WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous spine surgeries

  1. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cleary, Kevin R

    2000-01-01

    .... Key research accomplishments for the first year are: ̂Demonstrated the value of intraoperative CT for visualization and verification of the anatomy in complex spine surgeries in the neurosurgery operating room...

  2. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Christopher P; Clark, Aaron J; Kanter, Adam S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multi-institutional retrospective study. The goal of the current study is to quantify the incidence of 2 extremely rare complications of cervical spine surgery; hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerve palsies. A total of 8887 patients who underwent cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were included in the study from 21 institutions. No glossopharyngeal nerve injuries were reported. One hypoglossal nerve injury was reported after a C3-7 laminectomy (0.01%). This deficit resolved with conservative management. The rate by institution ranged from 0% to 1.28%. Although not directly injured by the surgical procedure, the transient nerve injury might have been related to patient positioning as has been described previously in the literature. Hypoglossal nerve injury during cervical spine surgery is an extremely rare complication. Institutional rates may vary. Care should be taken during posterior cervical surgery to avoid hyperflexion of the neck and endotracheal tube malposition.

  3. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  4. Spine surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... milk). This means you should not lift a laundry basket, grocery bags, or small children. You should ... Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. ...

  5. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the frontal approach takes advantage of normal tissue planes and does not require removal of any bone. ... to the “open” procedure may include: Obesity A history of prior abdominal surgery causing dense scar tissue ...

  6. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Khoi D; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. A retrospective case-series study of 12 903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy. A literature review of the US National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) database was conducted to identify articles pertaining to brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery. In our total population of 12 903 patients, only 1 suffered from postoperative brachial plexopathy. The overall prevalence rate was thus 0.01%, but the prevalence rate at the site where this complication occurred was 0.07%. Previously reported risk factors for postoperative brachial plexopathy include age, anterior surgical procedures, and a diagnosis of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The condition can also be due to patient positioning during surgery, which can generally be detected via the use of intraoperative neuromonitoring. Brachial plexopathy following cervical spine surgery is rare and merits further study.

  7. Performance Indicators in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, Godefroy Hardy; Yang, Michael H; Bourget-Murray, Jonathan; Thomas, Ken C; Hurlbert, Robin John; Matthes, Nikolas

    2018-02-15

    Systematic review. To elucidate how performance indicators are currently used in spine surgery. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has given significant traction to the idea that healthcare must provide value to the patient through the introduction of hospital value-based purchasing. The key to implementing this new paradigm is to measure this value notably through performance indicators. MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, EMBASE, and Google Scholar were searched for studies reporting the use of performance indicators specific to spine surgery. We followed the Prisma-P methodology for a systematic review for entries from January 1980 to July 2016. All full text articles were then reviewed to identify any measure of performance published within the article. This measure was then examined as per the three criteria of established standard, exclusion/risk adjustment, and benchmarking to determine if it constituted a performance indicator. The initial search yielded 85 results among which two relevant studies were identified. The extended search gave a total of 865 citations across databases among which 15 new articles were identified. The grey literature search provided five additional reports which in turn led to six additional articles. A total of 27 full text articles and reports were retrieved and reviewed. We were unable to identify performance indicators. The articles presenting a measure of performance were organized based on how many criteria they lacked. We further examined the next steps to be taken to craft the first performance indicator in spine surgery. The science of performance measurement applied to spine surgery is still in its infancy. Current outcome metrics used in clinical settings require refinement to become performance indicators. Current registry work is providing the necessary foundation, but requires benchmarking to truly measure performance. 1.

  8. Surgery for failed cervical spine reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Albert, Todd J

    2012-03-01

    Review article. To review the indications, operative strategy, and complications of revision cervical spine reconstruction. With many surgeons expanding their indications for cervical spine surgery, the number of patients being treated operatively has increased. Unfortunately, the number of patients requiring revision procedures is also increasing, but very little literature exists reviewing changes in the indications or operative planning for revision reconstruction. Narrative and review of the literature. In addition to the well-accepted indications for primary cervical spine surgery (radiculopathy, myelopathy, instability, and tumor), we have used the following indications for revision surgery: pseudarthrosis, adjacent segment degeneration, inadequate decompression, iatrogenic instability, and deformity. Our surgical goal for pseudarthrosis is obviously to obtain a fusion, which can usually be performed with an approach not done previously. Our surgical goals for instability and deformity are more complex, with a focus on decompression of any neurologic compression, correction of deformity, and stability. Revision cervical spine reconstruction is safe and effective if performed for the appropriate indications and with proper planning.

  9. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  10. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Pseudomeningocoele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailon, Tamir; Smith, Justin S; Nassr, Ahmad; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Fehlings, Michael G; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Hilibrand, Alan S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Sasso, Rick C; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Buser, Zorica; Lord, Elizabeth L; Massicotte, Eric M; Sebastian, Arjun S; Than, Khoi D; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Riew, K Daniel; Shaffrey, Christopher

    2017-04-01

    This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Rare complications of cervical spine surgery are inherently difficult to investigate. Pseudomeningocoele (PMC), an abnormal collection of cerebrospinal fluid that communicates with the subarachnoid space, is one such complication. In order to evaluate and better understand the incidence, presentation, treatment, and outcome of PMC following cervical spine surgery, we conducted a multicenter study to pool our collective experience. This study was a retrospective, multicenter cohort study of patients who underwent cervical spine surgery at any level(s) from C2 to C7, inclusive; were over 18 years of age; and experienced a postoperative PMC. Thirteen patients (0.08%) developed a postoperative PMC, 6 (46.2%) of whom were female. They had an average age of 48.2 years and stayed in hospital a mean of 11.2 days. Three patients were current smokers, 3 previous smokers, 5 had never smoked, and 2 had unknown smoking status. The majority, 10 (76.9%), were associated with posterior surgery, whereas 3 (23.1%) occurred after an anterior procedure. Myelopathy was the most common indication for operations that were complicated by PMC (46%). Seven patients (53%) required a surgical procedure to address the PMC, whereas the remaining 6 were treated conservatively. All PMCs ultimately resolved or were successfully treated with no residual effects. PMC is a rare complication of cervical surgery with an incidence of less than 0.1%. They prolong hospital stay. PMCs occurred more frequently in association with posterior approaches. Approximately half of PMCs required surgery and all ultimately resolved without residual neurologic or other long-term effects.

  11. Malpractice litigation following spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Ruttiman, Roy; Eltorai, Adam E M; DePasse, J Mason; Brea, Bielinsky A; Palumbo, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Adverse events related to spine surgery sometimes lead to litigation. Few studies have evaluated the association between spine surgical complications and medical malpractice proceedings, outcomes, and awards. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent causes of alleged malpractice in spine surgery and to gain insight into patient demographic and clinical characteristics associated with medical negligence litigation. METHODS A search for "spine surgery" spanning February 1988 to May 2015 was conducted utilizing the medicolegal research service VerdictSearch (ALM Media Properties, LLC). Demographic data for the plaintiff and defendant in addition to clinical data for the procedure and legal outcomes were examined. Spinal cord injury, anoxic/hypoxic brain injury, and death were classified as catastrophic complications; all other complications were classified as noncatastrophic. Both chi-square and t-tests were used to evaluate the effect of these variables on case outcomes and awards granted. RESULTS A total of 569 legal cases were examined; 335 cases were excluded due to irrelevance or insufficient information. Of the 234 cases included in this investigation, 54.2% (127 cases) resulted in a defendant ruling, 26.1% (61) in a plaintiff ruling, and 19.6% (46) in a settlement. The awards granted for plaintiff rulings ranged from $134,000 to $38,323,196 (mean $4,045,205 ± $6,804,647). Awards for settlements ranged from $125,000 to $9,000,000 (mean $1,930,278 ± $2,113,593), which was significantly less than plaintiff rulings (p = 0.022). Compared with cases without a delay in diagnosis of the complication, the cases with a diagnostic delay were more likely to result in a plaintiff verdict or settlement (42.9% vs 72.7%, p = 0.007) than a defense verdict, and were more likely to settle out of court (17.5% vs 40.9%, p = 0.008). Similarly, compared with cases without a delay in treatment of the complication, those with a therapeutic delay were more

  12. Brachial Plexopathy After Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Than, Khoi D.; Mummaneni, Praveen V.; Smith, Zachary A.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective, multicenter case-series study and literature review. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery and to review the literature to better understand the etiology and risk factors of brachial plexopathy after cervical spine surgery. Methods: A retrospective case-series study of 12?903 patients at 21 different sites was performed to analyze the prevalence of several different complications, including brachial plexopathy....

  13. Hypoglossal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ames, Christopher P.; Clark, Aaron J.; Kanter, Adam S.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Multi-institutional retrospective study. Objective: The goal of the current study is to quantify the incidence of 2 extremely rare complications of cervical spine surgery; hypoglossal and glossopharyngeal nerve palsies. Methods: A total of 8887 patients who underwent cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were included in the study from 21 institutions. Results: No glossopharyngeal nerve injuries were reported. One hypoglossal nerve injury was reported after a C3-7 laminectomy...

  14. Surgical site infection in posterior spine surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-20

    Mar 20, 2016 ... Methodology: All consecutive patients who had posterior spine surgeries between January 2012 ... However, spinal instrumentation, surgery on cervical region and wound inspection on or ... While advances have been made in infection control ... costs, due to loss of productivity, patient dissatisfaction and.

  15. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A prospective observational quality assurance study was performed at Glostrup Hospital, Denmark, to describe patients undergoing spine surgery with regard to perioperative analgesic management, post-operative pain, opioid consumption and side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... experienced acceptable pain levels, but instrumented lumbar fusion leads to moderate to severe pain levels and a relatively high opioid consumption. The scheduled standard pain management protocols were sparsely followed. Challenges exist in post-operative pain management as observed in previous surveys...... eligible for the study were identified consecutively from the operation chart. The following data were registered: post-operative visual analogue (VAS) pain score at rest and during mobilisation, opioid consumption for the first 24 h, other analgesics administered and side effects. RESULTS: A total of 87...

  16. Return to golf after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abla, Adib A; Maroon, Joseph C; Lochhead, Richard; Sonntag, Volker K H; Maroon, Adara; Field, Melvin

    2011-01-01

    no published evidence indicates when patients can resume golfing after spine surgery. The objective of this study is to provide data from surveys sent to spine surgeons. a survey of North American Spine Society members was undertaken querying the suggested timing of return to golf. Of 1000 spine surgeons surveyed, 523 responded (52.3%). The timing of recommended return to golf and the reasons were questioned for college/professional athletes and avid and recreational golfers of both sexes. Responses were tallied for lumbar laminectomy, lumbar microdiscectomy, lumbar fusion, and anterior cervical discectomy with fusion. the most common recommended time for return to golf was 4-8 weeks after lumbar laminectomy and lumbar microdiscectomy, 2-3 months after anterior cervical fusion, and 6 months after lumbar fusion. The results showed a statistically significant increase in the recommended time to resume golf after lumbar fusion than after cervical fusion in all patients (p golf after spine surgery depends on many variables, including the general well-being of patients in terms of pain control and comfort when golfing. This survey serves as a guide that can assist medical practitioners in telling patients the average times recommended by surgeons across North America regarding return to golf after spine surgery.

  17. Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettlich, Bianca F

    2018-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) seems to have many benefits for human patients and is currently used for various minor and major spine procedures. For MISS, a change in access strategy to the target location is necessary and it requires intraoperative imaging, special instrumentation, and magnification. Few veterinary studies have evaluated MISS for canine patients for spinal decompression procedures. This article discusses the general requirements for MISS and how these can be applied to veterinary spinal surgery. The current veterinary MISS literature is reviewed and suggestions are made on how to apply MISS to different spinal locations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidural Hematoma Following Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Hilibrand, Alan S; Arnold, Paul M; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Isaacs, Robert E; Kanter, Adam S; Mroz, Thomas E; Nassr, Ahmad; Sasso, Rick C; Fehlings, Michael G; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Lord, Elizabeth L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Nguyen, Emily C; Roe, Allison K; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Yanez, Marisa Y; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicentered retrospective case series. To determine the incidence and circumstances surrounding the development of a symptomatic postoperative epidural hematoma in the cervical spine. Patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, at 23 institutions were reviewed, and all patients who developed an epidural hematoma were identified. A total of 16 582 cervical spine surgeries were identified, and 15 patients developed a postoperative epidural hematoma, for a total incidence of 0.090%. Substantial variation between institutions was noted, with 11 sites reporting no epidural hematomas, and 1 site reporting an incidence of 0.76%. All patients initially presented with a neurologic deficit. Nine patients had complete resolution of the neurologic deficit after hematoma evacuation; however 2 of the 3 patients (66%) who had a delay in the diagnosis of the epidural hematoma had residual neurologic deficits compared to only 4 of the 12 patients (33%) who had no delay in the diagnosis or treatment ( P = .53). Additionally, the patients who experienced a postoperative epidural hematoma did not experience any significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life metrics as a result of the index procedure at final follow-up evaluation. This is the largest series to date to analyze the incidence of an epidural hematoma following cervical spine surgery, and this study suggest that an epidural hematoma occurs in approximately 1 out of 1000 cervical spine surgeries. Prompt diagnosis and treatment may improve the chance of making a complete neurologic recovery, but patients who develop this complication do not show improvements in the health-related quality-of-life measurements.

  19. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsharief, Alaa N. [IWK Children' s Health Center, Dalhousie University, Diagnostic Imaging Department, Halifax, NS (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); King Saud University, Department of Medical Imaging, King Abdul-Aziz Medical City, King Khaled National Guard Hospital-Western Region, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); El-Hawary, Ron [Dalhousie University, Orthopedic Surgery Department, IWK Children' s Health Center, Halifax, NS (Canada); Schmit, Pierre [IWK Children' s Health Center, Dalhousie University, Diagnostic Imaging Department, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2018-01-15

    Many orthopedic articles describe advances in surgical techniques and implants used in pediatric scoliosis surgery. However, even though postoperative spine imaging constitutes a large portion of outpatient musculoskeletal pediatric radiology, few, if any, radiology articles discuss this topic. There has been interval advancement over the last decades of the orthopedic procedures used in the treatment of spinal scoliosis in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of treatment in these patients is to stop the progression of the curve by blocking the spinal growth and correcting the deformity as much as possible. To that end, the authors in this paper discuss postoperative imaging findings of Harrington rods, Luque rods, Luque-Galveston implants and segmental spinal fusion systems. Regarding early onset scoliosis, the guiding principles used for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis do not apply to a growing spine because they would impede lung development. As a result, other devices have been developed to correct the curve and to allow spinal growth. These include spine-based growing rods, vertically expandable prosthetic titanium rods (requiring repetitive surgeries) and magnetically controlled growing rods (with a magnetic locking/unlocking system). Other more recent systems are Shilla and thoracoscopic anterior vertebral body tethering, which allow guided growth of the spine without repetitive interventions. In this paper, we review the radiologic appearances of different orthopedic implants and techniques used to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and early onset scoliosis. Moreover, we present the imaging findings of the most frequent postoperative complications. (orig.)

  20. Pediatric spine imaging post scoliosis surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsharief, Alaa N.; El-Hawary, Ron; Schmit, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Many orthopedic articles describe advances in surgical techniques and implants used in pediatric scoliosis surgery. However, even though postoperative spine imaging constitutes a large portion of outpatient musculoskeletal pediatric radiology, few, if any, radiology articles discuss this topic. There has been interval advancement over the last decades of the orthopedic procedures used in the treatment of spinal scoliosis in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis. The goal of treatment in these patients is to stop the progression of the curve by blocking the spinal growth and correcting the deformity as much as possible. To that end, the authors in this paper discuss postoperative imaging findings of Harrington rods, Luque rods, Luque-Galveston implants and segmental spinal fusion systems. Regarding early onset scoliosis, the guiding principles used for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis do not apply to a growing spine because they would impede lung development. As a result, other devices have been developed to correct the curve and to allow spinal growth. These include spine-based growing rods, vertically expandable prosthetic titanium rods (requiring repetitive surgeries) and magnetically controlled growing rods (with a magnetic locking/unlocking system). Other more recent systems are Shilla and thoracoscopic anterior vertebral body tethering, which allow guided growth of the spine without repetitive interventions. In this paper, we review the radiologic appearances of different orthopedic implants and techniques used to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and early onset scoliosis. Moreover, we present the imaging findings of the most frequent postoperative complications. (orig.)

  1. Thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for tuberculosis of cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Huzurbazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to report this rare case and discuss the probable mechanism of thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for Kochs cervical spine.

  2. Disparities in Rates of Spine Surgery for Degenerative Spine Disease Between HIV Infected and Uninfected Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Joseph T.; Gordon, Adam J.; Perkal, Melissa F.; Crystal, Stephen; Rosenthal, Ronnie A.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Butt, Adeel A.; Gibert, Cynthia L.; Rimland, David; Simberkoff, Michael S.; Justice, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of nationwide Veterans Health Administration (VA) clinical and administrative data. Objective Examine the association between HIV infection and the rate of spine surgery for degenerative spine disease. Summary of Background Data Combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has prolonged survival in patients with HIV/AIDS, increasing the prevalence of chronic conditions such as degenerative spine disease that may require spine surgery. Methods We studied all HIV infected patients under care in the VA from 1996–2008 (n=40,038) and uninfected comparator patients (n=79,039) matched on age, gender, race, year, and geographic region. The primary outcome was spine surgery for degenerative spine disease defined by ICD-9 procedure and diagnosis codes. We used a multivariate Poisson regression to model spine surgery rates by HIV infection status, adjusting for factors that might affect suitability for surgery (demographics, year, comorbidities, body mass index, cART, and laboratory values). Results Two-hundred twenty eight HIV infected and 784 uninfected patients underwent spine surgery for degenerative spine disease during 700,731 patient-years of follow-up (1.44 surgeries per 1,000 patient-years). The most common procedures were spinal decompression (50%), and decompression and fusion (33%); the most common surgical sites were the lumbosacral (50%), and cervical (40%) spine. Adjusted rates of surgery were lower for HIV infected patients (0.86 per 1,000 patient-years of follow-up) than for uninfected patients (1.41 per 1,000 patient-years; IRR 0.61, 95% CI: 0.51, 0.74, Pdegenerative spine disease. Possible explanations include disease prevalence, emphasis on treatment of non-spine HIV-related symptoms, surgical referral patterns, impact of HIV on surgery risk-benefit ratio, patient preferences, and surgeon bias. PMID:21697770

  3. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons: Scientific progress and the increase in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hyun Jib; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2017-02-01

    There has been a marked increase in spine surgery in the 21st century, but there are no reports providing quantitative and qualitative analyses of research by Korean spine surgeons. The study goal was to assess the status of Korean spinal surgery and research. The number of spine surgeries was obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons were reviewed by using the Medline/PubMed online database. The number of spine surgeries in Korea increased markedly from 92,390 in 2004 to 164,291 in 2013. During the 2000-2014 period, 1982 articles were published by Korean spine surgeons. The annual number of articles increased from 20 articles in 2000 to 293 articles in 2014. There was a positive correlation between the annual spine surgery and article numbers (particles with Oxford levels of evidence 1, 2, and 3. The mean five-year impact factor (IF) for article quality was 1.79. There was no positive correlation between the annual IF and article numbers. Most articles (65.9%) were authored by neurosurgical spine surgeons. But spinal deformity-related topics were dominant among articles authored by orthopedics. The results show a clear quantitative increase in Korean spinal surgery and research over the last 15years. The lack of a correlation between annual IF and published article numbers indicate that Korean spine surgeons should endeavor to increase research value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Blood-loss Management in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Mirza, Muhammad; Knaub, Mark A

    2018-01-15

    Substantial blood loss during spine surgery can result in increased patient morbidity and mortality. Proper preoperative planning and communication with the patient, anesthesia team, and operating room staff can lessen perioperative blood loss. Advances in intraoperative antifibrinolytic agents and modified anesthesia techniques have shown promising results in safely reducing blood loss. The surgeon's attention to intraoperative hemostasis and the concurrent use of local hemostatic agents also can lessen intraoperative bleeding. Conversely, the use of intraoperative blood salvage has come into question, both for its potential inability to reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions as well as its cost-effectiveness. Allogeneic blood transfusion is associated with elevated risks, including surgical site infection. Thus, desirable transfusion thresholds should remain restrictive.

  5. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p costs (p difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection after surgery. Accepted antibiotic guidelines in this population must be followed to decrease the risk of developing postoperative C. difficile colitis.

  6. Historical contributions from the Harvard system to adult spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J

    2011-10-15

    Literature review. To document the historical contributions from the Harvard Medical School system to the field of adult spine surgery. Despite the fact that significant contributions to the discipline of spinal surgery have derived from the Harvard system, no prior study documents the history of the Harvard spine services in a cohesive narrative. This historical perspective reviews the history of adult spine surgery within the Harvard system and outlines the significant contributions made by orthopedic and neurosurgical practitioners to the field. Literature reviews were performed from historical works, as well as scientific publications to fashion a cohesive review covering the history of spine surgery at Harvard from the early 19th century to the present. The development of the spine surgical services at the three main Harvard hospitals, and significant spine surgical personalities within the system, are discussed, including W. Jason Mixter, MD, Joseph S. Barr Sr., MD, and Marius N. Smith-Petersen, MD. Substantial developments that have arisen from the Harvard teaching hospitals include the recognition of disc herniation as the cause of radicular symptoms in the lower extremities, the description of lumbar discectomy as a surgical treatment for radicular pain, osteotomy for the correction of spinal deformity, and the first attempt to create a systematic algorithm capable of informing treatment for cervical spine trauma. Despite humble beginnings, the surgeons and scientists at Harvard have influenced nearly every facet of spine surgery over the course of the last two centuries.

  7. Lumbar Spine Surgery in Patients with Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Joshua E; Hughes, Alexander; Sama, Andrew; Weinstein, Joseph; Kaplan, Leon; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2015-10-21

    Parkinson disease is the second most common neurodegenerative condition. The literature on patients with Parkinson disease and spine surgery is limited, but increased complications have been reported. All patients with Parkinson disease undergoing lumbar spine surgery between 2002 and 2012 were identified. Patients' charts, radiographs, and outcome questionnaires were reviewed. Parkinson disease severity was assessed with use of the modified Hoehn and Yahr staging scale. Complications and subsequent surgeries were analyzed. Risk for reoperation was assessed. Ninety-six patients underwent lumbar spine surgery. The mean patient age was 63.0 years. The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. The Parkinson disease severity stage was Parkinson disease severity stage of ≥3 (p Parkinson disease is good, with improvement of spine-related pain. A larger prospective study is warranted. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  8. Minimally invasive spine surgery: Hurdles to be crossed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Bijjawara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MISS as a concept is noble and all surgeons need to address and minimize the surgical morbidity for better results. However, we need to be cautions and not fall prey into accepting that minimally invasive spine surgery can be done only when certain metal access systems are used. Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS has come a long way since the description of endoscopic discectomy in 1997 and minimally invasive TLIF (mTLIF in 2003. Today there is credible evidence (though not level-I that MISS has comparable results to open spine surgery with the advantage of early postoperative recovery and decreased blood loss and infection rates. However, apart from decreasing the muscle trauma and decreasing the muscle dissection during multilevel open spinal instrumentation, there has been little contribution to address the other morbidity parameters like operative time , blood loss , access to decompression and atraumatic neural tissue handling with the existing MISS technologies. Since all these parameters contribute to a greater degree than posterior muscle trauma for the overall surgical morbidity, we as surgeons need to introspect before we accept the concept of minimally invasive spine surgery being reduced to surgeries performed with a few tubular retractors. A spine surgeon needs to constantly improve his skills and techniques so that he can minimize blood loss, minimize traumatic neural tissue handling and minimizing operative time without compromising on the surgical goals. These measures actually contribute far more, to decrease the morbidity than approach related muscle damage alone. Minimally invasine spine surgery , though has come a long way, needs to provide technical solutions to minimize all the morbidity parameters involved in spine surgery, before it can replace most of the open spine surgeries, as in the case of laparoscopic surgery or arthroscopic surgery.

  9. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Daniels, Alan H.; Hart, Robert A.; Hilibrand, Alan S.; Fish, David E.; Wang, Jeffrey C.; Lord, Elizabeth L.; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P. Justin; Stroh, D. Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L.; Sebastian, Arjun S.; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. Objective: To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. Methods: A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17?625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011,...

  10. Clostridium difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Silvestre, Jason; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective database analysis. To investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after lumbar spine surgery. C. difficile colitis is reportedly increasing in hospitalized patients and can have a negative impact on patient outcomes. No data exist on estimates of C. difficile infection rates and its consequences on patient outcomes and health care resources among patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was examined from 2002 to 2011. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery for degenerative diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined and multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery is 0.11%. At baseline, patients infected with C. difficile were significantly older (65.4 yr vs. 58.9 yr, Pinfection. Small hospital size was associated with decreased odds (odds ratio [OR], 0.5; Pinfection. Uninsured (OR, 1.62; Pinfection. C. difficile increased hospital length of stay by 8 days (Pdifficile infection after lumbar spine surgery carries a 36.4-fold increase in mortality and costs approximately $10,658,646 per year to manage. These data suggest that great care should be taken to avoid C. difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery because it is associated with longer hospital stays, greater overall costs, and increased inpatient mortality. 3.

  11. Advantages and disadvantages of nonfusion technology in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Russel C; Girardi, Federico P; Lim, Moe R; Cammisa, Frank P

    2005-07-01

    Nonfusion technology in spine surgery may improve outcomes by reducing surgical morbidity and the incidence of adjacent level degeneration; however, new technologies also introduce new short- and long-term complications. There is currently no evidence that nonfusion implants are superior to fusion in mid- to long-term follow-up. Understanding the potential risks and benefits of nonfusion technology is essential for spine surgeons and their patients. This article reviews the current evidence relating to the potential risks and benefits of nonfusion technology in spine surgery.

  12. The top 100 classic papers in lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jeremy; Skovrlj, Branko; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2015-05-15

    Bibliometric review of the literature. To analyze and quantify the most frequently cited papers in lumbar spine surgery and to measure their impact on the entire lumbar spine literature. Lumbar spine surgery is a dynamic and complex field. Basic science and clinical research remain paramount in understanding and advancing the field. While new literature is published at increasing rates, few studies make long-lasting impacts. The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all papers relevant to lumbar spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1990 by Boden et al that described magnetic resonance imaging findings in individuals without back pain, sciatica, and neurogenic claudication showing that spinal stenosis and herniated discs can be incidentally found when scanning patients. The second most cited study similarly showed that asymptomatic patients who underwent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging frequently had lumbar pathology. The third most cited paper was the 2000 publication of Fairbank and Pynsent reviewing the Oswestry Disability Index, the outcome-measure questionnaire most commonly used to evaluate low back pain. The majority of the papers originate in the United States (n=58), and most were published in Spine (n=63). Most papers were published in the 1990s (n=49), and the 3 most common topics were low back pain, biomechanics, and disc degeneration. This report identifies the top 100 papers in lumbar spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the lumbar spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in lumbar spine surgery today. 3.

  13. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  14. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury. In total, 3 cases of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery were identified. Institutional incidence rates ranged from 0.0% to 0.24%. Of the 3 patients with quadriplegia, one underwent anterior-only surgery with 2-level cervical corpectomy, one underwent anterior surgery with corpectomy in addition to posterior surgery, and one underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery alone. One patient had complete neurologic recovery, one partially recovered, and one did not recover motor function. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery is a rare and devastating adverse event. No standard protocol exists that can guarantee prevention of this complication, and there is a lack of consensus regarding evaluation and treatment when it does occur. Emergent imaging with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography myelography to evaluate for compressive etiology or malpositioned instrumentation and avoidance of hypotension should be performed in cases of intraoperative and postoperative spinal cord injury.

  15. Predicting surgical site infection after spine surgery: a validated model using a prospective surgical registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; Cizik, Amy M; Hamilton, Deven; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-09-01

    The impact of surgical site infection (SSI) is substantial. Although previous study has determined relative risk and odds ratio (OR) values to quantify risk factors, these values may be difficult to translate to the patient during counseling of surgical options. Ideally, a model that predicts absolute risk of SSI, rather than relative risk or OR values, would greatly enhance the discussion of safety of spine surgery. To date, there is no risk stratification model that specifically predicts the risk of medical complication. The purpose of this study was to create and validate a predictive model for the risk of SSI after spine surgery. This study performs a multivariate analysis of SSI after spine surgery using a large prospective surgical registry. Using the results of this analysis, this study will then create and validate a predictive model for SSI after spine surgery. The patient sample is from a high-quality surgical registry from our two institutions with prospectively collected, detailed demographic, comorbidity, and complication data. An SSI that required return to the operating room for surgical debridement. Using a prospectively collected surgical registry of more than 1,532 patients with extensive demographic, comorbidity, surgical, and complication details recorded for 2 years after the surgery, we identified several risk factors for SSI after multivariate analysis. Using the beta coefficients from those regression analyses, we created a model to predict the occurrence of SSI after spine surgery. We split our data into two subsets for internal and cross-validation of our model. We created a predictive model based on our beta coefficients from our multivariate analysis. The final predictive model for SSI had a receiver-operator curve characteristic of 0.72, considered to be a fair measure. The final model has been uploaded for use on SpineSage.com. We present a validated model for predicting SSI after spine surgery. The value in this model is that it gives

  16. Recurrent spine surgery patients in hospital administrative database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sami Walid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital patient databases are typically used by administrative staff to estimate loss-profit ratios and to help with the allocation of hospital resources. These databases can also be very useful in following rehospitalization. This paper studies the recurrence of spine surgery patients in our hospital population based on administrative data analysis. Methods: Hospital data on 4,958 spine surgery patients operated between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. After sorting the cohort per ascending discharge date, the patient official name, consisting of first, middle and last names, was used as the variable determining duplicate cases in the SPSS statistical program, designating the first case in each group as primary. Yearly recurrence rate and change in procedure distribution were studied. In addition, hospital charges and length of stay were compared using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 4,958 spine surgery patients 364 (7.3% were categorized as duplicate cases by SPSS. The number of primary cases from which duplicate cases emerged was 327 meaning that some patients had more than two spine surgeries. Among primary patients (N=327 the percentage of excision of intervertebral disk procedures was 33.3% and decreased to 15.1% in recurrent admissions of the same patients (N=364. This decrease was compensated by an increase in lumbar fusion procedures. On the other hand, the rate of cervical fusion remained the same. The difference in hospital charges between primary and duplicate patients was $2,234 for diskectomy, $6,319 for anterior cervical fusion, $8,942 for lumbar fusion – lateral technique, and $12,525 for lumbar fusion – posterior technique. Recurrent patients also stayed longer in hospital, up to 0.9 day in lumbar fusion – posterior technique patients. Conclusion: Spine surgery is associated with an increasing possibility of additional spine surgery with rising invasiveness and cost.

  17. Esophageal perforation associated with cervical spine surgery: Report of two cases and review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrouenraets, B. C.; Been, H. D.; Brouwer-Mladin, R.; Bruno, M.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.

    2004-01-01

    Background/Aims: Esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery is a rare complication with various clinical presentations and treatments. Methods: Two cases of esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery are described, one occurring in the immediate postoperative

  18. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Zhao, Jianning; Xu, Haidong

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  19. Characteristics of Hemorrhagic Stroke following Spine and Joint Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic stroke can occur after spine and joint surgeries such as laminectomy, lumbar spinal fusion, tumor resection, and total joint arthroplasty. Although this kind of stroke rarely happens, it may cause severe consequences and high mortality rates. Typical clinical symptoms of hemorrhagic stroke after spine and joint surgeries include headache, vomiting, consciousness disturbance, and mental disorders. It can happen several hours after surgeries. Most bleeding sites are located in cerebellar hemisphere and temporal lobe. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF leakage caused by surgeries may be the key to intracranial hemorrhages happening. Early diagnosis and treatments are very important for patients to prevent the further progression of intracranial hemorrhages. Several patients need a hematoma evacuation and their prognosis is not optimistic.

  20. Spine surgery training and competence of European Neurosurgical Trainees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian; Mooij, Jan Jakob; Schmitt, Natascha; Di Rocco, Concezio; Fakouri, Baroum Baroum; Lindsay, Kenneth W.

    Little is known about the nature of spine surgery training received by European neurosurgical trainees during their residency and the level of competence they acquire in dealing with spinal disorders. A three-part questionnaire entailing 32 questions was devised and distributed to the neurosurgical

  1. Influence of perioperative resuscitation status on postoperative spine surgery complications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Skolasky, R.L.; Ross, H.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Restrictive transfusion criteria have led to decreased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Their use has been extended to other patient groups. In adult spine surgery, ongoing postoperative blood losses and soft-tissue trauma may make these patients not

  2. The medicolegal landscape of spine surgery: how do surgeons fare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Melvin C; Park, Paul J; Jimenez, Jesus; Saifi, Comron; Caldwell, Jon-Michael; Ha, Alex; Figueroa-Santana, Bianca; Lehman, Ronald A; Weidenbaum, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Because of the limited and confidential nature of most legal data, scarce literature is available to physicians about reasons for litigation in spine surgery. To optimally compensate patients while protecting physicians, further understanding of the medicolegal landscape is needed for high-risk procedures such as spine surgery. Based on these, surgeons can explore ways to better protect both their patients and themselves. To characterize the current medicolegal environment of spine surgery by analyzing a recent dataset of malpractice litigation. A retrospective study. All malpractice cases involving spine surgery available to public query between the years of 2010 and 2014. Case outcome for spine surgery malpractice cases between the years of 2010 and 2014. WestlawNext was used to analyze spine surgery malpractice cases at the state and federal level between the years 2010 and 2014. WestlawNext is a subscription-based, legal search engine that contains publicly available federal and state court records. All monetary values were inflation adjusted for 2016. One hundred three malpractice cases were categorized by case descriptors and outcome measures. Claims were categorized as either intraoperative complaints or preoperative complaints. Rulings in favor of the defendant (surgeon) were noted in 75% (77 of 103) of the cases. Lack of informed consent was cited in 34% of cases. For the 26 cases won by the plaintiff, the average amount in settlement was $2,384,775 versus $3,945,456 in cases brought before a jury. Cases involving consent averaged a compensation of $2,029,884, whereas cases involving only intraoperative complaints averaged a compensation of $3,667,530. A significant correlation was seen between increased compensation for plaintiffs and cases involving orthopedic surgeons (p=.020) or nerve injury (p=.005). Wrong-level surgery may be associated with lower plaintiff compensation (p=.055). The length of cases resulting in defense verdicts averaged 5.51 years

  3. Spine surgery in Nepal: the 2015 earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutterlin, Chester E

    2015-12-01

    At noon on Saturday, 25 April 2015, a 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal. It was centered in the Himalaya northwest of Kathmandu, the capital of over 1 million people. The violent tremors were felt as far away as New Delhi, India 1,000 km from the epicenter, but the worst of its destructive force was experienced in the heavily populated Kathmandu valley and in the remote mountainous villages of the Himalaya. Ancient temples crumbled; poorly constructed buildings collapsed; men, women, and children were trapped and injured, sometimes fatally. Avalanches killed mountain climbers, Sherpa guides, and porters at Everest base camp (EBC). The death toll to date exceeds 8,600 with as many as 20,000 injured. Spinal Health International (SHI), a nonprofit volunteer organization, has been active in Nepal in past years and responded to requests by Nepali spine surgeons for assistance with traumatic spine injury victims following the earthquake. SHI volunteers were present during the 2(nd) major earthquake of magnitude 7.3 on 12 May 2015. Past and current experiences in Nepal will be presented.

  4. The Top 50 Articles on Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Sohrab S; Yu, Elizabeth

    2017-04-01

    Bibliometric study of current literature. To catalog the most important minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery articles using the amount of citations as a marker of relevance. MIS surgery is a relatively new tool used by spinal surgeons. There is a dynamic and evolving field of research related to MIS techniques, clinical outcomes, and basic science research. To date, there is no comprehensive review of the most cited articles related to MIS surgery. A systematic search was performed over three widely used literature databases: Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. There were four searches performed using the terms "minimally invasive spine surgery," "endoscopic spine surgery," "percutaneous spinal surgery," and "lateral interbody surgery." The amount of citations included was averaged amongst the three databases to rank each article. The query of the three databases was performed in November 2015. Fifty articles were selected based upon the amount of citations each averaged amongst the three databases. The most cited article was titled "Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion (XLIF): a novel surgical technique for anterior lumbar interbody fusion" by Ozgur et al and was credited with 447, 239, and 279 citations in Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus, respectively. Citations ranged from 27 to 239 for Web of Science, 60 to 279 for Scopus, and 104 to 462 for Google Scholar. There was a large variety of articles written spanning over 14 different topics with the majority dealing with clinical outcomes related to MIS surgery. The majority of the most cited articles were level III and level IV studies. This is likely due to the relatively recent nature of technological advances in the field. Furthermore level I and level II studies are required in MIS surgery in the years ahead. 5.

  5. Patient Safety in Spine Surgery: Regarding the Wrong-Site Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Sup; Jeong, Yoo-Chul; Kwak, Dae-Kyung; Chun, Ja-Hae; Lee, Hwan-Mo

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety regarding wrong site surgery has been one of the priority issues in surgical fields including that of spine care. Since the wrong-side surgery in the DM foot patient was reported on a public mass media in 1996, the wrong-site surgery issue has attracted wide public interest as regarding patient safety. Despite the many wrong-site surgery prevention campaigns in spine care such as the operate through your initial program by the Canadian Orthopaedic Association, the sign your sit...

  6. The use of presurgical psychological screening to predict the outcome of spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, A R; Ohnmeiss, D D; Guyer, R D; Rashbaum, R F; Hochschuler, S H

    2001-01-01

    Several previous studies have shown that psychosocial factors can influence the outcome of elective spine surgery. The purpose of the current study was to determine how well a presurgical screening instrument could predict surgical outcome. The study was conducted by staff of a psychologist's office. They performed preoperative screening for spine surgery candidates and collected the follow-up data. Presurgical screening and follow-up data collection was performed on 204 patients who underwent laminectomy/discectomy (n=118) or fusion (n=86) of the lumbar spine. The outcome measures used in the study were visual analog pain scales, the Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and medication use. A semi-structured interview and psychometric testing were used to identify specific, quantifiable psychological, and "medical" risk factors for poor surgical outcome. A presurgical psychological screening (PPS) scorecard was completed for each patient, assessing whether the patient had a high or low level of risk on these psychological and medical dimensions. Based on the scorecard, an overall surgical prognosis of "good," "fair," or "poor" was generated. Results showed spine surgery led to significant overall improvements in pain, functional ability, and medication use. Medical and psychological risk levels were significantly related to outcome, with the poorest results obtained by patients having both high psychological and medical risk. Further, the accuracy of PPS surgical prognosis in predicting overall outcome was 82%. Only 9 of 53 patients predicted to have poor outcome achieved fair or good results from spine surgery. These findings suggest that PPS should become a more routine part of the evaluation of chronic pain patients in whom spine surgery is being considered.

  7. Morbidity and mortality of complex spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, Sven; Bari, Tanvir; Gehrchen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    requiring revision. METHODS: All patients undergoing spinal surgery at an academic tertiary referral center in the study period were prospectively included. The newest version of SAVES system was used, and a research coordinator collected all intraoperative and perioperative data prospectively. Once a week...... adverse events (AEs). PURPOSE: This study aimed to determine the mortality and examine the incidence of morbidity in patients undergoing complex spinal surgery, including pediatric patients, and to validate the SAVES system in a European population. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective, consecutive cohort study...

  8. History of cervical spine surgery: from nihilism to advanced reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweik, A; Van den Brande, E; Kossmann, T; Maas, A I R

    2013-11-01

    Review of literature. To review and analyze the evolution of cervical spine surgery from ancient times to current practice. The aim is to present an accessible overview, primarily intended for a broad readership. Descriptive literature review and analysis of the development of cervical spine surgery from the prehistoric era until today. The first evidence for surgical treatment of spinal disorders dates back to approximately 1500 BC. Conservative approaches to treatment have been the hallmark for thousands of years, but over the past 50 years progress has been rapid. We illustrate how nations have added elements to this complex subject and how knowledge has surpassed borders and language barriers. Transferral of knowledge occurred from Babylon (Bagdad) to Old Egypt, to the Greek and Roman empires and finally via the Middle East (Bagdad and Damascus) back to Europe. Recent advances in the field of anesthesia, imaging and spinal instrumentation have changed long-standing nihilism in the treatment of cervical spine pathologies to the current practice of advanced reconstructive surgery of the cervical spine. A critical approach to the evaluation of benefits and complications of these advanced surgical techniques for treatment of cervical spine disorders is required. Advances in surgery now permit full mechanical reconstruction of the cervical spine. However, despite substantial experimental progress, spinal cord repair and restoration of lost functions remain a challenge. Modern surgeons are still looking for the best way to manage spine disorders.

  9. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Horner's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traynelis, Vincent C; Malone, Hani R; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Kanter, Adam S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Isaacs, Robert E; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Polevaya, Galina; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter retrospective case series. Horner's syndrome is a known complication of anterior cervical spinal surgery, but it is rarely encountered in clinical practice. To better understand the incidence, risks, and neurologic outcomes associated with Horner's syndrome, a multicenter study was performed to review a large collective experience with this rare complication. We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received subaxial cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Descriptive statistics were provided for baseline patient characteristics. Paired t test was used to analyze changes in clinical outcomes at follow-up compared to preoperative status. In total, 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery at the participating institutions were screened. Postoperative Horner's syndrome was identified in 5 (0.06%) patients. All patients experienced the complication following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The sympathetic trunk appeared to be more vulnerable when operating on midcervical levels (C5, C6), and most patients experienced at least a partial recovery without further treatment. This collective experience suggests that Horner's syndrome is an exceedingly rare complication following anterior cervical spine surgery. Injury to the sympathetic trunk may be limited by maintaining a midline surgical trajectory when possible, and performing careful dissection and retraction of the longus colli muscle when lateral exposure is necessary, especially at caudal cervical levels.

  10. Predicting medical complications after spine surgery: a validated model using a prospective surgical registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael J; Cizik, Amy M; Hamilton, Deven; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-02-01

    The possibility and likelihood of a postoperative medical complication after spine surgery undoubtedly play a major role in the decision making of the surgeon and patient alike. Although prior study has determined relative risk and odds ratio values to quantify risk factors, these values may be difficult to translate to the patient during counseling of surgical options. Ideally, a model that predicts absolute risk of medical complication, rather than relative risk or odds ratio values, would greatly enhance the discussion of safety of spine surgery. To date, there is no risk stratification model that specifically predicts the risk of medical complication. The purpose of this study was to create and validate a predictive model for the risk of medical complication during and after spine surgery. Statistical analysis using a prospective surgical spine registry that recorded extensive demographic, surgical, and complication data. Outcomes examined are medical complications that were specifically defined a priori. This analysis is a continuation of statistical analysis of our previously published report. Using a prospectively collected surgical registry of more than 1,476 patients with extensive demographic, comorbidity, surgical, and complication detail recorded for 2 years after surgery, we previously identified several risk factor for medical complications. Using the beta coefficients from those log binomial regression analyses, we created a model to predict the occurrence of medical complication after spine surgery. We split our data into two subsets for internal and cross-validation of our model. We created two predictive models: one predicting the occurrence of any medical complication and the other predicting the occurrence of a major medical complication. The final predictive model for any medical complications had a receiver operator curve characteristic of 0.76, considered to be a fair measure. The final predictive model for any major medical complications had

  11. A short review on a complication of lumbar spine surgery: CSF leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sajesh K; Onyia, Chiazor U

    2015-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a common complication of surgery involving the lumbar spine. Over the past decades, there has been significant advancement in understanding the basis, management and techniques of treatment for post-operative CSF leak following lumbar spine surgery. In this article, we review previous work in the literature on the various factors and technical errors during or after lumbar spine surgery that may lead to this feared complication, the available options of management with focus on the various techniques employed, the outcomes and also to highlight on the current trends. We also discuss the presentation, factors contributing to its development, basic concepts and practical aspects of the management with emphasis on the different techniques of treatment. Different outcomes following various techniques of managing post-operative CSF leak after lumbar spine surgery have been well described in the literature. However, there is currently no most ideal technique among the available options. The choice of which technique to be applied in each case is dependent on each surgeon's cumulative experience as well as a clear understanding of the contributory underlying factors in each patient, the nature and site of the leak, the available facilities and equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in adults with previous cardiovascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Knobelsdorff-Brenkenhoff, Florian; Trauzeddel, Ralf Felix; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile non-invasive imaging modality that serves a broad spectrum of indications in clinical cardiology and has proven evidence. Most of the numerous applications are appropriate in patients with previous cardiovascular surgery in the same manner as in non-surgical subjects. However, some specifics have to be considered. This review article is intended to provide information about the application of CMR in adults with previous cardiovascular surgery. In particular, the two main scenarios, i.e. following coronary artery bypass surgery and following heart valve surgery, are highlighted. Furthermore, several pictorial descriptions of other potential indications for CMR after cardiovascular surgery are given.

  13. Disease-Specific Care: Spine Surgery Program Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Katie; Franker, Lauren; Douglas, Barbara; Medero, Edgardo; Bromeland, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Minimal literature exists describing the process for development of a Joint Commission comprehensive spine surgery program within a community hospital health system. Components of a comprehensive program include structured communication across care settings, preoperative education, quality outcomes tracking, and patient follow-up. Organizations obtaining disease-specific certification must have clear knowledge of the planning, time, and overall commitment, essential to developing a successful program. Health systems benefit from disease-specific certification because of their commitment to a higher standard of service. Certification standards establish a framework for organizational structure and management and provide institutions a competitive edge in the marketplace. A framework for the development of a spine surgery program is described to help guide organizations seeking disease-specific certification. In developing a comprehensive program, it is critical to define the program's mission and vision, identify key stakeholders, implement clinical practice guidelines, and evaluate program outcomes.

  14. The effect of chlorzoxazone on acute pain after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R V; Fomsgaard, J S; Siegel, M H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chlorzoxazone is a muscle relaxant administered for musculoskeletal pain, and as an analgesic adjunct for post-operative pain. Chlorzoxazone for low back pain is currently not advised due to the lack of placebo-controlled trials. We explored the effect of chlorzoxazone on acute pain...... after spine surgery. METHODS: One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned to 500 mg oral chlorzoxazone or placebo in this blinded study of patients having spine surgery under general anaesthesia. In the 4 h trial period analgesia consisted of IV patient-controlled analgesia (morphine bolus 2.......5 mg). Primary outcome was pain during mobilization (visual analogue scale) 2 h after the intervention. Secondary outcomes were pain at rest, opioid consumption, nausea, vomiting, sedation and dizziness. RESULTS: For pain during mobilization 2 h after intervention, there was no significant difference...

  15. Depression as an independent predictor of postoperative delirium in spine deformity patients undergoing elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Adogwa, Owoicho; Lydon, Emily; Sergesketter, Amanda; Kaakati, Rayan; Mehta, Ankit I; Vasquez, Raul A; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A; Karikari, Isaac O

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Depression is the most prevalent affective disorder in the US, and patients with spinal deformity are at increased risk. Postoperative delirium has been associated with inferior surgical outcomes, including morbidity and mortality. The relationship between depression and postoperative delirium in patients undergoing spine surgery is relatively unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if depression is an independent risk factor for the development of postoperative delirium in patients undergoing decompression and fusion for deformity. METHODS The medical records of 923 adult patients (age ≥ 18 years) undergoing elective spine surgery at a single major academic institution from 2005 through 2015 were reviewed. Of these patients, 255 (27.6%) patients had been diagnosed with depression by a board-certified psychiatrist and constituted the Depression group; the remaining 668 patients constituted the No-Depression group. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and intra- and postoperative complication rates were collected for each patient and compared between groups. The primary outcome investigated in this study was rate of postoperative delirium, according to DSM-V criteria, during initial hospital stay after surgery. The association between depression and postoperative delirium rate was assessed via multivariate logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Patient demographics and comorbidities other than depression were similar in the 2 groups. In the Depression group, 85.1% of the patients were taking an antidepressant prior to surgery. There were no significant between-group differences in intraoperative variables and rates of complications other than delirium. Postoperative complication rates were also similar between the cohorts, including rates of urinary tract infection, fever, deep and superficial surgical site infection, pulmonary embolism, deep vein thrombosis, urinary retention, and proportion of patients transferred to the intensive care unit. In

  16. Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery: Horner’s Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Hani R.; Smith, Zachary A.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Kanter, Adam S.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Cho, Samuel K.; Baird, Evan O.; Isaacs, Robert E.; Rahman, Ra’Kerry K.; Polevaya, Galina; Smith, Justin S.; Shaffrey, Christopher; Tortolani, P. Justin; Stroh, D. Alex; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: A multicenter retrospective case series. Objective: Horner’s syndrome is a known complication of anterior cervical spinal surgery, but it is rarely encountered in clinical practice. To better understand the incidence, risks, and neurologic outcomes associated with Horner’s syndrome, a multicenter study was performed to review a large collective experience with this rare complication. Methods: We conducted a retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received subaxial cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Descriptive statistics were provided for baseline patient characteristics. Paired t test was used to analyze changes in clinical outcomes at follow-up compared to preoperative status. Results: In total, 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery at the participating institutions were screened. Postoperative Horner’s syndrome was identified in 5 (0.06%) patients. All patients experienced the complication following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The sympathetic trunk appeared to be more vulnerable when operating on midcervical levels (C5, C6), and most patients experienced at least a partial recovery without further treatment. Conclusions: This collective experience suggests that Horner’s syndrome is an exceedingly rare complication following anterior cervical spine surgery. Injury to the sympathetic trunk may be limited by maintaining a midline surgical trajectory when possible, and performing careful dissection and retraction of the longus colli muscle when lateral exposure is necessary, especially at caudal cervical levels. PMID:28451480

  17. Technical consideration of transforaminal endoscopic spine surgery for central herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish P Datar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar disc prolapse is most common between 30 and 50 years of age and is associated with severe disability and pain. It commonly occurs at L4/5 and L5/S1. Transforaminal endoscopic discectomy is an emerging technique for treatment of degenerative disc disease. Literature has shown clinical outcomes, comparable to classical open and micro lumbar discectomy. Central disc herniations in lumbar spine pose technical challenge for transforaminal endoscopic decompression due to its location. Existing techniques to access central herniations and ventral epidural space have trajectory related challenges due to the proximity of the retroperitoneal space and abdominal organs and technically difficult for the less experienced surgeon. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients – 19 males and 11 females – with central, multifocal, central-paracentral disc herniations in the lumbar spine operated in 2015 and 2016 were considered in this study. All patients underwent selective endoscopic discectomy under monitored care anesthesia and local anesthesia with modification of the classical technique, medialization of annulotomy, undercutting the nonarticular part of superior articular process (foraminotomy and use of articulating and long jaw instruments either alone or in combination. Results: In all the thirty patients, we were able to achieve adequate decompression with neurological recovery. All patients improved in their neurological status. Postoperatively, visual analog scale dropped from 7.8 to 1.8 and ODI dropped from 73.46% to 32. 90% of the patients reported excellent and good results. One patient had recurrent herniation and was treated with transforaminal surgery. One patient had persistent back pain and reported poor outcome. Three patients underwent medial branch block for facet joint pain followed by medial branch rhizotomy and reported excellent and good results. Conclusion: Transforaminal endoscopic spine surgery with modifications

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khouja, Lutfi T; Baron, Eli M; Johnson, J Patrick; Kim, Terrence T; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-06-01

    Medical care has been evolving with the increased influence of a value-based health care system. As a result, more emphasis is being placed on ensuring cost-effectiveness and utility in the services provided to patients. This study looks at this development in respect to minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) costs. A literature review using PubMed, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis (CEA) Registry, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) was performed. Papers were included in the study if they reported costs associated with minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS). If there was no mention of cost, CEA, cost-utility analysis (CUA), quality-adjusted life year (QALY), quality, or outcomes mentioned, then the article was excluded. Fourteen studies reporting costs associated with MISS in 12,425 patients (3675 undergoing minimally invasive procedures and 8750 undergoing open procedures) were identified through PubMed, the CEA Registry, and NHS EED. The percent cost difference between minimally invasive and open approaches ranged from 2.54% to 33.68%-all indicating cost saving with a minimally invasive surgical approach. Average length of stay (LOS) for minimally invasive surgery ranged from 0.93 days to 5.1 days compared with 1.53 days to 12 days for an open approach. All studies reporting EBL reported lower volume loss in an MISS approach (range 10-392.5 ml) than in an open approach (range 55-535.5 ml). There are currently an insufficient number of studies published reporting the costs of MISS. Of the studies published, none have followed a standardized method of reporting and analyzing cost data. Preliminary findings analyzing the 14 studies showed both cost saving and better outcomes in MISS compared with an open approach. However, more Level I CEA/CUA studies including cost/QALY evaluations with specifics of the techniques utilized need to be reported in a standardized manner to make more accurate conclusions on the cost effectiveness of

  19. A comparative analysis of minimally invasive and open spine surgery patient education resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Feghhi, Daniel P; Gupta, Raghav; Hansberry, David R; Quinn, John C; Heary, Robert F; Goldstein, Ira M

    2014-09-01

    The Internet has become a widespread source for disseminating health information to large numbers of people. Such is the case for spine surgery as well. Given the complexity of spinal surgeries, an important point to consider is whether these resources are easily read and understood by most Americans. The average national reading grade level has been estimated to be at about the 7th grade. In the present study the authors strove to assess the readability of open spine surgery resources and minimally invasive spine surgery resources to offer suggestions to help improve the readability of patient resources. Online patient education resources were downloaded in 2013 from 50 resources representing either traditional open back surgery or minimally invasive spine surgery. Each resource was assessed using 10 scales from Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1. Patient education resources representing traditional open back surgery or minimally invasive spine surgery were all found to be written at a level well above the recommended 6th grade level. In general, minimally invasive spine surgery materials were written at a higher grade level. The readability of patient education resources from spine surgery websites exceeds the average reading ability of an American adult. Revisions may be warranted to increase quality and patient comprehension of these resources to effectively reach a greater patient population.

  20. Surgical Site Infections in Pediatric Spine Surgery: Comparative Microbiology of Patients with Idiopathic and Nonidiopathic Etiologies of Spine Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesani, Matthieu; Doit, Catherine; Lorrot, Mathie; Vitoux, Christine; Hilly, Julie; Michelet, Daphné; Vidal, Christophe; Julien-Marsollier, Florence; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are a concern in pediatric spine surgery with unusually high rates for a clean surgery and especially for patients with deformity of nonidiopathic etiology. Microbiologic differences between etiologies of spine deformities have been poorly investigated. We reviewed all cases of SSI in spinal surgery between 2007 and 2011. Characteristics of cases and of bacteria according to the etiology of the spine disease were investigated. Of 496 surgeries, we identified 51 SSIs (10.3%) in 49 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent pathogen whatever the etiology (n = 31, 61% of infection cases). The second most frequent pathogens vary according to the etiology of the spine deformity. It was Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) in nonidiopathic cases (n = 19, 45% of cases) and anaerobe in idiopathic cases (n = 8, 38% of cases), particularly Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (n = 5, 24% of cases). Infection rate was 6.8% in cases with idiopathic spine disease (n = 21) and 15.9% in cases with nonidiopathic spine disease (n = 30). Nonidiopathic cases were more frequently male with lower weight. American Society of Anesthesiologists score was more often greater than 2, they had more frequently sacral implants and postoperative intensive care unit stay. GNB were significantly associated with a nonidiopathic etiology, low weight, younger age and sacral fusion. SSIs were polymicrobial in 31% of cases with a mean of 1.4 species per infection cases. S. aureus is the first cause of SSI in pediatric spine surgery. However, Gram-positive anaerobic cocci should be taken into account in idiopathic patients and GNB in nonidiopathic patients when considering antibiotic prophylaxis and curative treatment.

  1. Accuracy of navigated pedicle screw insertion by a junior spine surgeon without spinal surgery experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hironori; Kotani, Toshiaki; Motegi, Hiroyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuharu; Koshi, Takana; Nagahara, Ken; Minami, Syohei

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pedicle screw placement accuracy during navigated surgery by a junior spine surgeon who had no spinal surgery experience. A junior spine surgeon with no spinal surgery experience implanted a total of 137 pedicle screws by using a navigation system. Postoperative computerized tomography was performed to evaluate screw placement, and the pedicle perforation rate was 2.2%. There were no neurologic or vascular complications related to the pedicle screws. The results demonstrated that pedicle screws can be placed safely and effectively by a junior spine surgeon who has no spinal surgery experience when instructed by a senior spine surgeon. The results of this study suggest that navigation can be used as a surgical training tool for junior spine surgeons. (author)

  2. What is the role of autologous blood transfusion in major spine surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Chen, Yongsheng; Nath, Chinmoy; Liu, Eugene Hern Choon

    2012-06-01

    Major spine surgery is associated with significant blood loss, which has numerous complications. Blood loss is therefore an important concern when undertaking any major spine surgery. Blood loss can be addressed by reducing intraoperative blood loss and replenishing perioperative blood loss. Reducing intraoperative blood loss helps maintain hemodynamic equilibrium and provides a clearer operative field during surgery. Homologous blood transfusion is still the mainstay for replenishing blood loss in major spine surgery across the world, despite its known adverse effects. These significant adverse effects can be seen in up to 20% of patients. Autologous blood transfusion avoids the risks associated with homologous blood transfusion and has been shown to be cost-effective. This article reviews the different methods of autologous transfusion and focuses on the use of intraoperative cell salvage in major spine surgery. Autologous blood transfusion is a proven alternative to homologous transfusion in major spine surgery, avoiding most, if not all of these adverse effects. However, autologous blood transfusion rates in major spine surgery remain low across the world. Autologous blood transfusion may obviate the need for homologous transfusion completely. We encourage spine surgeons to consider autologous blood transfusion wherever feasible.

  3. Quantifying risk of transfusion in children undergoing spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Michael G; Levy, Douglas E; Park, Maxwell C; Choi, Hyunok; Choe, Julie C; Roye, David P

    2002-01-01

    The risks and costs of transfusion are a great concern in the area of pediatric spine surgery, because it is a blood-intensive procedure with a high risk for transfusion. Therefore, determining the predictors of transfusion in this patient population is an important first step and has the potential to improve upon the current approaches to reducing transfusion rates. In this study, we reveal several predictors of transfusion in a pediatric patient population undergoing spine surgery. In turn, we present a general rule of thumb ("rule of two's") for gauging transfusion risk, thus enhancing the surgeon's approach to avoiding transfusion in certain clinical scenarios. This study was conducted to determine the main factors of transfusion in a population of pediatric patients undergoing scoliosis surgery. The goal was to present an algorithm for quantifying the true risk of transfusion for various patient groups that would highlight patients "at high risk" for transfusion. This is especially important in light of the various risks associated with undergoing a transfusion, as well as the costs involved in maintaining and disposing of exogenous blood materials. This is a retrospective review of a group of children who underwent scoliosis surgery between 1988 and 1995 at an academic institution. A total of 290 patients were analyzed in this study, of which 63 were transfused and 227 were not. No outcomes measures were used in this study. A retrospective review of 290 patients presenting to our institution for scoliosis surgery was conducted, with a focus on socioclinical data related to transfusion risk. Univariate analysis and logistic regression were used to quantify the determinants of transfusion risk. Univariate analysis identified many factors that were associated with the risk of transfusion. However, it is clear that several of these factors are dependent on each other, obscuring the true issues driving transfusion need. We used multivariate analysis to control for

  4. HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS OPEN HEART SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Transplantation (HTx to date remains the most effective and radical method of treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. The defi cit of donor hearts is forcing to resort increasingly to the use of different longterm mechanical circulatory support systems, including as a «bridge» to the follow-up HTx. According to the ISHLT Registry the number of recipients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass surgery increased from 40% in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 49.6% for the period from 2009 to 2015. HTx performed in repeated patients, on the one hand, involves considerable technical diffi culties and high risks; on the other hand, there is often no alternative medical intervention to HTx, and if not dictated by absolute contradictions the denial of the surgery is equivalent to 100% mortality. This review summarizes the results of a number of published studies aimed at understanding the immediate and late results of HTx in patients, previously underwent open heart surgery. The effect of resternotomy during HTx and that of the specifi c features associated with its implementation in recipients previously operated on open heart, and its effects on the immediate and long-term survival were considered in this review. Results of studies analyzing the risk factors for perioperative complications in repeated recipients were also demonstrated. Separately, HTx risks after implantation of prolonged mechanical circulatory support systems were examined. The literature does not allow to clearly defi ning the impact factor of earlier performed open heart surgery on the course of perioperative period and on the prognosis of survival in recipients who underwent HTx. On the other hand, subject to the regular fl ow of HTx and the perioperative period the risks in this clinical situation are justifi ed as a long-term prognosis of recipients previously conducted open heart surgery and are comparable to those of patients who underwent primary HTx. Studies

  5. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery.......In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery....

  6. Carotid Artery Injury in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Multicenter Cohort Study and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    H?rtl, Roger; Alimi, Marjan; Abdelatif Boukebir, Mohamed; Berlin, Connor D.; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective study and literature review. Objective: To provide more comprehensive data about carotid artery injury (CAI) or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) related to anterior cervical spine surgery. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, multicenter, case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records of 17?625 patients who went through cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between Januar...

  7. Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter AOSpine Clinical Research Network Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Mohamad; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Smith, Zachary A.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Cho, Samuel K.; Baird, Evan O.; Mroz, Thomas E.; Fehlings, Michael; Arnold, Paul M.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Multicenter retrospective study. Objectives: To investigate the risk of symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (RLNP) following cervical spine surgery, to examine risk factors for its development, and to report its treatment and outcomes. Methods: A multicenter study from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was performed. Each center screened for rare complications following cervical spine surgery, including RLNP. Patient...

