 9) and missense (10 of 26) mutation sites were found to occur at Arginine (Arg) sites and multiple small deletions/insertions (5 of 10) located within the poly-A runs of the B domain. The majority of these sequence variants frequently recurred in the database. The odds ratios for the likelihood of developing inhibitors significantly increased in the presence of nonsense mutation. Our F8 defect spectrum was heterogeneous. Small deletions/insertions in the poly-A runs of the B domain and nonsense and missense mutations at Arg sites were identified as mutation hot spots. Nonsense mutation increased the risk of developing inhibitors.

  1. Screen for IDH1, IDH2, IDH3, D2HGDH and L2HGDH mutations in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Krell

    Full Text Available Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs catalyse oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. IDH1 functions in the cytosol and peroxisomes, whereas IDH2 and IDH3 are both localized in the mitochondria. Heterozygous somatic mutations in IDH1 occur at codon 132 in 70% of grade II-III gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs, and in 5% of primary GBMs. Mutations in IDH2 at codon 172 are present in grade II-III gliomas at a low frequency. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations cause both loss of normal enzyme function and gain-of-function, causing reduction of α-KG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG which accumulates. Excess hydroxyglutarate (2HG can also be caused by germline mutations in D- and L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenases (D2HGDH and L2HGDH. If loss of IDH function is critical for tumourigenesis, we might expect some tumours to acquire somatic IDH3 mutations. Alternatively, if 2HG accumulation is critical, some tumours might acquire somatic D2HGDH or L2HGDH mutations. We therefore screened 47 glioblastoma samples looking for changes in these genes. Although IDH1 R132H was identified in 12% of samples, no mutations were identified in any of the other genes. This suggests that mutations in IDH3, D2HGDH and L2HGDH do not occur at an appreciable frequency in GBM. One explanation is simply that mono-allelic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations occur more frequently by chance than the bi-allelic mutations expected at IDH3, D2HGDH and L2HGDH. Alternatively, both loss of IDH function and 2HG accumulation might be required for tumourigenesis, and only IDH1 and IDH2 mutations have these dual effects.

  2. Mutation spectrum of the TYR and SLC45A2 genes in patients with oculocutaneous albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min; Yang, Jung-Ah; Jeong, Seon-Yong; Kim, Hyon-Ju

    2012-04-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is a group of inherited disorders characterized by defective melanin biosynthesis. OCA1, the most common and severe form, is caused by mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. OCA4, caused by mutations in the SLC45A2 gene, has frequently been reported in the Japanese population. To determine the mutational spectrum in Korean OCA patients, 12 patients were recruited. The samples were first screened for TYR mutations, and negative samples were screened for SLC45A2 mutations. OCA1 was confirmed in 8 of 12 (66.7%) patients, and OCA4 was diagnosed in 1 (8.3%) patient. In the OCA1 patients, a total of 6 distinct TYR mutations were found in 15 of 16 (93.8%) alleles, all of which had been previously reported. Out of the 6 alleles, c.929insC was the most frequently detected (31.3%), and was mainly associated with OCA1A phenotypes. Other TYR mutations identified included c.1037-7T>A/c.1037-10delTT, p.D383N, p.R77Q and p.R299H. These largely overlapped with mutations found in Japanese and Chinese patients. The SLC45A2 gene analysis identified 1 novel mutation, p.D93N, in 1 patient. This study has provided information on the mutation spectrum in Korean OCA patients, and allows us to estimate the relative frequencies of OCA1 and OCA4 in Korea.

  3. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1-3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia.

  4. DNA sequence analysis of X-ray induced Adh null mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, J.; Fossett, N.G.; Arbour-Reily, P.; McDaniel, M.; Tucker, A.; Chang, S.H.; Lee, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    The mutational spectrum for 28 X-ray induced mutations and 2 spontaneous mutations, previously determined by genetic and cytogenetic methods, consisted of 20 multilocus deficiencies (19 induced and 1 spontaneous) and 10 intragenic mutations (9 induced and 1 spontaneous). One of the X-ray induced intragenic mutations was lost, and another was determined to be a recombinant with the allele used in the recovery scheme. The DNA sequence of two X-ray induced intragenic mutations has been published. This paper reports the results of DNA sequence analysis of the remaining intragenic mutations and a summary of the X-ray induced mutational spectrum. The combination of DNA sequence analysis with genetic complementation analysis shows a continuous distribution in size of deletions rather than two different types of mutations consisting of deletions and 'point mutations'. Sequencing is shown to be essential for detecting intragenic deletions. Of particular importance for future studies is the observation that all of the intragenic deletions consist of a direct repeat adjacent to the breakpoint with one of the repeats deleted

