WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous light microscopic

  1. The Light Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the function of the various parts of the microscope and their integration in the formation of an optical image. Presents a procedure for setting up a microscope to obtain maximum resolution and contrast for each objective lens at all magnifications. (JRH)

  2. Light microscope alignment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnell, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Instructions for proper alignment for each of the most common wide field light microscopy contrast techniques are presented: bright field, polarization, dark field, phase contrast, differential interference contrast, and fluorescence. These are then followed by methods on photomicrography, measurement, and cleaning. An extensive set of Notes provides practical tips for each of these methods.

  3. Microscopic structure for light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The microscopic structure for light nuclei e.g. 4 He, 7 Li and 8 Be is considered in the frame work of the generator coordinate method (GCM). The physical interpretation of our GCM is also discussed. The GC amplitudes are used to calculate the various properties like charge and magnetic RMS radii, form factors, electromagnetic moments, astrophysical S-factor, Bremsstrahlung weighted cross sections, relative wavefunctions and vertex functions etc. All the calculated quantities agree well with the values determined experimentally. (author). 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Major Components of the Light Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Centonze Frohlich, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The light microscope is a basic tool for the cell biologist, who should have a thorough understanding of how it works, how it should be aligned for different applications, and how it should be maintained as required to obtain maximum image-forming capacity and resolution. The components of the microscope are described in detail here.

  5. Major components of the light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze Frohlich, Victoria

    2008-07-30

    The light microscope is a basic tool for the cell biologist, who should have a thorough understanding of how it works, how it should be aligned for different applications, and how it should be maintained as required to obtain maximum image-forming capacity and resolution. The components of the microscope are described in detail here.

  6. Shear Brillouin light scattering microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moonseok; Besner, Sebastien; Ramier, Antoine; Kwok, Sheldon J J; An, Jeesoo; Scarcelli, Giuliano; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2016-01-11

    Brillouin spectroscopy has been used to characterize shear acoustic phonons in materials. However, conventional instruments had slow acquisition times over 10 min per 1 mW of input optical power, and they required two objective lenses to form a 90° scattering geometry necessary for polarization coupling by shear phonons. Here, we demonstrate a confocal Brillouin microscope capable of detecting both shear and longitudinal phonons with improved speeds and with a single objective lens. Brillouin scattering spectra were measured from polycarbonate, fused quartz, and borosilicate in 1-10 s at an optical power level of 10 mW. The elastic constants, phonon mean free path and the ratio of the Pockels coefficients were determined at microscopic resolution.

  7. Microscope spectrometer for light scattering investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, Aude; Lopez-Rios, Tomas; Dumont, Sylvain; Gay, Frédéric; Quémerais, Pascal

    2010-08-01

    We describe a setup including a microscope to study volumes of a few mum(3) by static and dynamic light scattering (DLS) in a backscattering configuration. Light scattered by individual objects of micrometric size can be analyzed in the 400-800?nm spectral range. This setup can also be employed to study both diluted and concentrated colloidal solutions by DLS measurements. For diluted solutions we found evidence of the fluctuations of the number of particles in a confocal volume. We discuss their contribution to the autocorrelation function of the scattered intensity measured as a function of time.

  8. Implementation of a virtual correlative light and transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Tilman; Zuber, Benoît; Gawatz, Gerlinde; Herrmann, Gudrun

    2013-07-01

    In the long run, the widespread use of slide scanners by pathologists requires an adaptation of teaching methods in histology and cytology in order to target these new possibilities of image processing and presentation via the internet. Accordingly, we were looking for a tool with the possibility to teach microscopic anatomy, histology, and cytology of tissue samples which would be able to combine image data from light and electron microscopes independently of microscope suppliers. With the example of a section through the villus of jejunum, we describe here how to process image data from light and electron microscopes in order to get one image-stack which allows a correlation of structures from the microscopic anatomic to the cytological level. With commercially available image-presentation software that we adapted to our needs, we present here a platform which allows for the presentation of this new but also of older material independently of microscope suppliers. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Effect of operating microscope light on brain temperature during craniotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayatri, Parthasarathi; Menon, Girish G; Suneel, Puthuvassery R

    2013-07-01

    Operating microscopes used during neurosurgery are fitted with xenon light. Burn injuries have been reported because of xenon microscope lighting as the intensity of xenon light is 300 W. We designed this study to find out if the light of operating microscope causes an increase in temperature of the brain tissue, which is exposed underneath. Twenty-one adult patients scheduled for elective craniotomies were enrolled. Distal esophageal temperature (T Eso), brain temperature under the microscope light (T Brain), and brain temperature under dura mater (T Dura) were measured continuously at 15-minute intervals during microscope use. The irrigation fluid temperature, room temperature, intensity of the microscope light, and the distance of the microscope from the brain surface were kept constant. The average age of the patients was 44±15 years (18 males and 3 females). The mean duration of microscope use was 140±39 minutes. There were no significant changes in T Brain and T Dura and T Eso over time. T Dura was significantly lower than T Brain both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. T Brain was significantly lower than T Eso both at time 0 and 60 minutes but not at 90 minutes. The T Dura remained significantly lower than T Eso at 0, 60, and 90 minutes. Our study shows that there is no significant rise in brain temperature under xenon microscope light up to 120 minutes duration, at intensity of 60% to 70%, from a distance of 20 to 25 cm from the brain surface.

  10. Integration of a high-NA light microscope in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonnevylle, A C; Van Tol, R F C; Liv, N; Narvaez, A C; Effting, A P J; Kruit, P; Hoogenboom, J P

    2013-10-01

    We present an integrated light-electron microscope in which an inverted high-NA objective lens is positioned inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM objective lens and the light objective lens have a common axis and focal plane, allowing high-resolution optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on the same area of a sample simultaneously. Components for light illumination and detection can be mounted outside the vacuum, enabling flexibility in the construction of the light microscope. The light objective lens can be positioned underneath the SEM objective lens during operation for sub-10 μm alignment of the fields of view of the light and electron microscopes. We demonstrate in situ epifluorescence microscopy in the SEM with a numerical aperture of 1.4 using vacuum-compatible immersion oil. For a 40-nm-diameter fluorescent polymer nanoparticle, an intensity profile with a FWHM of 380 nm is measured whereas the SEM performance is uncompromised. The integrated instrument may offer new possibilities for correlative light and electron microscopy in the life sciences as well as in physics and chemistry. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  11. Utility and safety of a novel surgical microscope laser light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Taku; Bakhit, Mudathir S; Suzuki, Kyouichi; Sakuma, Jun; Fujii, Masazumi; Murakami, Yuta; Ito, Yuhei; Sugano, Tetsuo; Saito, Kiyoshi

    2018-01-01

    Tissue injuries caused by the thermal effects of xenon light microscopes have previously been reported. Due to this, the development of a safe microscope light source became a necessity. A newly developed laser light source is evaluated regarding its effectiveness and safety as an alternative to conventional xenon light source. We developed and tested a new laser light source for surgical microscopes. Four experiments were conducted to compare xenon and laser lights: 1) visual luminance comparison, 2) luminous and light chromaticity measurements, 3) examination and analysis of visual fatigue, and 4) comparison of focal temperature elevation due to light source illumination using porcine muscle samples. Results revealed that the laser light could be used at a lower illumination value than the xenon light (p source is more efficient and safer than a conventional xenon light source. It lacks harmful ultraviolet waves, has a longer lifespan, a lower focal temperature than that of other light sources, a wide range of brightness and color production, and improved safety for the user's vision. Further clinical trials are necessary to validate the impact of this new light source on the patient's outcome and prognosis.

  12. Minimizing light exposure with the programmable array microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caarls, W; Rieger, B; De Vries, A H B; Arndt-Jovin, D J; Jovin, T M

    2011-01-01

    The exposure of fluorophores to intense illumination in a microscope often results in photobleaching and phototoxicity, thus constituting a major limiting factor in time lapse live cell or single molecule imaging. Laser scanning confocal microscopes are particularly prone to this problem, inasmuch as they require high irradiances to compensate for the inherently low duty cycle of point scanning systems. In the attempt to maintain adequate speed and signal-to-noise ratios, the fluorophores are often driven into saturation, thereby generating a nonlinear response. One approach for reducing photodegradation in the laser scanning confocal microscope is represented by controlled light exposure microscopy, introduced by Manders and colleagues. The strategy is to reduce the illumination intensity in both background areas (devoid of information) as well as in bright foreground regions, for which an adequate signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with lower excitation levels than those required for the less intense foreground pixels/voxels. Such a variable illumination scheme can also be exploited in widefield microscopes that employ lower irradiance but higher illumination duty cycles. We report here on the adaptation of the controlled light exposure microscopy principle to the programmable array microscope, which achieves optical sectioning by use of a spatial light modulator (SLM) in an image plane as a programmable mask for illumination and conjugate (and nonconjugate) detection. By incorporating the basic controlled light exposure microscopy concept for minimizing exposure, we have obtained a reduction in the rate of photobleaching of up to ~5-fold, while maintaining an image quality comparable to regular imaging with the programmable array microscope. © 2010 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2010 The Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04)

  14. Incidence, risk factors, and morphology in operating microscope light retinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khwarg, S.G.; Linstone, F.A.; Daniels, S.A.; Isenberg, S.J.; Hanscom, T.A.; Geoghegan, M.; Straatsma, B.R.

    1987-03-15

    A review of 135 consecutive cataract operations identified ten cases (7.4%) of operating microscope light retinopathy. Ophthalmoscopically, these light retinopathy lesions appeared as a focal pigment epithelial change with varying degrees of pigment clumping in the center. Fluorescein angiography accentuated the lesion by demonstrating a sharply demarcated transmission defect, occasionally with multiple satellite lesions. The shape of the lesion matched the shape of the illuminating source of the particular operating microscope used during the surgery. The most significant risk factor associated with the production of these light retinopathy lesions was prolonged operating time. Mean total operating time for the ten patients with light retinopathy was 51 minutes longer than for those without (P less than .0001). Other significant associated factors were the presence of diabetes mellitus (P less than .03), younger age (P less than .05), and the use of hydrochlorothiazide (P less than .04).

  15. Light microscopic detection of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The parasite count was titrated against the Pf-HRP 2 gold conjugate and was analyzed under the light microscope with a fluorescent filter. Reactivity and specificity of Pf-HRP 2 gold conjugate was found to be highly specific and gave direct identification of the erythrocytes infected with the parasite. A good contrast was also ...

  16. Light sheet microscopes: Novel imaging toolbox for visualizing life's processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddleston, John M; Chew, Teng-Leong

    2016-11-01

    Capturing dynamic processes in live samples is a nontrivial task in biological imaging. Although fluorescence provides high specificity and contrast compared to other light microscopy techniques, the photophysical principles of this method can have a harmful effect on the sample. Current advances in light sheet microscopy have created a novel imaging toolbox that allows for rapid acquisition of high-resolution fluorescent images with minimal perturbation of the processes of interest. Each unique design has its own advantages and limitations. In this review, we describe several cutting edge light sheet microscopes and their optimal applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Versatile multispectral microscope based on light emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Jayaweera, Hiran; Ålebring, Jens; Svanberg, Sune

    2011-12-01

    We describe the development of a novel multispectral microscope, based on light-emitting diodes, capable of acquiring megapixel images in thirteen spectral bands from the ultraviolet to the near infrared. The system captures images and spectra in transmittance, reflectance, and scattering modes. We present as examples of applications ground truth measurements for remote sensing and parasitology diagnostics. The system is a general purpose scientific instrument that could be used to develop dedicated simplified instruments with optimal bands and mode selection.

  18. Morphometric Evaluation of Preeclamptic Placenta Using Light Microscopic Images

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Deficient trophoblast invasion and anomalies in placental development generally lead to preeclampsia (PE) but the inter-relationship between placental function and morphology in PE still remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric features of placental villi and capillaries in preeclamptic and normal placentae. The study included light microscopic images of placental tissue sections of 40 preeclamptic and 35 normotensive pregnant women. Preprocessing and segmentati...

  19. White light differential interference contrast microscope with a Sagnac interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sanjib; Pavan Kumar, Y

    2014-01-10

    A new technique for producing a white light differential interference contrast (DIC) image using a lateral shearing, rotation phase shifting Sagnac interferometer (SI) is proposed. The SI, placed in the image space after the tube lens of a microscope system with spatially coherent white light Kohler illumination, splits the image forming beam into coherent components with small lateral shear. Phase shifts, between the interfering components, which can be considered as biased phase difference (BPD), are introduced by applying small angular rotation of the SI in its own plane. This variable BPD between the interfering white light components produces a uniform intensity colored background. The object related phase shift, due to the height difference between two close points on the object surface with separation on the order of least resolvable separation of the microscope objective, in addition to the BPD would produce a change in intensity/hue/color against a uniform background due to the BPD. Thus a DIC image is formed and the variable BPD provides an excellent means of improving the contrast of the image.

  20. Morphometric Evaluation of Preeclamptic Placenta Using Light Microscopic Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Mukherjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficient trophoblast invasion and anomalies in placental development generally lead to preeclampsia (PE but the inter-relationship between placental function and morphology in PE still remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric features of placental villi and capillaries in preeclamptic and normal placentae. The study included light microscopic images of placental tissue sections of 40 preeclamptic and 35 normotensive pregnant women. Preprocessing and segmentation of these images were performed to characterize the villi and capillaries. Fisher’s linear discriminant analysis (FLDA, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA, and principal component analysis (PCA were applied to identify the most significant placental (morphometric features from microscopic images. A total of 10 morphometric features were extracted, of which the villous parameters were significantly altered in PE. FLDA identified 5 highly significant morphometric features (>90% overall discrimination accuracy. Two large subclusters were clearly visible in HCA based dendrogram. PCA returned three most significant principal components cumulatively explaining 98.4% of the total variance based on these 5 significant features. Hence, quantitative microscopic evaluation revealed that placental morphometry plays an important role in characterizing PE, where the villous is the major component that is affected.

  1. Morphometric evaluation of preeclamptic placenta using light microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Deficient trophoblast invasion and anomalies in placental development generally lead to preeclampsia (PE) but the inter-relationship between placental function and morphology in PE still remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the morphometric features of placental villi and capillaries in preeclamptic and normal placentae. The study included light microscopic images of placental tissue sections of 40 preeclamptic and 35 normotensive pregnant women. Preprocessing and segmentation of these images were performed to characterize the villi and capillaries. Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (FLDA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to identify the most significant placental (morphometric) features from microscopic images. A total of 10 morphometric features were extracted, of which the villous parameters were significantly altered in PE. FLDA identified 5 highly significant morphometric features (>90% overall discrimination accuracy). Two large subclusters were clearly visible in HCA based dendrogram. PCA returned three most significant principal components cumulatively explaining 98.4% of the total variance based on these 5 significant features. Hence, quantitative microscopic evaluation revealed that placental morphometry plays an important role in characterizing PE, where the villous is the major component that is affected.

  2. A multi-modal stereo microscope based on a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M P; Gibson, G M; Bowman, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M; Phillips, D B; Padgett, M J

    2013-07-15

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) can emulate the classic microscopy techniques, including differential interference (DIC) contrast and (spiral) phase contrast. Their programmability entails the benefit of flexibility or the option to multiplex images, for single-shot quantitative imaging or for simultaneous multi-plane imaging (depth-of-field multiplexing). We report the development of a microscope sharing many of the previously demonstrated capabilities, within a holographic implementation of a stereo microscope. Furthermore, we use the SLM to combine stereo microscopy with a refocusing filter and with a darkfield filter. The instrument is built around a custom inverted microscope and equipped with an SLM which gives various imaging modes laterally displaced on the same camera chip. In addition, there is a wide angle camera for visualisation of a larger region of the sample.

  3. Light Microscopy Module: International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Meyer, William V.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Abbott-Hearn, Amber; Atherton, Arthur; Beltram, Alexander; Bodzioney, Christopher; Brinkman, John; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began hardware operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2016, if all goes as planned, three experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Heated base-2 (ACE-H2) and [2] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Temperature control (ACE-T1). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al. and [2] from Chungnam National University, Daejeon, S. Korea: Chang-Soo Lee, et al.

  4. Mucopolysaccharides in the trabecular meshwork. Light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Yamana, Yasuo; Abe, Masahiro (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1982-09-01

    The localization of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the trabecular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after the intraperitoneal injection. Exposed silver grains of /sup 35/S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera and cornea, and grains of /sup 35/H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells and fibroblasts in Schlemm's canal and the trabecular meshwork. Thereafter, the grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the juxtacanalicular connective tissue. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the trabecular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated mucopolysaccharides and hyaluronic acid.

  5. Fiber optic light collection system for scanning-tunneling-microscope-induced light emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Neil J; Long, James P; Kafafi, Zakya H; Mäkinen, Antti J

    2007-05-01

    We report a compact light collection scheme suitable for retrofitting a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) for STM-induced light emission experiments. The approach uses a pair of optical fibers with large core diameters and high numerical apertures to maximize light collection efficiency and to moderate the mechanical precision required for alignment. Bench tests indicate that efficiency reduction is almost entirely due to reflective losses at the fiber ends, while losses due to fiber misalignment have virtually been eliminated. Photon-map imaging with nanometer features is demonstrated on a stepped Au(111) surface with signal rates exceeding 10(4) counts/s.

  6. Chronic Chagas disease: PCR-xenodiagnosis without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool to detect viable Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Saavedra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the elimination of the microscopic stage of conventional xenodiagnosis (XD to optimize the parasitological diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagas disease. To this purpose we applied under informed consent two XD cages to 150 Chilean chronic chagasic patients. The fecal samples (FS of the triatomines at 30, 60 and 90 days post feeding were divided into two parts: in one a microscopic search for mobile trypomastigote and/or epimastigote forms was performed. In the other part, DNA extraction-purification for PCR directed to the conserved region of kDNA minicircles of trypanosomes (PCR-XD, without previous microscopic observation was done. An XD was considered positive when at least one mobile T. cruzi parasite in any one of three periods of incubation was observed, whereas PCR-XD was considered positive when the 330 bp band specific for T. cruzi was detected. 25 of 26 cases with positive conventional XD were PCR-XD positive (concordance 96.2%, whereas 85 of 124 cases with negative conventional XD were positive by PCR-XD (68.5%. Human chromosome 12 detected by Real-time PCR used as exogenous internal control of PCR-XD reaction allowed to discounting of PCR inhibition and false negative in 40 cases with negative PCR-XD. Conclusion: PCR-XD performed without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool for detection of viable parasites with higher efficiency then conventional XD.

  7. Light Microsopy Module, International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Brown, Daniel F.; O'Toole, Martin A.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Abbot-Hearn, Amber Ashley; Atherton, Arthur Johnson; Beltram, Alexander; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2015, if all goes as planned, five experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with a manual sample base -3 (ACE-M-3), [2] the Advanced Colloids Experiment with a Heated Base -1 (ACE-H-1), [3] (ACE-H-2), [4] the Advanced Plant Experiment -03 (APEX-03), and [5] the Microchannel Diffusion Experiment (MDE). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] New York University: Paul Chaikin, Andrew Hollingsworth, and Stefano Sacanna, [2] University of Pennsylvania: Arjun Yodh and Matthew Gratale, [3] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al., [4] from the University of Florida and CASIS: Anna-Lisa Paul and Rob Ferl, and [5] from the Methodist Hospital Research Institute from CASIS: Alessandro Grattoni and Giancarlo Canavese.

  8. Light microscope observations on the epididymis of paca (Agouti paca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimming, Bruno Cesar; Machado, Márcia Rita Fernandes; Simões, Karina; da Cruz, Claudinei; Domeniconi, Raquel Fantin

    2013-01-01

    The features of paca epididymis, based on its appearance in light microscope, is described in this paper. The cellular population of the epithelial lining comprises principal cells, basal cells, apical cells, narrows cells, and hallo cells. The epididymis is divided in five distinct and continuous regions, Zone I, or initial segment, and zone II, are both localized into the head. Zone III comprises the distal head and all the body. Zones IV and V are restricted to the tail, in the proximal and distal cauda epididymis respectively. Each zone can be readily distinguished on the basis of morphological characteristics. The height of epididymal epithelium is greater in zone I. There is a progressive increase in the diameter of the tubular lumen through the different areas, with the maximum in the zone V. The presence of a high epithelium, and the virtual absence of sperm in zone I suggest fast transit of spermatozoa in this region. Zone V comprises the distal tail, has smaller epithelial lining, greater luminal diameter, shorter stereocilia than the other zones, and contains spermatozoa packed inside the lumen, that characterizes this zone as a place of sperm storage. The findings are compared with other reports in rodents and other domestic animals, to contribute to the understanding of epididymal morphophysiology.

  9. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. Light and electron microscope assessment of the lytic activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    840 scanning electron microscope operating at 5.0 kV. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Thin sections of agar were made with a stainless blade and then were immersed in gluteraldehyde solution for 30 min. This was washed three times with 0.075 M phosphate buffer (15 min) and fixed with osmium tetroxide (1 h).

  11. Undulator based scanning microscope at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Ade, H.; Jacobsen, C.; Kirz, J.; McNulty, I.; Rosser, R.

    1986-01-01

    A second generation scanning soft x-ray microscope is under construction, designed to utilize the dramatic increase in source bightness available at the soft x-ray undulator. The new instrument is expected to reduce image acquisition time by a factor of about 100, and to improve resolution, stability, and reproducibility

  12. Using a university characterization facility to educate the public about microscopes: light microscopes to SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Nancy; Henderson, Walter

    2015-10-01

    The National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN)1is an integrated partnership of 14 universities across the US funded by NSF to support nanoscale researchers. The NNIN education office is located at the Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology at the Georgia Institute of Technology. At Georgia Tech we offer programs that integrate the facility and its resources to educate the public about nanotechnology. One event that has proved highly successful involves using microscopes in our characterization suite to educate a diverse audience about a variety of imaging instruments. As part of the annual Atlanta Science Festival (ATLSF)2 we provided an event entitled: "What's all the Buzz about Nanotechnology?" which was open to the public and advertised through a variety of methods by the ATLSF. During the event, we provided hands-on demos, cleanroom tours, and activities with three of our microscopes in our recently opened Imaging and Characterization Facility: 1. Keyence VHX-600 Digital Microscope; 2. Hitachi SU823 FE-SEM; and 3. Hitachi TM 3000. During the two hour event we had approximately 150 visitors including many families with school-aged children. Visitors were invited to bring a sample for scanning with the TM-3000. This paper will discuss how to do such an event, lessons learned, and visitor survey results.

  13. 3D adaptive optics in a light sheet microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgenot, Cyril; Saunter, Christopher D; Taylor, Jonathan M; Girkin, John M; Love, Gordon D

    2012-06-04

    We report on a single plane illumination microscope (SPIM) incorporating adaptive optics in the imaging arm. We show how aberrations can occur from the sample mounting tube and quantify the aberrations both experimentally and computationally. A wavefront sensorless approach was taken to imaging a green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelled transgenic zebrafish. We show improvements in image quality whilst recording a 3D "z-stack" and show how the aberrations come from varying depths in the fish.

  14. Enhancing the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noy; Yang, Samuel; Andalman, Aaron; Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Deisseroth, Karl; Horowitz, Mark; Levoy, Marc

    2014-10-06

    Light field microscopy has been proposed as a new high-speed volumetric computational imaging method that enables reconstruction of 3-D volumes from captured projections of the 4-D light field. Recently, a detailed physical optics model of the light field microscope has been derived, which led to the development of a deconvolution algorithm that reconstructs 3-D volumes with high spatial resolution. However, the spatial resolution of the reconstructions has been shown to be non-uniform across depth, with some z planes showing high resolution and others, particularly at the center of the imaged volume, showing very low resolution. In this paper, we enhance the performance of the light field microscope using wavefront coding techniques. By including phase masks in the optical path of the microscope we are able to address this non-uniform resolution limitation. We have also found that superior control over the performance of the light field microscope can be achieved by using two phase masks rather than one, placed at the objective's back focal plane and at the microscope's native image plane. We present an extended optical model for our wavefront coded light field microscope and develop a performance metric based on Fisher information, which we use to choose adequate phase masks parameters. We validate our approach using both simulated data and experimental resolution measurements of a USAF 1951 resolution target; and demonstrate the utility for biological applications with in vivo volumetric calcium imaging of larval zebrafish brain.

  15. A compact Airy beam light sheet microscope with a tilted cylindrical lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Prokopas, Martynas; Nylk, Jonathan; Coll-Lladó, Clara; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Ferrier, David E K; Vettenburg, Tom; Dholakia, Kishan

    2014-10-01

    Light-sheet imaging is rapidly gaining importance for imaging intact biological specimens. Many of the latest innovations rely on the propagation-invariant Bessel or Airy beams to form an extended light sheet to provide high resolution across a large field of view. Shaping light to realize propagation-invariant beams often relies on complex programming of spatial light modulators or specialized, custom made, optical elements. Here we present a straightforward and low-cost modification to the traditional light-sheet setup, based on the open-access light-sheet microscope OpenSPIM, to achieve Airy light-sheet illumination. This brings wide field single-photon light-sheet imaging to a broader range of endusers. Fluorescent microspheres embedded in agarose and a zebrafish larva were imaged to demonstrate how such a microscope can have a minimal footprint and cost without compromising on imaging quality.

  16. [The evaluation of acrylic resins for the study of nondecalcified human teeth with the light and electronic microscopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, F; Martignoni, M; Scala, C; Cocchia, D

    1995-04-01

    Resin embedding of human teeth for light and transmission electron microscopic studies becomes difficult without previous decalcification. The limited and slow infiltration of the resin into hard tissues may cause problems during preparation and observation of the samples. Moreover the type of resin that is used may affect the morphologic preservation of both tissues and cellular elements. Recently there has been an increasing number of studies on the application of acrylic resins in light and electron microscopy, in order to overcome problems encountered with the use of epoxy resins still utilized in morphologic studies. We compared different acrylic resins (Technovit 7200 VLC, LR White, LR Gold, Bioacryl) in order to understand which one was more suitable for undecalcified human dental tissues under light and transmission electron microscope. Evaluation of such resins was performed using the following criteria: ease of cutting with ultramicrotome, soft and hard tissues infiltration, uptake of tissue stains for both light and electron microscopy, morphologic preservation and stability under electron beam. This study, carried out on the pulp area comprising predentin and dentin, showed excellent quality of Bioacryl and LR Gold, the two resins presenting, by far, the best results among all the different types tested. The optimal morphologic preservation obtained with such resins is indicated for light and electron microscopic studies, allowing their application in different fields of dental research.

  17. Pigmentosis tubae, a new entity: light and electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, G.A.; Reimann, B.E.; Greenberg, H.L.; Miles, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    The authors noted an unusual finding in the fallopian tubes of a 31-year-old woman who had received external and internal whole pelvis radiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Aggregates of macrophages containing pigment, identified in a subepithelial location, were reminiscent of melanosis coli, which is caused by abuse of anthracene-containing laxatives. Electron microscopic examination of the pigment revealed cytoplasmic material with the appearance of lipofuscin, identical to the pigment described in cases of colonic melanosis. After a careful study of possible etiologic agents, it was concluded that the pigment most likely resulted from cellular damage caused by radiotherapy. The authors are not aware of any other reported case of this entity, which will be called pigmentosis tubae

  18. Efficacy of oral exfoliative cytology in diabetes mellitus patients: a light microscopic and confocal microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Deepika; Malathi, N; Reddy, B Thirupathi

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a global problem. By monitoring the health status of these individuals, diabetic complications can be prevented. We aimed to analyze alterations in the morphology and cytomorphometry of buccal epithelial cells of type 2 DM patients using oral exfoliative cytology technique and determine its importance in public health screening, diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus. The study was carried out in 100 type 2 DM patients and 30 healthy individuals. Smears were taken from the right buccal mucosa and stained by the Papanicolaou technique. Staining with Acridine orange was carried out to view qualitative changes with confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM-510 Meta). The cytomorphometry was evaluated using IMAGE PRO PLUS 5.5 software with Evolution LC camera. All findings were statistically analyzed. The results showed that with increase in fasting plasma glucose levels, there is significant increase in nuclear area, decrease in cytoplasmic area, and increase in nuclear cytoplasmic ratio (p diabetes and aid in monitoring of diabetes throughout the lifetime of the patient.

  19. Light and electron microscope assessment of the lytic activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Microcystis cells were exposed to copper, B. mycoides B16 and Triton X-100, in order to ascertain the level of cell membrane damage. The membrane cell damage ... The electron microscopy observations appeared to reveal at least two mechanisms of Microcystis lysis (contact and parasitism). The light and electron ...

  20. Setting up a simple light sheet microscope for in toto imaging of C. elegans development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chardès, Claire; Mélénec, Pauline; Bertrand, Vincent; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2014-05-05

    Fast and low phototoxic imaging techniques are pre-requisite to study the development of organisms in toto. Light sheet based microscopy reduces photo-bleaching and phototoxic effects compared to confocal microscopy, while providing 3D images with subcellular resolution. Here we present the setup of a light sheet based microscope, which is composed of an upright microscope and a small set of opto-mechanical elements for the generation of the light sheet. The protocol describes how to build, align the microscope and characterize the light sheet. In addition, it details how to implement the method for in toto imaging of C. elegans embryos using a simple observation chamber. The method allows the capture of 3D two-colors time-lapse movies over few hours of development. This should ease the tracking of cell shape, cell divisions and tagged proteins over long periods of time.

  1. Microscopic vision modeling method by direct mapping analysis for micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuezong; Zhao, Zhizhong; Wang, Junshuai

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel and high-precision microscopic vision modeling method, which can be used for 3D data reconstruction in micro-gripping system with stereo light microscope. This method consists of four parts: image distortion correction, disparity distortion correction, initial vision model and residual compensation model. First, the method of image distortion correction is proposed. Image data required by image distortion correction comes from stereo images of calibration sample. The geometric features of image distortions can be predicted though the shape deformation of lines constructed by grid points in stereo images. Linear and polynomial fitting methods are applied to correct image distortions. Second, shape deformation features of disparity distribution are discussed. The method of disparity distortion correction is proposed. Polynomial fitting method is applied to correct disparity distortion. Third, a microscopic vision model is derived, which consists of two models, i.e., initial vision model and residual compensation model. We derive initial vision model by the analysis of direct mapping relationship between object and image points. Residual compensation model is derived based on the residual analysis of initial vision model. The results show that with maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1mm in X direction, 2.9mm in Y direction and 2.25mm in Z direction, our model achieves a precision of 0.01mm in X and Y directions and 0.015mm in Z direction. Comparison of our model with traditional pinhole camera model shows that two kinds of models have a similar reconstruction precision of X coordinates. However, traditional pinhole camera model has a lower precision of Y and Z coordinates than our model. The method proposed in this paper is very helpful for the micro-gripping system based on SLM microscopic vision. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Postirradiation changes in rat brain. Observations in light- and scanning microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiczka-Wojczuk, J.; Sosnierz, M.; Bialas, B.; Wazna-Bogunska, C.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation changes in central nervous system of the rat were evaluated. Fifty rats irradiated by a single dose of 1000 R were used. A special attention was paid to changes in ventricular ependyma. The changes observed in scanning microscope consisted of loss of cilia, swelling of ependymal cells and changes in their nuclear profiles. The changes presented in light microscope were typical for postirradiation damage of the brain. The authors express the opinion that scanning microscope offers a valuable, complementary tool for routine neuropathological investigations. (author)

  3. Light and electron microscopic features of early and late phase radiation-induced proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haboubi, N.Y.; Schofield, P.F.; Rowland, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The light and electron microscopic features of rectal biopsies from 10 symptomatic patients treated with irradiation for pelvic malignancies are detailed. They are divided into two groups. Group I: biopsies taken during or shortly after the course of irradiation (six patients). Group II: biopsies taken 4 months or more after course completion (four patients). The distinguishing light microscopic features in the first group are epithelial meganucleosis, lack of mitotic activity, and patchy fibroblastic proliferation in the lamina propria. The blood vessels appear normal. In the second group, there are severe vascular changes characterized by narrowing of the arterioles by subintimal fibrosis, telangiectasia of capillaries and post-capillary venules, endothelial degeneration, and platelet thrombi formation. These vascular changes are always associated with severe fibrosis of the lamina propria and crypt distortion. The ultrastructural and light microscopic findings indicate that the cellular epithelial reaction and fibroblastic proliferation antedate the vascular injury, and the latter has no role in the acute phase reaction

  4. Ellipso-Microscopic Observation of Titanium Surface under UV-Light Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, K.; Kurauchi, K.; Nakanishi, T.; Hasegawa, Y.; Ueda, M.; Ohtsuka, T.