  8. Esophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hershman, Stuart H.; Kunkle, William A.; Kelly, Michael P.; Buchowski, Jacob M.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Bumpass, David B.; Gum, Jeffrey L.; Peters, Colleen M.; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Kim, Jin Young; Smith, Zachary A.; Hsu, Wellington K.; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L.; Rahman, Ra?Kerry K.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Multicenter retrospective case series and review of the literature. Objective: To determine the rate of esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Methods: As part of an AOSpine series on rare complications, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data from patients? charts and created case report forms fo...

  9. Comparison of Patient Outcomes and Cost of Overlapping Versus Nonoverlapping Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Sizdahkhani, Saman; Keefe, Malla; Lee, Janelle; Chou, Dean; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-04-01

    Overlapping surgery recently has gained significant media attention, but there are limited data on its safety and efficacy. To date, there has been no analysis of overlapping surgery in the field of spine. Our goal was to compare overlapping versus nonoverlapping spine surgery patient outcomes and cost. A retrospective review was undertaken of 2319 spine surgeries (n = 848 overlapping; 1471 nonoverlapping) performed by 3 neurosurgery attendings from 2012 to 2015 at the University of California San Francisco. Collected variables included patient age, sex, insurance, American Society of Anesthesiology score, severity of illness, risk of mortality, procedure type, surgeon, day of surgery, source of transfer, admission type, overlapping versus nonoverlapping surgery (≥1 minute of overlapping procedure time), Medicare-Severity Diagnosis-Related Group, osteotomy, and presence of another attending/fellow/resident. Univariate, then multivariate mixed-effect models were used to evaluate the effect of the collected variables on the following outcomes: procedure time, estimated blood loss, length of stay, discharge status, 30-day mortality, 30-day unplanned readmission, unplanned return to OR, and total hospital cost. Urgent spine cases were more likely to be done in an overlapping fashion (all P return to the operating room, estimated blood loss, length of stay, and total hospital cost (all P = ns). Overlapping spine surgery may be performed safely at our institution, although continued monitoring of patient outcomes is necessary. Overlapping surgery does not lead to greater hospital costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Complications in lumbar spine surgery: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Proietti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatment of adult lumbar spinal disorders is associated with a substantial risk of intraoperative and perioperative complications. There is no clearly defined medical literature on complication in lumbar spine surgery. Purpose of the study is to retrospectively evaluate intraoperative and perioperative complications who underwent various lumbar surgical procedures and to study the possible predisposing role of advanced age in increasing this rate. Materials and Methods: From 2007 to 2011 the number and type of complications were recorded and both univariate, (considering the patients′ age and a multivariate statistical analysis was conducted in order to establish a possible predisposing role. 133 were lumbar disc hernia treated with microdiscetomy, 88 were lumbar stenosis, treated in 36 cases with only decompression, 52 with decompression and instrumentation with a maximum of 2 levels. 26 patients showed a lumbar fracture treated with percutaneous or open screw fixation. 12 showed a scoliotic or kyphotic deformity treated with decompression, fusion and osteotomies with a maximum of 7.3 levels of fusion (range 5-14. 70 were spondylolisthesis treated with 1 or more level of fusion. In 34 cases a fusion till S1 was performed. Results: Of the 338 patients who underwent surgery, 55 showed one or more complications. Type of surgical treatment ( P = 0.004, open surgical approach (open P = 0.001 and operative time ( P = 0.001 increased the relative risk (RR of complication occurrence of 2.3, 3.8 and 5.1 respectively. Major complications are more often seen in complex surgical treatment for severe deformities, in revision surgery and in anterior approaches with an occurrence of 58.3%. Age greater than 65 years, despite an increased RR of perioperative complications (1.5, does not represent a predisposing risk factor to complications ( P = 0.006. Conclusion: Surgical decision-making and exclusion of patients is not justified only

  11. Does previous abdominal surgery affect the course and outcomes of laparoscopic bariatric surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Piotr; Droś, Jakub; Kacprzyk, Artur; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Małczak, Piotr; Wysocki, Michał; Janik, Michał; Walędziak, Maciej; Paśnik, Krzysztof; Hady, Hady Razak; Dadan, Jacek; Proczko-Stepaniak, Monika; Kaska, Łukasz; Lech, Paweł; Michalik, Maciej; Duchnik, Michał; Kaseja, Krzysztof; Pastuszka, Maciej; Stepuch, Paweł; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2018-03-26

    Global experiences in general surgery suggest that previous abdominal surgery may negatively influence different aspects of perioperative care. As the incidence of bariatric procedures has recently increased, it is essential to assess such correlations in bariatric surgery. To assess whether previous abdominal surgery influences the course and outcomes of laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Seven referral bariatric centers in Poland. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 2413 patients; 1706 patients who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (SG) or Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) matched the inclusion criteria. Patients with no history of abdominal surgery were included as group 1, while those who had undergone at least 1 abdominal surgery were included as group 2. Group 2 had a significantly prolonged median operation time for RYGB (P = .012), and the longest operation time was observed in patients who had previously undergone surgeries in both the upper and lower abdomen (P = .002). Such a correlation was not found in SG cases (P = .396). Groups 1 and 2 had similar rates of intraoperative adverse events and postoperative complications (P = .562 and P = .466, respectively). Group 2 had a longer median duration of hospitalization than group 1 (P = .034), while the readmission rate was similar between groups (P = .079). There was no significant difference between groups regarding the influence of the long-term effects of bariatric treatment on weight loss (percentage of follow-up was 55%). Previous abdominal surgery prolongs the operative time of RYGB and the duration of postoperative hospitalization, but does not affect the long-term outcomes of bariatric treatment. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Carotid Artery Injury in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Multicenter Cohort Study and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtl, Roger; Alimi, Marjan; Abdelatif Boukebir, Mohamed; Berlin, Connor D; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective study and literature review. To provide more comprehensive data about carotid artery injury (CAI) or cerebrovascular accident (CVA) related to anterior cervical spine surgery. We conducted a retrospective, multicenter, case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records of 17 625 patients who went through cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were analyzed. Also, we performed a literature review using Medline and PubMed databases. The following terms were used alone, and in combination, to search for relevant articles: cervical, spine, surgery, complication, iatrogenic, carotid artery, injury, cerebrovascular accident, CVA, and carotid stenosis. Among 17 625 patients that were analyzed, no cases were reported to experienced CAI or CVA after cervical spine surgery. Nevertheless, in our PubMed search we found 157 articles, but only 5 articles matched our study objective criteria; 2 cases were reported to present CAI and 3 cases presented CVA. CAI and CVA related to anterior cervical spine surgeries are extremely rare. We were not able to find neither in our retrospective study nor in our literature research a correlation between the type or length of anterior cervical spine procedure with CVA or CAI complications. However, surgeons should be aware of the possibility of vascular complications and minimize intraoperative direct vascular manipulations or retraction. Preoperative screening for underlying vascular pathology and risk factors is also important.

  13. Corneal perforation after conductive keratoplasty with previous refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Titze, Patrik; Markomanolakis, Marinos M; Aslanides, Ioannis M; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2003-12-01

    A 56-year-old woman had conductive keratoplasty (CK) for residual hyperopia and astigmatism. Three years before the procedure, the patient had arcuate keratotomy, followed by laser in situ keratomileusis 2 years later for high astigmatism correction in both eyes. During CK, a corneal perforation occurred in the right eye; during the postoperative examination, an iris perforation and anterior subcapsule opacification were seen beneath the perforation site. The perforation was managed with a bandage contact lens and an antibiotic-steroid ointment; it had a negative Seidel sign by the third day. The surgery in the left eye was uneventful. Three months after the procedure, the uncorrected visual acuity was 20/32 and the best corrected visual acuity 20/20 in both eyes with a significant improvement in corneal topography. Care must be taken to prevent CK-treated spots from coinciding with areas in the corneal stroma that might have been altered by previous refractive procedures.

  14. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoordinated trajectories....... The patients describe a feeling of being mistrusted and thrown around in the system. It is the aim of this study to examine how spine fusion patients experience their illness trajectory and hospitalisation. Methods The study is based on qualitative interviews, and the data analysis is inspired by the French...... system and healthcare professionals are often dismissed as irrelevant. It is also evident that spine fusion patients are denied the opportunity to verbalise what it feels like to, for example, be ”a person in constant pain” or someone who ”holds back” to avoid being an inconvenience. These feelings...

  15. Minimally invasive versus open spine surgery: What does the best evidence tell us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearwood McClelland

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spine surgery has been transformed significantly by the growth of minimally invasive surgery (MIS procedures. Easily marketable to patients as less invasive with smaller incisions, MIS is often perceived as superior to traditional open spine surgery. The highest quality evidence comparing MIS with open spine surgery was examined. Methods: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs involving MIS versus open spine surgery was performed using the Entrez gateway of the PubMed database for articles published in English up to December 28, 2015. RCTs and systematic reviews of RCTs of MIS versus open spine surgery were evaluated for three particular entities: Cervical disc herniation, lumbar disc herniation, and posterior lumbar fusion. Results: A total of 17 RCTs were identified, along with six systematic reviews. For cervical disc herniation, MIS provided no difference in overall function, arm pain relief, or long-term neck pain. In lumbar disc herniation, MIS was inferior in providing leg/low back pain relief, rehospitalization rates, quality of life improvement, and exposed the surgeon to >10 times more radiation in return for shorter hospital stay and less surgical site infection. In posterior lumbar fusion, MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF had significantly reduced 2-year societal cost, fewer medical complications, reduced time to return to work, and improved short-term Oswestry Disability Index scores at the cost of higher revision rates, higher readmission rates, and more than twice the amount of intraoperative fluoroscopy. Conclusion: The highest levels of evidence do not support MIS over open surgery for cervical or lumbar disc herniation. However, MIS TLIF demonstrates advantages along with higher revision/readmission rates. Regardless of patient indication, MIS exposes the surgeon to significantly more radiation; it is unclear how this impacts patients. These results should optimize informed

  16. Minimally Invasive versus Open Spine Surgery: What Does the Best Evidence Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Shearwood; Goldstein, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-01

    Spine surgery has been transformed significantly by the growth of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) procedures. Easily marketable to patients as less invasive with smaller incisions, MIS is often perceived as superior to traditional open spine surgery. The highest quality evidence comparing MIS with open spine surgery was examined. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving MIS versus open spine surgery was performed using the Entrez gateway of the PubMed database for articles published in English up to December 28, 2015. RCTs and systematic reviews of RCTs of MIS versus open spine surgery were evaluated for three particular entities: Cervical disc herniation, lumbar disc herniation, and posterior lumbar fusion. A total of 17 RCTs were identified, along with six systematic reviews. For cervical disc herniation, MIS provided no difference in overall function, arm pain relief, or long-term neck pain. In lumbar disc herniation, MIS was inferior in providing leg/low back pain relief, rehospitalization rates, quality of life improvement, and exposed the surgeon to >10 times more radiation in return for shorter hospital stay and less surgical site infection. In posterior lumbar fusion, MIS transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) had significantly reduced 2-year societal cost, fewer medical complications, reduced time to return to work, and improved short-term Oswestry Disability Index scores at the cost of higher revision rates, higher readmission rates, and more than twice the amount of intraoperative fluoroscopy. The highest levels of evidence do not support MIS over open surgery for cervical or lumbar disc herniation. However, MIS TLIF demonstrates advantages along with higher revision/readmission rates. Regardless of patient indication, MIS exposes the surgeon to significantly more radiation; it is unclear how this impacts patients. These results should optimize informed decision-making regarding MIS versus open spine surgery

  17. Esophageal Perforation Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershman, Stuart H; Kunkle, William A; Kelly, Michael P; Buchowski, Jacob M; Ray, Wilson Z; Bumpass, David B; Gum, Jeffrey L; Peters, Colleen M; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Kim, Jin Young; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Rahman, Ra'Kerry K; Isaacs, Robert E; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Thompson, Sara E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series and review of the literature. To determine the rate of esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. As part of an AOSpine series on rare complications, a retrospective cohort study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data from patients' charts and created case report forms for each event identified. Case report forms were then sent to the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing and analysis. The records of 9591 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery were reviewed. Two (0.02%) were found to have esophageal perforations following anterior cervical spine surgery. Both cases were detected and treated in the acute postoperative period. One patient was successfully treated with primary repair and debridement. One patient underwent multiple debridement attempts and expired. Esophageal perforation following anterior cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Prompt recognition and treatment of these injuries is critical to minimizing morbidity and mortality.

  18. Thoracic Duct Injury Following Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review

    OpenAIRE

    Derakhshan, Adeeb; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P.; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Pace, Jonathan R.; Smith, Gabriel A.; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Mohamad; Arnold, Paul M.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Riew, K. Daniel; Mroz, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Study Design: Multicenter retrospective case series. Objective: To determine the rate of thoracic duct injury during cervical spine operations. Methods: A retrospective case series study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify instances of thoracic duct injury during anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data for each identified case into case report forms. All case report forms were collected by the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Ne...

  19. A Multicenter Review of Superior Laryngeal Nerve Injury Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Zachary J; Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel; Kanter, Adam S

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective multicenter case-series study; case report and review of the literature. The anatomy and function of the superior laryngeal nerve (SLN) are well described; however, the consequences of SLN injury remain variable and poorly defined. The prevalence of SLN injury as a consequence of cervical spine surgery is difficult to discern as its clinical manifestations are often inconstant and frequently of a subclinical degree. A multicenter study was performed to better delineate the risk factors, prevalence, and outcomes of SLN injury. A retrospective multicenter case-series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AO Spine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received subaxial cervical spine surgery from 2005 to 2011 were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Descriptive statistics were provided for baseline patient characteristics. A retrospective review of the neurosurgical literature on SLN injury was also performed. A total of 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery at the participating institutions were screened, and 1 case of SLN palsy was identified. The prevalence ranged from 0% to 1.25% across all centers. The patient identified underwent a C4 corpectomy. The SLN injury was identified after the patient demonstrated difficulty swallowing postoperatively. He underwent placement of a percutaneous gastrostomy tube and his SLN palsy resolved by 6 weeks. This multicenter study demonstrates that identification of SLN injury occurs very infrequently. Symptomatic SLN injury is an exceedingly rare complication of anterior cervical spine surgery. The SLN is particularly vulnerable when exposing the more rostral levels of the cervical spine. Careful dissection and retraction of the longus coli may decrease the risk of SLN injury during anterior cervical surgery.

  20. Vertebral artery injury in cervical spine surgery: anatomical considerations, management, and preventive measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chan W; Chou, Benedict T; Bendo, John A; Spivak, Jeffrey M

    2009-01-01

    Vertebral artery (VA) injury can be a catastrophic iatrogenic complication of cervical spine surgery. Although the incidence is rare, it has serious consequences including fistulas, pseudoaneurysm, cerebral ischemia, and death. It is therefore imperative to be familiar with the anatomy and the instrumentation techniques when performing anterior or posterior cervical spine surgeries. To provide a review of VA injury during common anterior and posterior cervical spine procedures with an evaluation of the surgical anatomy, management, and prevention of this injury. Comprehensive literature review. A systematic review of Medline for articles related to VA injury in cervical spine surgery was conducted up to and including journal articles published in 2007. The literature was then reviewed and summarized. Overall, the risk of VA injury during cervical spine surgery is low. In anterior cervical procedures, lateral dissection puts the VA at the most risk, so sound anatomical knowledge and constant reference to the midline are mandatory during dissection. With the development and rise in popularity of posterior cervical stabilization and instrumentation, recognition of the dangers of posterior drilling and insertion of transarticular screws and pedicle screws is important. Anomalous vertebral anatomy increases the risk of injury and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography (CT) scans should be carefully reviewed. When the VA is injured, steps should be taken to control local bleeding. Permanent occlusion or ligation should only be attempted if it is known that the contralateral VA is capable of providing adequate collateral circulation. With the advent of endovascular repair, this treatment option can be considered when a VA injury is encountered. VA injury during cervical spine surgery is a rare but serious complication. It can be prevented by careful review of preoperative imaging studies, having a sound anatomical knowledge and paying attention

  1. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  2. Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter AOSpine Clinical Research Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Mohamad; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Mroz, Thomas E; Fehlings, Michael; Arnold, Paul M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective study. To investigate the risk of symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (RLNP) following cervical spine surgery, to examine risk factors for its development, and to report its treatment and outcomes. A multicenter study from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was performed. Each center screened for rare complications following cervical spine surgery, including RLNP. Patients were included if they underwent cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. Data were analyzed with regard to complication treatment and outcome. Cases were compared to a control group from the AOSpine CSM and CSM-I studies. Three centers reported 19 cases of RLNP from a cohort of 1345 patients. The reported incidence of RLNP ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between these 3 centers. Fifteen patients (79%) in the RLNP group were approached from the left side. Ten patients (52.6%) required treatment for RLNP-6 required medical therapy (steroids), 1 interventional treatment (injection laryngoplasty), and 3 conservative therapy (speech therapy). When examining outcomes, 73.7% (14/19) of cases resolved completely, 15.8% (3/19) resolved with residual effects, and in 10.5% (2/19) of cases this could not be determined. In this multicenter study examining rare complications following cervical spine surgery, the risk of RLNP after cervical spine surgery ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between centers. Though rare, it was found that 16% of patients may experience partial resolution with residual effects, and 74% resolve completely.

  3. Efficacy of tranexamic acid on surgical bleeding in spine surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Thomas; Maier, Stephen P; Bianco, Kristina; Slobodyanyuk, Kseniya; Rattenni, Rachel N; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank J; Lonner, Baron S; Errico, Thomas J

    2015-04-01

    Spine surgery is usually associated with large amount of blood loss, necessitating blood transfusions. Blood loss-associated morbidity can be because of direct risks, such as hypotension and organ damage, or as a result of blood transfusions. The antifibrinolytic, tranexamic acid (TXA), is a lysine analog that inhibits activation of plasminogen and has shown to be beneficial in reducing surgical blood loss. To consolidate the findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the use of TXA on surgical bleeding in spine surgery. A metaanalysis. Randomized controlled trials investigating the effectiveness of intravenous TXA in reducing blood loss in spine surgery, compared with a placebo/no treatment group. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane controlled trials register, and Google Scholar were used to identify RCTs published before January 2014 that examined the effectiveness of intravenous TXA on reduction of blood loss and blood transfusions, compared with a placebo/no treatment group in spine surgery. Metaanalysis was performed using RevMan 5. Weighted mean difference with 95% confidence intervals was used to summarize the findings across the trials for continuous outcomes. Dichotomous data were expressed as risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals. A pTranexamic acid reduced intraoperative, postoperative, and total blood loss by an average of 219 mL ([-322, -116], pTranexamic acid led to a reduction in proportion of patients who received a blood transfusion (risk ratio 0.67 [0.54, 0.83], pTranexamic acid reduces surgical bleeding and transfusion requirements in patients undergoing spine surgery. Tranexamic acid does not appear to be associated with an increased incidence of pulmonary embolism, DVT, or MI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Variation in payments for spine surgery episodes of care: implications for episode-based bundled payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Elyne N; Ellimoottil, Chandy; Dupree, James M; Park, Paul; Ryan, Andrew M

    2018-05-25

    OBJECTIVE Spine surgery is expensive and marked by high variation across regions and providers. Bundled payments have potential to reduce unwarranted spending associated with spine surgery. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of commercial and Medicare claims data from January 2012 through March 2015 in the state of Michigan. The objective was to quantify variation in payments for spine surgery in adult patients, document sources of variation, and determine influence of patient-level, surgeon-level, and hospital-level factors. METHODS Hierarchical regression models were used to analyze contributions of patient-level covariates and influence of individual surgeons and hospitals. The primary outcome was price-standardized 90-day episode payments. Intraclass correlation coefficients-measures of variability accounted for by each level of a hierarchical model-were used to quantify sources of spending variation. RESULTS The authors analyzed 17,436 spine surgery episodes performed by 195 surgeons at 50 hospitals. Mean price-standardized 90-day episode payments in the highest spending quintile exceeded mean payments for episodes in the lowest cost quintile by $42,953 (p accounting for patient-level covariates, the remaining hospital-level and surgeon-level effects accounted for 2.0% (95% CI 1.1%-3.8%) and 4.0% (95% CI 2.9%-5.6%) of total variation, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Significant variation exists in total episode payments for spine surgery, driven mostly by variation in post-discharge and facility payments. Hospital and surgeon effects account for relatively little of the observed variation.

  5. Robotic colorectal surgery: previous laparoscopic colorectal experience is not essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sian, Tanvir Singh; Tierney, G M; Park, H; Lund, J N; Speake, W J; Hurst, N G; Al Chalabi, H; Smith, K J; Tou, S

    2018-06-01

    A background in minimally invasive colorectal surgery (MICS) has been thought to be essential prior to robotic-assisted colorectal surgery (RACS). Our aim was to determine whether MICS is essential prior to starting RACS training based on results from our initial experience with RACS. Two surgeons from our centre received robotic training through the European Academy of Robotic Colorectal Surgery (EARCS). One surgeon had no prior formal MICS training. We reviewed the first 30 consecutive robotic colorectal procedures from a prospectively maintained database between November 2014 and January 2016 at our institution. Fourteen patients were male. Median age was 64.5 years (range 36-82) and BMI was 27.5 (range 20-32.5). Twelve procedures (40%) were performed by the non-MICS-trained surgeon: ten high anterior resections (one conversion), one low anterior resection and one abdomino-perineal resection of rectum (APER). The MICS-trained surgeon performed nine high and four low anterior resections, one APER and in addition three right hemicolectomies and one abdominal suture rectopexy. There were no intra-operative complications and two patients required re-operation. Median post-operative stay was five days (range 1-26). There were two 30-day re-admissions. All oncological resections had clear margins and median node harvest was 18 (range 9-39). Our case series demonstrates that a background in MICS is not essential prior to starting RACS training. Not having prior MICS training should not discourage surgeons from considering applying for a robotic training programme. Safe and successful robotic colorectal services can be established after completing a formal structured robotic training programme.

  6. Thoracic Duct Injury Following Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Adeeb; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Pace, Jonathan R; Smith, Gabriel A; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Mohamad; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Riew, K Daniel; Mroz, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series. To determine the rate of thoracic duct injury during cervical spine operations. A retrospective case series study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify instances of thoracic duct injury during anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data for each identified case into case report forms. All case report forms were collected by the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing, cleaning, and analysis. Of a total of 9591 patients reviewed that underwent cervical spine surgery, 2 (0.02%) incurred iatrogenic injury to the thoracic duct. Both patients underwent a left-sided anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The interruption of the thoracic duct was addressed intraoperatively in one patient with no residual postoperative effects. The second individual developed a chylous fluid collection approximately 2 months after the operation that required drainage via needle aspiration. Damage to the thoracic duct during cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Rapid identification of the disruption of this lymphatic vessel is critical to minimize deleterious effects of this complication.

  7. Recurrent Laryngeal Edema Imitating Angioedema Caused by Dislocated Screw after Anterior Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wójtowicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis.

  8. Efficacy, safety, and economics of bracing after spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mary P; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Sorefan-Mangou, Fatimah; Garwood, Philip; Wilson, Jefferson R

    2018-01-31

    Bracing is often used after spinal surgery to immobilize the spine, improve fusion, and relieve pain. However, controversy exists regarding the efficacy, necessity, and safety of various bracing techniques in the postsurgical setting. In this systematic review, we aimed to compare the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of postoperative bracing versus no postoperative bracing after spinal surgery in patients with several common operative spinal pathologies. A systematic review was carried out to compare postoperative bracing and no postoperative bracing. A systematic search was conducted of MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaboration Library from 1970 to May 2017, supplemented by manual searching of the reference list of relevant studies and previously published reviews. Studies were included if they compared disability, quality of life, functional impairment, radiographic outcomes, cost-effectiveness, or complications between patients treated with postoperative bracing and patients not receiving any postoperative bracing. Each article was critically appraised independently by two reviewers, and the overall body of evidence was rated using guidelines outlined by the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. Of the 858 retrieved citations, 5 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review, consisting of 4 randomized controlled trials and 1 prospective cohort study. Low to moderate evidence suggests that there are no significant differences in most measures of disability, pain, quality of life, functional impairment, radiographic outcomes, and safety between groups. Isolated studies reported statistically significant and inconsistent differences between groups with respect to Neck Disability Index at 6 weeks postoperatively or Short Form-36 Physical Component Score at 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Based on limited evidence, postoperative bracing does not result in improved

  9. Assessing Online Patient Education Readability for Spine Surgery Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Haws, Brittany E; Khechen, Benjamin; Massel, Dustin H; Mayo, Benjamin C; Singh, Kern

    2018-03-01

    Increased patient reliance on Internet-based health information has amplified the need for comprehensible online patient education articles. As suggested by the American Medical Association and National Institute of Health, spine fusion articles should be written for a 4th-6th-grade reading level to increase patient comprehension, which may improve postoperative outcomes. The purpose of this study is to determine the readability of online health care education information relating to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and lumbar fusion procedures. Online health-education resource qualitative analysis. Three search engines were utilized to access patient education articles for common cervical and lumbar spine procedures. Relevant articles were analyzed for readability using Readability Studio Professional Edition software (Oleander Software Ltd). Articles were stratified by organization type as follows: General Medical Websites (GMW), Healthcare Network/Academic Institutions (HNAI), and Private Practices (PP). Thirteen common readability tests were performed with the mean readability of each compared between subgroups using analysis of variance. ACDF and lumbar fusion articles were determined to have a mean readability of 10.7±1.5 and 11.3±1.6, respectively. GMW, HNAI, and PP subgroups had a mean readability of 10.9±2.9, 10.7±2.8, and 10.7±2.5 for ACDF and 10.9±3.0, 10.8±2.9, and 11.6±2.7 for lumbar fusion articles. Of 310 total articles, only 6 (3 ACDF and 3 lumbar fusion) were written for comprehension below a 7th-grade reading level. Current online literature from medical websites containing information regarding ACDF and lumbar fusion procedures are written at a grade level higher than the suggested guidelines. Therefore, current patient education articles should be revised to accommodate the average reading level in the United States and may result in improved patient comprehension and postoperative outcomes.

  10. Effect of liberal blood transfusion on clinical outcomes and cost in spine surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Taylor E; Goodwin, C Rory; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Ahmed, A Karim; Lafage, Virginie; Neuman, Brian J; Passias, Peter G; Kebaish, Khaled M; Frank, Steven M; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2017-09-01

    Blood transfusions in spine surgery are shown to be associated with increased patient morbidity. The association between transfusion performed using a liberal hemoglobin (Hb) trigger-defined as an intraoperative Hb level of ≥10 g/dL, a postoperative level of ≥8 g/dL, or a whole hospital nadir between 8 and 10 g/dL-and perioperative morbidity and cost in spine surgery patients is unknown and thus was investigated in this study. This study aimed to describe the perioperative outcomes and economic cost associated with liberal Hb trigger transfusion among spine surgery patients. This is a retrospective study. The surgical billing database at our institution was queried for inpatients discharged between 2008 and 2015 after the following procedures: atlantoaxial fusion, anterior cervical fusion, posterior cervical fusion, anterior lumbar fusion, posterior lumbar fusion, lateral lumbar fusion, other procedures, and tumor-related surgeries. In total, 6,931 patients were included for analysis. The primary outcome was composite morbidity, which was composed of (1) infection (sepsis, surgical-site infection, Clostridium difficile infection, or drug-resistant infection); (2) thrombotic event (pulmonary embolus, deep venous thrombosis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation); (3) kidney injury; (4) respiratory event; and (5) ischemic event (transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular accident). Data on intraoperative transfusion were obtained from an automated, prospectively collected anesthesia data management system. Data on postoperative hospital transfusion were obtained through a Web-based intelligence portal. Based on previous research, we analyzed the data using three definitions of a liberal transfusion trigger in patients who underwent red blood cell transfusion: a liberal intraoperative Hb trigger as a nadir Hb level of 10 g/dL or greater, a liberal postoperative Hb trigger as a nadir Hb level of 8 g/dL or greater, or a whole

  11. Towards standardized measurement of adverse events in spine surgery: conceptual model and pilot evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyo Richard A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Independent of efficacy, information on safety of surgical procedures is essential for informed choices. We seek to develop standardized methodology for describing the safety of spinal operations and apply these methods to study lumbar surgery. We present a conceptual model for evaluating the safety of spine surgery and describe development of tools to measure principal components of this model: (1 specifying outcome by explicit criteria for adverse event definition, mode of ascertainment, cause, severity, or preventability, and (2 quantitatively measuring predictors such as patient factors, comorbidity, severity of degenerative spine disease, and invasiveness of spine surgery. Methods We created operational definitions for 176 adverse occurrences and established multiple mechanisms for reporting them. We developed new methods to quantify the severity of adverse occurrences, degeneration of lumbar spine, and invasiveness of spinal procedures. Using kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients, we assessed agreement for the following: four reviewers independently coding etiology, preventability, and severity for 141 adverse occurrences, two observers coding lumbar spine degenerative changes in 10 selected cases, and two researchers coding invasiveness of surgery for 50 initial cases. Results During the first six months of prospective surveillance, rigorous daily medical record reviews identified 92.6% of the adverse occurrences we recorded, and voluntary reports by providers identified 38.5% (surgeons reported 18.3%, inpatient rounding team reported 23.1%, and conferences discussed 6.1%. Trained observers had fair agreement in classifying etiology of 141 adverse occurrences into 18 categories (kappa = 0.35, but agreement was substantial (kappa ≥ 0.61 for 4 specific categories: technical error, failure in communication, systems failure, and no error. Preventability assessment had moderate agreement (mean weighted

  12. Predicting complication risk in spine surgery: a prospective analysis of a novel risk assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeravagu, Anand; Li, Amy; Swinney, Christian; Tian, Lu; Moraff, Adrienne; Azad, Tej D; Cheng, Ivan; Alamin, Todd; Hu, Serena S; Anderson, Robert L; Shuer, Lawrence; Desai, Atman; Park, Jon; Olshen, Richard A; Ratliff, John K

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The ability to assess the risk of adverse events based on known patient factors and comorbidities would provide more effective preoperative risk stratification. Present risk assessment in spine surgery is limited. An adverse event prediction tool was developed to predict the risk of complications after spine surgery and tested on a prospective patient cohort. METHODS The spinal Risk Assessment Tool (RAT), a novel instrument for the assessment of risk for patients undergoing spine surgery that was developed based on an administrative claims database, was prospectively applied to 246 patients undergoing 257 spinal procedures over a 3-month period. Prospectively collected data were used to compare the RAT to the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Surgical Risk Calculator. Study end point was occurrence and type of complication after spine surgery. RESULTS The authors identified 69 patients (73 procedures) who experienced a complication over the prospective study period. Cardiac complications were most common (10.2%). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to compare complication outcomes using the different assessment tools. Area under the curve (AUC) analysis showed comparable predictive accuracy between the RAT and the ACS NSQIP calculator (0.670 [95% CI 0.60-0.74] in RAT, 0.669 [95% CI 0.60-0.74] in NSQIP). The CCI was not accurate in predicting complication occurrence (0.55 [95% CI 0.48-0.62]). The RAT produced mean probabilities of 34.6% for patients who had a complication and 24% for patients who did not (p = 0.0003). The generated predicted values were stratified into low, medium, and high rates. For the RAT, the predicted complication rate was 10.1% in the low-risk group (observed rate 12.8%), 21.9% in the medium-risk group (observed 31.8%), and 49.7% in the high-risk group (observed 41.2%). The ACS NSQIP calculator consistently

  13. C5 Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review of 59 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Nassr, Ahmad; Mroz, Thomas E; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Fehlings, Michael G; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Tortolani, P Justin; Traynelis, Vincent C; Gokaslan, Ziya; Hilibrand, Alan S; Isaacs, Robert E; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Chou, Dean; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Sasso, Rick C; Arnold, Paul M; Buser, Zorica; Bydon, Mohamad; Clarke, Michelle J; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Jobse, Bruce; Lord, Elizabeth L; Lubelski, Daniel; Massicotte, Eric M; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Cha, Peter I; Chatterjee, Dhananjay; Gee, Erica L; Mayer, Erik N; McBride, Owen J; Roe, Allison K; Yanez, Marisa Y; Stroh, D Alex; Than, Khoi D; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective review of C5 palsy after cervical spine surgery. Postoperative C5 palsy is a known complication of cervical decompressive spinal surgery. The goal of this study was to review the incidence, patient characteristics, and outcome of C5 palsy in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. We conducted a multicenter, retrospective review of 13 946 patients across 21 centers who received cervical spine surgery (levels C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, inclusive. P values were calculated using 2-sample t test for continuous variables and χ 2 tests or Fisher exact tests for categorical variables. Of the 13 946 cases reviewed, 59 patients experienced a postoperative C5 palsy. The incidence rate across the 21 sites ranged from 0% to 2.5%. At most recent follow-up, 32 patients reported complete resolution of symptoms (54.2%), 15 had symptoms resolve with residual effects (25.4%), 10 patients did not recover (17.0%), and 2 were lost to follow-up (3.4%). C5 palsy occurred in all surgical approaches and across a variety of diagnoses. The majority of patients had full recovery or recovery with residual effects. This study represents the largest series of North American patients reviewed to date.

  14. Technical Aspects on the Use of Ultrasonic Bone Shaver in Spine Surgery: Experience in 307 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derya Burcu Hazer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We discuss technical points, the safety, and efficacy of ultrasonic bone shaver in various spinal surgeries within our own series. Methods. Between June 2010 and January 2014, 307 patients with various spinal diseases were operated on with the use of an ultrasonic bone curette with microhook shaver (UBShaver. Patients’ data were recorded and analyzed retrospectively. The technique for the use of the device is described for each spine surgery procedure. Results. Among the 307 patients, 33 (10.7% cases had cervical disorder, 17 (5.5% thoracic disorder, 3 (0.9% foramen magnum disorder, and 254 (82.7% lumbar disorders. Various surgical techniques were performed either assisted or alone by UBShaver. The duration of the operations and the need for blood replacement were relatively low. The one-year follow-up with Neck Disability Index (NDI and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI scores were improved. We had 5 cases of dural tears (1.6% in patients with lumbar spinal disease. No neurological deficit was found in any patients. Conclusion. We recommend this device as an assistant tool in various spine surgeries and as a primary tool in foraminotomies. It is a safe device in spine surgery with very low complication rate.

  15. Surgical Site Infections Following Spine Surgery: Eliminating the Controversies in the Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad eChahoud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infection (SSI following spine surgery is a dreaded complication with significant morbidity and economic burden. SSIs following spine surgery can be superficial, characterized by obvious wound drainage, or deep-seated with a healed wound. Staphylococcus aureus remains the principal causal agent. There are certain pre-operative risk factors that increase the risk of SSI, mainly diabetes, smoking, steroids, and peri-operative transfusions. Additionally, intra-operative risk factors include surgical invasiveness, type of fusion, implant use, and traditional instead of minimally invasive approach. A high level of suspicion is crucial to attaining an early definitive diagnosis and initiating appropriate management. The most common presenting symptom is back pain, usually manifesting 2 to 4 weeks and up to 3 months after a spinal procedure. Scheduling a follow-up visit between weeks 2 to 4 after surgery is therefore necessary for early detection. Inflammatory markers are important diagnostic tools, and comparing pre-operative with post-operative levels should be done when suspecting SSIs following spine surgery. Particularly, Serum Amyloid A (SAA is a novel inflammatory marker that can expedite the diagnosis of SSIs. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the diagnostic modality of choice when suspecting a SSI following spine surgery. While 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is not widely used, it may be useful in challenging cases. Despite their low yield, blood cultures should be collected before initiating antibiotic therapy. Samples from wound drainage should be sent for Gram stain and cultures. When there is a high clinical suspicion of SSI and in the absence of superficial wound drainage, CT guided aspiration of paraspinal collections is warranted. Unless the patient is hemodynamically compromised, antibiotics should be deferred until proper specimens for culture are secured.

  16. The Arrival of Robotics in Spine Surgery: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasem, Alexander; Sharma, Akhil; Greif, Dylan N; Alam, Milad; Maaieh, Motasem Al

    2018-04-18

    Systematic Review. The authors aim to review comparative outcome measures between robotic and free-hand spine surgical procedures including: accuracy of spinal instrumentation, radiation exposure, operative time, hospital stay, and complication rates. Misplacement of pedicle screws in conventional open as well as minimally invasive surgical procedures has prompted the need for innovation and allowed the emergence of robotics in spine surgery. Prior to incorporation of robotic surgery in routine practice, demonstration of improved instrumentation accuracy, operative efficiency, and patient safety is required. A systematic search of the PubMed, OVID-MEDLINE, and Cochrane databases was performed for papers relevant to robotic assistance of pedicle screw placement. Inclusion criteria were constituted by English written randomized control trials, prospective and retrospective cohort studies involving robotic instrumentation in the spine. Following abstract, title, and full-text review, 32 articles were selected for study inclusion. Intrapedicular accuracy in screw placement and subsequent complications were at least comparable if not superior in the robotic surgery cohort. There is evidence supporting that total operative time is prolonged in robot assisted surgery compared to conventional free-hand. Radiation exposure appeared to be variable between studies; radiation time did decrease in the robot arm as the total number of robotic cases ascended, suggesting a learning curve effect. Multi-level procedures appeared to tend toward earlier discharge in patients undergoing robotic spine surgery. The implementation of robotic technology for pedicle screw placement yields an acceptable level of accuracy on a highly consistent basis. Surgeons should remain vigilant about confirmation of robotic assisted screw trajectory, as drilling pathways have been shown to be altered by soft tissue pressures, forceful surgical application, and bony surface skiving. However, the effective

  17. [Controversies about instrumented surgery and pain relief in degenerative lumbar spine pain. Results of scientific evidence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robaina-Padrón, F J

    2007-10-01

    Investigation and development of new techniques for intrumented surgery of the spine is not free of conflicts of interest. The influence of financial forces in the development of new technologies an its immediately application to spine surgery, shows the relationship between the published results and the industry support. Even authors who have defend eagerly fusion techniques, it have been demonstrated that them are very much involved in the revision of new articles to be published and in the approval process of new spinal technologies. When we analyze the published results of spine surgery, we must bear in mind what have been call in the "American Stock and Exchange" as "the bubble of spine surgery". The scientific literature doesn't show clear evidence in the cost-benefit studies of most instrumented surgical interventions of the spine compare with the conservative treatments. It has not been yet demonstrated that fusion surgery and disc replacement are better options than the conservative treatment. It's necessary to point out that at present "there are relationships between the industry and back pain, and there is also an industry of the back pain". Nonetheless, the "market of the spine surgery" is growing up because patients are demanding solutions for their back problems. The tide of scientific evidence seams to go against the spinal fusions in the degenerative disc disease, discogenic pain and inespecific back pain. After decades of advances in this field, the results of spinal fusions are mediocre. New epidemiological studies show that "spinal fusion must be accepted as a non proved or experimental method for the treatment of back pain". The surgical literature on spinal fusion published in the last 20 years following the Cochrane's method establish that: 1- this is at least incomplete, not reliable and careless; 2- the instrumentation seems to slightly increase the fusion rate; 3- the instrumentation doesn't improve the clinical results in general, lacking

  18. The "shadow sign": a radiographic differentiation of stainless steel versus titanium spinal instrumentation in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones-Quaidoo, Sean M; Novicoff, Wendy; Park, Andrew; Arlet, Vincent

    2011-12-01

    Stainless steel spinal instrumentation has been supplanted in recent years by titanium instrumentation. Knowing whether stainless steel or titanium was used in a previous surgery can guide clinical decision making processes, but frequently the clinician has no way to know what type of metal was used. We describe the radiographic "shadow sign," in which superimposed titanium rods and screws remain radiolucent enough that the contour of the underlying components can be seen on a lateral radiograph, whereas superimposed stainless steel rods and screws are completely radiopaque. This technique was evaluated using a retrospective, randomized, and blinded radiographic comparison of titanium and stainless steel spinal instrumentation. The objective was to determine whether the "shadow sign" can reliably differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation. Lateral radiographs from 16 cases of posterior spinal instrumentation (6 titanium, 6 stainless steel, and 2 replicates of each to assess intraobserver reliability) were randomly selected from a database of cases performed for pediatric scoliosis in a university setting from 2005 to 2009. The cases were randomized then shown to 19 orthopaedic surgery residents, 1 spine fellow, and 2 spine attendings. After the "shadow sign" was described, the surgeons were asked to determine what type of metal each implant was made of. The κ value for both stainless steel and titanium versus the gold standard was 0.83 [standard error (SE) = 0.053], indicating excellent agreement. The κ value for agreement between raters was 0.71 (SE = 0.016) and the κ value for agreement within raters was 0.70 (SE = 0.016), both of which indicated substantial agreement. The "shadow sign" can help a clinician differentiate titanium from stainless steel spinal instrumentation based on radiographic appearance alone. Furthermore, our study reveals that the level of experience in diagnosing spinal lateral radiographs also enhances the use of

  19. Cervical spine surgery performed in ambulatory surgical centers: Are patients being put at increased risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    Spine surgeons are being increasingly encouraged to perform cervical operations in outpatient ambulatory surgical centers (ASC). However, some studies/data coming out of these centers are provided by spine surgeons who are part or full owners/shareholders. In Florida, for example, there was a 50% increase in ASC (5349) established between 2000-2007; physicians had a stake (invested) in 83%, and outright owned 43% of ASC. Data regarding "excessive" surgery by ASC surgeon-owners from Idaho followed shortly thereafter. The risks/complications attributed to 3279 cervical spine operations performed in 6 ASC studies were reviewed. Several studies claimed 99% discharge rates the day of the surgery. They also claimed major complications were "picked up" within the average postoperative observation window (e.g., varying from 4-23 hours), allowing for appropriate treatment without further sequelae. Morbidity rates for outpatient cervical spine ASC studies (e.g. some with conflicts of interest) varied up to 0.8-6%, whereas morbidity rates for 3 inpatient cervical studies ranged up to 19.3%. For both groups, morbidity included postoperative dysphagia, epidural hematomas, neck swelling, vocal cord paralysis, and neurological deterioration. Although we have no clear documentation as to their safety, "excessive" and progressively complex cervical surgical procedures are increasingly being performed in ASC. Furthermore, we cannot rely upon ASC-based data. At least some demonstrate an inherent conflict of interest and do not veridically report major morbidity/mortality rates for outpatient procedures. For now, cervical spine surgery performed in ASC would appear to be putting patients at increased risk for the benefit of their surgeon-owners.

  20. Cervical bracing practices after degenerative cervical surgery: a survey of cervical spine research society members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardini, David J; Krag, Martin H; Mauser, Nathan S; Lee, Joon Y; Donaldson, William H; Kang, James D

    2018-05-21

    Context: Prior studies have shown common use of post-operative bracing, despite advances in modern day instrumentation rigidity and little evidence of brace effectiveness. To document current practice patterns of brace use after degenerative cervical spine surgeries among members of the Cervical Spine Research Society (CSRS), to evaluate trends, and to identify areas of further study. A questionnaire survey METHODS: A 10 question survey was sent to members of the Cervical Spine Research Society to document current routine bracing practices after various common degenerative cervical spine surgical scenarios, including fusion and non-fusion procedures. The overall bracing rate was 67%. This included 8.4% who used a hard collar in each scenario. Twenty-two percent of surgeons never used a hard collar, while 34% never used a soft collar, and 3.6% (3 respondents) did not use a brace in any surgical scenario. Bracing frequency for specific surgical scenarios varied from 39% after foraminotomy to 88% after multi-level corpectomy with anterior & posterior fixation. After one, two and three level anterior cervical discectomy & fusion (ACDF), bracing rates were 58%, 65% and 76% for an average of 3.3, 4.3 and 5.3 weeks, respectively. After single level corpectomy, 77% braced for an average of 6.2 weeks. After laminectomy and fusion, 72% braced for an average of 5.4 weeks. Significant variation persists among surgeons on the type and length of post-operative brace usage after cervical spine surgeries. Overall rates of bracing have not changed significantly with time. Given the lack evidence in the literature to support bracing, reconsidering use of a brace after certain surgeries may be warranted. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Do authors report surgical expertise in open spine surgery related randomized controlled trials? A systematic review on quality of reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oldenrijk, Jakob; van Berkel, Youri; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Bhandari, Mohit; Poolman, Rudolf W.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic review of published trials in orthopedic spine literature. To determine the quality of reporting in open spine surgery randomized controlled trials (RCTs) between 2005 and 2010 with special focus on the reporting of surgical skill or expertise. In technically demanding procedures such

  2. An evidence-based clinical guideline for the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Christopher M; Watters, William C; Heggeness, Michael H; Resnick, Daniel K; Shaffer, William O; Baisden, Jamie; Ben-Galim, Peleg; Easa, John E; Fernand, Robert; Lamer, Tim; Matz, Paul G; Mendel, Richard C; Patel, Rajeev K; Reitman, Charles A; Toton, John F

    2009-12-01

    The objective of the North American Spine Society (NASS) Evidence-Based Clinical Guideline on antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery was to provide evidence-based recommendations to address key clinical questions surrounding the use of antithrombotic therapies in spine surgery. The guideline is intended to address these questions based on the highest quality clinical literature available on this subject as of February 2008. The goal of the guideline recommendations was to assist in delivering optimum, efficacious treatment with the goal of preventing thromboembolic events. To provide an evidence-based, educational tool to assist spine surgeons in minimizing the risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Systematic review and evidence-based clinical guideline. This report is from the Antithrombotic Therapies Work Group of the NASS Evidence-Based Guideline Development Committee. The work group was composed of multidisciplinary spine care specialists, all of whom were trained in the principles of evidence-based analysis. Each member of the group was involved in formatting a series of clinical questions to be addressed by the group. The final questions agreed on by the group are the subject of this report. A literature search addressing each question and using a specific search protocol was performed on English language references found in MEDLINE, EMBASE (Drugs and Pharmacology), and four additional, evidence-based databases. The relevant literature was then independently rated by at least three reviewers using the NASS-adopted standardized levels of evidence. An evidentiary table was created for each of the questions. Final grades of recommendation for the answers to each clinical question were arrived at via Web casts among members of the work group using standardized grades of recommendation. When Level I to IV evidence was insufficient to support a recommendation to answer a specific clinical question, expert consensus was arrived at by

  3. A comprehensive multimodal pain treatment reduces opioid consumption after multilevel spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Ole; Dahl, Benny; Thomsen, Berit A

    2013-01-01

    and postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) treatment protocol would improve pain treatment in this population. METHODS: A new regimen with acetaminophen, NSAIDs, gabapentin, S-ketamine, dexamethasone, ondansetron and epidural local anesthetic infusion or patient controlled analgesia with morphine, was introduced......PURPOSE: Major spine surgery with multilevel instrumentation is followed by large amount of opioid consumption, significant pain and difficult mobilization in a population of predominantly chronic pain patients. This case-control study investigated if a standardized comprehensive pain...... and dizziness on POD 1-6. CONCLUSIONS: In this study of patients scheduled for multilevel spine surgery, it was demonstrated that compared to a historic group of patients receiving usual care, a comprehensive and standardized multimodal pain and PONV protocol significantly reduced opioid consumption, improved...

  4. A Review of Current Clinical Applications of Three-Dimensional Printing in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woojin; Job, Alan Varkey; Chen, Jing; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2018-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a transformative technology with a potentially wide range of applications in the field of orthopaedic spine surgery. This article aims to review the current applications, limitations, and future developments of 3D printing technology in orthopaedic spine surgery. Current preoperative applications of 3D printing include construction of complex 3D anatomic models for improved visual understanding, preoperative surgical planning, and surgical simulations for resident education. Intraoperatively, 3D printers have been successfully used in surgical guidance systems and in the creation of patient specific implantable devices. Furthermore, 3D printing is revolutionizing the field of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, allowing construction of biocompatible scaffolds suitable for cell growth and vasculature. Advances in printing technology and evidence of positive clinical outcomes are needed before there is an expansion of 3D printing applied to the clinical setting.

  5. Metastatic spine tumor surgery: does perioperative blood transfusion influence postoperative complications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Saparamadu, Amarasinghe A; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-11-01

    The question of independent association between allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) and postoperative complications in cancer surgeries has been controversial and remains so. In metastatic spine tumor surgery (MSTS), previous studies investigated the influence of ABT on survival, but not on postoperative complications. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. This retrospective study included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The outcome measures were postoperative complications and infections within 30 days after MSTS. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to assess influence of blood transfusion on the outcomes after adjusting for potential confounders. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT with overall median (range) of 2 (0-10) units. The adjusted odds of developing any postoperative complication was 2.27 times higher in patients with transfusion (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17-4.38; p = 0.01) and 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in blood transfusion (95% CI, 1.05-1.46; p blood transfusion also increased the odds of having overall postoperative infections (odds ratio, 3.58; 95% CI, 1.15-11.11; p = 0.02) and there were 1.24 times higher odds per every unit increase in transfusion (95% CI, 1.01-1.54; p = 0.04). This study adds evidence to the literature implicating ABT to be influential on postoperative complications and infections in patients undergoing MSTS. Appropriate blood management measures should, therefore, be given a crucial place in the care of these patients so as to reduce any putative effect of blood transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  6. Incidence and Outcomes of Acute Implant Extrusion Following Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Mroz, Thomas E; Nassr, Ahmad; Fehlings, Michael G; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Arnold, Paul M; Bumpass, David B; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Mohamad; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2017-04-01

    Multi-institutional retrospective case series of 8887 patients who underwent anterior cervical spine surgery. Anterior decompression from discectomy or corpectomy is not without risk. Surgical morbidity ranges from 9% to 20% and is likely underreported. Little is known of the incidence and effects of rare complications on functional outcomes following anterior spinal surgery. In this retrospective review, we examined implant extrusions (IEs) following anterior cervical fusion. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of 21 predefined treatment complications. Following anterior cervical fusion, the incidence of IE ranged from 0.0% to 0.8% across 21 institutions with 11 cases reported. All surgeries involved multiple levels, and 7/11 (64%) involved either multilevel corpectomies or hybrid constructs with at least one adjacent discectomy to a corpectomy. In 7/11 (64%) patients, constructs ended with reconstruction or stabilization at C7. Nine patients required surgery for repair and stabilization following IE. Average length of hospital stay after IE was 5.2 days. Only 2 (18%) had residual deficits after reoperation. IE is a very rare complication after anterior cervical spine surgery often requiring revision. Constructs requiring multilevel reconstruction, especially at the cervicothoracic junction, have a higher risk for failure, and surgeons should proceed with caution in using an anterior-only approach in these demanding cases. Surgeons can expect most patients to regain function after reoperation.

  7. Risk factors for surgical site infection and urinary tract infection after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Hiroyuki; Setoguchi, Takao; Ishidou, Yasuhiro; Nagano, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takuya; Komiya, Setsuro

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to identify and compare risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and non-surgical site infections (non-SSIs), particularly urinary tract infection (UTI), after spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 825 patients (median age 59.0 years (range 33-70 years); 442 males) who underwent spine surgery at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 2009 to December 2014. Patient parameters were compared using the Mann-Whitney U and Fisher's exact tests. Risk factors associated with SSI and UTI were analyzed via the multiple logistic regression analysis. P operation time (P = 0.0019 and 0.0162, respectively) and ASA classification 3 (P = 0.0132 and 0.0356, respectively). The 1 week post-operative C-reactive protein (CRP) level was a risk factor for UTI (P = 0.0299), but not for SSI (P = 0.4996). There was no relationship between SSI and symptomatic UTI after spine surgery. Risk factors for post-operative SSI and UTI were operative time and ASA classification 3; 1 week post-operative CRP was a risk factor for UTI only.

  8. Multiple hemorrhages in brain after spine surgery supra- and infra-tentorial components together

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after cranial and spinal surgeries is a well-documented entity, so far concomitant supra- and infra-tentorial hemorrhage after spine surgery has rarely been reported in the literature. A 57-year-old woman presented with intractable low back pain and severely impaired mobility. One year ago, she underwent lumbar laminectomy and fusion with posterior spinal instrumentation between L2 and S1. She developed adjacent segment disease at the upper level of the instrumented vertebra. She had a revision surgery and underwent posterior laminectomy and fusion with bilateral transpedicular instrumentation between T10 and S1. She had severe headache, somnolence, and left hemiparesia 48 h after the surgery. Her emergent head computed tomography depicted intra-parenchymal hemorrhage in the right parietal lobe accompanying with subarachnoid hemorrhage, bilateral symmetrical cerebellar hemorrhages and pneumocephalus. She was treated nonsurgically and she got better despite some residual deficits. Symptoms including constant headache, nausea, vomiting, impaired consciousness, new onset seizure, and focal neurological deficit after spine surgeries should raise suspicion for intracranial intra-parenchymal hemorrhage.

  9. Impact of preoperative diagnosis on patient satisfaction following lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Charles H; Carreon, Leah Y; Bydon, Mohamad; Asher, Anthony L; Glassman, Steven D

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Patient satisfaction is a commonly used metric in the current health care environment. While factors that affect patient satisfaction following spine surgery are complex, the authors of this study hypothesized that specific diagnostic groups of patients are more likely to be satisfied after spine surgery and that this is reflected in patient-reported outcome measures. The purpose of this study was to determine if the preoperative diagnosis-disc herniation, stenosis, spondylolisthesis, adjacent segment degeneration, or mechanical disc collapse-would impact patient satisfaction following surgery. METHODS Patients enrolled in the Quality Outcomes Database, formerly known as the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N 2 QOD), completed patient-reported outcome measures, including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for back pain (NRS-BP) and leg pain (NRS-LP) preoperatively and 1-year postoperatively. Patients were stratified by diagnosis and by their response to the satisfaction question: 1) surgery met my expectations; 2) I did not improve as much as I hoped, but I would undergo the same operation for the same results; 3) surgery helped, but I would not undergo the same operation for the same results; or 4) I am the same or worse as compared with before surgery. RESULTS A greater proportion of patients with primary disc herniation or spondylolisthesis reported that surgery met expectations (66% and 67%, respectively), followed by recurrent disc herniation and stenosis (59% and 60%, respectively). A smaller proportion of patients who underwent surgery for adjacent segment degeneration or mechanical disc collapse had their expectations met (48% and 41%, respectively). The percentage of patients that would undergo the same surgery again, by diagnostic group, was as follows: disc herniation 88%, recurrent disc herniation 79%, spondylolisthesis 86%, stenosis 82%, adjacent segment disease 75%, and mechanical collapse

  10. Design-Based Comparison of Spine Surgery Simulators: Optimizing Educational Features of Surgical Simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Mostafa, Ahmed E; Dharampal, Navjit; Sharlin, Ehud; Kopp, Gail; Jacobs, W Bradley; Hurlbert, R John; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-10-01

    Simulation-based education has made its entry into surgical residency training, particularly as an adjunct to hands-on clinical experience. However, one of the ongoing challenges to wide adoption is the capacity of simulators to incorporate educational features required for effective learning. The aim of this study was to identify strengths and limitations of spine simulators to characterize design elements that are essential in enhancing resident education. We performed a mixed qualitative and quantitative cohort study with a focused survey and interviews of stakeholders in spine surgery pertaining to their experiences on 3 spine simulators. Ten participants were recruited spanning all levels of training and expertise until qualitative analysis reached saturation of themes. Participants were asked to perform lumbar pedicle screw insertion on 3 simulators. Afterward, a 10-item survey was administrated and a focused interview was conducted to explore topics pertaining to the design features of the simulators. Overall impressions of the simulators were positive with regards to their educational benefit, but our qualitative analysis revealed differing strengths and limitations. Main design strengths of the computer-based simulators were incorporation of procedural guidance and provision of performance feedback. The synthetic model excelled in achieving more realistic haptic feedback and incorporating use of actual surgical tools. Stakeholders from trainees to experts acknowledge the growing role of simulation-based education in spine surgery. However, different simulation modalities have varying design elements that augment learning in distinct ways. Characterization of these design characteristics will allow for standardization of simulation curricula in spinal surgery, optimizing educational benefit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prophylaxis of surgical site infection in adult spine surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Reina; Tan, Terence; Tee, Jin Wee; Street, John

    2018-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains a significant source of morbidity in spine surgery, with reported rates varying from 0.7 to 16%. To systematically review and evaluate the evidence for strategies for prophylaxis of SSI in adult spine surgery in the last twenty years. Two independent systematic searches were conducted, at two international spine centers, encompassing PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Cochrane Database, EBSCO Medline, ScienceDirect, Ovid Medline, EMBASE (Ovid), and MEDLINE. References were combined and screened, then distilled to 69 independent studies for final review. 11 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), 51 case-controlled studies (CCS), and 7 case series were identified. Wide variation exists in surgical indications, approaches, procedures, and even definitions of SSI. Intra-wound vancomycin powder was the most widely studied intervention (19 studies, 1 RCT). Multiple studies examined perioperative antibiotic protocols, closed-suction drainage, povidone-iodine solution irrigation, and 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate skin closure. 18 interventions were examined by a single study only. There is limited evidence for the efficacy of intra-wound vancomycin. There is strong evidence that closed-suction drainage does not affect SSI rates, while there is moderate evidence for the efficacy of povidone-iodine irrigation and that single-dose preoperative antibiotics is as effective as multiple doses. Few conclusions can be drawn about other interventions given the paucity and poor quality of studies. While a small body of evidence underscores a select few interventions for SSI prophylaxis in adult spine surgery, most proposed measures have not been investigated beyond a single study. Further high level evidence is required to justify SSI preventative treatments. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Frailty and postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Alana M; Charest-Morin, Raphaële; Stobart, Liam; Street, John; Ryerson, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Frailty is defined as a state of decreased reserve and susceptibility to stressors. The relationship between frailty and postoperative outcomes after degenerative spine surgery has not been studied. This study aimed to (1) determine prevalence of frailty in the degenerative spine population; (2) describe patient characteristics associated with frailty; and (3) determine the association between frailty and postoperative complications, mortality, length of stay, and discharge disposition. This is a retrospective analysis on a prospectively collected cohort from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). A total of 53,080 patients who underwent degenerative spine surgery between 2006 and 2012 were included in the study. A modified frailty index (mFI) with 11 variables derived from the NSQIP dataset was used to determine prevalence of frailty and its correlation with a composite outcome of perioperative complications as well as hospital length of stay, mortality, and discharge disposition. After calculating the mFI for each patient, the prevalence and predictors of frailty were determined for our cohort. The association of frailty with postoperative outcomes was determined after adjusting for known and suspected confounders using multivariate logistic regression. Frailty was present in 2,041 patients within the total population (4%) and in 8% of patients older than 65 years. Frailty severity increased with increasing age, male sex, African American race, higher body mass index, recent weight loss, paraplegia or quadriplegia, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and preadmission residence in a care facility. Frailty severity was an independent predictor of major complication (OR 1.15 for every 0.10 increase in mFI, 95%CI 1.09-1.21, pdegenerative spine surgery. Preoperative recognition of frailty may be useful for perioperative optimization, risk stratification, and patient counseling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Conflicts of Interest on Practice Patterns and Complication Rates in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ralph W; Weiner, Joseph A; Schallmo, Michael S; Chun, Danielle S; Barth, Kathryn A; Singh, Sameer K; Hsu, Wellington K

    2017-09-01

    Retrospective cohort study. We sought to determine whether financial relationships with industry had any impact on operative and/or complication rates of spine surgeons performing fusion surgeries. Recent actions from Congress and the Institute of Medicine have highlighted the importance of conflicts of interest among physicians. Orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons have been identified as receiving the highest amount of industry payments among all specialties. No study has yet investigated the potential effects of disclosed industry payments with quality and choices of patient care. A comprehensive database of spine surgeons in the United States with compiled data of industry payments, operative fusion rates, and complication rates was created. Practice pattern data were derived from a publicly available Medicare-based database generated from selected CPT codes from 2011 to 2012. Complication rate data from 2009 to 2013 were extracted from the ProPublica-Surgeon-Scorecard database, which utilizes postoperative inhospital mortality and 30-day-readmission for designated conditions as complications of surgery. Data regarding industry payments from 2013 to 2014 were derived from the Open Payments website. Surgeons performing rate, and/or complication rate. A total of 2110 surgeons met the inclusion criteria for our database. The average operative fusion rate was 8.8% (SD 4.8%), whereas the average complication rate for lumbar and cervical fusion was 4.1% and 1.9%, respectively. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a statistically significant but negligible relationship between disclosed payments/transactions and both operative fusion and complication rates. Our findings do not support a strong correlation between the payments a surgeon receives from industry and their decisions to perform spine fusion or associated complication rates. Large variability in the rate of fusions performed suggests a poor consensus for indications for spine fusion surgery. 3.