  5. Significance of Coexisting Mutations on Determination of the Degree of Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunaratne, Galbokka Hewage Roshanthi Eranga; Wijesundera, Sandhya Sulochana; Vidanagama, Dhammika; Adikaram, Chamila Priyangani; Perera, Jennifer

    2018-04-23

    The emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) pose a threat to TB control in Sri Lanka. Isoniazid (INH) is a key element of the first-line anti-TB treatment regimen. Resistance to INH is mainly associated with point mutations in katG, inhA, and ahpC genes. The objective of this study was to determine mutations of these three genes in INH-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) strains in Sri Lanka. Complete nucleotide sequence of the three genes was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and subjected to DNA sequencing. Point mutations in the katG gene were identified in 93% isolates, of which the majority (78.6%) were at codon 315. Mutations at codons 212 and 293 of the katG gene have not been reported previously. Novel mutations were recognized in the promoter region of the inhA gene (C deletion at -34), fabG1 gene (codon 27), and ahpC gene (codon 39). Single S315T mutation in the katG gene led to a high level of resistance, while a low level of resistance with high frequency (41%) was observed when katG codon 315 coexisted with the mutation at codon 463. Since most of the observed mutations of all three genes coexisted with the katG315 mutation, screening of katG315 mutations will be a useful marker for molecular detection of INH resistance of MTb in Sri Lanka.

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 44

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents research reports on the role of radiation induced mutation and chemical mutagens in improving productivity, disease resistance; cold and salinity tolerance of various crops and ornamental plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  18. Mutation Breeding Newsletter. No. 37

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter contains a brief account of FAO/IAEA meetings held in 1990 on plant breeding involving the use of induced mutations. It also features a list of commercially available plant cultivars produced by such techniques. Refs and tabs

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-08-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  2. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    with atypia. BRAF mutations were identified in 39 of 111 (35%) cases. The rate ratio of BRAF-mutated versus BRAF-wild-type melanoma did not change over time. BRAF mutations were associated with T1 stage (p = 0.007), young age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.02), sun-exposed location (p = 0.01), mixed....../non-pigmented tumour colour (p = 0.02) and nevus origin (p = 0.005), but did not associate with prognosis. BRAF status in conjunctival melanoma and paired premalignant lesions corresponded in 19 of 20 cases. Immunohistochemistry detected BRAF V600E mutations with a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 1...

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1972-05-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  4. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  5. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  6. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  7. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  8. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents abstracts and short communications of research results on radiation and chemical induced mutation breeding projects. Positive traits such as disease resistance and increased productivity are highlighted

  9. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  10. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-03-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  11. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  12. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  14. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  15. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  16. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  17. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 29

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and rea search abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  18. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  19. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  20. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents reports and research abstracts on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  1. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    This issue of the Newsletter presents new reports on mutation breeding programs using radiation or chemical mutagenesis to improve productivity, introduce disease resistance or induce morphological changes in crop plants

  2. Mutational spectrum in breast cancer associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briceño-Balcázar, Ignacio; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Díaz-Dussán, Natalia Andrea; Noguera-Santamaría, María Claudia; Díaz-Rincón, Diego; Casas-Gómez, María Consuelo

    2017-06-30

    The risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer is higher in families that carry mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, and timely mutation detection is critical. To identify the presence of mutations in the Colombian population and evaluate two testing strategies. From a total universe of 853 individual blood samples referred for BRCA1 and BRCA2 typing, 256 cases were analyzed by complete direct sequencing of both genes in Myriad Genetics, and the remaining 597 cases were studied by partial sequencing based on founder mutations in a PCR test designed by ourselves ("Profile Colombia"). We found 107 patients carrying deleterious mutations in this group of patients, 69 (64.5%) located in BRCA1, and 38 (35.5%) in BRCA2. Overall, we detected 39 previously unreported mutations in Colombia (22 in BRCA1 and 17 in BRCA2) and only 4 out of the 6 previously reported founder mutations. Sixty four out of 597 patients (10.7%) studied by "Profile Colombia" showed mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, and 41/256 patients (16%) showed mutations by complete BRCA1-BRCA2 sequencing. The spectrum of 44 different mutations in Colombia as detected in our study is broader than the one previously reported for this country. "Profile Colombia" is a useful screening test to establish both founder and new mutations (detection rate of 10.7%) in cases with family history of breast cancer. Complete sequencing shows a detection rate of 16.0%, and should complement the study of the genetic basis of this disease.