    2016-01-01

    The ellipso-microscopic observation of a titanium surface undergoing anodization in 0.05 mol dm -3 of H 2 SO 4 was conducted. During irradiation by ultra-violet (UV) light with a wavelength of 325 nm, the titanium surface allowed for the flow of a photo-induced current and showed up as a bright, patch-like image on an ellipso-microscopic view. The brightness and patch-pattern in the image changed with flowing photo-induced current. The changes in the brightness and the image corresponded to the formation and/or degradation of titanium oxide due to the photo-electrochemical reaction of the oxide. An in situ monitoring using the ellipso-microscope revealed that the film change was dependent on the irradiation light power, by UV-light increases the anodic current and results in the initiation of pitting at lower potentials as compared with the non-irradiated condition.

  5. Quantitative evaluation of a handheld light microscope for field diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminth infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogoch, Isaac I; Andrews, Jason R; Speich, Benjamin; Ame, Shaali M; Ali, Said M; Stothard, J Russell; Utzinger, Jürg; Keiser, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated the Newton Nm1, a commercially available handheld light microscope and compared it with conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of soil-transmitted helminth infections. A total of 91 Kato-Katz thick smears were examined by experienced microscopists and helminth eggs were counted and expressed as eggs per gram of stool (EPG). Mean egg counts were significantly higher with the conventional light microscope (5,190 EPG versus 2,386 EPG for Ascaris lumbricoides; 826 versus 456 for Trichuris trichiura; both P Newton Nm1 microscope may be a useful tool for the detection and quantification of soil-transmitted helminth infection in clinical, epidemiologic, and public health settings. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  6. AccessScope project: Accessible light microscope for users with upper limb mobility or visual impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Awais; Ahmed, Wamiq M; Samarapungavan, Ala; Cirillo, John; Schwarte, David; Robinson, J Paul; Duerstock, Bradley S

    2010-01-01

    A web-based application was developed to remotely view slide specimens and control all functions of a research-level light microscopy workstation, called AccessScope. Students and scientists with upper limb mobility and visual impairments are often unable to use a light microscope by themselves and must depend on others in its operation. Users with upper limb mobility impairments and low vision were recruited to assist in the design process of the AccessScope personal computer (PC) user interface. Participants with these disabilities were evaluated in their ability to use AccessScope to perform microscopical tasks. AccessScope usage was compared with inspecting prescanned slide images by grading participants' identification and understanding of histological features and knowledge of microscope operation. With AccessScope subjects were able to independently perform common light microscopy functions through an Internet browser by employing different PC pointing devices or accessibility software according to individual abilities. Subjects answered more histology and microscope usage questions correctly after first participating in an AccessScope test session. AccessScope allowed users with upper limb or visual impairments to successfully perform light microscopy without assistance. This unprecedented capability is crucial for students and scientists with disabilities to perform laboratory coursework or microscope-based research and pursue science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields.

  7. Light microscope observation of circulating human lymphocytes cultured in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Francis Paulo de Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study the isolation and a light microscopy technique for cultured lymphocytes. Blood samples were obtained by venipuncture with an anticoagulant added and centrifuged in a Percoll density gradient to separate the leukocytes. Lymphocytes were placed in 25 cm ³ tissue culture flasks at 37ºC. After culturing, they were fixed and stained with the methods used for blood smears. Results showed that not all fixing solutions and stains were an equally good choice for cultured lymphocytes.Os linfócitos são células importantes do sistema imune e têm sido largamente utilizados em estudos morfológicos. Entretanto, a literatura sobre técnicas de preparação dessas células é escassa e antiga, especialmente para linfócitos cultivados in vitro. Portanto, o objetivo desse estudo foi relatar com detalhes as técnicas de isolamento e microscopia de luz de linfócitos mantidos em cultura. Amostras de sangue foram obtidas por punção venosa e centrifugadas em gradiente de densidade de Percoll, para separar os leucócitos. Os linfócitos foram mantidos em frascos de cultura de 25 cm³ a 37ºC. Após a cultura, as células foram fixadas e coradas de acordo com a metodologia utilizada para esfregaços sanguíneos. Nossos resultados mostraram que nem todos os fixadores e corantes utilizados para esfregaços sanguíneos são uma boa escolha para linfócitos cultivados in vitro.

  8. Light and electron microscope observations on Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. (Prasinophyceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, C. K.; Jiao-Fen, Chen; Zhe-Fu, Zhang; Hui-Qi, Zhang

    1994-09-01

    Nephroselmis gaoae sp. nov. is described on the basis of light and electron microscope observations of cultured material originally collected and isolated from seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, Qingdao, China. The periplasts on the cell body and flagella are covered by five types of scales, two types on the flagella and three on the body. Among these, the morphology and the number of spines of large stellate body scales differ remarkably from those of previously described species of Nephroselmis. Apart from these, the unusual fine structure of the eyespot (stigma) is very characteristic. As in the other species of Nephroselmis, the eyespot lies immediately under the two-membraned chloroplast envelope; unlike the others, however, it is not composed of a number of osmiophilic globules, but consists of about 14 curved rod-shaped osmiophilic bodies arranged loosely and randomly. This feature distinguishes the present new species not only from the other species of Nephroselmis but also from the other motile algal species, the eyespots structure of which had been previously described.

  9. The ordinary light microscope: an appropriate tool for provisional detection and identification of crystals in synovial fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, E; Tovar, J; Ruiz, M T

    1989-01-01

    To determine if the ordinary light microscope is a useful tool in the detection and identification of crystals in synovial fluid 63 fluids (13 with monosodium urate (MSU), 14 with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD), one with both types of crystal, and 35 without crystals) were examined blindly by two observers, first with an ordinary light microscope, then with a polarising light microscope. Tentative identification of the crystals by their shape was attempted. The sensitivity of the ordi...

  10. Light microscopical demonstration and zonal distribution of parasinusoidal cells (Ito cells) in normal human liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Junge, Jette; Nielsen, O

    1988-01-01

    The parasinusoidal cells of the liver (Ito cells) were demonstrated light microscopically in autopsy specimens fixed in formalin and stained with Oil red O after dichromate treatment. The method allows examination of large samples containing numerous acini. Quantitative assessment showed a zonal...

  11. Carboxylic ester hydrolases in the thyroid gland of the guinea-pig. A light microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    1976-01-01

    The location of cholinesterase and non-specific esterase in the thyroid gland of the guniea-pig was studied with the light microscope. It was found that the idoxyl method for non-specific esterase activity under special conditions is superior to the cholinesterase method in a number of respects...

  12. Light microscopic distribution and electron microscopic identification of severely damaged cells in x-irradiated oral epithelium in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.M.; Meyer, J.; Waterhouse, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    After x irradiation with a single dose of 5000 R to the lower lip of shielded rats, the responses of the epithelium of the mucosa were studied at 2, 6, 26, and 50 hr by light and electron microscopy. Light microscopy showed sharp contrasts in the intensity of staining among the irradiated basal cells, and the presence of focally distributed dark cells. These were identified in the electron microscope as degenerating cells with condensed nuclear and cytoplasmic contents and degenerate organelles. Quantitative analysis of the pattern of distribution of dark cells revealed a marked increase in over-all frequency, pairing, and formation of larger clusters by 50 hr. At this time dark cells were 11.6 percent of the total number of the basal cells and the largest cluster consisted of 12 adjacent cells. The distribution of dark cells at 50 hr fitted the negative binomial distribution (goodness of fit, chi 2 = 5.03, p = 0.185) and showed significant clustering. The mechanism of pair and cluster formation is discussed. (U.S.)

  13. Automated image mosaics by non-automated light microscopes: the MicroMos software tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, F; Bevilacqua, A; Lucarelli, E

    2013-12-01

    Light widefield microscopes and digital imaging are the basis for most of the analyses performed in every biological laboratory. In particular, the microscope's user is typically interested in acquiring high-detailed images for analysing observed cells and tissues, meanwhile being representative of a wide area to have reliable statistics. The microscopist has to choose between higher magnification factor and extension of the observed area, due to the finite size of the camera's field of view. To overcome the need of arrangement, mosaicing techniques have been developed in the past decades for increasing the camera's field of view by stitching together more images. Nevertheless, these approaches typically work in batch mode and rely on motorized microscopes. Or alternatively, the methods are conceived just to provide visually pleasant mosaics not suitable for quantitative analyses. This work presents a tool for building mosaics of images acquired with nonautomated light microscopes. The method proposed is based on visual information only and the mosaics are built by incrementally stitching couples of images, making the approach available also for online applications. Seams in the stitching regions as well as tonal inhomogeneities are corrected by compensating the vignetting effect. In the experiments performed, we tested different registration approaches, confirming that the translation model is not always the best, despite the fact that the motion of the sample holder of the microscope is apparently translational and typically considered as such. The method's implementation is freely distributed as an open source tool called MicroMos. Its usability makes building mosaics of microscope images at subpixel accuracy easier. Furthermore, optional parameters for building mosaics according to different strategies make MicroMos an easy and reliable tool to compare different registration approaches, warping models and tonal corrections. © 2013 The Authors Journal of

  14. An integrated single- and two-photon non-diffracting light-sheet microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sze Cheung; Chiu, Hoi Chun; Zhao, Luwei; Zhao, Teng; Loy, M. M. T.; Du, Shengwang

    2018-04-01

    We describe a fluorescence optical microscope with both single-photon and two-photon non-diffracting light-sheet excitations for large volume imaging. With a special design to accommodate two different wavelength ranges (visible: 400-700 nm and near infrared: 800-1200 nm), we combine the line-Bessel sheet (LBS, for single-photon excitation) and the scanning Bessel beam (SBB, for two-photon excitation) light sheet together in a single microscope setup. For a transparent thin sample where the scattering can be ignored, the LBS single-photon excitation is the optimal imaging solution. When the light scattering becomes significant for a deep-cell or deep-tissue imaging, we use SBB light-sheet two-photon excitation with a longer wavelength. We achieved nearly identical lateral/axial resolution of about 350/270 nm for both imagings. This integrated light-sheet microscope may have a wide application for live-cell and live-tissue three-dimensional high-speed imaging.

  15. Adaptive illumination based on direct wavefront sensing in a light-sheet fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Dean; Pozzi, Paolo; Soloviev, Oleg; Vdovin, Gleb; Verhaegen, Michel

    2016-10-31

    A methodology for the adaptive control and correction of phase aberrations in the illumination arm of a light-sheet fluorescence microscope has been developed. The method uses direct wavefront sensing on epi-fluorescent light to detect the aberration present in the sample. Using this signal, the aberrations in the illumination arm are subsequently corrected with a spatial light modulator in a feedforward mode. Adaptive correction, resulting in significant improvement in the axial resolution, has been demonstrated by imaging Tg(fli:GFP) zebrafish embryos.

  16. Three-dimensional visualization system for ophthalmic microscopes using visible light and near-infrared illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ki-Chul; Im, Chan Young; Seo, Kyoung Yul; Nam, Sang Min; Erdenebat, Munkh-Uchral; Shim, Young Bo; Han, Young-Geun; Kim, Nam

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we describe a three-dimensional visualization system for ophthalmic microscopes that is aimed at microsurgery without the eyepieces. A three-dimensional visualization system for ophthalmic microscopes using the mixed illumination, which consists of visible light and near-infrared illumination, is established in order to acquire more exact information of object and reduce the amount of light irradiated to the patients, and its usage in microsurgery without eyepieces is herein described. A custom-designed stereoscopic three-dimensional display which is manufactured for the convenience of the surgeons during the long-time surgery, is connected directly to the camera of the ophthalmic microscope in order to eliminate the discomfort of eyepieces to the surgeon and signal delay between the camera, mounted on the microscope, and display device for surgeon. The main features of the established system are the signal delay-free for surgeon and the low level of illumination for patient. In particular, it could significantly reduce the amount of light irradiated on a patient's eye via NIR illumination. Upon comparison with the conventional system during clinical ophthalmology trials, this system is confirmed to require almost the same operation time and reduced discomfort and eyestrain during long periods of observation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Measurements of polarization-dependent angle-resolved light scattering from individual microscopic samples using Fourier transform light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, JaeHwang; Kim, Jinhyung; Seo, Min-Kyo; Park, YongKeun

    2018-03-01

    We present a method to measure the vector-field light scattering of individual microscopic objects. The polarization-dependent optical field images are measured with quantitative phase imaging at the sample plane, and then numerically propagated to the far-field plane. This approach allows the two-dimensional polarization-dependent angle-resolved light scattered patterns from individual object to be obtained with high precision and sensitivity. Using this method, we present the measurements of the polarization-dependent light scattering of a liquid crystal droplet and individual silver nanowires over scattering angles of 50{\\deg}. In addition, the spectroscopic extension of the polarization-dependent angle-resolved light scattering is demonstrated using wavelength-scanning illumination.

  18. From Animaculum to single molecules: 300 years of the light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Nudd, Richard; Hedlund, Erik G; Leake, Mark C

    2015-04-01

    Although not laying claim to being the inventor of the light microscope, Antonj van Leeuwenhoek (1632-1723) was arguably the first person to bring this new technological wonder of the age properly to the attention of natural scientists interested in the study of living things (people we might now term 'biologists'). He was a Dutch draper with no formal scientific training. From using magnifying glasses to observe threads in cloth, he went on to develop over 500 simple single lens microscopes (Baker & Leeuwenhoek 1739 Phil. Trans. 41, 503-519. (doi:10.1098/rstl.1739.0085)) which he used to observe many different biological samples. He communicated his finding to the Royal Society in a series of letters (Leeuwenhoek 1800 The select works of Antony Van Leeuwenhoek, containing his microscopical discoveries in many of the works of nature, vol. 1) including the one republished in this edition of Open Biology. Our review here begins with the work of van Leeuwenhoek before summarizing the key developments over the last ca 300 years, which has seen the light microscope evolve from a simple single lens device of van Leeuwenhoek's day into an instrument capable of observing the dynamics of single biological molecules inside living cells, and to tracking every cell nucleus in the development of whole embryos and plants.

  19. From Animaculum to single molecules: 300 years of the light microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J. M.; Nudd, Richard; Hedlund, Erik G.; Leake, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Although not laying claim to being the inventor of the light microscope, Antonj van Leeuwenhoek (1632–1723) was arguably the first person to bring this new technological wonder of the age properly to the attention of natural scientists interested in the study of living things (people we might now term ‘biologists’). He was a Dutch draper with no formal scientific training. From using magnifying glasses to observe threads in cloth, he went on to develop over 500 simple single lens microscopes (Baker & Leeuwenhoek 1739 Phil. Trans. 41, 503–519. (doi:10.1098/rstl.1739.0085)) which he used to observe many different biological samples. He communicated his finding to the Royal Society in a series of letters (Leeuwenhoek 1800 The select works of Antony Van Leeuwenhoek, containing his microscopical discoveries in many of the works of nature, vol. 1) including the one republished in this edition of Open Biology. Our review here begins with the work of van Leeuwenhoek before summarizing the key developments over the last ca 300 years, which has seen the light microscope evolve from a simple single lens device of van Leeuwenhoek's day into an instrument capable of observing the dynamics of single biological molecules inside living cells, and to tracking every cell nucleus in the development of whole embryos and plants. PMID:25924631

  20. Oral leukoplakia: Transmission electron microscopic correlation with clinical types and light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamgadge, Sandhya Avinash; Ganvir, Sindhu Milind; Hazarey, Vinay Krishnarao; Tamgadge, Avinash

    2012-01-01

    Background: Leukoplakia, is a precancerous lesion that is most commonly encountered in the oral cavity. The grade of dysplasia is presumed to be the most important indicator of malignant potential. There are many promising aspects in advanced methods for the evaluation of oral precancer and cancer. Among these methods, electron microscopic examination predicts the true biologic potential more accurately than conventional histology and has some success in the early detection of potentially malignant lesions. It has been reported in the literature that there is some correlation between clinical, histopathological, and transmission electron microscopic features. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study (prospective research), from the total of 9 subjects, 3 had homogenous leukoplakia, 3 had ulcerative type of oral leukoplakia, and 3 had nodular type of oral leukoplakia. Two patients were selected as control patients. Transmission electron microscopic examination was carried for all the cases and controls. All the findings were correlated with clinical features and light microscopy. Results: Clinically and histologically, mild leukoplakia showed break in basement membrane, which can only be observed under transmission electron microscope (TEM). Additional dysplastic features were observed under transmission electron microscope, which are indicative of neoplastic process. Conclusions: Thus, it is finally concluded that nodular leukoplakia seems to be the most severe clinical type of leukoplakia showing highest risk of malignant transformation. Homogenous leukoplakia might show break in basement membrane under TEM. PMID:23814570

  1. The scanning transmission microscope at the NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rarback, H.; Buckley, C.; Goncz, K.

    1989-01-01

    The scanning transmission soft x-ray microscope (STXM), that has been under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been substantially upgraded for operation with the X1 undulator. The principal new features are: optical prefocusing, using a visible light interferometer, a dedicated VAXstation 3200 with a more user friendly and flexible software system for image acquisition and analysis, a flow cell that makes it possible not only to keep the specimen wet during exposure, but to change the fluid around the specimen as well, and a more compact proportional counter that is capable of counting rates of several MHz. In conjunction with new zone plates of better resolution and higher efficiency, the microscope is ready for a period of extended use in biological imaging. 9 refs., 6 figs

  2. A Simple low-cost device enables four epi-illumination techniques on standard light microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishmukhametov, Robert R; Russell, Aidan N; Wheeler, Richard J; Nord, Ashley L; Berry, Richard M

    2016-02-08

    Back-scattering darkfield (BSDF), epi-fluorescence (EF), interference reflection contrast (IRC), and darkfield surface reflection (DFSR) are advanced but expensive light microscopy techniques with limited availability. Here we show a simple optical design that combines these four techniques in a simple low-cost miniature epi-illuminator, which inserts into the differential interference-contrast (DIC) slider bay of a commercial microscope, without further additions required. We demonstrate with this device: 1) BSDF-based detection of Malarial parasites inside unstained human erythrocytes; 2) EF imaging with and without dichroic components, including detection of DAPI-stained Leishmania parasite without using excitation or emission filters; 3) RIC of black lipid membranes and other thin films, and 4) DFSR of patterned opaque and transparent surfaces. We believe that our design can expand the functionality of commercial bright field microscopes, provide easy field detection of parasites and be of interest to many users of light microscopy.

  3. Automatic identification of cell files in light microscopic images of conifer wood

    OpenAIRE

    Kennel, Pol; Subsol, Gérard; Guéroult, Michaël; Borianne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we present an automatic method to recognize cell files in light microscopic images of conifer wood. This original method is decomposed into three steps: the segmentation step which extracts some anatomical structures in the image, the classification step which identifies in these structures the interesting cells, and the cell files recognition step. Some preliminary results obtained on several species of conifers are presented and analyzed.

  4. Inverted light-sheet microscope for imaging mouse pre-implantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Petr; Gunther, Stefan; Reichmann, Judith; Krzic, Uros; Balazs, Balint; de Medeiros, Gustavo; Norlin, Nils; Hiiragi, Takashi; Hufnagel, Lars; Ellenberg, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Despite its importance for understanding human infertility and congenital diseases, early mammalian development has remained inaccessible to in toto imaging. We developed an inverted light-sheet microscope that enabled us to image mouse embryos from zygote to blastocyst, computationally track all cells and reconstruct a complete lineage tree of mouse pre-implantation development. We used this unique data set to show that the first cell fate specification occurs at the 16-cell stage.

  5. The Light Microscopy Module: An On-Orbit Multi-User Microscope Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.

    2002-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a remotely controllable on-orbit microscope subrack facility, allowing flexible scheduling and operation of fluids and biology experiments within the Fluids and Combustion Facility (FCF) Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) on the International Space Station (ISS). The LMM will be the first integrated payload with the FIR to conduct four fluid physics experiments. A description of the LMM diagnostic capabilities, including video microscopy, interferometry, laser tweezers, confocal, and spectrophotometry, will be provided.

  6. Elementary and advanced Lie algebraic methods with applications to accelerator design, electron microscopes, and light optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragt, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A review is given of elementary Lie algebraic methods for treating Hamiltonian systems. This review is followed by a brief exposition of advanced Lie algebraic methods including resonance bases and conjugacy theorems. Finally, applications are made to the design of third-order achromats for use in accelerators, to the design of subangstroem resolution electron microscopes, and to the classification and study of high order aberrations in light optics. (orig.)

  7. Observation of sperm-head vacuoles and sperm morphology under light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Seog; Park, Sol; Ko, Duck Sung; Park, Dong Wook; Seo, Ju Tae; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2014-09-01

    The presence of sperm-head vacuoles has been suspected to be deleterious to the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). It is difficult to accurately distinguish morphologically abnormal sperm with vacuoles under a light microscope. This study was performed to analyze the result of the observation of sperm-head vacuoles using Papanicolaou staining under a light microscope and whether the male partner's age affects these vacuoles. Sperm morphology with vacuoles was evaluated using Papanicolaou staining and observed under a light microscope (400×) in 980 men. The normal morphology was divided into three categories (group A, 14% of normal morphology). The criteria for the sperm-head vacuoles were those given in the World Health Organization manual. For the analysis of the age factor, the participants were divided into the following groups: 26-30 years, 31-35 years, 36-40 years, 41-45 years, and 46-50 years. The percentage of sperm-head vacuoles increased with normal sperm morphology (group A vs. groups B, C) (p<0.05). In the case of the age factor, a statistically significant difference was not observed across any of the age groups. A majority of the sperm-head vacuoles showed a statistically significant difference among normal morphology groups. Therefore, we should consider the probability of the percentage of sperm-head vacuoles not increasing with age but with abnormal sperm morphology. A further study is required to clarify the effect of the sperm-head vacuoles on ART outcomes.

  8. Dynamic light scattering microscope: accessing opaque samples with high spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, Takashi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    2013-08-26

    We developed a new technique that conducts dynamic light scattering (DLS) under a microscope with high spatial resolution. This technique dramatically extends the range of DLS application from transparent to opaque samples. The total scattered electric field contains both electric field generated from the samples and time-independent reflected electric field. These two components are decomposed by applying a partial heterodyne method. By using this technique, we successfully calculate the characteristic size distribution of both multiple-scattering samples and strong light-absorbing samples. This is the first study to observe the collective motion of particles in a highly concentrated solution by using DLS.

  9. Studying aerosol light scattering based on aspect ratio distribution observed by fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zheng, Xu; Li, Zhengqiang; Li, Zhanhua; Dubovik, Oleg; Chen, Xingfeng; Wendisch, Manfred

    2017-08-07

    Particle shape is crucial to the properties of light scattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. A method of fluorescence microscopy direct observation was introduced to determine the aspect ratio distribution of aerosol particles. The result is comparable with that of the electron microscopic analysis. The measured aspect ratio distribution has been successfully applied in modeling light scattering and further in simulation of polarization measurements of the sun/sky radiometer. These efforts are expected to improve shape retrieval from skylight polarization by using directly measured aspect ratio distribution.

  10. Visible Light Emission from Atomic Scale Patterns Fabricated by the Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.; Sakurai, M.; Stokbro, Kurt

    1999-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) induced light emission from artificial atomic scale structures comprising silicon dangling bonds on hydrogen-terminated Si(001) surfaces has been mapped spatially and analyzed spectroscopically in the visible spectral range. The light emission is based on a novel...... mechanism involving optical transitions between a tip state and localized states on the sample surface. The wavelength of the photons can be changed by the bias voltage of the STM. The spatial resolution of the photon maps is as good as that of STM topographic images and the photons are emitted from...

  11. Performance of light-emitting diode fluorescence microscope for diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Manpreet; Sidiq, Zeeshan; Sharma, P P; Singhal, Ritu; Myneedu, V P; Sarin, Rohit

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) over the years has shown the potential for increasing the performance of microscopy. The present study was aimed to access the performance of the LED microscope for the detection of acid fast bacilli in a tuberculosis (TB) endemic country. The study was conducted at a National Reference Laboratory (NRL) in New Delhi, India. Sputum samples were collected from suspected TB patients. Each sample was processed with Auramine O and ZN methods. Auramine O stained smears were evaluated using two different excitatory light sources (MVP and LED); and ZN stained smears were examined under light microscope. The mean time required to read the smears with different modalities was recorded. Bacterial cultures provided the reference standard. A total of 200 patients were included in this study. Sensitivity and specificity for the LED assessment, MVP assessment and light microscopy were 83.1% and 82.4%, 78.5% and 87.5% and 81.6% and 83.5%, respectively. Mean reading time was approximately three times faster than ZN microscopy. The mean time to read a negative smear was 2min with fluorescence microscopy and 5min with light microscopy with time savings of 60%. Although the use of LED-FM only marginally increased sensitivity, the considerable time saving ability combined with very good acceptance and ease of use makes it a reliable alternative to other conventional methods available. Copyright © 2013 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotang Hu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  13. Operating microscope light-induced phototoxic maculopathy after transscleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Eui Yong; Ahn, Min; Lee, Dong Wook; You, In Cheon; Kim, Min Jung; Cho, Nam Chun

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the features of operating microscope light-induced retinal phototoxic maculopathy after transscleral sutured posterior chamber intraocular lens (TSS PC-IOL) implantation. The charts of 118 patients who underwent TSS PC-IOL implantation surgery at Chonbuk National University Hospital (Jeonju, Korea) between March 1999 and February 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Fourteen patients underwent combined 3-port pars plana vitrectomy and TSS PC-IOL implantation (vitrectomy group), and 104 patients underwent TSS PC-IOL implantation only (nonvitrectomy group). All surgeries were performed under the same coaxial illuminated microscope. All diagnoses were confirmed through careful fundus examination and fluorescein angiography (FA). Diagnoses of retinal phototoxic maculopathy were established in 10 (8.47%) of 118 TSS PC-IOL implantation cases. Phototoxic maculopathy occurred more frequently in the vitrectomy group than in the nonvitrectomy group (6/14 versus 4/104, respectively; P microscope light-induced retinal phototoxic maculopathy can occur more frequently after TSS PC-IOL implantation than after casual cataract surgery, especially when TSS PC-IOL is combined with vitrectomy surgery. Surgeons should take precautions to prevent retinal phototoxicity after TSS PC-IOL implantation and vitrectomy.

  14. The HVAC Challenges of Upgrading an Old Lab for High-end Light Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, R.; Martone, P.; Callahan, L.M.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Rochester Medical Center forms the centerpiece of the University of Rochester's health research, teaching, patient care, and community outreach missions. Within this large facility of over 5 million square feet, demolition and remodeling of existing spaces is a constant activity. With more than $145 million in federal research funding, lab space is frequently repurposed and renovated to support this work. The URMC Medical Center Facilities Organization supporting small to medium space renovations is constantly challenged and constrained by the existing mechanical infrastructure and budgets to deliver a renovated space that functions within the equipment environmental parameters. One recent project, sponsored by the URMC Shared Resources Laboratory, demonstrates these points. The URMC Light Microscopy Shared Resource Laboratory requested renovation of a 121 sq. ft. room in a 40 year old building which would enable placement of a laser capture microdissection microscope and a Pascal 5 laser scanning confocal microscope with the instruments separated by a blackout curtain. This poster discusses the engineering approach implemented to bring an older lab into the environmental specifications needed for the proper operation of the high-end light microscopes.

  15. Simple structured illumination microscope setup with high acquisition speed by using a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Ronny; Lu-Walther, Hui-Wen; Jost, Aurélie; Kielhorn, Martin; Wicker, Kai; Heintzmann, Rainer

    2014-08-25

    We describe a two-beam interference structured illumination fluorescence microscope. The novelty of the presented system lies in its simplicity. A programmable spatial light modulator (ferroelectric LCoS) in an intermediate image plane enables precise and rapid control of the excitation pattern in the specimen. The contrast of the projected light pattern is strongly influenced by the polarization state of the light entering the high NA objective. To achieve high contrast, we use a segmented polarizer. Furthermore, a mask with six holes blocks unwanted components in the spatial frequency spectrum of the illumination grating. Both these passive components serve their purpose in a simpler and almost as efficient way as active components. We demonstrate a lateral resolution of 114.2 ± 9.5 nm at a frame rate of 7.6 fps per reconstructed 2D slice.

  16. A compact light-sheet microscope for the study of the mammalian central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhengyi; Haslehurst, Peter; Scott, Suzanne; Emptage, Nigel; Dholakia, Kishan

    2016-05-24

    Investigation of the transient processes integral to neuronal function demands rapid and high-resolution imaging techniques over a large field of view, which cannot be achieved with conventional scanning microscopes. Here we describe a compact light sheet fluorescence microscope, featuring a 45° inverted geometry and an integrated photolysis laser, that is optimized for applications in neuroscience, in particular fast imaging of sub-neuronal structures in mammalian brain slices. We demonstrate the utility of this design for three-dimensional morphological reconstruction, activation of a single synapse with localized photolysis, and fast imaging of neuronal Ca(2+) signalling across a large field of view. The developed system opens up a host of novel applications for the neuroscience community.

  17. Kaleidoscope of oral artifacts: A vivid picture through light and polarizing microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardam, Priyanka; Jain, Kanu; Mehendiratta, Monica; Mathias, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    This study is based on finding of an inexplicable artifact that was seen in the tissue received as periapical granuloma. To observe the histological appearance of different commonly implanted food particles and easily incorporated substances from a laboratory in the oral biopsy tissues. Various food particles such as wheat chapatti, beans, peas, pulses, and coriander leaves and substances such as a suture, cotton, and paper that can easily gain entry during biopsy and histotechnical procedures were intentionally introduced in the tissue specimens of a uterus from outside. Both light and polarizing microscopes were utilized to view them. Different food particles and substances gave different appearances that could lead to misdiagnosis. Some of these also exhibited positive birefringence under the polarizing microscope. Knowledge and familiarity with probable foreign substances which can appear in tissues may help prevent misdiagnosis or erroneous diagnosis of biopsy specimens.

  18. Light and electron microscopic localization of GABAA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells and astrocytes using immunohistochemical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Hösli, E; Belhage, B

    1991-01-01

    . At the light microscope level specific staining of GABAA-receptors was localized in various types of neurones in explant cultures of rat cerebellum using the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique, whereas no specific staining was found in astrocytes. At the electron microscope level labeling...

  19. Progress in tear microdesiccate analysis by combining various transmitted-light microscope techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traipe-Salas, Felipe; Traipe-Castro, Leonidas; Salinas-Toro, Daniela; López, Daniela; Valenzuela, Felipe; Cartes, Christian; Toledo-Araya, Héctor; Pérez, Claudio; López Solís, Remigio

    2016-06-03

    Tear desiccation on a glass surface followed by transmitted-light microscopy has served as diagnostic test for dry eye. Four distinctive morphological domains (zones I, II, III and transition band) have been recently recognized in tear microdesiccates. Physicochemical dissimilarities among those domains hamper comprehensive microscopic examination of tear microdesiccates. Optimal observation conditions of entire tear microdesiccates are now investigated. One-μl aliquots of tear collected from individual healthy eyes were dried at ambient conditions on microscope slides. Tear microdesiccates were examined by combining low-magnification objective lenses with transmitted-light microscopy (brightfield, phase contrasts Ph1,2,3 and darkfield). Fern-like structures (zones II and III) were visible with all illumination methods excepting brightfield. Zone I was the microdesiccate domain displaying the most noticeable illumination-dependent variations, namely transparent band delimited by an outer rim (Ph1, Ph2), homogeneous compactly built structure (brightfield) or invisible domain (darkfield, Ph3). Intermediate positions of the condenser (BF/Ph1, Ph1/Ph2) showed a structured roughly cylindrical zone I. The transition band also varied from invisibility (brightfield) to a well-defined domain comprising interwoven filamentous elements (phase contrasts, darkfield). Imaging of entire tear microdesiccates by transmitted-light microscopy depends upon illumination. A more comprehensive description of tear microdesiccates can be achieved by combining illumination methods.

  20. The first isolation of Cochliopodium gulosum Schaeffer, 1926 (Lobosea, Himatismenida) since its initial description. I. light-microscopical investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander

    1999-01-01

    A marine lobose amoeba possessing characteristic features of the genus Cochliopodium (Hertwig and Lesser, 1874) Kudryavtsev, 1999 was found in the upper layer of sand at the beach of Keret Island, Kandalaksha Bay, the White Sea. Light-microscopical identity of this isolate and Cochliopodium gulosum Schaeffer, 1926 has been shown. This species has never been isolated and studied since its initial description. Its validity and generic position are confirmed by the results of light-microscopical...

  1. Development of a scanning tunneling microscope combined with a synchrotron radiation light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; Okuda, Taichi; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Matsushima, Takeshi; Harasawa, Ayumi; Akiyama, Kotone; Kinoshita, Toyohiko

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a synchrotron-radiation light source (SR-STM) aiming at elemental analysis in a spatial resolution of STM. Using SR-STM atomically resolved STM images under the irradiation and also X-ray adsorption spectra clearly showing an adsorption edge of a substrate were successfully obtained by detecting photo-emitted electrons with the STM tip. In order to focus the probing area of the photo-induced current, a glass-coated metal tip sharpened with focused ion beam was used as a probe. The present situation and prospects of the instrument are discussed in this review. (author)

  2. Optical sectioning microscopes with no moving parts using a micro-stripe array light emitting diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poher, V; Zhang, H X; Kennedy, G T; Griffin, C; Oddos, S; Gu, E; Elson, D S; Girkin, M; French, P M W; Dawson, M D; Neil, M A

    2007-09-03

    We describe an optical sectioning microscopy system with no moving parts based on a micro-structured stripe-array light emitting diode (LED). By projecting arbitrary line or grid patterns onto the object, we are able to implement a variety of optical sectioning microscopy techniques such as grid-projection structured illumination and line scanning confocal microscopy, switching from one imaging technique to another without modifying the microscope setup. The micro-structured LED and driver are detailed and depth discrimination capabilities are measured and calculated.