  14. A novel index for quantifying the risk of early complications for patients undergoing cervical spine surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, Peter G; Diebo, Bassel G; Marascalchi, Bryan J; Jalai, Cyrus M; Horn, Samantha R; Zhou, Peter L; Paltoo, Karen; Bono, Olivia J; Worley, Nancy; Poorman, Gregory W; Challier, Vincent; Dixit, Anant; Paulino, Carl; Lafage, Virginie

    2017-11-01

    OBJECTIVE It is becoming increasingly necessary for surgeons to provide evidence supporting cost-effectiveness of surgical treatment for cervical spine pathology. Anticipating surgical risk is critical in accurately evaluating the risk/benefit balance of such treatment. Determining the risk and cost-effectiveness of surgery, complications, revision procedures, and mortality rates are the most significant limitations. The purpose of this study was to determine independent risk factors for medical complications (MCs), surgical complications (SCs), revisions, and mortality rates following surgery for patients with cervical spine pathology. The most relevant risk factors were used to structure an index that will help quantify risk and anticipate failure for such procedures. METHODS The authors of this study performed a retrospective review of the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database for patients treated surgically for cervical spine pathology between 2001 and 2010. Multivariate models were performed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of the independent risk factors that led to MCs and repeated for SCs, revisions, and mortality. The models controlled for age ( 65 years old), sex, race, revision status (except for revision analysis), surgical approach, number of levels fused/re-fused (2-3, 4-8, ≥ 9), and osteotomy utilization. ORs were weighted based on their predictive category: 2 times for revision surgery predictors and 4 times for mortality predictors. Fifty points were distributed among the predictors based on their cumulative OR to establish a risk index. RESULTS Discharges for 362,989 patients with cervical spine pathology were identified. The mean age was 52.65 years, and 49.47% of patients were women. Independent risk factors included medical comorbidities, surgical parameters, and demographic factors. Medical comorbidities included the following: pulmonary circulation disorder, coagulopathy, metastatic cancer, renal failure, congestive heart failure

  15. The impact of the 2006 Massachusetts health care reform law on spine surgery patient payer-mix status and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villelli, Nicolas W; Yan, Hong; Zou, Jian; Barbaro, Nicholas M

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Several similarities exist between the Massachusetts health care reform law of 2006 and the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The authors' prior neurosurgical research showed a decrease in uninsured surgeries without a significant change in surgical volume after the Massachusetts reform. An analysis of the payer-mix status and the age of spine surgery patients, before and after the policy, should provide insight into the future impact of the ACA on spine surgery in the US. METHODS Using the Massachusetts State Inpatient Database and spine ICD-9-CM procedure codes, the authors obtained demographic information on patients undergoing spine surgery between 2001 and 2012. Payer-mix status was assigned as Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, uninsured, or other, which included government-funded programs and workers' compensation. A comparison of the payer-mix status and patient age, both before and after the policy, was performed. The New York State data were used as a control. RESULTS The authors analyzed 81,821 spine surgeries performed in Massachusetts and 248,757 in New York. After 2008, there was a decrease in uninsured and private insurance spine surgeries, with a subsequent increase in the Medicare and "other" categories for Massachusetts. Medicaid case numbers did not change. This correlated to an increase in surgeries performed in the age group of patients 65-84 years old, with a decrease in surgeries for those 18-44 years old. New York showed an increase in all insurance categories and all adult age groups. CONCLUSIONS After the Massachusetts reform, spine surgery decreased in private insurance and uninsured categories, with the majority of these surgeries transitioning to Medicare. Moreover, individuals who were younger than 65 years did not show an increase in spine surgeries, despite having greater access to health insurance. In a health care system that requires insurance, the decrease in private insurance is primarily due to an increasing elderly

  16. Does minimal access tubular assisted spine surgery increase or decrease complications in spinal decompression or fusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourney, Daryl R; Dettori, Joseph R; Norvell, Daniel C; Dekutoski, Mark B

    2010-04-20

    Systematic review. The purpose of this review was to attempt to answer the following 2 clinical questions: (1) Does minimal access tubular assisted spine surgery (MAS) decrease the rate of complications in posterior thoracolumbar decompression and/or fusion surgery compared with traditional open techniques? (2) What strategies to reduce the risk of complications in MAS have been shown to be effective? The objective of minimal access spine surgery is to reduce damage to surrounding tissues while accomplishing the same goals as conventional surgery. Patient demand and marketing for MAS is driven by the perception of better outcomes, although the purported advantages remain unproven. Whether the risk of complications is affected by minimal access techniques is unknown. A systematic review of the English language literature was undertaken for articles published between 1990 and July 2009. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify published studies that compared the rate of complications after MAS to a control group that underwent open surgery. Single-arm studies were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of literature using GRADE criteria assessing quality, quantity, and consistency of results. Disagreements were resolved by consensus. From the 361 articles identified, 13 met a priori criteria and were included for review. All of the studies evaluated only lumbar spine surgery. The single large randomized study showed less favorable results for MAS discectomy, but no significant difference in complication rates. The quality of the other studies, particularly for fusion surgery, was low. Overall, the rates of reoperation, dural tear, cerebrospinal fluid leak, nerve injury, and infection occurred in similar proportions between MAS and open surgery. Blood loss was reduced in MAS fusion; however, the quality of those studies was very low. Operation time and hospital length of stay was variable across studies

  17. Improvement in Pain After Lumbar Spine Surgery: The Role of Preoperative Expectations of Pain Relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Carol A; Reid, M C; Duculan, Roland; Girardi, Federico P

    2017-02-01

    Improvement in pain is a major expectation of patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Among 422 patients, the goal of this prospective study was to measure 2-year postoperative pain and to determine whether this outcome varied according to patient and clinical characteristics, including amount of pain relief expected preoperatively. Before surgery patients completed valid questionnaires that addressed clinical characteristics and expectations for pain improvement. Two years after surgery patients reported how much pain improvement they actually received. The mean age was 56 years old and 55% were men. Two years after surgery 11% of patients reported no improvement in pain, 28% reported a little to moderate improvement, 44% reported a lot of improvement, and 17% reported complete improvement. In multivariable analysis, patients reported less pain improvement if, before surgery, they expected greater pain improvement (odds ratio [OR] 1.4), had a positive screen for depression (OR 1.7), were having revision surgery (OR 1.6), had surgery at L4 or L5 (OR 2.5), had a degenerative diagnosis (OR 1.6), and if, after surgery, they had another surgery (OR 2.8) and greater back (OR 1.3) and leg (OR 1.1) pain (all variables P≤0.05). Pain is not uncommon after lumbar surgery and is associated with a network of clinical, surgical, and psychological variables. This study provides evidence that patients' expectations about pain are an independent variable in this network. Because expectations are potentially modifiable this study supports addressing pain-related expectations with patients before surgery through discussions with surgeons and through formal preoperative patient education.

  18. Association between urinary incontinence in women and a previous history of surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mommsen, S.; Foldspang, Anders; Elving, L.

    1993-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, 85% of 3114 women responded to a questionnaire on urinary incontinence and a history of abdominal, gynaecological and urological surgery. In 1987 the prevalence of urinary incontinence was 17%; 63% had undergone surgery, mainly gynaecological, and almost one......-third of the respondents had had more than one operation. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed stress urinary incontinence to be associated with previous exposure to surgery....

  19. The use of polyurethane materials in the surgery of the spine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Kenneth R

    2014-12-01

    The spine contains intervertebral discs and the interspinous and longitudinal ligaments. These structures are elastomeric or viscoelastic in their mechanical properties and serve to allow and control the movement of the bony elements of the spine. The use of metallic or hard polymeric devices to replace the intervertebral discs and the creation of fusion masses to replace discs and/or vertebral bodies changes the load transfer characteristics of the spine and the range of motion of segments of the spine. The purpose of the study was to survey the literature, regulatory information available on the Web, and industry-reported device development found on the Web to ascertain the usage and outcomes of the use of polyurethane polymers in the design and clinical use of devices for spine surgery. A systematic review of the available information from all sources concerning the subject materials' usage in spinal devices was conducted. A search of the peer-reviewed literature combining spinal surgery with polyurethane or specific types and trade names of medical polyurethanes was performed. Additionally, information available on the Food and Drug Administration Web site and for corporate Web sites was reviewed in an attempt to identify pertinent information. The review captured devices that are in testing or have entered clinical practice that use elastomeric polyurethane polymers as disc replacements, dynamic stabilization of spinal movement, or motion limitation to relieve nerve root compression and pain and as complete a listing as possible of such devices that have been designed or tested but appear to no longer be pursued. This review summarizes the available information about the uses to which polyurethanes have been tested or are being used in spinal surgery. The use of polyurethanes in medicine has expanded as modifications to the stability of the polymers in the physiological environment have been improved. The potential for the use of elastomeric materials to more

  20. Use of next generation sequencing to detect biofilm bacteria in a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yijuan; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Lorenzen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    2. Center for Microbial Communities, Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Denmark 3. Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Magdeburg, Germany 4. Eifelklinik St. Brigida, Simmerath, Germany Aim: ”Hidden deep...... implant-related infection is believed to be linked to pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery. Low-grade bacterial infection can be hard to diagnose and may be undetected by conventional culture based methods. Next generation sequencing (NGS) could help to uncover hidden bacterial infections...... as a possible cause for implant loosening. This case report describes the use of NGS in the diagnostic work-up of a patient with pedicle screw loosening after spine surgery.” Method: ”A 60 y/o male had to undergo revision spine surgery for pedicle screw loosening and adjacent segment disease 3 years after...

  1. The Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative: a statewide Collaborative Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Victor; Schwalb, Jason M; Nerenz, David R; Pietrantoni, Lisa; Jones, Sharon; Jankowski, Michelle; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bartol, Stephen; Abdulhak, Muwaffak

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Given the scrutiny of spine surgery by policy makers, spine surgeons are motivated to demonstrate and improve outcomes, by determining which patients will and will not benefit from surgery, and to reduce costs, often by reducing complications. Insurers are similarly motivated. In 2013, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) and Blue Care Network (BCN) established the Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MSSIC) as a Collaborative Quality Initiative (CQI). MSSIC is one of the newest of 21 other CQIs that have significantly improved-and continue to improve-the quality of patient care throughout the state of Michigan. METHODS MSSIC focuses on lumbar and cervical spine surgery, specifically indications such as stenosis, disk herniation, and degenerative disease. Surgery for tumors, traumatic fractures, deformity, scoliosis, and acute spinal cord injury are currently not within the scope of MSSIC. Starting in 2014, MSSIC consisted of 7 hospitals and in 2015 included another 15 hospitals, for a total of 22 hospitals statewide. A standardized data set is obtained by data abstractors, who are funded by BCBSM/BCN. Variables of interest include indications for surgery, baseline patient-reported outcome measures, and medical history. These are obtained within 30 days of surgery. Outcome instruments used include the EQ-5D general health state score (0 being worst and 100 being the best health one can imagine) and EQ-5D-3 L. For patients undergoing lumbar surgery, a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale for leg and back pain and the Oswestry Disability Index for back pain are collected. For patients undergoing cervical surgery, a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale for arm and neck pain, Neck Disability Index, and the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score are collected. Surgical details, postoperative hospital course, and patient-reported outcome measures are collected at 90-day, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. RESULTS As of July 1, 2015, a total of 6397 cases

  2. A COMPARISON OF TWO DIFFERENT DOSES OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION DURING MAINTENANCE OF GENERAL ANAESTHESIA IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING SPINE SURGERIES, FUNCTIONAL ENDOSCOPIC SINUS SURGERY AND MIDDLE EAR SURGERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study is undertaken to compare the hemodynamic effects and reduction in the doses of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants using two different doses of dexmedetomidine infusion during maintenance of anaesthesia in spine, functional endoscopic sinus surgery and middle ear surgeries. METHODS Sixty patients are randomly divided into 2 groups of 30 each. After shifting to the operation theatre baseline vitals were recorded. Anesthesia induced with thiopentone sodium and intubation done with the help of succinylcholine and maintained with oxygen, nitrous oxide and isoflurane. After 1 min of intubation, maintenance infusion of dexmedetomidine (0.4 mcg/kg/hr and 0.7 mcg/kg/hr for patients allotted in 2 separate groups was started and stopped 15 min before end of surgery. Hemodynamic parameters and any reduction in the doses of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants was noted. RESULTS Dexmedetomidine infusion (0.4 mcg/kg/hr and 0.7 mcg/kg/hr in both groups reduced the requirements of muscle relaxants and volatile anaesthetics. Hemodynamic stability was better in the group receiving 0.4 mcg/kg/hr. Patients receiving 0.7 mcg/kg/hr had higher incidence of hypotension, bradycardia and delayed emergence from anaesthesia. CONCLUSION Dexmedetomidine infusion at 0.4 mcg/kg/hr during maintenance of anaesthesia in spine surgery, FESS and middle ear surgery would be good option to reduce the requirements of volatile anaesthetics, muscle relaxants and for better hemodynamic stability. OBJECTIVE OF STUDY: Primary Objective To compare and evaluate the hemodynamic effects and reduction in requirements of volatile anaesthetics and muscle relaxants with two different doses of dexmedetomidine infusion during maintenance of general anaesthesia in patients undergoing spine, FESS and middle ear surgeries.

  3. Pain Sensitivity and Pain Catastrophizing are Associated with Persistent Pain and Disability after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; George, Steven Z.; Devin, Clinton J.; Wegener, Stephen T.; Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether pain sensitivity and pain catastrophizing are associated with persistent pain and disability after lumbar spine surgery. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Academic medical center. Participants Patients (N = 68, mean ± SD age = 57.9 ± 13.1 years, N female = 40 (58.8%)) undergoing spine surgery for a degenerative condition from March 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013 were assessed 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after surgery. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s) The main outcome measures were persistent back pain intensity, pain interference, and disability. Patients with persistent back pain intensity, pain interference, or disability were identified as those patients reporting Brief Pain Inventory scores ≥ 4 and Oswestry Disability Index scores ≥ 21 at all postoperative time points. Results From 6 weeks to 6 months after surgery, approximately 12.9%, 24.2%, and 46.8% of patients reported persistent back pain intensity, pain interference, or disability, respectively. Increased pain sensitivity at 6 weeks was associated with having persistent back pain intensity (OR = 2.0, 95% CI = 1.0; 4.1) after surgery. Increased pain catastrophizing at 6 weeks was associated with having persistent back pain intensity (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0; 1.2), pain interference (OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0; 1.2), and disability (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1; 1.4). An interaction effect was not found between pain sensitivity and pain catastrophizing on persistent outcomes (p > 0.05). Conclusion(s) Findings suggest the importance of early postoperative screening for pain sensitivity and pain catastrophizing in order to identify patients at-risk for poor postoperative pain intensity, interference, and/or disability outcomes. Future research should consider the benefit of targeted therapeutic strategies for patients with these postoperative prognostic factors. PMID:26101845

  4. Patient-reported allergies predict postoperative outcomes and psychosomatic markers following spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, David D; Ye, Wenda; Xiao, Roy; Miller, Jacob A; Mroz, Thomas E; Steinmetz, Michael P; Nagel, Sean J; Machado, Andre G

    2018-05-22

    Prior studies have shown that patient-reported allergies can be prognostic of poorer postoperative outcomes. To investigate the correlation between self-reported allergies and outcomes after cervical or lumbar spine surgery. Retrospective cohort study at a single tertiary-care institution. All patients undergoing cervical or lumbar spine surgery from 2009-2014. The primary outcome measure was change in the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) following surgery. Secondary outcomes included change in the Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), achieving the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in these measures, as well as cost of admission. Prior to and following surgery, EQ-5D, PDQ, and PHQ-9 were recorded for patients with available data. Paired student's t-tests were used to compare change in these measures following surgery. Multivariable linear and logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between the log transformation of the total number of allergies and outcomes. 592 cervical patients and 4,465 lumbar patients were included. The median number of reported allergies was two. The EQ-5D index increased from 0.539 to 0.703 for cervical patients and from 0.530 to 0.676 for lumbar patients (pallergies predicted significantly higher odds of achieving the PDQ MCID (OR = 2.09, 95% CI 1.05-4.15, p=0.02 for cervical patients; OR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.68, p=0.03 for lumbar patients). However, this relationship was not durable for patients with follow-up exceeding 1 year. The log transformation of number of allergies for lumbar patients predicted significantly increased cost of admission (β=$3,597, pallergies correlate with subjective improvement in pain and disability following spine surgery and may serve as a marker of postoperative outcomes. The relationship between allergies and PDQ improvement may be secondary to the short-term expectation-actuality discrepancy, as this relationship was not durable beyond 1

  5. Assessment of presurgical psychological screening in patients undergoing spine surgery: use and clinical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Arthur K; Young, Benjamin K; Riley, Lee H; Skolasky, Richard L

    2014-04-01

    Prospective survey. To determine the prevalence of use of presurgical psychological screening (PPS) among spine surgeons in the United States, identify factors associated with PPS use, evaluate surgeons' opinions of PPS, and investigate how PPS is applied in clinical practice. The United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends PPS for patients undergoing back surgery. The prevalence of PPS is unknown. Thus, it may be difficult to improve preoperative care for such patients with psychological conditions. An online survey invitation was emailed to 340 spine surgeons. Questions addressed surgeon characteristics (eg, number of years in practice), practice characteristics (eg, practice type), inclusion of integrated rehabilitation and psychological services, and use of PPS. The impact of psychological factors on rehabilitation and recovery was assessed using an 11-point Likert scale (0, no impact; 10, highest impact). We analyzed the 110 (32%) responses with a χ(2) test (significance, Ppsychological factors on pain relief, adherence to therapy, and return to work (mean impact rating, >7.0); however, impact on return for follow-up was only moderate (mean rating, 5.8). A minority of surgeons reported using PPS. Surgeons were less likely to use PPS if they had completed residency or begun practice within 14 years, had fewer than 200 cases annually, or were university affiliated. This study highlights the need to advocate for the use of North American Spine Society guidelines regarding the use of PPS.

  6. Antimetabolites in cataract surgery to prevent failure of a previous trabeculectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Roger E; Crichton, Andrew; Thomas, Bennett C

    2014-07-28

    Patients having cataract surgery have often earlier undergone a trabeculectomy for glaucoma. However, cataract surgery may be associated with failure of the previous glaucoma surgery and antimetabolites may be used with cataract surgery to prevent such failure. There is no systematic review on whether antimetabolites with cataract surgery prevent failure of a previous trabeculectomy. To assess the effects of antimetabolites with cataract surgery on functioning of a previous trabeculectomy. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 5), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 10 June 2014. We also searched the Science Citation Index database (July 2013) and reference lists of potentially relevant studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in people with a functioning trabeculectomy. Two review authors independently reviewed the titles and abstracts from the electronic searches. Two review authors independently assessed relevant full-text articles and entered data. We identified no RCTs to test the effectiveness of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in individuals with the intention of preventing failure of a previous trabeculectomy. There are no RCTs of antimetabolites with cataract surgery in people with a functioning trabeculectomy. Appropriately powered RCTs

  7. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasiou, Anastasia; Giannis, Theofanis; Brotis, Alexandros G; Siasios, Ioannis; Georgiadis, Iordanis; Gatos, Haralampos; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical spine procedures have been associated with satisfactory outcomes. However, the occurrence of troublesome complications, although uncommon, needs to be taken into consideration. The purpose of our study was to assess the actual incidence of anterior cervical spine procedure-associated complications and identify any predisposing factors. A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in our retrospective, case-control study. The diagnosis was cervical radiculopathy, and/or myelopathy due to degenerative disc disease, cervical spondylosis, or traumatic cervical spine injury. All our participants underwent surgical treatment, and complications were recorded. The most commonly performed procedure (79%) was anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Fourteen patients (12.3%) underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and interbody fusion, seven (6.1%) ACDF with plating, two (1.7%) odontoid screw fixation, and one anterior removal of osteophytes for severe Forestier's disease. Mean follow-up time was 42.5 months (range, 6-78 months). The overall complication rate was 13.2%. Specifically, we encountered adjacent intervertebral disc degeneration in 2.7% of our cases, dysphagia in 1.7%, postoperative soft tissue swelling and hematoma in 1.7%, and dural penetration in 1.7%. Additionally, esophageal perforation was observed in 0.9%, aggravation of preexisting myelopathy in 0.9%, symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy in 0.9%, mechanical failure in 0.9%, and superficial wound infection in 0.9%. In the vast majority anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications are minor, requiring no further intervention. Awareness, early recognition, and appropriate management, are of paramount importance for improving the patients' overall functional outcome.

  8. Race as a predictor of postoperative hospital readmission after spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel R; Wang, Timothy Y; Loriaux, Daniel; Desai, Rupen; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Karikari, Isaac O; Bagley, Carlos A; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-12-01

    Hospital readmission after surgery results in a substantial economic burden, and several recent studies have investigated the impact of race and ethnicity on hospital readmission rates, with the goal to identify hospitals and patients with high readmission risk. This single-institution, retrospective cohort study assesses the impact of race, along with other risk factors, on 30-day readmission rates following spinal surgery. This study is a single-institution retrospective cohort study with accrual from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2010. Inclusion criteria included adult patients who underwent anterior and/or posterior spinal surgery. The primary aim of this study was to assess the impact of patient race and other risk factors for postoperative hospital readmission within 30days following spine surgery. A total of 1346 patients (654 male, 692 female) were included in the study. Overall, 159 patients (11.8%) were readmitted in the 30days following their surgery. Multivariate logistic regression found significant risk factors for 30-day readmission, including Black race (OR: 2.20, C.I. 95% (1.04, 4.64)) and total length of stay greater than 7days (OR: 4.73, C.I. 95% (1.72, 12.98)). Cervical surgery was associated with decreased odds of readmission (OR: 0.27, C.I. 95% (0.08, 0.91)). Our study demonstrates that race and length of hospital stay influence the incidence of 30-day readmission rates after spinal surgery. Studies such as ours will aid in identifying patients with postoperative readmission risk and help elucidate the underlying factors that may be contributing to disparities in readmission after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. MINIMALLY INVASIVE SPINE SURGERY IN THE NUEVO HOSPITAL CIVIL DE GUADALAJARA "DR. JUAN I. MENCHACA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIGUEL ÁNGEL ANDRADE-RAMOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To describe our experience on a case series treated with minimal invasive techniques in spine surgery, with short-term follow-up and identify complications. Methods: A prospective analysis was performed on 116 patients operated on by the same team from September 2015 to June 2016. Evaluating the short-term follow-up we registered the surgical time, bleeding, complications, hospital stay, pre- and postoperatively neurological status, as well as scales of disability and quality of life. Demographic and surgical procedure data were analyzed with SPSS version 20 program. Results: A total of 116 patients with a mean age of 49.7 + 15.7 (21-85 years underwent surgery being 76 (65% with lumbar conditions and 37 (32% with cervical conditions. The most common procedures were tubular discectomies (31, tubular bilateral decompression (17, lumbar MI-TLIFs (7, and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (35. The mean blood loss was 50.6 cc, the hospital stay was 1.7 day, pre- and postoperative pain VAS were 7.4 % and 2.3%, respectively, pre- and postoperative Oswestry (ODI were 64.6% and 13.1%, respectively, pre- and postoperative SF-36 of 37.8% and 90.3%. There were no major complications, except for a surgical wound infection in diabetic patient and three incidental durotomies, one of these being a contained fistula, treated conservatively. Conclusions: The current tendency towards minimally invasive surgery has been justified on multiple studies in neoplastic and degenerative diseases, with the preservation of the structures that support the spine biomechanics. The benefits should not replace the primary objectives of surgery and its usefulness depends on the skills of the surgeon, pathology and the adequate selection of the techniques. We found that the tubular access allows developing techniques such as discectomy, corpectomy and fusion without limiting exposure, avoiding manipulation of adjacent structures, reducing complications and

  10. Poor Nutrition Status and Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery in the Elderly: Readmissions, Complications, and Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvanesarajah, Varun; Jain, Amit; Kebaish, Khaled; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Sciubba, Daniel M; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Khanna, Akhil Jay; Hassanzadeh, Hamid

    2017-07-01

    Retrospective database review. To quantify the medical and surgical risks associated with elective lumbar spine fusion surgery in patients with poor preoperative nutritional status and to assess how nutritional status alters length of stay and readmission rates. There has been recent interest in quantifying the increased risk of complications caused by frailty, an important consideration in elderly patients that is directly related to comorbidity burden. Preoperative nutritional status is an important contributor to both sarcopenia and frailty and is poorly studied in the elderly spine surgery population. The full 100% sample of Medicare data from 2005 to 2012 were utilized to select all patients 65 to 84 years old who underwent elective 1 to 2 level posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative pathology. Patients with diagnoses of poor nutritional status within the 3 months preceding surgery were selected and compared with a control cohort. Outcomes that were assessed included major medical complications, infection, wound dehiscence, and mortality. In addition, readmission rates and length of stay were evaluated. When adjusting for demographics and comorbidities, malnutrition was determined to result in significantly increased odds of both 90-day major medical complications (adjusted odds ratio, OR: 4.24) and 1-year mortality (adjusted OR: 6.16). Multivariate analysis also demonstrated that malnutrition was a significant predictor of increased infection (adjusted OR: 2.27) and wound dehiscence (adjusted OR: 2.52) risk. Length of stay was higher in malnourished patients, though 30-day readmission rates were similar to controls. Malnutrition significantly increases complication and mortality rates, whereas also significantly increasing length of stay. Nutritional supplementation before surgery should be considered to optimize postoperative outcomes in malnourished individuals. 3.

  11. Pelvic Fixation in Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgery: Historical Perspective, Indications, and Techniques: AAOS Exhibit Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Strike, Sophia A; Menga, Emmanuel N; Sponseller, Paul D; Kebaish, Khaled M

    2015-09-16

    Achieving solid osseous fusion across the lumbosacral junction has historically been, and continues to be, a challenge in spine surgery. Robust pelvic fixation plays an integral role in achieving this goal. The goals of this review are to describe the history of and indications for spinopelvic fixation, examine conventional spinopelvic fixation techniques, and review the newer S2-alar-iliac technique and its outcomes in adult and pediatric patients with spinal deformity. Since the introduction of Harrington rods in the 1960s, spinal instrumentation has evolved substantially. Indications for spinopelvic fixation as a means to achieve lumbosacral arthrodesis include a long arthrodesis (five or more vertebral levels) or use of three-column osteotomies in the lower thoracic or lumbar spine, surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis, and correction of lumbar deformity and pelvic obliquity. A variety of techniques have been described over the years, including Galveston iliac rods, Jackson intrasacral rods, the Kostuik transiliac bar, iliac screws, and S2-alar-iliac screws. Modern iliac screws and S2-alar-iliac screws are associated with relatively low rates of pseudarthrosis. S2-alar-iliac screws have the advantages of less implant prominence and inline placement with proximal spinal anchors. Collectively, these techniques provide powerful methods for obtaining control of the pelvis in facilitating lumbosacral arthrodesis. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  12. Repeated sugammadex reversal of muscle relaxation during lumbar spine surgery with intraoperative neurophysiological multimodal monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errando, C L; Blanco, T; Díaz-Cambronero, Ó

    2016-11-01

    Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spine surgery is usually acomplished avoiding muscle relaxants. A case of intraoperative sugammadex partial reversal of the neuromuscular blockade allowing adequate monitoring during spine surgery is presented. A 38 year-old man was scheduled for discectomy and vertebral arthrodesis throughout anterior and posterior approaches. Anesthesia consisted of total intravenous anesthesia plus rocuronium. Intraoperatively monitoring was needed, and the muscle relaxant reverted twice with low dose sugammadex in order to obtain adequate responses. The doses of sugammadex used were conservatively selected (0.1mg/kg boluses increases, total dose needed 0.4mg/kg). Both motor evoqued potentials, and electromyographic responses were deemed adequate by the neurophysiologist. If muscle relaxation was needed in the context described, this approach could be useful to prevent neurological sequelae. This is the first study using very low dose sugammadex to reverse rocuronium intraoperatively and to re-establish the neuromuscular blockade. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Need for Elective Primary Posterior Lumbar Fusion in A High-Volume Center for Spine Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristagno, Giuseppe; Beluffi, Simonetta; Tanzi, Dario; Belloli, Federica; Carmagnini, Paola; Croci, Massimo; D’Aviri, Giuseppe; Menasce, Guido; Pastore, Juan C.; Pellanda, Armando; Pollini, Alberto; Savoia, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    (1) Background: This study evaluated the perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion need and determined predictors for transfusion in patients undergoing elective primary lumbar posterior spine fusion in a high-volume center for spine surgery. (2) Methods: Data from all patients undergoing spine surgery between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2016 were reviewed. Patients’ demographics and comorbidities, perioperative laboratory results, and operative time were analyzed in relation to RBC transfusion. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of transfusion. (3) Results: A total of 874 elective surgeries for primary spine fusion were performed over the three years. Only 54 cases (6%) required RBC transfusion. Compared to the non-transfused patients, transfused patients were mainly female (p = 0.0008), significantly older, with a higher ASA grade (p = 0.0002), and with lower pre-surgery hemoglobin (HB) level and hematocrit (p < 0.0001). In the multivariate logistic regression, a lower pre-surgery HB (OR (95% CI) 2.84 (2.11–3.82)), a higher ASA class (1.77 (1.03–3.05)) and a longer operative time (1.02 (1.01–1.02)) were independently associated with RBC transfusion. (4) Conclusions: In the instance of elective surgery for primary posterior lumbar fusion in a high-volume center for spine surgery, the need for RBC transfusion is low. Factors anticipating transfusion should be taken into consideration in the patient’s pre-surgery preparation. PMID:29385760

  14. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Need for Elective Primary Posterior Lumbar Fusion in A High-Volume Center for Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Ristagno

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: This study evaluated the perioperative red blood cell (RBC transfusion need and determined predictors for transfusion in patients undergoing elective primary lumbar posterior spine fusion in a high-volume center for spine surgery. (2 Methods: Data from all patients undergoing spine surgery between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2016 were reviewed. Patients’ demographics and comorbidities, perioperative laboratory results, and operative time were analyzed in relation to RBC transfusion. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the predictors of transfusion. (3 Results: A total of 874 elective surgeries for primary spine fusion were performed over the three years. Only 54 cases (6% required RBC transfusion. Compared to the non-transfused patients, transfused patients were mainly female (p = 0.0008, significantly older, with a higher ASA grade (p = 0.0002, and with lower pre-surgery hemoglobin (HB level and hematocrit (p < 0.0001. In the multivariate logistic regression, a lower pre-surgery HB (OR (95% CI 2.84 (2.11–3.82, a higher ASA class (1.77 (1.03–3.05 and a longer operative time (1.02 (1.01–1.02 were independently associated with RBC transfusion. (4 Conclusions: In the instance of elective surgery for primary posterior lumbar fusion in a high-volume center for spine surgery, the need for RBC transfusion is low. Factors anticipating transfusion should be taken into consideration in the patient’s pre-surgery preparation.

  15. The Clinical Features, Risk Factors, and Surgical Treatment of Cervicogenic Headache in Patients With Cervical Spine Disorders Requiring Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimohata, Keiko; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Onodera, Osamu; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Shimohata, Takayoshi

    2017-07-01

    To clarify the clinical features and risk factors of cervicogenic headache (CEH; as diagnosed according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta) in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery. CEH is caused by cervical spine disorders. The pathogenic mechanism of CEH is hypothesized to involve a convergence of the upper cervical afferents from the C1, C2, and C3 spinal nerves and the trigeminal afferents in the trigeminocervical nucleus of the upper cervical cord. According to this hypothesis, functional convergence of the upper cervical and trigeminal sensory pathways allows the bidirectional (afferent and efferent) referral of pain to the occipital, frontal, temporal, and/or orbital regions. Previous prospective studies have reported an 86-88% prevalence of headache in patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy requiring anterior cervical surgery; however, these studies did not diagnose headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders criteria. Therefore, a better understanding of the prevalence rate, clinical features, risk factors, and treatment responsiveness of CEH in patients with cervical spine disorders requiring surgery is necessary. We performed a single hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study and enrolled 70 consecutive patients with cervical spine disorders such as cervical spondylotic myelopathy, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, cervical spondylotic radiculopathy, and cervical spondylotic myeloradiculopathy who had been scheduled to undergo anterior cervical fusion or dorsal cervical laminoplasty between June 2014 and December 2015. Headache was diagnosed preoperatively according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders-Third Edition beta. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association Cervical Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire, Neck Disability Index, and a 0-100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) were used to evaluate clinical

  16. Results of Database Studies in Spine Surgery Can Be Influenced by Missing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; McLynn, Ryan P; Fice, Michael P; Samuel, Andre M; Lukasiewicz, Adam M; Bohl, Daniel D; Ahn, Junyoung; Singh, Kern; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2017-12-01

    National databases are increasingly being used for research in spine surgery; however, one limitation of such databases that has received sparse mention is the frequency of missing data. Studies using these databases often do not emphasize the percentage of missing data for each variable used and do not specify how patients with missing data are incorporated into analyses. This study uses the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database to examine whether different treatments of missing data can influence the results of spine studies. (1) What is the frequency of missing data fields for demographics, medical comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, operating room times, and length of stay recorded in ACS-NSQIP? (2) Using three common approaches to handling missing data, how frequently do those approaches agree in terms of finding particular variables to be associated with adverse events? (3) Do different approaches to handling missing data influence the outcomes and effect sizes of an analysis testing for an association with these variables with occurrence of adverse events? Patients who underwent spine surgery between 2005 and 2013 were identified from the ACS-NSQIP database. A total of 88,471 patients undergoing spine surgery were identified. The most common procedures were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, lumbar decompression, and lumbar fusion. Demographics, comorbidities, and perioperative laboratory values were tabulated for each patient, and the percent of missing data was noted for each variable. These variables were tested for an association with "any adverse event" using three separate multivariate regressions that used the most common treatments for missing data. In the first regression, patients with any missing data were excluded. In the second regression, missing data were treated as a negative or "reference" value; for continuous variables, the mean of each variable's reference range

  17. Does previous open renal surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy affect the outcomes and complications of percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgor, Faruk; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Sarılar, Omer; Toptas, Mehmet; Simsek, Abdulmuttalip; Gurbuz, Zafer Gokhan; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih; Muslumanoglu, Ahmet Yaser; Binbay, Murat

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of PNL in patients with a history of open renal surgery or PNL by comparing with primary patients and to compare impact of previous open renal surgery and PNL on the success and complications of subsequent PNL. Charts of patients, who underwent PNL at our institute, were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into three groups according to history of renal stone surgery. Patients without history of renal surgery were enrolled into Group 1. Other patients with previous PNL and previous open surgery were categorized as Group 2 and Group 3. Preoperative characteristic, perioperative data, stone-free status, and complication rates were compared between the groups. Stone-free status was accepted as completing clearance of stone and residual fragment smaller than 4 mm. Eventually, 2070 patients were enrolled into the study. Open renal surgery and PNL had been done in 410 (Group 2) and 131 (Group 3) patients, retrospectively. The mean operation time was longer (71.3 ± 33.5 min) in Group 2 and the mean fluoroscopy time was longer (8.6 ± 5.0) in Group 3 but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Highest stone clearance was achieved in primary PNL patients (81.62%) compared to the other groups (77.10% in Group 2 and 75.61% in Group 3). Stone-free rate was not significantly different between Group 2 and Group 3. Fever, pulmonary complications, and blood transfusion requirement were not statically different between groups but angioembolization was significantly higher in Group 2. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a safe and effective treatment modality for patients with renal stones regardless history of previous PNL or open renal surgery. However, history of open renal surgery but not PNL significantly reduced PNL success.

  18. Effects of previous ovarian surgery for endometriosis on the outcome of assisted reproduction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Selmo; Ferreira, Daniela Parreiras; Spyer Prates, Luis Felipe Víctor; Sales, Liana; Sampaio, Marcos

    2002-01-01

    Endometriosis affects 2-50% of women at reproductive age. Surgery is an option for treatment, but there is no convincing evidence that it promotes a significant improvement in fertility. Also, the removal of ovarian endometrioma might lead to a reduction in the follicular reserve and response to stimulation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of previous ovarian surgery for endometriosis on the ovarian response in assisted reproduction treatment cycles and its pregnancy outcome. A total of 61 women, with primary infertility and previously having undergone ovarian surgery for endometriosis, who had received 74 IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles, were studied (study group). A further 74 patients with primary infertility who underwent 77 IVF/ICSI cycles within#10; the same period of time, at the same clinic and without previous ovarian surgery or endometriosis were studied as a control group. Patients were matched for age and treatment performed. Patients 35 years with previous ovarian surgery needed more ampoules for ovulation induction (P = 0.017) and had fewer follicles and oocytes than women in the control group (P = 0.001). Duration of folliculogenesis was similar in both groups, as was fertilization rate. A total of 10 patients achieved pregnancy in the study group (34.5%) and 14 (48.3%) in the control group. Although a lower pregnancy rate was observed in patients who had undergone previous ovarian surgery, this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.424). In conclusion, ovarian surgery for the treatment of endometriosis reduces the ovarian outcome in IVF/ICSI cycles in women >35 years old, and might also decrease pregnancy rates. Therefore, for infertile patients, non-surgical treatment might be a better option to avoid reduction of the ovarian response.

  19. Are patient-reported outcomes predictive of patient satisfaction 5 years after anterior cervical spine surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Coric, Dom; Kim, Han Jo; Albert, Todd J; Radcliff, Kris E

    2017-07-01

    Patient satisfaction is becoming an increasing common proxy for surgical quality; however, the correlation between patient satisfaction and surgical outcomes 2 and 5 years after anterior cervical surgery has not been evaluated. The study aimed to determine if patient satisfaction is predicted by improvement in patient-reported outcomes (PRO) 2 and 5 years after anterior cervical spine surgery. This is a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The sample included patients enrolled in the Food and Drug Administration investigational device exemption clinical trial comparing total disc replacement with Mobi-C cervical artificial disc and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The outcome measures were visual analog scale (VAS) neck pain score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short-Form 12-Item scores, as well as patient satisfaction. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine if improvement in different PRO metrics can accurately identify patient satisfaction. Additionally, a logistic regression analysis was performed on the results at 24 months and 60 months to identify independent predictors of patient satisfaction. This research was supported by LDR (Zimmer Biomet) 13785 Research Boulevard - Suite 200 Austin, TX 78750. Data were available for 512 patients at 60 months. At 24 months postoperatively, NDI score improvement (area under the curve [AUC]=0.806), absolute NDI score (AUC=0.823), and absolute VAS neck pain score (AUC=0.808) were all excellent predictors of patient satisfaction. At 60 months postoperatively, NDI score improvement (AUC=0.815), absolute NDI score (AUC=0.839), VAS neck pain score improvement (AUC=0.803), and absolute VAS neck pain score (AUC=0.861) were all excellent predictors of patient satisfaction. In patients undergoing one- and two-level anterior cervical spine surgery, between 2 and 5 years postoperatively, patient satisfaction is significantly predicted by PROs, including the VAS neck score and the

  20. A Portable Shoulder-Mounted Camera System for Surgical Education in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Martin H; Ohiorhenuan, Ifije E; Patel, Neil N; Jakoi, Andre M; Hsieh, Patrick C; Acosta, Frank L; Wang, Jeffrey C; Liu, John C

    2017-02-07

    The past several years have demonstrated an increased recognition of operative videos as an important adjunct for resident education. Currently lacking, however, are effective methods to record video for the purposes of illustrating the techniques of minimally invasive (MIS) and complex spine surgery. We describe here our experiences developing and using a shoulder-mounted camera system for recording surgical video. Our requirements for an effective camera system included wireless portability to allow for movement around the operating room, camera mount location for comfort and loupes/headlight usage, battery life for long operative days, and sterile control of on/off recording. With this in mind, we created a shoulder-mounted camera system utilizing a GoPro™ HERO3+, its Smart Remote (GoPro, Inc., San Mateo, California), a high-capacity external battery pack, and a commercially available shoulder-mount harness. This shoulder-mounted system was more comfortable to wear for long periods of time in comparison to existing head-mounted and loupe-mounted systems. Without requiring any wired connections, the surgeon was free to move around the room as needed. Over the past several years, we have recorded numerous MIS and complex spine surgeries for the purposes of surgical video creation for resident education. Surgical videos serve as a platform to distribute important operative nuances in rich multimedia. Effective and practical camera system setups are needed to encourage the continued creation of videos to illustrate the surgical maneuvers in minimally invasive and complex spinal surgery. We describe here a novel portable shoulder-mounted camera system setup specifically designed to be worn and used for long periods of time in the operating room.

  1. Design and Fabrication of a Precision Template for Spine Surgery Using Selective Laser Melting (SLM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to meet the clinical requirements of spine surgery, this paper proposes the fabrication of the customized template for spine surgery through computer-aided design. A 3D metal printing-selective laser melting (SLM technique was employed to directly fabricate the 316L stainless steel template, and the metal template with tiny locating holes was used as an auxiliary tool to insert spinal screws inside the patient’s body. To guarantee accurate fabrication of the template for cervical vertebra operation, the contact face was placed upwards to improve the joint quality between the template and the cervical vertebra. The joint surface of the printed template had a roughness of Ra = 13 ± 2 μm. After abrasive blasting, the surface roughness was Ra = 7 ± 0.5 μm. The surgical metal template was bound with the 3D-printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS plastic model. The micro-hardness values determined at the cross-sections of SLM-processed samples varied from HV0.3 250 to HV0.3 280, and the measured tensile strength was in the range of 450 MPa to 560 MPa, which showed that the template had requisite strength. Finally, the metal template was clinically used in the patient’s surgical operation, and the screws were inserted precisely as the result of using the auxiliary template. The geometrical parameters of the template hole (e.g., diameter and wall thickness were optimized, and measures were taken to optimize the key geometrical units (e.g., hole units in metal 3D printing. Compared to the traditional technology of screw insertion, the use of the surgical metal template enabled the screws to be inserted more easily and accurately during spinal surgery. However, the design of the high-quality template should fully take into account the clinical demands of surgeons, as well as the advice of the designing engineers and operating technicians.

  2. Design and Fabrication of a Precision Template for Spine Surgery Using Selective Laser Melting (SLM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Wang, Yimeng; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Changhui; Yang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Zimian; Lin, Hui; Zhen, Yongqiang; Liao, Suixiang

    2016-07-22

    In order to meet the clinical requirements of spine surgery, this paper proposes the fabrication of the customized template for spine surgery through computer-aided design. A 3D metal printing-selective laser melting (SLM) technique was employed to directly fabricate the 316L stainless steel template, and the metal template with tiny locating holes was used as an auxiliary tool to insert spinal screws inside the patient's body. To guarantee accurate fabrication of the template for cervical vertebra operation, the contact face was placed upwards to improve the joint quality between the template and the cervical vertebra. The joint surface of the printed template had a roughness of Ra = 13 ± 2 μm. After abrasive blasting, the surface roughness was Ra = 7 ± 0.5 μm. The surgical metal template was bound with the 3D-printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) plastic model. The micro-hardness values determined at the cross-sections of SLM-processed samples varied from HV0.3 250 to HV0.3 280, and the measured tensile strength was in the range of 450 MPa to 560 MPa, which showed that the template had requisite strength. Finally, the metal template was clinically used in the patient's surgical operation, and the screws were inserted precisely as the result of using the auxiliary template. The geometrical parameters of the template hole (e.g., diameter and wall thickness) were optimized, and measures were taken to optimize the key geometrical units (e.g., hole units) in metal 3D printing. Compared to the traditional technology of screw insertion, the use of the surgical metal template enabled the screws to be inserted more easily and accurately during spinal surgery. However, the design of the high-quality template should fully take into account the clinical demands of surgeons, as well as the advice of the designing engineers and operating technicians.

  3. Current applications of robotics in spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Liu, Xilin; Park, Paul

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical robotics has demonstrated utility across the spectrum of surgery. Robotics in spine surgery, however, remains in its infancy. Here, the authors systematically review the evidence behind robotic applications in spinal instrumentation. METHODS This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies (through October 2016) that reported the use of robotics in spinal instrumentation were identified from a search of the PubMed database. Data regarding the accuracy of screw placement, surgeon learning curve, radiation exposure, and reasons for robotic failure were extracted. RESULTS Twenty-five studies describing 2 unique robots met inclusion criteria. Of these, 22 studies evaluated accuracy of spinal instrumentation. Although grading of pedicle screw accuracy was variable, the most commonly used method was the Gertzbein and Robbins system of classification. In the studies using the Gertzbein and Robbins system, accuracy (Grades A and B) ranged from 85% to 100%. Ten studies evaluated radiation exposure during the procedure. In studies that detailed fluoroscopy usage, overall fluoroscopy times ranged from 1.3 to 34 seconds per screw. Nine studies examined the learning curve for the surgeon, and 12 studies described causes of robotic failure, which included registration failure, soft-tissue hindrance, and lateral skiving of the drill guide. CONCLUSIONS Robotics in spine surgery is an emerging technology that holds promise for future applications. Surgical accuracy in instrumentation implanted using robotics appears to be high. However, the impact of robotics on radiation exposure is not clear and seems to be dependent on technique and robot type.

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for resection of ossification of the ligamentum flavum in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Shen, Chaoxiong; Cai, Ranze; Wu, Jianfeng; Zhuang, Yuandong; Cai, Zhaowen; Wang, Rui; Chen, Chunmei

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (TOLF) is a common cause of progressive thoracic myelopathy. Surgical decompression is commonly used to treat TOLF. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of microsurgical decompression of TOLF via a paraspinal approach, using a percutaneous tubular retractor system. First, three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction and printed models were made from thin computed tomography scans for each patient. Then, 3D computer-assisted virtual surgery was performed using the 3D reconstruction to calculate the precise location and sizes of the bone window and the angle of insertion of the percutaneous tubular retractor system. In total, 13 patients underwent the surgery through the percutaneous micro channel unilateral vertebral approach under electrophysiological monitoring. Five days after the surgery, increased creatine phosphokinase levels returned to preoperative levels. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was improved and computed tomography reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed that decompression was achieved without injuries to the spinal cord or nerve root. The stability of the spine was not affected, nor were any deformities of the spine detected. Finally, nerve functional recovery was achieved with minimal injury to the paraspinal muscle, articulum, spinous process and ligament. The mean operative time was 98.23 ±19.10 min, and mean blood loss was 19.77 ±5.97 ml. At a mean follow-up of 13.3 months (median: 12 months), the mean JOA score was 7.54 ±1.13 at the final follow-up, yielding a mean RR of 49.10 ±15.71%. Using The recovery rate, 7 (53.85%) patients had good outcomes, 5 (38.46%) patients had a fair outcome, and 1 (7.69%) patient had poor outcomes, indicating significant improvement by the final follow-up examination (p < 0.05). The 3D printed patient model-based microsurgical resection of TOLF via the paraspinal approach can achieve decompression of the spinal canal

  5. Influence of previous breast surgery in sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Prior, V; Díaz-Expósito, R; Casáns Tormo, I

    The aim of this study was to review the feasibility of selective sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with previous surgery for breast cancer, as well as to examine the factors that may interfere with sentinel node detection. A retrospective review was performed on 91 patients with breast cancer and previous breast surgery, and who underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy. Patients were divided into two groups according to their previous treatment: aesthetic breast surgery in 30 patients (group I) and breast-conserving surgery in 61 (group II). Lymphoscintigraphy was performed after an intra-tumour injection in 21 cases and a peri-areolar injection in 70 cases. An analysis was made of lymphatic drainage patterns and overall sentinel node detection according to clinical, pathological and surgical variables. The overall detection of the sentinel lymph node in the lymphoscintigraphy was 92.3%, with 7.7% of extra-axillary drainages. The identification rate was similar after aesthetic breast surgery (93.3%) and breast-conserving surgery (91.8%). Sentinel lymph nodes were found in the contralateral axilla in two patients (2.2%), and they were included in the histopathology study. The non-identification rate in the lymphoscintigraphy was 7.7%. There was a significantly higher non-detection rate in the highest histological grade tumours (28.6% grade III, 4.5% grade I and 3.6% grade II). Sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with previous breast surgery is feasible and deserves further studies to assess the influence of different aspects in sentinel node detection in this clinical scenario. A high histological grade was significantly associated with a lower detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  6. Navigation and Image Injection for Control of Bone Removal and Osteotomy Planes in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosterhon, Michael; Gutenberg, Angelika; Kantelhardt, Sven Rainer; Archavlis, Elefterios; Giese, Alf

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to cranial interventions, neuronavigation in spinal surgery is used in few applications, not tapping into its full technological potential. We have developed a method to preoperatively create virtual resection planes and volumes for spinal osteotomies and export 3-D operation plans to a navigation system controlling intraoperative visualization using a surgical microscope's head-up display. The method was developed using a Sawbone ® model of the lumbar spine, demonstrating feasibility with high precision. Computer tomographic and magnetic resonance image data were imported into Amira ® , a 3-D visualization software. Resection planes were positioned, and resection volumes representing intraoperative bone removal were defined. Fused to the original Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine data, the osteotomy planes were exported to the cranial version of a Brainlab ® navigation system. A navigated surgical microscope with video connection to the navigation system allowed intraoperative image injection to visualize the preplanned resection planes. The workflow was applied to a patient presenting with a congenital hemivertebra of the thoracolumbar spine. Dorsal instrumentation with pedicle screws and rods was followed by resection of the deformed vertebra guided by the in-view image injection of the preplanned resection planes into the optical path of a surgical microscope. Postoperatively, the patient showed no neurological deficits, and the spine was found to be restored in near physiological posture. The intraoperative visualization of resection planes in a microscope's head-up display was found to assist the surgeon during the resection of a complex-shaped bone wedge and may help to further increase accuracy and patient safety. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  7. Perils of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring: analysis of "false-negative" results in spine surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamkus, Arvydas A; Rice, Kent S; McCaffrey, Michael T

    2018-02-01

    Although some authors have published case reports describing false negatives in intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM), a systematic review of causes of false-negative IONM results is lacking. The objective of this study was to analyze false-negative IONM findings in spine surgery. This is a retrospective cohort analysis. A cohort of 109 patients with new postoperative neurologic deficits was analyzed for possible false-negative IONM reporting. The causes of false-negative IONM reporting were determined. From a cohort of 62,038 monitored spine surgeries, 109 consecutive patients with new postoperative neurologic deficits were reviewed for IONM alarms. Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring alarms occurred in 87 of 109 surgeries. Nineteen patients with new postoperative neurologic deficits did not have an IONM alarm and surgeons were not warned. In addition, three patients had no interpretable IONM baseline data and no alarms were possible for the duration of the surgery. Therefore, 22 patients were included in the study. The absence of IONM alarms during these 22 surgeries had different origins: "true" false negatives where no waveform changes meeting the alarm criteria occurred despite the appropriate IONM (7); a postoperative development of a deficit (6); failure to monitor the pathway, which became injured (5); the absence of interpretable IONM baseline data which precluded any alarm (3); and technical IONM application issues (1). Overall, the rate of IONM method failing to predict the patient's outcome was very low (0.04%, 22/62,038). Minimizing false negatives requires the application of a proper IONM technique with the limitations of each modality considered in their selection and interpretation. Multimodality IONM provides the most inclusive information, and although it might be impractical to monitor every neural structure that can be at risk, a thorough preoperative consideration of available IONM modalities is important. Delayed

  8. COMPARISON OF INTRAOPERATIVE KETAMINE VS. FENTANYL USE DECREASES POSTOPERATIVE OPIOID REQUIREMENTS IN TRAUMA PATIENTS UNDERGOING CERVICAL SPINE SURGERY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Aviva C; Ginsburg, Aryeh M; Pesso, Raymond M; Angus, George L D; Kang, Amiee; Ginsburg, Dov B

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative airway compromise following cervical spine surgery is a potentially serious adverse event. Residual effects of anesthesia and perioperative opioids that can cause both sedation and respiratory depression further increase this risk. Ketamine is an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist that provides potent analgesia without noticeable respiratory depression. We investigated whether intraoperative ketamine administration could decrease perioperative opioid requirements in trauma patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. We retrospectively reviewed anesthesia records identifying cervical spine surgeries performed between March 2014 and February 2015. All patients received a balanced anesthetic technique utilizing sevoflurane 0.5 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) and propofol infusion (50-100 mcg/kg/min). For intraoperative analgesia, one group of patients received ketamine (N=25) and a second group received fentanyl (N=27). Cumulative opioid doses in the recovery room and until 24 hours postoperatively were recorded. Fewer patients in the ketamine group (11/25 [44%] vs. 20/27 [74%], respectively; p = 0.03) required analgesics in the recovery room. Additionally, the total cumulative opioid requirements in the ketamine group decreased postoperatively at both 3 and 6 hours (p = 0.01). Ketamine use during cervical spine surgery decreased opioid requirements in both the recovery room and in the first 6 hours postoperatively. This may have the potential to minimize opioid induced respiratory depression in a population at increased risk of airway complications related to the surgical procedure.

  9. MR imaging of the pediatric spine: Comparison of myelography, MCT, and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.C.; Hoffman, J.C.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.; Braun, I.F.; Fry, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of MR imaging of 53 pediatric patients with suspected spinal abnormalities were compared findings on metrizamide myelography, MCT, and surgery. Prototype surface coil studies with multisection multiplanar imaging (0.5 and 1.5 T) using T1-weighted sequences were optimum for anatomic definition, while T2-weighted sequences were utilized for intramedullary pathology. Diseases studied included neoplasia, infection, trauma, scoliosis, and dysrhaphsium. Surface coils were essential for imaging the thoracic and lumbar spine. MR imaging yielded approximately equivalent information to that obtained on myelography or MCT in 25 of 31 patients. Limitations to MR imaging included bony spurs, small eccentric lesions, tumor seeding, metal artifacts, postoperative scarring, and motion. With further refinements, MR imaging may replace more invasive techniques for pediatric spinal imaging

  10. Artificial muscles for a novel simulator in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollensteiner, Marianne; Fuerst, David; Schrempf, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are commonly used minimally invasive methods to treat vertebral compression fractures. Novice surgeons gather surgical skills in different ways, mainly by "learning by doing" or training on models, specimens or simulators. Currently, a new training modality, an augmented reality simulator for minimally invasive spine surgeries, is going to be developed. An important step in investigating this simulator is the accurate establishment of artificial tissues. Especially vertebrae and muscles, reproducing a comparable haptical feedback during tool insertion, are necessary. Two artificial tissues were developed to imitate natural muscle tissue. The axial insertion force was used as validation parameter. It appropriates the mechanical properties of artificial and natural muscles. Validation was performed on insertion measurement data from fifteen artificial muscle tissues compared to human muscles measurement data. Based on the resulting forces during needle insertion into human muscles, a suitable material composition for manufacturing artificial muscles was found.

  11. Instruments used in the assessment of expectation toward a spine surgery: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Nepomuceno

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify and describe the instruments used to assess patients' expectations toward spine surgery. METHOD An integrative review was carried out in the databases PubMed, CINAHL, LILACS and PsycINFO. RESULTS A total of 4,402 publications were identified, of which 25 met the selection criteria. Of the studies selected, only three used tools that had confirmed validity and reliability to be applied; in five studies, clinical scores were used, and were modified for the assessment of patients' expectations, and in 17 studies the researchers developed scales without an adequate description of the method used for their development and validation. CONCLUSION The assessment of patients' expectations has been methodologically conducted in different ways. Until the completion of this integrative review, only two valid and reliable instruments had been used in three of the selected studies.

  12. The 'nightmare' of wrong level in spine surgery: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irace Claudio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent article published in the Journal by Lindley and colleagues (Patient Saf. Surg. 2011, 5:33 reported the successful surgical treatment of a persistent thoracic pain following a T7-8 microdiscectomy, truly performed at the ‘level immediately above’. The wrong level in spine surgery is a multi-factorial matter and several strategies have been designed and adopted to try decreasing its occurrence. We think that three of these factors are crucial: global strategy, attention, precision in level identification; and the actors we identified are the surgeon, the assistant nurse and the (neuroradiologist respectively. Basing upon our experience, the role of the radiologist pre- and intraoperatively and the importance of the assistant nurse are briefly described.

  13. Tension Pneumothorax During Surgery for Thoracic Spine Stabilization in Prone Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demicha Rankin MD

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The intraoperative progression of a simple or occult pneumothorax into a tension pneumothorax can be a devastating clinical scenario. Routine use of prophylactic thoracostomy prior to anesthesia and initiation of controlled ventilation in patients with simple or occult pneumothorax remains controversial. We report the case of a 75-year-old trauma patient with an insignificant pneumothorax on the right who developed an intraoperative tension pneumothorax on the left side while undergoing thoracic spine stabilization surgery in the prone position. Management of an intraoperative tension pneumothorax requires prompt recognition and treatment; however, the prone position presents an additional challenge of readily accessing the standard anatomic sites for pleural puncture and air drainage.

  14. Basic concepts in metal work failure after metastatic spine tumour surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh; Patel, Ravish; Wadhwa, Anshuja Charvi; Kumar, Aravind; Milavec, Helena Maria; Sonawane, Dhiraj; Singh, Gurpal; Benneker, Lorin Michael

    2018-04-01

    The development of spinal implants marks a watershed in the evolution of metastatic spine tumour surgery (MSTS), which has evolved from standalone decompressive laminectomy to instrumented stabilization and decompression with reconstruction when necessary. Fusion may not be feasible after MSTS due to poor quality of graft host bed along with adjunct chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy postoperatively. With an increase in the survival of patients with spinal tumours, there is a probability of an increase in the rate of implant failure. This review aims to help establish a clear understanding of implants/constructs used in MSTS and to highlight the fundamental biomechanics of implant/construct failures. Published literature on implant failure after spine surgery and MSTS has been reviewed. The evolution of spinal implants and their role in MSTS has been briefly described. The review defines implant/construct failures using radiological parameters that are practical, feasible, and derived from historical descriptions. We have discussed common modes of implant/construct failure after MSTS to allow further understanding, interception, and prevention of catastrophic failure. Implant failure rates in MSTS are in the range of 2-8%. Variability in patterns of failure has been observed based on anatomical region and the type of constructs used. Patients with construct/implant failures may or may not be symptomatic and present either as early (failures (> 3months). It has been noted that not all the implant failures after MSTS result in revisions. Based on the observed radiological criteria and clinical presentations, we have proposed a clinico-radiological classification for implant/construct failure after MSTS.

  15. Indications for spine surgery: validation of an administrative coding algorithm to classify degenerative diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Anna N.A.; Deyo, Richard A.; Tosteson, Tor; Weinstein, James; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis of Medicare claims linked to a multi-center clinical trial. Objective The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) provided a unique opportunity to examine the validity of a claims-based algorithm for grouping patients by surgical indication. SPORT enrolled patients for lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis. We compared the surgical indication derived from Medicare claims to that provided by SPORT surgeons, the “gold standard”. Summary of Background Data Administrative data are frequently used to report procedure rates, surgical safety outcomes, and costs in the management of spinal surgery. However, the accuracy of using diagnosis codes to classify patients by surgical indication has not been examined. Methods Medicare claims were link to beneficiaries enrolled in SPORT. The sensitivity and specificity of three claims-based approaches to group patients based on surgical indications were examined: 1) using the first listed diagnosis; 2) using all diagnoses independently; and 3) using a diagnosis hierarchy based on the support for fusion surgery. Results Medicare claims were obtained from 376 SPORT participants, including 21 with disc herniation, 183 with spinal stenosis, and 172 with degenerative spondylolisthesis. The hierarchical coding algorithm was the most accurate approach for classifying patients by surgical indication, with sensitivities of 76.2%, 88.1%, and 84.3% for disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and degenerative spondylolisthesis cohorts, respectively. The specificity was 98.3% for disc herniation, 83.2% for spinal stenosis, and 90.7% for degenerative spondylolisthesis. Misclassifications were primarily due to codes attributing more complex pathology to the case. Conclusion Standardized approaches for using claims data to accurately group patients by surgical indications has widespread interest. We found that a hierarchical coding approach correctly classified over 90

  16. The efficacy of bipolar sealer on blood loss in spine surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tao; Hu, Shi-Yu; Yang, Xin-Jian; Chen, Yang; Qiu, Yi-Yan; Guo, Wei-Zhuang; Lin, Jian-Ze; Ren, Kai

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs was to gather data to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bipolar sealer versus standard electrocautery in the management of spinal disease. The electronic databases including Embase, PubMed and Cochrane library were searched to identify relevant studies published from the time of the establishment of these databases up to January 2017. The primary outcomes were total blood loss, requirement of transfusion (rate and amount), and operation time. The secondary outcomes were length of hospital stay and postoperative wound infection. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 software. A total of five studies involving 500 patients (261 patients in the BS group and 239 in the control group) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled results revealed that application of bipolar sealer could decrease the total blood loss in spine surgery [WMD = -467.49, 95% CI (685.47 to -249.51); p SMD = -0.36, 95% CI (-0.60 to -0.13), p infection [OR = 0.88, 95% CI (0.31-2.48), p = 0.81; I 2  = 0.0%] between both groups. The available evidence suggests that bipolar sealer is superior to standard electrocautery with less blood loss, shorter operation time and less transfusion requirement. There is no significant difference between both groups regarding length of hospitalization and wound infection. Hence, bipolar sealer is recommended in spine surgery. Because of the limitation of our study, more well-designed RCTs with large sample are required to provide further evidence of safety and efficacy between bipolar sealer and standard electrocautery in the treatment of spinal disease.

  17. Reirradiation, surgery and IORT for recurrent rectal cancer in previously irradiated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J.M.E.; Ferenschild, Floris T.J.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M.M.; Wilt, Johannes H.W. de

    2008-01-01

    A total of 11 patients with recurrent rectal cancer who had been previously irradiated were treated with preoperative reirradiation (median dose 30 Gy), surgery and IORT. This treatment was related with high morbidity, a short pain-free survival (5 months) and poor local control (27% after 3 years), although some patients have long-term distant control and survival

  18. Effects of previous surgery on the detection of sentinel nodes in women with vulvar cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ennik, T.A.; Allen, D.G; Bekkers, R.L.M.; Hyde, S.E.; Grant, P.T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a growing interest to apply the sentinel node (SN) procedure in the treatment of vulvar cancer. Previous vulvar surgery might disrupt lymphatic patterns and thereby decrease SN detection rates, lengthen scintigraphic appearance time (SAT), and increase SN false-negative rate.