  3. Drug abuse and acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Y

    1998-12-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a modern plague. The first sign of the disease was the appearance of Pneumocystis carinii and Kaposi's sarcoma among young homosexual patients. The virus transmission is from an infected individual to a susceptible host through blood-related, sexual, and perinatal routes. Exchange of body fluid occurs when sharing syringes, drugs, and drug paraphernalia. Although the largest number of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is in subSaharan Africa, the most rapid growth of HIV infection during the 1990s was seen in South-East Asia. Asia showed a steep increase from 1992. Given the experiences in Thailand, India and China, a similar spread of AIDS in other parts of Asia is possible. The risk behaviors that enable the spread of HIV are present in all Pacific Asian countries. Risk behaviors are considered to be the injection of illicit drugs, male patronage of prostitutes, high rates of sexually transmitted diseases, and low condom use.

  4. Identification of acquired antimicrobial resistance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Cosentino, Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic laborato......ObjectivesIdentification of antimicrobial resistance genes is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms and the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available in routine diagnostic...... laboratories and is anticipated to substitute traditional methods for resistance gene identification. Thus, the current challenge is to extract the relevant information from the large amount of generated data.MethodsWe developed a web-based method, ResFinder that uses BLAST for identification of acquired...... antimicrobial resistance genes in whole-genome data. As input, the method can use both pre-assembled, complete or partial genomes, and short sequence reads from four different sequencing platforms. The method was evaluated on 1862 GenBank files containing 1411 different resistance genes, as well as on 23 de...

  5. Peptidomic analysis of human acquired enamel pellicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Rui; Calheiros-Lobo, Maria João; Williams, Jason; Ferrer-Correia, António J; Tomer, Kenneth B; Duarte, José A; Domingues, Pedro M; Amado, Francisco M L

    2007-11-01

    Human acquired enamel pellicle is the result of a selective interaction of salivary proteins and peptides with the tooth surface. In the present work, the characterization of the peptides as well as the type of interactions established with the enamel surface was performed. Peptides from in vivo bovine enamel implants in the human oral cavity were sequentially extracted using guanidine and trifluoroacetic acid solutions and the fractions obtained were analysed by LC-MS and LC-MS/MS. Based on the LC-MS data, six phosphorylated peptides were identified in an intact form, strongly adsorbed to the enamel surface. Data from the LC-MS/MS analyses allowed us to identified 30 fragment peptides non-covalently bonded to enamel [basic proline-rich proteins, histatins (1 and 3) and acidic proline-rich protein classes]. The tandem mass spectrometry experiments showed the existence of a pattern of amide bond cleavage for the different identified peptide classes suggesting a selective proteolytic activity. For histatins, a predominance of cleavage at Arg, Lys and His residues was observed, while for basic proline-rich proteins, cleavage at Arg and Pro residues prevailed. In the case of acidic proline-rich proteins, a clearly predominance of cleavage of the Gln-Gly amide bond was evident. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Ocular Manifestations of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Shin; Sun, Hae Jung; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kang, Kui Dong; Lee, Sung Jin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the patterns and risk factors of the ocular manifestations of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and their correlation with CD4+ count in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This retrospective study examined 127 AIDS patients who presented to Soonchunhyang University Hospital. Data were collected from patient interviews, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations. Ophthalmologic examinations included the best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, anterior segment and adnexal examination, and dilated fundus examination. Of the 127 patients with AIDS, 118 were on HAART and 9 were not. The mean CD4+ count was 266.7 ± 209.1 cells/µL. There were ocular manifestations in 61 patients (48.0%). The incidence of anterior segment manifestations was higher than posterior segment manifestations at 28.3% and 19.7%, respectively. The mean CD4+ count was significantly (p AIDS. In this study, anterior segment and external ocular manifestations occurred more frequently than posterior segment manifestations. Also, the mean CD4+ count was significantly lower in patients with posterior segment ocular manifestations versus anterior segment ocular manifestations. We found that CD4+ count and age >35 years were independent risk factors for developing ocular manifestations.