  3. Sperm head vacuoles--light microscopic and ultrastructural observations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shucheng; Wang, Ning; He, Bin; Cheng, Jie; Xi, Shui; Wang, Shang-ming; Gao, Yu; Wang, Jiedong

    2012-05-01

    Sperm head vacuoles are easily detectable in human spermatozoa under the electron microscope. A sperm head vacuole is considered abnormal when it exceeds 20% of the head's cross-sectional area. The authors report a rare case of primary spermatozoa deformity with 100% vacuolated head and evaluate the correlation between presence of head vacuoles/nucleus vacuoles and abnormal transformation of nucleoprotamine types, defects of nucleoprotamine, and gene disorders of chromatin/chromosome/spermatogenesis. A 43-year-old male patient with infertility came to the Reproduction Health Center, Hebei, China. Semen was examined in accordance with the WHO criteria, and the spermatozoa were counted. Two hundred spermatozoa were observed both under light microscope and the electronic microscope. About 50% of the spermatozoa had head deformities. In the intact spermatozoa, the heads were 100% vacuolated. Under ultrastructural observation, abnormalities were observed and two major types of spermatozoa were detected. In the head of those incompletely mature spermatozoa, four kinds of the nucleus vacuoles were observed. Abnormal spermatozoa with head vacuoles account for the patient infertility.

  4. Analytical electron microscope based on scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Masanari; Tsuneta, Ruriko; Anan, Yoshihiro; Nakamae, Koji

    2017-01-01

    An analytical electron microscope based on the scanning transmission electron microscope with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (STEM-WDX) to realize highly sensitive elemental imaging especially for light elements has been developed. In this study, a large-solid-angle multi-capillary x-rays lens with a focal length of 5 mm, long-time data acquisition (e.g. longer than 26 h), and a drift-free system made it possible to visualize boron-dopant images in a Si substrate at a detection limit of 0.2 atomic percent. (paper)

  5. Development of scanning X-ray microscopes for materials science spectromicroscopy at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warwick, T.; Ade, H.

    1997-07-01

    Third generation synchrotron sources of soft x-rays provide an excellent opportunity to apply established x-ray spectroscopic materials analysis techniques to surface imaging on a sub-micron scale. This paper describes an effort underway at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) to pursue this development using Fresnel zone plate lenses. These are used to produce a sub-micron spot of x-rays for use in scanning microscopy. Several groups have developed microscopes using this technique. A specimen is rastered in the focused x-ray spot and a detector signal is acquired as a function of position to generate an image. Spectroscopic capability is added by holding the small spot on a feature of interest and scanning through the spectrum. The authors are pursuing two spectroscopic techniques: Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) which together provide a powerful capability for light element analysis in materials science

  6. Light and electron microscopic features of eperythrozoon-like parasites in a North American opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messick, J B; Berent, L M; Ehrhart, E J; Wasmer, C C

    2000-06-01

    Epierythrocytic parasites associated with a severe anemic episode have not been previously reported in the opossum. A Wright-Giemsa-stained peripheral blood smear from an anemic North American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) revealed numerous organisms attached to red blood cells either singularly or in chains. Ring forms of the organism were common and could be found free in the plasma. Electron microscopy revealed that these organisms were attached to the intact plasma membrane in depressions on the surface of red blood cells. Delicate fibrils between the organism and adjacent membrane were observed. The organisms were round to oval with a diameter of 300-750 nm and were enclosed by a single limiting membrane. The light and electron microscopic features of these epierythrocytic organisms are similar to those reported for Eperythrozoon and Haemobartonella species.

  7. Ultraviolet Laser SQUID Microscope for GaN Blue Light Emitting Diode Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daibo, M; Kamiwano, D; Kurosawa, T; Yoshizawa, M; Tayama, N

    2006-01-01

    We carried out non-contacting measurements of photocurrent distributions in GaN blue light emitting diode (LED) chips using our newly developed ultraviolet (UV) laser SQUID microscope. The UV light generates the photocurrent, and then the photocurrent induces small magnetic fields around the chip. An off-axis arranged HTS-SQUID magnetometer is employed to detect a vector magnetic field whose typical amplitude is several hundred femto-tesla. Generally, it is difficult to obtain Ohmic contacts for p-type GaN because of the low hole concentration in the p-type epitaxial layer and the lack of any available metal with a higher work function compared with the p-type GaN. Therefore, a traditional probecontacted electrical test is difficult to conduct for wide band gap semiconductors without an adequately annealed electrode. Using the UV-laser SQUID microscope, the photocurrent can be measured without any electrical contact. We show the photocurrent vector map which was reconstructed from measured magnetic fields data. We also demonstrate how we found the position of a defect of the electrical short circuits in the LED chip

  8. Light-microscope specimen holder with 3-axis rotation and small-angle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwabuchi, Sadahiro; Koh, Jin-Young; Wardenburg, Michael; Johnson, James D; Harata, N Charles

    2014-01-15

    Although recent developments in methodologies for light microscopy have enabled imaging of fine biological structures, such imaging is often accompanied by two types of problems. One is a tilting of the specimen with respect to the x-y plane (i.e. rotation around the x- or y-axis) such that the sample is not perpendicular to the optical z-axis, and the other is rotation around the z-axis that precludes optimal orientations for imaging and experimentation. These rotation problems can cause optical aberrations and hamper imaging experiments, even when the angular difference from the ideal position is small. In order to correct for these practical issues, we have developed a specimen holder with 3-axis (x-y-z) rotation for an inverted light microscope. This allows for full-range rotations of 2-4° for x-, y-axes, ~24° for z-axis, and a small-angle control of microscope stage without requiring changes to the existing optical components. Similar devices with full capability have not been available. It will be useful for imaging experiments with biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Light microscopic image analysis system to quantify immunoreactive terminal area apposed to nerve cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, L. C.; D'Amelio, F.; Fox, R. A.; Polyakov, I.; Daunton, N. G.

    1997-01-01

    The present report describes a desktop computer-based method for the quantitative assessment of the area occupied by immunoreactive terminals in close apposition to nerve cells in relation to the perimeter of the cell soma. This method is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routines incorporated in NIH-Image public domain software. Pyramidal cells of layer V of the somatosensory cortex outlined by GABA immunolabeled terminals were chosen for our analysis. A Leitz Diaplan light microscope was employed for the visualization of the sections. A Sierra Scientific Model 4030 CCD camera was used to capture the images into a Macintosh Centris 650 computer. After preprocessing, filtering was performed on the power spectrum in the frequency domain produced by the FFT operation. An inverse FFT with filter procedure was employed to restore the images to the spatial domain. Pasting of the original image to the transformed one using a Boolean logic operation called 'AND'ing produced an image with the terminals enhanced. This procedure allowed the creation of a binary image using a well-defined threshold of 128. Thus, the terminal area appears in black against a white background. This methodology provides an objective means of measurement of area by counting the total number of pixels occupied by immunoreactive terminals in light microscopic sections in which the difficulties of labeling intensity, size, shape and numerical density of terminals are avoided.

  10. Three-dimensional measuring technique for surface topography using a light-sectioning microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Linglin; Chen, Peifeng; Wang, Ying; Zhou, Le; Luo, Xi

    2012-03-10

    Three-dimensional (3D) surface topographic analysis, measurement, and assessment techniques have raised great interest not only among researchers but also among industrial users. Many industrial processes and applications are directly influenced by the small-scale roughness of surface finishes. This paper describes the development and implementation of a noncontact, three-dimensional, microtopography measuring system. The instrument is formed by combining a modified light-sectioning microscope subsystem with a computer subsystem. In particular, optical system characteristics of the light-sectioning microscope are investigated, and a textured steel sheet is measured to demonstrate good practical outcomes. Details of measuring processes and image processing algorithms are provided, such as procedures for measurement, image edge extraction, and 3D topography reconstruction. After the 3D topography of the measured surface has been reconstructed, the topography field description parameters are calculated. A standard roughness block was used for calibration of the surface microtopography measuring system. Results obtained showed the measurement method output has good agreement with the actual asperity (unevenness or roughness) of the surface. The computer subsystem is used to process and control asperity measurements and image generation, and for image acquisition and presentation.

  11. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  12. Further light microscopic studies on morphology and development of Pneumocystis carinii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y; Shiota, T; Yamada, M; Matsumoto, Y

    1981-01-01

    In order to add more advance in light microscopic investigation of P. carinii, phase contrast microscopy partly followed by wet giemsa stain and semiultrathin section of the lungs embedded in JB-4 plastic were studied. In phase contrast microscopy, small and large sized trophozoites of P. carinii were clearly recognized. Although movement of trophozoite was not found, rhythmic movement of intracystic bodies with filopodia was often seen in mature cyst. Those living organisms were then directly stained with Giemsa by infiltrating under the coverglass. Thus the organism could be investigated both in unstained and stained conditions. It is noticed with interest that 8 intracystic bodies seem to fill up the cavity of cyst when cell division is completed, then they liberate and become independent into spherical bodies, followed by banana-shaped or amoeboid forms with motility. An emphasis was done that semiultrathin section made from JB-4 plastic embedded lungs was quite useful for investigation of P. carinii infection. Several sizes of mononuclear thin-walked trophozoites, mature and immature cysts, and empty cysts were more clearly distinguished than any other light microscopical method ever reported.

  13. Microscopic coupled-channels study of scattering and breakup of light heavy-ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuragi, Yukinori; Yahiro, Masanobu; Kamimura, Masayasu.

    1987-01-01

    The elastic and inelastic scattering and the breakup reactions of light heavy-ions, particularly 6 Li, 7 Li and 12 C, are investigated on the basis of a microscopic coupled-channels method. The bound states and resonant and non-resonant continuum states of the projectile nucleus are taken into account. The wave functions of those states are given by a microscopic cluster model assuming α-d, α-t and 3α for the three projectile nuclei, respectively. The unbound continuum states are approximately treated with the method of coupled discretized continuum channels (CDCC). The real parts of all the diagonal and coupling potentials are given by doubly folding the M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction into the nucleon transition densities of the projectile nucleus and the ground-state density of the target nucleus. The microscopic CDCC method is successfully applied to the analyses of the scattering and the breakup of 6,7 Li and 12 C in a wide range of the target mass and the bombarding energy. The effect of the projectile virtual breakup on the elastic scattering is strikingly large and absolutely important to reproduce the observed cross sections. The dynamical polarization (DP) potentials induced by the breakup of the 6,7 Li and 12 C projectiles are found to be strongly repulsive and, for 6 Li, very weakly absorptive, which is quite different from what has been known for DP potentials induced by the excitation of usual collective states. Unified understanding is presented for various types of possible DP potentials due to weak-coupling channels through strong-coupling channels. Further discussions are made on the roles of the coupling between the breakup channels and that between the elastic channel and the breakup channels in the scattering and breakup reactions of the light heavy-ions. (author)

  14. Modular low-light microscope for imaging cellular bioluminescence and radioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Jin; Türkcan, Silvan; Pratx, Guillem

    2017-05-01

    Low-light microscopy methods are receiving increased attention as new applications have emerged. One such application is to allow longitudinal imaging of light-sensitive cells with no phototoxicity and no photobleaching of fluorescent biomarkers. Another application is for imaging signals that are inherently dim and undetectable using standard microscopy techniques, such as bioluminescence, chemiluminescence or radioluminescence. In this protocol, we provide instructions on how to build a modular low-light microscope (1-4 d) by coupling two microscope objective lenses, back to back from each other, using standard optomechanical components. We also provide directions on how to image dim signals such as those of radioluminescence (1-1.5 h), bioluminescence (∼30 min) and low-excitation fluorescence (∼15 min). In particular, radioluminescence microscopy is explained in detail, as it is a newly developed technique that enables the study of small-molecule transport (e.g., radiolabeled drugs, metabolic precursors and nuclear medicine contrast agents) by single cells without perturbing endogenous biochemical processes. In this imaging technique, a scintillator crystal (e.g., CdWO 4 ) is placed in close proximity to the radiolabeled cells, where it converts the radioactive decays into optical flashes detectable using a sensitive camera. Using the image reconstruction toolkit provided in this protocol, the flashes can be reconstructed to yield high-resolution images of the radiotracer distribution. With appropriate timing, the three aforementioned imaging modalities may be performed together on a population of live cells, allowing the user to perform parallel functional studies of cell heterogeneity at the single-cell level.

  15. Wave optics theory and 3-D deconvolution for the light field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxton, Michael; Grosenick, Logan; Yang, Samuel; Cohen, Noy; Andalman, Aaron; Deisseroth, Karl; Levoy, Marc

    2013-10-21

    Light field microscopy is a new technique for high-speed volumetric imaging of weakly scattering or fluorescent specimens. It employs an array of microlenses to trade off spatial resolution against angular resolution, thereby allowing a 4-D light field to be captured using a single photographic exposure without the need for scanning. The recorded light field can then be used to computationally reconstruct a full volume. In this paper, we present an optical model for light field microscopy based on wave optics, instead of previously reported ray optics models. We also present a 3-D deconvolution method for light field microscopy that is able to reconstruct volumes at higher spatial resolution, and with better optical sectioning, than previously reported. To accomplish this, we take advantage of the dense spatio-angular sampling provided by a microlens array at axial positions away from the native object plane. This dense sampling permits us to decode aliasing present in the light field to reconstruct high-frequency information. We formulate our method as an inverse problem for reconstructing the 3-D volume, which we solve using a GPU-accelerated iterative algorithm. Theoretical limits on the depth-dependent lateral resolution of the reconstructed volumes are derived. We show that these limits are in good agreement with experimental results on a standard USAF 1951 resolution target. Finally, we present 3-D reconstructions of pollen grains that demonstrate the improvements in fidelity made possible by our method.

  16. Resolution enhancement method for lensless in-line holographic microscope with spatially-extended light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shaodong; Wu, Jigang

    2017-10-02

    We propose a resolution enhancement method for lensless in-line holographic microscope (LIHM) with spatially-extended light source, where the resolution is normally deteriorated by the insufficient spatial coherence of the illumination. In our LIHM setup, a light-emitting diode (LED), which was a spatially-extended light source, directly illuminated the sample, and the in-line hologram were recorded by a CMOS imaging sensor located behind the sample. In our holographic reconstruction process, the in-line hologram was first deconvoled with a properly resized image of the LED illumination area, and then back-propagated with scalar diffraction formula to reconstruct the sample image. We studied the hologram forming process and showed that the additional deconvolution process besides normal scalar diffraction reconstruction in LIHM can effectively enhance the imaging resolution. The resolution enhancements capability was calibrated by numerical simulations and imaging experiments with the U.S. air force target as the sample. We also used our LIHM to image the wing of a green lacewing to further demonstrate the capability of our methods for practical imaging applications. Our methods provide a way for LIHM to achieve satisfactory resolution with less stringent requirement for spatial coherence of the source and could reduce the cost for compact imaging system.

  17. Object-based representation and analysis of light and electron microscopic volume data using Blender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadulina, Albina; Conzelmann, Markus; Williams, Elizabeth A; Panzera, Aurora; Jékely, Gáspár

    2015-07-25

    Rapid improvements in light and electron microscopy imaging techniques and the development of 3D anatomical atlases necessitate new approaches for the visualization and analysis of image data. Pixel-based representations of raw light microscopy data suffer from limitations in the number of channels that can be visualized simultaneously. Complex electron microscopic reconstructions from large tissue volumes are also challenging to visualize and analyze. Here we exploit the advanced visualization capabilities and flexibility of the open-source platform Blender to visualize and analyze anatomical atlases. We use light-microscopy-based gene expression atlases and electron microscopy connectome volume data from larval stages of the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii. We build object-based larval gene expression atlases in Blender and develop tools for annotation and coexpression analysis. We also represent and analyze connectome data including neuronal reconstructions and underlying synaptic connectivity. We demonstrate the power and flexibility of Blender for visualizing and exploring complex anatomical atlases. The resources we have developed for Platynereis will facilitate data sharing and the standardization of anatomical atlases for this species. The flexibility of Blender, particularly its embedded Python application programming interface, means that our methods can be easily extended to other organisms.

  18. On-axis programmable microscope using liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Pascuala; Martínez, José Luís.; Moreno, Ignacio

    2017-06-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLM) are currently used in many applications in optical microscopy and imaging. One of the most promising methods is the use of liquid crystal displays (LCD) as programmable phase diffractive optical elements (DOE) placed in the Fourier plane giving access to the spatial frequencies which can be phased shifted individually, allowing to emulate a wealth of contrast enhancing methods for both amplitude and phase samples. We use phase and polarization modulation of LCD to implement an on-axis microscope optical system. The LCD used are Hamamatsu liquid crystal on silicon (LCOS) SLM free of flicker, thus showing a full profit of the SLM space bandwidth, as opposed to optical systems in the literature forced to work off-axis due to the strong zero-order component. Taking benefits of the phase modulation of the LCOS we have implemented different microscopic imaging operations, such as high-pass and low-pass filtering in parallel using programmable blazed gratings. Moreover, we are able to control polarization modulation to display two orthogonal linear state of polarization images than can be subtracted or added by changing the period of the blazed grating. In that sense, Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) microscopy can be easily done by generating two images exploiting the polarization splitting properties when a blazed grating is displayed in the SLM. Biological microscopy samples are also used.

  19. Improving spatial resolution of the light field microscope with Fourier ptychography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Yoshitake; Usuki, Shin; Miura, Kenjiro T.

    2017-09-01

    Light field microscope (LFM) is an optical microscope capable of obtaining images having large depth of field with different viewpoints. By using the parallax of these multi-view images, it is possible to reconstruct the 3D sample. However, the sampling interval of this multi-viewpoint image depends on the pitch interval of the microlens array, so the spatial resolution is low, and the accuracy of the 3D sample to be reconstructed is also low. Conventional research has a method of increasing the spatial resolution by subpixel-shifted multiple images. However, this method has problems such as the necessity of mechanical operation and high cost. Therefore, we propose applying Fourier ptychography to the LFM. Fourier ptychography is a technique to obtain high spatial resolution images by joining images obtained by irradiating samples from different angles using LED arrays in Fourier space. Fourier ptychography does not require mechanical scanning and is high throughput and low cost. In addition, Fourier ptycoography is possible to obtain phase information on a sample, and it is also possible to obtain a fine 3D sample. We propose a method to generate high spatial resolution multiview images using Fourier ptychography and reconstruct highly accurate 3D sample from those images. In this research, we experiment with the original LFM and verify the effect.

  20. A scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade, H.; Kirz, J.; Hulbert, S.; Johnson, E.; Anderson, E.; Kern, D.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY

    1989-01-01

    We are in the process of developing and commissioning a scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) at the X1A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). It is designed to make use of the Soft X-ray Undulator (SXU) at the NSLS. This high brightness source illuminates a Fresnel zone plate, which forms a focused probe, ≤ 0.2μm in size, on the specimen surface. A grating monochromator selects the photon energy in the 400-800 eV range with an energy resolution of better than 1 eV. The expected flux in the focus is in the 5 x 10 7 - 10 9 photons/s range. A single pass Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer (CMA) is used to record photoemission spectra, or to form an image within a fixed electron energy bandwidth as the specimen is mechanically scanned. As a first test, a 1000 mesh Au grid was successfully imaged with a resolution of about 1μm and the CMA tuned to the Au 4 f photoelectron peak. Once it is commissioned, a program is planned which will utilize the microscope to study beam sensitive systems, such as thin oxide/sub-oxide films of alumina and silica, and ultimately various adsorbates on these films. 14 refs., 4 figs

  1. Energy-dependent microscopic optical potential for scattering of nucleons on light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farag, M.Y.H.; Esmael, E.H. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Maridi, H.M. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Taiz University, Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz (Yemen)

    2014-06-15

    We present an energy-dependent microscopic optical model potential for elastic scattering of nucleons on light nuclei. The single-folding model is used for the real part of the optical potential (OP), while the imaginary part is derived within the high-energy approximation theory. The energy dependence of the OP is determined from the parameterization of the volume integrals those calculated from the best-fit OP that fit the experimental data of the cross sections and analyzing powers. This energy-dependent OP is successfully applied to analyze the proton elastic scattering of {sup 4,6,i8}He, {sup 6,7}Li, and {sup 9,10}Be nuclei at low and intermediate incident energies up to 200MeV/nucleon. (orig.)

  2. Compact soft x-ray microscope using a gas-discharge light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benk, Markus; Bergmann, Klaus; Schäfer, David; Wilhein, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    We report on a soft x-ray microscope using a gas-discharge plasma with pseudo spark-like electrode geometry as a light source. The source produces a radiant intensity of 4 x 10(13) photons/(sr pulse) for the 2.88 nm emission line of helium-like nitrogen. At a demonstrated 1 kHz repetition rate a brilliance of 4.3 x 10(9) photons/(microm2 sr s) is obtained for the 2.88 nm line. Ray-tracing simulations show that, employing an adequate grazing incidence collector, a photon flux of 1 x 10(7) photons/(microm2 s) can be achieved with the current source. The applicability of the presented pinch plasma concept to soft x-ray microscopy is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle experiment.

  3. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A depth estimation method based on geometric transformation for stereo light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shengli; Yu, Mei; Wang, Yigang; Jiang, Gangyi

    2014-01-01

    Stereo light microscopes (SLM) with narrow vision and shallow depth of field are widely used in micro-domain research. In this paper, we propose a depth estimation method of micro objects based on geometric transformation. By analyzing the optical imaging geometry, the definition of geometric transformation distance is given and the depth-distance relation express is obtained. The parameters of geometric transformation and express are calibrated with calibration board images captured in aid of precise motorized stage. The depth of micro object can be estimated by calculating the geometric transformation distance. The proposed depth-distance relation express is verified using an experiment in which the depth map of an Olanzapine tablet surface is reconstructed.

  5. Selective scanning tunneling microscope light emission from rutile phase of VO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Joe; Kuwahara, Masashi; Hotsuki, Masaki; Katano, Satoshi; Uehara, Yoichi

    2016-09-28

    We observed scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) induced by a tunneling current at the gap between an Ag tip and a VO2 thin film, in parallel to scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) profiles. The 34 nm thick VO2 film grown on a rutile TiO2 (0 0 1) substrate consisted of both rutile (R)- and monoclinic (M)-structure phases of a few 10 nm-sized domains at room temperature. We found that STM-LE with a certain photon energy of 2.0 eV occurs selectively from R-phase domains of VO2, while no STM-LE was observed from M-phase. The mechanism of STM-LE from R-phase VO2 was determined to be an interband transition process rather than inverse photoemission or inelastic tunneling processes.

  6. Image processing of muscle striations below the resolution limit of the light microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.H.; Holdren, D.N.; Periasamy, A.; Everts, W.C.; Pollack, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    We describe the use of digital deconvolution in the study of muscle striations below the resolution imposed by the optical diffraction of our video light microscope. To use deconvolution procedures on muscle images, the transfer function of the optical system is first characterized. This is accomplished by imaging a step object and fitting the image with the combination of a first order Bessel and Guassian function using a non-linear least squares approach. Due to the ill-conditioned nature of deconvolution, however, ambiguity in the reconstruction is sometimes found. To allow better estimation of the true object, separate deconvolution approaches are used and the reconstructions compared. In this manner, the fine structure of muscle striations is determined

  7. Laser based imaging of time depending microscopic scenes with strong light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahlweg, Cornelius; Wilhelm, Eugen; Rothe, Hendrik

    2011-10-01

    Investigating volume scatterometry methods based on short range LIDAR devices for non-static objects we achieved interesting results aside the intended micro-LIDAR: the high speed camera recording of the illuminated scene of an exploding wire -intended for Doppler LIDAR tests - delivered a very effective method of observing details of objects with extremely strong light emission. As a side effect a schlieren movie is gathered without any special effort. The fact that microscopic features of short time processes with high emission and material flow might be imaged without endangering valuable equipment makes this technique at least as interesting as the intended one. So we decided to present our results - including latest video and photo material - instead of a more theoretical paper on our progress concerning the primary goal.

  8. A versatile maskless microscope projection photolithography system and its application in light-directed fabrication of DNA microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Naiser, Thomas; Mai, Timo; Michel, Wolfgang; Ott, Albrecht

    2006-01-01

    We present a maskless microscope projection lithography system (MPLS), in which photomasks have been replaced by a Digital Micromirror Device type spatial light modulator (DMD, Texas Instruments). Employing video projector technology high resolution patterns, designed as bitmap images on the computer, are displayed using a micromirror array consisting of about 786000 tiny individually addressable tilting mirrors. The DMD, which is located in the image plane of an infinity corrected microscope...

  9. A stereovision model applied in bio-micromanipulation system based on stereo light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuezong

    2017-12-01

    A bio-micromanipulation system is designed for manipulating micro-objects with a length scale of tens or hundreds of microns based on stereo light microscope. The world coordinate reconstruction of points on the surface of micro-objects is an important goal for the micromanipulation. Traditional pinhole camera model is applied widely in macrocomputer vision. However, this model will output bad data with remarkable error if it is directly used to reconstruct three-dimensional world coordinates for stereo light microscope. Therefore, a novel and improved pinhole camera model applied in bio-micromanipulation system is proposed in this article. The new model is composed of binocular-pinhole model and error-correction model. The binocular-pinhole model is used to output the basic world coordinates. The error-correction model is used to correct the errors from the basic world coordinates and outputs the final high-precision world coordinates. The results show that the new model achieves a precision of 0.01 mm in the X direction, 0.01 mm in the Y direction, and 0.015 mm in the Z direction within a maximum reconstruction distance of 4.1 mm in the X direction, 2.9 mm in the Y direction, and 2.25 mm in the Z direction, and that traditional pinhole camera model achieves a lower and unsatisfactory precision of about 0.1 mm. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. MICROSCOPE Mission: First Constraints on the Violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle by a Light Scalar Dilaton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergé, Joel; Brax, Philippe; Métris, Gilles; Pernot-Borràs, Martin; Touboul, Pierre; Uzan, Jean-Philippe

    2018-04-01

    The existence of a light or massive scalar field with a coupling to matter weaker than gravitational strength is a possible source of violation of the weak equivalence principle. We use the first results on the Eötvös parameter by the MICROSCOPE experiment to set new constraints on such scalar fields. For a massive scalar field of mass smaller than 10-12 eV (i.e., range larger than a few 1 05 m ), we improve existing constraints by one order of magnitude to |α |<10-11 if the scalar field couples to the baryon number and to |α |<10-12 if the scalar field couples to the difference between the baryon and the lepton numbers. We also consider a model describing the coupling of a generic dilaton to the standard matter fields with five parameters, for a light field: We find that, for masses smaller than 10-12 eV , the constraints on the dilaton coupling parameters are improved by one order of magnitude compared to previous equivalence principle tests.

  11. Automated, highly reproducible, wide-field, light-based cortical mapping method using a commercial stereo microscope and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Su; Liu, Ya-Feng; Wang, Xiao-Min; Liu, Ke-Fei; Zhang, Ding-Hong; Li, Yi-Ding; Yu, Ai-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Jia-Yi; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Zeng, Shao-Qun

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a more flexible optogenetics-based mapping system attached on a stereo microscope, which offers automatic light stimulation to individual regions of interest in the cortex that expresses light-activated channelrhodopsin-2 in vivo . Combining simultaneous recording of electromyography from specific forelimb muscles, we demonstrate that this system offers much better efficiency and precision in mapping distinct domains for controlling limb muscles in the mouse motor cortex. Furthermore, the compact and modular design of the system also yields a simple and flexible implementation to different commercial stereo microscopes, and thus could be widely used among laboratories.

  12. Scanning tunnelling microscope light emission: Finite temperature current noise and over cut-off emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalathingal, Vijith; Dawson, Paul; Mitra, J

    2017-06-14

    The spectral distribution of light emitted from a scanning tunnelling microscope junction not only bears its intrinsic plasmonic signature but is also imprinted with the characteristics of optical frequency fluc- tuations of the tunnel current. Experimental spectra from gold-gold tunnel junctions are presented that show a strong bias (V b ) dependence, curiously with emission at energies higher than the quantum cut-off (eV b ); a component that decays monotonically with increasing bias. The spectral evolution is explained by developing a theoretical model for the power spectral density of tunnel current fluctuations, incorporating finite temperature contribution through consideration of the quantum transport in the system. Notably, the observed decay of the over cut-off emission is found to be critically associated with, and well explained in terms of the variation in junction conductance with V b . The investigation highlights the scope of plasmon-mediated light emission as a unique probe of high frequency fluctuations in electronic systems that are fundamental to the electrical generation and control of plasmons.

  13. Three-dimensional imaging of trapped cold atoms with a light field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Gordon E; Marciniak, Michael A; Burke, John H

    2017-11-01

    This research images trapped atoms in three dimensions, utilizing light field imaging. Such a system is of interest in the development of atom interferometer accelerometers in dynamic systems where strictly defined focal planes may be impractical. In this research, a light field microscope was constructed utilizing a Lytro Development Kit micro lens array and sensor. It was used to image fluorescing rubidium atoms in a magneto optical trap. The three-dimensional (3D) volume of the atoms is reconstructed using a modeled point spread function (PSF), taking into consideration that the low magnification (1.25) of the system changed typical assumptions used in the optics model for the PSF. The 3D reconstruction is analyzed with respect to a standard off-axis fluorescence image. Optical axis separation between two atom clouds is measured to a 100 μm accuracy in a 3 mm deep volume, with a 16 μm in-focus standard resolution with a 3.9 mm by 3.9 mm field of view. Optical axis spreading is observed in the reconstruction and discussed. The 3D information can be used to determine properties of the atom cloud with a single camera and single image, and can be applied anywhere 3D information is needed but optical access may be limited.

  14. A study on the effect of thiotepa on mice spermatogenesis using light and electronic microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, D M; Rad, J S; Roshankar, L; Karimipor, M; Ghanbari, A A; Aazami, A; Valilou, M R

    2008-08-01

    The present study was designed to explore the spermatogenic effect of intraperitoneal administration of thiotepa in mice. It is known the chemotherapy could affect testicular function and result in infertility. There are few reports on the side effect of thiotepa on spermatogenesis when are used as anticancer drug. Therefore, in the present study the effect of thiotepa on spermatogenesis was evaluated by electron microscopy. A total of 20 balb/c mice were used in this study. They were divided into control and thiotepa treated groups. Thiotepa was administrated as 2.5 mg kg(-1) for 5 days. The mice were sacrificed after 5 weeks and testicular specimens were removed, fixed in boueins fixative and 2.5% Glutaraldehide then prepared for light and electron microscopic study. Light microscopy showed that the thickness of germinal epithelium was decreased in thiotepa treated group and many seminiferous tubules have lost germinal cells. Electron microscopy revealed that in experimental group several intercellular spaces appeared between spermatogonial and sertoli cells. The basement membrane became irregular and intercellular vacuoles were present in sertoli and spermatogonial cells. Nuclear chromatin was condensed and there were several vacuolated mitochondria. It was indicated that thiotepa affected testicular germinal epithelium by both cytotoxic effect and induction of apoptosis.

  15. The mechanism of light emission from a scanning tunnelling microscope operating in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogez, B; Cao, S; Dujardin, G; Comtet, G; Moal, E Le; Mayne, A; Boer-Duchemin, E

    2016-11-18

    The scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) may be used as a low-energy, electrical nanosource of surface plasmon polaritons and light. In this article, we demonstrate that the optimum mode of operation of the STM for maximum photon emission is completely different in air than in vacuum. To this end, we investigate the emission of photons, the variation in the relative tip-sample distance and the measured current as a function of time for an STM operating in air. Contrary to the case of an STM operating in vacuum, the measured current between the tip and sample for an STM in air is very unstable (rapidly fluctuating in time) when the applied voltage between the tip and sample is in the ∼1.5-3 V range (i.e., in the energy range of visible photons). The photon emission occurs in short (50 μs) bursts when the STM tip is closest to the sample. The current instabilities are shown to be a key ingredient for producing intense light emission from an STM operating in air (photon emission rate several orders of magnitude higher than for stable current). These results are explained in terms of the interplay between the tunnel current and the electrochemical current in the ubiquitous thin water layer that exists when working in air.