  19. Bone morphogenetic protein use in spine surgery-complications and outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundez, Antonio; Tournier, Clément; Garcia, Matthieu; Aunoble, Stéphane; Le Huec, Jean-Charles

    2016-06-01

    Because of significant complications related to the use of autologous bone grafts in spinal fusion surgery, bone substitutes and growth factors such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) have been developed. One of them, recombinant human (rh) BMP-2, has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use under precise conditions. However, rhBMP-2-related side effects have been reported, used in FDA-approved procedures, but also in off-label use.A systematic review of clinical data was conducted to analyse the rhBMP-2-related adverse events (AEs), in order to assess their prevalence and the associated surgery practices. Medline search with keywords "bone morphogenetic protein 2", "lumbar spine", "anterolateral interbody fusion" (ALIF) and the filter "clinical trial". FDA published reports were also included. Study assessment was made by authors (experienced spine surgeons), based on quality of study designs and level of evidence. Extensive review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled series published up to the present point, reveal no evidence of a significant increase of AEs related to rhBMP-2 use during ALIF surgeries, provided that it is used following FDA guidelines. Two additional RCTs performed with rhBMP-2 in combination with allogenic bone dowels reported increased bone remodelling in BMP-treated patients. This AE was transient and had no consequence on the clinical outcome of the patients. No other BMP-related AEs were reported in these studies. This literature review confirms that the use of rhBMP-2 following FDA-approved recommendations (i.e. one-level ALIF surgery with an LT-cage) is safe. The rate of complications is low and the AEs had been identified by the FDA during the pre-marketing clinical trials. The clinical efficiency of rhBMP-2 is equal or superior to that of allogenic or autologous bone graft in respect to fusion rate, low back pain disability, patient satisfaction and rate of re-operations. For all other off

  20. Current role of endovascular therapy in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Akin

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim Akin, Stephan Kische, Tim C Rehders, Tushar Chatterjee, Henrik Schneider, Thomas Körber, Christoph A Nienaber, Hüseyin InceDepartment of Medicine, Division of Cardiology at the University Hospital Rostock, Rostock School of Medicine, Ernst-Heydemann-Str. 6, 18057 Rostock, GermanyAbstract: The Marfan syndrome is a heritable disorder of the connective tissue which affects the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal system. The cardiovascular manifestation with aortic root dilatation, aortic valve regurgitation, and aortic dissection has a prevalence of 60% to 90% and determines the premature death of these patients. Thirty-four percent of the patients with Marfan syndrome will have serious cardiovascular complications requiring surgery in the first 10 years after diagnosis. Before aortic surgery became available, the majority of the patients died by the age of 32 years. Introduction in the aortic surgery techniques caused an increase of the 10 year survival rate up to 97%. The purpose of this article is to give an overview about the feasibility and outcome of stent-graft placement in the descending thoracic aorta in Marfan patients with previous aortic surgery.Keywords: Marfan syndrome, aortic dissection, root replacement, stent-graft, previous aortic surgery

  1. Management of Esophageal and Pharyngeal Perforation as Complications of Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Moo Sung; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Park, Jeong Yoon; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Jin, Byung Ho; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2017-06-01

    To describe our experience in treating esophageal and pharyngeal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery. Six patients with esophageal injury and one patient with pharyngeal injury after anterior cervical spinal surgery, managed at our department between 2000 and 2015, were analyzed retrospectively. During the study period, 7 patients (6 male and 1 female; mean age, 45 years) presented with esophageal perforation. The original anterior cervical spinal surgery was performed due to trauma in 2 patients and because of a degenerative cervical disorder in 5. Early esophageal perforation was diagnosed in 2 patients, and delayed esophageal injury due to chronic irritation with the cervical implants was noted in 5. Three of the five delayed perforation cases were related to cervical instrument displacement. Two patients showed no definite signs of infection, whereas 5 patients had various symptoms, including fever, neck pain, odynophagia, neck swelling, and upper extremity weakness. Two patients with a large defect underwent surgical repair and three with minimal perforation due to chronic irritation from the implants underwent instrument removal without direct repair of defect. Two asymptomatic patients received no intervention. Six patients with infection completely recovered from esophageal injury after treatment for a mean duration of 5.2 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks). One patient died because of postoperative pneumonia and sepsis after implant removal. Esophageal and pharyngeal injury after cervical spinal surgery may occur either directly due to spinal trauma and vigorous intraoperative retraction or due to chronic irritation with cervical implants. In cases of perforation associated with infection, various surgical modalities, including primary closure and reinforcement with a flap, could be considered depending on factors such as esophageal defect size, infection severity, and timing of recognition of injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of hematomas after anterior cervical spine surgery: A retrospective study of 15 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Weiliang; Ma, Xiaojun; Liang, Deyong; Sun, Yu

    2018-05-04

    Postoperative hematoma is a rare and dangerous complication of cervical spine surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and related factors of postoperative hematoma, and to report on 15 cases at our institution over a 6-year period. Fifteen cases of postoperative hematoma were retrospectively identified. We investigated their neurological outcomes, characteristics, and surgical data, and identified risk factors associated with postoperative (PO) hematoma. Patients with hematoma were compared to those with no hematoma, in order to identify risk factors. Retropharyngeal hematomas developed in seven cases and epidural hematomas in eight. The total incidence of postoperative hematoma was 1.2%: 0.5% retropharyngeal hematomas and 0.6% spinal epidural hematomas. At time of onset, the severity of paralysis was assessed as grade B in one case, grade C in six cases, and grade D in eight cases. Risk factors for PO hematoma were: (1) presence of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) (Phematoma group and non-hematoma group (P>0.05). Precise preoperative preparation and systematic evaluation are central to successful management of PO hematoma after anterior cervical surgery. Risk factors for PO hematoma include multilevel decompression, OPLL, higher BMI, and longer operation time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk factors for postoperative retropharyngeal hematoma after anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kevin R; Neuman, Brian; Peters, Colleen; Riew, K Daniel

    2014-02-15

    Retrospective review of prospective database. To investigate risk factors involved in the development of anterior cervical hematomas and determine any impact on patient outcomes. Postoperative (PO) hematomas after anterior cervical spine surgery require urgent recognition and treatment to avoid catastrophic patient morbidity or death. Current studies of PO hematomas are limited. Cervical spine surgical procedures performed on adults by the senior author at a single academic institution from 1995 to 2012 were evaluated. Demographic data, surgical history, operative data, complications, and neck disability index (NDI) scores were recorded prospectively. Cases complicated by PO hematoma were reviewed, and time until hematoma development and surgical evacuation were determined. Patients who developed a hematoma (HT group) were compared with those that did not (no-HT group) to identify risk factors. NDI outcomes were compared at early (11 mo) time points. There were 2375 anterior cervical spine surgical procedures performed with 17 occurrences (0.7%) of PO hematoma. In 11 patients (65%) the hematoma occurred within 24 hours PO, whereas 6 patients (35%) presented at an average of 6 days postoperatively. All underwent hematoma evacuation, with 2 patients (12%) requiring emergent cricothyroidotomy. Risk factors for hematoma were found to be (1) the presence of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (relative risk = 13.2, 95% confidence interval = 3.2-54.4), (2) presence of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (relative risk = 6.8, 95% confidence interval = 2.3-20.6), (3) therapeutic heparin use (relative risk 148.8, 95% confidence interval = 91.3-242.5), (4) longer operative time, and (5) greater number of surgical levels. The occurrence of a PO hematoma was not found to have a significant impact on either early (HT: 30, no-HT: 28; P = 0.86) or late average NDI scores (HT: 28, no-HT 31; P = 0.76). With fast recognition and treatment, no long-term detriment

  4. Managing spine surgery referrals: The consultation of neurosurgery and its nuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debono, B; Sabatier, P; Koudsie, A; Buffenoir, K; Hamel, O

    2017-09-01

    Spinal disorders, particularly low back pain, are among the most common reasons for general practitioner (GP) consultation and can sometimes be a source of professional friction. Despite their frequency and published guidelines, many patients are still mistakenly referred by their GP to specialists for spinal surgery consultation which can create colleague relationship problems, suboptimal or unnessary delayed care, as well as the financial implications for patients. To assess the management of GP lumbar spine referrals made to 4 neurosurgeons from 3 neurosurgical teams specialized in spinal surgery. All patient's medical records relating to 672 primary consultants over a period of two months (January and February 2015) at three institutions were retrospectively reviewed. Medical referral letters, clinical evidence and imaging data were analyzed and the patients were classified according the accuracy of surgical assessment. The final decisions of the surgeons were also considered. Of the 672 patients analyzed, 198 (29.5%) were considered unsuitable for surgical assessment: no spinal pathology=10.6%, no surgical conditions=35.4%, suboptimal medical treatment=31.3%, suboptimal radiology=18.2% and asymptomatic patients=4.5%. Unnecessary referrals to our consultation centers highlight the gap between the reason for the consultation and the indications for spinal surgery. Compliance with the guidelines, the creation of effective multidisciplinary teams, as well as the "hands on" involvement of surgeons in primary and continuing education of physicians are the best basis for a reduction in inappropriate referrals and effective patient care management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. One-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection of T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Seijiro; Goto, Tatsuya; Koike, Terumoto; Okamoto, Takeshi; Shoji, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy of one-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection for T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine is described. A 56-year-old man with locally advanced lung cancer infiltrating the aortic wall and spine underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation, followed by en bloc resection of the aortic wall and spine with thoracic endovascular grafting. He developed postoperative chylothorax, but there were no stent graft-relat...

  6. Preliminary experience with SpineEOS, a new software for 3D planning in AIS surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Emmanuelle; Mazda, Keyvan; Simon, Anne-Laure; Ilharreborde, Brice

    2018-04-24

    Preoperative planning of scoliosis surgery is essential in the effective treatment of spine pathology. Thus, precontoured rods have been recently developed to avoid iatrogenic sagittal misalignment and rod breakage. Some specific issues exist in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), such as a less distal lower instrumented level, a great variability in the location of inflection point (transition from lumbar lordosis to thoracic kyphosis), and sagittal correction is limited by both bone-implant interface. Since 2007, stereoradiographic imaging system is used and allows for 3D reconstructions. Therefore, a software was developed to perform preoperative 3D surgical planning and to provide rod's shape and length. The goal of this preliminary study was to assess the feasibility, reliability, and the clinical relevance of this new software. Retrospective study on 47 AIS patients operated with the same surgical technique: posteromedial translation through posterior approach with lumbar screws and thoracic sublaminar bands. Pre- and postoperatively, 3D reconstructions were performed on stereoradiographic images (EOS system, Paris, France) and compared. Then, the software was used to plan the surgical correction and determine rod's shape and length. Simulated spine and rods were compared to postoperative real 3D reconstructions. 3D reconstructions and planning were performed by an independent observer. 3D simulations were performed on the 47 patients. No difference was found between the simulated model and the postoperative 3D reconstructions in terms of sagittal parameters. Postoperatively, 21% of LL were not within reference values. Postoperative SVA was 20 mm anterior in 2/3 of the cases. Postoperative rods were significantly longer than precontoured rods planned with the software (mean 10 mm). Inflection points were different on the rods used and the planned rods (2.3 levels on average). In this preliminary study, the software based on 3D stereoradiography low

  7. Post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (≥65years old): A study of 453 consecutive elderly spine surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Wang, Timothy Y; Back, Adam G; Lydon, Emily; Reddy, Gireesh B; Karikari, Isaac O; Gottfried, Oren N

    2017-07-01

    In the last decade, costs of U.S. healthcare expenditures have been soaring, with billions of dollars spent on hospital readmissions. Identifying causes and risk factors can reduce soaring readmission rates and help lower healthcare costs. The aim of this is to determine if post-operative delirium in the elderly is an independent risk factor for 30-day hospital readmission after spine surgery. The medical records of 453 consecutive elderly (≥65years old) patients undergoing spine surgery at Duke University Medical Center from 2008 to 2010 were reviewed. We identified 17 (3.75%) patients who experienced post-operative delirium according to DSM-V criteria. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and post-operative complication rates were collected for each patient. Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium had an increased length of hospital stay (10.47days vs. 5.70days, p=0.009). Complication rates were similar between the cohorts with the post-operative delirium patients having increased UTI and superficial surgical site infections. In total, 12.14% of patients were re-admitted within 30-days of discharge, with post-operative delirium patients experiencing approximately a 4-fold increase in 30-day readmission rates (Delirium: 41.18% vs. No Delirium: 11.01%, p=0.002). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, post-operative delirium is an independent predictor of 30-day readmission after spine surgery in the elderly (p=0.03). Elderly patients experiencing post-operative delirium after spine surgery is an independent risk factor for unplanned readmission within 30-days of discharge. Preventable measures and early awareness of post-operative delirium in the elderly may help reduce readmission rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Piezosurgery in Bone Augmentation Procedures Previous to Dental Implant Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrin, Gabriel Leonardo; Sigua-Rodriguez, Eder Alberto; Goulart, Douglas Rangel; Asprino, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The piezosurgery has been used with increasing frequency and applicability by health professionals, especially those who deal with dental implants. The concept of piezoelectricity has emerged in the nineteenth century, but it was applied in oral surgery from 1988 by Tomaso Vercellotti. It consists of an ultrasonic device able to cut mineralized bone tissue, without injuring the adjacent soft tissue. It also has several advantages when compared to conventional techniques with drills and saws, such as the production of a precise, clean and low bleed bone cut that shows positive biological results. In dental implants surgery, it has been used for maxillary sinus lifting, removal of bone blocks, distraction osteogenesis, lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve, split crest of alveolar ridge and even for dental implants placement. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the use of piezosurgery in bone augmentation procedures used previously to dental implants placement. PMID:26966469

  9. Incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery - incidence, risk factors and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Incidental durotomy is a common complication of lumbar spine operations for degenerative disorders. Its incidence varies depending on several risk factors and regarding the intra and postoperative management, there is no consensus. Our objective was to report our experience with incidental durotomy in patients who were operated on for lumbar disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis and revision surgeries. Between 2009 and 2012, 1259 patients were operated on for degenerative lumbar disorders. For primary operations, the surgical approach was mino-open, interlamar, uni- or bilateral, as for recurrences, the removal of the compressive element was intended: the epidural scar and the disc fragment. 863 patients (67,7% were operated on for lumbar disc herniation, 344 patients (27,3% were operated on for lumbar spinal stenosis and 52 patients (5% were operated for recurrences. The operations were performed by neurosurgeons with the same professional degree but with different operative volume. Unintentional durotomy occurred in 20 (2,3% of the patients with herniated disc, in 14 (4,07% of the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and in 12 (23% of the patients who were operated on for recurrences. The most frequent risk factors were: obesity, revised surgery and the physician’s low operative volume. Intraoperative dural fissures were repaired through suture (8 cases, by applying muscle, fat graft or by applying curaspon, tachosil. There existed 4 CSF fistulas which were repaired at reoperation. Incidental dural fissures during operations for degenerative lumbar disorders must be recognized and immediately repaired to prevent complications such as CSF fistula, osteodiscitis and increased medical costs. Preventing, identifying and treating unintentional durotomies can be best achieved by respecting a neat surgical technique and a standardized treatment protocol.

  10. Impact of robot-assisted spine surgery on health care quality and neurosurgical economics: A systemic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiani, Brian; Quadri, Syed A; Farooqui, Mudassir; Cathel, Alessandra; Berman, Blake; Noel, Jerry; Siddiqi, Javed

    2018-04-03

    Whenever any new technology is introduced into the healthcare system, it should satisfy all three pillars of the iron triangle of health care, which are quality, cost-effectiveness, and accessibility. There has been quite advancement in the field of spine surgery in the last two decades with introduction of new technological modalities such as CAN and surgical robotic devices. MAZOR SpineAssist/Renaissance was the first robotic system to be approved for the use in spine surgeries in the USA in 2004. In this review, the authors sought to determine if the current literature supports this technology to be cost-effective, accessible, and improve the quality of care for individuals and populations by increasing the likelihood of desired health outcomes. Robotic-assisted surgery seems to provide perfection in surgical ergonomics and surgical dexterity, consequently improving patient outcomes. A lot of data is present on the accuracy, effectiveness, and safety of the robotic-guided technology which reflects remarkable improvements in quality of care, making its utility convincingly undisputable. The technology has been claimed to be cost-effective but there seems to be lack of data in the literature on this topic to validate this claim. Apart from just the outcome parameters, there is an immense need of studies on real-time cost-efficacy, patient perspective, surgeon and resident learning curve, and their experience with this new technology. Furthermore, new studies looking into increased utilities of this technology, such as brain and spine tumor resection, deep brain stimulation procedures, and osteotomies in deformity surgery, might authenticate the cost of the equipment.

  11. Lower cervical levels: Increased risk of early dysphonia following anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ji-Huan; Li, Xiao-Dan; Deng, Liang; Xiao, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to re-evaluate the incidence of early dysphonia after anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS) and to determine the related risk factors. Patients underwent ACSS between January 2011 and December 2013 at two sites were identified retrospectively from hospital's patient databases. A total of 233 cases were included in this study. Dysphonia developed 1 month postoperatively was recorded. Follow-up was conducted in all positive-response patients. Those reporting severe or persistent voice symptoms were referred to otolaryngologists for further assessments and (or) treatments. Pre and intraoperative factors were collected to determine their relationships with dysphonia one month postoperatively. 45 patients developed dysphonia at one month, including 23 males and 22 females, yielding to an incidence of 19.3%. 34 cases resolved themselves in 3 months, leaving the remaining 11 patients considered to be severe or persistent cases. However, 10 of them recovered spontaneously in the next 9 months, while the last case received vocal cord medialization and returned to almost normal speech function at 18 months. In univariate analysis, only approaching level involving C6-C7 or (and) C7-T1 was significantly associated with postoperative dysphonia (Pdysphonia following ACSS was relatively high and approaching at lower cervical levels was an independent predictive factor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Planning and performing spine surgery with CT/MPR: A primer for radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, P.; Kerber, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    Few things are more discouraging to a surgeon than the patient who has continued bitter complaints after spine surgery. We often show our discouragement by refusing even to name these patients;instead we depersonalize them, calling them ''failed backs.'' The most common cause of the failed-back syndrome is probably an error in the original decision to operate. Many patients have unsolved psychosocial problems that the surgeon may not recognize. Even though we are critical of this lapse in surgical judgment, the most experienced and cautious physician occasionally makes these mistakes. Not all failed backs are psychosocial in origin. The advent of computerized tomography with multiplanar reconstruction (CT/MPR) has demonstrated several large and important subsets of patients whose operation has failed not for psychosocial reasons but for a lack of appreciation of unrecognized pathology. In a small minority of cases, the surgeon has operated on the wrong interspace. In most, though, important pathology was overlooked and not operated on because the technology to see it was unavailable. In order that the radiologist can better understand the problems encountered by the surgeon, the authors now review the most common of these problems and outline how specific abnormalities are diagnosed and treated. The evaluation of back disease is a complex undertaking, and the partnership between radiologist and surgeon is an essential one

  13. Clinical outcomes of Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy at patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Odabasi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical outcomes of Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH at patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery.\tDesign: A clinical observational, prospective, non randomised trial comparing outcomes of 13 patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery with outcomes of 19 patients who had not surgery.\tSetting: Adnan Menderes University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.\tPatients: Thirty-two subjects [average age 51,1±6,9 (37-66] who had indication of total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral\tsalpingooferectomy due to benign pathologies.\tInterventions: According to ACOG, LAVH was performed by using the Garry technique at the trocar insertions, the Reich technique\tat the laparoscopic phase and the Heaney technique at the vaginal phase by the same operator. After adhesiolysis and diagnostic procedures, ureters were dissected medially. By coagulating, bilateral round and infundibulopelvic ligaments were cut after the\tmobilisation of bladder. The operation was completed by the same operation team by vaginal approach consequently. At all operations, 80 W unipolar or 150 W bipolar diathermic dissection and 25-35 W unipolar diathermic cutting were performed.\tMain outcome measures: Age, parity, menopausal status, preoperative indications, type of previous abdominopelvic surgey and incision, intraoperative indications, adhesion scores, rate of unintended laparotomy, operative time, uterus weight, loss of blood,\tcomplications, postoperative pain scores and analgesic requirements, time necessary for returning to normal intestinal function, length of hospitalisation and rate of readmission to hospital.\tRESULTS: When compared with the patients who had not previous abdominopelvic surgery, all adhesion scores, uterus weight, operative time and the number of total postoperative complications were found significantly high at patients who had previous\tsurgery. Loss of blood, the rate

  14. [Impact of obesity in the pathophysiology of degenerative disk disease and in the morbidity and outcome of lumbar spine surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-López, Pedro David; Castilla-Díez, José Manuel

    Obesity (BMI>30Kg/m 2 ) is a pandemic with severe medical and financial implications. There is growing evidence that relates certain metabolic processes within the adipose tissue, preferentially abdominal fat, with a low-intensity chronic inflammatory state mediated by adipokines and other substances that favor disk disease and chronic low back pain. Obesity greatly conditions both the preoperative evaluation and the spinal surgical technique itself. Some meta-analyses have confirmed an increase of complications following lumbar spine surgery (mainly infections and venous thrombosis) in obese subjects. However, functional outcomes after lumbar spine surgery are favorable although inferior to the non-obese population, acknowledging that obese patients present with worse baseline function levels and the prognosis of conservatively treated obese cohorts is much worse. The impact of preoperative weight loss in spine surgery has not been prospectively studied in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Modular femoral component for conversion of previous hip surgery in total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Wayne M; Branson, Jill J

    2005-09-01

    The conversion of previous hip surgery to total hip arthroplasty creates a durable construct that is anatomically accurate. Most femoral components with either cemented or cementless design have a fixed tapered proximal shape. The proximal femoral anatomy is changed due to previous hip surgery for fixation of an intertrochanteric hip fracture, proximal femoral osteotomy, or a fibular allograft for avascular necrosis. The modular S-ROM (DePuy Orthopaedics Inc., Warsaw, Ind) hip stem accommodates these issues and independently prepares the proximal and distal portion of the femur. In preparation and implantation, the S-ROM hip stem creates less hoop stresses on potentially fragile stress risers from screws and thin bone. The S-ROM hip stem also prepares a previously distorted anatomy by milling through cortical bone that can occlude the femoral medullar canals and recreate proper femoral anteversion and reduces the risk of intraoperative or postoperative periprosthetic fracture due to the flexible titanium-slotted stem. The S-ROM femoral stem is recommended for challenging total hip reconstructions.

  16. [Renal oncocytoma in the single kidney after previous surgery of renal carcinoma. Apropos of 2 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneroni, L; Canclini, L; Berti, G L; Giola, V; Leidi, G L; Maccaroni, A; Raimoldi, A; Sironi, M; Assi, A; Bacchioni, A M

    1997-12-01

    Renal oncocytoma is a neoplasm which rarely occurs in patients with solitary kidney, the other being absent because of a previous nephrectomy performed for renal cancer. We present two case reports and a literature review. We have studied some important problems such as the histogenesis, the potential for malignancy, the diagnosis, the treatment and the follow up. The high incidence of coexistence of renal oncocytoma and renal cell carcinoma has important clinical implications. We would like to emphasize the importance of preoperatory FNAB, nephron sparing surgery and very careful follow up.

  17. Does previous open surgical experience have any influence on robotic surgery simulation exercises?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumpanas, Alin Adrian; Bardan, Razvan; Ferician, Ovidiu Catalin; Latcu, Silviu Constantin; Duta, Ciprian; Lazar, Fulger Octavian

    2017-12-01

    Within the last years, there has been a trend in many hospitals to switch their surgical activity from open/laparoscopic procedures to robotic surgery. Some open surgeons have been shifting their activity to robotic surgery. It is still unclear whether there is a transfer of open surgical skills to robotic ones. To evaluate whether such transfer of skills occurs and to identify which specific skills are more significantly transferred from the operative table to the console. Twenty-five volunteers were included in the study, divided into 2 groups: group A (15 participants) - medical students (without any surgical experience in open, laparoscopic or robotic surgery); and group B (10 participants) - surgeons with exclusively open surgical experience, without any previous laparoscopic or robotic experience. Participants were asked to complete 3 robotic simulator console exercises structured from the easiest one (Peg Board) to the toughest one (Sponge Suture). Overall scores for each exercise as well as specific metrics were compared between the two groups. There were no significant differences between overall scores of the two groups for the easiest task. Overall scores were better for group B as the exercises got more complex. For the intermediate and high-difficulty level exercises, most of the specific metrics were better for group B, with the exception of the working master space item. Our results suggest that the open surgical skills transfer to robotic skills, at least for the very beginning of the training process.

  18. Patient characteristics of smokers undergoing lumbar spine surgery: an analysis from the Quality Outcomes Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Devin, Clinton J; McCutcheon, Brandon; Chotai, Silky; Archer, Kristin R; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E; McGirt, Matthew; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Foley, Kevin; Glassman, Steven D; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE In this analysis the authors compare the characteristics of smokers to nonsmokers using demographic, socioeconomic, and comorbidity variables. They also investigate which of these characteristics are most strongly associated with smoking status. Finally, the authors investigate whether the association between known patient risk factors and disability outcome is differentially modified by patient smoking status for those who have undergone surgery for lumbar degeneration. METHODS A total of 7547 patients undergoing degenerative lumbar surgery were entered into a prospective multicenter registry (Quality Outcomes Database [QOD]). A retrospective analysis of the prospectively collected data was conducted. Patients were dichotomized as smokers (current smokers) and nonsmokers. Multivariable logistic regression analysis fitted for patient smoking status and subsequent measurement of variable importance was performed to identify the strongest patient characteristics associated with smoking status. Multivariable linear regression models fitted for 12-month Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores in subsets of smokers and nonsmokers was performed to investigate whether differential effects of risk factors by smoking status might be present. RESULTS In total, 18% (n = 1365) of patients were smokers and 82% (n = 6182) were nonsmokers. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the factors significantly associated with patients' smoking status were sex (p smoker (p = 0.0008), while patients with coronary artery disease had greater odds of being a smoker (p = 0.044). Patients' propensity for smoking was also significantly associated with higher American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class (p smokers and nonsmokers. CONCLUSIONS Using a large, national, multiinstitutional registry, the authors described the profile of patients who undergo lumbar spine surgery and its association with their smoking status. Compared with nonsmokers, smokers were younger, male

  19. In vitro fertilization outcome in women with endometriosis & previous ovarian surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Pop-Trajkovic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Women with endometriosis often need in vitro fertilization (IVF to concieve. There are conflicting data on the results of IVF in patients with endometriosis. This study was undertaken to elucidate the influence of endometriosis on IVF outcome to give the best counselling for infertile patient with this problem. Methods: The outcome measures in 78 patients with surgically confirmed endometriosis were compared with 157 patients with tubal factor infertility, all of whom have undergone IVF. The groups were matched for age and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH levels. Outcome measures included number of follicles, number of ocytes, peak oestradiol (E2 concentrations and mean number of ampoules of gonadotropins. Cumulative pregnancy, miscarriage and live birth rates were calculated in both the groups. Results: Higher cancelation rates, higher total gonadotropin requirements, lower peak E2 levels and lower oocyte yield were found in women with endometriosis and previous surgery compared with those with tubal factor infertility. However, no differences were found in fertilization, implantation, pregnancy, miscarriage, multiple births and delivery rates between the endometriosis and tubal factor infertility groups. Interpretation & conclusions: The present findings showed that women with endometriosis and previous surgery responded less well to gonadotropins during ovarian stimulation and hence the cost of treatment to achieve pregnancy was higher in this group compared with those with tubal factor infertility. However, the outcome of IVF treatment in patients with endometriosis was as good as in women with tubal factor infertility.

  20. Trephine Transverse Colostomy Is Effective for Patients Who Have Previously Undergone Rectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Seung-Seop; Jung, Sung Woo; Oh, Se Heon; Lee, Jong Lyul; Yoon, Yong Sik; Park, In Ja; Lim, Seok-Byung; Yu, Chang Sik; Kim, Jin Cheon

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Colostomy creation is an essential procedure for colorectal surgeons, but the preferred method of colostomy varies by surgeon. We compared the outcomes of trephine colostomy creation with open those for the (laparotomy) and laparoscopic methods and evaluated appropriate indications for a trephine colostomy and the advantages of the technique. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 263 patients who had undergone colostomy creation by trephine, open and laparoscopic approaches between April 2006 and March 2016. We compared the clinical features and the operative and postoperative outcomes according to the approach used for stoma creation. Results One hundred sixty-three patients (62%) underwent colostomy surgery for obstructive causes and 100 (38%) for fistulous problems. The mean operative time was significantly shorter with the trephine approach (trephine, 46.0 ± 1.9 minutes; open, 78.7 ± 3.9 minutes; laparoscopic, 63.5 ± 5.0 minutes; P colostomy was feasible for a diversion colostomy (P colostomy is safe and can be implemented quickly in various situations, and compared to other colostomy procedures, the patient’s recovery is faster. Previous laparotomy history was not a contraindication for a trephine colostomy, and a trephine transverse colostomy is feasible for patients who have undergone previous rectal surgery. PMID:29742862

  1. Multi-stage 3D-2D registration for correction of anatomical deformation in image-guided spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketcha, M. D.; De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Jacobson, M. W.; Goerres, J.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-06-01

    A multi-stage image-based 3D-2D registration method is presented that maps annotations in a 3D image (e.g. point labels annotating individual vertebrae in preoperative CT) to an intraoperative radiograph in which the patient has undergone non-rigid anatomical deformation due to changes in patient positioning or due to the intervention itself. The proposed method (termed msLevelCheck) extends a previous rigid registration solution (LevelCheck) to provide an accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of spinal deformation. The method employs a multi-stage series of rigid 3D-2D registrations performed on sets of automatically determined and increasingly localized sub-images, with the final stage achieving a rigid mapping for each label to yield a locally rigid yet globally deformable solution. The method was evaluated first in a phantom study in which a CT image of the spine was acquired followed by a series of 7 mobile radiographs with increasing degree of deformation applied. Second, the method was validated using a clinical data set of patients exhibiting strong spinal deformation during thoracolumbar spine surgery. Registration accuracy was assessed using projection distance error (PDE) and failure rate (PDE  >  20 mm—i.e. label registered outside vertebra). The msLevelCheck method was able to register all vertebrae accurately for all cases of deformation in the phantom study, improving the maximum PDE of the rigid method from 22.4 mm to 3.9 mm. The clinical study demonstrated the feasibility of the approach in real patient data by accurately registering all vertebral labels in each case, eliminating all instances of failure encountered in the conventional rigid method. The multi-stage approach demonstrated accurate mapping of vertebral labels in the presence of strong spinal deformation. The msLevelCheck method maintains other advantageous aspects of the original LevelCheck method (e.g. compatibility with standard clinical workflow, large

  2. Vancomycin Powder Regimen for Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Complex Spine Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hal, Michael; Lee, Joon; Laudermilch, Dann; Nwasike, Chinedu; Kang, James

    2017-10-01

    In total, 496 patients of a single surgeon cohort examining the surgical-site infection (SSI) rates with the addition of vancomycin powder in both diabetic and revision spine surgery cases. A historical control group of 652 patients were compared from the same surgeon over an earlier time period before the inception of using vancomycin powder prophylaxis. The objective of this study was to describe and compare the rates of infection in high-risk patient populations while using vancomycin powder. Vancomycin powder may not decrease an already low rate of infection. Therefore, use of vancomycin powder in high-risk patients with a higher rate of infection would potentially show benefit of vancomycin powder. In total, 496 patient charts were collected from a database of cases. Patients were included in the cohort if they had revision spinal operation or if they were diabetic. Patients in the time period July 2010 to August 2013 were included in the vancomycin protocol where 1 g of vancomycin powder was added to the wound before wound closure. Cases were considered positive if there was a positive culture or if there was sufficient clinical suspicion to treat. As a control to this cohort, 692 charts were reviewed from a earlier time period of the same surgeon and institution. In total, 28 patients of 496 (5.6%) patients in the cohort returned to the operating room for seroma, hematoma, draining wound, or infection. Sixteen of these patients (16/496, 3.2%) had a culture positive infection or were treated as an infection. This rate was significantly lower than the historical rate before the protocol. Although vancomycin does seem to be useful in decreasing SSIs, it is not a panacea. SSIs in high-risk patients were not completely eliminated by the vancomycin protocol.

  3. Music Therapy Increases Comfort and Reduces Pain in Patients Recovering From Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondanaro, John F; Homel, Peter; Lonner, Baron; Shepp, Jennifer; Lichtensztein, Marcela; Loewy, Joanne V

    The treatment of pain continues to gain in saliency as a component of defining best practice in medical care. Music therapy is an integrative treatment modality that impacts patient outcomes in the treatment of spinal pain. At Mount Sinai Beth Israel, we conducted a mixed-methods study addressing the effects of music therapy interventions on the recovery of patients after spine surgery. The study combined standard medical approaches and integrative music therapy. Sixty patients (35 female, 25 male) ranging in age from 40 to 55 years underwent anterior, posterior, or anterior-posterior spinal fusion and were randomly assigned to either music therapy plus standard care (medical and nursing care with scheduled pharmacologic pain intervention) or standard care only. Measurements for both groups were completed before and after the intervention. Music therapy involved the use of patient-preferred live music that supported tension release/relaxation through incentive-based clinical improvisation, singing, and/or rhythmic drumming or through active visualization supported by live music that encompasses tension resolution. The control and music groups showed significant differences in degree and direction of change in the visual analog scale (VAS) pain ratings from before to after intervention (P = .01). VAS pain levels increased slightly in the control group (to 5.87 from 5.20) but decreased by more than 1 point in the music group (to 5.09 from 6.20). The control and music therapy groups did not differ in the rate of change in scores on Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) Anxiety (P = .62), HADS Depression (P = .85), or Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (P = .93). Both groups had slight increases in HADS Anxiety, comparable decreases in HADS Depression, and minimal changes in fear-related movement (Tampa scale).

  4. Comparison of propofol based anaesthesia to conventional inhalational general anaesthesia for spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L D Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Often conventional Inhalational agents are used for maintenance of anaesthesia in spine surgery. This study was undertaken to compare propofol with isoflurane anaesthesia with regard to haemodynamic stability, early emergence, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV and early assessment of neurological functions. Patients & Methods: Eighty ASA grade I &II adult patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Patients in study group received inj propofol for induction as well as for maintenance along with N 2O+O2 and the control group patients received inj thiopentone for induction and N 2 O+O 2 +isoflurane for maintenance. BIS monitoring was used for titrating the anaesthetic dose adjustments in all patients. All patients received fentanyl boluses for intraoperative analgesia and atracurium as muscle relaxant. Statistical data containing haemodynamic parameters, PONV, emergence time, dose of drug consumed & quality of surgical field were recorded and compared using student t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The haemodynamic stability was coparable in both the groups. The quality of surgical field were better in study group. Though there was no significant difference in the recovery profile (8.3% Vs 9.02% between both the groups, the postoperative nausea and vomiting was less in propofol group than isoflurane group (25%Vs60%. The anaesthesia cost was nearly double for propofol than isoflurane anaesthesia. Conclusion: Haemodynamic stability was comparable in both the groups. There was no significant difference in the recovery time between intravenous and inhalational group. Patients in propofol group were clear headed at awakening and were better oriented to place than inhalational group.

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral-Based Physical Therapy for Patients With Chronic Pain Undergoing Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Kristin R; Devin, Clinton J; Vanston, Susan W; Koyama, Tatsuki; Phillips, Sharon E; George, Steven Z; McGirt, Matthew J; Spengler, Dan M; Aaronson, Oran S; Cheng, Joseph S; Wegener, Stephen T

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral-based physical therapy (CBPT) program for improving outcomes in patients after lumbar spine surgery. A randomized controlled trial was conducted on 86 adults undergoing a laminectomy with or without arthrodesis for a lumbar degenerative condition. Patients were screened preoperatively for high fear of movement using the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia. Randomization to either CBPT or an education program occurred at 6 weeks after surgery. Assessments were completed pretreatment, posttreatment and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcomes were pain and disability measured by the Brief Pain Inventory and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcomes included general health (SF-12) and performance-based tests (5-Chair Stand, Timed Up and Go, 10-Meter Walk). Multivariable linear regression analyses found that CBPT participants had significantly greater decreases in pain and disability and increases in general health and physical performance compared with the education group at the 3-month follow-up. Results suggest a targeted CBPT program may result in significant and clinically meaningful improvement in postoperative outcomes. CBPT has the potential to be an evidence-based program that clinicians can recommend for patients at risk for poor recovery after spine surgery. This study investigated a targeted cognitive-behavioral-based physical therapy program for patients after lumbar spine surgery. Findings lend support to the hypothesis that incorporating cognitive-behavioral strategies into postoperative physical therapy may address psychosocial risk factors and improve pain, disability, general health, and physical performance outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe radiation morbidity in carcinoma of the cervix: impact of pretherapy surgical staging and previous surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, Bruce A.; Hempling, Ronald E.; Piver, M. Steven; Baker, Trudy R.; McAuley, Michael; Driscoll, Deborah

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to delineate the factors which (a) contribute to an increase in the severe, radiation induced complication rate and (b) have a significant effect on survival in patients with International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians (FIGO) Stage I-IVA cervical cancer undergoing pretherapy surgical staging. Methods and Materials: From 1971-1991, 189 patients underwent pretherapy surgical staging via a retroperitoneal approach (67) or transperitoneal approach (122). Seventy-nine patients had previously experienced a laparotomy. Patients subsequently received a median of 85 Gy to point A. In patients receiving paraaortic radiation, a median of 45 Gy was administered. One hundred and thirty-two (69.8%) patients received hydroxyurea as a radiation sensitizer. Results: Pretherapy surgical evaluation revealed that 21 of 89 (23.6%) Stage II patients and 32 of 85 (37.6%) Stage III patients had paraaortic lymph node metastases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis detailed the significant factors favorably influencing the radiation-induced complication rate to be a retroperitoneal approach of pretherapy surgical staging and no previous laparotomy. Survival was significantly prolonged in patients receiving hydroxyurea, evaluated via a retroperitoneal incision, with negative paraaortic lymph nodes, and with an early stage of disease. Conclusion: A retroperitoneal approach to pretherapy surgical staging and absence of previous surgery reduced the incidence of subsequent radiation-induced complications. Despite improvements in the detection of occult disease, prolonged survival is impaired when the therapeutic measures currently available are used

  7. Reverse arthroplasty for osteoarthritis and rotator cuff deficiency after previous surgery for recurrent anterior shoulder instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiss, Patric; Zeifang, Felix; Pons-Villanueva, Juan; Smithers, Christopher J; Loew, Markus; Walch, Gilles

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis in combination with rotator cuff deficiency following previous shoulder stabilisation surgery and after failed surgical treatment for chronic anterior shoulder dislocation is a challenging condition. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of reverse shoulder arthroplasty in such patients. Thirteen patients with a median follow-up of 3.5 (range two to eight) years and a median age of 70 (range 48-82) years were included. In all shoulders a tear of at least one rotator cuff tendon in combination with osteoarthritis was present at the time of arthroplasty. The Constant score, shoulder flexion and external and internal rotation with the elbow at the side were documented pre-operatively and at the final follow-up. Pre-operative, immediate post-operative and final follow-up radiographs were analysed. All complications and revisions were documented. Twelve patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the procedure. The median Constant score increased from 26 points pre-operatively to 67 points at the final follow-up (p = 0.001). The median shoulder flexion increased significantly from 70° to 130° and internal rotation from two to four points (p = 0.002). External rotation did not change significantly (p = 0.55). Glenoid notching was present in five cases and was graded as mild in three cases and moderate in two. One complication occurred leading to revision surgery. Reverse arthroplasty leads to high satisfaction rates for patients with osteoarthritis and rotator cuff deficiency who had undergone previous shoulder stabilisation procedures. The improvements in clinical outcome as well as the radiographic results seem to be comparable with those of other studies reporting on the outcome of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for other conditions.

  8. Interaction of demographic factors with the results of the surgery for degenerative disease of the cervical spine: a retrospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Garreta Prats Dias

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Degenerative disease of the cervical spine is a frequent source of intermittent neck pain, where the predominant symptom is axial neck pain. The indications for surgical treatment are reserved for the cases where the conservative treatment has not relieved the symptoms or the patient presents progressive neurological impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors involved in patients submitted to surgical treatment of the cervical spine, Methods: The study analyzed data from patients submitted to cervical spine surgery between July 2011 and November 2015 (n= 58. The evaluated data included smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes, overweight, surgical technique, and number of levels of fusion. The primary outcome was defined as pain and the secondary outcomes were quality of life and disability., Results: A statistically significant difference was found between baseline and the 12-month post-operative results regarding pain in favor of non-hypertensive patients (p= 0.009 and discectomy plus instrumentation (, p= 0.004. There was also significant difference between the results of neck disability in favor of non-hypertensive patients (p= 0.028 and patients with body mass index lower than 25, kg/m2 (p= 0.005. There was no significant interaction between any analyzed data and the quality of life score results. Conclusions: Non-hypertensive patients, those with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m2, and those submitted to discectomy combined with arthrodesis of the cervical spine are the most benefited by cervical degenerative disease surgery.

  9. Interaction of demographic factors with the results of the surgery for degenerative disease of the cervical spine: a retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Celso Garreta Prats; Roberto, Bruno Braga; Basaglia, Lucas; Lenza, Mario; Nicolau, Rodrigo Junqueira; Ferretti, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the cervical spine is a frequent source of intermittent neck pain, where the predominant symptom is axial neck pain. The indications for surgical treatment are reserved for the cases where the conservative treatment has not relieved the symptoms or the patient presents progressive neurological impairment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prognostic factors involved in patients submitted to surgical treatment of the cervical spine. The study analyzed data from patients submitted to cervical spine surgery between July 2011 and November 2015 ( n  = 58). The evaluated data included smoking habits, hypertension, diabetes, overweight, surgical technique, and number of levels of fusion. The primary outcome was defined as pain and the secondary outcomes were quality of life and disability. A statistically significant difference was found between baseline and the 12-month post-operative results regarding pain in favor of non-hypertensive patients ( p  = 0.009) and discectomy plus instrumentation ( p  = 0.004). There was also significant difference between the results of neck disability in favor of non-hypertensive patients ( p  = 0.028) and patients with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m 2 ( p  = 0.005). There was no significant interaction between any analyzed data and the quality of life score results. Non-hypertensive patients, those with body mass index lower than 25 kg/m 2 , and those submitted to discectomy combined with arthrodesis of the cervical spine are the most benefited by cervical degenerative disease surgery.

  10. Anterior cervical spine surgery-associated complications in a retrospective case-control study

    OpenAIRE

    Tasiou, Anastasia; Giannis, Theofanis; Brotis, Alexandros G.; Siasios, Ioannis; Georgiadis, Iordanis; Gatos, Haralampos; Tsianaka, Eleni; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas N.

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cervical spine procedures have been associated with satisfactory outcomes. However, the occurrence of troublesome complications, although uncommon, needs to be taken into consideration. The purpose of our study was to assess the actual incidence of anterior cervical spine procedure-associated complications and identify any predisposing factors. A total of 114 patients undergoing anterior cervical procedures over a 6-year period were included in our retrospective, case-control study. ...

  11. The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia is a known complication of cervical surgery and may be prolonged or occasionally serious. A previous study showed that dysphagia after occipitocervical fusion was caused by oropharyngeal stenosis resulting from O-C2 (upper cervical lordosis) fixation in a flexed position. However, there have been few reports analyzing the association between the C2-C7 angle (middle-lower cervical lordosis) and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cervical lordosis and the development of dysphagia after anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery (AC and PC). Three hundred fifty-four patients were reviewed in this retrospective clinical study, including 172 patients who underwent the AC procedure and 182 patients who had the PC procedure between June 2007 and May 2010. The presence and duration of postoperative dysphagia were recorded via face-to-face questioning or telephone interview performed at least 1 year after the procedure. Plain cervical radiographs before and after surgery were collected. The O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were measured. Changes in the O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were defined as dO-C2 angle = postoperative O-C2 angle - preoperative O-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle = postoperative C2-C7 angle - preoperative C2-C7 angle. The association between postoperative dysphagia with dO-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle was studied. Results showed that 12.8 % of AC and 9.4 % of PC patients reported dysphagia after cervical surgery. The dC2-C7 angle has considerable impact on postoperative dysphagia. When the dC2-C7 angle is greater than 5°, the chance of developing postoperative dysphagia is significantly greater. The dO-C2 angle, age, gender, BMI, operative time, blood loss, procedure type, revision surgery, most cephalic operative level, and number of operative levels did not significantly influence the incidence of postoperative dysphagia. No relationship was found between the dC2-C7 angle and the degree of

  12. Postoperative pain relief using intrathecal morphine for lumbar spine decompression and instrumentation surgery: A comparative study of two different doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Dhir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Patients undergoing lumbar spine instrumentation surgery suffer severe postoperative pain which is difficult to treat by conventional multimodal analgesic methods. We aimed to compare the analgesic effect of two different doses of intrathecal morphine (ITM 0.2 mg and 0.3 mg in patients undergoing lumbar spine decompression and instrumentation surgery. Design: This was a randomized, prospective, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: After approval from the Institutional Ethics Committee, forty American Society of Anesthesiologists 1 and 2 patients of either sex aged 18 years or older undergoing lumbar spine surgery were randomly assigned to receive ITM either 0.2 mg (Group A, n = 20 or 0.3 mg (Group B, n = 20 in 2 ml saline before general anesthesia. A morphine intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA device was used for rescue analgesia in the postoperative period. Assessment parameters included hemodynamics, sedation score, pain using numeric rating scale (NRS, total consumption of PCA morphine recorded for 24 h, and patient's satisfaction score. The data were analyzed using Chi-square test for categorical variables and Student's t-test for quantitative variables. Results: NRS score was significantly low in Group B at 4, 8, 12, and 24 h as compared to Group A (P < 0.05. Group B also had decreased requirement for rescue analgesia (P = 0.001 with higher patient satisfaction. There was no significant difference between the two groups in other studied parameters. Conclusions: 0.3 mg ITM provided superior analgesia postoperatively in terms of NRS score and higher patient satisfaction compared to 0.2 mg with no significant difference in the incidence of side effects.

  13. Inadequacy of 3-month Oswestry Disability Index outcome for assessing individual longer-term patient experience after lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Chotai, Silky; Devin, Clinton J; Speroff, Theodore; Harrell, Frank E; Nian, Hui; Dittus, Robert S; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Knightly, John J; Glassman, Steven D; Bydon, Mohamad; Archer, Kristin R; Foley, Kevin T; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Prospective longitudinal outcomes registries are at the center of evidence-driven health care reform. Obtaining real-world outcomes data at 12 months can be costly and challenging. In the present study, the authors analyzed whether 3-month outcome measurements sufficiently represent 12-month outcomes for patients with degenerative lumbar disease undergoing surgery. METHODS Data from 3073 patients undergoing elective spine surgery for degenerative lumbar disease were entered into a prospective multicenter registry (N(2)QOD). Baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-up Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores were recorded. The absolute differences between actual 12- and 3-month ODI scores was evaluated. Additionally, the authors analyzed the absolute difference between actual 12-month ODI scores and a model-predicted 12-month ODI score (the model used patients' baseline characteristics and actual 3-month scores). The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) for ODI of 12.8 points and the substantial clinical benefit (SCB) for ODI of 18.8 points were used based on the previously published values. The concordance rate of achieving MCID and SCB for ODI at 3-and 12-months was computed. RESULTS The 3-month ODI scores differed from 12-month scores by an absolute difference of 11.9 ± 10.8, and predictive modeling estimations of 12-month ODI scores differed from actual 12-month scores by a mean (± SD) of 10.7 ± 9.0 points (p = 0.001). Sixty-four percent of patients (n = 1982) achieved an MCID for ODI at 3 months in comparison with 67% of patients (n = 2088) by 12 months; 51% (n = 1731) and 61% (n = 1860) of patients achieved SCB for ODI at 3 months and 12 months, respectively. Almost 20% of patients had ODI scores that varied at least 20 points (the point span of an ODI functional category) between actual 3- and 12-month values. In the aggregate analysis of achieving MCID, 77% of patients were concordant and 23% were discordant in achieving or not achieving

  14. WE-AB-BRA-07: Operating Room Quality Assurance (ORQA) for Spine Surgery Using Known-Component 3D-2D Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M; Ketcha, M; Reaungamornrat, S; Siewerdsen, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kleinszig, G [Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Bayern (Germany); Vogt, S [Siemens Healthcare, Malvern, PA (United States); Khanna, A [Johns Hopkins Health Care and Surgery Center, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wolinsky, J [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to qualitatively assess delivery of surgical devices (e.g., spine pedicle screws) but can fail to reliably detect suboptimal placement (e.g., breach of adjacent critical structures). We present a method wherein prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components is leveraged to match preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs for quantitative assessment of 3D pose. The method presents a new means of operating room quantitative quality assurance (ORQA) that could improve quality and safety, and reduce the frequency of revision surgeries. Methods: The algorithm (known-component registration, KC-Reg) uses patient-specific preoperative CT and parametrically defined surgical component models within a robust 3D-2D registration method to iteratively optimize gradient similarity using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. Advances from previous work address key challenges to clinical translation: i) absolving the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm; and ii) solving multiple component bodies simultaneously, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g., spinal construct with 4–20 screws), rather than sequential QA of each component. Performance was tested in a spine phantom with 10 pedicle screws, and first results from clinical studies are reported. Results: Phantom experiments demonstrated median target registration error (TRE) of (1.0±0.3) mm at the screw tip and (0.7°±0.4°) in angulation. The simultaneous multi-body registration approach improved TRE from the previous (sequential) method by 42%, reduced outliers, and fits into the natural workflow. Initial application of KC-Reg in clinical data shows TRE of (2.5±4.5) mm and (4.7°±0.5°). Conclusion: The KC-Reg algorithm offers a potentially valuable method for quantitative QA of the surgical product, using radiographic systems that are already within the surgical arsenal. For spine surgery, the method

  15. WE-AB-BRA-07: Operating Room Quality Assurance (ORQA) for Spine Surgery Using Known-Component 3D-2D Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uneri, A; De Silva, T; Goerres, J; Jacobson, M; Ketcha, M; Reaungamornrat, S; Siewerdsen, J; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Khanna, A; Wolinsky, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative x-ray radiography/fluoroscopy is commonly used to qualitatively assess delivery of surgical devices (e.g., spine pedicle screws) but can fail to reliably detect suboptimal placement (e.g., breach of adjacent critical structures). We present a method wherein prior knowledge of the patient and surgical components is leveraged to match preoperative CT and intraoperative radiographs for quantitative assessment of 3D pose. The method presents a new means of operating room quantitative quality assurance (ORQA) that could improve quality and safety, and reduce the frequency of revision surgeries. Methods: The algorithm (known-component registration, KC-Reg) uses patient-specific preoperative CT and parametrically defined surgical component models within a robust 3D-2D registration method to iteratively optimize gradient similarity using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy. Advances from previous work address key challenges to clinical translation: i) absolving the need for offline geometric calibration of the C-arm; and ii) solving multiple component bodies simultaneously, thereby allowing QA in a single step (e.g., spinal construct with 4–20 screws), rather than sequential QA of each component. Performance was tested in a spine phantom with 10 pedicle screws, and first results from clinical studies are reported. Results: Phantom experiments demonstrated median target registration error (TRE) of (1.0±0.3) mm at the screw tip and (0.7°±0.4°) in angulation. The simultaneous multi-body registration approach improved TRE from the previous (sequential) method by 42%, reduced outliers, and fits into the natural workflow. Initial application of KC-Reg in clinical data shows TRE of (2.5±4.5) mm and (4.7°±0.5°). Conclusion: The KC-Reg algorithm offers a potentially valuable method for quantitative QA of the surgical product, using radiographic systems that are already within the surgical arsenal. For spine surgery, the method

  16. The influence of lunar phases and zodiac sign 'Leo' on perioperative complications and outcome in elective spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joswig, Holger; Stienen, Martin N; Hock, Carolin; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Surbeck, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Many people believe that the moon has an influence on daily life, and some even request elective surgery dates depending on the moon calendar. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of 'unfavorable' lunar or zodiac constellations on perioperative complications and outcome in elective surgery for degenerative disc disease. Retrospective database analysis including 924 patients. Using uni- and multivariate logistic regression, the likelihood for intraoperative complications and re-do surgeries as well as the clinical outcomes at 4 weeks was analyzed for surgeries performed during the waxing moon, full moon, and dates when the moon passed through the zodiac sign 'Leo.' In multivariate analysis, patients operated on during the waxing moon were 1.54 times as likely as patients who were operated on during the waning moon to suffer from an intraoperative complication (OR 1.54, 95 % CI 1.07-2.21, p = 0.019). In contrast, there was a trend toward fewer re-do surgeries for surgery during the waxing moon (OR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.23-1.16, p = 0.109), while the 4-week responder status was similar (OR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.47-1.14, p = 0.169). A full moon and the zodiac sign Leo did not increase the likelihood for complications, re-do surgeries or unfavorable outcomes. We found no influence of 'unfavorable' lunar or zodiac constellations on the 4-week responder status or the revision rate that would justify a moon calendar-based selection approach to elective spine surgery dates. However, the fact that patients undergoing surgery during the waxing moon were more likely to suffer from an intraoperative complication is a surprising curiosity and defies our ability to find a rational explanation.

  17. Risks of cardiovascular adverse events and death in patients with previous stroke undergoing emergency noncardiac, nonintracranial surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mia N.; Andersson, Charlotte; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The outcomes of emergent noncardiac, nonintracranial surgery in patients with previous stroke remain unknown. Methods: All emergency surgeries performed in Denmark (2005 to 2011) were analyzed according to time elapsed between previous ischemic stroke and surgery. The risks of 30-day...... mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs using adjusted logistic regression models in a priori defined groups (reference was no previous stroke). In patients undergoing surgery immediately (within 1 to 3 days) or early after stroke (within 4 to 14...... and general anesthesia less frequent in patients with previous stroke (all P Risks of major adverse cardiovascular events and mortality were high for patients with stroke less than 3 months (20.7 and 16.4% events; OR = 4.71 [95% CI, 4.18 to 5.32] and 1.65 [95% CI, 1.45 to 1.88]), and remained...

  18. A Survey of Patients' Preoperative Need for Information About Postoperative Pain-Effect of Previous Surgery Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavridou, Paraskevi; Manataki, Adamantia; Arnaoutoglou, Elena; Damigos, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the kind of information patients need preoperatively about postoperative pain (POP) and whether this is affected by previous surgery experience. A descriptive study design using preoperative questionnaires. Questionnaires with fixed questions related to POP and its management were distributed preoperatively to consenting, consecutive surgical patients. Patients were divided into two groups: patients with previous surgery experience (group A) and patients without previous surgery experience (group B). Of the patients who participated in the study, 94.2% wanted information about POP and 77.8% of them believe that they will feel calmer if they get the information they need. The patients' biggest concern relates to pain management issues after discharge. Next, in order of preference is information about the analgesics that they need to take. The patients want to be informed primarily with a personal interview (59.4%). Previous surgery experience has no effect on patients' needs for information. Most of the patients want to be informed about the management of the POP after being discharged. It is remarkable that patients who had previous surgery experience need the same information with those who had no previous surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of previous open renal stone surgery types on PNL outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgor, Faruk; Kucuktopcu, Onur; Ucpinar, Burak; Sarilar, Omer; Erbin, Akif; Yanaral, Fatih; Sahan, Murat; Binbay, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to demonstrate the effect of insicion of renal parenchyma during open renal stone surgery (ORSS) on percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) outcomes. Patients with history of ORSS who underwent PNL operation between June 2005 and June 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups according to their type of previous ORSS. Patients who had a history of ORSS with parenchymal insicion, such as radial nephrotomies, anatrophic nephrolithotomy, lower pole resection, and partial nephrectomy, were included in Group 1. Other patients with a history of open pyelolithotomy were enrolled in Group 2. Preoperative characteristics, perioperative data, stone-free status, and complications were compared between the groups. Stone-free status was defined as complete clearance of stone(s) or presence of residual fragments smaller than 4 mm. The retrospective nature of our study, different experience level of surgeons, and lack of the evaluation of anesthetic agents and cost of procedures were limitations of our study. 123 and 111 patients were enrolled in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Preoperative characteristics were similar between groups. In Group 1, the mean operative time was statistically longer than in Group 2 (p=0.013). Stone-free status was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p=0.027). Complication rates were similar between groups. Hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion was the most common complication in both groups (10.5% vs. 9.9%). Our study demonstrated that a history of previous ORSS with parenchymal insicion significantly reduces the success rates of PNL procedure.

  20. The Effect of Severity of Illness on Spine Surgery Costs Across New York State Hospitals: An Analysis of 69,831 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, I David; Adrados, Murillo; Karia, Raj J; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Bosco, Joseph A

    2017-11-01

    Observational database review. To determine the effect of patient severity of illness (SOI) on the cost of spine surgery among New York state hospitals. National health care spending has risen at an unsustainable rate with musculoskeletal care, and spine surgery in particular, accounting for a significant portion of this expenditure. In an effort towards cost-containment, health care payers are exploring novel payment models some of which reward cost savings but penalize excessive spending. To mitigate risk to health care institutions, accurate cost forecasting is essential. No studies have evaluated the effect of SOI on costs within spine surgery. The New York State Hospital Inpatient Cost Transparency Database was reviewed to determine the costs of 69,831 hospital discharges between 2009 and 2011 comprising the 3 most commonly performed spine surgeries in the state. These costs were then analyzed in the context of the specific all patient refined diagnosis-related group (DRG) SOI modifier to determine this index's effect on overall costs. Overall, hospital-reported cost increases with the patient's SOI class and patients with worse baseline health incur greater hospital costs (Pcosts are increasingly variable for each worsening SOI class (Pcosts is persistent for all 3 DRGs across all 3 years studied (2009-2011), within each of the 7 New York state regions, and occurs irrespective of the hospital's teaching status or size. Using the 3M all patient refined-DRG SOI index as a measure of patient's health status, a significant increase in cost for spine surgery for patients with higher SOI index was found. This study confirms the greater cost and variability of spine surgery for sicker patients and illustrates the inherent unpredictability in cost forecasting and budgeting for these same patients.

  1. Spinal Anesthesia with Isobaric Tetracaine in Patients with Previous Lumbar Spinal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Hwan; Jeon, Dong-Hyuk; Chang, Chul Ho; Lee, Sung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Previous lumbar spinal surgery (PLSS) is not currently considered as a contraindication for regional anesthesia. However, there are still problems that make spinal anesthesia more difficult with a possibility of worsening the patient's back pain. Spinal anesthesia using combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA) in elderly patients with or without PLSS was investigated and the anesthetic characteristics, success rates, and possible complications were evaluated. Materials and Methods Fifty patients without PLSS (Control group) and 45 patients with PLSS (PLSS group) who were scheduled for total knee arthroplasty were studied prospectively. A CSEA was performed with patients in the left lateral position, and 10 mg of 0.5% isobaric tetracaine was injected through a 27 G spinal needle. An epidural catheter was then inserted for patient controlled analgesia. Successful spinal anesthesia was defined as adequate sensory block level more than T12. The number of skin punctures and the onset time were recorded, and maximal sensory block level (MSBL), time to 2-segment regression, success rate and complications were observed. Results The success rate of CSEA in Control group and PLSS group was 98.0%, and 93.3%, respectively. The median MSBL in PLSS group was higher than Control group [T4 (T2-L1) vs. T6 (T3-T12)] (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the number of patients who required ephedrine for the treatment of hypotension in PLSS group (p = 0.028). Conclusion The success rate of CSEA in patients with PLSS was 93.3%, and patients experienced no significant neurological complications. The MSBL can be higher in PLSS group than Control group. PMID:19430559

  2. Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated With Previous Meniscus and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Surgery Among Elite College American Football Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew V; Nepple, Jeffrey J; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J; Brophy, Robert H

    Football puts athletes at risk for knee injuries such meniscus and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, which are associated with the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Previous knee surgery, player position, and body mass index (BMI) may be associated with knee OA. In elite football players undergoing knee magnetic resonance imaging at the National Football League's Invitational Combine, the prevalence of knee OA is associated with previous knee surgery and BMI. Retrospective cohort. Level 4. A retrospective review was performed of all participants of the National Football League Combine from 2005 to 2009 who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the knee because of prior knee injury, surgery, or knee-related symptoms or concerning examination findings. Imaging studies were reviewed for evidence of OA. History of previous knee surgery-including ACL reconstruction, meniscal procedures, and articular cartilage surgery-and position were recorded for each athlete. BMI was calculated based on height and weight. There was a higher prevalence of OA in knees with a history of previous knee surgery (23% vs 4.0%, P 30 kg/m 2 was also associated with a higher risk of OA ( P = 0.007) but player position was not associated with knee OA. Previous knee surgery, particularly ACL reconstruction and partial meniscectomy, and elevated BMI are associated with knee OA in elite football players. Future research should investigate ways to minimize the risk of OA after knee surgery in these athletes. Treatment of knee injuries in football athletes should consider chondroprotection, including meniscal preservation and cartilage repair, when possible.

  3. The role of minimally invasive spine surgery in the management of pyogenic spinal discitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: MIS surgery provides an opportunity for early pain relief in patients with discitis, osteomyelitis, spondylodiscitis, and/or epidural abscess by directly addressing the primary cause of pain. MIS surgery for discitis provides a higher diagnostic yield to direct antibiotic treatment. MIS surgery results in good long-term recovery.

  4. Effect of Previous Abdominal Surgery on Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Analysis of Feasibility and Risk Factors for Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Federica; Ratti, Francesca; Fiorentini, Guido; Catena, Marco; Paganelli, Michele; Aldrighetti, Luca

    2018-03-28

    Previous abdominal surgery has traditionally been considered an additional element of difficulty to later laparoscopic procedures. The aim of the study is to analyze the effect of previous surgery on the feasibility and safety of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR), and its role as a risk factor for conversion. After matching, 349 LLR in patients known for previous abdominal surgery (PS group) were compared with 349 LLR on patients with a virgin abdomen (NPS group). Subgroup analysis included 161 patients with previous upper abdominal surgery (UPS subgroup). Feasibility and safety were evaluated in terms of conversion rate, reasons for conversion and outcomes, and risk factors for conversion assessed via uni/multivariable analysis. Conversion rate was 9.4%, and higher for PS patients compared with NPS patients (13.7% versus 5.1%, P = .021). Difficult adhesiolysis resulted the commonest reason for conversion in PS group (5.7%). However, operative time (P = .840), blood loss (P = .270), transfusion (P = .650), morbidity rate (P = .578), hospital stay (P = .780), and R1 rate (P = .130) were comparable between PS and NPS group. Subgroup analysis confirmed higher conversion rates for UPS patients (23%) compared with both NPS (P = .015) and PS patients (P = .041). Previous surgery emerged as independent risk factor for conversion (P = .033), alongside the postero-superior location and major hepatectomy. LLR are feasible in case of previous surgery and proved to be safe and maintain the benefits of LLR carried out in standard settings. However, a history of surgery should be considered a risk factor for conversion.