  7. Acquiring Synaesthesia: Insights from Training Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRothen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Synaesthesia denotes a condition of remarkable individual differences in experience characterized by specific additional experiences in response to normal sensory input. Synaesthesia seems to (i run in families which suggests a genetic component, (ii is associated with marked structural and functional neural differences, and (iii is usually reported to exist from early childhood. Hence, synaesthesia is generally regarded as a congenital phenomenon. However, most synaesthetic experiences are triggered by cultural artefacts (e.g., letters, musical sounds. Evidence exists to suggest that synaesthetic experiences are triggered by the conceptual representation of their inducer stimuli. Cases were identified for which the specific synaesthetic associations are related to prior experiences and large scale studies show that grapheme-colour associations in synaesthesia are not completely random. Hence, a learning component is inherently involved in the development of specific synaesthetic associations. Researchers have hypothesized that associative learning is the critical mechanism. Recently, it has become of scientific and public interest if synaesthetic experiences may be acquired by the means of associative training procedures and whether the gains of these trainings are associated with similar cognitive benefits as genuine synaesthetic experiences. In order to shed light on these issues and inform synaesthesia researchers and the general interested public alike, we provide a comprehensive literature review on developmental aspects of synaesthesia and specific training procedures in non-synaesthetes. Under the light of a clear working definition of synaesthesia, we come to the conclusion that synaesthesia can potentially be learned by the appropriate training.

  8. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  10. Species A rotavirus NSP3 acquires its translation inhibitory function prior to stable dimer formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo I Contreras-Treviño

    Full Text Available Species A rotavirus non-structural protein 3 (NSP3 is a translational regulator that inhibits or, under some conditions, enhances host cell translation. NSP3 binds to the translation initiation factor eIF4G1 and evicts poly-(A binding protein (PABP from eIF4G1, thus inhibiting translation of polyadenylated mRNAs, presumably by disrupting the effect of PABP bound to their 3'-ends. NSP3 has a long coiled-coil region involved in dimerization that includes a chaperone Hsp90-binding domain (HS90BD. We aimed to study the role in NSP3 dimerization of a segment of the coiled-coil region adjoining the HS90BD. We used a vaccinia virus system to express NSP3 with point mutations in conserved amino acids in the coiled-coil region and determined the effects of these mutations on translation by metabolic labeling of proteins as well as on accumulation of stable NSP3 dimers by non-dissociating Western blot, a method that separates stable NSP3 dimers from the monomer/dimerization intermediate forms of the protein. Four of five mutations reduced the total yield of NSP3 and the formation of stable dimers (W170A, K171E, R173E and R187E:K191E, whereas one mutation had the opposite effects (Y192A. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 revealed that stable NSP3 dimers and monomers/dimerization intermediates are susceptible to proteasome degradation. Surprisingly, mutants severely impaired in the formation of stable dimers were still able to inhibit host cell translation, suggesting that NSP3 dimerization intermediates are functional. Our results demonstrate that rotavirus NSP3 acquires its function prior to stable dimer formation and remain as a proteasome target throughout dimerization.

  11. When words fail us: insights into language processing from developmental and acquired disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Dorothy V M; Nation, Kate; Patterson, Karalyn

    2014-01-01

    Acquired disorders of language represent loss of previously acquired skills, usually with relatively specific impairments. In children with developmental disorders of language, we may also see selective impairment in some skills; but in this case, the acquisition of language or literacy is affected from the outset. Because systems for processing spoken and written language change as they develop, we should beware of drawing too close a parallel between developmental and acquired disorders. Nevertheless, comparisons between the two may yield new insights. A key feature of connectionist models simulating acquired disorders is the interaction of components of language processing with each other and with other cognitive domains. This kind of model might help make sense of patterns of comorbidity in developmental disorders. Meanwhile, the study of developmental disorders emphasizes learning and change in underlying representations, allowing us to study how heterogeneity in cognitive profile may relate not just to neurobiology but also to experience. Children with persistent language difficulties pose challenges both to our efforts at intervention and to theories of learning of written and spoken language. Future attention to learning in individuals with developmental and acquired disorders could be of both theoretical and applied value.