  16. Muscle pathology in myotonic dystrophy: light and electron microscopic investigation in eighteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadaj-Pakleza, A; Lusakowska, A; Sułek-Piątkowska, A; Krysa, W; Rajkiewicz, M; Kwieciński, H; Kamińska, A

    2011-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common muscular dystrophy in adults. Two known genetic subtypes include DM1 (myotonic dystrophy type 1) and DM2 (myotonic dystrophy type 2). Genetic testing is considered as the only reliable diagnostic criterion in myotonic dystrophies. Relatively little is known about DM1 and DM2 myopathology. Thus, the aim of our study was to characterise light and electron microscopic features of DM1 and DM2 in patients with genetically proven types of the disease. We studied 3 DM1 cases and 15 DM2 cases from which muscle biopsies were taken for diagnostic purposes during the period from 1973 to 2006, before genetic testing became available at our hospital. The DM1 group included 3 males (age at biopsy 15-19). The DM2 group included 15 patients (5 men and 10 women, age at biopsy 26-60). The preferential type 1 fibre atrophy was seen in all three DM1 cases in light microscopy, and substantial central nucleation was present in two biopsies. Electron microscopy revealed central nuclei in all three examined muscle biopsies. No other structural or degenerative changes were detected, probably due to the young age of our patients. Central nucleation, prevalence of type 2 muscle fibres, and the presence of pyknotic nuclear clumps were observed in DM2 patients in light microscopy. Among the ultrastructural abnormalities observed in our DM2 group, the presence of internal nuclei, severely atrophied muscle fibres, and lipofuscin accumulation were consistent findings. In addition, a variety of ultrastructural abnormalities were identified by us in DM2. It appears that no single ultrastructural abnormality is characteristic for the DM2 muscle pathology. It seems, however, that certain constellations of morphological changes might be indicative of certain types of myotonic dystrophy.

  17. A dual-mode mobile phone microscope using the onboard camera flash and ambient light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, A; Wilson, E R; Thompson, J G; Gibson, B C

    2018-02-19

    Mobile phone microscopes are a natural platform for point-of-care imaging, but current solutions require an externally powered illumination source, thereby adding bulk and cost. We present a mobile phone microscope that uses the internal flash or sunlight as the illumination source, thereby reducing complexity whilst maintaining functionality and performance. The microscope is capable of both brightfield and darkfield imaging modes, enabling microscopic visualisation of samples ranging from plant to mammalian cells. We describe the microscope design principles, assembly process, and demonstrate its imaging capabilities through the visualisation of unlabelled cell nuclei to observing the motility of cattle sperm and zooplankton.

  18. Quantitative characterization of the carbon/carbon composites components based on video of polarized light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixian; Qi, Lehua; Song, Yongshan; Chao, Xujiang

    2017-06-01

    The components of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have significant influence on the thermal and mechanical properties, so a quantitative characterization of component is necessary to study the microstructure of C/C composites, and further to improve the macroscopic properties of C/C composites. Considering the extinction crosses of the pyrocarbon matrix have significant moving features, the polarized light microscope (PLM) video is used to characterize C/C composites quantitatively because it contains sufficiently dynamic and structure information. Then the optical flow method is introduced to compute the optical flow field between the adjacent frames, and segment the components of C/C composites from PLM image by image processing. Meanwhile the matrix with different textures is re-segmented by the length difference of motion vectors, and then the component fraction of each component and extinction angle of pyrocarbon matrix are calculated directly. Finally, the C/C composites are successfully characterized from three aspects of carbon fiber, pyrocarbon, and pores by a series of image processing operators based on PLM video, and the errors of component fractions are less than 15%. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Muscarinic cholinergic receptors subtypes in rat cerebellar cortex: light microscope autoradiography of age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, S K; Vitali, D; Scordella, S; Amenta, F

    2001-01-19

    Muscarinic cholinergic M1-M5 receptor subtypes were investigated in the cerebellar cortex of Fischer 344 rats aged 6 (young), 15 (adult) and 22 months (senescent) by combined kinetic and equilibrium binding and light microscope autoradiography. In young rats the rank order of receptor density was M5M4M4 in the molecular and granular layers, respectively. M1, M2, M4 and M5 receptors were also observed within Purkinje neurons. M1 receptor did not show age-related changes as well as the M2 receptor in the molecular layer. In this layer, M3-M5 receptors were increased in senescent compared to younger rats. In the granular layer the expression of M2 and M5 muscarinic receptors was similar in young and senescent rats and higher in adult rats. M3 and M4 receptors were more in adult and senescent rats compared to young animals. In Purkinje neurons, a slight-to-moderate age-related increase of M1 and M5 receptor expression was observed.

  20. Demonstration of epidermal growth factor binding sites in the adult rat pancreas by light microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabot, J.G.; Walker, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors was studied in the pancreas using light microscopic autoradiography, which was performed at different time intervals (2-60 min) after injecting 125 I-labeled EGF intravenously into the adult rat. In the exocrine pancreas, a labeling was found to occur over the pyramidal cells of the acini and cells lining the intercalated ducts. Moreover, substantial binding of EGF to cells of the islets of Langerhans was also revealed. At the 2-min time interval, most silver grains were found at the periphery of the target cells. The localization, as well as the diminution of silver grains over the cytoplasm of these cells, between 7 and 60 min, suggested the internalization and degradation of 125 I-labeled EGF. Control experiments indicated that the autoradiography reaction was due to specific interaction of 125 I-labeled EGF with its receptor. These results clearly indicate that EGF receptors are present in the acinar cells and the cells of intercalated ducts of the exocrine pancreas, as well as the cells of the endocrine pancreas. Finding that there are EGF binding sites in pancreatic acinar cells supports the physiological role of EGF in the regulation of pancreatic exocrine function. The presence of EGF receptors in cells of the islets of Langerhans suggests that EGF may play a role in the regulation of the endocrine pancreas

  1. Gross and microscopic findings in patients submitted to nonablative full-face resurfacing using intense pulsed light: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pérez, Enrique; Ibiett, Erick Valencia

    2002-08-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) is a noncoherent, nonlaser, filtered flashlamp emitting a broadband visible light that has been shown to be effective in photoepilation, as well as in a number of vascular and pigmented lesions of the skin. Their efficacy has also been reported recently in the treatment of photodamaged facial skin. In the last condition, however, there are few studies showing the clinical and microscopic changes produced by IPL. To assess the gross and microscopic changes that occur in photodamaged skin submitted to nonablative full-face resurfacing (NAFFR) using IPL. Five women were submitted to five NAFFR sessions using IPL, one every 2 weeks. Skin biopsies and photographs were taken on all of the patients before the first procedure and after the last one, as well as weekly clinical assessment. Data concerning skin features (wrinkles, oiliness, thickness, dilated pores, and general appearance) were all assessed. Microscopic improvement of the aging features in the epidermis and dermis were all assessed. For the statistical analysis a t test for small samples was used. All the patients showed clinical and microscopic improvement in every one of the parameters assessed. The t test for small samples showed a statistically significant difference (P Facial photodamage was clinically and microscopically improved using IPL. Use of IPL as a rejuvenating method seems to be promising, with minimal side effects, a wide safety margin, and minimal downtime.

  2. Hyalocytes in idiopathic epiretinal membranes: a correlative light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ricarda G; Gandorfer, Arnd; Ziada, Jean; Scheler, Renate; Schaumberger, Markus M; Wolf, Armin; Kampik, Anselm; Haritoglou, Christos

    2014-12-01

    To describe characteristics of epiretinal cells at the vitreoretinal interface by correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). Epiretinal membrane (ERM) specimens and internal limiting membrane (ILM) specimens were harvested by sequential peeling during vitrectomy from 27 eyes with idiopathic epiretinal gliosis, and processed for CLEM. Intraoperatively, the presence of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) was documented. We used anti-vimentin, anti-α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and anti-CD45 as primary antibodies. A fluorescein-tagged immunonanogold cluster was used as secondary antibody and visualized under the fluorescence and transmission electron microscope. We demonstrated CD45-positive cells specifically labelled at their plasma membranes with ultrastructural features known for hyalocytes, such as oval nucleus with marginal chromatin, vacuoles, dense granules, and thin cytoplasmic protrusions. CD45-positive cells were mostly located on a thick layer of native vitreous collagen. They were covered by newly formed collagen strands with multilayered proliferation of myofibroblasts. We also demonstrated immunoreactivity for vimentin and alpha-SMA. Cell fragments with positive labelling for α-SMA and vimentin were not only found on the vitreal side of the ILM, but also on the retinal side. By CLEM, the majority of CD45-positive cells in epiretinal cell proliferation were characterized as hyalocytes. In the context of anomalous PVD and vitreoschisis, ultrastructural features and topographic localization of hyalocytes suggest that these cells play a significant role in ERM formation. CLEM enables a more accurate characterization of epiretinal cell proliferation, and therefore, contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of diseases at the vitreoretinal interface.

  3. Histological changes in kidneys of adult rats treated with Monosodium glutamate: A light microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh BR, Ujwal Gajbe, Anil Kumar Reddy, Vandana Kumbhare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Monosodium Glutamate (MSG, which is chemically known as AJI-NO-MOTO also familiar as MSG in routine life. MSG is always considered to be a controversial food additive used in the world. It is a natural excitatory neurotransmitter, helps in transmitting the fast synaptic signals in one third of CNS. Liver and kidney play a crucial role in metabolism as well as elimination of MSG from the body. Present study is to detect structural changes in adult rat kidney tissue treated with MSG; observations are done with a light microscope. Materials & Methods: The study was conducted in the department of Anatomy, J.N.M.C, Sawangi (M Wardha. Thirty (30 adult Wistar rats (2-3 months old weighing about (200 ± 20g were used in the current study, animals were divided into three groups (Group – A, B, C. Group A: Control, Group B: 3 mg /gm body weight, Group C: 6 mg /gm body weight, MSG were administered orally daily for 45 days along with the regular diet. Observations & Results: The Mean values of animals weight at the end of experiment (46th day respectively were 251.2 ± 13, 244.4 ± 19.9 and 320 ± 31.1. Early degenerative changes like, Glomerular shrinkage (GSr, loss of brush border in proximal convoluted tubules and Cloudy degeneration was observed in sections of kidney treated with 3 mg/gm body weight of MSG. Animals treated with 6 mg/gm body weight of MSG showed rare changes like interstitial chronic inflammatory infiltrate with vacuolation in some of the glomeruli, and much glomerular shrinkage invaginated by fatty lobules. Conclusion: The effects of MSG on kidney tissues of adult rats revealed that the revelatory changes are directly proportional to the doses of MSG.

  4. Compact, light-weight and cost-effective microscope based on lensless incoherent holography for telemedicine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudanyali, Onur; Tseng, Derek; Oh, Chulwoo; Isikman, Serhan O; Sencan, Ikbal; Bishara, Waheb; Oztoprak, Cetin; Seo, Sungkyu; Khademhosseini, Bahar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-06-07

    Despite the rapid progress in optical imaging, most of the advanced microscopy modalities still require complex and costly set-ups that unfortunately limit their use beyond well equipped laboratories. In the meantime, microscopy in resource-limited settings has requirements significantly different from those encountered in advanced laboratories, and such imaging devices should be cost-effective, compact, light-weight and appropriately accurate and simple to be usable by minimally trained personnel. Furthermore, these portable microscopes should ideally be digitally integrated as part of a telemedicine network that connects various mobile health-care providers to a central laboratory or hospital. Toward this end, here we demonstrate a lensless on-chip microscope weighing approximately 46 grams with dimensions smaller than 4.2 cm x 4.2 cm x 5.8 cm that achieves sub-cellular resolution over a large field of view of approximately 24 mm(2). This compact and light-weight microscope is based on digital in-line holography and does not need any lenses, bulky optical/mechanical components or coherent sources such as lasers. Instead, it utilizes a simple light-emitting-diode (LED) and a compact opto-electronic sensor-array to record lensless holograms of the objects, which then permits rapid digital reconstruction of regular transmission or differential interference contrast (DIC) images of the objects. Because this lensless incoherent holographic microscope has orders-of-magnitude improved light collection efficiency and is very robust to mechanical misalignments it may offer a cost-effective tool especially for telemedicine applications involving various global health problems in resource limited settings.

  5. Compact, Light-weight and Cost-effective Microscope based on Lensless Incoherent Holography for Telemedicine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudanyali, Onur; Tseng, Derek; Oh, Chulwoo; Isikman, Serhan O.; Sencan, Ikbal; Bishara, Waheb; Oztoprak, Cetin; Seo, Sungkyu; Khademhosseini, Bahar; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the rapid progress in optical imaging, most of the advanced microscopy modalities still require complex and costly set-ups that unfortunately limit their use beyond well equipped laboratories. In the meantime, microscopy in resource-limited settings has requirements significantly different from those encountered in advanced laboratories, and such imaging devices should be cost-effective, compact, light-weight and appropriately accurate and simple to be usable by minimally trained personnel. Furthermore, these portable microscopes should ideally be digitally integrated as part of a telemedicine network that connects various mobile health-care providers to a central laboratory or hospital. Toward this end, here we demonstrate a lensless on-chip microscope weighing ~46 grams with dimensions smaller than 4.2cm × 4.2cm × 5.8cm that achieves sub-cellular resolution over a large field of view of ~24 mm2. This compact and light-weight microscope is based on digital in-line holography and does not need any lenses, bulky optical/mechanical components or coherent sources such as lasers. Instead, it utilizes a simple light-emitting-diode (LED) and a compact opto-electronic sensor-array to record lensless holograms of the objects, which then permits rapid digital reconstruction of regular transmission or differential interference contrast (DIC) images of the objects. Because this lensless incoherent holographic microscope has orders-of-magnitude improved light collection efficiency and is very robust to mechanical misalignments it may offer a cost-effective tool especially for telemedicine applications involving various global health problems in resource limited settings. PMID:20401422

  6. [Phenotype-based primary screening for drugs promoting neuronal subtype differentiation in embryonic stem cells with light microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi-ning; Wang, Dan-ying; Pan, Zong-fu; Mei, Yu-qin; Wang, Zhi-qiang; Zhu, Dan-yan; Lou, Yi-jia

    2012-07-01

    To set up a platform for phenotype-based primary screening of drug candidates promoting neuronal subtype differentiation in embryonic stem cells (ES) with light microscope. Hanging drop culture 4-/4+ method was employed to harvest the cells around embryoid body (EB) at differentiation endpoint. Morphological evaluation for neuron-like cells was performed with light microscope. Axons for more than three times of the length of the cell body were considered as neuron-like cells. The compound(s) that promote neuron-like cells was further evaluated. Icariin (ICA, 10(-6)mol/L) and Isobavachin (IBA, 10(-7)mol/L) were selected to screen the differentiation-promoting activity on ES cells. Immunofluorescence staining with specific antibodies (ChAT, GABA) was used to evaluate the neuron subtypes. The cells treated with IBA showed neuron-like phenotype, but the cells treated with ICA did not exhibit the morphological changes. ES cells treated with IBA was further confirmed to be cholinergic and GABAergic neurons. Phenotypic screening with light microscope for molecules promoting neuronal differentiation is an effective method with advantages of less labor and material consuming and time saving, and false-positive results derived from immunofluorescence can be avoided. The method confirms that IBA is able to facilitate ES cells differentiating into neuronal cells, including cholinergic neurons and GABAergic neurons.

  7. Multiparameter breast cancer cell image analysis for objective estimation of nuclear grade: comparison with light microscopic observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, Juris; Sneiders, Uldis; Plegere, Daina; Freivalds, Talivaldis; Grigalinovica, Romalda

    2000-04-01

    We performed a multi parameter image analysis assessment of breast cancer cell population nuclear grade (NG), which is regarded as one of the main prognostic factors for treatment efficacy and survival of the patients and compared it with light microscopic estimation of NG. Cytological imprint slides from 20 ductal carcinomas were stained according to Leischmann-AzureII-eosine method, and NG was estimated by light microscopic observation according to Black in Fisher's modification. Simultaneously, using specially elaborated software, in each patient 100 cancer cells were analyzed for nuclear perimeter, diameter, area, nucleolar area, and average intensity of staining. The chromatin structure was assessed using mean diameter of chromatin grains and relatively chromatic are within the nucleus. Light microscopic estimation revealed 4/15 grade 2 and 7/15 grade 3 tumors out of 15 filtrating ductal carcinomas, with 4/15 classified as intermediate between grade 2-3. Multifactoral linear correlation coefficient r equals 0.39, p < 0.001 for ductal cancer, higher NG comes with increasing nucleolar area, nuclear roundness factor, nuclear are, and chromatin area within the cell nucleus. Image analysis may yield precise information on NG as a prognostic factor in breast cancer patients.

  8. Analysis of signal processing in vestibular circuits with a novel light-emitting diodes-based fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direnberger, Stephan; Banchi, Roberto; Brosel, Sonja; Seebacher, Christian; Laimgruber, Stefan; Uhl, Rainer; Felmy, Felix; Straka, Hans; Kunz, Lars

    2015-05-01

    Optical visualization of neural network activity is limited by imaging system-dependent technical tradeoffs. To overcome these constraints, we have developed a powerful low-cost and flexible imaging system with high spectral variability and unique spatio-temporal precision for simultaneous optical recording and manipulation of neural activity of large cell groups. The system comprises eight high-power light-emitting diodes, a camera with a large metal-oxide-semiconductor sensor and a high numerical aperture water-dipping objective. It allows fast and precise control of excitation and simultaneous low noise imaging at high resolution. Adjustable apertures generated two independent areas of variable size and position for simultaneous optical activation and image capture. The experimental applicability of this system was explored in semi-isolated preparations of larval axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) with intact inner ear organs and central nervous circuits. Cyclic galvanic stimulation of semicircular canals together with glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-uncaging caused a corresponding modulation of Ca(2+) transients in central vestibular neurons. These experiments revealed specific cellular properties as well as synaptic interactions between excitatory and inhibitory inputs, responsible for spatio-temporal-specific sensory signal processing. Location-specific GABA-uncaging revealed a potent inhibitory shunt of vestibular nerve afferent input in the predominating population of tonic vestibular neurons, indicating a considerable impact of local and commissural inhibitory circuits on the processing of head/body motion-related signals. The discovery of these previously unknown properties of vestibular computations demonstrates the merits of our novel microscope system for experimental applications in the field of neurobiology. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies on trophozoites and cyst-like stages of Histomonas meleagridis from cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Mareike; Lotfi, Abdulrahman; Hafez, Hafez Mohammed; Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, H

    2009-02-01

    The present study deals with Berlin strains of Histomonas meleagridis, the specimens of which were cultivated in Dwyer's medium. The light and electron microscopic examination revealed that the cultivated trophozoite stages (reaching about 10 mum in size) appeared more or less spherical, although their surface (covered by a single membrane) showed amoeba-like waves. All stages were uni-nucleated and reproduced by binary fission with an extranuclear spindle apparatus. Some trophozoites appeared ovoid and possessed a single flagellum with a typical microtubular 9 x 2 + 2 arrangement. Furthermore, the latter were characterized by an inner row of typical microtubules (remnant of an axostyle) and a Golgi apparatus (both adjacent to the nucleus), multivesicular structures, hydrogenosomes, and many food vacuoles containing either starch grains or bacteria. Their cytoplasm was densely filled with glycogen granules and ribosomes. Similar stages were also documented in the caeca and cloaca of chicken when being inoculated (via cloaca) with such culture stages. In addition to these typical trophozoites, the cultures contained a low number of 10-mum-sized spherical cyst-like stages with a surrounding amorphous layer. The cytoplasm of some of these cyst-like stages-when studied by electron microscopy-appeared with two membranes or had formed an amorphic, cyst-wall-like layer at their surface, apparently corresponding to their light microscopical appearance. Such stages might be involved in transmission from one host to another and probably have been missed before in microscopical examinations of infected poultry.

  10. A compact two photon light sheet microscope for applications in neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a compact setup for two photon light sheet microscopy. By using pulsed Airy beam illumination we demonstrate eight-fold increase of the FOV compared to Gaussian light sheet with the same axial resolution....

  11. [Getting an insight into the brain - new optical clearing techniques and imaging using light-sheet microscope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska, Monika; Legutko, Diana; Stefaniuk, Marzena

    2017-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in neuroscience is to understand how brain operates. For this, it would be the best to image the whole brain with at least cellular resolution, preserving the three-dimensional structure in order to capture the connections between different areas. Most currently available high-resolution imaging techniques are based on preparing thin brain sections that are next photographed one by one and subsequently bigger structures are reconstructed. These techniques are laborious and create artifacts. Recent optical clearing methods allow to obtain literally transparent brains that can be imaged using light-sheet microscope. The present review summarizes the most popular optical clearing techniques, describing their different mechanisms and comparing advantages and disadvantages of different approaches, and presents the principle of light-sheet microscopy and its use in imaging. Finally, it gives examples of application of optical tissue clearing and light-sheet imaging in neuroscience and beyond it.

  12. Low Efficiency Upconversion Nanoparticles for High-Resolution Coalignment of Near-Infrared and Visible Light Paths on a Light Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Sriramkumar; Garcia Badaracco, Adrian; Hirsch, Sophia M; Park, Jun Hong; Davies, Tim; Dumont, Julien; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi; Kummel, Andrew C; Canman, Julie C

    2017-03-08

    The combination of near-infrared (NIR) and visible wavelengths in light microscopy for biological studies is increasingly common. For example, many fields of biology are developing the use of NIR for optogenetics, in which an NIR laser induces a change in gene expression and/or protein function. One major technical barrier in working with both NIR and visible light on an optical microscope is obtaining their precise coalignment at the imaging plane position. Photon upconverting particles (UCPs) can bridge this gap as they are excited by NIR light but emit in the visible range via an anti-Stokes luminescence mechanism. Here, two different UCPs have been identified, high-efficiency micro 540 -UCPs and lower efficiency nano 545 -UCPs, that respond to NIR light and emit visible light with high photostability even at very high NIR power densities (>25 000 Suns). Both of these UCPs can be rapidly and reversibly excited by visible and NIR light and emit light at visible wavelengths detectable with standard emission settings used for Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), a commonly used genetically encoded fluorophore. However, the high efficiency micro 540 -UCPs were suboptimal for NIR and visible light coalignment, due to their larger size and spatial broadening from particle-to-particle energy transfer consistent with a long-lived excited state and saturated power dependence. In contrast, the lower efficiency nano-UCPs were superior for precise coalignment of the NIR beam with the visible light path (∼2 μm versus ∼8 μm beam broadening, respectively) consistent with limited particle-to-particle energy transfer, superlinear power dependence for emission, and much smaller particle size. Furthermore, the nano-UCPs were superior to a traditional two-camera method for NIR and visible light path alignment in an in vivo Infrared-Laser-Evoked Gene Operator (IR-LEGO) optogenetics assay in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In summary, nano-UCPs are powerful new tools

  13. Low efficiency upconversion nanoparticles for high-resolution coalignment of near-infrared and visible light paths on a light microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Sriramkumar; Badaracco, Adrian Garcia; Hirsch, Sophia M.; Park, Jun Hong; Davies, Tim; Dumont, Julien; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi; Kummel, Andrew C.; Canman, Julie C.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of near infrared (NIR) and visible wavelengths in light microscopy for biological studies is increasingly common. For example, many fields of biology are developing the use of NIR for optogenetics, in which an NIR laser induces a change in gene expression and/or protein function. One major technical barrier in working with both NIR and visible light on an optical microscope is obtaining their precise coalignment at the imaging plane position. Photon upconverting particles (UCPs) can bridge this gap as they are excited by NIR light but emit in the visible range via an anti-Stokes luminescence mechanism. Here, two different UCPs have been identified, high-efficiency micro540-UCPs and lower efficiency nano545-UCPs, that respond to NIR light and emit visible light with high photostability even at very high NIR power densities (>25,000 Suns). Both of these UCPs can be rapidly and reversibly excited by visible and NIR light and emit light at visible wavelengths detectable with standard emission settings used for Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), a commonly used genetically-encoded fluorophore. However, the high efficiency micro540-UCPs were suboptimal for NIR and visible light coalignment, due to their larger size and spatial broadening from particle-to-particle energy transfer consistent with a long lived excited state and saturated power dependence. In contrast, the lower efficiency nano-UCPs were superior for precise coalignment of the NIR beam with the visible light path (~2 µm versus ~8 µm beam broadening respectively) consistent with limited particle-to-particle energy transfer, superlinear power dependence for emission, and much smaller particle size. Furthermore, the nano-UCPs were superior to a traditional two-camera method for NIR and visible light path alignment in an in vivo Infrared-Laser-Evoked Gene Operator (IR-LEGO) optogenetics assay in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. In summary, nano-UCPs are powerful new tools for coaligning NIR and

  14. Versatile maskless microscope projection photolithography system and its application in light-directed fabrication of DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiser, Thomas; Mai, Timo; Michel, Wolfgang; Ott, Albrecht

    2006-06-01

    We present a maskless microscope projection lithography system (MPLS), in which photomasks have been replaced by a Digital Micromirror Device type spatial light modulator (DMD™, Texas Instruments). Employing video projector technology high resolution patterns, designed as bitmap images on the computer, are displayed using a micromirror array consisting of about 786 000 tiny individually addressable tilting mirrors. The DMD, which is located in the image plane of an infinity corrected microscope, is projected onto a substrate placed in the focal plane of the microscope objective. With a 5× [0.25 NA (numerical aperture)] Fluar microscope objective, a fivefold reduction of the image to a total size of 9mm2 and a minimum feature size of 3.5μm is achieved. The ultrahigh pressure lamp of a video projector is a cheap, durable, and powerful alternative to the mercury arc lamps commonly used in lithography applications. The MPLS may be employed in standard photolithography. We have successfully produced patterns in 40μm films of SU-8 photoresist, with an aspect ratio of about 1:10. Our system can be used in the visible range as well as in the near UV (with a light intensity of up to 76mW/cm2 around the 365nm Hg line). We developed an inexpensive and simple method to enable exact focusing and controlling of the image quality of the projected patterns. Our MPLS has originally been designed for the light-directed in situ synthesis of DNA microarrays. One requirement is a high UV intensity to keep the fabrication process reasonably short. Another demand is a sufficient contrast ratio over small distances (of about 5μm). This is necessary to achieve a high density of features (i.e., separated sites on the substrate at which different DNA sequences are synthesized in parallel fashion) while at the same time the number of stray light induced DNA sequence errors is kept reasonably small. We demonstrate the performance of the apparatus in light-directed DNA chip synthesis and

  15. Frequency dependent detection in a STED microscope using modulated excitation light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzitti, Emiliano; Harke, Benjamin; Diaspro, Alberto

    2013-01-14

    We present a novel concept adaptable to any kind of STED microscope in order to expand the limited number of compatible dyes for performing super resolution imaging. The approach is based on an intensity modulated excitation beam in combination with a frequency dependent detection in the form of a standard lock-in amplifier. This enables to unmix fluorescence signal originated by the excitation beam from the fluorescence caused by the STED beam. The benefit of this concept is demonstrated by imaging biological samples as well as fluorescent spheres, whose spectrum does not allow STED imaging in the conventional way. Our concept is suitable with CW or pulsed STED microscope and can thereby be seen as a general improvement adaptable to any existing setup.

  16. Congenital adenoma of the iris and ciliary body: light and electron microscopic observations.

    OpenAIRE

    Rennie, I G; Parsons, M A; Palmer, C A

    1992-01-01

    A 23-year-old man had a lesion in the right inferior iris which appeared to have enlarged since it was first seen when the patient was aged 5 years. The lesion was excised by a partial iridocyclectomy. Histopathologically the neoplasm was composed of both pigmented and non-pigmented cells. Pseudoacini, containing acid mucopolysaccharides, were present throughout the tumour matrix. Electron microscopically the non-pigmented cells were found to possess a convoluted plasmalemma, abundant rough e...

  17. Expression of calcium channel CaV1.3 in cat spinal cord: light and electron microscopic immunohistochemical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mengliang; Møller, Morten; Broman, Jonas

    2008-01-01

    in the cat spinal cord by light and electron microscopic immunohistochemistry. The results show that Ca(V)1.3-like immunoreactivity is widely distributed in all segments of the spinal cord but that the distribution in the different laminae of the spinal gray matter varies, with the highest density of labeled...... associated with the rough endoplasmic reticulum but some also with the plasma membrane. In dendrites, they were associated with both intracellular organelles, including microtubules and microchondria, and the plasma membrane. These results indicate that significant proportions of the neurons in cat spinal...

  18. Microscopic calculations of elastic scattering between light nuclei based on a realistic nuclear interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy [F.R.S.-FNRS (Belgium); Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Baye, Daniel, E-mail: jdoheter@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: jmspar@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucleaire et Physique Quantique, CP229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-09-16

    The elastic phase shifts for the {alpha} + {alpha} and {alpha} + {sup 3}He collisions are calculated in a cluster approach by the Generator Coordinate Method coupled with the Microscopic R-matrix Method. Two interactions are derived from the realistic Argonne potentials AV8' and AV18 with the Unitary Correlation Operator Method. With a specific adjustment of correlations on the {alpha} + {alpha} collision, the phase shifts for the {alpha} + {alpha} and {alpha} + {sup 3}He collisions agree rather well with experimental data.

  19. Ultrastructure and light microscope analysis of intact skin after a varying number of low level laser irradiations in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Leão, Juliane Caroline; Rizzi, Élen Camargo; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Dias, Fernando José; Watanabe, Ii-sei; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki

    2014-01-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been used to relieve pain, inflammation, and wound healing processes. Thus, the skin is overexposed to laser and this effect is not completely understood. This study analyzed the effects of the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10) on the intact skin of the masseteric region in mice of strain HRS/J. The animals (n = 30) were equally divided into control (0 J/cm(2)) and irradiated (20 J/cm(2)), and each of these groups was further equally divided according to the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10) and underwent LLLT on alternate days. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The animals receiving applications exhibited open channels more dilated between the keratinocytes and photobiomodulation effect on endothelial cells and fibroblasts by TEM. Under the light microscope after 10 laser applications, the type I collagen decreased (P < 0.05) compared to the three and six applications. Under these experimental conditions, all numbers of applications provided photobiomodulatory effect on the epidermis and dermis, without damage. More studies are needed to standardize the energy density and number of applications recommended for laser therapy to have a better cost-benefit ratio associated with treatment.

  20. Light Microscopy Module: An On-Orbit Microscope Planned for the Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.; Griffin, DeVon W.

    2001-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a fully remotely controllable on-orbit microscope subrack facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of fluids and biology experiments within NASA Glenn Research Center's Fluids and Combustion Facility on the International Space Station. Within the Fluids and Combustion Facility, four fluids physics experiments will utilize an instrument built around a light microscope. These experiments are the Constrained Vapor Bubble experiment (Peter C. Wayner of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute), the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment-2 (Paul M. Chaikin of Princeton University), the Physics of Colloids in Space-2 experiment (David A. Weitz of Harvard University), and the Low Volume Fraction Colloidal Assembly experiment (Arjun G. Yodh of the University of Pennsylvania). The first experiment investigates heat conductance in microgravity as a function of liquid volume and heat flow rate to determine, in detail, the transport process characteristics in a curved liquid film. The other three experiments investigate various complementary aspects of the nucleation, growth, structure, and properties of colloidal crystals in microgravity and the effects of micromanipulation upon their properties. Key diagnostic capabilities for meeting the science requirements of the four experiments include video microscopy to observe sample features including basic structures and dynamics, interferometry to measure vapor bubble thin film thickness, laser tweezers for colloidal particle manipulation and patterning, confocal microscopy to provide enhanced three-dimensional visualization of colloidal structures, and spectrophotometry to measure colloidal crystal photonic properties.

  1. Dynamic Ca2+ imaging with a simplified lattice light-sheet microscope: A sideways view of subcellular Ca2+ puffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Parker, Ian

    2018-05-01

    We describe the construction of a simplified, inexpensive lattice light-sheet microscope, and illustrate its use for imaging subcellular Ca 2+ puffs evoked by photoreleased i-IP 3 in cultured SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells loaded with the Ca 2+ probe Cal520. The microscope provides sub-micron spatial resolution and enables recording of local Ca 2+ transients in single-slice mode with a signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution (2ms) at least as good as confocal or total internal reflection microscopy. Signals arising from openings of individual IP 3 R channels are clearly resolved, as are stepwise changes in fluorescence reflecting openings and closings of individual channels during puffs. Moreover, by stepping the specimen through the light-sheet, the entire volume of a cell can be scanned within a few hundred ms. The ability to directly visualize a sideways (axial) section through cells directly reveals that IP 3 -evoked Ca 2+ puffs originate at sites in very close (≤a few hundred nm) to the plasma membrane, suggesting they play a specific role in signaling to the membrane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ light spectroscopy in the environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo; Langhammer, C.; Pedersen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    is often recorded on a limited portion of the sample. Being able to probe the sample with INPS and ETEM at the same time allows parallel investigation at the local and macro scale, as well as aids the assessment of beam effects. A dedicated custom TEM specimen holder containing two optical fibers, five...... electrical contacts, a fixed miniaturized optical bench for light handling and a heating element (Fig. 1) has been designed. A system of pre-aligned mirrors and a MEMS heater are implemented in the holder. The system is primarily designed for use in combination with LSPR spectroscopy, but it is flexible...... and can be employed with a variety of other methods that require light input and/or output. The two fibers can be used as parallel light inlets to activate a photoinduced reaction, e.g. photoinduced reduction of particles or nanoparticle photodeposition [7]. Alternatively, both fibers can be used...