  5. Validation of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) computerized adaptive tests in cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boody, Barrett S; Bhatt, Surabhi; Mazmudar, Aditya S; Hsu, Wellington K; Rothrock, Nan E; Patel, Alpesh A

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS), which is funded by the National Institutes of Health, is a set of adaptive, responsive assessment tools that measures patient-reported health status. PROMIS measures have not been validated for surgical patients with cervical spine disorders. The objective of this project is to evaluate the validity (e.g., convergent validity, known-groups validity, responsiveness to change) of PROMIS computer adaptive tests (CATs) for pain behavior, pain interference, and physical function in patients undergoing cervical spine surgery. METHODS The legacy outcome measures Neck Disability Index (NDI) and SF-12 were used as comparisons with PROMIS measures. PROMIS CATs, NDI-10, and SF-12 measures were administered prospectively to 59 consecutive tertiary hospital patients who were treated surgically for degenerative cervical spine disorders. A subscore of NDI-5 was calculated from NDI-10 by eliminating the lifting, headaches, pain intensity, reading, and driving sections and multiplying the final score by 4. Assessments were administered preoperatively (baseline) and postoperatively at 6 weeks and 3 months. Patients presenting for revision surgery, tumor, infection, or trauma were excluded. Participants completed the measures in Assessment Center, an online data collection tool accessed by using a secure login and password on a tablet computer. Subgroup analysis was also performed based on a primary diagnosis of either cervical radiculopathy or cervical myelopathy. RESULTS Convergent validity for PROMIS CATs was supported with multiple statistically significant correlations with the existing legacy measures, NDI and SF-12, at baseline. Furthermore, PROMIS CATs demonstrated known-group validity and identified clinically significant improvements in all measures after surgical intervention. In the cervical radiculopathy and myelopathic cohorts, the PROMIS measures demonstrated similar responsiveness to the

  6. Aspirin in Patients With Previous Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Michelle M; Sessler, Daniel I; Parlow, Joel L

    2018-01-01

    Background: Uncertainty remains about the effects of aspirin in patients with prior percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) having noncardiac surgery. Objective: To evaluate benefits and harms of perioperative aspirin in patients with prior PCI. Design: Nonprespecified subgroup analysis of a mul...

  7. Vitamin D Levels and 1-Year Fusion Outcomes in Elective Spine Surgery: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Godzik, Jakub; Dailey, Andrew T; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F; Hood, Robert S; Cutler, Andrew; Ray, Wilson Z

    2015-10-01

    Prospective observational study. To investigate the association of perioperative vitamin D levels and nonunion rates and time to fusion in patients undergoing elective spine fusion. Although there is a clear link between bone mineral density and the risk of osteoporosis, it is unclear whether low vitamin D levels affect rates and timing of spinal fusion. Serum 25-OH vitamin D levels were measured perioperatively in adults undergoing elective spinal fusion between 2011 and 2012. Vitamin D levels vitamin D deficiency. Mean patient age was 57 ± 13 years; 44% were female and 94% were Caucasian. The cervical spine was fused in 49%, the lumbar spine in 47%, and the thoracic spine in 4%. Mean construct length was 2 levels (range 1-16). At 12-month follow-up, 112/133 (84%) patients demonstrated fusion (median time to fusion 8.4 mo). Nonunion at 12 months was associated with vitamin D deficiency (20% of patients with adequate vitamin D level vs. 38% of vitamin D-deficient patients, P = 0.063). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated time to fusion was significantly longer in the vitamin D-deficient group (12 vs. 6 mo, P = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, vitamin D deficiency was an independent predictor of nonunion (odds ratio 3.449, P = 0.045) when adjusted for age, sex, obesity, fusion length, location, graft type, smoking, and bone morphogenetic protein use. Vitamin D levels may affect nonunion rate and time to fusion. These results offer insight into the importance of the metabolic milieu for bony fusion as well as a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention. 3.

  8. Return-to-Duty Rates Following Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery Performed on Active Duty Military Patients in an Ambulatory Surgery Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Elder; Prada, Stefan; Bereczki, Zoltan; Weiss, Michael; Wade, Chip; Davis, Reginald

    2018-05-21

    Low back pain is a primary health care utilization driver in the US population. Health care evaluation visits for low back pain are as common as medical evaluation for the common cold. Low back pain is the most common reason for reductions in activities of daily living and work activity in the general population. Although these statistics are compelling, in the military population, there is arguably a significantly greater economic impact on the military population, as the cost to train, retain, and deploy a service member is a tremendous cost. The current study retrospectively examines surgical outcomes, return to duty, and patient-centric outcomes among 82 active duty or reserve military patients who underwent an outpatient minimally invasive spine surgery Laminotomy Foraminotomy Decompression for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in an ambulatory surgery center. Overall, our results indicate that within the 82 active duty military service members, 100% of the service members return to duty within 3 mo. Additionally, there was a significant reduction in self-reported pain and disability 12 mo postoperative, whereas the average length of surgery was 62 min with an average estimated blood loss of 30.64 mL. The current study indicates that minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis in an ambulatory surgery center setting are an effective option for active duty servicemen to reduce return-to-duty rates and symptomatic back-related pain and disability.

  9. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Spine Surgery Outcomes in Elderly Patients Versus General Adult Patients in the United States: A MarketScan Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagman, Carlito; Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Boakye, Maxwell; Drazin, Doniel

    2017-07-01

    To compare spine surgery outcomes in elderly patients (80-103 years old) versus general adult patients (18-79 years-old) in the United States. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases (2000-2012) were queried. Patients with a diagnosis of degenerative disease of the spine without concurrent spinal stenosis, spinal stenosis without concurrent degenerative disease, or degenerative disease with concurrent spinal stenosis and who had undergone decompression without fusion, fusion without decompression, or decompression with fusion procedures were included. Indirect outcome measures included length of stay, in-hospital mortality, in-hospital and 30-day complications, and discharge disposition. Patients (N = 155,720) were divided into elderly (n = 10,232; 6.57%) and general adult (n = 145,488; 93.4%) populations. Mean length of stay was longer in elderly patients versus general adult patients (3.62 days vs. 3.11 days; P adult patients (0.31% vs. 0.06%; P adult patients (11.3% vs. 7.15% and 17.8% vs. 12.6%; P adult patients (33.7% vs. 16.2%; P < 0.0001). Our results revealed significantly longer hospital stays, more in-hospital mortalities, and more in-hospital and 30-day complications after decompression without fusion, fusion without decompression, or decompression with fusion procedures in elderly patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of nonlinearity in the materials used for the semi-rigid pedicle screw systems on biomechanical behaviors of the lumbar spine after surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun; Lee, Sung-Jae; Lim, Do-Hyung; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Kwon-Yong

    2011-01-01

    Recently, various types of semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation systems have been developed for the surgical treatment of the lumbar spine. They were introduced to address the adverse issues commonly found in traditional rigid spinal fusion--abnormally large motion at the adjacent level and subsequent degeneration. The semi-rigid system uses more compliant materials (nitinol or polymers) and/or changes in rod design (coiled or twisted rods) as compared to the conventional rigid straight rods made of Ti alloys (E = 114 GPa, υ = 0.32). However, biomechanical studies on the semi-rigid pedicle screw systems were usually limited to linear modeling of the implant and anatomic elements, which may not be capable of reflecting realistic post-operative motions of the spine. In this study, we evaluated the effects of nonlinearity in materials used for semi-rigid pedicle screw fixation systems to evaluate the changes in biomechanical behaviors using finite element analysis. Changes in range of motion (ROM) and center of rotation (COR) were assessed at the operated and adjacent levels. Actual load-displacement results of the semi-rigid rod from mechanical test were carried out to reflect the nonlinearity of the implant. In addition, nonlinear material properties of various spinal ligaments studies were used for the finite element modeling. The post-operative models were constructed by modifying the previously validated intact model of the L1-S1 spine. Eight different post-operative models were made to address the effects of nonlinearity-with a traditional stiffness modulus rod (with linear ligaments, case 1; with nonlinear ligaments, case 5), with a rigid rod (with linear ligaments, case 2; with nonlinear ligaments, case 6), with a soft rod (with linear ligaments, case 3; with nonlinear ligaments, case 7), and with a nonlinear rod (with linear ligaments, case 4; with nonlinear ligaments, case 8). To simulate the load on the lumbar spine in a neutral posture, follower load (400 N

  12. Prevalence and Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Reintubation After Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: Results From the AOSpine North America Multicenter Study on 8887 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoshi, Narihito; Fehlings, Michael G; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Tetreault, Lindsay; Gum, Jeffrey L; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Tannoury, Chadi A; Tannoury, Tony; Traynelis, Vincent C; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Mohamad; De Giacomo, Anthony F; Jobse, Bruce C; Massicotte, Eric M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter, retrospective cohort study. To evaluate clinical outcomes in patients with reintubation after anterior cervical spine surgery. A total of 8887 patients undergoing anterior cervical spine surgery were enrolled in the AOSpine North America Rare Complications of Cervical Spine Surgery study. Patients with or without complications after surgery were included. Demographic and surgical information were collected for patients with reintubation. Patients were evaluated using a variety of assessment tools, including the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association scale, Nurick score, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 Health Survey. Nine cases of postoperative reintubation were identified. The total prevalence of this complication was 0.10% and ranged from 0% to 0.59% across participating institutions. The time to development of airway symptoms after surgery was within 24 hours in 6 patients and between 5 and 7 days in 3 patients. Although 8 patients recovered, 1 patient died. At final follow-up, patients with reintubation did not exhibit significant and meaningful improvements in pain, functional status, or quality of life. Although the prevalence of reintubation was very low, this complication was associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Clinicians should identify their high-risk patients and carefully observe them for up to 2 weeks after surgery.

  13. Haemodynamic improvement of older, previously replaced mechanical mitral valves by removal of the subvalvular pannus in redo cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Tae Youn; Choi, Jong Bum; Kuh, Ja Hong

    2017-01-01

    Patients requiring redo cardiac surgery for diseased heart valves other than mitral valves may show increased pressure gradients and reduced valve areas of previously placed mechanical mitral valves due to subvalvular pannus formation. We treated four women who had mechanical mitral valves inserted greater than or equal to 20 years earlier and who presented with circular pannus that protruded into the lower margin of the valve ring but did not impede leaflet motion. Pannus removal improved the haemodynamic function of the mitral valve. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of the Oswestry Disability Index score equivalent to a "satisfactory symptom state" in patients undergoing surgery for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine-a Spine Tango registry-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Mannion, Anne F; Staub, Lukas P; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fairbank, Jeremy C T

    2016-10-01

    The achievement of a given change score on a valid outcome instrument is commonly used to indicate whether a clinically relevant change has occurred after spine surgery. However, the achievement of such a change score can be dependent on baseline values and does not necessarily indicate whether the patient is satisfied with the current state. The achievement of an absolute score equivalent to a patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) may be a more stringent measure to indicate treatment success. This study aimed to estimate the score on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, version 2.1a; 0-100) corresponding to a PASS in patients who had undergone surgery for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. This is a cross-sectional study of diagnostic accuracy using follow-up data from an international spine surgery registry. The sample includes 1,288 patients with degenerative lumbar spine disorders who had undergone elective spine surgery, registered in the EUROSPINE Spine Tango Spine Surgery Registry. The main outcome measure was the ODI (version 2.1a). Surgical data and data from the ODI and Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) were included to determine the ODI threshold equivalent to PASS at 1 year (±1.5 months; n=780) and 2 years (±2 months; n=508) postoperatively. The symptom-specific well-being item of the COMI was used as the external criterion in the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine the ODI threshold equivalent to PASS. Separate sensitivity analyses were performed based on the different definitions of an "acceptable state" and for subgroups of patients. JF is a copyright holder of the ODI. The ODI threshold for PASS was 22, irrespective of the time of follow-up (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.89 [sensitivity {Se}: 78.3%, specificity {Sp}: 82.1%] and AUC: 0.91 [Se: 80.7%, Sp: 85.6] for the 1- and 2-year follow-ups, respectively). Sensitivity analyses showed that the absolute ODI-22 threshold for the two follow-up time-points were

  15. The incidences and risk factors related to early dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Ming; Tong, Wei-Lai; Chen, Xuan-Yin; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen-Zhao; Huang, Shan-Hu; Liu, Zhi-Li

    2017-01-01

    Dysphagia is a common complication following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). The incidences of dysphagia were variable and controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of early dysphagia after ACSS with a new scoring system, and to identify the risk factors of it. A prospective study was carried out and patients who underwent ACSS from March 2014 to August 2014 in our hospital were included in this study. A self-designed dysphagia questionnaire was delivered to all of the patients from the first day to the fifth day after ACSS. Perioperative characteristics of patients were recorded, and incidences and risk factors of dysphagia were analyzed. A total of 104 patients who underwent ACSS were included and incidences of dysphagia from the first to the fifth day after ACSS was 87.5%, 79.81%, 62.14%, 50% and 44.23%, respectively. There was a good correlation between the new dysphagia scoring system and Bazaz scoring system (P dysphagia during the first to the second day postoperatively. However, the dC2-C7angle was the main risk factor for dysphagia from the third to the fifth day after surgery. There were comparatively high incidences of early dysphagia after ACSS, which may be ascribed to operative time, BMI and the dC2-C7 angle.

  16. Impact of the Economic Downturn on Elective Cervical Spine Surgery in the United States: A National Trend Analysis, 2003-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David N; Jain, Amit; Brodell, David; Li, Yue; Rubery, Paul T; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-12-01

    To analyze overall trends of elective cervical spine surgery in the United States from 2003 to 2013 with the goal of determining whether the economic downturn had an impact. Codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification were used to identify elective cervical spine surgery procedures in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2013. National Health Expenditure, gross domestic product, and S&P 500 Index were used as measures of economic performance. The economic downturn was defined as 2008-2009. Confidence intervals were determined using subgroup analysis techniques. Linear regressions were completed to determine the association between surgery trends and economic conditions. From 2003 to 2013, posterior cervical fusions saw a 102.7% increase. During the same time frame, there was a 7.4% and 14.7% decrease in the number of anterior cervical diskectomy and fusions (ACDFs) and posterior decompressions, respectively. The trend of elective cervical spine surgeries per 100,000 persons in the U.S. population may have been affected by the economic downturn from 2008 to 2009 (-0.03% growth). The percentage of procedures paid for by private insurance decreased from 2003 to 2013 for all ACDFs, posterior cervical fusions, and posterior decompressions. The linear regression coefficients (β) and R 2 values between the number of surgeries and each of the macroeconomic factors analyzed were not statistically significant. The overall elective cervical spine surgery trend was not likely impacted by the economic downturn. Posterior cervical fusions grew significantly from 2003 to 2013, whereas ACDFs and posterior decompressions decreased. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Feasibility Study of Utilization of Action Camera, GoPro Hero 4, Google Glass, and Panasonic HX-A100 in Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Kyu; Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Nam; Kim, Byeongwoo; Kim, Doyoung; Yi, Seong

    2017-02-15

    Study for feasibility of commercially available action cameras in recording video of spine. Recent innovation of the wearable action camera with high-definition video recording enables surgeons to use camera in the operation at ease without high costs. The purpose of this study is to compare the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of commercially available action cameras in recording video of spine surgery. There are early reports of medical professionals using Google Glass throughout the hospital, Panasonic HX-A100 action camera, and GoPro. This study is the first report for spine surgery. Three commercially available cameras were tested: GoPro Hero 4 Silver, Google Glass, and Panasonic HX-A100 action camera. Typical spine surgery was selected for video recording; posterior lumbar laminectomy and fusion. Three cameras were used by one surgeon and video was recorded throughout the operation. The comparison was made on the perspective of human factor, specification, and video quality. The most convenient and lightweight device for wearing and holding throughout the long operation time was Google Glass. The image quality; all devices except Google Glass supported HD format and GoPro has unique 2.7K or 4K resolution. Quality of video resolution was best in GoPro. Field of view, GoPro can adjust point of interest, field of view according to the surgery. Narrow FOV option was the best for recording in GoPro to share the video clip. Google Glass has potentials by using application programs. Connectivity such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enables video streaming for audience, but only Google Glass has two-way communication feature in device. Action cameras have the potential to improve patient safety, operator comfort, and procedure efficiency in the field of spinal surgery and broadcasting a surgery with development of the device and applied program in the future. N/A.

  18. Intrinsic Vertebral Markers for Spinal Level Localization in Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Deepak Kumar; Thakur, Anil; Jain, Mukul; Arya, Arvind; Tripathi, Chandrabhushan; Kumari, Rima; Kushwaha, Suman

    2016-12-01

    Prospective clinical study. To observe the usefulness of anterior cervical osteophytes as intrinsic markers for spinal level localization (SLL) during sub-axial cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. Various landmarks, such as the mandibular angle, hyoid bone, thyroid cartilage, first cricoid ring, and C6 carotid tubercle, are used for gross cervical SLL; however, none are used during cervical spinal surgery via the anterior approach. We present our preliminary assessment of SLL over anterior vertebral surfaces (i.e., intrinsic markers) in 48 consecutive cases of anterior cervical spinal surgeries for the disc-osteophyte complex (DOC) in degenerative diseases and granulation or tumor tissue associated with infectious or neoplastic diseases, respectively, at an ill-equipped center. This prospective study on patients undergoing anterior cervical surgery for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies aimed to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of SLL via intraoperative palpation of disease-related morphological changes on anterior vertebral surfaces visible on preoperative midline sagittal T1/2-weighted magnetic resonance images. During a 3-year period, 48 patients (38 males,10 females; average age, 43.58 years) who underwent surgery via the anterior approach for various sub-axial cervical spinal pathologies, including degenerative disease (n= 42), tubercular infection (Pott's disease; n=3), traumatic prolapsed disc (n=2), and a metastatic lesion from thyroid carcinoma (n=1), comprised the study group. Intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 79% of patients (n=38). Among those with degenerative diseases (n=42), intrinsic marker palpation yielded accurate SLL in 76% of patients (n=32). Intrinsic marker palpation is an attractive potential adjunct for SLL during cervical spinal surgeries via the anterior approach in well-selected patients at ill-equipped centers (e.g., those found in developing countries). This technique may prove helpful

  19. Metastatic Spine Tumor Epidemiology: Comparison of Trends in Surgery Across Two Decades and Three Continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ernest; Ricciardi, Federico; Arts, Mark; Buchowski, Jacob M; Chung, Chun Kee; Coppes, Maarten; Crockard, Alan; Depreitere, Bart; Fehlings, Michael; Kawahara, Norio; Lee, Chong Suh; Leung, Yee; Martin-Benlloch, Antonio; Massicotte, Eric; Mazel, Christian; Oner, Cumhur; Peul, Wilco; Quraishi, Nasir; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Tomita, Katsuro; Ulbricht, Christian; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan; Wang, Mike; Choi, David

    2018-03-20

    Indications for surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases have become better defined in recent years, and suitable outcome measures have been established against a changing backdrop of patient characteristics, tumor behavior, and oncologic treatments. Nonetheless, variations still exist in the local management of patients with spinal metastases. In this study, we aimed to review global trends and habits in the surgical treatment of symptomatic spinal metastases, and to examine how these have changed over the last 25 years. In this cohort study of consecutive patients undergoing surgery for symptomatic spinal metastases, data were collected using a secure Internet database from 22 centers across 3 continents. All patients were invited to participate in the study, except those unable or unwilling to give consent. There was a higher incidence of colonic, liver, and lung carcinoma metastases in Asian countries, and more frequent presentation of breast, prostate, melanoma metastases in the West. Trends in surgical technique were broadly similar across the centers. Overall survival rates after surgery were 53% at 1 year, 31% at 2 years, and 10% at 5 years after surgery (standard error 0.013 for all). Survival improved over successive time periods, with longer survival in patients who underwent surgery in 2011-2016 compared with those who underwent surgery in earlier time periods. Surgical habits have been fairly consistent among countries worldwide and over time. However, patient survival has improved in later years, perhaps due to medical advances in the treatment of cancer, improved patient selection, and operating earlier in the course of disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transesophageal Echocardiography-Guided Epicardial Left Ventricular Lead Placement by Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery in Nonresponders to Biventricular Pacing and Previous Chest Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Carsten; Chung, Jane M; Mackall, Judith A; Cakulev, Ivan T; Patel, Aaron; Patel, Sunny J; Hoit, Brian D; Sahadevan, Jayakumar

    2018-06-14

    The aim of the study was to study the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of transesophageal echocardiography-guided intraoperative left ventricular lead placement via a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach in patients with failed conventional biventricular pacing. Twelve patients who could not have the left ventricular lead placed conventionally underwent epicardial left ventricular lead placement by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Eight patients had previous chest surgery (66%). Operative positioning was a modified far lateral supine exposure with 30-degree bed tilt, allowing for groin and sternal access. To determine the optimal left ventricular location for lead placement, the left ventricular surface was divided arbitrarily into nine segments. These segments were transpericardially paced using a hand-held malleable pacing probe identifying the optimal site verified by transesophageal echocardiography. The pacing leads were screwed into position via a limited pericardiotomy. The video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach was successful in all patients. Biventricular pacing was achieved in all patients and all reported symptomatic benefit with reduction in New York Heart Association class from III to I-II (P = 0.016). Baseline ejection fraction was 23 ± 3%; within 1-year follow-up, the ejection fraction increased to 32 ± 10% (P = 0.05). The mean follow-up was 566 days. The median length of hospital stay was 7 days with chest tube removal between postoperative days 2 and 5. In patients who are nonresponders to conventional biventricular pacing, intraoperative left ventricular lead placement using anatomical and functional characteristics via a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach is effective in improving heart failure symptoms. This optimized left ventricular lead placement is feasible and safe. Previous chest surgery is no longer an exclusion criterion for a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery approach.

  1. Failure to Launch: What the Rejection of Lumbar Total Disk Replacement Tells us About American Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert A; DePasse, J Mason; Daniels, Alan H

    2017-07-01

    Spine surgeon survey. The objective was to investigate the failure of widespread adoption of lumbar total disk replacement (L-TDR) in the United States. L-TDR has been available for use in the United States since 2005. L-TDR has not gained wide acceptance as a treatment for degenerative disk disease despite substantial investments in product development and positive results in randomized controlled trials. Estimates of the number of L-TDR procedures performed in the United States from 2005 to 2010 were calculated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Insurance policies were assessed for L-TDR coverage through Internet search. Finally, an 18-question survey regarding surgeons' opinions toward L-TDR was distributed to the members of North American Spine Society. The estimated number of primary L-TDR procedures performed in the United States decreased from 3650 in 2005 to 1863 in 2010, whereas revision L-TDR procedures increased from 420 to 499. Of 14 major insurers, 11 (78.6%) do not cover L-TDR. In total, 613 spine surgeons responded to the survey. Over half of respondents (51.1%, 313/612) have performed L-TDR, although only 44.6% (136/305) of initial adopters currently perform the surgery. However, 81.5% (106/130) of those currently performing L-TDR have been satisfied with the results. When asked about their perceptions of L-TDR, 65.0% (367/565) indicated a lack of insurance coverage for L-TDR in their region, 54.9% (310/565) worry about long-term complications, and 52.7% (298/565) worry about the technical challenges of revision. Despite early enthusiasm for L-TDR, wide adoption has not occurred. A primary reason for this failure seems to be a lack of insurance coverage, despite intermediate-term clinical success. In addition, surgeons continue to express concerns regarding long-term outcomes and the technical difficulties of revision. This case study of a failed surgical innovation may signal increasing involvement of payers in clinical decision

  2. The Impact of Comorbid Mental Health Disorders on Complications Following Cervical Spine Surgery with Minimum 2-Year Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebo, Bassel G; Lavian, Joshua D; Liu, Shian; Shah, Neil V; Murray, Daniel P; Beyer, George A; Segreto, Frank A; Maffucci, Fenizia; Poorman, Gregory W; Cherkalin, Denis; Torre, Barrett; Vasquez-Montes, Dennis; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Cukor, Daniel; Naziri, Qais; Passias, Peter G; Paulino, Carl B

    2018-03-23

    Retrospective Analysis OBJECTIVE.: To improve understanding of the impact of comorbid mental health disorders on long-term outcomes following cervical spinal fusion in cervical radiculopathy (CR) or cervical myelopathy (CM) patients. Subsets of patients with CR and CM have mental health disorders, and their impact on surgical complications is poorly understood. Patients admitted from 2009-2013 with CR or CM diagnoses who underwent cervical surgery with minimum 2-year surveillance were retrospectively reviewed using New York State's Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). Patients with a comorbid mental health disorder (MHD) were compared against those without (no-MHD). Univariate analysis compared demographics, complications, readmissions, and revisions between MHD and no-MHD cohorts. Multivariate binary logistic regression models identified independent predictors of outcomes (covariates: age, gender, Charlson/Deyo score, and surgical approach). 20,342 patients (MHD: n = 4,819; no-MHD: n = 15,523) were included. Mental health disorders identified: depressive (57.8%), anxiety (28.1%), sleep (25.2%), and stress (2.9%). CR patients had greater prevalence of comorbid MHD than CM patients (p = 0.015). Two years post-operatively, all MHD patients had significantly higher rates of complications (specifically: device-related, infection), readmission for any indication, and revision surgery (all p mental health disorder and experienced greater rates of any complication, readmission, or revision, at minimum, two years following cervical spine surgery. Results must be confirmed with retrospective studies utilizing larger national databases and with prospective cohort studies. Patient counseling and psychological screening/support is recommended to complement surgical treatment. 3.

  3. The effects of massage therapy after decompression and fusion surgery of the lumbar spine: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Glenda

    2012-01-01

    Spinal fusion and decompression surgery of the lumbar spine are common procedures for problems such as disc herniations. Various studies for postoperative interventions have been conducted; however, no massage therapy studies have been completed. The objective of this study is to determine if massage therapy can beneficially treat pain and dysfunction associated with lumbar spinal decompression and fusion surgery. Client is a 47-year-old female who underwent spinal decompression and fusion surgery of L4/L5 due to chronic disc herniation symptoms. The research design was a case study in a private clinic involving the applications of seven, 30-minute treatments conducted over eight weeks. Common Swedish massage and myofascial techniques were applied to the back, shoulders, posterior hips, and posterior legs. Outcomes were assessed using the following measures: VAS pain scale, Hamstring Length Test, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire. Hamstring length improved (in degrees of extension) from pretreatment measurements in the right leg of 40° and left leg 65° to post-treatment measurement at the final visit, when the results were right 50° and left 70°. The Oswestry Disability Index improved 14%, from 50% to 36% disability. Roland-Morris Disability decreased 1 point, from 3/24 to 2/24. The VAS pain score decreased by 2 points after most treatments, and for three of the seven treatments, client had a post-treatment score of 0/10. Massage for pain had short-term effects. Massage therapy seemed to lengthen the hamstrings bilaterally. Massage therapy does appear to have positive effects in the reduction of disability. This study is beneficial for understanding the relationship between massage therapy and clients who have undergone spinal decompression and fusion. Further research is warranted.

  4. Outcomes and Complications of the Midline Anterior Approach 3 Years after Lumbar Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charla R. Fischer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new questionnaire to assess outcomes related to the midline anterior lumbar approach and to identify risk factors for negative patient responses. Methods. A retrospective review of 58 patients who underwent anterior lumbar surgery at a single institution for either degenerative disc disease or spondylolisthesis in 2009 was performed. The outcome measures included our newly developed Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire (ALSQ, ODI, and EQ-5D. Results. There were 58 patients available for followup, 27 women and 31 men. The average age at surgery was 50.8 years, with an average followup of 2.92 years. The average change in ODI was 34.94 (22.7 and EQ-5D was 0.28 (0.29. The rate of complications with the anterior approach was 10.3% and there was one male patient (3.2% with retrograde ejaculation. Determination of the effectiveness of the new ALSQ revealed that it significantly correlated to the EQ-5D and ODI (P<0.05. Smoking was associated with a negative response on thirteen questions. BMP use was not associated with a negative response on any sexual function questions. Conclusions. Our new Anterior Lumbar Surgery Questionnaire determines patient perceived complications related to the midline anterior lumbar surgical approach.

  5. Delayed spinal extradural hematoma following thoracic spine surgery and resulting in paraplegia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Chandra JKB

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Postoperative spinal extradural hematomas are rare. Most of the cases that have been reported occured within 3 days of surgery. Their occurrence in a delayed form, that is, more than 72 hours after surgery, is very rare. This case is being reported to enhance awareness of delayed postoperative spinal extradural hematomas. Case presentation We report a case of acute onset dorsal spinal extradural hematoma from a paraspinal muscular arterial bleed, producing paraplegia 72 hours following surgery for excision of a spinal cord tumor at T8 level. The triggering mechanism was an episode of violent twisting movement by the patient. Fresh blood in the postoperative drain tube provided suspicion of this complication. Emergency evacuation of the clot helped in regaining normal motor and sensory function. The need to avoid straining of the paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period is emphasized. Conclusion Most cases of postoperative spinal extradural hematomas occur as a result of venous bleeding. However, an arterial source of bleeding from paraspinal muscular branches causing extradural hematoma and subsequent neurological deficit is underreported. Undue straining of paraspinal muscles in the postoperative period after major spinal surgery should be avoided for at least a few days.

  6. Do Modic changes have an impact on clinical outcome in lumbar spine surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Aske Foldbjerg; Bech-Azeddine, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    = 607), 1 fusion versus discectomy (n = 91), 3 fusion surgery (n = 454), and 4 total disc replacement (TDR, n = 500). A trend toward less improvement in low back pain or Oswestry Disability Index score was found in the discectomy studies, and a trend toward increased improvement was demonstrated...

  7. Virtual reality-based simulators for spine surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfandler, Michael; Lazarovici, Marc; Stefan, Philipp; Wucherer, Patrick; Weigl, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR)-based simulators offer numerous benefits and are very useful in assessing and training surgical skills. Virtual reality-based simulators are standard in some surgical subspecialties, but their actual use in spinal surgery remains unclear. Currently, only technical reviews of VR-based simulators are available for spinal surgery. Thus, we performed a systematic review that examined the existing research on VR-based simulators in spinal procedures. We also assessed the quality of current studies evaluating VR-based training in spinal surgery. Moreover, we wanted to provide a guide for future studies evaluating VR-based simulators in this field. This is a systematic review of the current scientific literature regarding VR-based simulation in spinal surgery. Five data sources were systematically searched to identify relevant peer-reviewed articles regarding virtual, mixed, or augmented reality-based simulators in spinal surgery. A qualitative data synthesis was performed with particular attention to evaluation approaches and outcomes. Additionally, all included studies were appraised for their quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) tool. The initial review identified 476 abstracts and 63 full texts were then assessed by two reviewers. Finally, 19 studies that examined simulators for the following procedures were selected: pedicle screw placement, vertebroplasty, posterior cervical laminectomy and foraminotomy, lumbar puncture, facet joint injection, and spinal needle insertion and placement. These studies had a low-to-medium methodological quality with a MERSQI mean score of 11.47 out of 18 (standard deviation=1.81). This review described the current state and applications of VR-based simulator training and assessment approaches in spinal procedures. Limitations, strengths, and future advancements of VR-based simulators for training and assessment in spinal surgery were explored. Higher-quality studies with

  8. Impact of the Economic Downturn on Elective Lumbar Spine Surgery in the United States: A National Trend Analysis, 2003 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David N; Brodell, David; Li, Yue; Rubery, Paul T; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective database analysis. The impact of the 2008-2009 economic downtown on elective lumbar spine surgery is unknown. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the economic downturn on the overall trends of elective lumbar spine surgery in the United States. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used in conjunction with US Census and macroeconomic data to determine historical trends. The economic downturn was defined as 2008 to 2009. Codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), were used in order to identify appropriate procedures. Confidence intervals were determined using subgroup analysis techniques. From 2003 to 2012, there was a 19.8% and 26.1% decrease in the number of lumbar discectomies and laminectomies, respectively. Over the same time period, there was a 56.4% increase in the number of lumbar spinal fusions. The trend of elective lumbar spine surgeries per 100 000 persons in the US population remained consistent from 2008 to 2009. The number of procedures decreased by 4.5% from 2010 to 2011, 7.6% from 2011 to 2012, and 3.1% from 2012 to 2013. The R 2 value between the number of surgeries and the S&P 500 Index was statistically significant ( P ≤ .05). The economic downturn did not affect elective lumbar fusions, which increased in total from 2003 to 2013. The relationship between the S&P 500 Index and surgical trends suggests that during recessions, individuals may utilize other means, such as insurance, to cover procedural costs and reduce out-of-pocket expenditures, accounting for no impact of the economic downturn on surgical trends. These findings can assist multiple stakeholders in better understanding the interconnectedness of macroeconomics, policy, and elective lumbar spine surgery trends.

  9. Reversible coma and Duret hemorrhage after intracranial hypotension from remote lumbar spine surgery: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonow, Robert H; Bales, James W; Morton, Ryan P; Levitt, Michael R; Zhang, Fangyi

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hypotension is a rare condition caused by spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leaks that alter normal CSF dynamics. Symptoms range from mild headaches to transtentorial herniation, coma, and death. Duret hemorrhages have been reported to occur in some patients with this condition and are traditionally believed to be associated with a poor neurological outcome. A 73-year-old man with a remote history of spinal fusion presented with syncope and was found to have small subdural hematomas on head CT studies. He was managed nonoperatively and discharged with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, only to return 3 days later with obtundation, fixed downward gaze, anisocoria, and absent cranial nerve reflexes. A CT scan showed Duret hemorrhages and subtle enlargement of the subdural hematomas, though the hematomas remained too small to account for his poor clinical condition. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a large lumbar pseudomeningocele in the area of prior fusion. His condition dramatically improved when he was placed in the Trendelenburg position and underwent repair of the pseudomeningocele. He was kept flat for 7 days and was ultimately discharged in good condition. On long-term follow-up, his only identifiable deficit was diplopia due to an internuclear ophthalmoplegia. Intracranial hypotension is a rare condition that can cause profound morbidity, including tonsillar herniation and brainstem hemorrhage. With proper identification and treatment of the CSF leak, patients can make functional recoveries.

  10. A technical case report on use of tubular retractors for anterior cervical spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Arvind G; Patel, Ankit; Ankith, N V

    2017-12-19

    The authors put-forth this technical report to establish the feasibility of performing an anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) and a two-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a minimally invasive approach with tubular retractors. First case: cervical spondylotic myelopathy secondary to a large postero-inferiorly migrated disc treated with corpectomy and reconstruction with a mesh cage and locking plate. Second case: cervical disc herniation with radiculopathy treated with a two-level ACDF. Both cases were operated with minimally invasive approach with tubular retractor using a single incision. Technical aspects and clinical outcomes have been reported. No intra or post-operative complications were encountered. Intra-operative blood loss was negligible. The patients had a cosmetic scar on healing. Standard procedure of placement of tubular retractors is sufficient for adequate surgical exposure with minimal invasiveness. Minimally invasive approach to anterior cervical spine with tubular retractors is feasible. This is the first report on use of minimally invasive approach for ACCF and two-level ACDF.

  11. Internal jugular phlebectasia as an incidental finding in cervical spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasiraman V

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic internal jugular phlebectasia, occurs either unilaterally or bilaterally affecting the internal jugular vein is a rare congenital variation often diagnosed during childhood. It usually presents with a benign swelling over the lateral side of neck on the affected side, seen on exertion. A-30-year old male was operated for anterior cervical dissectomy from right lateral approach and was diagnosed per-operatively as internal jugular phlebectasia.The surgery was abandoned at this stage on the advice of cardiothoracic surgeon to investigate the patient for the secondary etiological factors for internal jugular vein dilatation. The patient was reassured without any active intervention for the phlebectasia and cervical dissectomy was performed in the second surgery through the lateral approach from left side. This case is presented in view of rarity and suggested that during preoperative workup the nearby structures like carotid sheath should be evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging to avoid such per-operative surprises.

  12. CREST Calcinosis Affecting the Lumbar and Cervical Spine and the Use of Minimally-Invasive Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Faraj, Kassem; Perez-Cruet, Kristin; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2017-01-01

    Calcinosis in CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome can affect the spinal and paraspinal areas. We present the first case to our knowledge where a CREST syndrome patient required surgery for spinal calcinosis in both the cervical and lumbar areas.?A 66-year-old female with a history of CREST syndrome presented with right-sided lower extremity radicular pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed bilateral lumbar masses (5...

  13. Using Lean Process Improvement to Enhance Safety and Value in Orthopaedic Surgery: The Case of Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Rajiv; Yanamadala, Vijay; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Robert Shay

    2017-11-01

    Lean methodology was developed in the manufacturing industry to increase output and decrease costs. These labor organization methods have become the mainstay of major manufacturing companies worldwide. Lean methods involve continuous process improvement through the systematic elimination of waste, prevention of mistakes, and empowerment of workers to make changes. Because of the profit and productivity gains made in the manufacturing arena using lean methods, several healthcare organizations have adopted lean methodologies for patient care. Lean methods have now been implemented in many areas of health care. In orthopaedic surgery, lean methods have been applied to reduce complication rates and create a culture of continuous improvement. A step-by-step guide based on our experience can help surgeons use lean methods in practice. Surgeons and hospital centers well versed in lean methodology will be poised to reduce complications, improve patient outcomes, and optimize cost/benefit ratios for patient care.

  14. Outcome after arthroscopic labral surgery in patients previously treated with periacetabular osteotomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartig-Andreasen, Charlotte; Nielsen, Torsten G; Lund, Bent

    2017-01-01

    To identify factors predicting failure after hip arthroscopy in patients with previous periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) defined as a conversion to total hip replacement (THR) and to evaluate the patient reported outcome scores. Of 55 hips treated with hip arthroscopy after PAO from Aug 2008 to 2012....... Nine hips were converted to a THR. Kaplan-Meier survival rate was 52.8% (95% CI, 10%-83.8%) at 6.5 years follow-up. Statistically significant predictors of failure: joint space width after PAO ...% of the hips. In 42% of the hips cartilage lesions of Becks grade >3 were found. Mean mHHS and HOS were 65.7 and 68.8 respectively at follow-up. A NRS pain score of >3 in rest and during activity were present in respectively, 43% and 62% of the patients. Hip arthroscopy after PAO demonstrated limited clinical...

  15. Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dailson Mamede Bezerra

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objective Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. Case report A male patient, 39 years old, 71 kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0 mm followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30 min, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conclusions Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin,including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunc-tion in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered asa differential diagnosis.

  16. [Postoperative visual loss due to conversion disorder after spine surgery: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Dailson Mamede; Bezerra, Eglantine Mamede; Silva Junior, Antonio Jorge; Amorim, Marco Aurélio Soares; Miranda, Denismar Borges de

    Patients undergoing spinal surgeries may develop postoperative visual loss. We present a case of total bilateral visual loss in a patient who, despite having clinical and surgical risk factors for organic lesion, evolved with visual disturbance due to conversion disorder. A male patient, 39 years old, 71kg, 1.72 m, ASA I, admitted to undergo fusion and discectomy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. Venoclysis, cardioscopy, oximetry, NIBP; induction with remifentanil, propofol and rocuronium; intubation with ETT (8.0mm) followed by capnography and urinary catheterization for diuresis. Maintenance with full target-controlled intravenous anesthesia. During fixation and laminectomy, the patient developed severe bleeding and hypovolemic shock. After 30minutes, hemostasis and hemodynamic stability was achieved with infusion of norepinephrine, volume expansion, and blood products. In the ICU, the patient developed mental confusion, weakness in the limbs, and bilateral visual loss. It was not possible to identify clinical, laboratory or image findings of organic lesion. He evolved with episodes of anxiety, emotional lability, and language impairment; the hypothesis of conversion syndrome with visual component was raised after psychiatric evaluation. The patient had complete resolution of symptoms after visual education and introduction of low doses of antipsychotic, antidepressant, and benzodiazepine. Other symptoms also regressed, and the patient was discharged 12 days after surgery. After 60 days, the patient had no more symptoms. Conversion disorders may have different signs and symptoms of non-organic origin, including visual component. It is noteworthy that the occurrence of this type of visual dysfunction in the postoperative period of spinal surgery is a rare event and should be remembered as a differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnoea for major spine surgery: An anaesthetic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Redhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Morbidly obese patients with clinical features of obstructive sleep apnoea can present a myriad of challenges to the anaesthesiologists which must be addressed to minimise the perioperative risks. Initiation of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP therapy early in the pre- and post-operative period along with appropriate anaesthetic planning is of paramount importance in such patients. This case report emphasises the usefulness of CPAP therapy, even for a short duration, to minimise morbidity, improve recovery and hasten early discharge from the hospital after major surgery.

  18. The efficacy and safety of topical administration of tranexamic acid in spine surgery: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Sun, Ru-Xin; Jiang, Han; Ma, Xin-Long

    2018-04-24

    We conducted a meta-analysis from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs to assess the efficacy and safety of tranexamic acid (TXA) in spine surgery. Potentially relevant academic articles were identified from the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (1966-2017.11), PubMed (1966-2017.11), Embase (1980-2017.11), and ScienceDirect (1985-2017.11). Secondary sources were identified from the references of the included literature. The pooled data were analyzed using RevMan 5.1. Three RCTs and one non-RCT met the inclusion criteria. There were significant differences in total blood loss (MD = - 267.53, 95% CI - 373.04 to - 106.02, P < 0.00001), drainage volume (MD = - 157.00, 95% CI - 191.17 to - 122.84, P < 0.00001), postoperative hemoglobin level (MD = 0.95, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.47, P = 0.0003), and length of hospital stay (MD = - 1.42, 95% CI - 1.92 to - 0.93, P < 0.00001). No significant differences were found regarding transfusion requirement, deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), wound hematoma, and infection between the two groups. The present meta-analysis indicated that the topical application of TXA in spinal surgery decreases the total blood loss and drainage volume and preserves higher postoperative hemoglobin level without increasing the risk of DVT infection, hematoma, DVT, and PE.

  19. Predictors of extended length of stay, discharge to inpatient rehab, and hospital readmission following elective lumbar spine surgery: introduction of the Carolina-Semmes Grading Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Chotai, Silky; Pfortmiller, Deborah; Sorenson, Jeffrey M; Foley, Kevin; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Extended hospital length of stay (LOS), unplanned hospital readmission, and need for inpatient rehabilitation after elective spine surgery contribute significantly to the variation in surgical health care costs. As novel payment models shift the risk of cost overruns from payers to providers, understanding patient-level risk of LOS, readmission, and inpatient rehabilitation is critical. The authors set out to develop a grading scale that effectively stratifies risk of these costly events after elective surgery for degenerative lumbar pathologies. METHODS The Quality and Outcomes Database (QOD) registry prospectively enrolls patients undergoing surgery for degenerative lumbar spine disease. This registry was queried for patients who had undergone elective 1- to 3-level lumbar surgery for degenerative spine pathology. The association between preoperative patient variables and extended postoperative hospital LOS (LOS ≥ 7 days), discharge status (inpatient facility vs home), and 90-day hospital readmission was assessed using stepwise multivariate logistic regression. The Carolina-Semmes grading scale was constructed using the independent predictors for LOS (0-12 points), discharge to inpatient facility (0-18 points), and 90-day readmission (0-6 points), and its performance was assessed using the QOD data set. The performance of the grading scale was then confirmed separately after using it in 2 separate neurosurgery practice sites (Carolina Neurosurgery & Spine Associates [CNSA] and Semmes Murphey Clinic). RESULTS A total of 6921 patients were analyzed. Overall, 290 (4.2%) patients required extended LOS, 654 (9.4%) required inpatient facility care/rehabilitation on hospital discharge, and 474 (6.8%) were readmitted to the hospital within 90 days postdischarge. Variables that remained as independently associated with these unplanned events in multivariate analysis included age ≥ 70 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Classification System

  20. Calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition with intraosseous penetration involving the posterior aspect of the cervical spine: a previously unreported cause of neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, Julio; Contreras, Oscar

    2017-05-01

    Calcific tendinitis is a frequent disorder caused by hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; however, bone erosions from calcific tendinitis are unusual. The spinal manifestation of this disease is calcific tendinitis of the longus colli muscle; this disease has never been described in the posterior aspect of the spine. We report a case of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition involving the posterior cervical spine eroding the bone cortex. A 57-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of left-sided neck pain. Radiographs showed C4-C5 interspinous calcification with lytic compromise of the posterior arch of C4. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a lytic lesion of the posterior arch of C4, with a soft tissue mass extending to the C4-C5 interspinous space; calcifications were observed as very low signal intensity areas on T1 and T2 sequences, surrounded by gadolinium-enhanced soft tissues. A computed tomography (CT) scan confirmed the bone erosions and the soft tissue calcifications. A CT-guided needle biopsy was performed; it showed vascularized connective tissue with inflammatory histiocytic infiltration and multinucleated giant cells; Alizarin Red stain confirmed the presence of hydroxyapatite crystals. The patient was treated with anti-inflammatories for 2 weeks. She has been asymptomatic in a 6-month follow-up; a CT scan at the last follow-up revealed reparative remodeling of bone erosions. This is the first report of calcium hydroxyapatite crystal deposition with intraosseous penetration involving the posterior aspect of the cervical spine. Considering that this unusual lesion can be misinterpreted as a tumor or infection, high suspicion is required to avoid unnecessary surgical procedures.

  1. Is a drain tube necessary for minimally invasive lumbar spine fusion surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Pei-I; Chang, Ming-Chau; Chou, Po-Hsin; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Wang, Shih-Tien; Liu, Chien-Lin

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate if closed suction wound drainage is necessary in minimally invasive surgery of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS TLIF). This is a prospective randomized clinical study. Fifty-six patients who underwent MIS TLIF were randomly divided into groups A (with a closed suction wound drainage) and B (without tube drainage). Surgical duration, intraoperative blood loss, timing of ambulation, length of hospital stay and complications were recorded. Patients were followed up for an average of 25.3 months. Clinical outcome was assessed using the Oswestry disability index and visual analogue scale (VAS). Fusion rate was classified with the Bridwell grading system, based on plain radiograph. Both groups had similar patient demographics. The use of drains had no significant influence on perioperative parameters including operative time, estimated blood loss, length of stay and complications. Patients in group B started ambulation 1 day earlier than patients in group A (p drain tube can lead to pain, anxiety and discomfort during the postoperative period. We conclude that drain tubes are not necessary for MIS TLIF. Patients without drains had the benefit of earlier ambulation than those with drains.

  2. Use of an operating microscope during spine surgery is associated with minor increases in operating room times and no increased risk of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basques, Bryce A; Golinvaux, Nicholas S; Bohl, Daniel D; Yacob, Alem; Toy, Jason O; Varthi, Arya G; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-10-15

    Retrospective database review. To evaluate whether microscope use during spine procedures is associated with increased operating room times or increased risk of infection. Operating microscopes are commonly used in spine procedures. It is debated whether the use of an operating microscope increases operating room time or confers increased risk of infection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database, which includes data from more than 370 participating hospitals, was used to identify patients undergoing elective spinal procedures with and without the use of an operating microscope for the years 2011 and 2012. Bivariate and multivariate linear regressions were used to test the association between microscope use and operating room times. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were similarly conducted to test the association between microscope use and infection occurrence within 30 days of surgery. A total of 23,670 elective spine procedures were identified, of which 2226 (9.4%) used an operating microscope. The average patient age was 55.1±14.4 years. The average operative time (incision to closure) was 125.7±82.0 minutes.Microscope use was associated with minor increases in preoperative room time (+2.9 min, P=0.013), operative time (+13.2 min, Pmicroscope and nonmicroscope groups for occurrence of any infection, superficial surgical site infection, deep surgical site infection, organ space infection, or sepsis/septic shock, regardless of surgery type. We did not find operating room times or infection risk to be significant deterrents for use of an operating microscope during spine surgery. 3.

  3. The impact of economic evaluation on quality management in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Norbert

    2009-08-01

    Health care expenditures are substantially increasing within the last two decades prompting the imperative need for economic evaluations in health care. Historically, economic evaluations in health care have been carried out by four approaches: (1) the human-capital approach (HCA), (2) cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA), (3) cost-utility analysis (CUA) and (4) cost-benefit analysis (CBA). While the HCA cannot be recommended because of methodological shortcomings, CEA and CUA have been used frequently in healthcare. In CEA, costs are measured in monetary terms and health effects are measured in a non-monetary unit, e.g. number of successfully treated patients. In an attempt to develop an effectiveness measure that incorporates effects on both quantity and quality of life, so-called Quality Adjusted Life Years (QUALYs) were introduced. Contingent valuation surveys are used in cost-benefit analyses (CBA) to elicit the consumer's monetary valuations for program benefits by applying the willingness-to-pay approach. A distinguished feature of CBA is that costs and benefits are expressed in the same units of value, i.e. money. Only recently, economic evaluations have started to explore various spinal interventions particularly the very expensive fusion operations. While most of the studies used CEA or CUA approaches, CBAs are still rare. Most studies fail to show that sophisticated spinal interventions are more cost-effective than conventional treatments. In spite of the lack of therapeutic or cost-effectiveness for most spinal surgeries, there is rapidly growing spinal implant market demonstrating market imperfection and information asymmetry. A change can only be anticipated when physicians start to focus on the improvement of health care quality as documented by outcome research and economic evaluations of cost-effectiveness and net benefits.

  4. Perioperative blood transfusion: does it influence survival and cancer progression in metastatic spine tumor surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Vellayappan, Balamurugan; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-02-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for spinal metastases, there is often substantial blood loss, resulting in patients requiring blood transfusion during the perioperative period. Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) has been the main replenishment method for lost blood. However, the impact of ABT on cancer-related outcomes has been controversial in various studies. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on disease progression and survival in patients undergoing metastatic spinal tumor surgery (MSTS). We conducted a retrospective study that included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The impact of using perioperative ABT (either exposure to or quantities of transfusion) on disease progression and survival was assessed using Cox regression analyses while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT. The overall median number of blood units transfused was 2 (range, 0-10 units). Neither blood transfusion exposure nor quantities of transfusion were associated with overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15 [p = 0.35] and 1.10 [p = 0.11], respectively) and progression-free survival (HR, 0.87 [p = 0.18] and 0.98 [p = 0.11], respectively). The factors that influenced overall survival were primary tumor type and preoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, whereas primary tumor type was the only factor that had an impact on progression-free survival. This is the first study providing evidence that disease progression and survival in patients who undergo MSTS are less likely to be influenced by perioperative ABT. The worst oncologic outcomes are more likely to be caused by the clinical circumstances necessitating blood transfusion, but not transfusion itself. However, because ABT can have a propensity toward developing postoperative infections, including surgical site infection, the use of patient blood management

  5. Effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on intraoperative core temperature in patients undergoing posterior spine surgery: prospective randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyungseok; Do Son, Je; Lee, Hyung-Chul; Oh, Hyung-Min; Jung, Chul-Woo; Park, Hee-Pyoung

    2018-03-01

    Objective Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) causes carotid baroreceptor unloading, which leads to thermoregulatory peripheral vasoconstriction. However, the effects of PEEP on intraoperative thermoregulation in the prone position remain unknown. Methods Thirty-seven patients undergoing spine surgery in the prone position were assigned at random to receive either 10 cmH 2 O PEEP (Group P) or no PEEP (Group Z). The primary endpoint was core temperature 180 minutes after intubation. Secondary endpoints were delta core temperature (difference in core temperature between 180 minutes and immediately after tracheal intubation), incidence of intraoperative hypothermia (core temperature of peripheral vasoconstriction-related data. Results The median [interquartile range] core temperature 180 minutes after intubation was 36.1°C [35.9°C-36.2°C] and 36.0°C [35.9°C-36.4°C] in Groups Z and P, respectively. The delta core temperature and incidences of intraoperative hypothermia and peripheral vasoconstriction were not significantly different between the two groups. The peripheral vasoconstriction threshold (36.2°C±0.5°C vs. 36.7°C±0.6°C) was lower and the onset of peripheral vasoconstriction (66 [60-129] vs. 38 [28-70] minutes) was slower in Group Z than in Group P. Conclusions Intraoperative PEEP did not reduce the core temperature decrease in the prone position, although it resulted in an earlier onset and higher threshold of peripheral vasoconstriction.

  6. Spine device clinical trials: design and sponsorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cher, Daniel J; Capobianco, Robyn A

    2015-05-01

    Multicenter prospective randomized clinical trials represent the best evidence to support the safety and effectiveness of medical devices. Industry sponsorship of multicenter clinical trials is purported to lead to bias. To determine what proportion of spine device-related trials are industry-sponsored and the effect of industry sponsorship on trial design. Analysis of data from a publicly available clinical trials database. Clinical trials of spine devices registered on ClinicalTrials.gov, a publicly accessible trial database, were evaluated in terms of design, number and location of study centers, and sample size. The relationship between trial design characteristics and study sponsorship was evaluated using logistic regression and general linear models. One thousand six hundred thrity-eight studies were retrieved from ClinicalTrials.gov using the search term "spine." Of the 367 trials that focused on spine surgery, 200 (54.5%) specifically studied devices for spine surgery and 167 (45.5%) focused on other issues related to spine surgery. Compared with nondevice trials, device trials were far more likely to be sponsored by the industry (74% vs. 22.2%, odds ratio (OR) 9.9 [95% confidence interval 6.1-16.3]). Industry-sponsored device trials were more likely multicenter (80% vs. 29%, OR 9.8 [4.8-21.1]) and had approximately four times as many participating study centers (pdevices not sponsored by the industry. Most device-related spine research is industry-sponsored. Multicenter trials are more likely to be industry-sponsored. These findings suggest that previously published studies showing larger effect sizes in industry-sponsored vs. nonindustry-sponsored studies may be biased as a result of failure to take into account the marked differences in design and purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Successful Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Recurrent Uterine Fibroid Previously Treated with Uterine Artery Embolization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Yoon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old premenopausal woman was referred to our clinic due to recurring symptoms of uterine fibroids, nine years after a uterine artery embolization (UAE. At the time of screening, the patient presented with bilateral impairment and narrowing of the uterine arteries, which increased the risk of arterial perforation during repeated UAE procedures. The patient was subsequently referred for magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS treatment. Following the treatment, the patient experienced a significant improvement in symptoms (symptom severity score was reduced from 47 to 12 by 1 year post-treatment. MR images at 3 months showed a 49% decrease in fibroid volume. There were no adverse events during the treatment or the follow-up period. This case suggests that MRgFUS can be an effective treatment option for patients with recurrent fibroids following previous UAE treatment.

  8. Gorham's disease of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livesley, P.J.; Saifuddin, A.; Webb, P.J.; Mitchell, N.; Ramani, P.

    1996-01-01

    Massive osteolysis is a rare condition and is very uncommon in the spine. The MRI appearance of Gorham's disease of the spine has not previously been reported. We present here a case of this condition with imaging details. (orig.)

  9. Simulation of the Effect of Different Presbyopia-Correcting Intraocular Lenses With Eyes With Previous Laser Refractive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Vicente J; Miret, Juan J; García, Celia; Tolosa, Angel; Piñero, David P

    2018-04-01

    To simulate the optical performance of three presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs) implanted in eyes with previous laser refractive surgery. A simulation of the through-focus modulation transfer function (MTF) was performed for three presbyopia-correcting IOLs (Mplus, Oculentis GmbH, Berlin, Germany; Symfony, Johnson & Johnson Vision, Santa Ana, CA; and Mini Well, SIFI S.p.A., Lavinaio, Italy) in one eye with previous myopic LASIK and another with hyperopic LASIK. Real topographic data and the wavefront aberration profile of each IOL obtained with a Hartmann-Shack sensor were used. In the eye with myopic LASIK, all IOLs lost optical quality at near and intermediate distances for 4- and 4.7-mm pupil size. For 3-mm pupil size, the Mini Well IOL showed the best intermediate and near MTF and maintained the far focus independently of the pupil. In the eye with hyperopic LASIK, the Mini Well IOL showed an intermediate, distance, and -4.00-diopter (D) foci for all pupils. The Symfony IOL showed a depth of focus at far and intermediate distance for 3-mm and a focus at -2.50 D in the rest. The Mplus showed a focus of -4.50 and -3.00 D for the 3- and 4-mm pupil, respectively. The Mini Well and Symfony IOLs seem to work better than the Mplus IOL in eyes with previous myopic LASIK. With previous hyperopic LASIK, the Mini Well IOL seems to be able to provide acceptable near, intermediate, and far foci for all pupil sizes. These findings should be confirmed in future clinical studies. [J Refract Surg. 2018;34(4):222-227.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Epidemiology and Outcomes of Vertebral Artery Injury in 16 582 Cervical Spine Surgery Patients: An AOSpine North America Multicenter Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wellington K; Kannan, Abhishek; Mai, Harry T; Fehlings, Michael G; Smith, Zachary A; Traynelis, Vincent C; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Hilibrand, Alan S; Nassr, Ahmad; Arnold, Paul M; Mroz, Thomas E; Bydon, Mohamad; Massicotte, Eric M; Ray, Wilson Z; Steinmetz, Michael P; Smith, Gabriel A; Pace, Jonathan; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Isaacs, Robert E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    A multicenter retrospective case series was compiled involving 21 medical institutions. Inclusion criteria included patients who underwent cervical spine surgery between 2005 and 2011 and who sustained a vertebral artery injury (VAI). To report the frequency, risk factors, outcomes, and management goals of VAI in patients who have undergone cervical spine surgery. Patients were evaluated on the basis of condition-specific functional status using the Neck Disability Index (NDI), modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) score, the Nurick scale, and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). VAIs were identified in a total of 14 of 16 582 patients screened (8.4 per 10 000). The mean age of patients with VAI was 59 years (±10) with a female predominance (78.6%). Patient diagnoses included myelopathy, radiculopathy, cervical instability, and metastatic disease. VAI was associated with substantial blood loss (770 mL), although only 3 cases required transfusion. Of the 14 cases, 7 occurred with an anterior-only approach, 3 cases with posterior-only approach, and 4 during circumferential approach. Fifty percent of cases of VAI with available preoperative imaging revealed anomalous vessel anatomy during postoperative review. Average length of hospital stay was 10 days (±8). Notably, 13 of the 14 (92.86%) cases resolved without residual deficits. Compared to preoperative baseline NDI, Nurick, mJOA, and SF-36 scores for these patients, there were no observed changes after surgery ( P = .20-.94). Vertebral artery injuries are potentially catastrophic complications that can be sustained from anterior or posterior cervical spine approaches. The data from this study suggest that with proper steps to ensure hemostasis, patients recover function at a high rate and do not exhibit residual deficits.

  11. Goal-Directed Fluid Therapy Based on Stroke Volume Variation in Patients Undergoing Major Spine Surgery in the Prone Position: A Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchin, Maria Renata; Ceria, Chiara Marta; Giannone, Sandra; Ghisi, Daniela; Stagni, Gaetano; Greggi, Tiziana; Bonarelli, Stefano

    2016-09-15

    A retrospective observational study. The aim of this study was to test whether a goal-directed fluid therapy (GDFT) protocol, based on stroke volume variation (SVV), applied in major spine surgery performed in the prone position, would be effective in reducing peri-operative red blood cells transfusions. Recent literature shows that optimizing perioperative fluid therapy is associated with lower complication rates and faster recovery. Data from 23 patients who underwent posterior spine arthrodesis surgery and whose intraoperative fluid administration were managed with the GDFT protocol were retrospectively collected and compared with data from 23 matched controls who underwent the same surgical procedure in the same timeframe, and who received a liberal intraoperative fluid therapy. Patients in the GDFT group received less units of transfused red blood cells (primary endpoint) in the intra (0 vs. 2.0, P = 0.0 4) and postoperative period (2.0 vs. 4.0, P = 0.003). They also received a lower amount of intraoperative crystalloids, had fewer blood losses, and lower intraoperative peak lactate. In the postoperative period, patients in the GDFT group had fewer pulmonary complications and blood losses from surgical drains, needed less blood product transfusions, had a shorter intensive care unit stay, and a faster return of bowel function. We found no difference in the total length of stay among the two groups. Our study shows that application of a GDFT based on SVV in major spine surgery is feasible and can lead to reduced blood losses and transfusions, better postoperative respiratory performance, shorter ICU stay, and faster return of bowel function. 3.

  12. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cleary, Kevin R

    2002-01-01

    ... hardware and software needed for their implementation The current focus of the project is on physician assist systems incorporating robotics, tracking, and visualization to improve the precision...

  13. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cleary, Kevin R

    2005-01-01

    .... The OR2020 Workshop was organized by the ISIS Center at Georgetown University to identity the clinical and technical requirements for integrating advanced computer-assisted and robotic technologies...