  12. Associative learning, acquired equivalence, and flexible generalization of knowledge in mild Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódi, Nikoletta; Csibri, Eva; Myers, Catherine E; Gluck, Mark A; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2009-06-01

    Acquired equivalence is a phenomenon in which prior training to treat 2 stimuli as equivalent increases generalization between them. Previous studies demonstrated that the hippocampal complex might play an important role in acquired equivalence associative learning. In this study, we tested the possibility that acquired equivalence learning is a sensitive marker of mild Alzheimer disease (AD). In the associative learning test, antecedent stimuli were cartoon faces and consequent stimuli were different colored cartoon fishes. Each cartoon character had some pet fish and the task was to learn these face-fish associations using feedback provided after each decision. In the transfer phase, knowledge about face-fish pairs had to be generalized to new associations. AD patients exhibited mild impairments in the training phase, whereas they were profoundly impaired on the acquired equivalence test. Associative knowledge could not be transferred to a more flexible retrieval condition. These results suggest that acquired equivalence learning is specifically impaired in early AD, which may indicate the pathology of the hippocampal complex.

  13. 2 CFR 1.215 - Relationship to previous issuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuances. 1.215 Section 1.215 Grants and Agreements ABOUT TITLE 2 OF THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND SUBTITLE A Introduction toSubtitle A § 1.215 Relationship to previous issuances. Although some of the guidance was...

  14. 2 CFR 230.45 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 230.45 Section 230.45 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-122) § 230.45 Relationship to previous issuance. (a...

  15. Research Note Effects of previous cultivation on regeneration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Note Effects of previous cultivation on regeneration of Julbernadia globiflora and Brachystegia spiciformis in grazing areas of Mupfurudzi ... Plant attributes for Julbernadia globiflora and Brachystegia spiciformis were measured in previously cultivated and uncultivated sites making up rangelands of the scheme.

  16. 49 CFR 173.23 - Previously authorized packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Previously authorized packaging. 173.23 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Preparation of Hazardous Materials for Transportation § 173.23 Previously authorized packaging. (a) When the regulations specify a packaging with a specification marking...

  17. 75 FR 76056 - FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: STATUS: Closed meeting. PLACE: 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC. DATE AND TIME OF PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED MEETING: Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 2 p.m. CHANGE IN THE MEETING: Time change. The closed...

  18. Triple outlet right ventricle: a previously unknown cardiac malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingo, Jennifer E; Carroll, Sheila J; Crystal, Matthew A

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of an infant with three distinct outflow tracts from the right ventricle. Three outlets from the heart have been previously named the "Tritruncal Heart". We review the two previously reported cases of tritruncal hearts and describe the anatomy, diagnosis, surgical management, and outcome of our case. Embryologic implications are also discussed.

  19. Screening of three Mediterranean phenylketonuria mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    as the most frequent mutation (Dahri et al. 2010). The. E280K mutation was also reported in Mediterranean popu- lations (Guldberg et al. 1993). Since Tunisia is a Mediter- ranean country, patients with PKU are presumed to have these mutations. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of the three above mutations ...

  20. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A. J. R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolò; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T. W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van 't Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.; Claviez, Alexander; Rosenwald, Andreas; Borkhardt, Arndt; Brors, Benedikt; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Lawerenz, Chris; Lopez, Cristina; Langenberger, David; Karsch, Dennis; Lenze, Dido; Kube, Dieter; Leich, Ellen; Richter, Gesine; Korbel, Jan; Hoell, Jessica; Eils, Jürgen; Hezaveh, Kebriah; Trümper, Lorenz; Rosolowski, Maciej; Weniger, Marc; Rohde, Marius; Kreuz, Markus; Loeffler, Markus; Schilhabel, Markus; Dreyling, Martin; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Hummel, Michael; Szczepanowski, Monika; Ammerpohl, Ole; Stadler, Peter F.; Möller, Peter; Küppers, Ralf; Haas, Siegfried; Eberth, Sonja; Schreiber, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Hoffmann, Steve; Radomski, Sylwester; Kostezka, Ulrike; Klapper, Wolfram; Sotiriou, Christos; Larsimont, Denis; Vincent, Delphine; Maetens, Marion; Mariani, Odette; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Martens, John W. M.; Jonasson, Jon G.; Treilleux, Isabelle; Thomas, Emilie; Mac Grogan, Gaëtan; Mannina, Cécile; Arnould, Laurent; Burillier, Laura; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Lefebvre, Magali; Bibeau, Frédéric; Massemin, Blandine; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Lopez, Qian; Mathieu, Marie-Christine; Lonning, Per Eystein; Schlooz-Vries, Margrete; Tol, Jolien; van Laarhoven, Hanneke; Sweep, Fred; Bult, Peter

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362