  3. Light-Induced Reduction of Cuprous Oxide in an Environmental Transmission Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalca, Filippo Carlo; Laursen, Anders Bo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    Photocatalysts for solar fuel production are subject to intensive investigation as they constitute one viable route for solar energy harvesting. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) is a working photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution but it photocorrodes upon light illumination in an aqueous environment. Environme......Photocatalysts for solar fuel production are subject to intensive investigation as they constitute one viable route for solar energy harvesting. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O) is a working photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution but it photocorrodes upon light illumination in an aqueous environment....... Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) makes it possible to obtain insight into the local structure, composition and reactivity of catalysts in their working environment, which is of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research and is essential for further material optimization. Herein......, photoreduction of Cu2O is studied in situ using a dedicated TEM specimen holder for light illumination....

  4. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  5. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  6. A customized light sheet microscope to measure spatio-temporal protein dynamics in small model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckher, Matthias; Kyparissidis-Kokkinidis, Ilias; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Kourmoulakis, Georgios; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Ripoll, Jorge; Zacharakis, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    We describe a customizable and cost-effective light sheet microscopy (LSM) platform for rapid three-dimensional imaging of protein dynamics in small model organisms. The system is designed for high acquisition speeds and enables extended time-lapse in vivo experiments when using fluorescently labeled specimens. We demonstrate the capability of the setup to monitor gene expression and protein localization during ageing and upon starvation stress in longitudinal studies in individual or small groups of adult Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. The system is equipped to readily perform fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which allows monitoring protein recovery and distribution under low photobleaching conditions. Our imaging platform is designed to easily switch between light sheet microscopy and optical projection tomography (OPT) modalities. The setup permits monitoring of spatio-temporal expression and localization of ageing biomarkers of subcellular size and can be conveniently adapted to image a wide range of small model organisms and tissue samples.

  7. Microscopic approach to the theory of light nuclei and to simple nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baz', L.I.; Filippov, G.F.

    1976-01-01

    The results of calculations for the properties of light nuclei and simple nuclear reactions using the Schrodinger multinucleon equation involving the realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction are reviewed. It is noted that the theory for the A(<=)4 nuclei is practically complete at present. The reasons for the good agreement between the theoretical and experimental cross sections of nuclear reactions are given. The programme of a correct separation of the nuclear collective degree of freedom are discussed in detail

  8. Light and electron microscopic study on complex carbohydrates in the testis of Salamandra salamandra L. (Amphibia, Urodela).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelmeiser, J

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of complex carbohydrates was studied in the testis of the European fire salamander, Salamandra salamandra, by light- and electron-microscopic methods. The basal laminae and fibrous structures in the connective tissue between the lobules are PAS-positive. After alcianblue staining (at pH = 2.8), acid mucopolysaccharides could be demonstrated in steroid hormone-producing cells in the interstitial tissue between lobules containing spermatids, spermatozoa, and lobules after spermiation, as well as in most of the Sertoli cells in lobules after spermiation. In all spermatogenic stages from secondary spermatocytes to mature sperms, dictyosome-like structures and flat vesicles showed a distinct contrast enhancement, as did parts of the acrosome after treatment with the phosphotungstic acid-chromic acid method for electron microscopy.

  9. A light-sheet microscope compatible with mobile devices for label-free intracellular imaging and biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tsung-Feng; Yen, Tony Minghung; Han, Yuanyuan; Chiu, Yu-Jui; Lin, Eason Y-S; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2014-09-07

    The inner structure, especially the nuclear structure, of cells carries valuable information about disease and health conditions of a person. Here we demonstrate a label-free technique to enable direct observations and measurements of the size, shape and morphology of the cell nucleus. With a microfabricated lens and a commercial CMOS imager, we form a scanning light-sheet microscope to produce a dark-field optical scattering image of the cell nucleus that overlays with the bright-field image produced in a separate regime of the same CMOS sensor. We have used the device to detect nuclear features that characterize the life cycle of cells and have used the nucleus volume as a new parameter for cell classification. The device can be developed into a portable, low-cost, point-of-care device leveraging the capabilities of the CMOS imagers to be pervasive in mobile electronics.

  10. Light and scanning electron microscopic studies on the esophageal spines in the Pacific ridley turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshie, S; Honma, Y

    1976-02-01

    The peculairly specialized esophagus of the Pacific ridley turtle, Lepidochelys olivacea, was described by light and scanning electron microscopic studies. The esophagus is lined by a stratified squamous epithelium with remarkable keratinization, and its major part forms a number of large spines which have been called "pharyngeal teeth." The epithelium consists of three strate: stratum germinativum, stratum spinosum and stratum corneum. The surface of the spine is covered by a scaly keratin of possibly sloughing cells, and the cornified layer on the spine is very thick (more than 100 mu), reaching 3 to 7 times the depth of the corresponding layer in other parts. This peculiar structure in the marine turtle without toothed jaws prabably is used for breaking food into small pieces.

  11. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Surfaces Prepared with LightSpeed & Endowave Rotary System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    B S, Hema; Chandu, G S; Shiraguppi, Vijayakumar L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the cleaning efficiency on root canal surfaces prepared with LightSpeed and Endowave rotary instruments. A total of 30 freshly extracted human mandibular premolars were subjected for the study. They were divided into two groups, each group consisting of 15 teeth. Group 1: The canals were prepared with LightSpeed system. Group 2: Endowave rotary system. All the groups were prepared according to manufacturer's recommendation, using 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA (dent wash, prime dent) alternately as an irrigants. Crowns of each tooth were removed with diamond disks at the level of cement enamel junction. Canal length was determined by placing a size 10 K-file. The working length was 0.5 mm short of canal length. Two longitudinal grooves were prepared on the lingual and buccal surfaces of each root to facilitate vertical splitting with a chisel after canal instrumentation. The sections were then observed under SEM for presence or absence of debris and smear layer and the photographs were taken at coronal, middle and apical 1/3 with a magnification of 200 X and 1000X respectively. The scores recorded were statistically analysed using one-way-ANOVA and Mann- Whitney test. There was statistically significant difference between two groups. All groups resulted in significantly more debris and smear layer in the apical 1/3 of the canal, compared to coronal and middle 1/3 (p, <0.01). The study demonstrated that, LightSpeed instrumentation removed debris and smear layer more effectively on root canal surface than compared to Endowave instrument.

  12. Conjugation of both on-axis and off-axis light in Nipkow disk confocal microscope to increase availability of incoherent light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kenta; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Jize; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Tani, Tomomi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2011-01-01

    Laser-scanning confocal microscopy has been employed for exploring structures at subcellular, cellular and tissue level in three dimensions. To acquire the confocal image, a coherent light source, such as laser, is generally required in conventional single-point scanning microscopy. The illuminating beam must be focused onto a small spot with diffraction-limited size, and this determines the spatial resolution of the microscopy system. In contrast, multipoint scanning confocal microscopy using a Nipkow disk enables the use of an incoherent light source. We previously demonstrated successful application of a 100 W mercury arc lamp as a light source for the Yokogawa confocal scanner unit in which a microlens array was coupled with a Nipkow disk to focus the collimated incident light onto a pinhole (Saito et al., Cell Struct. Funct., 33: 133-141, 2008). However, transmission efficiency of incident light through the pinhole array was low because off-axis light, the major component of the incident light, was blocked by the non-aperture area of the disk. To improve transmission efficiency, we propose an optical system in which off-axis light is able to be transmitted through pinholes surrounding the pinhole located on the optical axis of the collimator lens. This optical system facilitates the use of not only the on-axis but also the off-axis light such that the available incident light is considerably improved. As a result, we apply the proposed system to high-speed confocal and multicolor imaging both with a satisfactory signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Imaging, microscopic analysis, and modeling of a CdTe module degraded by heat and light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Steve; Albin, David; Hacke, Peter; Harvey, Steven P.; Moutinho, Helio; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Parikh, Anuja; Nardone, Marco; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2018-05-01

    Photoluminescence (PL), electroluminescence (EL), and dark lock-in thermography are collected during stressing of a CdTe module under one-Sun light at an elevated temperature of 100 degrees C. The PL imaging system is simple and economical. The PL images show differing degrees of degradation across the module and are less sensitive to effects of shunting and resistance that appear on the EL images. Regions of varying degradation are chosen based on avoiding pre-existing shunt defects. These regions are evaluated using time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry and Kelvin probe force microscopy. Reduced PL intensity correlates to increased Cu concentration at the front interface. Numerical modeling and measurements agree that the increased Cu concentration at the junction also correlates to a reduced space charge region.

  14. The optical fiber tip: an inherently light-coupled microscopic platform for micro- and nanotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostovski, Gorgi; Stoddart, Paul R; Mitchell, Arnan

    2014-06-18

    The flat tip of an optical fiber is a unique and unconventional platform for micro and nanotechnologies. The small cross-section and large aspect ratio of the fiber provide an inherently light-coupled substrate that is uniquely suited to remote, in vivo and in situ applications. However, these same characteristics challenge established fabrication technologies, which are best suited to large planar substrates. This review presents a broad overview of strategies for patterning the flat tip of an optical fiber. Techniques discussed include self-assembly, numerous lithographies, through-fiber patterning, hybrid techniques, and strategies for mass manufacture, while the diverse applications are discussed in context throughout. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Proceedings of study meeting on microscopic and phenomenological research of interaction for light heavy-ion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The Research Center for Nuclear Physics study meeting 'Microscopic and phenomenological research of interaction for light heavy-ion systems was held on March 7-9, 1990 as the study meeting in the second half of 1990, and 25 researchers took part in it. As the background of holding this study meeting, the fact that recently the rainbow scattering due to nuclear force was discovered experimentally in 16 O- 16 O system, and phenomenologically it was explained only by deep inter-nucleus potential. This should be evaluated as an important foothold for the research on the interaction for light heavy-ion systems and nuclear reaction mechanism. Accordingly, most of the papers presented this time were those related to the inter-nucleus potential and nuclear reaction mechanism. Also the development of theoretical analysis method was carried out and reported. Further, recently the experimental study on the structure and reaction of the neutron rich nucleus has advanced, and the theoretical research related to this topic was reported. (K.I.)

  16. Polarized light microscopic analysis of bone formation after inhibition of cyclooxygenase 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamoso, Luciana Borges; Montagner, Francisco; Camargo, Elisa Souza; Vitral, Roberto Willer Farinazzo; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2010-02-01

    Potassium diclofenac is a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) and COX isoforms (COX-1 and COX-2) inhibitor. Quantitative analysis of birefringence with polarized light microscopy is a useful method to investigate the macromolecular orientation and organization of collagen fibers in connective tissues. The aim of this research was to analyze the collagen structure and maturation in bone formed after potassium diclofenac administration, during first molar orthodontic movement. Sixty Wistar rats were divided in two equal groups (N = 30): control (C) and potassium diclofenac (PD). The animals in Group C received 0.9% saline solution and the PD group received potassium diclofenac Cataflam (5 mg/kg). Animals were sacrificed 3, 7, or 14 days after a NiTi unilateral closed-coil spring was stretched between the upper right first molar and the incisors. The first molar area was fixed, decalcified, and histologically processed using picrosirius pigment. The collagen birefringence of bone turnover was analyzed by phase retardation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test showed that optical retardation was influenced by time and treatment. There was increase in the collagen organization over time. On the third day, the C group showed better collagen organization than the PD group. Potassium diclofenac interfered in collagen maturation, reducing fibril organization in the initial phase of orthodontic movement. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Light and electron microscopic analysis of tattoos treated by Q-switched ruby laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.R.; Anderson, R.R.; Gange, R.W.; Michaud, N.A.; Flotte, T.J. (Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA))

    1991-07-01

    Short-pulse laser exposures can be used to alter pigmented structures in tissue by selective photothermolysis. Potential mechanisms of human tattoo pigment lightening with Q-switched ruby laser were explored by light and electron microscopy. Significant variation existed between and within tattoos. Electron microscopy of untreated tattoos revealed membrane-bound pigment granules, predominantly within fibroblasts and macrophages, and occasionally in mast cells. These granules contained pigment particles ranging from 2-in diameter. Immediately after exposure, dose-related injury was observed in cells containing pigment. Some pigment particles were smaller and lamellated. At fluences greater than or equal to 3 J/cm2, dermal vacuoles and homogenization of collagen bundles immediately adjacent to extracellular pigment were occasionally observed. A brisk neutrophilic infiltrate was apparent by 24 h. Eleven days later, the pigment was again intracellular. Half of the biopsies at 150 d revealed a mild persistent lymphocytic infiltrate. There was no fibrosis except for one case of clinical scarring. These findings confirm that short-pulse radiation can be used to selectively disrupt cells containing tattoo pigments. The physial alteration of pigment granules, redistribution, and elimination appear to account for clinical lightening of the tattoos.

  18. Light and electron microscopic study of mature spermatozoa from White Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos): an ultrastructural and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Kumar, Ashutosh; Yadav, Manoj; Kumar, Pradeep; Maity, Apratim; Giri, Sunil C; Goswami, Chandan

    2016-03-01

    The morphology, ultrastructure, and functions of mature avian spermatozoa have been of immense commercial and scientific interest for several reasons. This is mainly important in case of birds in poultry production, conservation, and in the use of sperm morphometry as phylogenetic evidence. Avian spermatozoa share complex or no correlation of sperm morphometry with respect to testis and/or body size as described before. In this work, we have isolated mature spermatozoa from White Pekin duck (Anas platyrhynchos) by non-invasive methods and performed several immunostaining analysis as well as cytochemical analysis using electron and light microscopes. Here, we report the presence of different post-translationally modified tubulin such as tyrosinated-, detyrosinated-, acetylated-, polyglutamylated-, and glycylated-tubulin in specific regions of the mature spermatozoa. By using field-emission scanning electron microscope, we confirm the presence of acrosome-like structure at the tip of the sperm head. However, this structure remains non-reactive to common lectins such as Peanut Agglutinin (PNA) and cholesterol-sensitive dyes such as Filipin. We report that this acrosomal structure is primarily made of lipid-based structures and is resistant to 0.1% Triton X100. Confocal microscopy and super resolution structured illumination microscopy study indicates that the nucleus is bifurcated at the tip region. By using specific markers, we report that the perforatorium structure present at the tip of the spermatozoa head contains specialized organelles that is similar to atypical mitochondria. We propose that these ultrastructural and molecular parameters can be used as species-specific features. The bifurcated nucleus and presence of atypical mitochondria within this structure may be relevant for the complex mitochondrial inheritance and mitochondrial heteroplasmy observed in case of avian population. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  19. In vivo light-microscopic documentation for primary calcification processes in the hermatypic coral Stylophora pistillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz-Bahat, Michal; Erez, Jonathan; Rinkevich, Baruch

    2006-08-01

    Skeletogenesis in the hermatypic coral Stylophora pistillata was studied by using the lateral skeleton preparative (LSP) assay, viz., a coral nubbin attached to a glass coverslip glued to the bottom of a Petri dish. Observations on tissue and skeletal growth were made by polarized microscopy and by using vital staining. The horizontal distal tissue edges developed thin transparent extensions of ectodermal and calicoblastic layers only. Four stages (I-IV) of skeletogenesis were observed at these edges, underneath the newly developed tissue. In stage I, a thin clear layer of coral tissue advanced 3-40 microm beyond the existing LSP peripheral zone, revealing no sign of spiculae deposition. At stage II, primary fusiform crystals (1 microm each) were deposited, forming a primary discontinuous skeletal front 5-30 microm away from the previously deposited skeleton. During stage III, needle-like crystals appeared, covering the primary fusiform crystals. Stage IV involved further lengthening of the needle-like crystals, a process that resulted in occlusion of the spaces between adjacent crystals. Calcification stages I-III developed within hours, whereas stage IV was completed in several days to weeks. Two basic skeletal structures, "scattered" and "laminar" skeletons, were formed, integrating the growth patterns of the needle-like crystals. High variation was recorded in the expression of the four calcification stages, either between different locations along a single LSP or between different preparations observed at the same diurnal time. All four skeletogenesis stages took place during both day and night periods, indicating that an intrinsic process controls S. pistillata calcification.

  20. Demonstration of 5'-nucleotidase activity in unfixed cryostat sections of rat liver using a combined light- and electron-microscope procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, J.; Bosch, K. S.; Tigchelaar, W.; van den Munckhof, R. J.; Schellens, J. P.; van Noorden, C. J.; Frederiks, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    In the present study a technique was developed to demonstrate 5'-nucleotidase activity in unfixed cryostat sections of rat liver at the light- and electron-microscope level using a semipermeable membrane. In order to retain the ultrastructure of the unfixed material as much as possible, incubations

  1. Scanning Miniature Microscopes without Lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2009-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts some alternative designs of proposed compact, lightweight optoelectronic microscopes that would contain no lenses and would generate magnified video images of specimens. Microscopes of this type were described previously in Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO - 20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43 and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO 20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 1999), page 6a. To recapitulate: In the design and construction of a microscope of this type, the focusing optics of a conventional microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. Elimination of focusing optics reduces the size and weight of the instrument and eliminates the need for the time-consuming focusing operation. The microscopes described in the cited prior articles contained two-dimensional CCDs registered with two-dimensional arrays of microchannels and, as such, were designed to produce full two-dimensional images, without need for scanning. The microscopes of the present proposal would contain one-dimensional (line image) CCDs registered with linear arrays of microchannels. In the operation of such a microscope, one would scan a specimen along a line perpendicular to the array axis (in other words, one would scan in pushbroom fashion). One could then synthesize a full two-dimensional image of the specimen from the line-image data acquired at one-pixel increments of position along the scan. In one of the proposed microscopes, a beam of unpolarized light for illuminating the specimen would enter from the side. This light would be reflected down onto the specimen by a nonpolarizing beam splitter attached to the microchannels at their lower ends. A portion of the light incident on the specimen would be reflected upward, through the beam splitter and along the microchannels, to form an image on the CCD. If the

  2. Structural Alterations of the Glomerular Wall And Vessels in Early Stages of Diabetes Mellitus: Light and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dkhil MA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The capillary changes at the initial stage of diabetes may show an angioarchitecture clearly different from those of later stages and,/or very severe glomerular change. However, the onset of alterations in the early phases is unclear. This study attempts to determine the functional and structural alterations of the glomerular wall and vesicles in the early stage of diabetes.Material and Methods: Twenty-five adult rats were used in this study. They were divided into two groups: the first group of five was used as a control .The second group of 20 (the experimental group was injected intraperitoneally by a single dose of streptozotocin to induce hyperglycemia. Rats were sacrificed after ten days, two months, and four months.Five rats at two months of age with hyperglycemia were treated with insulin for eight weeks. Renal tissues were prepared by routine technique for light and transmission electron microscopic evaluation. Results: By light microscopy after ten days of induced hyperglycemia, there were no structural modifications detected either in renal glomerular fine vessels or in the glomerular basement membrane of the glomerular capillaries. After two months, there was a moderate glomerular enlargement and dilatation of glomerular capillaries, afferent, and efferent arterioles. After four months, glomerular basement membrane thickening was the only structural alteration observed. Recovery of the glomerular alterations was observed after two months of treatment with insulin. Conclusion: In early stages of diabetes mellitus in rats, there was an increase in the diameter of glomerular vessels. In later stages of the disease, the reverse was seen, but insulin treatment had a positive role in reversing these changes in the study subjects.

  3. Quantitative characterization of carbon/carbon composites matrix texture based on image analysis using polarized light microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yixian; Qi, Lehua; Song, Yongshan; Hou, Xianghui; Li, Hejun

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative characteristic method was proposed for characterizing the matrix texture of carbon/carbon(C/C) composites, which determined the mechanical and physical properties of C/C composites. Based on the cloud theory that was commonly used for uncertain reasoning and the transformation between quantitative and qualitative characterization, so the relationship between the extinction angle and texture types was built by the cloud models for describing the texture of microstructure, moreover, linguistic controllers were established to analyze the matrix texture in accordance with the features of the polarized light microscope (PLM) image. On this basis, the extinction angle could be calculated from the PLM image of the C/C composites. In contrast to the results of measurement, the errors between calculative values and measured values were maintained 1-2° in basically. Meanwhile, the PLM image of C/C composites was segmented by the component, in particular, the matrix with mixed textures was further segmented by the difference of texture. It means that the quantitative characterization of C/C composites matrix based on single PLM image has been realized. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Light microscopical structure of the excurrent ducts and distribution of spermatozoa in the Australian rodents Pseudomys australis and Notomys alexis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirce, E J; Breed, W G

    1989-01-01

    The light microscopical structure of the male excurrent ducts and the distribution of spermatozoa were examined in two species of Australian rodents, the plains rat, Pseudomys australis, and the hopping mouse, Notomys alexis. In plains rats the microstructure of the ductus epididymidis and ductus deferens was similar to that of the common laboratory rodents, with the majority of the spermatozoa being found in the cauda epididymides. By contrast, in the hopping mouse, the structure of the cauda epididymidis differed significantly as the height of the epithelium and stereocilia did not decrease from the distal caput to the cauda region, and luminal diameter did not increase markedly along its length. In addition, few spermatozoa were stored in the cauda region of the tract, and as many as 60% were located in the ductus deferens, the distal portion of which displayed a highly infolded epithelium and underlying lamina propria. These differences in histological structure of the hopping mouse excurrent ducts presumably reflect divergence in function of the various regions of the tract. Although the functional implications of the present findings remain to be determined, this study demonstrates the considerable plasticity in the male excurrent ducts amongst the hydromyine rodents of Australia. Images Figs. 1-2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Figs. 22-23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 Fig. 26 PMID:2808117

  5. Analysis of light scattering from human breast tissue using a custom dual-optical scanning near-field optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Jennifer Reiber; Kyle, Michael D; Raghavan, Ravi; Budak, Gurer; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Ozkan, Mihrimah

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we introduce a custom scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) that simultaneously collects reflection and transmission near-field images along with topography. This dual-optical SNOM uses a bent probe, which allows for axial reflection imaging, accurate surface scanning, and easy identification of topographic artifacts. Using this novel dual-optical SNOM, we image desiccated and non-desiccated human breast epithelial tissue. By comparing the simultaneous SNOM images, we isolate the effects of tissue morphology and variations in refractive indices on the forward- and back-scattering of light from the tissue. We find that the reduction in back-scattering from tissue, relative to the glass slide, is caused by dense packing of the scattering sites in the cytoplasm (morphology) in the desiccated tissue and a thin-film of water adhering to the glass slide (refractive index) in the non-desiccated tissue sample. Our work demonstrates the potential of our customized dual-optical SNOM system for label-free tissue diagnostics. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Protective effects of vitamin C on cisplatin-induced renal damage: a light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarladacalisir, Yeter Topcu; Kanter, Mehmet; Uygun, Muberra

    2008-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate whether the chronic administration of antioxidant vitamin C provided morphological protection on cisplatin-induced renal damage. Wistar albino male rats were divided into control and two experiment groups, each consisting of six rats. Cisplatin (5 mg/kg/month) was administered intravenously to the second and third group for three months. After the first application of cisplatin, vitamin C (8 mg/kg/day) to the third group was administered intramuscular for 3 months. At the end of the third month, the kidney specimens of the all groups were obtained. All of these kidney specimens were processed for light and electron microscopical examination. In the second group, most of the renal corpuscle lost their normal appearance and size, especially in the corticomedullary region. The most obvious changes were encountered in the proximal tubules. These changes were tubular dilation, thickening of basement membrane, loss of brush border, vacuolization, and swollenness of mitochondria in the proximal tubule epithelial cells. In addition, infiltration foci were observed mainly in the cortical region. In the third group, which was administered cisplatin plus vitamin C, although the structural damages and morphometric changes were lessened, mononuclear cell infiltration was still observed. This study suggests that the chronic administration of vitamin C may be of therapeutic benefit on cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

  7. Light-microscopic and electron-microscopic evaluation of short-term nerve regeneration using a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolacton) nerve guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    denDunnen, WFA; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, EH; Holwerda, A; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Schakenraad, JM

    The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term peripheral nerve regeneration across a IO-mm gap, using a biodegradable poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolacton) nerve guide, with an internal diameter of 1.5 mm and a wall thickness of 0.30 mm. To do so, we evaluated regenerating nerves using light

  8. A light microscopic study of the course of cellular division of Giardia intestinalis trophozoites grown in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, L; Nohýnková, E

    1992-01-01

    The cellular division of trophozoites of Giardia intestinalis group was followed microscopically in stained preparations from axenic cultures. Eleven successive stages were described, documented by photomicrographs and their survival times calculated.

  9. Evaluation of Malaria Diagnoses Using a Handheld Light Microscope in a Community-Based Setting in Rural Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Jean T; Ouattara, Mamadou; Keiser, Jennifer; Bonfoh, Bassirou; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Andrews, Jason R; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2016-10-05

    Portable microscopy may facilitate quality diagnostic care in resource-constrained settings. We compared a handheld light microscope (Newton Nm1) with a mobile phone attachment to conventional light microscopy for the detection of Plasmodium falciparum in a cross-sectional study in rural Côte d'Ivoire. Single Giemsa-stained thick blood film from 223 individuals were prepared and read by local laboratory technicians on both microscopes under 1,000× magnification with oil. Of the 223 samples, 162 (72.6%) were P. falciparum positive, and the overall mean parasite count was 1,392/μL of blood. Sensitivity and specificity of the handheld microscope was 80.2% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 73.1-85.9%) and 100.0% (95% CI: 92.6-100.0%), respectively, with a positive and negative predictive value of 100.0% (95% CI: 96.4-100.0%) and 65.6% (95% CI: 54.9-74.9%), respectively. If sensitivity can be improved, handheld light microscopy may become a valuable public health tool for P. falciparum diagnosis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  10. The effects of rearing light level and duration differences on the optic nerve, brain, and associated structures in developing zebrafish larvae: a light and transmission electron microscope study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, George B; Tarboush, Rania; Connaughton, Victoria P

    2012-03-01

    The ultrastructure of the optic nerve, brain, and some associated structures of larval zebrafish, grown under three different light regimens were studied. Fish grown under cyclic light (control), constant dark (CD), and constant light (CL) were studied for 4 and 8 days postfertilization (dpf). We also studied the control and CD fish at 15 dpf. The brains of the control and CL fish were larger at 4 dpf than at 8 dpf. In all 4 dpf fish, the brain occupied the entire expanse between the two retinas and the optic nerve extended the shortest distance between the retina and the brain. The 15 dpf zebrafish had the smallest brain size. Groups of skeletal muscle cells associated with the optic nerves became visible in all older larvae. In the 15 dpf larvae, bulges and dilations in the optic nerve occurred as it reached the brain and optic chiasms occurred proximal to the brain. Electron microscopy yielded information about myelinated and unmyelinated axons in the optic nerve, the dimensions of neurotubules, neurofilaments, and myofilaments, including a unique variation in actin myofilaments, and a confirmation of reported myosin myofilament changes (but with dimensions). We also describe the ultrastructure of a sheath-like structure that is confluent over the optic nerve and the brain, which has not been described before in zebrafish. Also presented are images of associated fibroblasts, epithelial cells lining the mouth, cartilage plates, blood vessels, nerve bundles, and skeletal muscle cells, most of which have not been previously described in the literature. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Complex adjustments of photosynthetic potentials and internal diffusion conductance to current and previous light availabilities and leaf age in Mediterranean evergreen species Quercus ilex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinemets, Ulo; Cescatti, Alessandro; Rodeghiero, Mirco; Tosens, Tiina

    2006-06-01

    mass (g(m)M) was negatively associated with light in current-year leaves. Greater photosynthetic potentials and moderate changes in diffusion conductance resulted in greater internal diffusion limitations of photosynthesis in higher light. Both area- and mass-based g(m) decreased with increasing leaf age. The decrease in diffusion conductance was larger than changes in photosynthetic potentials, leading to larger CO2 drawdown from leaf internal air space to chloroplasts (delta(c)) in older leaves. The increases in diffusion limitations in older leaves and at higher light scaled with age- and light-dependent increases in MA and D(F). Overall, our study demonstrates a large potential of foliage photosynthetic acclimation to changes in leaf light environment, but also highlights enhanced structural diffusion limitations in older leaves that result from leaf structural acclimation to previous rather than to current light environment and accumulation of structural compounds with leaf age.

  12. Time-resolved ultraviolet near-field scanning optical microscope for characterizing photoluminescence lifetime of light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Jeong, Hyun; Kim, Yong Hwan; Yim, Sang-Youp; Lee, Hong Seok; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Mun Seok

    2013-03-01

    We developed a instrument consisting of an ultraviolet (UV) near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) combined with time-correlated single photon counting, which allows efficient observation of temporal dynamics of near-field photoluminescence (PL) down to the sub-wavelength scale. The developed time-resolved UV NSOM system showed a spatial resolution of 110 nm and a temporal resolution of 130 ps in the optical signal. The proposed microscope system was successfully demonstrated by characterizing the near-field PL lifetime of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells.

  13. A note about retinal structure and visual acuity. A light microscopic study of the cones in fovea centralis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Jørgen; Qvortrup, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    Primate eye, retina, fovea centralis, cone cells, non-shrinkage methods, light microscopy, resolution......Primate eye, retina, fovea centralis, cone cells, non-shrinkage methods, light microscopy, resolution...

  14. Light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry of neurons in the blowfly optic lobe reacting with antisera to RFamide and FMRFamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nässel, D R; Ohlsson, Lisbeth; Johansson, K U

    1988-01-01

    processes. In the medulla the RF-like immunoreactive processes are arranged in strict layers whereas in the lobula complex the distribution is diffuse. Electron microscopic immunocytochemistry, using both pre-embedding immuno peroxidase-antiperoxidase and post-embedding protein A-gold labeling, was employed...

  15. Characterization of process-induced damage in Cu/low-k interconnect structure by microscopic infrared spectroscopy with polarized infrared light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Hirofumi, E-mail: Hirofumi-Seki@trc.toray.co.jp; Hashimoto, Hideki [Toray Research Center, Inc., 3-3-7 Sonoyama, Otsu, Shiga 520-8567 (Japan); Ozaki, Yukihiro [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, 2-1, Gakuen, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2016-09-07

    Microscopic Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra are measured for a Cu/low-k interconnect structure using polarized IR light for different widths of low-k spaces and Cu lines, and for different heights of Cu lines, on Si substrates. Although the widths of the Cu line and the low-k space are 70 nm each, considerably smaller than the wavelength of the IR light, the FT-IR spectra of the low-k film were obtained for the Cu/low-k interconnect structure. A suitable method was established for measuring the process-induced damage in a low-k film that was not detected by the TEM-EELS (Transmission Electron Microscope-Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy) using microscopic IR polarized light. Based on the IR results, it was presumed that the FT-IR spectra mainly reflect the structural changes in the sidewalls of the low-k films for Cu/low-k interconnect structures, and the mechanism of generating process-induced damage involves the generation of Si-OH groups in the low-k film when the Si-CH{sub 3} bonds break during the fabrication processes. The Si-OH groups attract moisture and the OH peak intensity increases. It was concluded that the increase in the OH groups in the low-k film is a sensitive indicator of low-k damage. We achieved the characterization of the process-induced damage that was not detected by the TEM-EELS and speculated that the proposed method is applicable to interconnects with line and space widths of 70 nm/70 nm and on shorter scales of leading edge devices. The location of process-induced damage and its mechanism for the Cu/low-k interconnect structure were revealed via the measurement method.

  16. Compact plane illumination plugin device to enable light sheet fluorescence imaging of multi-cellular organisms on an inverted wide-field microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zeyi; Lee, Juhyun; Jiang, Hao; Dong, Siyan; Jen, Nelson; Hsiai, Tzung; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2016-01-01

    We developed a compact plane illumination plugin (PIP) device which enabled plane illumination and light sheet fluorescence imaging on a conventional inverted microscope. The PIP device allowed the integration of microscope with tunable laser sheet profile, fast image acquisition, and 3-D scanning. The device is both compact, measuring approximately 15 by 5 by 5 cm, and cost-effective, since we employed consumer electronics and an inexpensive device molding method. We demonstrated that PIP provided significant contrast and resolution enhancement to conventional microscopy through imaging different multi-cellular fluorescent structures, including 3-D branched cells in vitro and live zebrafish embryos. Imaging with the integration of PIP greatly reduced out-of-focus contamination and generated sharper contrast in acquired 2-D plane images when compared with the stand-alone inverted microscope. As a result, the dynamic fluid domain of the beating zebrafish heart was clearly segmented and the functional monitoring of the heart was achieved. Furthermore, the enhanced axial resolution established by thin plane illumination of PIP enabled the 3-D reconstruction of the branched cellular structures, which leads to the improvement on the functionality of the wide field microscopy.