  14. Does Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus Increase the Risk of Postoperative Infections After Elective Spine Surgery: Do Most Infections Occur in Carriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Vuong, Victoria D; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Lilly, Daniel T; Desai, Shyam A; Khalid, Syed; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A

    2018-05-14

    Wound infections after adult spinal deformity surgery place a high toll on patients, providers, and the healthcare system. Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of postoperative wound infections, and nasal colonization by this organism may be an important factor in the development of surgical site infections (SSIs). The aim is to investigate whether post-operative surgical site infections after elective spine surgery occur at a higher rate in patients with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) nasal colonization. Consecutive patients undergoing adult spinal deformity surgery between 2011-2013 were enrolled. Enrolled patients were followed up for a minimum of 3 months after surgery and received similar peri-operative infection prophylaxis. Baseline characteristics, operative details, rates of wound infection, and microbiologic data for each case of post-operative infection were gathered by direct medical record review. Local vancomycin powder was used in all patients and sub-fascial drains were used in the majority (88%) of patients. 1200 operative spine cases were performed for deformity between 2011 and 2013. The mean ± standard deviation age and body mass index were 62.08 ± 14.76 years and 30.86 ± 7.15 kg/m 2 , respectively. 29.41% had a history of diabetes. All SSIs occurred within 30 days of surgery, with deep wound infections accounting for 50% of all SSIs. Of the 34 (2.83%) cases of SSIs that were identified, only 1 case occurred in a patient colonized with MRSA. Our study suggests that the preponderance of SSIs occurred in patients without nasal colonization by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Future prospective multi-institutional studies are needed to corroborate our findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Geriatric comanagement reduces perioperative complications and shortens duration of hospital stay after lumbar spine surgery: a prospective single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine A; Vuong, Victoria D; Moreno, Jessica; Cheng, Joseph; Karikari, Isaac O; Bagley, Carlos A

    2017-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Geriatric patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery have unique needs due to the physiological changes of aging. They are at risk for adverse outcomes such as delirium, infection, and iatrogenic complications, and these complications, in turn, contribute to the risk of functional decline, nursing home admission, and death. Whether preoperative and perioperative comanagement by a geriatrician reduces the incidence of in-hospital complications and length of in-hospital stay after elective lumbar spine surgery remains unknown. METHODS A unique model of comanagement for elderly patients undergoing lumbar fusion surgery was implemented at a major academic medical center. The Perioperative Optimization of Senior Health (POSH) program was launched with the aim of improving outcomes in elderly patients (> 65 years old) undergoing complex lumbar spine surgery. In this model, a geriatrician evaluates elderly patients preoperatively, in addition to performing routine preoperative anesthesia surgical screening, and comanages them daily throughout the course of their hospital stay to manage medical comorbid conditions and coordinate multidisciplinary rehabilitation along with the neurosurgical team. The first 100 cases were retrospectively reviewed after initiation of the POSH protocol and compared with the immediately preceding 25 cases to assess the incidence of perioperative complications and clinical outcomes. RESULTS One hundred twenty-five patients undergoing lumbar decompression and fusion were enrolled in this pilot program. Baseline characteristics were similar between both cohorts. The mean length of in-hospital stay was 30% shorter in the POSH cohort (6.13 vs 8.72 days; p = 0.06). The mean duration of time between surgery and patient mobilization was significantly shorter in the POSH cohort compared with the non-POSH cohort (1.57 days vs 2.77 days; p = 0.02), and the number of steps ambulated on day of discharge was 2-fold higher in the POSH cohort (p = 0

  16. Swespine: the Swedish spine register : the 2012 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömqvist, Björn; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle; Jönsson, Bo; Sandén, Bengt

    2013-04-01

    Swespine, the Swedish National Spine Register, has existed for 20 years and is in general use within the country since over 10 years regarding degenerative lumbar spine disorders. Today there are protocols for registering all disorders of the entire spinal column. Patient-based pre- and postoperative questionnaires, completed before surgery and at 1, 2, 5 and 10 years postoperatively. Among patient-based data are VAS pain, ODI, SF-36 and EQ-5D. Postoperatively evaluation of leg and back pain as compared to preoperatively ("global assessment"), overall satisfaction with outcome and working conditions are registered in addition to the same parameters as preoperatively evaluation. A yearly report is produced including an analytic part of a certain topic, in this issue disc prosthesis surgery. More than 75,000 surgically treated patients are registered to date with an increasing number yearly. The present report includes 7,285 patients; 1-, 2- and 5-year follow-up data of previously operated patients are also included for lumbar disorders as well as for disc prosthesis surgery. For the degenerative lumbar spine disorders (disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis and DDD) significant improvements are seen in all aspects as exemplified by pronounced improvement regarding EQ-5D and ODI. Results seem to be stable over time. Spinal stenosis is the most common indication for spine surgery. Disc prosthesis surgery yields results on a par with fusion surgery in disc degenerative pain. The utility of spine surgery is well documented by the results. Results of spine surgery as documented on a national basis can be utilized for quality assurance and quality improvement as well as for research purposes, documenting changes over time and bench marking when introducing new surgical techniques. A basis for international comparisons is also laid.

  17. Transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring outcome in the high-risk brain and spine surgeries: Correlation of clinical and neurophysiological data - An Indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima Amit Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the safety, feasibility and clinical value of transcranial motor evoked potential (MEP monitoring by electrical stimulation. Setting: Clinical neurophysiology department of tertiary reach hospital. Materials and Methods: MEP monitoring was attempted in 44 "high risk" patients. Intraoperative surgical, anesthesia and neurophysiological findings were documented prospectively. MEP monitoring results were correlated with motor outcome. Results: The success for reliable MEP recording from the lower limbs was 75%. Incidence of new permanent post-operative motor deficit was zero. Nearly, 76.5% of the cases (13 out of 17 cases who showed unobtainable and unstable MEP outcome had lesion location in the spine as compared with 23.5% (4 out of 17 cases that had lesion location in the brain. Chi-square test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between these two groups (P = 0.0020. Out of these 13 spine surgery cases, 8 (62% were operated for deformity. Seven out of 12 (60% patients less than 12 years of age had a poor MEP monitoring outcome suggesting that extremes of age and presence of a spine deformity may be associated with a lesser incidence of successful MEP monitoring. No complications related to the repetitive transcranial electrical stimulation for eliciting MEP were observed. Conclusion: MEP monitoring is safe. The protocol used in this study is simple, feasible for use and has a fairly high success rate form the lower limbs. Pediatric age group and spine lesions, particularly deformities have an adverse effect on stable MEP recording.

  18. Efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in posterior lumbar spine surgery for degenerative spinal stenosis with instability: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Stefan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Degenerative spinal stenosis and instability requiring multilevel spine surgery has been associated with large blood losses. Factors that affect perioperative blood loss include time of surgery, surgical procedure, patient height, combined anterior/posterior approaches, number of levels fused, blood salvage techniques, and the use of anti-fibrinolytic medications. This study was done to evaluate the efficacy of tranexamic acid in reducing blood loss in spine surgery. Methods This retrospective case control study includes 97 patients who had to undergo surgery because of degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and instability. All operations included spinal decompression, interbody fusion and posterior instrumentation (4-5 segments. Forty-six patients received 1 g tranexamic acid intravenous, preoperative and six hours and twelve hours postoperative; 51 patients without tranexamic acid administration were evaluated as a control group. Based on the records, the intra- and postoperative blood losses were measured by evaluating the drainage and cell saver systems 6, 12 and 24 hours post operation. Additionally, hemoglobin concentration and platelet concentration were reviewed. Furthermore, the number of red cell transfusions given and complications associated with tranexamic acid were assessed. Results The postoperative hemoglobin concentration demonstrated a statistically significant difference with a p value of 0.0130 showing superiority for tranexamic acid use (tranexamic acid group: 11.08 g/dl, SD: 1.68; control group: 10.29 g/dl, SD: 1.39. The intraoperative cell saver volume and drainage volume after 24 h demonstrated a significant difference as well, which indicates a less blood loss in the tranexamic acid group than the control group. The postoperative drainage volume at12 hours showed no significant differences; nor did the platelet concentration Allogenic blood transfusion (two red cell units was needed for eight patients

  19. Endometriose umbilical sem cirurgia pélvica prévia Umbilical endometriosis without previous pelvic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ramalho de Carvalho

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: apresentar série de casos de endometriose na cicatriz umbilical, em pacientes no menacme, sem cirurgias pélvicas prévias. MÉTODOS: foram incluídas no estudo quatro pacientes com idade entre 33 e 43 anos, com queixa de sangramento umbilical associado ou não a dor pélvica, com evolução de dois meses a quatro anos. A ultra-sonografia da parede abdominal foi utilizada para o diagnóstico, procedendo-se à exérese cirúrgica das lesões sugestivas de endometriose umbilical e confirmação anatomopatológica. RESULTADOS: as avaliações ultra-sonográficas das quatro pacientes evidenciaram imagens umbilicais hipoecogênicas compatíveis com a hipótese diagnóstica de endometriose e, assim, todas elas foram encaminhadas para exérese cirúrgica da lesão. A dosagem do marcador sérico CA-125 foi realizada em três das quatro pacientes, com níveis dentro da normalidade, variando de 6,8 a 10,1 U/mL. A concomitância de endometriose pélvica apenas foi confirmada em uma paciente. Durante o seguimento de um ano, as pacientes não apresentaram recidiva dos sintomas nem das lesões. CONCLUSÕES: a endometriose umbilical é uma entidade nosológica rara, mas que deve ser sempre lembrada quando da presença de nodulações ou sangramento umbilicais, ainda que não exista relato de cirurgia pélvica prévia com manipulação endometrial. Seu tratamento cirúrgico é, em geral, suficiente para a remissão total da lesão e dos sintomas.PURPOSE: to present a series of cases of umbilical endometriosis in patients in reproductive age, with no previous pelvic surgery. METHODS: four patients aged between 33 and 43 years were included in the study. They all presented umbilical bleeding associated or not with pelvic pain, and medical history varied from two months to four years. Abdominal wall ultrasound was performed for diagnosis support before surgical excision of the umbilical lesions, and histological examination was also performed. RESULTS

  20. Breast conserving surgery in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy after previous external beam therapy: an option to avoid mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangarajah, F; Heilmann, J; Malter, W; Kunze, S; Marnitz, S; Mallmann, P; Wenz, F; Sperk, E

    2018-04-01

    Mastectomy is the standard procedure in patients with in-breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) or breast cancer after irradiation of the chest due to Hodgkin's disease. In certain cases a second breast conserving surgery (BCS) in combination with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is possible. To date, data concerning BCS in combination with IORT in pre-irradiated patients are limited. This is the first pooled analysis of this special indication with a mature follow-up of 5 years. Patients with IBTR after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; treated in two centers) for breast cancer were included. Patients with previous EBRT including the breast tissue due to other diseases were also included. IORT was performed with the Intrabeam™-device using low kV X-rays. Clinical data including outcome for all patients and toxicity for a representative cohort (LENT-SOMA scales) were obtained. Statistical analyses were done including Kaplan-Meier estimates for local recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival. A total of 41 patients were identified (39 patients with IBTR, 2 with Hodgkin`s disease in previous medical history). Median follow-up was 58 months (range 4-170). No grade 3/4 acute toxicity occurred within 9 weeks. Local recurrence-free survival rate was 89.9% and overall survival was 82.7% at 5 years. Seven patients developed metastasis within the whole follow-up. BCS in combination with IORT in IBTR in pre-irradiated patients is a feasible method to avoid mastectomy with a low risk of side effects and an excellent local control and good overall survival.

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Low-Dose Tranexamic Acid versus Placebo to Reduce Red Blood Cell Transfusion During Complex Multilevel Spine Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabini, Louanne M; Moreland, Natalie C; Vealey, Ryan J; Bebawy, John F; Koski, Tyler R; Koht, Antoun; Gupta, Dhanesh K; Avram, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Multilevel spine fusion surgery for adult deformity correction is associated with significant blood loss and coagulopathy. Tranexamic acid reduces blood loss in high-risk surgery, but the efficacy of a low-dose regimen is unknown. Sixty-one patients undergoing multilevel complex spinal fusion with and without osteotomies were randomly assigned to receive low-dose tranexamic acid (10 mg/kg loading dose, then 1 mg·kg -1 ·hr -1 throughout surgery) or placebo. The primary outcome was the total volume of red blood cells transfused intraoperatively. Thirty-one patients received tranexamic acid, and 30 patients received placebo. Patient demographics, risk of major transfusion, preoperative hemoglobin, and surgical risk of the 2 groups were similar. There was a significant decrease in total volume of red blood cells transfused (placebo group median 1460 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 1140 mL; median difference 463 mL, 95% confidence interval 15 to 914 mL, P = 0.034), with a decrease in cell saver transfusion (placebo group median 490 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 256 mL; median difference 166 mL, 95% confidence interval 0 to 368 mL, P = 0.042). The decrease in packed red blood cell transfusion did not reach statistical significance (placebo group median 1050 mL vs. tranexamic acid group 600 mL; median difference 300 mL, 95% confidence interval 0 to 600 mL, P = 0.097). Our results support the use of low-dose tranexamic acid during complex multilevel spine fusion surgery to decrease total red blood cell transfusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Full-thickness knee articular cartilage defects in national football league combine athletes undergoing magnetic resonance imaging: prevalence, location, and association with previous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Wright, Rick W; Matava, Matthew J; Brophy, Robert H

    2012-06-01

    To better define the prevalence and location of full-thickness articular cartilage lesions in elite football players undergoing knee magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the National Football League (NFL) Invitational Combine and assess the association of these lesions with previous knee surgery. We performed a retrospective review of all participants in the NFL Combine undergoing a knee MRI scan from 2005 to 2009. Each MRI scan was reviewed for evidence of articular cartilage disease. History of previous knee surgery including anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, meniscal procedures, and articular cartilage surgery was recorded for each athlete. Knees with a history of previous articular cartilage restoration surgery were excluded from the analysis. A total of 704 knee MRI scans were included in the analysis. Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions were associated with a history of any previous knee surgery (P football players at the NFL Combine undergoing MRI. The lateral compartment appears to be at greater risk for full-thickness cartilage loss. Previous knee surgery, particularly meniscectomy, is associated with these lesions. Level IV, therapeutic case series. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of previous open renal surgery on the outcomes of subsequent percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Henglong; Lu, Yuchao; Cui, Lei; Zhang, Jiaqiao; Zhao, Zhenyu; Qin, Baolong; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Qing; Wang, Shaogang

    2016-04-28

    The aim of this study was to systematically compare the perioperative outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy in patients with or without previous ipsilateral open renal surgery (POS). Systematic searches of the PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases were used to identify relevant studies, and, following literature screening and data extraction, a meta-analysis was performed. 17 retrospective cohort studies involving 4833 procedures (4784 patients) were included. No statistically significant differences were observed between patients with or without POS in terms of supracostal access; single/multiple tracts; metal dilator need; time required to access the collecting system; fluoroscopic duration; demand for analgesics; hospital stay; final stone-free rate; and risk of developing certain complications (eg, fever, haemorrhage, haemo/hydro/pneumothorax, blood transfusion, urinary tract infection and sepsis) as well as regarding the risk of total complications. Patients with POS, however, had a greater drop in haemoglobin (weighted mean difference (WMD), 1.78 g/L; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.47; pPOS also had a lower initial stone-free rate (RR, 0.96; 95% CI 0.92 to 0.99; p=0.007) and more secondary treatment (RR, 1.61; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.37; p=0.02). Sensitivity analysis produced comparable results except for differences in operative time and initial stone-free rate, which did, however, prove to be statistically insignificant (p=0.16 and 0.69, respectively). Current evidence suggests that percutaneous nephrolithotomy in patients with POS is associated with a significantly greater drop in haemoglobin, higher risk of requiring angiographic embolisation and auxiliary procedures, potentially longer operative time, and lower initial stone-free rate than percutaneous nephrolithotomy in patients without POS. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  4. Benign metastasizing leiomyoma: A review of current literature in respect to the time and type of previous gynecological surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaś, Edyta; Książek, Mariusz; Raś, Renata; Skręt, Andrzej; Skręt- Magierło, Joanna; Dmoch- Gajzlerska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Benign metastasizing leiomyoma (BML) is a rare disorder that affects women with a history of uterine leiomyoma, which is found to metastasise within extrauterine sites. The aetiology of BML remains unexplained. Because BML is rare, and most publications contain descriptions of single cases, no statistically determined time relations were found between the primary and secondary surgeries, which may have aetiological implications. Objectives To determine age before BML surgery, age during diagnosis of BML, type of prior surgery, and location of metastasis based on the literature. Methods A systematic review of four databases (Medline/PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane) covering articles published from 1 January 1965 to 10 April 2016. The inclusion criteria were full-text articles in English and articles containing case reports. Articles in languages other than English (39), articles containing incomplete data (14), i.e. no information regarding the time of surgery and/or the site of metastasis, articles bereft of case studies (25), and articles with access only to summaries, without access to the complete text (10) were excluded. Of 321 titles identified, only 126 articles met the aforementioned criteria. Results and conclusions The mean age during primary surgery and BML diagnosis was 38.5 years and 47.3 years, respectively. The most common surgery was total hysterectomy. The most frequent site of metastasis was the lungs; other organs were affected less frequently.The site of metastases and their number were not related to the longer time span between the patient’s initial surgery and occurrence of metastasis. The analysed data, such as the age during primary surgery, age during BML diagnosis, site and type of metastasis, do not provide us a clear answer. Thus, BML pathogenesis is most probably complex in nature and requires further multidirectional research. PMID:28426767

  5. Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copay, Anne G; Glassman, Steven D; Subach, Brian R; Berven, Sigurd; Schuler, Thomas C; Carreon, Leah Y

    2008-01-01

    The impact of lumbar spinal surgery is commonly evaluated with three patient-reported outcome measures: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the physical component summary (PCS) of the Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36), and pain scales. A minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is a threshold used to measure the effect of clinical treatments. Variable threshold values have been proposed as MCID for those instruments despite a lack of agreement on the optimal MCID calculation method. This study has three purposes. First, to illustrate the range of values obtained by common anchor-based and distribution-based methods to calculate MCID. Second, to determine a statistically sound and clinically meaningful MCID for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, and leg pain scale in lumbar spine surgery patients. Third, to compare the discriminative ability of two anchors: a global health assessment and a rating of satisfaction with the results of the surgery. This study is a review of prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes data. A total of 454 patients from a large database of surgeries performed by the Lumbar Spine Study Group with a 1-year follow-up on either ODI or PCS were included in the study. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative scores for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, leg pain scale, health transition item (HTI) of the SF-36, and Satisfaction with Results scales. ODI, SF-36, and pain scales were administered before and 1 year after spinal surgery. Several candidate MCID calculation methods were applied to the data and the resulting values were compared. The HTI of the SF-36 was used as the anchor and compared with a second anchor (Satisfaction with Results scale). Potential MCID calculations yielded a range of values: fivefold for ODI, PCS, and leg pain, 10-fold for back pain. Threshold values obtained with the two anchors were very similar. The minimum detectable change (MDC) appears as a statistically and clinically appropriate MCID value. MCID values

  6. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF): incremental validity in predicting early postoperative outcomes in spine surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Ryan J; Block, Andrew R; Ben-Porath, Yossef S

    2015-03-01

    A substantial proportion of individuals who undergo surgical procedures to relieve spine pain continue to report significant pain and dysfunction after recovery. Psychopathology and patient expectations have been linked to poor results, leading to an increasing reliance on presurgical psychological screening (PPS) as part of the surgical diagnostic process. The original Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI; Hathaway & McKinley, 1943) and the MMPI-2 (Butcher, Graham, Ben-Porath, Tellegen, & Dahlstrom, 2001) were among the measures most commonly used in PPS evaluations and research. This study focuses on the newest version of the test, the MMPI-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008/2011) as a predictor of outcomes for spine surgery candidates. Using a sample of 172 men and 210 women who underwent a PPS, we examined the ability of MMPI-2-RF scale scores to predict early surgical outcomes independent of other presurgical risk factors identified by other means, as well as patients' presurgical expectations. MMPI-2-RF results accounted for up to 11% of additional variance in measures of early postoperative functioning. MMPI-2-RF scales that assess for emotional/internalizing problems, specifically Demoralization, measures of somatoform dysfunction, and interpersonal problems contributed most to the prediction of diminished outcome. 2015 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Effect of preoperative angina pectoris on cardiac outcomes in patients with previous myocardial infarction undergoing major noncardiac surgery (data from ACS-NSQIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ambarish; Sood, Akshay; Sammon, Jesse D; Abdollah, Firas; Gupta, Ena; Golwala, Harsh; Bardia, Amit; Kibel, Adam S; Menon, Mani; Trinh, Quoc-Dien

    2015-04-15

    The impact of preoperative stable angina pectoris on postoperative cardiovascular outcomes in patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI) who underwent major noncardiac surgery is not well studied. We studied patients with previous MI who underwent elective major noncardiac surgeries within the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2005 to 2011). Primary outcome was occurrence of an adverse cardiac event (MI and/or cardiac arrest). Multivariable logistic regression models evaluated the impact of stable angina on outcomes. Of 1,568 patients (median age 70 years; 35% women) with previous MI who underwent major noncardiac surgery, 5.5% had postoperative MI and/or cardiac arrest. Patients with history of preoperative angina had significantly greater incidence of primary outcome compared to those without anginal symptoms (8.4% vs 5%, p = 0.035). In secondary outcomes, reintervention rates (22.5% vs 11%, p angina. In multivariable analyses, preoperative angina was a significant predictor for postoperative MI (odds ratio 2.49 [1.20 to 5.58]) and reintervention (odds ratio 2.40 [1.44 to 3.82]). In conclusion, our study indicates that preoperative angina is an independent predictor for adverse outcomes in patients with previous MI who underwent major noncardiac surgery, and cautions against overreliance on predictive tools, for example, the Revised Cardiac Risk Index, in these patients, which does not treat stable angina and previous MI as independent risk factors during risk prognostication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of motor-evoked potential monitoring in conjunction with temporary clipping of spinal nerve roots in posterior thoracic spine tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleraky, Mohammed A; Setzer, Matthias; Papanastassiou, Ioannis D; Baaj, Ali A; Tran, Nam D; Katsares, Kiesha M; Vrionis, Frank D

    2010-05-01

    The vascular supply of the thoracic spinal cord depends on the thoracolumbar segmental arteries. Because of the small size and ventral course of these arteries in relation to the dorsal root ganglion and ventral root, they cannot be reliably identified during surgery by anatomic or morphologic criteria. Sacrificing them will most likely result in paraplegia. The goal of this study was to evaluate a novel method of intraoperative testing of a nerve root's contribution to the blood supply of the thoracic spinal cord. This is a clinical retrospective study of 49 patients diagnosed with thoracic spine tumors. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with motor-evoked potential (MEP) and somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring was performed; additionally, postoperative clinical evaluation was done and reported in all cases. All cases were monitored by SSEP and MEPs. The nerve root to be sacrificed was temporarily clipped using standard aneurysm clips, and SSEP/MEP were assessed before and after clipping. Four nerve roots were sacrificed in four cases, three nerve roots in eight cases, and two nerve roots in 22 cases. Nerve roots were sacrificed bilaterally in 12 cases. Most patients (47/49) had no changes in MEP/SSEP and had no neurological deficit postoperatively. One case of a spinal sarcoma demonstrated changes in MEP after temporary clipping of the left T11 nerve root. The nerve was not sacrificed, and the patient was neurologically intact after surgery. In another case of a sarcoma, MEPs changed in the lower limbs after ligation of left T9 nerve root. It was felt that it was a global event because of anesthesia. Postoperatively, the patient had complete paraplegia but recovered almost completely after 6 months. Temporary nerve root clipping combined with MEP and SSEP monitoring may enhance the impact of neuromonitoring in the intraoperative management of patients with thoracic spine tumors and favorably influence neurological outcome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier

  9. WE-AB-BRA-01: 3D-2D Image Registration for Target Localization in Spine Surgery: Comparison of Similarity Metrics Against Robustness to Content Mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M; Siewerdsen, J H; Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S; Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G; Lo, S F; Wolinsky, J P; Gokaslan, Z L; Aygun, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In image-guided spine surgery, mapping 3D preoperative images to 2D intraoperative images via 3D-2D registration can provide valuable assistance in target localization. However, the presence of surgical instrumentation, hardware implants, and soft-tissue resection/displacement causes mismatches in image content, confounding existing registration methods. Manual/semi-automatic methods to mask such extraneous content is time consuming, user-dependent, error prone, and disruptive to clinical workflow. We developed and evaluated 2 novel similarity metrics within a robust registration framework to overcome such challenges in target localization. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study in 19 spine surgery patients included 19 preoperative 3D CT images and 50 intraoperative mobile radiographs in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine regions. A neuroradiologist provided truth definition of vertebral positions in CT and radiography. 3D-2D registration was performed using the CMA-ES optimizer with 4 gradient-based image similarity metrics: (1) gradient information (GI); (2) gradient correlation (GC); (3) a novel variant referred to as gradient orientation (GO); and (4) a second variant referred to as truncated gradient correlation (TGC). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) of the vertebral levels. Results: Conventional similarity metrics were susceptible to gross registration error and failure modes associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation: for GI, the median PDE and interquartile range was 33.0±43.6 mm; similarly for GC, PDE = 23.0±92.6 mm respectively. The robust metrics GO and TGC, on the other hand, demonstrated major improvement in PDE (7.6 ±9.4 mm and 8.1± 18.1 mm, respectively) and elimination of gross failure modes. Conclusion: The proposed GO and TGC similarity measures improve registration accuracy and robustness to gross failure in the presence of strong image content mismatch. Such

  10. WE-AB-BRA-01: 3D-2D Image Registration for Target Localization in Spine Surgery: Comparison of Similarity Metrics Against Robustness to Content Mismatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M; Siewerdsen, J H [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Vogt, S; Kleinszig, G [Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen, DE (Germany); Lo, S F; Wolinsky, J P; Gokaslan, Z L [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States); Aygun, N [Department of Raiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In image-guided spine surgery, mapping 3D preoperative images to 2D intraoperative images via 3D-2D registration can provide valuable assistance in target localization. However, the presence of surgical instrumentation, hardware implants, and soft-tissue resection/displacement causes mismatches in image content, confounding existing registration methods. Manual/semi-automatic methods to mask such extraneous content is time consuming, user-dependent, error prone, and disruptive to clinical workflow. We developed and evaluated 2 novel similarity metrics within a robust registration framework to overcome such challenges in target localization. Methods: An IRB-approved retrospective study in 19 spine surgery patients included 19 preoperative 3D CT images and 50 intraoperative mobile radiographs in cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine regions. A neuroradiologist provided truth definition of vertebral positions in CT and radiography. 3D-2D registration was performed using the CMA-ES optimizer with 4 gradient-based image similarity metrics: (1) gradient information (GI); (2) gradient correlation (GC); (3) a novel variant referred to as gradient orientation (GO); and (4) a second variant referred to as truncated gradient correlation (TGC). Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) of the vertebral levels. Results: Conventional similarity metrics were susceptible to gross registration error and failure modes associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation: for GI, the median PDE and interquartile range was 33.0±43.6 mm; similarly for GC, PDE = 23.0±92.6 mm respectively. The robust metrics GO and TGC, on the other hand, demonstrated major improvement in PDE (7.6 ±9.4 mm and 8.1± 18.1 mm, respectively) and elimination of gross failure modes. Conclusion: The proposed GO and TGC similarity measures improve registration accuracy and robustness to gross failure in the presence of strong image content mismatch. Such

  11. Cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials during spine surgery in patients with neuromuscular and idiopathic scoliosis under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, H.; Lipfert, P.; Meier, S.; Jetzek-Zader, M.; Krauspe, R.; Stevens, M. F.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraoperative monitoring of the spinal cord via cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEP) is a routine during spinal surgery. However, especially in neuromuscular scoliosis, the reliability of cortical SSEP has been questioned. Therefore, we compared the feasibility of cortical

  12. Metastatic tumor of thoracic and lumbar spine: prospective study comparing the surgery and radiotherapy vs external immobilization with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Grasselli, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Bone metastases at the thoracic and lumbar segment of the spine are usually presented with painful sensation and medullar compression. The treatment is based on the clinical and neurological conditions of the patient and the degree of tumor invasion. In the present study, 32 patients with spinal metastasis of thoracic and lumbar segment were prospectively analyzed. These patients were treated by decompression and internal stabilization followed by radiotherapy or irradiation with external immobilization. The election of the groups was in accordance with the tumor radiotherapy sensitivity, clinical conditions, spinal stability, medullar or nerve compression and patient's decision. The Frankel scale and pain visual test were applied at the moment of diagnosis and after 1 and 6 months. The surgical group had better results with preserving the ambulation longer and significant reduction of pain.(author)

  13. Enhanced Morbidity of Pectoralis Major Myocutaneous Flap Used for Salvage after Previously Failed Oncological Treatment and Unsuccessful Reconstructive Head and Neck Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Maria Ribeiro Salles Vanni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The reconstruction of complex cervicofacial defects arising from surgical treatment for cancer is a real challenge for head and neck surgeons, especially in salvage reconstruction surgery and/or failed previous reconstruction. The pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMF has been widely used in these specific situations due to its reliability and low rate of failure or complications. Objectives. Identify factors that determine complications and influence the final outcome of the reconstructions with PMMF in salvage cancer surgery or in salvage reconstruction. Methods. A cross-sectional study design was used to evaluate a sample including 17 surgical patients treated over a period of ten years that met the inclusion criteria. Results. Reconstruction was successful in 13 cases (76.5%, with two cases of partial flap loss and no case of total loss. Complications occurred in 13 cases (76.5% and were specifically related to the flap in nine instances (52.9%. An association was identified between the development of major complications and reconstruction of the hypopharynx (=0.013 as well as in patients submitted to surgery in association with radiation therapy as a previous cancer treatment (=0.002. The former condition is also associated with major reconstruction failure (=0.018. An even lower incidence of major complications was noted in patients under the age of 53 (=0.044. Conclusion. Older patients, with hypopharyngeal defects and submitted to previous surgery plus radiation therapy, presented a higher risk of complications and reconstruction failure with PMMF.

  14. Outcome of the use of tension-free vaginal tape in women with mixed urinary incontinence, previous failed surgery, or low valsalva pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hady, El-Said; Constantine, Glyn

    2005-02-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of the use of tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women with mixed incontinence, previous failed incontinence surgery or low valsalva leak point pressure (VLPP). Six hundred and fifty-eight women with SUI underwent the TVT procedure. These included women with mixed stress and urge incontinence (n=128), previous surgery for SUI (n=118), low VLPP (n=80), and those over 70 years old (n=68). The procedure was carried out under spinal anesthetic and operative and immediate postoperative data was collected for all women. Six-month follow-up data was available on 454 women, with the first 300 women completing a quality of life (QOL) questionnaire before and after surgery. The overall subjective cure rate at 6 months was 91%, with 8% of women reporting significant (>50%) improvement in their symptoms. Subgroups with a body mass index > 30, age > 70 years, coexisting instability, previous failed surgery, and low VLPP showed cure rates of 81-89%. QOL improvements for all groups were highly significant. Significant complications included voiding difficulties in 29 women (4.4%), retropubic hematomas in four (0.6%), and thromboembolic episodes in three (0.5%). The simplicity and high efficacy of the TVT makes it the first choice for the treatment of women with SUI, including those with more complex problems or coexisting risk factors.

  15. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes according to surgery to conception interval and gestational weight gain in women with previous gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentebjerg, Louise Laage; Andersen, Lise Lotte Torvin; Renault, Kristina; Støving, René Klinkby; Jensen, Dorte Møller

    2017-05-01

    To compare perinatal and pregnancy outcomes including adherence to the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) recommendations for gestational weight gain (GWG) in pregnant women with conception surgery. Women in the late group had a significantly higher risk of requiring CS or receiving intravenous iron supplementation compared to the early group (57% versus 30%, p = 0.03 and 29% versus 7%, p = 0.02, respectively). Early conception was not significantly associated with insufficient GWG, preterm delivery or birthweight. Among 54 women with information on GWG, only 13 (24%) had an appropriate GWG. The majority of pregnant women with gastric bypass did not fulfill guidelines for GWG; however, this study could not support the recommendation to postpone pregnancy.

  16. Multiple-hook fixation in revision spinal deformity surgery for patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass: technical note and preliminary outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wood, Kirkham B

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A previous multilevel fusion mass encountered during revision spinal deformity surgery may obscure anatomical landmarks, making instrumentation unworkable or incurring substantial blood loss and operative time. This study introduced a surgical technique of multiple-hook fixation for fixating previous multilevel fusion masses in revision spinal deformity surgeries and then evaluated its outcomes. METHODS Patients with a previous multilevel fusion mass who underwent revision corrective surgery down to the lumbosacral junction were retrospectively studied. Multiple hooks were used to fixate the fusion mass and linked to distal pedicle screws in the lumbosacral-pelvic complex. Radiological and clinical outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS The charts of 8 consecutive patients with spinal deformity were retrospectively reviewed (7 women, 1 man; mean age 56 years). The primary diagnoses included flat-back deformity (6 cases), thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis (1 case), and lumbar spondylosis secondary to a previous scoliosis fusion (1 case). The mean follow-up duration was 30.1 months. Operations were performed at T3/4-ilium (4 cases), T7-ilium (1 case), T6-S1 (1 case), T12-S1 (1 case), and T9-L5 (1 case). Of 8 patients, 7 had sagittal imbalance preoperatively, and their mean C-7 plumb line improved from 10.8 ± 2.9 cm preoperatively to 5.3 ± 3.6 cm at final follow-up (p = 0.003). The mean lumbar lordosis of these patients at final follow-up was significantly greater than that preoperatively (35.2° ± 12.6° vs 16.8° ± 11.8°, respectively; p = 0.005). Two perioperative complications included osteotomy-related leg weakness in 1 patient and a stitch abscess in another. CONCLUSIONS The multiple-hook technique provides a viable alternative option for fixating a previous multilevel fusion mass in revision spinal deformity surgery.

  17. Morbidity, mortality, and health care costs for patients undergoing spine surgery following the ACGME resident duty-hour reform: Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ranjith; Thomas, Steven; Hazzard, Matthew A; Lokhnygina, Yuliya V; Friedman, Allan H; Gottfried, Oren N; Isaacs, Robert E; Boakye, Maxwell; Patil, Chirag G; Bagley, Carlos A; Haglund, Michael M; Lad, Shivanand P

    2014-10-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented resident duty-hour restrictions on July 1, 2003, in concern for patient and resident safety. Whereas studies have shown that duty-hour restrictions have increased resident quality of life, there have been mixed results with respect to patient outcomes. In this study, the authors have evaluated the effect of duty-hour restrictions on morbidity, mortality, length of stay (LOS), and charges in patients who underwent spine surgery. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to evaluate the effect of duty-hour restrictions on complications, mortality, LOS, and charges by comparing the prereform (2000-2002) and postreform (2005-2008) periods. Outcomes were compared between nonteaching and teaching hospitals using a difference-in-differences (DID) method. Results A total of 693,058 patients were included in the study. The overall complication rate was 8.6%, with patients in the postreform era having a significantly higher rate than those in the pre-duty-hour restriction era (8.7% vs. 8.4%, p duty-hour reform era. The DID analysis to compare the magnitude in change between teaching and nonteaching institutions revealed that teaching institutions to had a significantly greater increase in complications during the postreform era (p = 0.0002). The overall mortality rate was 0.37%, with no significant difference between the pre- and post-duty-hour eras (0.39% vs. 0.36%, p = 0.12). However, the mortality rate significantly decreased in nonteaching hospitals in the postreform era (0.30% vs. 0.23%, p = 0.0008), while remaining the same in teaching institutions (0.46% vs. 0.46%, p = 0.75). The DID analysis to compare the changes in mortality between groups revealed that the difference between the effects approached significance (p = 0.069). The mean LOS for all patients was 4.2 days, with hospital stay decreasing in nonteaching hospitals (3.7 vs. 3.5 days, p duty-hour reform era, increasing from $40,000 in

  18. The effect of bevacizumab for anterior segment neovascularization after silicone oil removal in eyes with previous vitreoretinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, C; Ozdamar, Y

    2010-07-01

    To report the outcomes of the use of intracameral bevacizumab for iris neovascularization occurring after silicone oil (SO) removal in eyes undergoing vitreoretinal surgery (VRS). This study included 12 eyes that had iris neovascularization after SO removal. The clinical outcomes of 12 eyes after intravitreal bevacizumab injection were reviewed. There were eight men and four women with an average age of 41.58+/-12.68 years. All eyes had VRS for various vitreoretinal diseases. After the mean follow-up period of 9.7+/-5.3 months, SO removal was performed. Then, the patients were followed for more than 2 months and detailed retinal examinations and intraocular pressure (IOP) were normal during this period, but rubeosis iridis (RI) developed. RI was treated with 1 dose of 1.25 mg bevacizumab into the anterior chamber. After a mean follow-up period of 4.8+/-2.2 months, the regression of iris neovacularization was detected and IOP was below 21 mmHg in all eyes. Anterior segment neovascularization (ASNV) may develop through various mechanisms in patients with VRS after SO removal, and anterior chamber injection of bevacizumab may lead to regression of ASNV.

  19. Readability of Spine-Related Patient Education Materials From Leading Orthopedic Academic Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Justine H; Yi, Paul H

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional analysis of online spine-related patient education materials from leading academic centers. To assess the readability levels of spine surgery-related patient education materials available on the websites of academic orthopedic surgery departments. The Internet is becoming an increasingly popular resource for patient education. Yet many previous studies have found that Internet-based orthopedic-related patient education materials from subspecialty societies are written at a level too difficult for the average American; however, no prior study has assessed the readability of spine surgery-related patient educational materials from leading academic centers. All spine surgery-related articles from the online patient education libraries of the top five US News & World Report-ranked orthopedic institutions were assessed for readability using the Flesch-Kincaid (FK) readability test. Mean readability levels of articles amongst the five academic institutions and articles were compared. We also determined the number of articles with readability levels at or below the recommended sixth- or eight-grade levels. Intraobserver and interobserver reliability of readability assessment were assessed. A total of 122 articles were reviewed. The mean overall FK grade level was 11.4; the difference in mean FK grade level between each department varied significantly (range, 9.3-13.4; P Online patient education materials related to spine from academic orthopedic centers are written at a level too high for the average patient, consistent with spine surgery-related patient education materials provided by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and spine subspecialty societies. This study highlights the potential difficulties patients might have in reading and comprehending the information in publicly available education materials related to spine. N/A.

  20. Postoperative analgesia after major spine surgery: patient-controlled epidural analgesia versus patient-controlled intravenous analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Michael R; Putzier, Michael; Kügler, Bjoern; Tohtz, Stephan; Voigt, Kristina; Schink, Tania; Kox, Wolfgang J; Spies, Claudia; Volk, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Spinal fusion surgery causes severe postoperative pain, hampering reconvalescense. We investigated the efficacy of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) in a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled comparison with patient-controlled IV analgesia (PCIA). After lumbar anterior-posterior fusion receiving an epidural catheter intraoperatively, 72 patients were given either PCEA (ropivacaine 0.125% and sufentanil 1.0 microg/mL at 14 mL/h; bolus: 5 mL; lockout time: 15 min) and IV placebo or PCIA (morphine 2.0 mg/mL; bolus: 3 mg; lockout time: 15 min) and epidural placebo. Pain levels (visual analog scale 0-10), functional capabilities (turning in bed, standing, and walking), analgesic consumption, and side effects were evaluated until 72 h after surgery. Fourteen patients were excluded by predetermined criteria, leaving 58 patients for data analysis. Pain levels at rest and during mobilization were significantly lower in the PCEA when compared with that in the PCIA group throughout the study period (P turn in bed was achieved earlier in the PCEA group (P Patients in the PCEA group were significantly more satisfied with pain therapy (P patient satisfaction when compared with PCIA after spinal fusion surgery.

  1. Mobile C-arm cone-beam CT for guidance of spine surgery: Image quality, radiation dose, and integration with interventional guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, S.; Nithiananthan, S.; Mirota, D. J.; Uneri, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Schmidgunst, C.; Kleinszig, G.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (United States); Siemens Healthcare XP Division, Erlangen (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21239 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 and Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: A flat-panel detector based mobile isocentric C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been developed to allow intraoperative 3D imaging with sub-millimeter spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Image quality and radiation dose were evaluated in spinal surgery, commonly relying on lower-performance image intensifier based mobile C-arms. Scan protocols were developed for task-specific imaging at minimum dose, in-room exposure was evaluated, and integration of the imaging system with a surgical guidance system was demonstrated in preclinical studies of minimally invasive spine surgery. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed as a function of kilovolt (peak) (80-120 kVp) and milliampere second using thoracic and lumbar spine dosimetry phantoms. In-room radiation exposure was measured throughout the operating room for various CBCT scan protocols. Image quality was assessed using tissue-equivalent inserts in chest and abdomen phantoms to evaluate bone and soft-tissue contrast-to-noise ratio as a function of dose, and task-specific protocols (i.e., visualization of bone or soft-tissues) were defined. Results were applied in preclinical studies using a cadaveric torso simulating minimally invasive, transpedicular surgery. Results: Task-specific CBCT protocols identified include: thoracic bone visualization (100 kVp; 60 mAs; 1.8 mGy); lumbar bone visualization (100 kVp; 130 mAs; 3.2 mGy); thoracic soft-tissue visualization (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 4.3 mGy); and lumbar soft-tissue visualization (120 kVp; 460 mAs; 10.6 mGy) - each at (0.3 x 0.3 x 0.9 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Alternative lower-dose, lower-resolution soft-tissue visualization protocols were identified (100 kVp; 230 mAs; 5.1 mGy) for the lumbar region at (0.3 x 0.3 x 1.5 mm{sup 3}) voxel size. Half-scan orbit of the C-arm (x-ray tube traversing under the table) was dosimetrically advantageous (prepatient attenuation) with a nonuniform dose distribution ({approx}2 x higher at the entrance side than at isocenter

  2. There is a Need to Request Cervical Spine Routine Radiographs for Patients with Down's Syndrome Before Carrying out Otorhinolaryngologic Surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpak, Andrea Marçal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Down's Syndrome (DS is a genetic syndrome characterized by several changes and the Atlanto-axial Instability is critical for the otorhinolaryngologist. Objective: Check the prevalence of atlanto-axial instability in patients with Down's Syndrome who undergo service follow-up in the Clinical Hospital of the UFPR [Federal University of Paraná] and review the need to carry out routine cervical radiography in the patients with prescription to otorhinolaryngologic surgery. Method: Prospective study of patients with the syndrome who undergo CH/UFPR's follow up, through questionnaire and cervical X-ray. Results: No case of IAA was found in the population studied. Discussion: we consider there's a high frequency of AAI in patients with DS, and for all patients who will take part in sports activities that involve motion of the region, or who are submitted to surgeries, an investigation with clinical and radiological exam is recommended. However, as the incidence has many variable findings we question the real validity of this research for all patients, even the asymptomatic ones. Conclusion: In spite of a DS's peculiar change, there are no evidences of the need to research the AAI as a routine in asymptomatic patients and the symptomatology should guide the investigation. But more studies are required to evaluate the importance of the radiological exams in such cases.

  3. Interventional spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  4. 3D–2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, T; Ketcha, M D; Siewerdsen, J H; Uneri, A; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P

    2016-01-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D–2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  <  6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1–2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved

  5. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric

  6. Trashepatic left gastric vein embolization in the treatment of recurrent hemorrhaging in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Fernandes Saad

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Non-derivative surgical techniques are the treatment of choice for the control of upper digestive tract hemorrhages after schistosomotic portal hypertension. However, recurrent hemorrhaging due to gastroesophagic varices is frequent. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of treatment based on embolization of the left gastric vein to control the reoccurrence of hemorrhages caused by gastroesophagic varices in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to non-derivative surgery. METHODS: Rates of reoccurrence of hemorrhages and the qualitative and quantitative reduction of gastroesophagic varices in patients undergoing transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein between December 1999 and January 2009 were studied based on medical charts and follow-up reports. RESULTS: Seven patients with a mean age of 39.3 years underwent percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein. The mean time between azigoportal disconnections employed in combination with splenectomy and the percutaneous approach was 8.4 ± 7.3 years, and the number of episodes of digestive hemorrhaging ranged from 1 to 7 years. No episodes of reoccurrence of hemorrhaging were found during a follow-up period which ranged from 6 months to 7 years. Endoscopic postembolization studies revealed reductions in gastroesophagic varices in all patients compared to preembolization endoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Percutaneous transhepatic embolization of the left gastric vein in patients with schistosomiasis previously submitted to surgery resulted in a decrease in gastroesophagic varices and was shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage reoccurrence.

  7. An analysis from the Quality Outcomes Database, Part 1. Disability, quality of life, and pain outcomes following lumbar spine surgery: predicting likely individual patient outcomes for shared decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Matthew J; Bydon, Mohamad; Archer, Kristin R; Devin, Clinton J; Chotai, Silky; Parker, Scott L; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E; Speroff, Theodore; Dittus, Robert S; Philips, Sharon E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Foley, Kevin T; Asher, Anthony L

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Quality and outcomes registry platforms lie at the center of many emerging evidence-driven reform models. Specifically, clinical registry data are progressively informing health care decision-making. In this analysis, the authors used data from a national prospective outcomes registry (the Quality Outcomes Database) to develop a predictive model for 12-month postoperative pain, disability, and quality of life (QOL) in patients undergoing elective lumbar spine surgery. METHODS Included in this analysis were 7618 patients who had completed 12 months of follow-up. The authors prospectively assessed baseline and 12-month patient-reported outcomes (PROs) via telephone interviews. The PROs assessed were those ascertained using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, and numeric rating scale (NRS) for back pain (BP) and leg pain (LP). Variables analyzed for the predictive model included age, gender, body mass index, race, education level, history of prior surgery, smoking status, comorbid conditions, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, symptom duration, indication for surgery, number of levels surgically treated, history of fusion surgery, surgical approach, receipt of workers' compensation, liability insurance, insurance status, and ambulatory ability. To create a predictive model, each 12-month PRO was treated as an ordinal dependent variable and a separate proportional-odds ordinal logistic regression model was fitted for each PRO. RESULTS There was a significant improvement in all PROs (p disability, QOL, and pain outcomes following lumbar spine surgery were employment status, baseline NRS-BP scores, psychological distress, baseline ODI scores, level of education, workers' compensation status, symptom duration, race, baseline NRS-LP scores, ASA score, age, predominant symptom, smoking status, and insurance status. The prediction discrimination of the 4 separate novel predictive models was good, with a c-index of 0.69 for ODI, 0.69 for EQ-5

  8. The impact of a cervical spine diagnosis on the careers of National Football League athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Lynch, T Sean; Gibbs, Daniel B; Chow, Ian; LaBelle, Mark W; Patel, Alpesh A; Savage, Jason W; Nuber, Gordon W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2014-05-20

    Cohort study. To determine the effect of cervical spine pathology on athletes entering the National Football League. The association of symptomatic cervical spine pathology with American football athletes has been described; however, it is unknown how preexisting cervical spine pathology affects career performance of a National Football League player. The medical evaluations and imaging reports of American football athletes from 2003 to 2011 during the combine were evaluated. Athletes with a cervical spine diagnosis were matched to controls and career statistics were compiled. Of a total of 2965 evaluated athletes, 143 players met the inclusion criteria. Athletes who attended the National Football League combine without a cervical spine diagnosis were more likely to be drafted than those with a diagnosis (P = 0.001). Players with a cervical spine diagnosis had a decreased total games played (P = 0.01). There was no difference in the number of games started (P = 0.08) or performance score (P = 0.38). In 10 athletes with a sagittal canal diameter of less than 10 mm, there was no difference in years, games played, games started, or performance score (P > 0.24). No neurological injury occurred during their careers. In 7 players who were drafted with a history of cervical spine surgery (4 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, 2 foraminotomy, and 1 suboccipital craniectomy with a C1 laminectomy), there was no difference in career longevity or performance when compared with matched controls. This study suggests that athletes with preexisting cervical spine pathology were less likely to be drafted than controls. Players with preexisting cervical spine pathology demonstrated a shorter career than those without; however, statistically based performance and numbers of games started were not different. Players with cervical spinal stenosis and those with a history of previous surgery demonstrated no difference in performance-based outcomes and no reports of neurological

  9. Relationship between admission blood glucose level and prognosis in elderly patients without previously known diabetes who undergo emergency non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinling; He, Lei; Wang, Xiujie; Gao, Meng; Zhao, Yuexiang; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Elevated blood glucose levels on admission are important as a marker for adverse events in patients who undergo surgery. This study aims to evaluate the relationship between admission glucose level and adverse outcome during the 30-day follow-up period in elderly patients without previously known diabetes who undergo emergency non-cardiac surgery. The primary and secondary end points were all-cause and major adverse cardiac event (MACE) mortalities, respectively, during the 30-day postoperative follow-up period. Higher 30-day all-cause (24.1 %) and MACE (13.7 %) mortalities were observed in patients with an admission glucose ≥ 11.1 mmol/L than in patients with admission glucose blood glucose level is an independent predictor for the development of the 30-day all-cause mortality [odds ratio (OR), 1.91; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.746-2.082; p blood glucose level ≥ 11.1 mmol/L has worse event-free survival than an admission blood glucose level <11.1 mmol/L.

  10. Chondrosarcoma of the Mobile Spine and Sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Stuckey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of bone. This family of tumors can be primary malignant tumors or a secondary malignant transformation of an underlying benign cartilage tumor. Pain is often the initial presenting complaint when chondrosarcoma involves the spine. In the mobile spine, chondrosarcoma commonly presents within the vertebral body and shows a predilection for the thoracic spine. Due to the resistance of chondrosarcoma to both radiation and chemotherapy, treatment is focused on surgery. With en bloc excision of chondrosarcoma of the mobile spine and sacrum patients can have local recurrence rates as low as 20%.

  11. Cervical spine collar clearance in the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient: a systematic review and practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayur B; Humble, Stephen S; Cullinane, Daniel C; Day, Matthew A; Jawa, Randeep S; Devin, Clinton J; Delozier, Margaret S; Smith, Lou M; Smith, Miya A; Capella, Jeannette M; Long, Andrea M; Cheng, Joseph S; Leath, Taylor C; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Haut, Elliott R; Como, John J

    2015-02-01

    With the use of the framework advocated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group, our aims were to perform a systematic review and to develop evidence-based recommendations that may be used to answer the following PICO [Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcomes] question:In the obtunded adult blunt trauma patient, should cervical collar removal be performed after a negative high-quality cervical spine (C-spine) computed tomography (CT) result alone or after a negative high-quality C-spine CT result combined with adjunct imaging, to reduce peri-clearance events, such as new neurologic change, unstable C-spine injury, stable C-spine injury, need for post-clearance imaging, false-negative CT imaging result on re-review, pressure ulcers, and time to cervical collar clearance? Our protocol was registered with the PROSPERO international prospective register of systematic reviews on August 23, 2013 (REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42013005461). Eligibility criteria consisted of adult blunt trauma patients 16 years or older, who underwent C-spine CT with axial thickness of less than 3 mm and who were obtunded using any definition.Quantitative synthesis via meta-analysis was not possible because of pre-post, partial-cohort, quasi-experimental study design limitations and the consequential incomplete diagnostic accuracy data. Of five articles with a total follow-up of 1,017 included subjects, none reported new neurologic changes (paraplegia or quadriplegia) after cervical collar removal. There is a worst-case 9% (161 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of stable injuries and a 91% negative predictive value of no injury, after coupling a negative high-quality C-spine CT result with 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging, upright x-rays, flexion-extension CT, and/or clinical follow-up. Similarly, there is a best-case 0% (0 of 1,718 subjects in 11 studies) cumulative literature incidence of unstable

  12. Prehospital spine immobilization/spinal motion restriction in penetrating trauma: A practice management guideline from the Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma (EAST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velopulos, Catherine G; Shihab, Hasan M; Lottenberg, Lawrence; Feinman, Marcie; Raja, Ali; Salomone, Jeffrey; Haut, Elliott R

    2018-05-01

    Spine immobilization in trauma has remained an integral part of most emergency medical services protocols despite a lack of evidence for efficacy and concern for associated complications, especially in penetrating trauma patients. We reviewed the published evidence on the topic of prehospital spine immobilization or spinal motion restriction in adult patients with penetrating trauma to structure a practice management guideline. We conducted a Cochrane style systematic review and meta-analysis and applied Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology to construct recommendations. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to evaluate the literature on the critical outcomes of mortality, neurologic deficit, and potentially reversible neurologic deficit. A total of 24 studies met inclusion criteria, with qualitative review conducted for all studies. We used five studies for the quantitative review (meta-analysis). No study showed benefit to spine immobilization with regard to mortality and neurologic injury, even for patients with direct neck injury. Increased mortality was associated with spine immobilization, with risk ratio [RR], 2.4 (confidence interval [CI], 1.07-5.41). The rate of neurologic injury or potentially reversible injury was very low, ranging from 0.002 to 0.076 and 0.00034 to 0.055, with no statistically significant difference for neurologic deficit or potentially reversible deficit, RR, 4.16 (CI, 0.56-30.89), and RR, 1.19 (CI, 0.83-1.70), although the point estimates favored no immobilization. Spine immobilization in penetrating trauma is associated with increased mortality and has not been shown to have a beneficial effect on mitigating neurologic deficits, even potentially reversible neurologic deficits. We recommend that spine immobilization not be used routinely for adult patients with penetrating trauma. Systematic review with meta-analysis study, level III.

  13. Audit of blood transfusion practice during anaesthesia for spine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Blood loss during spine surgery is often considerable, necessitating blood transfusion. The elective nature and other peculiarities of most spine surgeries, however, make them amenable to several blood conservation techniques, such that reduction in allogeneic blood transfusion is considered high priority in ...

  14. Late toxicity after conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Impact of previous surgery for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odrazka, K.; Dolezel, M.; Vanasek, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to retrospectively compare late toxicity of conventional-dose three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and high-dose intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. A total of 340 patients with T1-3 prostate cancer were treated with 3D-CRT (n=228) and IMRT (n=112). The median follow-up time was 5.9 years and 3.0 years, respectively. The prescription dose was 70 Gy for 3D-CRT and 78 Gy for IMRT. Late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were graded according to the Fox Chase modification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. There was no difference between 3D-CRT and IMRT in the incidence of GI and GU toxicity at 3 years. On multivariate analysis, transurethral resection of prostate/open transvesical prostatectomy (TURP/TVPE) for benign prostatic hyperplasia, carried out before radiotherapy, significantly increased the risk of Grade ≥2 GU toxicity (risk ratio 1.88). Among patients who experienced TURP/TVPE, the 5-year actuarial likelihood of Grade 2-3 urinary incontinence was 23%, compared with 9% for those without prostate surgery (P=0.01). Tolerance of 3D-CRT and IMRT was similar, despite the use of high radiation dose with IMRT. Previous TURP/TVPE increased the risk of GU toxicity. (author)

  15. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics

  16. Imaging of low-grade bone infection with a technetium-99m labelled monoclonal anti-NCA-90 Fab' fragment in patients with previous joint surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivaneeviae, V.; Sandrock, D.; Munz, D.L. [Clinic for Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Charite, Humboldt University of Berlin (Germany); Perka, C.; Hasart, O. [Orthopaedic Clinic, University Hospital Charite, Humboldt University of Berlin (Germany)

    2002-04-01

    or 7, infection was verified and scintigraphic outcome was accordingly true positive, while the remaining patient was true negative. In conclusion, MN3 Fab' scintigraphy proved to be highly sensitive but not specific in diagnosing low-grade infections of the hip and knee regions in patients with previous joint surgery. The method seems reliable in excluding but not in proving the presence of infection. MN3 Fab' scintigraphy should not be applied in patients with Girdlestone situations. Assessment of infection using the Zimmerli score was more reliable than MN3 Fab' scintigraphy in this group of patients without rheumatoid arthritis as the underlying disease. Considering results from the literature concerning leucocyte scintigraphy, MN3 Fab' scintigraphy may be clinically useful in evaluating low-grade bone infection in THA and TKA patients with Zimmerli scores above 5 and concomitant rheumatoid arthritis or other inflammatory diseases. (orig.)

  17. Spine surgeon's kinematics during discectomy, part II: operating table height and visualization methods, including microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-05-01

    Surgeon spine angle during surgery was studied ergonomically and the kinematics of the surgeon's spine was related with musculoskeletal fatigue and pain. Spine angles varied depending on operation table height and visualization method, and in a previous paper we showed that the use of a loupe and a table height at the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum are optimal for reducing musculoskeletal loading. However, no studies have previously included a microscope as a possible visualization method. The objective of this study is to assess differences in surgeon spine angles depending on operating table height and visualization method, including microscope. We enrolled 18 experienced spine surgeons for this study, who each performed a discectomy using a spine surgery simulator. Three different methods were used to visualize the surgical field (naked eye, loupe, microscope) and three different operating table heights (anterior superior iliac spine, umbilicus, the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum) were studied. Whole spine angles were compared for three different views during the discectomy simulation: midline, ipsilateral, and contralateral. A 16-camera optoelectronic motion analysis system was used, and 16 markers were placed from the head to the pelvis. Lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, cervical lordosis, and occipital angle were compared between the different operating table heights and visualization methods as well as a natural standing position. Whole spine angles differed significantly depending on visualization method. All parameters were closer to natural standing values when discectomy was performed with a microscope, and there were no differences between the naked eye and the loupe. Whole spine angles were also found to differ from the natural standing position depending on operating table height, and became closer to natural standing position values as the operating table height increased, independent of the visualization method

  18. SPECT/CT for imaging of the spine and pelvis in clinical routine: a physician's perspective of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting with a focus on trauma surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheyerer, Max J.; Zimmermann, Stefan M.; Osterhoff, Georg; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clement M.L. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Zuerich (Switzerland); Pietsch, Carsten [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Medical Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Injuries of the axial skeleton are an important field of work within orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. Most lesions following trauma may be diagnosed by means of conventional plain radiography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. However, for some aspects SPECT/ CT can be helpful even in a trauma setting. In particular, the combination of highly sensitive but nonspecific scintigraphy with nonsensitive but highly specific computed tomography makes it particularly useful in anatomically complex regions such as the pelvis and spine. From a trauma surgeon's point of view, the four main indications for nuclear medicine imaging are the detection of (occult) fractures, and the imaging of inflammatory bone and joint diseases, chronic diseases and postoperative complications such as instability of instrumentation or implants. The aim of the present review was to give an overview of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting. (orig.)

  19. Impact of Cervical Spine Deformity on Preoperative Disease Severity and Postoperative Outcomes Following Fusion Surgery for Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: Sub-analysis of AOSpine North America and International Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, So; Nouri, Aria; Wu, Dongjin; Nori, Satoshi; Tetreault, Lindsay; Fehlings, Michael G

    2018-02-15

    Sub-analysis of the prospective AOSpine CSM North America and International studies. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of cervical spine deformity on pre- and postoperative outcomes in fusion surgeries for degenerative cervical myelopathy. The associations between cervical alignment and patient outcomes have been reported but are not well established in a myelopathy cohort. The impact of deformity correction in this population also needs to be elucidated. A total of 757 patients were enrolled in two prospective international multicenter AOSpine studies. Among those who underwent anterior or posterior fusion surgeries, pre- and 1-year postoperative upright neutral lateral radiographs of cervical spine were investigated to measure C2-7 Cobb angle and C2-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA). Patient outcome measures included the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association score for myelopathy severity, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short-form 36 (SF-36). These scores were compared between patients with and without cervical deformity, which was defined as C2-7 Cobb >10° kyphosis and/or SVA >40 mm. A total of 178 patients were included with complete pre- and postoperative radiographs. SVA significantly increased postoperatively (27.4 vs. 30.7 mm, P = 0.004). All outcome measurement showed significant improvements above minimal clinically important differences. 23.6% of the patients had cervical deformity preoperatively; preoperative deformity was associated with worse preoperative NDI scores (45.7 vs. 38.9, P = 0.04). Postoperatively, those with deformity exhibited significantly lower SF-36 physical component scores (37.2 vs. 41.4, P = 0.048). However, when focusing on the preoperatively deformed cohort, we did not find any significant differences in the postoperative outcome scores between those with and without residual deformity. There was a significant association between cervical deformity and both preoperative disease severity and

  20. Trauma of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, B.; Hofmann, E.; Jacob, A.L.H.

    1990-01-01

    Primary reconstructive surgery is assuming increasing importance in the management of fractures of the spine. Analysis of the injury and thus surgical decision-making are greatly facilitated by the diagnostic power of CT and MRI. This volume provides a systemic introduction to the interpretation of CT and MRI images of injuries to the spinal column and the spinal cord, with special emphasis on the assessment or residual stability. Since survey X-rays remain the indispensable first step in radiodiagnosis, the typical appearances of spinal injuries on conventional films are also shown. This will help the reader interpret the CT and MRI images and also reflects the procedure in radiologic practice. The book's classification of spinal fractures, together with the attempt to conclude how the injury happened by analyzing the damage caused, paves the way for individually oriented therapy. (orig.) With 72 figs. in 132 separate illustrations

  1. Degenerative disease of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czervionke, L.F.; Daniels, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    With few exceptions, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the modality of choice for the evaluation of degenerative disorders of the entire spine. With the implementation of surface coils and continued refinement and development of new pulse sequences, osseous and soft tissue structures of the spine can now be studied in great detail. The introduction of paramagnetic contrast agents has made it possible to differentiate epidural scar from recurrent disc herniation in the postoperative setting and to discern previously undetected degenerative changes within the intervertebral disc itself. This paper discusses the spectrum of degenerative diseases of the spine, including disc degeneration (intervertebral osteochondrosis), disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spondylosis deformans, and osteoarthritis. A brief description of the MR techniques and strategies used to evaluate these disorders is also

  2. Radical Surgery of Only the Anterior Elements of the Spine at the Posterior Element Fusion Level due to Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuto Tsuchiya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal metastasis of differentiated thyroid cancer can have a favorable prognosis if radical surgery is performed. We encountered a case of spinal metastasis involving three anterior vertebral bodies at the posterior element fusion level and successfully achieved adequate stability by radical surgery involving only the anterior elements. A 67-year-old woman who had numbness and muscle weakness in the lower limbs caused by metastatic spinal tumor at the posterior element fusion level of L1–L3 vertebrae was treated with radical surgery of only the anterior element to gain stability. Similar situations may occur in cases involving other malignant tumor metastases or spinal primary tumors. If such a case occurs, this method could be useful in preventing metastasis to the posterior element.

  3. Assessment of Coronal Radiographic Parameters of the Spine in the Treatment of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Karami

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative coronal balance is very important to make a balanced spine after surgery. Other parameters like Lenke classification or main thoracic overcorrection did not affect postoperative coronal decompensation.

  4. Postoperative spine infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Domenico Parchi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of post-operative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication.