  17. Scanning Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1988-01-01

    A confocal color laser microscope which utilizes a three color laser light source (Red: He-Ne, Green: Ar, Blue: Ar) has been developed and is finding useful applications in the semiconductor field. The color laser microscope, when compared to a conventional microscope, offers superior color separation, higher resolution, and sharper contrast. Recently some new functions including a Focus Scan Memory, a Surface Profile Measurement System, a Critical Dimension Measurement system (CD) and an Optical Beam Induced Current Function (OBIC) have been developed for the color laser microscope. This paper will discuss these new features.

  18. Influence of synapsin I on synaptic vesicles: an analysis by force-volume mode of the atomic force microscope and dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awizio, Ann-Katrin; Onofri, Franco; Benfenati, Fabio; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-08-01

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are small neuronal organelles that store neurotransmitters and release them by exocytosis into the synaptic cleft for signal transmission between nerve cells. They consist of a highly curved membrane composed of different lipids containing several proteins with specific functions. A family of abundant extrinsic SV proteins, the synapsins, interact with SV proteins and phospholipids and play an important role in the regulation of SV trafficking and stability. We investigated the interactions of one these proteins with the SV membrane using atomic force microscope and dynamic light scattering. We examined SVs isolated from rat forebrain both under native conditions and after depletion of endogenous synapsin I. We used the atomic force microscope in two modes: imaging mode for characterizing the shape and size of SVs, and force-volume mode for characterizing their stiffness. Synapsin-depleted SVs were larger in size and showed a higher tendency to aggregate than native vesicles, although their stiffness was not significantly different. Because synapsins are believed to cross-link SV to each other and to the actin cytoskeleton, we also measured the SV aggregation kinetics induced by synapsin I by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy and found that the addition of synapsin I promotes a rapid aggregation of SVs. The data indicate that synapsin directly affects SV stability and aggregation state and support the physiological role of synapsins in the assembly and regulation of SV pools within nerve terminals.

  19. Real-time scattered light dark-field microscopic imaging of the dynamic degradation process of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Gang; Gao, Peng Fei; Liu, Hui; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-12-28

    Single nanoparticle analysis (SNA) technique with the aid of a dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique has attracted wide attention owing to its high sensitivity. Considering that the degradation of pesticides can bring about serious problems in food and the environment, and that the real-time monitoring of the dynamic degradation process of pesticides can help understand and define their degradation mechanisms, herein we real-time monitored the decomposition dynamics of sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate (NaDDC) under neutral and alkaline conditions by imaging single silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) under a dark-field microscope (DFM); the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) scattering signals were measured at a single nanoparticle level. As a result, the chemical mechanism of the degradation of NaDDC under neutral and alkaline conditions was proposed, and the inhibition effects of metal ions including Zn(II) and Cu(II) were investigated in order to understand the decomposition process in different environments. It was found that Cu(II) forms the most stable complex with NaDDC with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 2, which greatly reduces the toxicity.

  20. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sapoznikov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana. Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107.

  1. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana-light and scanning electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapoznikov, Olga; Cizek, Petr; Tichy, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas ( Iguana iguana ). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107.

  2. Development of olfactory epithelium and associated structures in the green iguana, Iguana iguana—light and scanning electron microscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizek, Petr; Tichy, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    The ontogenesis of the nasal cavity has been described in many mammalian species. The situation is different with reptiles, despite the fact that they have become relatively common as pets. In this study we focused on the ontogenesis of the olfactory epithelium, as well as other types of epithelia in the nasal cavity of pre-hatched green iguanas (Iguana iguana). Collection of samples began from day 67 of incubation and continued every four days until hatching. Microscopic examination revealed that significant morphological changes in the nasal cavity began approximately at day 91 of ontogenesis. Approximately at this same stage, the nasal cavity epithelium began to differentiate. The cavity was divided into two compartments by a cartilaginous disc. The ventral compartment bulged rostrally and eventually opened up into the external environment. Three clearly demarcated areas of epithelium in the nasal cavity were visible at day 107. PMID:27920949

  3. Light microscopic identification and semiquantification of polyethylene particles in methylmethacrylate and paraffin-embedded experimental bone implant specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek, O; Kold, S; Overgaard, S

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the identification of polyethylene (PE) particles in relatively thick methylmethacrylate (MMA) sections widely used in bone implant research. The sensitivity and specificity were compared between decalcified paraffin-embedded oil red O (ORO) stained and MMA......-embedded sections using polarized light. Furthermore, we introduced a grading system to semiquantify the level of PE particles in peri-implant tissue. Paraffin-embedded and MMA-embedded sections were compared concerning intra-observer agreement of the grading system. Moreover, the semiquantitative assessment...... of particle level was compared between the two section types. We found a sensitivity and specificity of polarized light of 100% for both paraffin ORO-stained and MMA sections. The intra-observer agreement on both types was comparable and acceptable. The ratings of differently processed blocks (MMA...

  4. Living Cells and Dynamic Molecules Observed with the Polarized Light Microscope: the Legacy of Shinya Inoué.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Tomomi; Shribak, Michael; Oldenbourg, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    In 1948, Shinya Inoué arrived in the United States for graduate studies at Princeton. A year later he came to Woods Hole, starting a long tradition of summer research at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), which quickly became Inoué's scientific home. Primed by his Japanese mentor, Katsuma Dan, Inoué followed Dan's mantra to work with healthy, living cells, on a fundamental problem (mitosis), with a unique tool set that he refined for precise and quantitative observations (polarized light microscopy), and a fresh and brilliant mind that was unafraid of challenging current dogma. Building on this potent combination, Inoué contributed landmark observations and concepts in cell biology, including the notion that there are dynamic, fine structures inside living cells, in which molecular assemblies such as mitotic spindle fibers exist in delicate equilibrium with their molecular building blocks suspended in the cytoplasm. In the late 1970s and 1980s, Inoué and others at the MBL were instrumental in conceiving video microscopy, a groundbreaking technique which married light microscopy and electronic imaging, ushering in a revolution in how we know and what we know about living cells and the molecular mechanisms of life. Here, we recount some of Inoué's accomplishments and describe how his legacy has shaped current activities in polarized light imaging at the MBL. © 2016 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  5. Noise Reduction Method for Quantifying Nanoparticle Light Scattering in Low Magnification Dark-Field Microscope Far-Field Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Fan, Jia; Liu, Chang; Liu, Yang; Bu, Yang; Lyon, Christopher J; Hu, Ye

    2016-12-20

    Nanoparticles have become a powerful tool for cell imaging and biomolecule, cell and protein interaction studies, but are difficult to rapidly and accurately measure in most assays. Dark-field microscope (DFM) image analysis approaches used to quantify nanoparticles require high-magnification near-field (HN) images that are labor intensive due to a requirement for manual image selection and focal adjustments needed when identifying and capturing new regions of interest. Low-magnification far-field (LF) DFM imagery is technically simpler to perform but cannot be used as an alternate to HN-DFM quantification, since it is highly sensitive to surface artifacts and debris that can easily mask nanoparticle signal. We now describe a new noise reduction approach that markedly reduces LF-DFM image artifacts to allow sensitive and accurate nanoparticle signal quantification from LF-DFM images. We have used this approach to develop a "Dark Scatter Master" (DSM) algorithm for the popular NIH image analysis program ImageJ, which can be readily adapted for use with automated high-throughput assay analyses. This method demonstrated robust performance quantifying nanoparticles in different assay formats, including a novel method that quantified extracellular vesicles in patient blood sample to detect pancreatic cancer cases. Based on these results, we believe our LF-DFM quantification method can markedly decrease the analysis time of most nanoparticle-based assays to impact both basic research and clinical analyses.

  6. Distributions of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster: light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    1983-06-01

    The distribution of /sup 35/S-sulfate and /sup 3/H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography following intraperitoneal injection of these compounds to hamsters. Exposed silver grains of /sup 35/S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera, and cornea, and grains of /sup 3/H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells of the angular aqueous plexus and the trabecular meshwork. The grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the region adjacent to the angular aqueous sinus. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the angular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid.

  7. Distributions of 35S-sulfate and 3H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster: light and electron microscopic autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of 35 S-sulfate and 3 H-glucosamine in the angular region of the hamster was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography following intraperitoneal injection of these compounds to hamsters. Exposed silver grains of 35 S-sulfate were concentrated in the trabecular meshwork, sclera, and cornea, and grains of 3 H-glucosamine were localized in the trabecular region. The radioactivity of both isotopes was observed in the Golgi apparatuses of the endothelial cells of the angular aqueous plexus and the trabecular meshwork. The grains were noted over the entire cytoplasm, except for the nucleus, and then were incorporated into the amorphous substance and collagen fibers in the region adjacent to the angular aqueous sinus. These results suggest that endothelial cells in the angular region synthesize and secrete the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and hyaluronic acid

  8. Pathology of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis: a light microscopical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of skin lesions and draining lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Gadir, A Fattah A; Theander, Thor G

    2006-01-01

    cells. Degenerating basal keratinocytes expressed HLA-DR, ICAM-1 and Leishmania antigen and closely interacted with CD4 T cells. Regional lymph nodes showed hyperplasia of the B- and T-cell zones. Conclusions: The inflammatory reaction in PKDL lesions is in response to Leishmania parasites and....../or antigen. The majority of cells are CD4 T cells. Degeneration of the basal keratinocytes is probably due to the action of cytotoxic CD4 T cells interacting with leishmania-expressing epidermal cells. Ismail A, Gadir AFA, Theander TG, Kharazmi A, El Hassan AM. Pathology of post-kala-azar dermal...... leishmaniasis: a light microscopical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of skin lesions and draining lymph nodes....

  9. Bringing light into the nano-world: What can you do with an atomic force microscope on top of your synchrotron radiation sample holder?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Mario Manuel Silveira

    2009-01-01

    This thesis had as a major objective to combine scanning probe microscopy in particular, atomic force microscopy with synchrotron light spectroscopies. The combination of these two types of spectroscopies is meant to be in-situ and in real time. Thus this thesis aimed at introducing new types of experimental techniques suitable for the investigation of nano-sized materials. The proposed new instrumentation, would provide chemical-specific contrast at unprecedented lateral resolution of up to 10-40 nanometers, thus overcoming existing limitations of the two families of spectroscopy methods and opening a wide range of research opportunities and challenges. For the purpose of combining these techniques an atomic force microscope was developed. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was developed around a quartz tuning fork crystal which was used as the sensor with which atomic forces are detected. The developed AFM was then used in several beam lines with essentially two different purposes. A first goal was to do spectroscopy, such as the measurement of an absorption edge, locally with the tip of the AFM. Such measurements were indeed done, but the lateral resolution is still dominated by the X-ray beam size rather than by the tip apex shape. The AFM tip was also used to measure Bragg peaks from crystals with sizes on the nanometer scale. A second goal was to use the AFM as an instrument to mechanical interact with nano-sized systems while the X-ray beam was used to probe changes in the lattice parameter of the studied systems. Thus the AFM tip was used to elastically indent a SiGe crystal while diffraction was simultaneously measured. It was possible to observe shifts of the Bragg peak as a consequence of the applied pressure. The in-situ combination of AFM with synchrotron light permitted, in this way, to measure the Young modulus of a crystal at the nano-scale without any kind of adjustable parameter. (author)

  10. Microscope basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluder, Greenfield; Nordberg, Joshua J

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides information on how microscopes work and discusses some of the microscope issues to be considered in using a video camera on the microscope. There are two types of microscopes in use today for research in cell biology-the older finite tube-length (typically 160mm mechanical tube length) microscopes and the infinity optics microscopes that are now produced. The objective lens forms a magnified, real image of the specimen at a specific distance from the objective known as the intermediate image plane. All objectives are designed to be used with the specimen at a defined distance from the front lens element of the objective (the working distance) so that the image formed is located at a specific location in the microscope. Infinity optics microscopes differ from the finite tube-length microscopes in that the objectives are designed to project the image of the specimen to infinity and do not, on their own, form a real image of the specimen. Three types of objectives are in common use today-plan achromats, plan apochromats, and plan fluorite lenses. The concept of mounting video cameras on the microscope is also presented in the chapter. Copyright © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Light Microscopy Module: On-Orbit Microscope Planned for the Fluids Integrated Rack on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Susan M.

    2002-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is planned as a remotely controllable, automated, on-orbit facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of physical science and biological science experiments within the Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) on the International Space Station. Initially four fluid physics experiments in the FIR will use the LMM the Constrained Vapor Bubble, the Physics of Hard Spheres Experiment-2, Physics of Colloids in Space-2, and Low Volume Fraction Entropically Driven Colloidal Assembly. The first experiment will investigate heat conductance in microgravity as a function of liquid volume and heat flow rate to determine, in detail, the transport process characteristics in a curved liquid film. The other three experiments will investigate various complementary aspects of the nucleation, growth, structure, and properties of colloidal crystals in microgravity and the effects of micromanipulation upon their properties.

  12. Neural differentiation of transplanted neural stem cells in a rat model of striatal lacunar infarction: light and electron microscopic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñetón-Gómez, Vilma C.; Doncel-Pérez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Ana P.; Serrano, Julia; Pozo-Rodrigálvarez, Andrea; Vellosillo-Huerta, Lara; Taylor, Julian S.; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.; Nieto-Sampedro, Manuel; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The increased risk and prevalence of lacunar stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD) makes the search for better experimental models an important requirement for translational research. In this study we assess ischemic damage of the nigrostriatal pathway in a model of lacunar stroke evoked by damaging the perforating arteries in the territory of the substantia nigra (SN) of the rat after stereotaxic administration of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor peptide. We hypothesized that transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) with the capacity of differentiating into diverse cell types such as neurons and glia, but with limited proliferation potential, would constitute an alternative and/or adjuvant therapy for lacunar stroke. These cells showed neuritogenic activity in vitro and a high potential for neural differentiation. Light and electron microscopy immunocytochemistry was used to characterize GFP-positive neurons derived from the transplants. 48 h after ET-1 injection, we characterized an area of selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons within the nigrostriatal pathway characterized with tissue necrosis and glial scar formation, with subsequent behavioral signs of Parkinsonism. Light microscopy showed that grafted cells within the striatal infarction zone differentiated with a high yield into mature glial cells (GFAP-positive) and neuron types present in the normal striatum. Electron microscopy revealed that NSCs-derived neurons integrated into the host circuitry establishing synaptic contacts, mostly of the asymmetric type. Astrocytes were closely associated with normal small-sized blood vessels in the area of infarct, suggesting a possible role in the regulation of the blood brain barrier and angiogenesis. Our results encourage the use of NSCs as a cell-replacement therapy for the treatment of human vascular Parkinsonism. PMID:22876219

  13. Reliable Detection and Smart Deletion of Malassez Counting Chamber Grid in Microscopic White Light Images for Microbiological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denimal, Emmanuel; Marin, Ambroise; Guyot, Stéphane; Journaux, Ludovic; Molin, Paul

    2015-08-01

    In biology, hemocytometers such as Malassez slides are widely used and are effective tools for counting cells manually. In a previous work, a robust algorithm was developed for grid extraction in Malassez slide images. This algorithm was evaluated on a set of 135 images and grids were accurately detected in most cases, but there remained failures for the most difficult images. In this work, we present an optimization of this algorithm that allows for 100% grid detection and a 25% improvement in grid positioning accuracy. These improvements make the algorithm fully reliable for grid detection. This optimization also allows complete erasing of the grid without altering the cells, which eases their segmentation.

  14. Nanoscale coupling of photons to vibrational excitation of Ag nanoparticle 2D array studied by scanning tunneling microscope light emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katano, Satoshi; Toma, Koji; Toma, Mana; Tamada, Kaoru; Uehara, Yoichi

    2010-11-28

    Scanning tunneling microscope light emission (STM-LE) spectroscopy has been utilized to elucidate the luminescence phenomena of Ag nanoparticles capped with myristate (myristate-capped AgNP) and 2-methyl-1-propanethiolate (C(4)S-capped AgNP) on the dodecanethiol-precovered Au substrate. The STM imaging revealed that myristate-capped AgNPs form an ordered hexagonal array whereas C(4)S-capped AgNPs show imperfect ordering, indicating that a shorter alkyl chain of C(4)S-capped AgNP is not sufficient to form rigid interdigitation. It should be noted that such a nanoparticle ordering affects the luminescence properties of the Ag nanoparticle. We found that the STM-LE is only detected from the Ag nanoparticles forming the two-dimensional superlattice. This indicates that the STM-LE of the Ag nanoparticle is radiated via the collective excitation of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spread over the Ag nanoparticles. Note that the STM-LE spectra of the Ag nanoparticles exhibit spike-like peaks superimposed on the broad light emission peak. Using Raman spectroscopy, we concluded that the spike-like structure appearing in the STM-LE spectra is associated with the vibrational excitation of the molecule embedded between Ag nanoparticles.

  15. Microwave Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Makes ultra-high-resolution field measurements. The Microwave Microscope (MWM) has been used in support of several NRL experimental programs involving sea...

  16. Microscopic study on proton elastic scattering of light exotic nuclei at energies below than 100 MeV/nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farag, M.Y.H.; Esmael, E.H. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Maridi, H.M. [Cairo University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Giza (Egypt); Taiz University, Physics Department, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz (Yemen)

    2012-11-15

    The proton elastic scattering data on some light exotic nuclei, namely, {sup 6,} {sup 8}He, {sup 9,} {sup 11}Li, and {sup 10,} {sup 11,} {sup 12}Be, at energies below than 100MeV/nucleon are analyzed using the single folding optical model. The real, imaginary, and spin-orbit parts of the optical potential (OP) are constructed only from the folded potentials and their derivatives using M3Y effective nucleon-nucleon interaction. These OP parts, their renormalization factors and their volume integrals are studied. The surface and spin-orbit potentials are important to fit the experimental data. Three model densities for halo nuclei are used and the sensitivity of the cross-sections to these densities is tested. The imaginary OP within high-energy approximation is used and compared with the single folding OP. This OP with few and limited fitting parameters, which have systematic behavior with incident energy, successfully describes the proton elastic scattering data with exotic nuclei. (orig.)

  17. A Light and Electron Microscope Study of the Epithelial Cells of the Gut of Fasciola hepatica L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresson, R. A. R.; Threadgold, L. T.

    1959-01-01

    The structure of the epithelial cells of the alimentary tract of Fasciola hepatica was investigated by means of light and electron microscopy. Tissue prepared for electron microscopy was fixed in 1 per cent osmium tetroxide, buffered with veronal to a pH of 7.4, and embedded in butyl methacrylate with 1 per cent benzoyl peroxide as a catalyst. Polymerisation was carried out at 60°C. The majority, if not all, the epithelial cells pass through both absorptive and secretory cycles. The free ends of absorptive cells possess fine protoplasmic processes that project into the lumen of the gut. These are apparently concerned with the absorption of nutriment. In electron micrographs, the protoplasmic (absorptive) processes are frequently seen to be in the form of tubular loops both ends of which arise from the same cell. The free end of a process is often expanded into a ribbon-like structure. Each process possesses an external limiting membrane and an internal membranous ultrastructure. When a cell becomes glandular in function, the protoplasmic processes seem to become less numerous. The plasma membrane is invaginated into the basal part of an absorptive cell. In the neighbourhood of the lumen of the gut where two tall cells are in contact, bands of amorphous cytoplasmic material are in contact with each cell membrane. PMID:13829217

  18. In vivo and in vitro effects of imidacloprid on sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus): a light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlhorn, H; D'Haese, J; Mencke, N; Hansen, O

    2001-04-01

    The effects of imidacloprid (Advantage) on sheep keds (Melophagus ovinus Linne 1758) were studied in vivo and in vitro by means of direct observation (monitored on video tape) and by light and electron microscopy. It was found that: 1. Imidacloprid acted rapidly on all motile stages of the sheep keds. Within 3-4 min after exposure they became immobile and their legs and the abdomen started tetanic trembling movements for 15-30 min, leading to death. 2. The compound is apparently taken up by the body, since it also acted on those sheep keds that had been exclusively exposed to imidacloprid-contaminated filter papers. 3. The compound is available and active for more than 1 month in the wool of sheep; even rainfall does not reduce its efficacy. Body contact between treated mother sheep and their lambs protects them from infestation with these ectoparasites. 4. The compound initiates an ultimately lethal destruction of the ganglia, nerve chords and related muscle fibers, as can be seen in electron micrographs.

  19. Light Microscopy Research Group (LMRG): International Test Results for Objective Lens Quality, Resolution, Spectral Accuracy and Spectral Separation for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopes (CLSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Marc; Bayles, Carol J.; Eason, Brady; Girard, Anne-Marie; Jinadasa, Tushare; Opansky, Cynthia; Schulz, Katherine; Brown, Claire M.; Cole, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to increase image reproducibility and fidelity in addition to improving cross-instrument consistency we have developed four separate instrument quality tests to augment the ones previously reported. 1) Objective lens quality 2) Resolution 3) Spectral accuracy of the wavelength information from spectral detectors 4) Spectral Separation tested the accuracy and quality of un-mixing algorithms. To ascertain the usefulness of these tests as well as to determine the current ““state”” of microscopes in use, test specimens and detailed protocols were made available worldwide free-of-charge. 55 laboratories located in 18 countries provided data. Objective lens quality: good with most issues arising from user errors or stage/focus drift, approximately 10% of lenses had aberrations. Resolution: within an average of approximately 25% of theoretical values. Spectral accuracy: excellent, even for low resolution systems. Spectral un-mixing: good, poor data collection was the main cause of low quality data.

  20. Lungs of the gecko Rhacodactylus leachianus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae): a correlative gross anatomical and light and electron microscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, S F; Bauer, A M; Russell, A P; Alston, J T; Maloney, J E

    1989-01-01

    The lungs of the New Caldeonian gecko Rhacodactylus leachianus were examined by means of gross dissection and light and electron microscopy. This tropical species, which is the largest living gecko, possesses two simple, single-chambered lungs. Right and left lungs are of similar size and shape. The lung volume (27.2 ml.100 g-1) is similar to that of the tokay (Gekko gecko) but differs in that the gas exchange tissue is approximately homogeneously distributed, and the parenchymal units (ediculae) are very large, approximately 2 mm in diameter. The parenchymal depth varies according to the location in the lung, being deepest near the middle of the lung and shallowest caudally. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy reveal an unusual distribution of ciliated cells in patches on the edicular walls as well as on the trabeculae. Secretory cells are very numerous, particularly in the bronchial epithelium, where they greatly outnumber the ciliated cells. The secretory cells form a morphological continuum characterized by small secretory droplets apically and large vacuoles basally. This continuum includes cells resembling type II pneumocytes but which are devoid of lamellar bodies. Type I pneumocytes similar to those of other reptiles cover the respiratory capillaries, where they form a thin, air-blood barrier together with the capillary endothelial cells and the fused basement laminae. The innervation, musculature, and vascular distribution in R. leachianus are also characterized. Apparent simplification of the lungs in this taxon may be related to features of its sluggish habits, whereas peculiarities of cell and tissue composition may reflect demands of its mesic habitat.

  1. Role of l-carnitine in the prevention of seminiferous tubules damage induced by gamma radiation: a light and electron microscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Kanter, Mehmet; Uzal, Mustafa Cem

    2009-01-01

    The present study, we hypothesized that l-carnitine can minimize germ-cell depletion and morphological features of late cell damage in the rat testis following gamma (γ)-irradiation. Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups. Control group received physiological saline 0.2 ml intraperitoneally (i.p.), as placebo. Radiation group received scrotal γ-irradiation of 10 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. Radiation + l-carnitine group received scrotal γ-irradiation plus 200 mg/kg i.p. l-carnitine. l-carnitine starting 1 day before irradiation and 21 days (three times per week) after irradiation. Testis samples of the all groups were taken at day 21, 44 and 70 post-irradiation. All samples were processed at the light and electron microscopic levels. Morphologically, examination of γ-irradiated testis revealed presence of marked disorganization and depletion of germ cells, arrest of spermatogenesis, formation of multinucleated giant cells, and vacuolization in the germinal epithelium. The type and extent of these changes varied at different post-treatment intervals. The damage was evident at the 21st day and reached maximum level by the 44th day. By day 44 post-irradiation, the changes were most advanced, and were associated with atrophied seminiferous tubules without germ cells, the increase in the number and size of vacuolizations in germinal epithelium, and the absent multinucleated giant cells due to spermatids had completely disappeared. The increase in nucleus invaginations, the dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cysternas and the increase in the number and size of lipid droplets in the Sertoli cells were determined at the electron microscopic level. In conclusion, l-carnitine supplementation during the radiotherapy would be effective in protecting against radiation-induced damages in rat testis, and thereby may improve the quality of patient's life after the therapy. (orig.)

  2. Role of l-carnitine in the prevention of seminiferous tubules damage induced by gamma radiation: a light and electron microscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topcu-Tarladacalisir, Yeter; Kanter, Mehmet [Trakya University, Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, Edirne (Turkey); Uzal, Mustafa Cem [Trakya University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Edirne (Turkey)

    2009-08-15

    The present study, we hypothesized that l-carnitine can minimize germ-cell depletion and morphological features of late cell damage in the rat testis following gamma ({gamma})-irradiation. Wistar albino male rats were divided into three groups. Control group received physiological saline 0.2 ml intraperitoneally (i.p.), as placebo. Radiation group received scrotal {gamma}-irradiation of 10 Gy as a single dose plus physiological saline. Radiation + l-carnitine group received scrotal {gamma}-irradiation plus 200 mg/kg i.p. l-carnitine. l-carnitine starting 1 day before irradiation and 21 days (three times per week) after irradiation. Testis samples of the all groups were taken at day 21, 44 and 70 post-irradiation. All samples were processed at the light and electron microscopic levels. Morphologically, examination of {gamma}-irradiated testis revealed presence of marked disorganization and depletion of germ cells, arrest of spermatogenesis, formation of multinucleated giant cells, and vacuolization in the germinal epithelium. The type and extent of these changes varied at different post-treatment intervals. The damage was evident at the 21st day and reached maximum level by the 44th day. By day 44 post-irradiation, the changes were most advanced, and were associated with atrophied seminiferous tubules without germ cells, the increase in the number and size of vacuolizations in germinal epithelium, and the absent multinucleated giant cells due to spermatids had completely disappeared. The increase in nucleus invaginations, the dilatation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum cysternas and the increase in the number and size of lipid droplets in the Sertoli cells were determined at the electron microscopic level. In conclusion, l-carnitine supplementation during the radiotherapy would be effective in protecting against radiation-induced damages in rat testis, and thereby may improve the quality of patient's life after the therapy. (orig.)

  3. Imaging arrangement and microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertsinidis, Alexandros; Chu, Steven

    2015-12-15

    An embodiment of the present invention is an imaging arrangement that includes imaging optics, a fiducial light source, and a control system. In operation, the imaging optics separate light into first and second tight by wavelength and project the first and second light onto first and second areas within first and second detector regions, respectively. The imaging optics separate fiducial light from the fiducial light source into first and second fiducial light and project the first and second fiducial light onto third and fourth areas within the first and second detector regions, respectively. The control system adjusts alignment of the imaging optics so that the first and second fiducial light projected onto the first and second detector regions maintain relatively constant positions within the first and second detector regions, respectively. Another embodiment of the present invention is a microscope that includes the imaging arrangement.

  4. Light microscopic autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, A.S.; Goodman, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    Much work has been done on opioid systems in the rat CNS. Although the mouse is widely used in pharmacological studies of opioid action, little has been done to characterize opioid systems in this species. In the present study the distribution of mu and delta opioid binding sites in the mouse CNS was examined using a quantitative in vitro autoradiography procedure. Tritiated dihydromorphine was used to visualize mu sites and [3H-d-Ala2-d-Leu5]enkephalin with a low concentration of morphine was used to visualize delta sites. Mu and delta site localizations in the mouse are very similar to those previously described in the rat (Goodman, R.R., S.H. Snyder, M.J. Kuhar, and W.S. Young, 3d (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77:6239-6243), with certain exceptions and additions. Mu and delta sites were observed in sensory processing areas, limbic system, extrapyramidal motor system, and cranial parasympathetic system. Differential distributions of mu and delta sites were noted in many areas. Mu sites were prominent in laminae I, IV, and VI of the neocortex, in patches in the striatum, and in the ventral pallidum, nucleus accumbens, medial and midline thalamic nuclei, medial habenular nucleus, interpeduncular nucleus, and laminae I and II of the spinal cord. In contrast, delta sites were prominent in all laminae of the neocortex, olfactory tubercle, diffusely throughout the striatum, and in the basal, lateral, and cortical nuclei of the amygdala. The determination of the differential distributions of opioid binding sites should prove useful in suggesting anatomical substrates for the actions of opiates and opioids

  5. Light and electron microscopic study of the toxic effect of prolonged lead exposure on the seminiferous tubules of albino rats and the possible protective effect of ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shafai, Adel; Zohdy, Nahed; El Mulla, Khaled; Hassan, Manal; Morad, Noha

    2011-04-01

    Lead has been long recognized as an occupational toxicant. Now, lead is considered to be one of the major environmental pollutants which have serious potential threat to human health. Reports of declining male fertility have renewed interest in the role of environmental and occupational exposures in the etiology of human infertility. The aim of the present work was to investigate the toxic effect of prolonged exposure to lead on albino rat's seminiferous tubules and the possible protective effect of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) on lead toxicity. The study was carried out on 40 adult male albino rats divided into three groups: a control group which comprised three subgroups; negative control which received no treatment and two positive controls receiving an oral daily dose of distilled water or ascorbic acid, respectively. Lead acetate--intoxicated group received lead acetate orally in a dose of 25 mg/kg b.w dissolved in distilled water for 3 months. While the protected group received ascorbic acid orally in a dose of 100 mg/kg b.w daily for 3 months, simultaneously with lead acetate in a similar dose to that of the intoxicated group. By the end of the experimental period, blood samples were collected for estimation of blood lead level. Fresh specimens were taken from the testis and processed for light and electron microscopic examination. Biochemical analysis demonstrated significant increase in the blood lead level in lead intoxicated group compared to the control group, while ascorbic acid--protected group revealed significant decrease in the blood lead level. Light microscopic examination of lead treated group revealed loss of normal architecture of the testicular tissue in the form of thin walled seminiferous tubules with wide lumen and vacuolations in the spermatogenic epithelium mostly separating primary spermatocytes from spermatogonia and surrounding nuclei of Sertoli cells. Apoptotic bodies were found among the basal part of the spermatogenic epithelium

  6. ReViMS: Software tool for estimating the volumes of 3-D multicellular spheroids imaged using a light sheet fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinini, Filippo; Tesei, Anna; Zanoni, Michele; Bevilacqua, Alessandro

    2017-11-01

    Cancer 3-D spheroids are widely used to test drugs and radiotherapy treatments. These 3-D cell clusters range from tens to hundreds of micrometers in size, with shapes that typically differ from a perfect sphere. Change in spheroid volume is one of the most important parameters for evaluating treatment efficacy, and using light sheet fluorescence microscopes (LSFM), optical sections of samples in that size range can be obtained. However, there remains a lack of validated methods for quantifying the volumes of 3-D multicellular aggregates. Here, we present Reconstruction and Visualization from Multiple Sections (ReViMS), an open-source, user-friendly software for automatically segmenting z-stacks of fluorescence images and estimating the volumes of 3-D multicellular spheroids. To assess the precision and accuracy of the volume estimates obtained with ReViMS, we used several cancer spheroids imaged with LSFM. Both the precision and accuracy were >95%, demonstrating the effectiveness of ReViMS.

  7. Light and electron microscopic studies of the intestinal epithelium in Notoplana humilis (Platyhelminthes, Polycladida): the contribution of mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts to intestinal regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okano, Daisuke; Ishida, Sachiko; Ishiguro, Sei-ichi; Kobayashi, Kazuya

    2015-12-01

    Some free-living flatworms in the phylum Platyhelminthes possess strong regenerative capability that depends on putative pluripotent stem cells known as neoblasts. These neoblasts are defined based on several criteria, including their proliferative capacity and the presence of cellular components known as chromatoid bodies. Polyclads, which are marine flatworms, have the potential to be a good model system for stem cell research, yet little information is available regarding neoblasts and regeneration. In this study, transmission electron microscopy and immunostaining analyses, using antibodies against phospho-histone H3 and BrdU, were used to identify two populations of neoblasts in the polyclad Notoplana humilis: mesodermal neoblasts (located in the mesenchymal space) and gastrodermal neoblasts (located within the intestine, where granular club cells and phagocytic cells are also located). Light and electron microscopic analyses also suggested that phagocytic cells and mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts, but not granular club cells, migrated into blastemas and remodeled the intestine during regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that, in polyclads, intestinal regeneration is accomplished by mechanisms underlying both morphallaxis (remodeling of pre-existing tissues) and epimorphosis (de novo tissue formation derived from mesodermal/gastrodermal neoblasts). Based on the assumption that gastrodermal neoblasts, which are derived from mesodermal neoblasts, are intestinal stem cells, we propose a model to study intestinal regeneration.

  8. Pathology of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis: a light microscopical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of skin lesions and draining lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Gadir, A Fattah A; Theander, Thor G; Kharazmi, Arsalan; El Hassan, Ahmed M

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the clinical manifestations and treatment of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) have been adequately described before, the pathology received little attention, particularly the African form of PKDL which shows some clinical differences from the disease in India. Therefore, our aim was to characterize the pathology and the immunohistopathology in PKDL lesions and correlate the histopathological findings with the clinical features of the disease. Biopsies of skin lesions were examined for histopathological changes in formalin-fixed tissues and for cell phenotypes and adhesion molecules by immunohistochemistry. The epidermis showed various changes in different combinations. The dermis was infiltrated by lymphocytes and macrophages, but plasma cells were scanty or absent. The majority of cells were CD3 T cells, with a preponderance of CD4 over CD8 cells. Degenerating basal keratinocytes expressed HLA-DR, ICAM-1 and Leishmania antigen and closely interacted with CD4 T cells. Regional lymph nodes showed hyperplasia of the B- and T-cell zones. The inflammatory reaction in PKDL lesions is in response to Leishmania parasites and/or antigen. The majority of cells are CD4 T cells. Degeneration of the basal keratinocytes is probably due to the action of cytotoxic CD4 T cells interacting with leishmania-expressing epidermal cells. Ismail A, Gadir AFA, Theander TG, Kharazmi A, El Hassan AM. Pathology of post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis: a light microscopical, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study of skin lesions and draining lymph nodes.

  9. Brain cytochrome oxidase subunit complementary DNAs: isolation, subcloning, sequencing, light and electron microscopic in situ hybridization of transcripts, and regulation by neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Riley, M T; Mullen, M A; Huang, Z; Guyer, C

    1997-02-01

    The goal of the present study was to isolate, for the first time, cytochrome oxidase subunit genes from murine brain complementary DNA library and to characterize the expression of these genes from mitochondrial and nuclear sources at both light and electron microscopic levels. Brain subunit III (mitochondrial) shared 100% identity with that of murine L cells. Subunit VIa (nuclear) was known to have tissue-specific isoforms in other species: the ubiquitous liver isoform and the heart/muscle isoform. Our brain subunit VIa shared 93% homology with that of the rat liver and 100% identity with the recently reported murine liver isoform, which is only 62% identical to that of the rat heart isoform. In situ hybridization with riboprobes revealed messenger RNA labelling that was similar, though not identical, to that of cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Monocular enucleation in adult mice induced a significant down-regulation of both subunit messages in the contralateral lateral geniculate nucleus. However, the decrease in subunit III messenger RNAs surpassed that of subunit VIa at all time periods examined, suggesting that mitochondrial gene expression is more tightly regulated by neuronal activity than that of nuclear ones. At the electron microscopic level, subunit III messenger RNA was localized to the mitochondrial compartment in both cell bodies and processes, while that of nuclear-encoded subunit VIa was present exclusively in the extramitochondrial compartment of somata and not of dendrites or axons. Surprisingly, the message was primarily associated with the rough endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting a novel pathway for its synthesis and trafficking. Our results indicate that the unique properties of neurons impose special requirements for subunits of a single mitochondrial enzyme with dual genomic origins. At sites of high energy demands (such as postsynaptic dendrites and some axon terminals), mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome oxidase subunits can be locally

  10. Microscopic approach to polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    The interaction between excitons and light has been investigated in detail. The perturbational approach turns out to be invalid. However, an exact solution can be obtained directly from the Schrödinger equation for a fixed light field. This solution corresponds to a nonlinear optical response...... contrary to experimental experience. In order to remove this absurdity the semiclassical approach must be abandoned and the electromagnetic field quantized. A simple microscopic polariton model is then derived. From this the wave function for the interacting exciton-photon complex is obtained...... of light of the crystal. The introduction of damping smears out the excitonic spectra. The wave function of the polariton, however, turns out to be very independent of damping up to large damping values. Finally, this simplified microscopic polariton model is compared with the exact solutions obtained...

  11. Color Laser Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awamura, D.; Ode, T.; Yonezawa, M.

    1987-04-01

    A color laser microscope utilizing a new color laser imaging system has been developed for the visual inspection of semiconductors. The light source, produced by three lasers (Red; He-Ne, Green; Ar, Blue; He-Cd), is deflected horizontally by an AOD (Acoustic Optical Deflector) and vertically by a vibration mirror. The laser beam is focused in a small spot which is scanned over the sample at high speed. The light reflected back from the sample is reformed to contain linear information by returning to the original vibration mirror. The linear light is guided to the CCD image sensor where it is converted into a video signal. Individual CCD image sensors are used for each of the three R, G, or B color image signals. The confocal optical system with its laser light source yields a color TV monitor image with no flaring and a much sharper resolution than that of the conventional optical microscope. The AOD makes possible a high speed laser scan and a NTSC or PAL TV video signal is produced in real time without any video memory. Since the light source is composed of R, G, and B laser beams, color separation superior to that of white light illumination is achieved. Because of the photometric linearity of the image detector, the R, G, and B outputs of the system are most suitably used for hue analysis. The CCD linear image sensors in the optical system produce no geometrical distortion, and good color registration is available principally. The output signal can be used for high accuracy line width measuring. The many features of the color laser microscope make it ideally suited for the visual inspection of semiconductor processing. A number of these systems have already been installed in such a capacity. The Color Laser Microscope can also be a very useful tool for the fields of material engineering and biotechnology.

  12. Proper alignment of the microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenfusser, Rudi

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is merely the first element of an imaging system in a research facility. Such a system may include high-speed and/or high-resolution image acquisition capabilities, confocal technologies, and super-resolution methods of various types. Yet more than ever, the proverb "garbage in-garbage out" remains a fact. Image manipulations may be used to conceal a suboptimal microscope setup, but an artifact-free image can only be obtained when the microscope is optimally aligned, both mechanically and optically. Something else is often overlooked in the quest to get the best image out of the microscope: Proper sample preparation! The microscope optics can only do its job when its design criteria are matched to the specimen or vice versa. The specimen itself, the mounting medium, the cover slip, and the type of immersion medium (if applicable) are all part of the total optical makeup. To get the best results out of a microscope, understanding the functions of all of its variable components is important. Only then one knows how to optimize these components for the intended application. Different approaches might be chosen to discuss all of the microscope's components. We decided to follow the light path which starts with the light source and ends at the camera or the eyepieces. To add more transparency to this sequence, the section up to the microscope stage was called the "Illuminating Section", to be followed by the "Imaging Section" which starts with the microscope objective. After understanding the various components, we can start "working with the microscope." To get the best resolution and contrast from the microscope, the practice of "Koehler Illumination" should be understood and followed by every serious microscopist. Step-by-step instructions as well as illustrations of the beam path in an upright and inverted microscope are included in this chapter. A few practical considerations are listed in Section 3. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes in cerebral cortex of Fisher 344 rats: a light microscope autoradiography study of age-related changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebati, Seyed Khosrow; Di Tullio, Maria Antonietta; Amenta, Francesco

    2006-02-01

    The density and localization of muscarinic cholinergic M1-M5 receptor subtypes was investigated in frontal and occipital cortex of male Fisher 344 rats aged 6 months (young-adult), 15 months (mature) and 22 months (senescent) by combined kinetic and equilibrium binding and light microscope autoradiography. In 6-month-old rats, the rank order density of muscarinic cholinergic receptor subtypes was M1>M2>M4>M3>M5 both in frontal and occipital cortex. A not homogeneous distribution of different receptor subtypes throughout cerebrocortical layers of frontal or occipital cortex was found. In frontal cortex silver grains corresponding to the M1 and M2 receptor subtypes were decreased in 15- and 22-month-old groups. The M3 receptor density was remarkably and moderately decreased in layers II/III and V, respectively, of rats aged 15 and 22 months. A reduced M4 receptor density was observed in layer I and to a lesser extent in layer V of mature and senescent rats, whereas no age-related changes of M5 receptor were found. In occipital cortex a diminution of M1 receptor was observed in layers II/III and V of mature and senescent rats. The M2 receptor expression decreased in layer I of 15- and 22-month-old senescent rats, whereas M3-M5 receptors were unchanged with exception of a slight decrease of the M4 receptor in layer IV and of M5 receptor in layers II/III. These findings indicate a different sensitivity to aging of muscarinic receptor subtypes located in various cerebrocortical layers. This may account for the difficulty in obtaining relevant results in manipulating cholinoceptors to counter age-related impairment of cholinergic system.

  14. Microscopic colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münch, A; Aust, D; Bohr, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Microscopic colitis (MC) is an inflammatory bowel disease presenting with chronic, non-bloody watery diarrhoea and few or no endoscopic abnormalities. The histological examination reveals mainly two subtypes of MC, lymphocytic or collagenous colitis. Despite the fact that the incidence in MC has...... been rising over the last decades, research has been sparse and our knowledge about MC remains limited. Specialists in the field have initiated the European Microscopic Colitis Group (EMCG) with the primary goal to create awareness on MC. The EMCG is furthermore a forum with the intention to promote...

  15. Martian Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The microscopic imager (circular device in center) is in clear view above the surface at Meridiani Planum, Mars, in this approximate true-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The image was taken on the 9th sol of the rover's journey. The microscopic imager is located on the rover's instrument deployment device, or arm. The arrow is pointing to the lens of the instrument. Note the dust cover, which flips out to the left of the lens, is open. This approximated color image was created using the camera's violet and infrared filters as blue and red.

  16. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  17. State Guidelines for Mental Retardation and Intellectual Disabilities: A Re-visitation of Previous Analyses in Light of Changes in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polloway, Edward A.; Patton, James R.; Smith, J. David; Lubin, Jacqueline; Antoine, Karian

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR) (Luckasson et al., 2002) revised their manual on mental retardation. It also extended the changes that had been made in the previous (1992) manual to further promote an alternative approach to definition and classification in the field. The study reported here sought to determine the…

  18. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  19. Light and scanning electron microscopic studies of Myxobolus indica n. sp. and a report of three Myxozoan (Myxosporea: Bivalvulida parasites of cultured ornamental goldfish, Carassius auratus L. for the first time in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandira Saha

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The ornamental fish industry is an economically viable sector in India which suffers from different ectoparasitic infestations, including the myxozoan parasites. An icthyoparasitological survey of myxozoan infections in ornamental fish farms in India revealed the presence of four myxozoan parasites belonging to the family Myxobolidae, in the genera Myxobolus and Thelohanellus. The myxozoan spores were small to large, spherical to ellipsoidal in size. The plasmodia measured 0.5–3.0 mm in diameter with disporic pansporoblasts and mature spores. During the survey the authors identified for the first time in India, three previously described species, namely, M. mehlhorni, T. nikolskii and T. batae; and one new species M. indica n. sp., all infecting the ornamental goldfish, Carassius auratus. The present study thus reports a new host, and a new locality for T. batae and M. mehlhorni. The description of T. nikolskii is the first record found in India. The spore of M. indica n. sp. measures 5.8 ± 0.2 × 4.1 ± 0.5 μm in size, having two equal shaped pyriform polar capsules measuring 4.1 ± 0.4 × 2.7 ± 0.6 μm. The results from a combination of light and scanning electron microscopic observations along with a comparison with closely related species were incorporated here. Molecular data is needed to complete the description of the new species.

  20. Sarcocystis calchasi sp. nov. of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) and the Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis): light and electron microscopical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olias, Philipp; Gruber, Achim D; Hafez, Hafez M; Heydorn, Alfred O; Mehlhorn, Heinz; Lierz, Michael

    2010-02-01

    A novel highly pathogenic Sarcocystis species has been shown to cycle between the Northern goshawk (Accipiter gentilis) as definitive host and the domestic pigeon (Columba livia f. domestica) as intermediate host. However, genetically based characteristics are only available from very few bird-infecting Sarcocystis species. We therefore further characterised morphological properties of this protozoan in both hosts. Using light and electron microscopy, oocysts and sporocysts as well as schizonts and sarcocysts were characterised and compared with available morphological features of previously reported Sarcocystis species of Northern goshawks, Columbidae and genetically closely related species of other avian hosts. Sporocysts shed from day 6 on after experimental infection by the Northern goshawk were of ovoid appearance (11.9 x 7.9 microm). Ultrastructurally, schizonts of all developmental stages were found in the liver, spleen and next to or in endothelial cells of various organs of domestic pigeons 7 to 12 days after experimental infection. The cyst wall surface of slender sarcocysts (1 to 2 mm in length and 20 to 50 microm in width) was smooth and lacked protrusions. Cystozoites were lancet-shaped and measured 7.5 x 1.5 microm in Giemsa stain smears. The morphological findings, when combined with data of experimental infection and genetic studies, convergently indicate that the recently discovered Sarcocystis species represents a new species. We therefore propose to name this parasite Sarcocystis calchasi species nova.

  1. Adding an Extra Dimension to What Students See through the Light Microscope: A Lab Exercise Demonstrating Critical Analysis for Microscopy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrill, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate lab exercise that demonstrates the importance of students thinking critically about what they see through a microscope. The students are given growth data from tip-growing organisms that suggest the cells grow in a pulsatile manner. The students then critique this data in several exercises that incorporate…

  2. Morphological description of Cosmocerca sp. (Nematoda: Cosmocerdidae) from the Mascarene grass frog Ptychadena cf. mascareniensis (Amphibia: Ptychadenidae). A light and scanning electron microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gaber, Rewaida; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Kamel, Reem; Maher, Sherein; El Deeb, Nashwa; Al Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2017-06-01

    The Mascarene grass frog Ptychadena cf. mascareniensis is a species of frog with a vast area of distribution in Africa. A total of 300 frog specimens were collected from different localities at El-Giza province, Egypt; then dissected and examined for the presence of parasitic infection. Only eighty six (28.66%) specimens were found to be naturally infected with nematode parasite. Seasonally, the prevalence of infection was reached its maximum value of 74.66% during summer and minimum values of 26.66% (20/75), 13.33% (10/75) during spring and autumn, respectively; while no records were observed during winter season. The morphology of the recovered parasite was studied by using light and scanning electron microscopy. The adult worm characterized by anterior extremity with small mouth opening being surrounded by three lips provided with four sub-median cephalic papillae and one pair of lateral amphids. Body measurements showed that male worms were smaller than females measuring 1.22-2.43 (2.21 ± 0.1) mm in length and 0.21-0.34 (0.29 ± 0.01) mm in width. Females measured 1.9-3.7 (2.8 ± 0.1) mm in length and 0.24-0.42 (0.38 ± 0.01) mm in width. Comparing the present parasite with other species of the same genus described previously, several similarities were observed. However, peculiar new characteristics such as the arrangement of plectanes and somatic papillae, the presence of gubernaculum, the position of nerve ring, excretory pore, and vulval opening make it reasonable belongs to the family Cosmocercidae and identified as Cosmocerca sp. In addition, the present study was the first report for occurrence of cosmocercid species from the Mascarene grass frog in Egypt.

  3. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  4. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Light is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind light, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  5. Solid state optical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ian T.

    1983-01-01

    A solid state optical microscope wherein wide-field and high-resolution images of an object are produced at a rapid rate by utilizing conventional optics with a charge-coupled photodiode array. A galvanometer scanning mirror, for scanning in one of two orthogonal directions is provided, while the charge-coupled photodiode array scans in the other orthogonal direction. Illumination light from the object is incident upon the photodiodes, creating packets of electrons (signals) which are representative of the illuminated object. The signals are then processed, stored in a memory, and finally displayed as a video signal.

  6. Photography with a Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fred; Oldfield, Ron

    2000-03-01

    This beautifully illustrated book describes the methods used to record images viewed through a microscope. The text describes the principles and practices of photomicrography, and is written for all who take photomicrographs, beginners and/or experienced practitioners. The authors describe techniques that may be applied to many disciplines for teaching, research, archives, or pleasure. The book includes chapters on standard photography, modern digital techniques, methods for improving contrast, and a short chapter on drawing. In addition to its value as a work of reference, the authors' clear, didactic style makes this book suitable as a textbook for courses in photomicrography and/or elementary light microscopy.

  7. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  8. Light-induced phase separation (LIPS) in [Fe(ptz)6](BF4)2 spin-crossover single crystals: Experimental data revisited through optical microscope investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varret, Francois; Chong, Christian; Boukheddaden, Kamel; Goujon, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the available experimental data for light-induced phase separation (LIPS) in the spin-crossover crystal [Fe(ptz) 6 ](BF 4 ) 2 . They are found in qualitative agreement with a spinodal instability process described by a macroscopic mean-field master equation. Sizable discrepancies with the model are discussed in terms of diffusion of light due to structural transformations of the crystal.

  9. Nanoparticle Imaging with Polarization Interferometric Nonlinear Confocal Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Kohei; Egami, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Polarization interferometric nonlinear confocal microscope has been developed for single nanoparticle analysis of drug delivery system (DDS). The microscope is a system based on a low cost and low power continuous wave (CW) laser light source. Also, the microscope observed shape anisotropy of the 200 nm diameter nanoparticle. According to nanoparticle imaging and CTF (contrast transfer function) curve observation of the microscope, three-dimensional resolution of the microscope measured up to...

  10. High-precision topography measurement through accurate in-focus plane detection with hybrid digital holographic microscope and white light interferometer module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liżewski, Kamil; Tomczewski, Sławomir; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kostencka, Julianna

    2014-04-10

    High-precision topography measurement of micro-objects using interferometric and holographic techniques can be realized provided that the in-focus plane of an imaging system is very accurately determined. Therefore, in this paper we propose an accurate technique for in-focus plane determination, which is based on coherent and incoherent light. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, a calibration of the imaging system with an amplitude object is performed with a common autofocusing method using coherent illumination, which allows for accurate localization of the in-focus plane position. In the second step, the position of the detected in-focus plane with respect to the imaging system is measured with white light interferometry. The obtained distance is used to accurately adjust a sample with the precision required for the measurement. The experimental validation of the proposed method is given for measurement of high-numerical-aperture microlenses with subwavelength accuracy.

  11. The illumination characteristics of operative microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutt, Christopher A; Redding, Brandon; Cao, Hui; Michaelides, Elias

    2015-01-01

    Modern operative microscopes use light sources which possess the power to severely damage underlying tissue. Currently, manufacturers provide a safety warning of this possibility. However, they are unable to suggest specific settings due to a stated "lack of scientific publications on this topic". We aim to radiometrically evaluate multiple otologic microscopes at variables which effect irradiance in order to determine reference emissions levels and provide guidelines for improved intraoperative safety. The optical radiance of four otologic microscopes was evaluated at variable field illumination sizes (spot size), intensity settings and working distances. The spectral emission of each microscope was separately measured. The energy absorbed in skin with representative properties was then calculated as a function of time for each microscope by accounting for the emission spectrum of the microscope and the absorption spectrum of skin. Microscopes showed a wide range of optical radiance based on model, spots size, intensity setting and working distances. Spectral emission of all four microscopes was centered in the visible spectrum with minimal ultraviolet or infrared contribution. A large amount of energy is absorbed by skin during usage of operative microscopes. The highest calculated absorption at 200 min of use was 736.26 J/cm(2). Operative microscopes have the ability to cause patient morbidity secondary to the energy they impart. In an effort to decrease potential injury we recommend that physicians be aware of their microscopes properties and how to control variables which effect irradiance of the skin. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Foldscope: origami-based paper microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S Cybulski

    Full Text Available Here we describe an ultra-low-cost origami-based approach for large-scale manufacturing of microscopes, specifically demonstrating brightfield, darkfield, and fluorescence microscopes. Merging principles of optical design with origami enables high-volume fabrication of microscopes from 2D media. Flexure mechanisms created via folding enable a flat compact design. Structural loops in folded paper provide kinematic constraints as a means for passive self-alignment. This light, rugged instrument can survive harsh field conditions while providing a diversity of imaging capabilities, thus serving wide-ranging applications for cost-effective, portable microscopes in science and education.

  13. Light and scanning electron microscopic study of the tongue in the estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis van Bénéden, 1864).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Juliana Plácido; Mari, Renata de Britto; Marigo, Juliana; Rosas, Fernando César Weber; Watanabe, Ii-Sei

    2011-08-01

    The importance of the tongue during feeding, and the limited information on the tongue of most aquatic mammals led us to investigate its morphological aspects in sexually immature and mature Sotalia guianensis. Six tongues were measured and photo-documented after their removal from the oral cavity. The samples were divided into rostral, middle, and caudal regions, and examined using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.). Sotalia guianensis tongue presented lateral grooves from the apex to the middle portion, while the anterolateral region presented marginal papillae. Histological characteristics revealed the presence of a keratinized stratified epithelium, salivary glands in the middle and caudal portions of the tongue, and filiform papillae in the caudal region. S.E.M. images revealed the presence of filiform papillae and ducts of salivary glands in the middle and caudal portions of the tongue. We can conclude that the characteristics found in this study may reflect an adaptation to changes in diet after weaning.

  14. Development and optimization of a "water window" microscope based on a gas-puff target laser-produced plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Alfio; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Węgrzyński, Łukasz; Fok, Tomasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2018-01-01

    A laser-plasma double stream gas-puff target source coupled with Fresnel zone plate (FZP) optics, operating at He-like nitrogen spectral line λ=2.88nm, is capable of acquire complementary information in respect to optical and electron microscopy, allowing to obtain high resolution imaging, compared to the traditional visible light microscopes, with an exposition time of a few seconds. The compact size and versatility of the microscope offers the possibility to perform imaging experiments in the university laboratories, previously restricted to large-scale photon facilities. Source and microscope optimization, and examples of applications will be presented and discussed.

  15. Light microscopic description of the effects of laser phototherapy on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate, bone morphogenetic proteins, and guided bone regeneration in a rodent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L B; Soares, Luiz G P; Aciole, Gilberth T S; Correia, Neandder A; Barbosa, Artur F S; Ramalho, Luciana M P; Dos Santos, Jean N

    2011-08-01

    We carried out a histological analysis on bone defects grafted with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) treated or not with laser, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Benefits of the use of MTA, laser, BMPs, and GBR on bone repair are well known, but there is no report on their association with laser light. Ninety rats were divided into 10 groups each subdivided into 3. Defects on G II and I were filled with the blood clot. G II was further irradiated with LED. G III and IV were filled with MTA; G IV was further irradiated with laser. G V and VI, the defects filled with MTA and covered with a membrane (GBR). G VI was further irradiated with laser. G VII and VIII, BMPs were added to the MTA and group VIII further irradiated with laser. G IX and X, the MTA + BMP graft was covered with a membrane (GBR). G X was further irradiated with laser. Laser light (λ = 850 nm, 150 mW, 4 J/cm(2) ) was applied over the defect at 48-h intervals and repeated for 15 days. Specimens were processed, cut and stained with H&E and Sirius red and underwent histological analysis. Subjects on group X were irradiated. The results showed different tissue response on all groups during the experimental time. Major changes were seen on irradiated subjects and included marked deposition of new bone in advanced maturation. It is concluded that near infrared laser phototherapy improved the results of the use of the MTA on bone defects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mecanoreceptores da mucosa palatina de avestruz (Struthio camelus: estudo ao microscópio de luz Mechanoreceptors of the palatine mucosa of ostrich (Struthio camelus: light microscope study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana P. Guimarães

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados corpúsculos de Herbst da mucosa palatina de avestruz em nível de microscopia de luz. Os corpúsculos compõem-se de uma cápsula externa, cápsula interna e axônio central. A cápsula externa apresentou numerosas lamelas, enquanto que a cápsula interna mostrou estrutura de folhas compactas. Os corpúsculos apresentaram formato ovalado ou circular e circundado por espessos feixes de fibras colágenas. Cada lamela estava composta de uma densa rede de fibras espessas. Os axônios terminais estavam situados ao longo do eixo, terminando em um bulbo terminal. As fibras da cápsula externa, coradas por Picrosirius e examinadas no microscópio óptico sob luz polarizada, revelou a presença de fibras colágenas do tipo I em verde e na região periférica observou-se grande quantidade de fibras colágenas do tipo III. Os corpúsculos apresentaram-se envoltos por células planas e envoltos por fibras colágenas.Herbst corpuscles of the palatine mucosa of ostrich were studied by light microscopy. The corpuscles are composed of an outer core, inner core and central nerve terminal. The outer core presents numerous lamellae, while the inner core shows compact structure of cytoplasm sheets. The corpuscles are elongate or oval in shape and are surrounded by bundles of collagen fibers. Each lamella is composed of a dense network of thick fibrils. The terminal axons are located along the axis and form a bulb terminal. The fibers of external core stained by Picrosirius and examined by polarized light microscopy revealed to be green in color like type I collagen fibers, and at the periphery is a large amount of collagen type III. The corpuscles are surrounded by flat cells and dense collagen fibers at the periphery.

  17. Weathered MC252 crude oil-induced anemia and abnormal erythroid morphology in double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) with light microscopic and ultrastructural description of Heinz bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Kendal E; Cunningham, Fred L; Pritsos, Chris A; Pritsos, Karen L; Muthumalage, Thivanka; Dorr, Brian S; Horak, Katherine E; Hanson-Dorr, Katie C; Dean, Karen M; Cacela, Dave; McFadden, Andrew K; Link, Jane E; Healy, Katherine A; Tuttle, Pete; Bursian, Steven J

    2017-12-01

    Injury assessment of birds following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in 2010 was part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment. One reported effect was hemolytic anemia with the presence of Heinz bodies (HB) in birds, however, the role of route and magnitude of exposure to oil is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to determine if double-crested cormorants (Phalacocorax auritis; DCCO) exposed orally and dermally to artificially weathered crude oil would develop hemolytic anemia including HB and reticulocytosis. In the oral experiment, sub-adult, mixed-sex DCCOs were fed control (n = 8) or oil-injected fish with a daily target dose of 5 (n = 9) or 10 (n = 9) ml oil/kg for 21 days. Then, subadult control (n = 12) and treated (n = 13) cormorant groups of similar sex-ratio were dermally treated with approximately 13ml of water or weathered MC252 crude oil, respectively, every 3 days for 6 dosages approximating 20% surface coverage. Collected whole blood samples were analyzed by light (new methylene blue) and transmission electron microscopy. Both oral and dermal treatment with weathered DWH MC252 crude oil induced regenerative, but inadequately compensated, anemia due to hemolysis and hematochezia as indicated by decreased packed cell volume, relative increase in reticulocytes with lack of difference in corrected reticulocyte count, and morphologic evidence of oxidant damage at the ultrastructural level. Hemoglobin precipitation, HB formation, degenerate organelles, and systemic oxidant damage were documented. Heinz bodies were typically <2µm in length and smaller than in mammals. These oblong cytoplasmic inclusions were difficult to see upon routine blood smear evaluation and lacked the classic button appearance found in mammalian red blood cells. They could be found as light, homogeneous blue inclusions upon new methylene blue staining. Ultrastructurally, HB appeared as homogeneous, electron-dense structures within the cytosol and lacked membranous

  18. A scanning electron microscope study of the pecten oculi of the black kite (Milvus migrans): possible involvement of melanosomes in protecting the pecten against damage by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiama, S.G.; Maina, J.N. [University Coll., Nairobi (Kenya). Faculty of Veterinary Science; Bhattacharjee, J. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Zoology; Weyrauch, K.D. [Free University of Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Veterinary Anatomy

    1994-12-01

    The pecten oculi of the black kite (Milvus migrans), a diurnally active bird of prey, has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. In this species the pecten consists of 12 highly vascularised pleats, held together apically by a heavily pigmented `bridge` and projects freely into the vitreous body in the ventral part of the eye cup. Ascending and descending blood vessels of varying calibre, together with a profuse network of capillaries, essentially constitute the vascular framework of the pecten. A distinct distribution of melansomes is discernible on the pecten, the concentration being highest at its apical end, moderate at the crest of the pleats and least at the basal and lateral margins. Overlying and within the vascular network, a close association between blood vessels and melanocytes is evident. It is conjectured that such an association may have evolved to augment the structural reinforcement of this nutritive organ in order to keep it firmly erectile within the gel-like vitreous. Such erectility may be an essential prerequisite for its optimal functioning, as well as in its overt use as a protective shield against the effects of ultraviolet light, which otherwise might lead to damage of the pectineal vessels. (author).

  19. A scanning electron microscope study of the pecten oculi of the black kite (Milvus migrans): possible involvement of melanosomes in protecting the pecten against damage by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiama, S.G.; Maina, J.N.; Bhattacharjee, J.; Weyrauch, K.D.

    1994-01-01

    The pecten oculi of the black kite (Milvus migrans), a diurnally active bird of prey, has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. In this species the pecten consists of 12 highly vascularised pleats, held together apically by a heavily pigmented 'bridge' and projects freely into the vitreous body in the ventral part of the eye cup. Ascending and descending blood vessels of varying calibre, together with a profuse network of capillaries, essentially constitute the vascular framework of the pecten. A distinct distribution of melansomes is discernible on the pecten, the concentration being highest at its apical end, moderate at the crest of the pleats and least at the basal and lateral margins. Overlying and within the vascular network, a close association between blood vessels and melanocytes is evident. It is conjectured that such an association may have evolved to augment the structural reinforcement of this nutritive organ in order to keep it firmly erectile within the gel-like vitreous. Such erectility may be an essential prerequisite for its optimal functioning, as well as in its overt use as a protective shield against the effects of ultraviolet light, which otherwise might lead to damage of the pectineal vessels. (author)

  20. Transmission positron microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Kogure, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Miyoshi; Kurihara, Toshikazu; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Oshima, Ryuichiro; Matsuya, Miyuki

    2006-01-01

    Immediate and near-future plans for transmission positron microscopes being built at KEK, Tsukuba, Japan, are described. The characteristic feature of this project is remolding a commercial electron microscope to a positron microscope. A point source of electrons kept at a negative high voltage is changed to a point source of positrons kept at a high positive voltage. Positional resolution of transmission microscopes should be theoretically the same as electron microscopes. Positron microscopes utilizing trapping of positrons have always positional ambiguity due to the diffusion of positrons

  1. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  2. A microscopic model of triangular arbitrage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, Yukihiro; Hatano, Naomichi

    2006-11-01

    We introduce a microscopic model which describes the dynamics of each dealer in multiple foreign exchange markets, taking account of the triangular arbitrage transaction. The model reproduces the interaction among the markets well. We explore the relation between the parameters of the present microscopic model and the spring constant of a macroscopic model that we proposed previously.

  3. A compact combined ultrahigh vacuum scanning tunnelling microscope (UHV STM) and near-field optical microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woolley, R A J; Hayton, J A; Cavill, S; Ma, Jin; Beton, P H; Moriarty, P

    2008-01-01

    We have designed and constructed a hybrid scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM)–scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) instrument which operates under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions. Indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated fibre-optic tips capable of high quality STM imaging and tunnelling spectroscopy are fabricated using a simple and reliable method which foregoes the electroless plating strategy previously employed by other groups. The fabrication process is reproducible, producing robust tips which may be exchanged under UHV conditions. We show that controlled contact with metal surfaces considerably enhances the STM imaging capabilities of fibre-optic tips. Light collection (from the cleaved back face of the ITO-coated fibre-optic tip) and optical alignment are facilitated by a simple two-lens arrangement where the in-vacuum collimation/collection lens may be adjusted using a slip-stick motor. A second in-air lens focuses the light (which emerges from the UHV system as a parallel beam) onto a cooled CCD spectrograph or photomultiplier tube. The application of the instrument to combined optical and electronic spectroscopy of Au and GaAs surfaces is discussed

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of the light microscope method to detect the eggs of Cardicola spp. in the gill filaments of the bluefin tuna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Abella, José F; Rodríguez-Llanos, Javier; Víllora-Montero, María; Mele, Salvatore; Raga, Juan A; Montero, Francisco E

    2017-11-30

    Trematode blood flukes of the genus Cardicola are potentially lethal in bluefin tuna cultures. The present study proposed a new method to detect aporocotylid eggs in tuna gills. Aporocotylid eggs were detected by analysing a pair of gill filaments of five transversal areas of the eight holobranches of one hundred Atlantic bluefin tuna and observed with glycerol and a stereomicroscope with an oblique brightfield. Data were gathered according to holobranches, transversal areas and their combination. Eggs were uniformly distributed among the holobranches, but they had the highest prevalence in the second and fifth transversal areas, which is controversial with respect to previous studies of egg distribution. An abbreviated method called the T-two test, which had the highest sensitivity (96.8%), is proposed for the detection of Cardicola spp. infections instead of the analysis all the holobranches. The T-two test limits the time and cost of the egg parasite screening analysis. The analyses of ten samples could be sufficient to detect the presence of parasites in farmed bluefin tuna; fish from the wild are expected to be less infected and more samples (45) would therefore be necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The Scanning Optical Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, C. J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the principle of the scanning optical microscope and explains its advantages over the conventional microscope in the improvement of resolution and contrast, as well as the possibility of producing a picture from optical harmonies generated within the specimen.