  5. The postoperative spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is one of the most perplexing medical and medicoeconomic problems facing our health system today. In many studies reoperation rates tend to be between 10 and 20%, but as many as 20-45% 3 of patients may have persistent back or radicular pain following what was to have been definitive therapy. The causes for the FBSS are very complex. The Workmen's Compensation system and medicolegal trends toward very high settlements of litigation for injury have provided serious incentive for patients to remain symptomatic. It is difficult to analyze any statistical survey of symptomatic back patients without serious bias from this group of patients. Others suggest that patients with severe psychological problems, drug abuse, and alcoholism are inappropriately selected as surgical candidates. They believe that careful psychological evaluation of patients minimizes FBSS. Even if all extrinsic factors could be eliminated, the problem of failed back surgery would still be a major one. This chapter is based on a review of 300 postoperative lumbar spine multiplanar CT scans performed over a 15-month period. All patients had a complete set of axial images, with sagittal and coronal reformations photographed twice: optimized once for bone definition and once for soft-tissue contrast resolution

  6. Recurrent back pain after diskectomy: MRI findings MR of the postoperative lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aparicio, Rocio; Eguren, Leonor Z.; Schinder, Humberto; Stur, Mariela

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To show the morphological changes in postoperative lumbar spine. Material and methods: We reviewed 128 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) studies of lumbar spine. All patients complained of low back pain and had a previous lumbar surgery (1 month to 8 years). All the examinations include axial and sagittal Gadopentate-dimeglumine enhanced T1 weighted imaging. Results: Only 7,8% have the normal appearance of the postoperative lumbar spine. Epidural scar was found in 69% of examinations; of this group, 72% showed radicular involvement, and 28% had no radicular involvement. Recurrent disc herniation was found in 14,8% of exams, using gadopentate-dimeglumine to assist the differentiation from epidural fibrosis; infections like spondylodiscitis and abscess in 12,5%. Other findings included arachnoiditis, pseudomeningoceles and seromas. Conclusions: MRI is a useful method to study the postoperative lumbar spine, specially when enhanced with gadopentate-dimeglumine. Enhanced images can differentiate two of the major complication like epidural fibrosis, and recurrent disc herniation. Spondylodiscitis are important and frequent too. Although the findings of complications in our series in the postoperative lumbar spine represent 92,18 %, these not always explain the symptomatology. Therefore, the interrelation is important with the surgeon to determine which abnormalities are clinically significant. (authors) [es

  7. Lumbar spine chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hatem, M.B.Ch.B, MRes, LMCC

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma.

  8. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulas, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  9. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  10. PROXIMAL JUNCTIONAL KYPHOSIS IN ADULT RECONSTRUCTIVE SPINE SURGERY RESULTS FROM INCOMPLETE RESTORATION OF THE LUMBAR LORDOSIS RELATIVE TO THE MAGNITUDE OF THE THORACIC KYPHOSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Lattes, Sergio; Ries, Zachary; Gao, Yubo; Weinstein, Stuart L

    2011-01-01

    Background Proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) is defined as: 1) Proximal junction sagittal Cobb angle >≥10°, and 2) Proximal junction sagittal Cobb angle of at least 10° greater than the pre-operative measurement PJK is a common complication which develops in 39% of adults following surgery for spinal deformity. The pathogenesis, risk factors and prevention of this complication are unclear. Methods Of 54 consecutive adults treated with spinal deformity surgery (age≥59.3±10.1 years), 19 of 54 (35%) developed PJK. The average follow-up was 26.8months (range 12 - 42). Radiographic parameters were measured at the pre-operative, early postoperative (4-6 weeks), and final follow-up visits. Sagittal alignment was measured by the ratio between the C7-plumbline and the sacral-femoral distance. Binary logistic regression model with predictor variables included: Age, BMI, C7-plumbline, and whether lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis and sacral slope were present Results Patients who developed PJK and those without PJK presented with comparable age, BMI, pelvic incidence and sagittal imbalance before surgery. They also presented with comparable sacral slope and lumbar lordosis. The average magnitude of thoracic kyphosis was significantly larger than the lumbar lordosis in the proximal junctional kyphosis group, both at baseline and in the early postoperative period, as represented by [(-lumbar )lordosis - (thoracic kyphosis)]; no- PJK versus PJK; 6.6°±23.2° versus -6.6°±14.2°; p≥0.012. This was not effectively addressed with surgery in the PJK group [(-LL-TK): 6.2°±13.1° vs. -5.2°±9.6°; p≥0.004]. This group also presented with signs of pelvic retroversion with a sacral slope of 29.3°±8.2° pre-operatively that was unchanged after surgery (30.4°±8.5° postoperatively). Logistic regression determined that the magnitude of thoracic kyphosis and sagittal balance (C7-plumbline) was the most important predictor of proximal junctional kyphosis. Conclusions

  11. Cervical spine instability in rheumatoid arthritis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-01-22

    Jan 22, 1983 ... In consultation with the joint replacement unit a total knee joint replacement was contem- plilted. Before surgery routine flex ion and extension radiographs were taken of the patient's cervical spine (Figs I and 2), and significant subluxation between the atlas and the axis was disco- vered. The knee operation ...

  12. The use of porcine small intestinal submucosa mesh (SURGISIS as a pelvic sling in a man and a woman with previous pelvic surgery: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Sahaf Osama

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Closing the pelvic peritoneum to prevent the small bowel dropping into the pelvis after surgery for locally recurrent rectal cancer is important to prevent adhesions deep in the pelvis or complications of adjuvant radiotherapy. Achieving this could be difficult because sufficient native tissue is unavailable; we report on the use of small intestine submucosa extra-cellular matrix mesh in the obliteration of the pelvic brim. Case presentation We describe two cases in which submucosa extra-cellular matrix mesh was used to obliterate the pelvic brim following resection of a recurrent rectal tumour; the first patient, a 78-year-old Caucasian man, presented with small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions to a recurrent rectal tumour. The second patient, an 84-year-old Caucasian woman, presented with vaginal discharge caused by an entero-vaginal fistula due to a recurrent rectal tumour. Conclusion We report on the use of submucosa extra-cellular matrix mesh as a pelvic sling in cases where primary closure of the pelvic peritoneum is unfeasible. Its use had no infective complications and added minimal morbidity to the postoperative period. This is an original case report that would be of interest to general and colorectal surgeons.

  13. Cirurgias endoscópicas para a coluna torácica: avaliação crítica Endoscopic surgery for thoracic spine: critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOHNNY WESLEY GONÇALVES MARTINS

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o advento da tecnologia vídeo-assistida a endoscopia tem assumido importante papel terapêutico na cavidade torácica. Este artigo é uma avaliação crítica da literatura e tem como objetivo demonstrar o estado atual da cirurgia endoscópica direcionada para a coluna torácica. Hérnias discais, deformidades, infecções, tumores, doenças congênitas e traumatismos estão sendo tratados por técnica endoscópica. Na literatura, as vantagens sobre a toracotomia aberta são visibilidade aumentada e reduções em: tempo de recuperação, perda sanguínea, custos, índice de infecção e morbidade pós-operatória. Algumas desvantagens são: intubação seletiva, significativa curva de aprendizado, dificuldades técnicas na operação de crianças muito pequenas, reparação da dura máter e instrumentação. Embora os benefícios sejam aparentemente claros e haja pronunciado grau de entusiasmo, os autores são cautelosos em afirmar que a toracoscopia já é uma alternativa definitiva à toracotomia convencional. A comparação dos resultados entre as técnicas endoscópica e aberta é dificultada pela escassez de estudos comparativos. Os autores, embora otimistas, recomendam análises de mais estudos prospectivos, multicêntricos e randomizados para uma conclusão definitiva.After the development of video-assisted technology, endoscopic techniques have assumed an important therapeutic role into thoracic cavity. This is a literature review article to show the current state of the endoscopy for thoracic spine. Disc herniations, deformities, infections, tumors, congenital disorders and traumatic events have been treated by endoscopic techniques. On reviewing the literature, the advantages over open approaches are: enhanced visualization, shorter recovery time and decreased blood loss, costs, infection rate and post operative morbidity. Some disadvantages are: one lung anesthesia, significant learning curve, and technical problems in operating

  14. Aplication of the stereolithography technique in complex spine surgery Aplicação da técnica de estereolitografia em cirurgias complexas da coluna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellingson Silva Paiva

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Many techniques have been proposed for surgical training as a learning process for young surgeons or for the simulation of complex procedures. Stereolithograpfy, a rapid prototyping technique, has been presented recently as an option for these purposes. We describe the case of a 12 years old boy, diagnosed with Ewing´s sarcoma in the cervical spine. After a surgical simulation accomplished in the prototype, built by stereolithography, the patient was submitted to a C4 corpectomy and to a C4 and C3 laminectomy with anterior and posterior fixation, a non intercurrence procedure. This technique is an innovative and complementary tool in diagnosis and therapy. As a result, it is easier for the surgeon to understand the complexity of the case and plan the approach before any surgical procedure.Lesões tumorais da coluna podem representar um grande desafio para equipe cirúrgica. A estereolitografia é uma técnica de construção de peças anatômicas a partir de desenhos gráficos ou exames radiológicos. Apresentamos um paciente de 12 anos, com quadro de cervicobraquialgia à direita com diagnóstico de sarcoma de Ewing. Ao exame neurológico, o paciente apresentava-se com paresia em MSD grau IV e leve hipoestesia em dermátomos de C6 à T1 à direita. RM evidenciou edema intra e extra-ósseo com compressão medular e instabilidade cervical. Realizada simulação cirúrgica no protótipo construído por estereolitografia. Foi submetido a corpectomia de C4 e a laminectomia C4 e C3, com fixação anterior e posterior, procedimento sem intercorrências. A estereolitografia é ferramenta inovadora no auxílio diagnóstico e terapêutico. Seu uso permite ao cirurgião entender fisicamente o sítio da lesão, estudar a via de acesso e perceber a real complexidade do caso antes do procedimento cirúrgico.

  15. Towards the causes of secondary post-traumatic deformations of thoracic and lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shulga А.Е.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to analyze and systematize main causes of secondary spine deformations forming in patients who had operations due to thoracic and lumbar spine damages. Material and Methods. The analysis of poor surgical results of 155 patients previously operated due to various thoracic and lumbar spine damages has been conducted. All patients had complications associated with secondary spinal column deformations at various time after the intervention. Standard investigation included the analysis of patients' complaints, their previous history, somatic, neurological and orthopedic status. Results. The intensity of spinal column deformation was defined due to the character and level of primary trauma structurally characterized predominantly by unstable damages. However as it has been found in this research the main cause of this complicated pathology lied in the number of tactical and technical pitfalls of primary surgical treatment. Conclusion. Surgical operations due to secondary post-traumatic deformations in most cases are laborious and are accompanied by significant surgical trauma therefore systematization and analysis of the main causes of poor results of primary spine surgery may contribute to the preventive treatment of this type of pathology.

  16. Cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine in a 5-year-old girl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Ryul; Song, Ji Hun; Lee, Ju Hong; Lee, Sang Yong; Yoo, Wan Hee

    2008-01-01

    Fractures of the tibial spine usually occur in children aged 8 to 14 years. Usually, radiographs will demonstrate a tibial spine fracture, with the degree of displacement. Tibial spine fractures in younger children have not been reported in the previously published literature. We report a tibial spine fracture that occurred in 5-year-old girl. The cartilaginous avulsion fracture of the tibial spine was not revealed by radiographs because it was limited to the cartilaginous portion of the proximal tibia. (orig.)

  17. A median sacral artery anterior to the iliocaval junction: a case report-anatomical considerations and clinical relevance for spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenin, Louis; Tandabany, Sharmila; Foulon, Pascal; Havet, Eric; Peltier, Johann

    2018-01-01

    The median sacral artery (MSA) is a relatively small vessel that always arises from the posterior, terminal part of the infrarenal aorta. In most cases, the MSA runs behind the iliocaval junction. Here, we describe a very rare case of an MSA running in front of this junction. During a human cadaveric dissection of the retroperitoneal area, we unexpectedly observed that the MSA passed in front of the left common iliac vein. The anatomy of the MSA has been extensively described and variations are quite rare. On the basis of this specific case, knowledge of the anatomic interactions between the MSA and other lumbar retroperitoneal vessels may help to avoid potential complications during surgery.

  18. Survey of French spine surgeons reveals significant variability in spine trauma practices in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonjon, G; Grelat, M; Dhenin, A; Dauzac, C; Lonjon, N; Kepler, C K; Vaccaro, A R

    2015-02-01

    In France, attempts to define common ground during spine surgery meetings have revealed significant variability in clinical practices across different schools of surgery and the two specialities involved in spine surgery, namely, neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery. To objectively characterise this variability by performing a survey based on a fictitious spine trauma case. Our working hypothesis was that significant variability existed in trauma practices and that this variability was related to a lack of strong scientific evidence in spine trauma care. We performed a cross-sectional survey based on a clinical vignette describing a 31-year-old male with an L1 burst fracture and neurologic symptoms (numbness). Surgeons received the vignette and a 14-item questionnaire on the management of this patient. For each question, surgeons had to choose among five possible answers. Differences in answers across surgeons were assessed using the Index of Qualitative Variability (IQV), in which 0 indicates no variability and 1 maximal variability. Surgeons also received a questionnaire about their demographics and surgical experience. Of 405 invited spine surgeons, 200 responded to the survey. Five questions had an IQV greater than 0.9, seven an IQV between 0.5 and 0.9, and two an IQV lower than 0.5. Variability was greatest about the need for MRI (IQV=0.93), degree of urgency (IQV=0.93), need for fusion (IQV=0.92), need for post-operative bracing (IQV=0.91), and routine removal of instrumentation (IQV=0.94). Variability was lowest for questions about the need for surgery (IQV=0.42) and use of the posterior approach (IQV=0.36). Answers were influenced by surgeon specialty, age, experience level, and type of centre. Clinical practice regarding spine trauma varies widely in France. Little published evidence is available on which to base recommendations that would diminish this variability. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Transfer vibration through spine

    OpenAIRE

    Benyovszky, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Transfer Vibration through Spine Abstract In the bachelor project we deal with the topic of Transfer Vibration through Spine. The problem of TVS is trying to be solved by the critical review method. We analyse some diagnostic methods and methods of treatment based on this principle. Close attention is paid to the method of Transfer Vibration through Spine that is being currently solved by The Research Institute of Thermomechanics in The Czech Academy of Sciences in cooperation with Faculty of...

  20. Spine Metastases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Stolyarova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose and the objectives of the study were to determine the incidence of metastatic lesions to various parts of the spine, the assessment of the association with other clinical signs of lung cancer (localization, form, histology, degree of differentiation, staging, nature of extraosseous metastasis, to investigate the effect of these parameters on the survi­val of the patients. Material and methods. The study included 1071 patients with lung cancer aged 24 to 86 years. None of the examined patients has been operated previously for lung cancer, and after arriving at a diagnosis, all patients received radiation therapy, 73 % of them — combined radiochemothe­rapy. Results. Metastasis in the vertebral bodies and vertebral joints occurs in 13 % of patients with lung cancer and in 61 % of patients with bone form of the disease, the ratio of the defeat of thoracic, sacral, lumbar and cervical spine was 6 : 4 : 2 : 1. The development of metastases in the spine is mostly associa­ted with the localization of the tumor in the upper lobe of the lung, the peripheral form of the disease, with non-small cell histologic variants (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The number of metastases in the spinal column directly correlates with the degree of metastatic involvement of the inguinal lymph nodes, abdominal wall and the liver, has an impact on the invasion of lung tumor into the esophagus and the trachea. The life expectancy of the deceased persons with spine metastases is less than that of other patients with the lung cancer, but the overall survival rate in these groups of patients is not very different. Conclusions. Clinical features of lung cancer with metastases in the spine necessitate the development of medical technology of rational radiochemotherapy in such patients.

  1. Severe kyphoscoliosis after primary Echinococcus granulosus infection of the spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabl, M.; Lechner, R.; Gstöttner, M.; Bach, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    free of recurrence of infection and free of neurologically deficits (Frankel E). This case demonstrates that inappropriate treatment—partial resection of the cyst, inappropriate anterior stabilization and posterior multilevel laminectomies without posterior stabilization—may lead to severe progressive kyphoscoliotic deformity and recurrence of infection, both leading to significant neurological injury presenting as a very difficult to treat pathology.Fig. 1X-rays of the patient showing a kyhoscoliotic deformity. a ap view, b lateral viewFig. 2CT reconstruction of the whole spine showing the apex of the deformity is located in the area of the previous surgeriesFig. 3Sagittal CT-cut showing the bone bloc at the apex with a translation deformityFig. 4Sagittal T2-weighted MRI image showing the cystic formation at the apex PMID:20514501

  2. Gunshot injuries in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Filho, T E P; Cristante, A F; Marcon, R M; Ono, A; Bilhar, R

    2014-07-01

    Review article. To review the literature regarding treatment approaches in cases of gunshot wounds (GSWs) affecting the spine. Brazil. Narrative review of medical literature. GSWs are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality. Most patients with spinal GSW have complete neurological deficit. The injury is more common in young men and is frequently immobilizing. The initial approach should follow advanced trauma life support, and broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy should be initiated immediately, especially in patients with perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. The indications for surgery in spinal GSW are deterioration of the neurologic condition in a patient with incomplete neurological deficit, the presence of liquor fistula, spinal instability, intoxication by the metal from the bullet or risk of bullet migration. Surgical treatment is associated with a higher complication rate than conservative treatment. Therefore, the surgeon must know the treatment limitations and recognize patients who would truly benefit from surgery.

  3. II Italian intersociety consensus statement on antithrombotic prophylaxis in orthopaedics and traumatology: arthroscopy, traumatology, leg immobilization, minor orthopaedic procedures and spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randelli, F; Romanini, E; Biggi, F; Danelli, G; Della Rocca, G; Laurora, N R; Imberti, D; Palareti, G; Prisco, D

    2013-03-01

    Pharmacological prophylaxis for preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a worldwide established procedure in hip and knee replacement surgery, as well as in the treatment of femoral neck fractures, but few data exist in other fields of orthopaedics and traumatology. Thus, no guidelines or recommendations are available in the literature except for a limited number of weak statements about knee arthroscopy and lower limb fractures. In any case, none of them are a multidisciplinary effort as the one here presented. The Italian Society for Studies on Haemostasis and Thrombosis (SISET), the Italian Society of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (SIOT), the Association of Orthopaedic Traumatology of Italian Hospitals (OTODI), together with the Italian Society of Anesthesia, Analgesia, Resuscitation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) and the Italian Society of General Medicine (SIMG) have set down easy and quick suggestions for VTE prophylaxis in a number of surgical conditions for which only scarce evidence is available. This inter-society consensus statement aims at simplifying the approach to VTE prophylaxis in the single patient with the goal to improve its clinical application.

  4. Traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Siebenga (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic spinal fractures have the lowest functional outcomes and the lowest rates of return to work after injury of all major organ systems.1 This thesis will cover traumatic thoracolumbar spine fractures and not osteoporotic spine fractures because of the difference in fracture

  5. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  6. Minimally invasive surgical treatment options for patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durny, P.

    2014-01-01

    The most common cause of reduced activity in working people is degenerative disc disease and spondylosis of lumbar spine. The variety of clinical findings such as segmental lumbago or severe form of mixed radicular compression syndromes can be occurred. Neurosurgical intervention is indicated in case of failure of conservative treatment and graphical findings correlating with a clinical picture. Large decompressive surgical procedures can destabilize segments previously affected. Recommendations from recent years suggested the functional reconstruction of damaged parts of the vertebrae, intervertebral discs and joints. Continuously improving surgical procedures and instrumentations, intended for operative treatment of lumbar spine degenerative diseases is primarily an effort to improve the properties of implants while minimizing tissue damage during the approach to the target structure. To protect functions of active spine stabilizer and paraspinal muscles is an important factor for the final outcome of the operation. Depend on the nature and extent of the disease the approaches to the spine can be an anterior, lateral and posterior as open surgery or minimally invasive procedures. (author)

  7. Total or partial vertebrectomy for lung cancer invading the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Oka

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: In our experience, Lung cancer surgery combined with vertebrectomy is highly aggressive surgery associated with high morbidity. But, this procedure is a promising treatment option for selected patients, for example N0M0 disease with lung cancer invading the spine.

  8. Clinically important deterioration in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery: a choice of evaluation methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and pain scales: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Glassman, Steven D; Carreon, Leah Y

    2013-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measures have become the mainstay for outcome appraisal in spine surgery. Clinically meaningful interpretation of HRQOL improvement has centered on the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). The purpose of this study was to calculate clinically important deterioration (CIDET) thresholds and determine a CIDET value for each HRQOL measure for patients undergoing lumbar fusion. Seven hundred twenty-two patients (248 males, 127 smokers, mean age 60.8 years) were identified with complete preoperative and 1-year postoperative HRQOLs including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and numeric rating scales (0-10) for back and leg pain following primary, instrumented, posterior lumbar fusion. Anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to calculate CIDET for each HRQOL. Anchor-based methods included change score, change difference, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The Health Transition Item, an independent item of the SF-36, was used as the external anchor. Patients who responded "somewhat worse" and "much worse" were combined and compared with patients responding "about the same." Distribution-based methods were minimum detectable change and effect size. Diagnoses included spondylolisthesis (n = 332), scoliosis (n = 54), instability (n = 37), disc pathology (n = 146), and stenosis (n = 153). There was a statistically significant change (p < 0.0001) for each HRQOL measure from preoperatively to 1-year postoperatively. Only 107 patients (15%) reported being "somewhat worse" (n = 81) or "much worse" (n = 26). Calculation methods yielded a range of CIDET values for ODI (0.17-9.06), SF-36 physical component summary (-0.32 to 4.43), back pain (0.02-1.50), and leg pain (0.02-1.50). A threshold for clinical deterioration was difficult to identify. This may be due to the small number of patients reporting being worse after surgery and the variability across

  9. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC] and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches.

  10. Fine structure of synapses on dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eFrotscher

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Camillo Golgi’s Reazione Nera led to the discovery of dendritic spines, small appendages originating from dendritic shafts. With the advent of electron microscopy (EM they were identified as sites of synaptic contact. Later it was found that changes in synaptic strength were associated with changes in the shape of dendritic spines. While live-cell imaging was advantageous in monitoring the time course of such changes in spine structure, EM is still the best method for the simultaneous visualization of all cellular components, including actual synaptic contacts, at high resolution. Immunogold labeling for EM reveals the precise localization of molecules in relation to synaptic structures. Previous EM studies of spines and synapses were performed in tissue subjected to aldehyde fixation and dehydration in ethanol, which is associated with protein denaturation and tissue shrinkage. It has remained an issue to what extent fine structural details are preserved when subjecting the tissue to these procedures. In the present review, we report recent studies on the fine structure of spines and synapses using high-pressure freezing (HPF, which avoids protein denaturation by aldehydes and results in an excellent preservation of ultrastructural detail. In these studies, HPF was used to monitor subtle fine-structural changes in spine shape associated with chemically induced long-term potentiation (cLTP at identified hippocampal mossy fiber synapses. Changes in spine shape result from reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report that cLTP was associated with decreased immunogold labeling for phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing protein. Phosphorylation of cofilin renders it unable to depolymerize F-actin, which stabilizes the actin cytoskeleton. Decreased levels of p-cofilin, in turn, suggest increased actin turnover, possibly underlying the changes in spine shape associated with cLTP. The findings reviewed here establish HPF as

  11. EphB/syndecan-2 signaling in dendritic spine morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethell, I M; Irie, F; Kalo, M S

    2001-01-01

    We previously reported that the cell surface proteoglycan syndecan-2 can induce dendritic spine formation in hippocampal neurons. We demonstrate here that the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylates syndecan-2 and that this phosphorylation event is crucial for syndecan-2 clustering and spine...... formation. Syndecan-2 is tyrosine phosphorylated and forms a complex with EphB2 in mouse brain. Dominant-negative inhibition of endogenous EphB receptor activities blocks clustering of endogenous syndecan-2 and normal spine formation in cultured hippocampal neurons. This is the first evidence that Eph...... receptors play a physiological role in dendritic spine morphogenesis. Our observations suggest that spine morphogenesis is triggered by the activation of Eph receptors, which causes tyrosine phosphorylation of target molecules, such as syndecan-2, in presumptive spines....

  12. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  13. [Team training and assessment in mixed reality-based simulated operating room : Current state of research in the field of simulation in spine surgery exemplified by the ATMEOS project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, P; Pfandler, M; Wucherer, P; Habert, S; Fürmetz, J; Weidert, S; Euler, E; Eck, U; Lazarovici, M; Weigl, M; Navab, N

    2018-04-01

    Surgical simulators are being increasingly used as an attractive alternative to clinical training in addition to conventional animal models and human specimens. Typically, surgical simulation technology is designed for the purpose of teaching technical surgical skills (so-called task trainers). Simulator training in surgery is therefore in general limited to the individual training of the surgeon and disregards the participation of the rest of the surgical team. The objective of the project Assessment and Training of Medical Experts based on Objective Standards (ATMEOS) is to develop an immersive simulated operating room environment that enables the training and assessment of multidisciplinary surgical teams under various conditions. Using a mixed reality approach, a synthetic patient model, real surgical instruments and radiation-free virtual X‑ray imaging are combined into a simulation of spinal surgery. In previous research studies, the concept was evaluated in terms of realism, plausibility and immersiveness. In the current research, assessment measurements for technical and non-technical skills are developed and evaluated. The aim is to observe multidisciplinary surgical teams in the simulated operating room during minimally invasive spinal surgery and objectively assess the performance of the individual team members and the entire team. Moreover, the effectiveness of training methods and surgical techniques or success critical factors, e. g. management of crisis situations, can be captured and objectively assessed in the controlled environment.

  14. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  15. Anatomy of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... curve of the neck is described as a lordosis or lordotic curve, and looks like a “C” ... like the cervical spine, creating a normal lumbar lordosis. The five lumbar vertebral bodies are the weight- ...

  16. SpineData

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large-scale clinical registries are increasingly recognized as important resources for quality assurance and research to inform clinical decision-making and health policy. We established a clinical registry (SpineData) in a conservative care setting where more than 10,000 new cases...... of spinal pain are assessed each year. This paper describes the SpineData registry, summarizes the characteristics of its clinical population and data, and signals the availability of these data as a resource for collaborative research projects. Methods: The SpineData registry is an Internet-based system...... that captures patient data electronically at the point of clinical contact. The setting is the government-funded Medical Department of the Spine Centre of Southern Denmark, Hospital Lillebaelt, where patients receive a multidisciplinary assessment of their chronic spinal pain. Results: Started in 2011...

  17. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...... highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession....

  18. Postoperative 3D spine reconstruction by navigating partitioning manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadoury, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.kadoury@polymtl.ca [Department of Computer and Software Engineering, Ecole Polytechnique Montreal, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada); Labelle, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.labelle@recherche-ste-justine.qc.ca; Parent, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.parent@umontreal.ca [CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Center, Montréal, Québec H3T 1C5 (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The postoperative evaluation of scoliosis patients undergoing corrective treatment is an important task to assess the strategy of the spinal surgery. Using accurate 3D geometric models of the patient’s spine is essential to measure longitudinal changes in the patient’s anatomy. On the other hand, reconstructing the spine in 3D from postoperative radiographs is a challenging problem due to the presence of instrumentation (metallic rods and screws) occluding vertebrae on the spine. Methods: This paper describes the reconstruction problem by searching for the optimal model within a manifold space of articulated spines learned from a training dataset of pathological cases who underwent surgery. The manifold structure is implemented based on a multilevel manifold ensemble to structure the data, incorporating connections between nodes within a single manifold, in addition to connections between different multilevel manifolds, representing subregions with similar characteristics. Results: The reconstruction pipeline was evaluated on x-ray datasets from both preoperative patients and patients with spinal surgery. By comparing the method to ground-truth models, a 3D reconstruction accuracy of 2.24 ± 0.90 mm was obtained from 30 postoperative scoliotic patients, while handling patients with highly deformed spines. Conclusions: This paper illustrates how this manifold model can accurately identify similar spine models by navigating in the low-dimensional space, as well as computing nonlinear charts within local neighborhoods of the embedded space during the testing phase. This technique allows postoperative follow-ups of spinal surgery using personalized 3D spine models and assess surgical strategies for spinal deformities.

  19. Postoperative 3D spine reconstruction by navigating partitioning manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoury, Samuel; Labelle, Hubert; Parent, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The postoperative evaluation of scoliosis patients undergoing corrective treatment is an important task to assess the strategy of the spinal surgery. Using accurate 3D geometric models of the patient’s spine is essential to measure longitudinal changes in the patient’s anatomy. On the other hand, reconstructing the spine in 3D from postoperative radiographs is a challenging problem due to the presence of instrumentation (metallic rods and screws) occluding vertebrae on the spine. Methods: This paper describes the reconstruction problem by searching for the optimal model within a manifold space of articulated spines learned from a training dataset of pathological cases who underwent surgery. The manifold structure is implemented based on a multilevel manifold ensemble to structure the data, incorporating connections between nodes within a single manifold, in addition to connections between different multilevel manifolds, representing subregions with similar characteristics. Results: The reconstruction pipeline was evaluated on x-ray datasets from both preoperative patients and patients with spinal surgery. By comparing the method to ground-truth models, a 3D reconstruction accuracy of 2.24 ± 0.90 mm was obtained from 30 postoperative scoliotic patients, while handling patients with highly deformed spines. Conclusions: This paper illustrates how this manifold model can accurately identify similar spine models by navigating in the low-dimensional space, as well as computing nonlinear charts within local neighborhoods of the embedded space during the testing phase. This technique allows postoperative follow-ups of spinal surgery using personalized 3D spine models and assess surgical strategies for spinal deformities

  20. Imaging of spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomoschitz, F. . e-mai: friedrich.lomoschitz@univie.ac.at

    2001-01-01

    Spinal trauma requires a prompt and detailed diagnosis for estimating the prognosis and installing proper therapy. Conventional radiograms are the first imaging modality in most cases. In the cervical and the lumbar spine, a CT has to be performed in patients with polytrauma and a higher risk of complications or with signs of instability. Especially for imaging the cervicocranium, multiplanar reformations in sagittal and coronal planes are necessary. For fractures of the thoracic spine, MR imaging is superior to CT because of the better detection of associated neurologic complications. (author)

  1. Trends in scientific publications of Indian spine surgeons over 14 years (2000–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Mugesh Kanna

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The current study shows that publications in the field of spine surgery have been increasing in the last few years, although it is less. Further efforts such as research training of spine surgeons, inducing collaborations and formulation of multicenter projects and periodically allocating adequate funds are key factors to improve the scientific publications from India.

  2. A musculoskeletal lumbar and thoracic model for calculation of joint kinetics in the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yong Cheol; Ta, Duc manh; Koo, Seung Bum; Jung Moon Ki

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a musculoskeletal spine model that allows relative movements in the thoracic spine for calculation of intra-discal forces in the lumbar and thoracic spine. The thoracic part of the spine model was composed of vertebrae and ribs connected with mechanical joints similar to anatomical joints. Three different muscle groups around the thoracic spine were inserted, along with eight muscle groups around the lumbar spine in the original model from AnyBody. The model was tested using joint kinematics data obtained from two normal subjects during spine flexion and extension, axial rotation and lateral bending motions beginning from a standing posture. Intra-discal forces between spine segments were calculated in a musculoskeletal simulation. The force at the L4-L5 joint was chosen to validate the model's prediction against the lumbar model in the original AnyBody model, which was previously validated against clinical data.

  3. A musculoskeletal lumbar and thoracic model for calculation of joint kinetics in the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Cheol; Ta, Duc manh; Koo, Seung Bum [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung Moon Ki [AnyBody Technology A/S, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2016-06-15

    The objective of this study was to develop a musculoskeletal spine model that allows relative movements in the thoracic spine for calculation of intra-discal forces in the lumbar and thoracic spine. The thoracic part of the spine model was composed of vertebrae and ribs connected with mechanical joints similar to anatomical joints. Three different muscle groups around the thoracic spine were inserted, along with eight muscle groups around the lumbar spine in the original model from AnyBody. The model was tested using joint kinematics data obtained from two normal subjects during spine flexion and extension, axial rotation and lateral bending motions beginning from a standing posture. Intra-discal forces between spine segments were calculated in a musculoskeletal simulation. The force at the L4-L5 joint was chosen to validate the model's prediction against the lumbar model in the original AnyBody model, which was previously validated against clinical data.

  4. Total motion generated in the unstable cervical spine during management of the typical trauma patient: a comparison of methods in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasarn, Mark L; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Dubose, Dewayne; Small, John; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Zhou, Haitao; Conrad, Bryan P; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2012-05-15

    Biomechanical cadaveric study. We sought to analyze the amount of motion generated in the unstable cervical spine during various maneuvers and transfers that a trauma patient would typically be subjected to prior to definitive fixation, using 2 different protocols. From the time of injury until the spine is adequately stabilized in the operating room, every step in management of the spine-injured patient can result in secondary injury to the spinal cord. The amount of angular motion between C5 and C6, after a surgically created unstable injury, was measured using an electromagnetic motion analysis device (Polhemus Inc., Colchester, VT). A total sequence of maneuvers and transfers was then performed that a patient would be expected to go through from the time of injury until surgical fixation. This included spine board placement and removal, bed transfers, lateral therapy, and turning the patient prone onto the operating table. During each of these, we performed what has been shown to be the best and commonly used (log-roll) techniques. During bed transfers and the turn prone for surgery, there was statistically more angular motion in each plane for traditional transfer with the spine board and manually turning the patient prone as commonly done (P patient from the field to stabilization in the operating room using the best compared with the most commonly used techniques. As previously reported, using log-roll techniques consistently results in unwanted motion at the injured spinal segment.

  5. Which surgery should be offered for carpal tunnel syndrome in a patient who was previously treated for recurrence on the contralateral side? Preliminary study of 13 patients with the Canaletto® implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, I; Seigle-Murandi, F; Gouzou, S; Fabacher, T; Facca, S; Hidalgo Diaz, J J; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    There are no published studies on the management of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients who have already been operated for recurrent CTS on the contralateral side. The aim of this study was to evaluate 13 patients with CTS who underwent primary release using a Canaletto ® implant. The 13 patients had all been operated for recurrent CTS previously. On the contralateral side, they all had subjective signs, and two of them already had complications. All were operated with the Canaletto ® implant according to Duché's technique, in a mean of 20minutes. After a mean 19.3-month follow-up, paresthesia, pain, and QuickDASH scores were significantly improved, even in one patient who underwent revision at another facility. This preliminary study suggests that use of a Canaletto ® implant as first-line treatment for CTS in patients who already underwent revision surgery on the other side is a simple and safe technique, without worsening of symptoms. These findings should be assessed with a prospective randomized controlled trial. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Robotics and the spine: a review of current and ongoing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shweikeh, Faris; Amadio, Jordan P; Arnell, Monica; Barnard, Zachary R; Kim, Terrence T; Johnson, J Patrick; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-03-01

    Robotics in the operating room has shown great use and versatility in multiple surgical fields. Robot-assisted spine surgery has gained significant favor over its relatively short existence, due to its intuitive promise of higher surgical accuracy and better outcomes with fewer complications. Here, the authors analyze the existing literature on this growing technology in the era of minimally invasive spine surgery. In an attempt to provide the most recent, up-to-date review of the current literature on robotic spine surgery, a search of the existing literature was conducted to obtain all relevant studies on robotics as it relates to its application in spine surgery and other interventions. In all, 45 articles were included in the analysis. The authors discuss the current status of this technology and its potential in multiple arenas of spinal interventions, mainly spine surgery and spine biomechanics testing. There are numerous potential advantages and limitations to robotic spine surgery, as suggested in published case reports and in retrospective and prospective studies. Randomized controlled trials are few in number and show conflicting results regarding accuracy. The present limitations may be surmountable with future technological improvements, greater surgeon experience, reduced cost, improved operating room dynamics, and more training of surgical team members. Given the promise of robotics for improvements in spine surgery and spine biomechanics testing, more studies are needed to further explore the applicability of this technology in the spinal operating room. Due to the significant cost of the robotic equipment, studies are needed to substantiate that the increased equipment costs will result in significant benefits that will justify the expense.

  7. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  8. Tuberculosis of the cervical spine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, comprising 3 -. 5% of cases of tuberculosis of the spine. Eight patients with tuberculosis of the cervicaJ spine seen during 1989 -. 1992 were reviewed. They all presented with neck pain. The 4 children presented with a kyphotic deformity. In all the children the disease was extensive, ...

  9. Tuberculosis of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psarras, H.; Faraj, J.; Gouliamos, A.; Kalovidouris, A.; Vlahos, L.; Papavassiliou, C.

    1985-07-01

    Two surgically proven cases of turberculous psoas abscess are presented. The common findings on CT were low-density paraspinal masses and extension of the lesions which followed the typical distribution of iliopsoas muscle in both cases. The skeletal findings from the spine are also discussed. Our cases indicate the complementary use of plain radiography and CT in the investigation of tuberculous spondylitis.

  10. [Cervical spine trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, U; Hellen, P

    2016-08-01

    In the emergency department 65 % of spinal injuries and 2-5 % of blunt force injuries involve the cervical spine. Of these injuries approximately 50 % involve C5 and/or C6 and 30 % involve C2. Older patients tend to have higher spinal injuries and younger patients tend to have lower injuries. The anatomical and development-related characteristics of the pediatric spine as well as degenerative and comorbid pathological changes of the spine in the elderly can make the radiological evaluation of spinal injuries difficult with respect to possible trauma sequelae in young and old patients. Two different North American studies have investigated clinical criteria to rule out cervical spine injuries with sufficient certainty and without using imaging. Imaging of cervical trauma should be performed when injuries cannot be clinically excluded according to evidence-based criteria. Degenerative changes and anatomical differences have to be taken into account in the evaluation of imaging of elderly and pediatric patients.

  11. Surgical management of prostate cancer metastatic to the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian J; Fox, Benjamin D; Sciubba, Daniel M; Suki, Dima; Tu, Shi Ming; Kuban, Deborah; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Rhines, Laurence D; Rao, Ganesh

    2009-05-01

    Significant improvements in neurological function and pain relief are the benefits of aggressive surgical management of spinal metastatic disease. However, there is limited literature regarding the management of tumors with specific histological features. In this study, a series of patients undergoing spinal surgery for metastatic prostate cancer were reviewed to identify predictors of survival and functional outcome. The authors retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients who were treated with surgery for prostate cancer metastases to the spine between 1993 and 2005 at a single institution. Particular attention was given to initial presentation, operative management, clinical and neurological outcomes, and factors associated with complications and overall survival. Forty-four patients underwent a total of 47 procedures. The median age at spinal metastasis was 66 years (range 50-84 years). Twenty-four patients had received previous external-beam radiation to the site of spinal involvement, with a median dose of 70 Gy (range 30-74 Gy). Frankel scores on discharge were significantly improved when compared with preoperative scores (p = 0.001). Preoperatively, 32 patients (73%) were walking and 33 (75%) were continent. On discharge, 36 (86%) of 42 patients were walking, and 37 (88%) of 42 were continent. Preoperatively, 40 patients (91%) were taking narcotics, with a median morphine equivalent dose of 21.5 mg/day, and 28 patients (64%) were taking steroids, with a median dose of 16 mg/day. At discharge, the median postoperative morphine equivalent dose was 12 mg/day, and the median steroid dose was 0 mg/day (p or = 65 years at the time of surgery was an independent predictor of a postoperative complication (p = 0.005). In selected patients with prostate cancer metastases to the spine, aggressive surgical decompression and spinal reconstruction is a useful treatment option. The results show that on average, neurological outcome is improved and use of analgesics

  12. Relationship between Northwick Park neck pain questionnaire and cervical spine MR imaging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Estanislao; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Montijano, Ruben; Bautista, Daniel; Molla, Enrique; Costa, Salvador

    2006-08-01

    The study was aimed at determining the association between the self-report of pain and disability by means of Northwick neck pain questionnaire (NPQ) and cervical spine MR imaging findings. A random sample of 251 patients, 132 men and 119 women aged 43+/-13 years, submitted with neck pain were investigated. Patients with previous discitis, surgery, neoplasm or hospitalized for cervical spine trauma were excluded. All patients completed the NPQ and were studied with sagittal gradient-echo T1 and turbo spin-echo T2, axial gradient-echo T2* and heavily T2 weighted MR myelographic weighted images. MR images of the two most affected disc levels were read, offering an MR imaging score from 0 to 30. There was no statistically significant correlation between NPQ and MR imaging scores. From the NPQ items, only difficulty in sleeping and numbness were related to the MR imaging score. Disc extrusion was the only MR finding almost significantly associated with NPQ (P=0.054). Neck injury did not increase NPQ scores. In patients with neck pain, NPQ scores do not correlate with MR imaging findings. NPQ and cervical spine MR imaging show different facets of the multidimensional complex of neck pain.

  13. Analgesia preemptiva nas cirurgias da coluna lombossacra: estudo prospectivo e randomizado Analgesia preventiva en las cirugías de la columna lumbosacra: estudio prospectivo y aleatorio Preemptive analgesia in lumbosacral spine surgeries: prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin Malzac

    2009-06-01

    recibieron alguna sustancia analgésica (control. Veinte y dos en el segundo (B que fueron sometidos a la inyección epidural, 20 minutos antes de la incisión quirúrgica, conteniendo 10 mL de marcaína y morfina. En el tercer grupo, y último (C, con 20 pacientes que fueron inyectados con auxilio de un catéter, en el espacio epidural, las mismas drogas del grupo B, por medio de la incisión antes de cerrar la herida operatoria. Los pacientes fueron examinados durante las primeras 24 horas, con auxilio de la escala verbal de dolor. RESULTADOS: los tres grupos fueron comparados según la edad, sexo, nivel y tiempo quirúrgico. Como los datos no obedecieron a una distribución Gausiana, el test paramétrico de Mann-Whitney fue entonces adoptado para análisis estadístico. De esta forma, los valores de la escala verbal de dolor, en todos los intervalos de tiempo fueron significativamente bajos (pOBJECTIVE: To analyze the efficacy of the preemptive analgesia with a method of epidural analgesic administration before and after the surgical painful stimulation, as comparing them. Its role in postoperative pain relief after lumbosacral spinal surgery, by the posterior approach, has not been fully investigated. METHODS: Sixty two patients who underwent microdiscectomy or microdecompression in a single level of the lumbosacral spine were divided into three groups: 20 patients that had not received any analgesic medication in the first one (A (control; 22 that had been submitted to the epidural injection containing 10 mL of marcaína and morphine 20 minutes before the surgical incision in the second one (B. In the third and last group (C, 20 patients received the same drugs of group B, with the aid of a catheter positioned in the epidural space, through the incision before the closing of the surgical wound. The patients were examined during the first 24 hours, with the use of the verbal scale of pain. RESULTS: The three groups were compared concerning age, sex, level and surgical

  14. Motion in the unstable thoracolumbar spine when spine boarding a prone patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Bryan P.; Marchese, Diana L.; Rechtine, Glenn R.; Horodyski, MaryBeth

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Previous research has found that the log roll (LR) technique produces significant motion in the spinal column while transferring a supine patient onto a spine board. The purpose of this project was to determine whether log rolling a patient with an unstable spine from prone to supine with a pulling motion provides better thoracolumbar immobilization compared to log rolling with a push technique. Methods A global instability was surgically created at the L1 level in five cadavers. Two spine-boarding protocols were tested (LR Push and LR Pull). Both techniques entailed performing a 180° LR rotation of the prone patient from the ground to the supine position on the spine board. An electromagnetic tracking device registered motion between the T12 and L2 vertebral segments. Six motion parameters were tracked. Repeated-measures statistical analysis was performed to evaluate angular and translational motion. Results Less motion was produced during the LR Push compared to the LR Pull for all six motion parameters. The difference was statistically significant for three of the six parameters (flexion–extension, axial translation, and anterior–posterior (A–P) translation). Conclusions Both the LR Push and LR Pull generated significant motion in the thoracolumbar spine during the prone to supine LR. The LR Push technique produced statistically less motion than the LR Pull, and should be considered when a prone patient with a suspected thoracolumbar injury needs to be transferred to a long spine board. More research is needed to identify techniques to further reduce the motion in the unstable spine during prone to supine LR. PMID:22330191

  15. Reducción de infecciones por autocontaminación en cirugía de columna Redução de infecções por autocontaminação em cirurgia de coluna vertebral Reducing infections by auto-contamination in spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo Vernengo Lezica

    2011-01-01

    de um dos membros da equipe, decidimos tomar uma série de medidas (com relação à escovação das mãos e manipulação da máscara cirúrgica de forma prospectiva. Avaliamos 120 pacientes nos quais operamos a coluna vertebral prospectivamente de janeiro de 2007 a dezembro de 2009. Os critérios de inclusão foram cirurgias de coluna por via posterior realizadas pela mesma equipe cirúrgica, de acordo com as medidas apresentadas a seguir. Os critérios de exclusão foram pacientes operados por via anterior, cirurgias laparoscópicas e vertebroplastias, assim como as cirurgias nas quais não havia ninguém da equipe cirúrgica em estudo. RESULTADOS: Das 120 colunas operadas houve infecção em três casos, nos quais se realizou a limpeza correspondente e a cultura e antibiograma da amostra e do nariz dos membros da equipe cirúrgica. Em nenhum dos casos, o microrganismo que produziu a infecção coincidiu com os encontrados no nariz da equipe cirúrgica, ou seja, 0% de contaminação provocada pelo cirurgião. CONCLUSÕES: Acreditamos que as medidas adotadas na sala de cirurgia, a saber, escovação das mãos e manipulação da máscara cirúrgica, podem reduzir a infecção nas cirurgias de coluna provocada pelo próprio cirurgião.OBJECTIVE: To carry out a prospective evaluation of spine surgery infections caused by contamination by the surgeon or some other member of the surgical team. METHODS: After seeing two infections in a row during spine surgery, and detecting that the germ found in the sample cultures coincided with that found in the nose of one of the members of the surgical team, we decided to prospectively implement a series of measures related to scrubbing and handling the surgical mask. We carried out a prospective evaluation from January 2007 to December 2009 of 120 patients who underwent spine surgery carried out by our team. Criteria for inclusion were spine surgery by the posterior route carried out by the same surgical team complying with the

  16. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Machado, Marcio Martins; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio Junqueira; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2002-01-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroid injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods. (author)

  17. Tuberculosis of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psarras, H.; Faraj, J.; Gouliamos, A.; Kalovidouris, A.; Vlahos, L.; Papavassiliou, C.

    1985-01-01

    Two surgically proven cases of turberculous psoas abscess are presented. The common findings on CT were low-density paraspinal masses and extension of the lesions which followed the typical distribution of iliopsoas muscle in both cases. The skeletal findings from the spine are also discussed. Our cases indicate the complementary use of plain radiography and CT in the investigation of tuberculous spondylitis. (orig.) [de

  18. Biologics in spine arthrodesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Abhishek; Dodwad, Shah-Nawaz M; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-06-01

    Spine fusion is a tool used in the treatment of spine trauma, tumors, and degenerative disorders. Poor outcomes related to failure of fusion, however, have directed the interests of practitioners and scientists to spinal biologics that may impact fusion at the cellular level. These biologics are used to achieve successful arthrodesis in the treatment of symptomatic deformity or instability. Historically, autologous bone grafting, including iliac crest bong graft harvesting, had represented the gold standard in spinal arthrodesis. However, due to concerns over potential harvest site complications, supply limitations, and associated morbidity, surgeons have turned to other bone graft options known for their osteogenic, osteoinductive, and/or osteoconductive properties. Current bone graft selection includes autograft, allograft, demineralized bone matrix, ceramics, mesenchymal stem cells, and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein. Each pose their respective advantages and disadvantages and are the focus of ongoing research investigating the safety and efficacy of their use in the setting of spinal fusion. Rh-BMP2 has been plagued by issues of widespread off-label use, controversial indications, and a wide range of adverse effects. The risks associated with high concentrations of exogenous growth factors have led to investigational efforts into nanotechnology and its application in spinal arthrodesis through the binding of endogenous growth factors. Bone graft selection remains critical to successful fusion and favorable patient outcomes, and orthopaedic surgeons must be educated on the utility and limitations of various biologics in the setting of spine arthrodesis.

  19. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  20. Osseous anatomy of the lumbosacral spine in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, P D; Ahn, N U; Ahn, U M; Nallamshetty, L; Rose, P S; Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    2000-11-01

    This study examines pedicle widths, laminar thicknesses, and scalloping values for lumbosacral spine elements in Marfan volunteers. Comparisons were made between these measurements and norms as well as measurements between Marfan patients with and without dural ectasia. To determine if the lumbosacral vertebral elements are altered in the patient with Marfan syndrome. Several abnormalities have been noted in Marfan lumbar spine, including pedicular attenuation and widened interpediculate distances. This may be due to abnormalities of growth or presence of dural ectasia. Given the large numbers of Marfan patients requiring spinal surgery and the high postoperative failure rate, better understanding of the bony anatomy of Marfan lumbar spine is necessary, especially if use of instrumentation is anticipated. Thirty-two volunteers with Marfan syndrome based on the Ghent criteria underwent spiral computed tomography of the lumbosacral spine. Images were evaluated for dural ectasia, and measurements of pedicle width, laminar thickness, and vertebral scalloping were made. Pedicle widths and laminar thicknesses were significantly smaller in Marfan patients at all levels (Plaminar thickness from L5-S2 and pedicle widths at all lumbar levels were significantly reduced (Plaminar thickness are significantly reduced in Marfan individuals. Those with dural ectasia demonstrate increased bony erosion of anterior and posterior elements of lumbosacral spine. Preoperative planning and routine computed tomography scans are recommended when operating on Marfan lumbosacral spine.

  1. Percutaneous pedicle screw for unstable spine fractures in polytraumatized patients: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boon Beng Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable spine fractures commonly occur in the setting of a polytraumatized patient. The aim of management is to balance the need for early operative stabilization and prevent additional trauma due to the surgery. Recent published literature has demonstrated the benefits of early stabilization of an unstable spine fracture particularly in patients with higher injury severity score (ISS. We report two cases of polytrauma with unstable spine fractures stabilized with a minimally invasive percutaneous pedicle screw instrumentation system as a form of damage control surgery. The patients had good recovery from the polytrauma injuries. These two cases illustrate the role of minimally invasive stabilization, its limitations and technical pitfalls in the management of unstable spine fractures in the polytrauma setting as a form of damage control surgery.

  2. Narrative review of the in vivo mechanics of the cervical spine after anterior arthrodesis as revealed by dynamic biplane radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderst, William

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis is the standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine and is performed over 150,000 times annually in the United States. The primary long-term concern after this surgery is adjacent segment disease (ASD), defined as new clinical symptoms adjacent to a previous fusion. The incidence of adjacent segment disease is approximately 3% per year, meaning that within 10 years of the initial surgery, approximately 25% of cervical arthrodesis patients require a second procedure to address symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. Despite the high incidence of ASD, until recently, there was little data available to characterize in vivo adjacent segment mechanics during dynamic motion. This manuscript reviews recent advances in our knowledge of adjacent segment mechanics after cervical arthrodesis that have been facilitated by the use of dynamic biplane radiography. The primary observations from these studies are that current in vitro test paradigms often fail to replicate in vivo spine mechanics before and after arthrodesis, that intervertebral mechanics vary among cervical motion segments, and that joint arthrokinematics (i.e., the interactions between adjacent vertebrae) are superior to traditional kinematics measurements for identifying altered adjacent segment mechanics after arthrodesis. Future research challenges are identified, including improving the biofidelity of in vitro tests, determining the natural history of in vivo spine mechanics, conducting prospective longitudinal studies on adjacent segment kinematics and arthrokinematics after single and multiple-level arthrodesis, and creating subject-specific computational models to accurately estimate muscle forces and tissue loading in the spine during dynamic activities. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Atlas of postsurgical neuroradiology. Imaging of the brain, spine, and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas; Westesson, Per-Lennart A.

    2012-01-01

    Covers the normal appearances and complications that may be encountered on neuroradiological examinations following surgery to the head, neck, and spine. Contains numerous images and to-the-point case descriptions. Serves as an invaluable and convenient resource for both neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. The number of surgical procedures performed on the brain, head, neck, and spine has increased markedly in recent decades. As a result, postoperative changes are being encountered more frequently on neuroradiological examinations and constitute an important part of the workflow. However, the imaging correlates of postsurgical changes can be unfamiliar to neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons and are sometimes difficult to interpret. This book is written by experts in the field and contains an abundance of high-quality images and concise descriptions, which should serve as a useful guide to postsurgical neuroradiology. It will familiarize the reader with the various types of surgical procedure, implanted hardware, and complications. Indeed, this work represents the first text dedicated to the realm of postoperative neuroimaging. Topics reviewed include imaging after facial cosmetic surgery; orbital and oculoplastic surgery; sinus surgery; scalp and cranial surgery; brain tumor treatment; psychosurgery, neurodegenerative surgery, and epilepsy surgery; skull base surgery including transsphenoidal pituitary resection; temporal bone surgery including various ossicular prostheses; orthognathic surgery; surgery of the neck including the types of dissection and flap reconstruction; CSF diversion procedures and devices; spine surgery; and vascular and endovascular neurosurgery.

  4. Atlas of postsurgical neuroradiology. Imaging of the brain, spine, and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginat, Daniel Thomas [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States). Harvard Medical School; Westesson, Per-Lennart A. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2012-11-01

    Covers the normal appearances and complications that may be encountered on neuroradiological examinations following surgery to the head, neck, and spine. Contains numerous images and to-the-point case descriptions. Serves as an invaluable and convenient resource for both neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. The number of surgical procedures performed on the brain, head, neck, and spine has increased markedly in recent decades. As a result, postoperative changes are being encountered more frequently on neuroradiological examinations and constitute an important part of the workflow. However, the imaging correlates of postsurgical changes can be unfamiliar to neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons and are sometimes difficult to interpret. This book is written by experts in the field and contains an abundance of high-quality images and concise descriptions, which should serve as a useful guide to postsurgical neuroradiology. It will familiarize the reader with the various types of surgical procedure, implanted hardware, and complications. Indeed, this work represents the first text dedicated to the realm of postoperative neuroimaging. Topics reviewed include imaging after facial cosmetic surgery; orbital and oculoplastic surgery; sinus surgery; scalp and cranial surgery; brain tumor treatment; psychosurgery, neurodegenerative surgery, and epilepsy surgery; skull base surgery including transsphenoidal pituitary resection; temporal bone surgery including various ossicular prostheses; orthognathic surgery; surgery of the neck including the types of dissection and flap reconstruction; CSF diversion procedures and devices; spine surgery; and vascular and endovascular neurosurgery.

  5. Spine Shape Predicts Vertebral Fractures in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, P.C.; A. Ghosh

    2008-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of patients at high risk of developing fragility fractures is crucial in the management of osteoporosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the shape of the spine as can be observed from lateral X-rays is indicative for the risk of future development...... of fragility fractures in the spine. The study included 568 elderly women of whom 455 maintained skeletal integrity during the mean observation period of 4.8 years and 113 sustained at least one vertebral fracture in the same period. At baseline, none of the women had experienced a previous osteoporotic...... and intervertebral disks, alignment of vertebrae, and spinal curvature. The positions of the points were subsequently used as the input features to train a pattern classification system to discriminate between spines of women maintaining skeletal health and spines sustaining a fracture in the near future...

  6. Anaesthetic and Intensive Care Management of Traumatic Cervical Spine Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Umamaheswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trauma to the cervical spine may have devastating consequences. Timely interventions are essential to prevent avoidable neurological deterioration. In the initial stabilization of patients with acute cervical spine injuries, physiological disturbances, especially those involving cardiac and respiratory function require careful attention. Early surgery, which facilitates rapid mobi-lization of the patient, is fraught with important management considerations in the intraopoerative period and the subsequent critical care. Airway management poses a crucial challenge at this stage. Those patients who survive the injury with quadriplegia or quadriparesis may present themselves for incidental surgical procedures. Chronic systemic manifestations in these patients require attention in providing anaesthesia and postoperative care at this stage. The current review provides an insight into the physiological disturbances and the management issues in both acute and chronic phases of traumatic cervical spine injury.

  7. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Tsafnat

    Full Text Available The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  8. Correlation of PROMIS Physical Function and Pain CAT Instruments With Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index in Spine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papuga, Mark O; Mesfin, Addisu; Molinari, Robert; Rubery, Paul T

    2016-07-15

    A prospective and retrospective cross-sectional cohort analysis. The aim of this study was to show that Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) computer adaptive testing (CAT) assessments for physical function and pain interference can be efficiently collected in a standard office visit and to evaluate these scores with scores from previously validated Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) providing evidence of convergent validity for use in patients with spine pathology. Spinal surgery outcomes are highly variable, and substantial debate continues regarding the role and value of spine surgery. The routine collection of patient-based outcomes instruments in spine surgery patients may inform this debate. Traditionally, the inefficiency associated with collecting standard validated instruments has been a barrier to routine use in outpatient clinics. We utilized several CAT instruments available through PROMIS and correlated these with the results obtained using "gold standard" legacy outcomes measurement instruments. All measurements were collected at a routine clinical visit. The ODI and the NDI assessments were used as "gold standard" comparisons for patient-reported outcomes. PROMIS CAT instruments required 4.5 ± 1.8 questions and took 35 ± 16 seconds to complete, compared with ODI/NDI requiring 10 questions and taking 188 ± 85 seconds when administered electronically. Linear regression analysis of retrospective scores involving a primary back complaint revealed moderate to strong correlations between ODI and PROMIS physical function with r values ranging from 0.5846 to 0.8907 depending on the specific assessment and patient subsets examined. Routine collection of physical function outcome measures in clinical practice offers the ability to inform and improve patient care. We have shown that several PROMIS CAT instruments can be efficiently administered during routine clinical visits. The

  9. The spine problem: Finding a function for dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eMalanowski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Why do neurons have dendritic spines? This question— the heart of what Yuste calls the spine problem— presupposes that why-questions of this sort have scientific answers: that empirical findings can favor or count against claims about why neurons have spines. Here we show how such questions can receive empirical answers. We construe such why-questions as questions about how spines make a difference to the behavior of some mechanism that we take to be significant. Why-questions are driven fundamentally by the effort to understand how some item, such as the dendritic spine, is situated in the causal structure of the world (the causal nexus. They ask for a filter on that busy world that allows us to see a part’s individual contribution to a mechanism, independent of everything else going on. So understood, answers to why-questions can be assessed by testing the claims these answers make about the causal structure of a mechanism. We distinguish four ways of making a difference to a mechanism (necessary, modulatory, component, background condition, and we sketch their evidential requirements. One consequence of our analysis is that there are many spine problems and that any given spine problem might have many acceptable answers.

  10. [Scoliosis: the bent spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radl, R; Maafe, M; Ziegler, S

    2011-05-01

    Scoliosis, a permanent abnormal curvature of the spine to the side, is divided into four forms: idiopathic (infantile, juvenile and adolescent, accounting for 80% of cases), neurogenic, congenital and adult scoliosis. Most patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis initially have mainly cosmetic problems. However, neurogenic, congenital and adult scoliosis can lead to severe clinical symptoms. The leading symptom is back pain caused by secondary changes. In recent years the Lenke classification has been proven to be a reliable tool for disease classification. Non-progressive scoliosis is usually treated conservatively. In the case of Cobb angles of greater than 50°, surgical therapy is recommended in patients presenting before adulthood. Technical improvements in implants and the optimisation of surgical methods have set a trend in the direction of surgical therapy.

  11. The digital spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbesen, Toke Riis

    2019-01-01

    In the words of the Oxford English Dictionary, a book is 'a portable volume consisting of a series of written, printed, or illustrated pages bound together for ease of reading' (‘book, n.’nd). Yet, the world of books isn’t what it used to be. If differences between media are material differences...... analyze books as digital or even 'post-digital' artifacts (Cramer 2014), while preserving the material dimension of the book artifact. In other words: is there is such a thing as a (post-)digital spine, and how can it be described? This article outlines an answer to this question within an inferential...... (Seiter 2015), and books are produced, distributed and read on various digital media and devices, it is no longer possible to understand digital books on the basis of the material and syntactical features of the codex artifact. It then becomes important to discuss how to conceptualize and subsequently...

  12. [Modern treatments for degenerative disc diseases of the lumbosacral spine. A literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, N A; Nazarenko, A G; Asyutin, D S; Zelenkov, P V; Onoprienko, R A; Korolishin, V A; Cherkiev, I U; Martynova, M A; Zakirov, B A; Timonin, S Yu; Kosyr'kova, A V; Pimenova, L F; Pogosyan, A L; Batyrov, A A

    Many researchers consider degenerative diseases of the spine as a pandemic of the XXIst century. Herniated intervertebral discs of the lumbosacral spine occur in 61% of patients with degenerative spine diseases. Of these, 15% of patients have herniated discs at the LII-LIII level, 10% of patients at the LIII-LIV level, and 40% of patients at the LIV-LV and LV-SI levels. A high cost of conservative treatment of degenerative spine disease symptoms and its low efficacy in reducing the intensity and duration of pain necessitate the development of new methods of surgical treatment. In this paper, we analyze the literature data on minimally invasive spine surgery and demonstrate the main advantages of percutaneous endoscopic surgical techniques.

  13. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  14. Surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapunt U

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ulrike Dapunt,1 Caroline Bürkle,1 Frank Günther,2 Wojciech Pepke,1 Stefan Hemmer,1 Michael Akbar1 1Clinic for Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery, Center for Orthopedics, Trauma Surgery and Spinal Cord Injury, Heidelberg University Hospital, 2Department for Infectious Diseases, Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Implant-associated infections are still a feared complication in the field of orthopedics. Bacteria attach to the implant surface and form so-called biofilm colonies that are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Since the majority of studies focus on prosthetic joint infections (PJIs of the hip and knee, current treatment options (eg, antibiotic prophylaxis of implant-associated infections have mostly been adapted according to these results. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate patients with surgical site infections following instrumented stabilization of the spine with regard to detected bacteria species and the course of the disease. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective single-center analysis of implant-associated infections of the spine from 2010 to 2014. A total of 138 patients were included in the study. The following parameters were evaluated: C-reactive protein serum concentration, microbiological evaluation of tissue samples, the time course of the disease, indication for instrumented stabilization of the spine, localization of the infection, and the number of revision surgeries required until cessation of symptoms. Results: Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. were most commonly detected (n=69, 50%, followed by fecal bacteria (n=46, 33.3%. In 23.2% of cases, no bacteria were detected despite clinical suspicion of an infection. Most patients suffered from degenerative spine disorders (44.9%, followed by spinal fractures (23.9%, non-degenerative scoliosis (20.3%, and spinal tumors (10.1%. Surgical site infections occurred predominantly within 3

  15. Gouty Arthropathy of the Cervical Spine in a Young Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jie Kuo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a young man with gouty discitis of the cervical spine. To our knowledge, our patient is the youngest patient with cervical gouty discitis reported in the literature. The clinical manifestation was similar to that of cervical spondylosis with radiculopathy. Gouty discitis was diagnosed only when tophi in the disc were found during surgery and proved by pathologic study. Surgical decompression followed by optimization of pharmacologic treatment enabled good recovery from neurologic complications.

  16. The prevalence of disc aging and back pain after fusion extending into the lower lumbar spine. A matched MR study twenty-five years after surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielsson, A J; Nachemson, A L [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Orthopaedics; Cederlund, C G; Ekholm, S [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    2001-03-01

    To determine the long-term outcome after fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in terms of degenerative disc findings diagnosed using MR imaging and to elucidate the clinical consequences. Material and methods: Thirty-two patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, who had undergone spinal fusion using Harrington rods to the lower lumbar spine with one or two unfused discs below the fusion, were re-examined 25 years after the fusion. The re-examinations included validated questionnaires, clinical examination, full standing frontal and lateral radiographs and MR examination of the lower lumbar region. Curve size and degenerative findings on MR images were evaluated by two unbiased radiologists, blinded to the clinical findings. A matched control group of 32 persons without scoliosis was subjected to the same examinations. Results and conclusion: There were significantly more degenerative disc changes (p<0.0001), disc height reduction (p=0.0010) and end-plate changes (p<0.0001 for both upper and lower end-plates) in the lowest unfused disc in the patient group compared with the control group. The MR findings in the lowest unfused disc, but not the one above, in the patient group correlated to lumbar pain intensity as well as to the diminished lumbar lordosis.

  17. The prevalence of disc aging and back pain after fusion extending into the lower lumbar spine. A matched MR study twenty-five years after surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielsson, A.J.; Nachemson, A.L.; Cederlund, C.G.; Ekholm, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the long-term outcome after fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in terms of degenerative disc findings diagnosed using MR imaging and to elucidate the clinical consequences. Material and methods: Thirty-two patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, who had undergone spinal fusion using Harrington rods to the lower lumbar spine with one or two unfused discs below the fusion, were re-examined 25 years after the fusion. The re-examinations included validated questionnaires, clinical examination, full standing frontal and lateral radiographs and MR examination of the lower lumbar region. Curve size and degenerative findings on MR images were evaluated by two unbiased radiologists, blinded to the clinical findings. A matched control group of 32 persons without scoliosis was subjected to the same examinations. Results and conclusion: There were significantly more degenerative disc changes (p<0.0001), disc height reduction (p=0.0010) and end-plate changes (p<0.0001 for both upper and lower end-plates) in the lowest unfused disc in the patient group compared with the control group. The MR findings in the lowest unfused disc, but not the one above, in the patient group correlated to lumbar pain intensity as well as to the diminished lumbar lordosis

  18. Monosegmental fixation for the treatment of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Defino Helton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : A short vertebral arthrodesis has been one of the objectives of the surgical treatment of fractures of the thoracolumbar spine. We present here clinical, functional and radiographic outcome obtained after monosegmental fixation (single posterior or combined anterior and posterior of specific types of unstable thoracolumbar fractures. Materials and Methods : Twenty four patients with fractures of the thoracolumbar spine submitted to monosegmental surgical treatment (Group I - 18 single posterior monosegmental fixations and Group II - 6 combined anterior and posterior fixations were retrospectively evaluated according to clinical, radiographic and functional parameters. The indication for surgery was instability or neurological deficit. All the procedures were indicated and performed by the senior surgeon (Helton LA Defino. Results : The patients from group I were followed-up from 2 to 12 years (mean: 6.65±2.96. The clinical, functional and radiographic results show that a single posterior monosegmental fixation is adequate and a satisfactory procedure to be used in specific types of thoracolumbar spine fractures, The patients from group II were followed-up from 9 to 15 years (mean: 13 ± 2,09 years. On group II the results of clinical evaluation showed moderate indices of residual pain and of satisfaction with the final result. The values obtained by functional evaluation showed that 66.6% of the patients were unable to return to their previous job and presented a moderate disability index (Oswestry = 16.6 and a significant reduction of quality of life based on the SF-36 questionnaire. Radiographic evaluation showed increased kyphosis of the fixed vertebral segment during the late postoperative period, accompanied by a reduction of the height of the intervertebral disk. Conclusion : It is possible to stabilize the fractures which have an anterior good load-bearing capacity by a standalone posterior monosegmental fixation. However

  19. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook; Koh, Yoon-Woo; Kim, Hee-Kyung; Park, Jung-Mi

    2008-01-01

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  20. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  1. [Spondylarthrosis of the cervical spine. Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radl, R; Leixner, G; Stihsen, C; Windhager, R

    2013-09-01

    Chronic neck pain is often associated with spondylarthrosis, whereby segments C4/C5 (C: cervical) are most frequently affected. Spondylarthrosis can be the sole complaint, but it is associated with a degenerative cascade of the spine. The umbrella term for neck pain is the so-called cervical syndrome, which can be differentiated into segmental dysfunction and/or morphological changes of the intervertebral discs and small joints of the vertebral column. Conservative therapy modalities include physical therapy, subcutaneous application of local anesthetics, muscle, nerve and facet joint injections in addition to adequate analgesic and muscle relaxant therapy. If surgery is required, various techniques via dorsal and ventral approaches, depending on the clinic and morphologic changes, can be applied.

  2. Traumatic subdural hematoma in the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jenn-Yeu; Chen, Yu-Hao; Hung, Kuang-Chen; Chang, Ti-Sheng

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic spinal subdural hematoma is rare and its mechanism remains unclear. This intervention describes a patient with mental retardation who was suffering from back pain and progressive weakness of the lower limbs following a traffic accident. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a lumbar subdural lesion. Hematoma was identified in the spinal subdural space during an operation. The muscle power of both lower limbs recovered to normal after surgery. The isolated traumatic spinal subdural hematoma was not associated with intracranial subdural hemorrhage. A spinal subdural hematoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression, especially for patients who have sustained spinal trauma. Emergency surgical decompression is usually the optimal treatment for a spinal subdural hematoma with acute deterioration and severe neurological deficits. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Giant cells reparative granuloma of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, Nancy; Jorge Andres Delgado; Walter Leon

    1998-01-01

    The giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG), was first described by Jaffe in 1953, which found it to be clinically and histopathologically different from the giant cell tumor. The GCRG accounts for 1.0 % of the osseous tumoral lesions, is more frequently found in females (68%) and in patients less than 30 years old (74%). It was believed that it only affected the jaw; it has been reported compromising other locations including the spine (7 cases). We report a case affecting the vertebral bodies of C2-C3 in a 10 years old, female patient, who was studied by plain film and MRI. The histological diagnosis was established at surgery, this report is the first one described in a cervical location and the second studied by MRI

  4. MR imaging evaluation of congenital spine anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, E.A.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Over a 2-year period, 135 patients between the ages of 1 week and 18 years were examined with MR imaging for possible congenital anomalies of the spine and spinal cord. Tethered cords with various other associated pathologies such as lipomas and myelomeningoceles were found in 36 patients. The remaining abnormal examinations consisted of syrinxes, Chiari malformations, diastematomyelia, and conus masses. In 55 patients the studies were interpreted as normal. Of these, three were subsequently shown by surgery of myelography to be abnormal. The first had a thickened filum with a small epidermoid, the second a thickened filum, and the third, with only sagittal images, a diastematomyelia. Children presenting with symptoms highly suspicious for congenital abnormalities but with a normal MR study in multiple planes may still require further evaluation with myelography. Multiplanar MR examination in most instances will be a sufficient evaluation for congenital anomalies

  5. The presentation, incidence, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections after spinal surgery.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Mohamed, A.S.; Skolasky, R.L.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive, retrospective cohort analysis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the presentation, etiology, and treatment of surgical site infections (SSI) after spinal surgery. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: SSI after spine surgery is frequently seen. Small case control studies have been published

  6. A simulation study of spine biofidelity in the hybrid-III 6-year-old ATD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Cao, Libo; Reed, Matthew P; Hu, Jingwen

    2013-01-01

    Because of the lack of pediatric biomechanical data, Hybrid-III (HIII) child anthropomorphic test devices (ATDs) are essentially scaled from the mid-size male ATD based on the geometric considerations. These ATDs inherit a rigid thoracic spine from the adult HIII ATDs, which has been criticized as unrealistic. Therefore, the objective of this study was to explore possible design modifications for improving the spine biofidelity of the HIII 6-year-old ATD. A previously developed and validated HIII 6-year-old MADYMO ATD model was used as the baseline model to investigate the effects of design modifications on the spine biofidelity of the current ATD. Several sets of child volunteer and cadaver test data were considered as the design targets, including child volunteer low-speed crash test data, pediatric cadaver cervical spine tensile test data, and child cadaver crash test data. ATD design modifications include adding an additional joint to the thoracic spine region and changing the joint characteristics at the cervical and lumbar spine regions. Optimization techniques were used to match simulation results to each set of test results. The results indicate that the translational characteristics of the cervical and lumbar spine in the current child ATD need to be reduced to achieve realistic spine flexibility. Adding an additional joint at the thoracic spine region with degree of freedom in both flexion/extension and tension would significantly improve the ATD biofidelity in terms of predicting the overall spine curvature and head excursion in frontal crashes. Future ATD spine modification should focus on reducing the neck and lumbar tension stiffness and adding additional flexibility both in flexion/extension and tension at the thoracic spine region. The child ATD model developed in this study can be used as an important tool to improve child ATD biofidelity and child restraint system design in motor vehicle crashes.

  7. The importance of preoperative tissue sampling for mobile spine chordomas: literature review and report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccato, Jeffrey A; Witiw, Christopher D; Keith, Julia; Dyer, Erin; Saghal, Arjun; da Costa, Leodante

    2018-01-01

    Pre-operative biopsy and diagnosis of chordomas of the mobile spine is indicated as en bloc resections improve outcomes. This review of the management of mobile spine chordomas includes two cases of unexpected mobile spine chordomas where a preoperative tissue diagnosis was decided against and may have altered surgical decision-making. Two lumbar spine chordomas thought to be metastatic and primary bony lesions preoperatively were not biopsied before surgery and eventual pathology revealed chordoma. Preoperative diagnoses were questioned during surgery after an intraoperative tissue diagnosis of chordoma in one case and unclear pathology with non-characteristic tumor morphology in the other. The surgical plan was altered in these cases to maximize resection as en bloc resection reduces the risk of local recurrence in chordoma. Mobile spine chordomas are rare and en bloc resection is recommended, contrary to the usual approach to more common spine tumors. Since en bloc resection of spine chordomas improves disease free survival, it has been recommended that tissue diagnosis be obtained preoperatively when chordoma is considered in the differential diagnosis, in order to guide surgical planning. We present two cases where a preoperative biopsy was considered but not obtained after neuroradiology consultation and imaging review, which may have been managed differently if the diagnosis of spine chordomas were known pre-operatively.

  8. [Selective biopsy of the sentinel lymph node in patients with breast cancer and previous excisional biopsy: is there a change in the reliability of the technique according to time from surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaté-Llobera, A; Notta, P C; Benítez-Segura, A; López-Ojeda, A; Pernas-Simon, S; Boya-Román, M P; Bajén, M T

    2015-01-01

    To assess the influence of time on the reliability of sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in breast cancer patients with previous excisional biopsy (EB), analyzing both the sentinel lymph node detection and the lymph node recurrence rate. Thirty-six patients with cT1/T2 N0 breast cancer and previous EB of the lesion underwent a lymphoscintigraphy after subdermal periareolar administration of radiocolloid, the day before SLNB. Patients were classified into two groups, one including 12 patients with up to 29 days elapsed between EB and SLNB (group A), and another with the remaining 24 in which time between both procedures was of 30 days or more (group B). Scintigraphic and surgical detection of the sentinel lymph node, histological status of the sentinel lymph node and of the axillary lymph node dissection, if performed, and lymphatic recurrences during follow-up, were analyzed. Sentinel lymph node visualization at the lymphoscintigraphy and surgical detection were 100% in both groups. Histologically, three patients showed macrometastasis in the sentinel lymph node, one from group A and two from group B. None of the patients, not even those with malignancy of the sentinel lymph node, relapsed after a medium follow-up of 49.5 months (24-75). Time elapsed between EB and SLNB does not influence the reliability of this latter technique as long as a superficial injection of the radiopharmaceutical is performed, proving a very high detection rate of the sentinel lymph node without evidence of lymphatic relapse during follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  9. CDK10 Mutations in Humans and Mice Cause Severe Growth Retardation, Spine Malformations, and Developmental Delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windpassinger, Christian; Piard, Juliette; Bonnard, Carine; Alfadhel, Majid; Lim, Shuhui; Bisteau, Xavier; Blouin, Stéphane; Ali, Nur'Ain B; Ng, Alvin Yu Jin; Lu, Hao; Tohari, Sumanty; Talib, S Zakiah A; van Hul, Noémi; Caldez, Matias J; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Yigit, Gökhan; Kayserili, Hülya; Youssef, Sameh A; Coppola, Vincenzo; de Bruin, Alain; Tessarollo, Lino; Choi, Hyungwon; Rupp, Verena; Roetzer, Katharina; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Altmüller, Janine; Roy, Sudipto; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Ganger, Rudolf; Grill, Franz; Ben Chehida, Farid; Wollnik, Bernd; Altunoglu, Umut; Al Kaissi, Ali; Reversade, Bruno; Kaldis, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    In five separate families, we identified nine individuals affected by a previously unidentified syndrome characterized by growth retardation, spine malformation, facial dysmorphisms, and developmental delays. Using homozygosity mapping, array CGH, and exome sequencing, we uncovered bi-allelic

  10. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN FAILED BACK SURGERY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    SEN, KK; SINGH, AMARJIT

    1999-01-01

    The failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is a severe, long-lasting, disabling and relatively frequent (5-10%) complication of lumbosacral spine surgery. Wrong level surgery, inadequate surgical techniques, vertebral instability, recurrent disc herniation, and lumbosacral fibrosis are the most frequent causes of FBSS. The results after repeated surgery on recurrent disc herniations are comparable to those after the first intervention, whereas repeated surgery for fibrosis gives only 30-35% succ...

  11. Degenerative disorders of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Puglielli, Edoardo; Splendiani, Alessandra [University of L' Aquila, Department of Radiology, L' Aquila (Italy); Pistoia, Francesca; Spacca, Giorgio [S. Salvatore Hospital, Department of Neuroscience, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Patients with back pain and degenerative disorders of the spine have a significant impact on health care costs. Some authors estimate that up to 80% of all adults experience back pain at some point in their lives. Disk herniation represents one of the most frequent causes. Nevertheless, other degenerative diseases have to be considered. In this paper, pathology and imaging of degenerative spine diseases will be discussed, starting from pathophysiology of normal age-related changes of the intervertebral disk and vertebral body. (orig.)

  12. Degenerative disorders of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Puglielli, Edoardo; Splendiani, Alessandra; Pistoia, Francesca; Spacca, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Patients with back pain and degenerative disorders of the spine have a significant impact on health care costs. Some authors estimate that up to 80% of all adults experience back pain at some point in their lives. Disk herniation represents one of the most frequent causes. Nevertheless, other degenerative diseases have to be considered. In this paper, pathology and imaging of degenerative spine diseases will be discussed, starting from pathophysiology of normal age-related changes of the intervertebral disk and vertebral body. (orig.)

  13. Short-term combined effects of thoracic spine thrust manipulation and cervical spine nonthrust manipulation in individuals with mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaracchio, Michael; Cleland, Joshua A; Hellman, Madeleine; Hagins, Marshall

    2013-03-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To investigate the short-term effects of thoracic spine thrust manipulation combined with cervical spine nonthrust manipulation (experimental group) versus cervical spine nonthrust manipulation alone (comparison group) in individuals with mechanical neck pain. Research has demonstrated improved outcomes with both nonthrust manipulation directed at the cervical spine and thrust manipulation directed at the thoracic spine in patients with neck pain. Previous studies have not determined if thoracic spine thrust manipulation may increase benefits beyond those provided by cervical nonthrust manipulation alone. Sixty-four participants with mechanical neck pain were randomized into 1 of 2 groups, an experimental or comparison group. Both groups received 2 treatment sessions of cervical spine nonthrust manipulation and a home exercise program consisting of active range-of-motion exercises, and the experimental group received additional thoracic spine thrust manipulations. Outcome measures were collected at baseline and at a 1-week follow-up, and included the numeric pain rating scale, the Neck Disability Index, and the global rating of change. Participants in the experimental group demonstrated significantly greater improvements (Ppain rating scale and Neck Disability Index at the 1-week follow-up compared to those in the comparison group. In addition, 31 of 33 (94%) participants in the experimental group, compared to 11 of 31 participants (35%) in the comparison group, indicated a global rating of change score of +4 or higher at the 1-week follow-up, with an associated number needed to treat of 2. Individuals with neck pain who received a combination of thoracic spine thrust manipulation and cervical spine nonthrust manipulation plus exercise demonstrated better overall short-term outcomes on the numeric pain rating scale, the Neck Disability Index, and the global rating of change.

  14. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI study of primary primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yu; Xu Jianmin; Li Ying; Zhang Jingzhong; Zhu Jing

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging in the diagnosis and differentiation of primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) in the thoracic spine. Methods: The dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging of 2 patients (3 times) with PNET in the thoracic spine proved by surgery and pathology were prospectively studied. Results: In the curves of SI-time and CER-time, PNET in the thoracic spine showed a rapid rise to the peak between 60 s and 120 s, then the flat level was kept and no obvious decline was detected after about 3.5 minute. Conclusion: Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI can help to make the diagnosis and differential diagnosis for PNET in the thoracic spine, offer reliable information for the choice of clinical management, and predict the prognosis

  15. Nonmetastatic Ewing’s Sarcoma of the Lumbar Spine in an Adult Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Iacoangeli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the spine is frequently involved in metastatic Ewing's sarcoma, primary involvement of the spine, beside sacrum, is much less frequent, especially in adult patients. Because of the low incidence of these tumors, there are currently no clinical guidelines outlining their management and a multitude of therapeutic strategies have been employed with varying success. The definitive management of Ewing's sarcoma of the spine, as in other locations, could include the combination of three main modalities: aggressive surgery, radiotherapy, and combined chemotherapy. Whenever possible, en bloc spondylectomy or extralesional resection is preferable, providing a better oncological result with a longer survival and a better preservation of the spine biomechanics. This is the lesson we learned about the case, we present here, of nonmetastatic lumbar localization by Ewing’s sarcoma in as adult patient.

  16. The influence of muscle forces on the stress distribution in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C; Rasmussen, J; Simonsen, Erik B.

    2011-01-01

    muscles. Results: In general the von Mises stress was larger by 30 %, and even higher when looking at the von Mises stress distribution in the superio-anterior and central part of the vertebral body and in the pedicles. Conclusion: The application of spine muscles to a finite element model showed markedly...... larger von Mises stress responses in the central and anterior part of the vertebral body, which can be tolerated in the young and healthy spine, but it would increase the risk of compression fractures in the elderly, osteoporotic spine.......Introduction: Previous studies of bone stresses in the human lumbar spine have relied on simplified models when modeling the spinal musculature, even though muscle forces are likely major contributors to the stresses in the vertebral bones. Detailed musculoskeletal spine models have recently become...

  17. Machine Learning-Based Classification of 38 Years of Spine-Related Literature Into 100 Research Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, David C; Metz, Lionel N; Dudli, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective review. To identify the top 100 spine research topics. Recent advances in "machine learning," or computers learning without explicit instructions, have yielded broad technological advances. Topic modeling algorithms can be applied to large volumes of text to discover quantifiable themes and trends. Abstracts were extracted from the National Library of Medicine PubMed database from five prominent peer-reviewed spine journals (European Spine Journal [ESJ], The Spine Journal [SpineJ], Spine, Journal of Spinal Disorders and Techniques [JSDT], Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine [JNS]). Each abstract was entered into a latent Dirichlet allocation model specified to discover 100 topics, resulting in each abstract being assigned a probability of belonging in a topic. Topics were named using the five most frequently appearing terms within that topic. Significance of increasing ("hot") or decreasing ("cold") topic popularity over time was evaluated with simple linear regression. From 1978 to 2015, 25,805 spine-related research articles were extracted and classified into 100 topics. Top two most published topics included "clinical, surgeons, guidelines, information, care" (n = 496 articles) and "pain, back, low, treatment, chronic" (424). Top two hot trends included "disc, cervical, replacement, level, arthroplasty" (+0.05%/yr, P < 0.001), and "minimally, invasive, approach, technique" (+0.05%/yr, P < 0.001). By journal, the most published topics were ESJ-"operative, surgery, postoperative, underwent, preoperative"; SpineJ-"clinical, surgeons, guidelines, information, care"; Spine-"pain, back, low, treatment, chronic"; JNS- "tumor, lesions, rare, present, diagnosis"; JSDT-"cervical, anterior, plate, fusion, ACDF." Topics discovered through latent Dirichlet allocation modeling represent unbiased meaningful themes relevant to spine care. Topic dynamics can provide historical context and direction for future research for aspiring investigators and trainees

  18. Irradiation spine deformity in children treated for neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayfield, J.K.; Riseborough, E.J.; Nehme, M.

    1978-01-01

    A retrospective long-term follow-up review of 56 children with neuroblastoma surviving five years and longer following treatment since 1946 revealed that 57% had developed spine deformity (S.D.) following treatment with 250 kilovolt irradiation at the time of review. The average age at diagnosis was 17 months. Irradiation therapy was delivered to most children before 24 months of age. Follow-up averaged 12.9 years with a range of 5-31 years. Eighty-five per cent of the children had developed structural spine deformity at skeletal maturity and 54% of these children had scoliosis greater than 20 degrees. Sixteen per cent of irradiated children developed structural kyphosis. Non-midline opposing anterior and posterior ports were used most frequently. Mean dosage in patients who developed scoliosis of 20 degrees or more was 3588 rads (spine dosage) and 3746 rads in patients who developed kyphosis. Irradiation through opposing anterior and posterior ports was more commonly associated with the development of S.D. Sixty-six per cent of children who had more than 2000 rads developed S.D. The adolescent growth spurt was associated with an increase in the frequency and severity of spine deformity. This study indicated that moderate to severe S.D. was produced by irradiation in excess of 2000 rads administered with a 250-kilovoltage machine. This study would also suggest that children with neuroblastoma treated with orthovoltage irradiation should be followed closely by the orthopaedic surgeon, the oncologist, the radiotherapist and the paediatrician until the completion of skeletal growth for the development of unsightly structural spine deformity. Early bracing and surgery may be helpful in controlling these deformities in the pre-adolescent to early adolescent years. Continued observation is necessary to determine if current irradiation techniques will minimize or eradicate the incidence and severity of these complications. (author)

  19. Radiology of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1989-01-01

    The author describes some particularities seen in the abnormal or pathological image of the cervical spine: The osteolysis of the cortical bone in the spinous processes, the 'Y' shaped course of the corporeal veins, the notch in interspinous bursitis, and the main forms of constitutional stenosis of the cervical canal. (orig.) [de

  20. SPINE INJURY IN MULAGO HOSPITAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the best outcome in patients with Cervical Spine injury ICSI}. ... which indicates the likely level and pattern of injury ... All trauma patients with altered level ... from arrival In hospital to review bya clinician. ... one ofthe 29 patierns had an op-en mouth view taken. .... Domeier, H_ M. Time reliability of pre-hospital c inical.

  1. spine injury in mulago hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Muiruri

    from arrival in hospital to review by a clinician. Figure i of adequate cervical spine X-rays(22, 25). High pick-up summarizes our findings. rates are only attained with adequate X-rays. Studies done elsewhere have shown that up to 45% of initial. Clinical evaluation: Not all patients were assessed for. X-rays are inadequate.

  2. Opposite effects of fear conditioning and extinction on dendritic spine remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cora Sau Wan; Franke, Thomas F; Gan, Wen-Biao

    2012-02-19

    It is generally believed that fear extinction is a form of new learning that inhibits rather than erases previously acquired fear memories. Although this view has gained much support from behavioural and electrophysiological studies, the hypothesis that extinction causes the partial erasure of fear memories remains viable. Using transcranial two-photon microscopy, we investigated how neural circuits are modified by fear learning and extinction by examining the formation and elimination of postsynaptic dendritic spines of layer-V pyramidal neurons in the mouse frontal association cortex. Here we show that fear conditioning by pairing an auditory cue with a footshock increases the rate of spine elimination. By contrast, fear extinction by repeated presentation of the same auditory cue without a footshock increases the rate of spine formation. The degrees of spine remodelling induced by fear conditioning and extinction strongly correlate with the expression and extinction of conditioned fear responses, respectively. Notably, spine elimination and formation induced by fear conditioning and extinction occur on the same dendritic branches in a cue- and location-specific manner: cue-specific extinction causes formation of dendritic spines within a distance of two micrometres from spines that were eliminated after fear conditioning. Furthermore, reconditioning preferentially induces elimination of dendritic spines that were formed after extinction. Thus, within vastly complex neuronal networks, fear conditioning, extinction and reconditioning lead to opposing changes at the level of individual synapses. These findings also suggest that fear memory traces are partially erased after extinction.

  3. Authorship Trends in Spine Publications from 2000 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haws, Brittany E; Khechen, Benjamin; Movassaghi, Kamran; Yom, Kelly H; Guntin, Jordan A; Cardinal, Kaitlyn L; Shoshana, Noah B; Singh, Kern

    2018-02-06

    Literature review. To examine changes in authorship characteristics for Spine publications from the year 2000-2015. Scientific publications are considered an indication of academic achievement for physicians. Recently, authorship trends have been investigated, however, limited information is available on this topic within spine-specific literature. Original research articles published in Spine in the years 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015 were evaluated. Authorship characteristics were collected for each article, including the number of authors and institutions per publication, first and last author gender, publication origin, and highest degree held by the first and last author. Trends over time were analyzed using numeric and visual descriptive analyses including percentages, means, standard deviations, and graphs. An average of 506 articles per year were published in Spine during the years 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015. The number of articles written by ≥ 10 authors increased during this time (0.9% to 14.4%). There was a substantial increase in the number of multiple institutional affiliations (33.6% to 68.7%) and articles originating from outside North America (47.6% to 55.7%) from 2000 to 2015. The percentage of first authors with bachelor's degrees was higher in 2015 (6.6%) as compared to 2000 (1.4%), and more last authors were identified as MD/PhDs in 2015 (19.2%) than in 2000 (10.0%). Similar female representation was noted for first and last authorship for all years evaluated. The results of this study demonstrate increases in authors per article published in Spine from 2000 to 2015. Additionally, first authors were more likely to hold bachelor's degrees over time. This may be attributed to increasing competition in spine-related fields, necessitating earlier research exposure to aid in academic achievement. Interestingly, the percentage of female authorship has not changed significantly over time, in contrast with much of the previous literature. 2.

  4. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  5. Aquatic antagonists: cutaneous sea urchin spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Clifford; Aronson, Erica R; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M

    2016-11-01

    Injuries from sea urchin spines are commonly seen in coastal regions with high levels of participation in water activities. Although these injuries may seem minor, the consequences vary based on the location of the injury. Sea urchin spine injuries may cause arthritis and synovitis from spines in the joints. Nonjoint injuries have been reported, and dermatologic aspects of sea urchin spine injuries rarely have been discussed. We present a case of a patient with sea urchin spines embedded in the thigh who subsequently developed painful skin nodules. Tissue from the site of the injury demonstrated foreign-body type granulomas. Following the removal of the spines and granulomatous tissue, the patient experienced resolution of the nodules and associated pain. Extraction of sea urchin spines can attenuate the pain and decrease the likelihood of granuloma formation, infection, and long-term sequelae.

  6. Bone tissue engineering for spine fusion : An experimental study on ectopic and orthotopic implants in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaalen, SM; Dhert, WJA; van den Muysenberg, A; Oner, FC; van Blitterswijk, C; Verbout, AJ; de Bruijn, J.D.

    2004-01-01

    Alternatives to the use of autologous bone as a bone graft in spine surgery are needed. The purpose of this study was to examine tissue-engineered bone constructs in comparison with control scaffolds without cells in a posterior spinal implantation model in rats. Syngeneic bone marrow cells were

  7. Dynamic impact testing of hedgehog spines using a dual-arm crash pendulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Nathan B; Hsiung, Bor-Kai; Kennedy, Emily B; Tan, Kwek-Tze

    2016-08-01

    Hedgehog spines are a potential model for impact resistant structures and material. While previous studies have examined static mechanical properties of individual spines, actual collision tests on spines analogous to those observed in the wild have not previously been investigated. In this study, samples of roughly 130 keratin spines were mounted vertically in thin substrates to mimic the natural spine layout on hedgehogs. A weighted crash pendulum was employed to induce and measure the effects of repeated collisions against samples, with the aim to evaluate the influence of various parameters including humidity effect, impact energy, and substrate hardness. Results reveal that softer samples-due to humidity conditioning and/or substrate material used-exhibit greater durability over multiple impacts, while the more rigid samples exhibit greater energy absorption performance at the expense of durability. This trend is exaggerated during high-energy collisions. Comparison of the results to baseline tests with industry standard impact absorbing foam, wherein the spines exhibit similar energy absorption, verifies the dynamic impact absorption capabilities of hedgehog spines and their candidacy as a structural model for engineered impact technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine; Cistos sinoviais lombares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Machado, Marcio Martins [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: anaclaudiaferreira@ig.com.br; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio Junqueira [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Tomografia Computadorizada; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2002-10-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroid injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods. (author)

  9. Primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a child

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yu-Hua [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yao, Xiao-Hong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Pathology, Xin Hua Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China)

    2007-11-15

    We report a primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a 3-year-old girl. MRI revealed a markedly enhancing oval mass associated with focal areas of low signal intensity extending from T11 to L1. The lesion was located posterolateral to the right side of the spinal cord, pushing the conus medullaris and cauda equina anteriorly and to the left. The adjacent spinal cord also showed serpiginous areas of flow void. The mass was completely removed. Microscopic examination and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The patient was free of symptoms after surgery. (orig.)

  10. Primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yu-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Hong

    2007-01-01

    We report a primary intradural mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the spine in a 3-year-old girl. MRI revealed a markedly enhancing oval mass associated with focal areas of low signal intensity extending from T11 to L1. The lesion was located posterolateral to the right side of the spinal cord, pushing the conus medullaris and cauda equina anteriorly and to the left. The adjacent spinal cord also showed serpiginous areas of flow void. The mass was completely removed. Microscopic examination and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. The patient was free of symptoms after surgery. (orig.)

  11. Characteristics and clinical aspects of patients with spinal cord injury undergoing surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Simão de Melo-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To identify the characteristics of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI undergoing surgery. METHODS: Previously, 321 patients with SCI were selected. Clinical and socio-demographic variables were collected. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients were submitted to surgery. Fall and injuries in the upper cervical and lumbosacral regions were associated with conservative treatment. Patients with lesions in the lower cervical spine, worse neurological status, and unstable injuries were associated with surgery. Individuals undergoing surgery were associated with complications after treatment. The authors assessed whether age influenced the characteristics of patients submitted to surgery. Subjects with <60 years of age were associated with motorcycle accidents and the morphologies of injury were fracture-dislocation. Elderly individuals were associated to fall, SCI in the lower cervical spine and the morphology of injury was listhesis. Subsequently, the authors analyzed the gender characteristics in these patients. Women who suffered car accidents were associated to surgery. Women were associated with paraparesis and the morphologic diagnosis was fracture-explosion, especially in the thoracolumbar transition and lumbosacral regions. Men who presented traumatic brain injury and thoracic trauma were related to surgery. These individuals had a worse neurological status and were associated to complications. Men and the cervical region were most affected, thereby, these subjects were analyzed separately (n= 92. The presence of complications increased the length of hospital stay. The simultaneous presence of morphological diagnosis, worst neurological status, tetraplegia, sensory, and motor alterations were associated with complications. Pneumonia and chest trauma were associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: These factors enable investments in prevention, rehabilitation, and treatment.

  12. CT anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Effective CT scanning of the spine requires gantry opening greater than 50 cm, spatial resolution of less than 1 mm, contrast resolution of better than 0.5%, and a method for exact localization and selection of cut levels. With a suitable scanner, excellent images of the intervertebral disc, dural sac, spinal cord, facet joints, ligamentum flavum, and epidural veins can be obtained. The purpose of this report is to describe the normal CT appearance of the spinal soft tissues. (orig.) [de

  13. MRI of the fetal spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, Erin M.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  14. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    OpenAIRE

    Cannada, Lisa K.; Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment...

  15. MRI of the fetal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Erin M. [Departement of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  16. Surgical management of metastatic tumors of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarski, Atanas N; Kitov, Borislav D; Zhelyazkov, Christo B; Raykov, Stefan D; Kehayov, Ivo I; Koev, Ilyan G; Kalnev, Borislav M

    2013-01-01

    To present the results from the clinical presentation, the imaging diagnostics, surgery and postoperative status of 17 patients with cervical spine metastases, to analyse all data and make the respective conclusions and compare them with the available data in the literature. The study analysed data obtained by patients with metastatic cervical tumours treated in St George University Hospital over a period of seven years. All patients underwent diagnostic imaging tests which included, separately or in combination, cervical x-rays, computed tomography scan and magnetic-resonance imaging. Severity of neurological damage and its pre- and postoperative state was graded according to the Frankel Scale. For staging and operating performance we used the Tomita scale and Harrington classification. Seven patients had only one affected vertebra, 4 patients--two vertebrae, one patient--three vertebrae, 2 patients--four vertebrae, and in the other 3 patients more than one segment was affected. Surgery was performed in 12 patients. One level anterior corpectomy was performed in 6 patients, three patients had two-level surgery, and one patient--three-level corpectomy; in the remaining 2 cases we used posterior approach in surgery. Complete corpectomy was performed in 4 patients, subtotal corpectomy was used in 6 patients and partial--in 2 patients. Anterior stabilization system ADD plus (Ulrich GmbH & Co. KG, Ulm, Germany) was implanted in 2 patients; in 8 patients anterior titanium plate and bone graft were used, and in 1 patient--posterior cervical stabilization system. Because of the pronounced pain syndrome and frequent neurological lesions as a result of the cervical spine metastases use of surgery is justified. The main purpose is to maximize tumor resection, achieve optimal spinal cord and nerve root decompression and stabilize the affected segment.

  17. Medical devices of the head, neck, and spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Tim B; Yoshino, Mark T; Dzioba, Robert B; Light, Rick A; Berger, William G

    2004-01-01

    There are many medical devices used for head, neck, and spinal diseases and injuries, and new devices are constantly being introduced. Many of the newest devices are variations on a previous theme. Knowing the specific name of a device is not important. It is important to recognize the presence of a device and to have an understanding of its function as well as to be able to recognize the complications associated with its use. The article discusses the most common and important devices of the head, neck, and spine, including cerebrospinal fluid shunts and the Codman Hakim programmable valve; subdural drainage catheters, subdural electrodes, intracranial electrodes, deep brain stimulators, and cerebellar electrodes; coils, balloons, adhesives, particles, and aneurysm clips; radiation therapy catheters, intracranial balloons for drug installation, and carmustine wafers; hearing aids, cochlear implants, and ossicular reconstruction prostheses; orbital prostheses, intraocular silicone oil, and lacrimal duct stents; anterior and posterior cervical plates, posterior cervical spine wiring, odontoid fracture fixation devices, cervical collars and halo vests; thoracic and lumbar spine implants, anterior and posterior instrumentation for the thoracic and lumbar spine, vertebroplasty, and artificial disks; spinal column stimulators, bone stimulators, intrathecal drug delivery pumps, and sacral stimulators; dental and facial implant devices; gastric and tracheal tubes; vagus nerve stimulators; lumboperitoneal shunts; and temperature- and oxygen-sensing probes. Copyright RSNA, 2004

  18. RSA in Spine: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humadi, Ali; Dawood, Sulaf; Halldin, Klas; Freeman, Brian

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review of literature. This systematic review was conducted to investigate the accuracy of radiostereometric analysis (RSA), its assessment of spinal motion and disorders, and to investigate the limitations of this technique in spine assessment. Systematic review in all current literature to invesigate the role of RSA in spine. The results of this review concluded that RSA is a very powerful tool to detect small changes between 2 rigid bodies such as a vertebral segment. The technique is described for animal and human studies for cervical and lumbar spine and can be used to analyze range of motion, inducible displacement, and fusion of segments. However, there are a few disadvantages with the technique; RSA percutaneous procedure needs to be performed to implant the markers (and cannot be used preoperatively), one needs a specific knowledge to handle data and interpret the results, and is relatively time consuming and expensive. RSA should be looked at as a very powerful research instrument and there are many questions suitable for RSA studies.

  19. Cervical spine motion: radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.; Miyabayashi, T.; Choy, S.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the acceptable range of motion of the cervical spine of the dog is used in the radiographic diagnosis of both developmental and degenerative diseases. A series of radiographs of mature Beagle dogs was used to identify motion within sagittal and transverse planes. Positioning of the dog's head and neck was standardized, using a restraining board, and mimicked those thought to be of value in diagnostic radiology. The range of motion was greatest between C2 and C5. Reports of severe disk degeneration in the cervical spine of the Beagle describe the most severely involved disks to be C4 through C7. Thus, a high range of motion between vertebral segments does not seem to be the cause for the severe degenerative disk disease. Dorsoventral slippage between vertebral segments was seen, but was not accurately measured. Wedging of disks was clearly identified. At the atlantoaxio-occipital region, there was a high degree of motion within the sagittal plane at the atlantoaxial and atlanto-occipital joints; the measurement can be a guideline in the radiographic diagnosis of instability due to developmental anomalies in this region. Lateral motion within the transverse plane was detected at the 2 joints; however, motion was minimal, and the measurements seemed to be less accurate because of rotation of the cervical spine. Height of the vertebral canal was consistently noted to be greater at the caudal orifice, giving some warning to the possibility of overdiagnosis in suspected instances of cervical spondylopathy

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: determining clinical impact and potential harm from overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Nathan M; Alkasab, Tarik K; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2018-04-18

    Lumbar spine MRI is frequently said to be "overused" in the evaluation of low-back pain, yet data concerning the extent of overuse and on potential harmful effects are lacking. To determine the proportion of examinations with a detectable impact on patient care (actionable outcomes). Retrospective cohort study PATIENT SAMPLE: 5,365 outpatient lumbar spine MR examinations OUTCOME MEASURES: Actionable outcomes included: 1) findings leading to an intervention making use of anatomical information such as surgery; 2) new diagnoses of cancer, infection, or fracture; or 3) following known lumbar spine pathology. Potential harm was assessed by identifying examinations where suspicion of cancer or infection was raised but no positive diagnosis made. A medical record aggregation/search system was used to identify lumbar spine MR examinations with positive outcome measures. Patient notes were examined to verify outcomes. A random sample was manually inspected to identify missed positive outcomes. The proportion of actionable lumbar spine MRIs was 13%, although 93% were appropriate according to American College of Radiology guidelines. Of 36 suspected cases of cancer/infection 81% were false positives. Further investigations were ordered on 59% of suspicious exams, 86% of which were false positives. The proportion of lumbar spine MR examinations that inform management is small. The false positive rate and proportion of false positives involving further investigation is high. Further study to improve the efficiency of imaging is warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Trauma of the lumbar spine and the thoracolumbar junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, W.; Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients who have experienced high energy trauma have a particularly high risk of suffering from fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The detection of spinal injuries and the correct classification of fractures before surgery are not only absolute requirements for the implementation of appropriate surgical treatment but they are also decisive for the choice of surgical procedure. By the application of spiral computed tomography (CT) crucial additional information on the morphology of the fracture can be gained in order to estimate the fracture type and possibly the indications for specific surgical treatment options. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is ideally suited to provide valuable additional information regarding injuries to the discoligamentous structures of the spine. Magerl et al. developed a comprehensive classification especially for injuries of the thoracic and lumbar spine, which was adopted by the working group for osteosynthesis (AO). This is based on a 2-pillar model of the spinal column. The classification is based on the pathomorphological characteristics of fractures recognizable by imaging. The injury pattern is of particular importance. In spinal trauma a distinction is made between stable and unstable fractures. The treatment of spinal injuries depends on the severity of the overall injury pattern. Besides adequate initial treatment at the scene, a trauma CT should be immediately carried out in order that no injuries are overlooked and to ensure a rapid decision on the treatment procedure. (orig.) [de

  2. Posterior longitudinal ligament status in cervical spine bilateral facet dislocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrino, John A.; Manton, Geoffrey L.; Morrison, William B.; Flanders, Adam E.; Vaccaro, Alex R.; Schweitzer, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    It is generally accepted that cervical spine bilateral facet dislocation results in complete disruption of the posterior longitudinal ligament. The goal of this study was to evaluate the integrity of numerous spine-stabilizing structures by MRI, and to determine if any associations between injury patterns exist with respect to the posterior longitudinal ligament status. Retrospective case series. A retrospective review was performed of 30 cervical spine injury subjects with bilateral facet dislocation. Assessment of 1.5T MRI images was carried out for: intervertebral disc disruption, facet fracture, and ligamentous disruption. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate for associations between various injury patterns and posterior longitudinal ligament status. The frequency of MRI abnormalities was: anterior longitudinal ligament disruption (26.7%), disc herniation or disruption (90%), posterior longitudinal ligament disruption (40%), facet fracture (63.3%) and disruption of the posterior column ligament complex (97%). There were no significant associations between injury to the posterior longitudinal ligament and other structures. Compared to surgical reports, MRI was accurate for determining the status for 24 of 26 ligaments (three of three anterior longitudinal ligament, seven of nine posterior longitudinal ligament, and 14 of 14 posterior column ligament complex) but generated false negatives in two instances (in both MRI showed an intact posterior longitudinal ligament that was torn at surgery). (orig.)

  3. The surgical management of the rheumatoid spine: Has the evolution of surgical intervention changed outcomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Surgery for the rheumatoid cervical spine has been shown to stabilize the unstable spine; arrest/improve the progression of neurological deficit, help neck pain, and possibly decelerate the degenerative disease process. Operative intervention for the rheumatoid spine has significantly changed over the last 30 years. Aims: The purpose of this study was to review all cases of cervical rheumatoid spine requiring surgical intervention in a single unit over the last 30 years. Materials and Methods: A prospectively-maintained spine database was retrospectively searched for all cases of rheumatoid spine, leading to a review of indications, imaging, Ranawat and Myelopathy Disability Index measures, surgical morbidity, and survival curve analysis. Results: A total of 224 cases were identified between 1981 and 2011. Dividing the data into three time-epochs, there has been a significant increase in the ratio of segment-saving Goel-Harms C1-C2: Occipitocervical fixation (OCF surgery and survival has increased between 1981 and 2011 from 30% to 51%. Patients undergoing C1-C2 fixation were comparatively less myelopathic and in a better Ranawat class preoperatively, but postoperative outcome measures were well-preserved with favorable mortality rates over mean 39.6 months of follow-up. However, 11% of cases required OCF at mean 28 months post-C1-C2 fixation, largely due to instrumentation failure (80%. Conclusion: We present the largest series of surgically managed rheumatoid spines, revealing comparative data on OCF and C1-C2 fixation. Although survival has improved over the last 30 years, there have been changes in medical, surgical and perioperative management over that period of time too confounding the interpretation; however, the analysis presented suggests that rheumatoid patients presenting early in the disease process may benefit from C1 to C2 fixation, albeit with a proportion requiring OCF at a later time.

  4. Total motion generated in the unstable thoracolumbar spine during management of the typical trauma patient: a comparison of methods in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasarn, Mark L; Zhou, Haitao; Dubose, Dewayne; Rossi, Gianluca Del; Conrad, Bryan P; Horodyski, Marybeth; Rechtine, Glenn R

    2012-05-01

    The proper prehospital and inpatient management of patients with unstable spinal injuries is critical for prevention of secondary neurological compromise. The authors sought to analyze the amount of motion generated in the unstable thoracolumbar spine during various maneuvers and transfers that a trauma patient would typically be subjected to prior to definitive fixation. Five fresh cadavers with surgically created unstable L-1 burst fractures were tested. The amount of angular motion between the T-12 and L-2 vertebral segments was measured using a 3D electromagnetic motion analysis device. A complete sequence of maneuvers and transfers was then performed that a patient would be expected to go through from the time of injury until surgical fixation. These maneuvers and transfers included spine board placement and removal, bed transfers, lateral therapy, and turning the patient prone onto the operating table. During each of these, the authors performed what they believed to be the most commonly used versus the best techniques for preventing undesirable motion at the injury level. When placing a spine board there was more motion in all 3 planes with the log-roll technique, and this difference reached statistical significance for axial rotation (p = 0.018) and lateral bending (p = 0.003). Using logrolling for spine board removal resulted in increased motion again, and this was statistically significant for flexion-extension (p = 0.014). During the bed transfer and lateral therapy, the log-roll technique resulted in more motion in all 3 planes (p ≤ 0.05). When turning the cadavers prone for surgery there was statistically more angular motion in each plane for manually turning the patient versus the Jackson table turn (p ≤ 0.01). The total motion was decreased by almost 50% in each plane when using an alternative to the log-roll techniques during the complete sequence (p ≤ 0.007). Although it is unknown how much motion in the unstable spine is necessary to cause

  5. Instrumentos de avaliação clínica e funcional em cirurgia da coluna vertebral Instrumentos de evaluación clínica y funcional en cirugía de la columna vertebral Instruments of clinical and functional evaluation in spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alguns dos indivíduos submetidos à cirurgia de coluna vertebral terão desfechos pós-operatório desfavoráveis, independente do êxito técnico. Esse insucesso gera aumento da morbidade e dos custos socioeconômicos. Sabe-se que fatores psicossociais interferem na impressão do sujeito. Com o propósito de identificá-los, tem-se estimulado a busca de preditores prognósticos por meio de instrumentos de triagem. Porém, a eleição do mais adequado pode ser difícil, já que existe um grande número de questionários. Entre os aspectos abordados por eles, podemos citar: incapacidade funcional, qualidade de vida, satisfação, dor, depressão, distúrbios do humor e atividade funcional. O trabalho objetiva revisar as particularidades, indicações e limitações dos instrumentos de avaliação do paciente com doença na coluna vertebral.Algunos individuos, sometidos a la cirugía de columna vertebral, tendrán resultados posoperatorios desfavorables, independientemente del éxito técnico. Esta falla causa aumento de la morbilidad y de los costos socioeconómicos. Se sabe que factores psicosociales interfieren en las impresiones del sujeto. Con la finalidad de identificarlos, se ha estimulado la búsqueda de predictores pronosticadores mediante instrumentos de selección. Sin embargo, elegir el más adecuado puede ser difícil, ya que existe un gran número de cuestionarios. Entre los aspectos abarcados por estos, podemos citar: incapacidad funcional, calidad de vida, satisfacción, dolor, depresión, disturbios del humor y actividad funcional. El trabajo tiene el objetivo de revisar las particularidades, indicaciones y limitaciones de los instrumentos de evaluación del paciente con enfermedad en la columna vertebral.Some individuals submitted to spine surgery will have unfavorable postoperative outcomes, regardless of the success of the technical procedure. This failure leads to an increase in morbidity and socioeconomic costs. Also, it is

  6. Complications of Minimally Invasive, Tubular Access Surgery for Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald A. Ross

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of the study was to review the author’s large series of minimally invasive spine surgeries for complication rates. The author reviewed a personal operative database for minimally access spine surgeries done through nonexpandable tubular retractors for extradural, nonfusion procedures. Consecutive cases (n=1231 were reviewed for complications. There were no wound infections. Durotomy occurred in 33 cases (2.7% overall or 3.4% of lumbar cases. There were no external or symptomatic internal cerebrospinal fluid leaks or pseudomeningoceles requiring additional treatment. The only motor injuries were 3 C5 root palsies, 2 of which resolved. Minimally invasive spine surgery performed through tubular retractors can result in a low wound infection rate when compared to open surgery. Durotomy is no more common than open procedures and does not often result in the need for secondary procedures. New neurologic deficits are uncommon, with most observed at the C5 root. Minimally invasive spine surgery, even without benefits such as less pain or shorter hospital stays, can result in considerably lower complication rates than open surgery.

  7. 49 CFR 572.19 - Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-Year-Old Child § 572.19 Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. (a) The lumbar spine, abdomen, and pelvis... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis. 572.19 Section..., the lumbar spine assembly shall flex by an amount that permits the rigid thoracic spine to rotate from...

  8. Paediatric cervical spine injury but NEXUS negative

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Melanie J; Jardine, Andrew D

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine injuries in paediatric patients following trauma are extremely rare. The National Emergency X‐Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) guidelines are a set of clinical criteria used to guide physicians in identifying trauma patients requiring cervical spine imaging. It is validated for use in children. A case of a child who did not fulfil the NEXUS criteria for imaging but was found to have a cervical spine fracture is reported.

  9. Tuberculosis of the Subaxial cervical spine: a case series from Tema, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, N B

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is endemic in West Africa. However, TB of the cervical spine is rare. To report a series of patients with TB of the sub-axial cervical spine (SACS), in order to illustrate its presentation, treatment and outcome. The patients were studied with respect to clinical history and physical examination. Laboratory tests, plain cervical spine X ray studies and myelography with post-myelographic CT scans were used for diagnosis. All patients underwent surgery and antituberculous therapy (ATT). Histopathologic results of surgical specimens were also analysed. All the patients were male and presented with severe neck pain and long tract signs. Osteomyelitis of the SACS was evident with disc space involvement and prevertebral soft tissue swelling. None of the patients had a history of pulmonary TB or TB meningitis; none had a positive Mantoux test. All patients improved neurologically after surgery and ATT. Although tuberculosis of the cervical spine is rare, the possibility of the disease should be considered when patients from areas in which the disease is endemic report with severe neck pain. Surgery could be indicated in cases with associated neurologic deficit and or spinal column instability. Anti-tuberculosis therapy should be continued for at least six months.

  10. Outcome and treatment of postoperative spine surgical site infections: predictors of treatment success and failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruo, Keishi; Berven, Sigurd H

    2014-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication after spine surgery. The management of SSI is characterized by significant variability, and there is little guidance regarding an evidence-based approach. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors associated with treatment failure of SSI after spine surgery. A total of 225 consecutive patients with SSI after spine surgery between July 2005 and July 2010 were studied retrospectively. Patients were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. Outcome and risk factors were analyzed in 197 patients having 1 year of follow-up. Treatment success was defined as resolution within 90 days. A total of 126 (76 %) cases were treated with retention of implants. Forty-three (22 %) cases had treatment failure with five (2.5 %) cases resulting in death. Lower rates of treatment success were observed with late infection (38 %), fusion with fixation to the ilium (67 %), Propionibacterium acnes (43 %), poly microbial infection (68 %), >6 operated spinal levels (67 %), and instrumented cases (73 %). Higher rates of early resolution were observed with superficial infection (93 %), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (95 %), and failure. Superficial infection and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus were predictors of early resolution. Postoperative spine infections were treated with aggressive surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. High rates of treatment failure occurred in cases with late infection, long instrumented fusions, polymicrobial infections, and Propionibacterium acnes. Removal of implants and direct or staged re-implantation may be a useful strategy in cases with high risk of treatment failure.

  11. A role for thrombospondin-1 deficits in astrocyte-mediated spine and synaptic pathology in Down's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Garcia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Down's syndrome (DS is the most common genetic cause of mental retardation. Reduced number and aberrant architecture of dendritic spines are common features of DS neuropathology. However, the mechanisms involved in DS spine alterations are not known. In addition to a relevant role in synapse formation and maintenance, astrocytes can regulate spine dynamics by releasing soluble factors or by physical contact with neurons. We have previously shown impaired mitochondrial function in DS astrocytes leading to metabolic alterations in protein processing and secretion. In this study, we investigated whether deficits in astrocyte function contribute to DS spine pathology.Using a human astrocyte/rat hippocampal neuron coculture, we found that DS astrocytes are directly involved in the development of spine malformations and reduced synaptic density. We also show that thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1, an astrocyte-secreted protein, possesses a potent modulatory effect on spine number and morphology, and that both DS brains and DS astrocytes exhibit marked deficits in TSP-1 protein expression. Depletion of TSP-1 from normal astrocytes resulted in dramatic changes in spine morphology, while restoration of TSP-1 levels prevented DS astrocyte-mediated spine and synaptic alterations. Astrocyte cultures derived from TSP-1 KO mice exhibited similar deficits to support spine formation and structure than DS astrocytes.These results indicate that human astrocytes promote spine and synapse formation, identify astrocyte dysfunction as a significant factor of spine and synaptic pathology in the DS brain, and provide a mechanistic rationale for the exploration of TSP-1-based therapies to treat spine and synaptic pathology in DS and other neurological conditions.

  12. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw

    2013-01-01

    an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the localization......Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...

  13. A Computational Investigation Of Minimal Invasive Spine Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sten; Rasmussen, John

    , stature of 1.73 m and body mass 62 kg. Results: MISS is preferable to TOSS from the point-of-view of muscle activation, except for the case of L5S1 fusion. It is remarkable that the case of L3L4 appears to be more sensitive to the TOSS approach than any of the other cases, including the double fusion L4S1......4S1TOSS. This is because both procedures sacrifice muscles spanning L5S1 but only the L4S1 procedure provides force and moment stabilization of L5S1by fusion. Conclusions: The model indicates that the muscle preservation obtained by MISS leaves the patient with significantly better muscular...

  14. spine deformity surgery at the kenyatta national hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    instrumentation system has several disadvantages including implant ... lordosis, plus there was the added risk of neurological injury as the wires ... It has many advantages over first and .... However prices are coming down, and projects such as the ones being ... surgeons receive training and the cost of implants become ...

  15. Preliminary Report of Instrumentation in Tuberculous Lumbosacral Spine

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    T Zin-Naing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of spinal tuberculosis treatment are to eradicate the disease, to prevent the development of paraplegia and kyphotic deformity, to manage the existing deformity and neurological deficit, to allow early ambulation and to return the patient back to daily life. Methods for the treatment of tuberculosis of vertebra are still controversial. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy as well as external supports and surgery is indicated for deformity of spine, severe pain, or neurological compromise conditions. Most cases in our country were late presentations with disc space already infected, and after débridement there was a large gap needing bone graft to enhance bony fusion and anterior column support. Although the spine was infected, instrumentation posed no additional hazard in terms of tuberculous discitis. Oga et al. reported that M. tuberculosis has low adhesion capability and forms only a few microcolonies surrounded by a biofilm. Moon et al. stated that interbody fusion performed with classical anterior radical surgery per se was ineffective in the correction of kyphosis and did not prevent the increase in kyphosis angle. The present study focuses on collected clinical and radiographic outcomes in ten patients who underwent Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF for tuberculous lumbosacral spine. All the cases had instability with kyphotic deformity or loss of lordosis. Clinical outcomes were measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, modified MacNab Criteria, and radiographic outcomes (segmental kyphotic angle and total lumbar lordotic, TLL, angle on follow-up to six months. The mean VAS back scores showed decrease, and kyphotic angles and lordotic angles improved. Three cases had excellent results, six good and one fair using the modified MacNab criteria.

  16. Analysis of scientific output by spine surgeons from Japan: January 2000 to December 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Guarise da Silva, Pedro; Quadros, Francine Wurzius; Merlin, Luiz Henrique; Radaelli, Lucas; Guyot, Juan Pablo; Dozza, Diego; Martins, Délio; Scheverin, Nicolas; Riew, Daniel K; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Falavigna, Asdrubal

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the growing body of work on spine pathology has led to developments and refinements in the areas of basic science, diagnosis and treatment of a variety of spine conditions. Scientific publications have a global impact on the international scientific community as they share vital information that can be applied by physicians worldwide to solve their everyday medical problems. The historical background of scientific publication in journals in Japan on the subject of spine is unclear. We performed a literature search for publications by Japanese spine surgeons regarding spine or spinal cord topics using an online database: Pubmed.gov (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/). The results were stored and analyzed at the Laboratory of Clinical Studies and Basic Models of Spinal Disorders of the University of Caxias do Sul. Results were limited to articles published from January 2000 to December 2013. The search terms used were "Japan" AND ("spine" OR "spinal diseases" OR "spinal cord" OR "spinal cord diseases" OR "vertebroplasty" OR "arthrodesis" OR "discectomy" OR "foraminotomy" OR "laminectomy" OR "denervation" OR "back injuries"). Japanese spine surgeons were defined as spine surgeons from orthopedic or neurosurgical specialties where the publication was affiliated with Japanese services. A total of 16,140 articles were identified by the Medline search. Most of the articles were excluded based on information provided in the title and abstract as they were not related to spine surgery. This study comprised 1768 articles published in the Medline database by Japanese spine surgeons from 2000 to 2013. The number of publications rose in a linear fashion, with the number of papers published increasing by 5.4 per year (p = 0.038). In recent years the publications were increasingly performed in conjunction with the neurosurgery and orthopedics specialties. This study showed a clear increase in publications (on Medline) by Japanese spine surgeons over the

  17. Surgical management of cervical spine instability in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients

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    Pedro Miguel Marques

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cross-sectional study that aims to evaluate the results of cervical spine surgeries due to rheumatoid arthritis (RA instability, between January of 2000 and of 2012 in a main Portuguese centre Methods: Patients followed on Rheumatology submitted to cervical spine fusion due to atlantoaxial (AAI, sub-axial (SAI or cranio-cervical (CCI instabilities between 2000-2012 were included. Information about the surgical procedure and associated complications was gathered and imagiologic and clinical indexes before and after surgery (as anterior and posterior atlanto-axial interval and Ranawat index were evaluated and compared using adequate statistics. Results: Forty-five patients with RA were included: 25 with AAI, 13 with CCI and 7 with SAI. Ten AAI and 4 CCI patients were submitted to wiring stabilization techniques; 15 AAI and 9 CCI patients to rigid ones; and in all patients with SAI an anterior cervical arthrodesis was chosen. There is a significant increase in PADI and a decrease in AADI in the postoperative evaluation (p

  18. Tertiary syphilis in the lumbar spine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Niu, Feng; Liu, Lidi; Sha, Hui; Wang, Yimei; Zhao, Song

    2017-07-24

    The incidence of tertiary syphilis involvement in the spinal column with destructive bone lesions is very rare. It is difficult to establish the correct diagnosis from radiographs and histological examination alone. Limited data are available on surgical treatment to tertiary syphilitic spinal lesions. In this article, we report a case of tertiary syphilis in the lumbar spine with osteolytic lesions causing cauda equina compression. A 44-year-old man who suffered with low back pain for 6 months and progressive radiating pain at lower extremity for 1 week. Radiologic findings showed osteolytic lesion and new bone formation in the parts of the bodies of L4 and L5. Serum treponema pallidum hemagglutination (TPHA) test was positive. A surgery of posterior debridement, interbody and posterolateral allograft bone fusion with instrumentation from L3 to S1 was performed. The low back pain and numbness abated after operation. But the follow-up radiographs showed absorption of the bone grafts and failure of instrumentation. A Charcot's arthropathy was formed between L4 and L5. It is challenging to diagnose the tertiary syphilis in the spine. Surgery is a reasonable auxiliary method to antibiotic therapy for patients who suffered with neuropathy. Charcot's arthropathy should be considered as an operative complication.

  19. Retropharyngeal cold abscess without Pott's spine | Singh | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Retropharyngeal cold abscess without Pott's spine. ... pyogenic osteomyelitis, tube‚rculosis of the spine, or external injuries caused by endoscopes ... in an adult woman without tuberculosis of the cervical spine who was managed surgically by ...

  20. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between

  1. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  2. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragón-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weijgaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between

  3. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray ... MRI): Lumbar Spine Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  4. Pott's Spine with Bilateral Psoas Abscesses

    OpenAIRE

    Masavkar, Sanjeevani; Shanbag, Preeti; Inamdar, Prithi

    2012-01-01

    A high degree of suspicion and appropriate imaging studies are required for the early diagnosis of Pott's spine. We describe a 4-year-old boy with Pott's disease of the lumbar spine with bilateral psoas abscesses. The child responded to conservative treatment with antituberculous treatment and ultrasonographically guided percutaneous drainage of the abscesses.

  5. Current Animal Models of Postoperative Spine Infection and Potential Future Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eStavrakis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Implant related infection following spine surgery is a devastating complication for patients and can potentially lead to significant neurological compromise, disability, morbidity, and even mortality. This paper provides an overview of the existing animal models of postoperative spine infection and highlights the strengths and weaknesses of each model. In addition there is discussion regarding potential modifications to these animal models to better evaluate preventative and treatment strategies for this challenging complication. Current models are effective in simulating surgical procedures but fail to evaluate infection longitudinally using multiple techniques. Potential future modifications to these models include using advanced imaging technologies to evaluate infection, use of bioluminescent bacterial species, and testing of novel treatment strategies against multiple bacterial strains. There is potential to establish a postoperative spine infection model using smaller animals, such as mice, as these would be a more cost-effective screening tool for potential therapeutic interventions.

  6. Trauma related changes in cervical spine and spinal cord in myelography and MRI; Zmiany pourazowe kregoslupa i rdzenia w odcinku szyjnym, w mielografii i w obrazie NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozniak, E.; Bronarski, J.; Kiwerski, J.; Krasuski, M. [Akademia Medyczna, Warsaw (Poland)]|[Stoleczny Zespol Rehabilitacji, Konstancin (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    Myelographic and MRI results in 14 patients treated in 1992 because of cervical spine injury with neurological complications have been presented. Myelography proves to be useful in posttraumatic spine diagnostics but in some cases does not render sufficient information, especially if the trauma superimposes previously existing pathological changes. MRI is exceptionally valuable diagnostic modality in cervical spine injuries offering an advantage of both early and late evaluation