  6. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors. Localization by light microscopic autoradiography in rat brain using [3H][3-Me-His2]TRH as the radioligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantyh, P.W.; Hunt, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the central and peripheral nervous system. In the present report, we have used autoradiography coupled with densitometric analysis of tritium-sensitive film to investigate the distribution of [ 3 H][3-Me-His2]TRH [( 3 H]MeTRH)-binding sizes in the rat brain. Previous pharmacological reports have established that many of these [ 3 H]MeTRH-binding sites have a structure-activity profile consistent with being a physiological TRH receptor. A high level of TRH receptors were observed in the accessory olfactory bulb, lateral nucleus of the amygdala, dentate gyrus, and entorhinal cortex. Moderate levels of TRH receptors were observed in the rhinal cortex, hypothalamus, superior colliculus, several brainstem motor nuclei, and lamina I of the spinal trigeminal nucleus pars candalis, while low concentrations of receptors are present in the cerebral cortex, striatum and ventral horn of the spinal cord. Very low levels of receptors were observed in the globus pallidus and in most nuclei of the dorsal thalamus. Comparisons of the distribution of TRH receptors to TRH-immunoreactive content indicates that, while in some areas of the brain there is a rough correlation between levels of TRH peptide and its receptor, in most brain areas there is little obvious correlation between the two. While such a discrepancy has been observed for other peptides and their receptors, the extensive distribution of TRH receptors in the central nervous system does provide an explanation for the variety of behavioral effects observed when TRH is infused into the central nervous system

  7. Anisotropic contrast optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, D; Hofmann, T; Kananizadeh, N; Beeram, S; Rodriguez, E; Wimer, S; Rodenhausen, K B; Herzinger, C M; Kasputis, T; Pfaunmiller, E; Nguyen, A; Korlacki, R; Pannier, A; Li, Y; Schubert, E; Hage, D; Schubert, M

    2016-11-01

    An optical microscope is described that reveals contrast in the Mueller matrix images of a thin, transparent, or semi-transparent specimen located within an anisotropic object plane (anisotropic filter). The specimen changes the anisotropy of the filter and thereby produces contrast within the Mueller matrix images. Here we use an anisotropic filter composed of a semi-transparent, nanostructured thin film with sub-wavelength thickness placed within the object plane. The sample is illuminated as in common optical microscopy but the light is modulated in its polarization using combinations of linear polarizers and phase plate (compensator) to control and analyze the state of polarization. Direct generalized ellipsometry data analysis approaches permit extraction of fundamental Mueller matrix object plane images dispensing with the need of Fourier expansion methods. Generalized ellipsometry model approaches are used for quantitative image analyses. These images are obtained from sets of multiple images obtained under various polarizer, analyzer, and compensator settings. Up to 16 independent Mueller matrix images can be obtained, while our current setup is limited to 11 images normalized by the unpolarized intensity. We demonstrate the anisotropic contrast optical microscope by measuring lithographically defined micro-patterned anisotropic filters, and we quantify the adsorption of an organic self-assembled monolayer film onto the anisotropic filter. Comparison with an isotropic glass slide demonstrates the image enhancement obtained by our method over microscopy without the use of an anisotropic filter. In our current instrument, we estimate the limit of detection for organic volumetric mass within the object plane of ≈49 fg within ≈7 × 7 μm 2 object surface area. Compared to a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation instrumentation, where contemporary limits require a total load of ≈500 pg for detection, the instrumentation demonstrated here improves

  8. Only one previous owner .

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snieckus, Darius

    1999-01-01

    In the light of the large number of offshore platforms earmarked for decommissioning in the next 30 years, a case for re-use is advanced. Henk Vreeswijk of the Netherlands believes that governments should encourage re-use; it makes sense from both an economical and an environmental perspective. Indeed, in the Netherlands, platforms are now being produced with re-use in mind. Elf has recently taken the unprecedented step of advertising a used platform and a subsea installation on the internet. (UK)

  9. Scanning Microscopes Using X Rays and Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu

    2003-01-01

    Scanning microscopes that would be based on microchannel filters and advanced electronic image sensors and that utilize x-ray illumination have been proposed. Because the finest resolution attainable in a microscope is determined by the wavelength of the illumination, the xray illumination in the proposed microscopes would make it possible, in principle, to achieve resolutions of the order of nanometers about a thousand times as fine as the resolution of a visible-light microscope. Heretofore, it has been necessary to use scanning electron microscopes to obtain such fine resolution. In comparison with scanning electron microscopes, the proposed microscopes would likely be smaller, less massive, and less expensive. Moreover, unlike in scanning electron microscopes, it would not be necessary to place specimens under vacuum. The proposed microscopes are closely related to the ones described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles; namely, Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20218), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 22, No. 8 (August 1998), page 43; and Reflective Variants of Miniature Microscope Without Lenses (NPO-20610), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 9 (September 2002) page 6a. In all of these microscopes, the basic principle of design and operation is the same: The focusing optics of a conventional visible-light microscope are replaced by a combination of a microchannel filter and a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image detector. A microchannel plate containing parallel, microscopic-cross-section holes much longer than they are wide is placed between a specimen and an image sensor, which is typically the CCD. The microchannel plate must be made of a material that absorbs the illuminating radiation reflected or scattered from the specimen. The microchannels must be positioned and dimensioned so that each one is registered with a pixel on the image sensor. Because most of the radiation incident on the microchannel walls becomes absorbed, the radiation that reaches the

  10. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  11. Light microscopic description and histopathological effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In many mucosal cells of the intestine, cytoplasmic vacuolations were detected, while in submucosa, there was a collection of mononuclear macrophages with very abundant brown cytoplasm and congested blood vessels. The muscle layer also was affected. The liver of the infected fish revealed cytoplasmic vacuoles and a ...

  12. Microscopic theory of semiconductor light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kira, M.; Jahnke, Frank; Hoyer, W.; Koch, Stephan W.

    2000-07-01

    A fully quantum mechanical theory for a system of photons and Coulomb interacting electron-hole pairs in semiconductors is investigated. The resulting semiconductor luminescence equations are discussed and evaluated for a variety of examples. For a quantum-well system, it is shown how luminescence at the exciton resonance can result from an incoherent electron-hole plasma. Also changes in carrier lifetimes due to radiative recombination are studied.

  13. Light microscopic description and histopathological effects of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A species of Coccidia, Eimeria was found infecting the Nile catfish Chrysichthys auratus. The parasite was found aggregated in mucosa, submucosa and connective tissue between muscle bundles of the intestine, and also in the parenchymal tissue of the liver and the pancreas. The recorded stages were the maturing ...

  14. Lighting Van Leeuwenhoek's samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robertson, L.A.

    2017-01-01

    Possible techniques for lighting opaque samples while using Van Leeuwenhoek microscopes have been tested, and the results are presented in relation to published material. The design of the microscope causes the sample to be in shadow with any form of top lighting. It is therefore suggested that

  15. Cryogenic immersion microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2010-12-14

    A cryogenic immersion microscope whose objective lens is at least partially in contact with a liquid reservoir of a cryogenic liquid, in which reservoir a sample of interest is immersed is disclosed. When the cryogenic liquid has an index of refraction that reduces refraction at interfaces between the lens and the sample, overall resolution and image quality are improved. A combination of an immersion microscope and x-ray microscope, suitable for imaging at cryogenic temperatures is also disclosed.

  16. Analytical Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Titan 80-300 is a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with spectroscopic detectors to allow chemical, elemental, and other analytical measurements to...

  17. Mailing microscope slides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many insects feed agriculturally important crops, trees, and ornamental plants and cause millions of dollars of damage annually. Identification for some of these require the preparation of a microscope slide for examination. There are times when a microscope slide may need to be sent away to a speci...

  18. Confocal scanning microscope for nuclear photoemulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batusov, Yu.A.; Kovalev, Yu.S.; Soroko, L.M.

    2005-01-01

    The application of the confocal scanning microscope to the objects in the nuclear photoemulsion is described. An array of 27 microtomograms of single silver grain is shown. The cross sections of the same particle track of diameter 1 μm, detected by means of the confocal scanning microscope with open and annular apertures, are presented. It was shown that the confocal scanning microscope opens indeed new opportunities for the nuclear photoemulsion technique to get previously inaccessible information for physics of the short-living particles

  19. Optical alignment using the Point Source Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Robert E.; Kuhn, William P.

    2005-08-01

    We give an example of a Point Source Microscope (PSM) and describe its uses as an aid in the alignment of optical systems including the referencing of optical to mechanical datums. The PSM is a small package (about 100x150x30 mm), including a point source of light, beam splitter, microscope objective and digital CCD camera to detect the reflected light spot. A software package in conjunction with a computer video display locates the return image in three degrees of freedom relative to an electronic spatial reference point. The PSM also includes a Koehler illumination source so it may be used as a portable microscope for ordinary imaging and the microscope can be zoomed under computer control. For added convenience, the laser diode point source can be made quite bright to facilitate initial alignment under typical laboratory lighting conditions. The PSM is particularly useful in aligning optical systems that do not have circular symmetry or are distributed in space such as off-axis systems. The PSM is also useful for referencing the centers of curvatures of optical surfaces to mechanical datums of the structure in which the optics are mounted. By removing the microscope objective the PSM can be used as an electronic autocollimator because of the infinite conjugate optical design.

  20. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  1. Fluorescence microscope by using computational ghost imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fluorescence microscope by using the computational Ghost imaging (CGI for observing a living cell for a long duration over an hour. There is a problem for observing a cell about light-induced bleaching fora ling-term observation.Toover come the problem, we focused on an advantageof sensitivityof the CGI as second order colleration for an imaging with weak intensity excitation light. Setting for the CGI, a DMD projector was installed at an eye-piece part of a microscope and fluorescent light was detected using a bucket detectorofa photo-multiplier tube.Asaresults,wehaveshownthe imagingadvantageoftheCGI under weak light intensity, in addition, we have demonstrated to detect fluorescence images of biological samples for one day.

  2. Upgrade of a Scanning Confocal Microscope to a Single-Beam Path STED Microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Klauss

    Full Text Available By overcoming the diffraction limit in light microscopy, super-resolution techniques, such as stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy, are experiencing an increasing impact on life sciences. High costs and technically demanding setups, however, may still hinder a wider distribution of this innovation in biomedical research laboratories. As far-field microscopy is the most widely employed microscopy modality in the life sciences, upgrading already existing systems seems to be an attractive option for achieving diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy in a cost-effective manner. Here, we demonstrate the successful upgrade of a commercial time-resolved confocal fluorescence microscope to an easy-to-align STED microscope in the single-beam path layout, previously proposed as "easy-STED", achieving lateral resolution < λ/10 corresponding to a five-fold improvement over a confocal modality. For this purpose, both the excitation and depletion laser beams pass through a commercially available segmented phase plate that creates the STED-doughnut light distribution in the focal plane, while leaving the excitation beam unaltered when implemented into the joint beam path. Diffraction-unlimited imaging of 20 nm-sized fluorescent beads as reference were achieved with the wavelength combination of 635 nm excitation and 766 nm depletion. To evaluate the STED performance in biological systems, we compared the popular phalloidin-coupled fluorescent dyes Atto647N and Abberior STAR635 by labeling F-actin filaments in vitro as well as through immunofluorescence recordings of microtubules in a complex epithelial tissue. Here, we applied a recently proposed deconvolution approach and showed that images obtained from time-gated pulsed STED microscopy may benefit concerning the signal-to-background ratio, from the joint deconvolution of sub-images with different spatial information which were extracted from offline time gating.

  3. Microscopical advances in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, B

    2004-01-01

    In a series of papers carried out by this laboratory it was demonstrated that the quality of sterile males sperm, assessed submicroscopically and mathematically, is closely correlated with the success of the various procedures of assisted reproduction. If we attempt to select hypothetically optimal spermatozoa destined to the ICSI by light inverted microscopy, a considerable amount of ultrastructural information is lost and our selection is merely based on the motility. In this study we apply polarization microscopy to the ICSI technique, introducing polarizing and analyzing lenses in an inverted microscope model, operating in a transparent container. The retardation of the birefringence in the various organelles is evaluated by compensators, and the images are transmitted to a video system, and stored in a computer. Spermatozoa are maintained alive and perfectly motile in this polarizing inverted microscope, and the character of the birefringence is the same as in fixed and sectioned biological material examined by polarization microscopy. The birefringence of the sperm structures allows a sperm analysis closer to TEM than to phase contrast light microscopy analysis.

  4. Stick-on microscope for smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. M.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, I demonstrate a low cost light weight microscope device that is compatible with any smartphone camera. The device amplifies the imaging resolution of a smartphone camera by three orders of magnitude from millimeters to sub-micrometers, while costing approximately USD$ 2.

  5. Assessment of Petrological Microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathison, Charter Innes

    1990-01-01

    Presented is a set of procedures designed to check the design, ergonomics, illumination, function, optics, accessory equipment, and image quality of a microscope being considered for purchase. Functions for use in a petrology or mineralogy laboratory are stressed. (CW)

  6. Scanning Auger Electron Microscope

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A JEOL model 7830F field emission source, scanning Auger microscope.Specifications / Capabilities:Ultra-high vacuum (UHV), electron gun range from 0.1 kV to 25 kV,...

  7. Development and applications of the positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Progress on the positron microscope during the past year has been steady, and we currently project that initial microscope images can be collected during mid to late summer of 1992. Work during the year has mainly been divided among four areas of effort: hardware construction; power supply and control system development; radioactive source fabrication; and planning of initial experimental projects. Details of progress in these areas will be given below. An initial optical design of the microscope was completed during 1990, but during the past year, significant improvements have been made to this design, and several limiting cases of microscope performance have been evaluated. The results of these evaluations have been extremely encouraging, giving us strong indications that the optical performance of the microscope will be better than originally anticipated. In particular, we should be able to explore ultimate performance capabilities of positron microscopy using our currently planned optical system, with improvements only in the image detector system, and the positron-source/moderator configuration. We should be able to study imaging reemission microscopy with resolutions approaching 10 Angstrom and be able to produce beam spots for rastered microscope work with diameters below the 1000 Angstrom diffusion limit. Because of these exciting new possibilities, we have decided to upgrade several microscope subsystems to levels consistent with ultimate performance earlier in our construction schedule than we had previously intended. In particular, alignment facilities in the optical system, vibration isolation, and power supply and control system flexibility have all been upgraded in their design over the past year

  8. Optical microscope and method for obtaining an optical image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garini, Y.; Young, I.T.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to an optical microscope, comprising, at least a light source, a carrier for an object to be examined, a detector for registering the illuminated object, and a light path that during operation runs substantially from the light source to the object and form the object to the

  9. Miniaturized integration of a fluorescence microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Kunal K.; Burns, Laurie D.; Cocker, Eric D.; Nimmerjahn, Axel; Ziv, Yaniv; Gamal, Abbas El; Schnitzer, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The light microscope is traditionally an instrument of substantial size and expense. Its miniaturized integration would enable many new applications based on mass-producible, tiny microscopes. Key prospective usages include brain imaging in behaving animals towards relating cellular dynamics to animal behavior. Here we introduce a miniature (1.9 g) integrated fluorescence microscope made from mass-producible parts, including semiconductor light source and sensor. This device enables high-speed cellular-level imaging across ∼0.5 mm2 areas in active mice. This capability allowed concurrent tracking of Ca2+ spiking in >200 Purkinje neurons across nine cerebellar microzones. During mouse locomotion, individual microzones exhibited large-scale, synchronized Ca2+ spiking. This is a mesoscopic neural dynamic missed by prior techniques for studying the brain at other length scales. Overall, the integrated microscope is a potentially transformative technology that permits distribution to many animals and enables diverse usages, such as portable diagnostics or microscope arrays for large-scale screens. PMID:21909102

  10. The optics of microscope image formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    Although geometric optics gives a good understanding of how the microscope works, it fails in one critical area, which is explaining the origin of microscope resolution. To accomplish this, one must consider the microscope from the viewpoint of physical optics. This chapter describes the theory of the microscope-relating resolution to the highest spatial frequency that a microscope can collect. The chapter illustrates how Huygens' principle or construction can be used to explain the propagation of a plane wave. It is shown that this limit increases with increasing numerical aperture (NA). As a corollary to this, resolution increases with decreasing wavelength because of how NA depends on wavelength. The resolution is higher for blue light than red light. Resolution is dependent on contrast, and the higher the contrast, the higher the resolution. This last point relates to issues of signal-to-noise and dynamic range. The use of video and new digital cameras has necessitated redefining classical limits such as those of Rayleigh's criterion. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microscopic morphology of nitrogen fixing paranodules on wheat roots

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The size of paranodules did not increase during subsequent plant growth. Light microscopic examination and scanning electron microscope showed a large number of bacteria within the mucigel. In ultra thin sections of the nodule, bacterial cells were found in the intercellular space of the paranodules. In the latter case, ...

  12. Electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope with ultra-high resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inami, Wataru; Nakajima, Kentaro; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2010-06-07

    We propose electron beam excitation assisted optical microscope, and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.

  13. Light, Matter, and Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall

    Interaction of light and matter produces the appearance of materials. To deal with the immense complexity of nature, light and matter is modelled at a macroscopic level in computer graphics. This work is the first to provide the link between the microscopic physical theories of light and matter a...

  14. Electron microscope studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-07-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations.

  15. Electron microscope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crewe, A.V.; Kapp, O.H.

    1992-01-01

    This is a report covering the research performed in the Crewe laboratory between 1964 and 1992. Because of limitations of space we have provided relatively brief summaries of the major research directions of the facility during these years. A complete bibliography has been included and we have referenced groups of pertinent publications at the beginning of each section. This report summarizes our efforts to develop better electron microscopes and chronicles many of the experimental programs, in materials science and biology, that acted both as a stimulus to better microscope design and also as a testing ground for many instrumental innovations

  16. Phase-shifting interference microscope with extendable field of measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Hsu, Wei-Feng; Wang, Ming-Shiang

    2018-04-01

    An innovative phase-shifting interference microscope aimed at extending the field of measurement is proposed in this paper. The microscope comprises a light source module, a phase modulation module, and an interferometric module, which reconstructs the micro-structure contours of samples using the five-step phase-shifting algorithm. This paper discusses the measurement theory and outlines the configuration, experimental setup, and experimental results obtained using the proposed interference microscope. The results confirm the efficacy of the microscope, achieving a standard deviation of 2.4 nm from a step height of 86.2 nm in multiple examinations.

  17. Polarized Light Corridor Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G. R.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven demonstrations of light polarization are presented. Each includes a brief description of the apparatus and the effect demonstrated. Illustrated are strain patterns, reflection, scattering, the Faraday Effect, interference, double refraction, the polarizing microscope, and optical activity. (CW)

  18. Scanning transmission electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruit, P.

    2006-01-01

    The invention relates to a scanning transmission electron microscope comprising an electron source, an electron accelerator and deflection means for directing electrons emitted by the electron source at an object to be examined, and in addition a detector for detecting electrons coming from the

  19. MICROSCOPIC, PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND CHROMATOGRAPHIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peters

    MICROSCOPIC, PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND CHROMATOGRAPHIC. FINGERPRINTS OF LEAVES OF NIGERIAN CASSIA TORA LINN. Fatokun Omolola T1*., EsievoKevwe B2., Ugbabe Grace E3. and Kunle Oluyemisi F4. Department of Medicinal Plant Research and Traditional Medicine, National Institute for.

  20. SPM: Scanning positron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Dickmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Munich scanning positron microscope, operated by the Universität der Bundeswehr München and the Technische Universität München, located at NEPOMUC, permits positron lifetime measurements with a lateral resolution in the µm range and within an energy range of 1 – 20 keV.

  1. Microscope on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken at Meridiani Planum, Mars by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the rover's microscopic imager (circular device in center), located on its instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' The image was acquired on the ninth martian day or sol of the rover's mission.

  2. Making Art with Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedis-Grab, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Interdisciplinary teaching is a great way to focus on overarching concepts and help students make connections across disciplines. Historically, art and science have been connected disciplines. The botanical prints of the 18th and 19th centuries and early work with microscopes are two examples of a need for strong artistic skills in the science…

  3. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  4. Designs for a quantum electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruit, P; Hobbs, R G; Kim, C-S; Yang, Y; Manfrinato, V R; Hammer, J; Thomas, S; Weber, P; Klopfer, B; Kohstall, C; Juffmann, T; Kasevich, M A; Hommelhoff, P; Berggren, K K

    2016-05-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This 'quantum weirdness' could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or "quantum electron microscope". A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Microscopic dynamical Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Impens, François; Neto, Paulo A. Maia

    2018-03-01

    We consider an atom in its ground state undergoing a nonrelativistic oscillation in free space. The interaction with the electromagnetic quantum vacuum leads to two effects to leading order in perturbation theory. When the mechanical frequency is larger than the atomic transition frequency, the dominant effect is the motion-induced transition to an excited state with the emission of a photon carrying the excess energy. We compute the angular distribution of emitted photons and the excitation rate. On the other hand, when the mechanical frequency is smaller than the transition frequency, the leading-order effect is the parametric emission of photon pairs, which constitutes the microscopic counterpart of the dynamical Casimir effect. We discuss the properties of the microscopic dynamical Casimir effect and build a connection with the photon production by an oscillating macroscopic metallic mirror.

  6. Ion photon emission microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  7. Neuromorphic Data Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naegle, John H.; Suppona, Roger A.; Aimone, James Bradley; James, Conrad D.; Follett, David R.; Townsend, Duncan C.M.; Follett, Pamela L.; Karpman, Gabe D.

    2017-08-01

    In 2016, Lewis Rhodes Labs, (LRL), shipped the first commercially viable Neuromorphic Processing Unit, (NPU), branded as a Neuromorphic Data Microscope (NDM). This product leverages architectural mechanisms derived from the sensory cortex of the human brain to efficiently implement pattern matching. LRL and Sandia National Labs have optimized this product for streaming analytics, and demonstrated a 1,000x power per operation reduction in an FPGA format. When reduced to an ASIC, the efficiency will improve to 1,000,000x. Additionally, the neuromorphic nature of the device gives it powerful computational attributes that are counterintuitive to those schooled in traditional von Neumann architectures. The Neuromorphic Data Microscope is the first of a broad class of brain-inspired, time domain processors that will profoundly alter the functionality and economics of data processing.

  8. Imaging differential polarization microscope with electronic readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickols, W.; Tinoco, I.; Katz, J.E.; Maestre, M.F.; Bustamante, C.

    1985-01-01

    A differential polarization microscope forms two images: one of the transmitted intensity and the other due to the change in intensity between images formed when different polarizations of light are used. The interpretation of these images for linear dichroism and circular dichroism are described. The design constraints on the data acquisition systems and the polarization modulation are described. The advantage of imaging several biological systems which contain optically anisotropic structures are described

  9. The microscopic structure of the hydrogen liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, M; Celli, M; Cuello, G J; Formisano, F; Guarini, E; Magli, R; Neumann, M

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the microscopic structure of liquid para-hydrogen by means of a neutron diffraction experiment on the D4C liquids diffractometer at Institute Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). This is the first direct neutron diffraction measurement of the static structure factor of hydrogen. The present determination of the microscopic structure of hydrogen is consistent with previous experimental determinations carried out on liquid deuterium and with path integral Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison with recent x-ray determinations is also satisfactory.

  10. Virtual pinhole confocal microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, J.S.; Rector, D.M.; Ranken, D.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Biophysics Group; Peterson, B. [SciLearn Inc. (United States); Kesteron, J. [VayTech Inc. (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Scanned confocal microscopes enhance imaging capabilities, providing improved contrast and image resolution in 3-D, but existing systems have significant technical shortcomings and are expensive. Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel approach--virtual pinhole confocal microscopy--that uses state of the art illumination, detection, and data processing technologies to produce an imager with a number of advantages: reduced cost, faster imaging, improved efficiency and sensitivity, improved reliability and much greater flexibility. Work at Los Alamos demonstrated proof of principle; prototype hardware and software have been used to demonstrate technical feasibility of several implementation strategies. The system uses high performance illumination, patterned in time and space. The authors have built functional confocal imagers using video display technologies (LCD or DLP) and novel scanner based on a micro-lens array. They have developed a prototype system for high performance data acquisition and processing, designed to support realtime confocal imaging. They have developed algorithms to reconstruct confocal images from a time series of spatially sub-sampled images; software development remains an area of active development. These advances allow the collection of high quality confocal images (in fluorescence, reflectance and transmission modes) with equipment that can inexpensively retrofit to existing microscopes. Planned future extensions to these technologies will significantly enhance capabilities for microscopic imaging in a variety of applications, including confocal endoscopy, and confocal spectral imaging.

  11. Thermal Lens Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Kenji; Hibara, Akihide; Kimura, Hiroko; Sawada, Tsuguo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2000-09-01

    We developed a novel laser microscope based on the thermal lens effect induced by a coaxial beam comprised of excitation and probe beams. The signal generation mechanism was confirmed to be an authentic thermal lens effect from the measurement of signal and phase dependences on optical configurations between the sample and the probe beam focus, and therefore, the thermal lens effect theory could be applied. Two-point spatial resolution was determined by the spot size of the excitation beam, not by the thermal diffusion length. Sensitivity was quite high, and the detection ability, evaluated using a submicron microparticle containing dye molecules, was 0.8 zmol/μm2, hence a distribution image of trace chemical species could be obtained quantitatively. In addition, analytes are not restricted to fluorescent species, therefore, the thermal lens microscope is a promising analytical microscope. A two-dimensional image of a histamine molecule distribution, which was produced in mast cells at the femtomole level in a human nasal mucous polyp, was obtained.

  12. Microscopic optoelectronic defectoscopy of solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallaeva D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning probe microscopes are powerful tool for micro- or nanoscale diagnostics of defects in crystalline silicon solar cells. Solar cell is a large p-n junction semiconductor device. Its quality is strongly damaged by the presence of defects. If the cell works under low reverse-biased voltage, defects emit a light in visible range. The suggested method combines three different measurements: electric noise measurement, local topography and near-field optical beam induced current and thus provides more complex information. To prove its feasibility, we have selected one defect (truncated pyramid in the sample, which emitted light under low reverse-biased voltage.

  13. Q: How do Microscopes Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimov, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This brief article describes the many types of microscopes and how they are used in different scientific venues.

  14. Neutron microscope with refractive wedge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masalovich, S.V.

    1990-01-01

    A possibility of applying a refractive element in a mirror-neutron microscope using ultracold neutrons to reduce neutron aberrations is considered. Application of a refractive element in a neutron microscope with horizontal optical axis is studied. A scheme of neutron microscope with a refractive wedge is presented, evaluation of quartz wedge parameters is made. It is stressed that application of refractive elements in neutron microscopes facilitates aberration reduction in neutron-optical systems

  15. Hyaline ring granuloma: a case report with histochemical and polarized microscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S K; Chiang, C P; Ou, S H; Wang, J T; Liu, B Y; Lan, W H

    1993-11-01

    An unusual case of hyaline ring granuloma arising from the connective tissue wall of a residual apical periodontal cyst is reported. Hyaline rings with foreign-body type giant cell inclusions were a significant feature in the histopathologic diagnosis. Histochemical and polarized light microscopic studies suggested that the introduction of foreign material, possibly cellulose, through the postextraction socket into the cystic wall may have caused the granulomatous reaction and formation of the hyaline ring granuloma. The clinical features of this case and 66 previously reported cases, as well as the pathogenesis of the hyaline rings, are discussed.

  16. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  17. A compact scanning soft X-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trail, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Soft x-ray microscopes operating at wavelengths between 2.3 nm and 4.4 nm are capable of imaging wet biological cells with a resolution many times that of a visible light microscope. Several such soft x-ray microscopes have been constructed. However, with the exception of contact microscopes, all use synchrotrons as the source of soft x-ray radiation and Fresnel zone plates as the focusing optics. These synchrotron based microscopes are very successful but have the disadvantage of limited access. This dissertation reviews the construction and performance of a compact scanning soft x-ray microscope whose size and accessibility is comparable to that of an electron microscope. The microscope uses a high-brightness laser-produced plasma as the soft x-ray source and normal incidence multilayer-coated mirrors in a Schwarzschild configuration as the focusing optics. The microscope operates at a wavelength of 14 nm, has a spatial resolution of 0.5 μm, and has a soft x-ray photon flux through the focus of 10 4 -10 5 s -1 when operated with only 170 mW of average laser power. The complete system, including the laser, fits on a single 4' x 8' optical table. The significant components of the compact microscope are the laser-produced plasma (LPP) source, the multilayer coatings, and the Schwarzschild objective. These components are reviewed, both with regard to their particular use in the current microscope and with regard to extending the microscope performance to higher resolution, higher speed, and operation at shorter wavelengths. Measurements of soft x-ray emission and debris emission from our present LPP source are presented and considerations given for an optimal LPP source. The LPP source was also used as a broadband soft x-ray source for measurement of normal incidence multilayer mirror reflectance in the 10-25 nm spectral region

  18. Electron microscope phase enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2010-06-15

    A microfabricated electron phase shift element is used for modifying the phase characteristics of an electron beam passing though its center aperture, while not affecting the more divergent portion of an incident beam to selectively provide a ninety-degree phase shift to the unscattered beam in the back focal plan of the objective lens, in order to realize Zernike-type, in-focus phase contrast in an electron microscope. One application of the element is to increase the contrast of an electron microscope for viewing weakly scattering samples while in focus. Typical weakly scattering samples include biological samples such as macromolecules, or perhaps cells. Preliminary experimental images demonstrate that these devices do apply a ninety degree phase shift as expected. Electrostatic calculations have been used to determine that fringing fields in the region of the scattered electron beams will cause a negligible phase shift as long as the ratio of electrode length to the transverse feature-size aperture is about 5:1. Calculations are underway to determine the feasibility of aspect smaller aspect ratios of about 3:1 and about 2:1.

  19. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  20. Auricular burns associated with operating microscope use during otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latuska, Richard F; Carlson, Matthew L; Neff, Brian A; Driscoll, Colin L; Wanna, George B; Haynes, David S

    2014-02-01

    To raise awareness of the potential hazard of auricular burns associated with operating microscope use during otologic surgery. Retrospective case series and summary of the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database of voluntary adverse event reports pertaining to microscope related auricular thermal injuries. All patients who sustained auricular burns while using the operating microscope during otologic surgery at 2 tertiary academic referral centers. Surgical procedure, microscope model, intensity of illumination, length of procedure, focal length, location and severity of burn, and patient outcome. A total of 4 microscope-related auricular thermal injuries were identified from the authors' institutions. Additionally, 82 unique cases of soft tissue burns associated with the use of an operative microscope have been voluntarily reported to the FDA since 2004. A disproportionately large percent (∼ 30%) of these occurred within the field of otology, the majority of which were during tympanoplasty or tympanomastoidectomy procedures at focal length distances of 300 mm or less with xenon light source microscopes. Simultaneous advancements in light delivery technologies and lens optics have continued to improve the efficiency of the operating microscope; however, these improvements also increase the potential for thermal injuries. Although rare, a review of the FDA MAUDE database suggests that microscope-related soft tissue burns occur more frequently in otology than any other surgical specialty. A variety of factors may help explain this finding, including the unique anatomy of the external ear with thin skin and limited underlying adipose tissue. Preventative measures should be taken to decrease the risk of thermal injuries including use of the lowest comfortable light intensity, adjusting the aperture width to match the operative field, frequent wound irrigation, and covering exposed portions of the pinna

  1. Mice embryology: a microscopic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, Maria Letícia Baptista; Lessa, Thais Borges; Russo, Fabiele Baldino; Fernandes, Renata Avancini; Kfoury, José Roberto; Braga, Patricia Cristina Baleeiro Beltrão; Miglino, Maria Angélica

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we studied the embryology of mice of 12, 14, and 18 days of gestation by gross observation, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Grossly, the embryos of 12 days were observed in C-shaped region of the brain, eye pigmentation of the retina, first, second, and third pharyngeal arches gill pit nasal region on the fourth ventricle brain, cervical curvature, heart, liver, limb bud thoracic, spinal cord, tail, umbilical cord, and place of the mesonephric ridge. Microscopically, the liver, cardiovascular system and spinal cord were observed. In the embryo of 14 days, we observed structures that make up the liver and heart. At 18 days of gestation fetuses, it was noted the presence of eyes, mouth, and nose in the cephalic region, chest and pelvic region with the presence of well-developed limbs, umbilical cord, and placenta. Scanning electron microscopy in 18 days of gestation fetuses evidenced head, eyes closed eyelids, nose, vibrissae, forelimb, heart, lung, kidney, liver, small bowel, diaphragm, and part of the spine. The results obtained in this work describe the internal and external morphology of mice, provided by an integration of techniques and review of the morphological knowledge of the embryonic development of this species, as this animal is of great importance to scientific studies. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Microscopic entropy and nonlocality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpov, E.; Ordonets, G.; Petroskij, T.; Prigozhin, I.

    2003-01-01

    We have obtained a microscopic expression for entropy in terms of H function based on nonunitary Λ transformation which leads from the time evolution as a unitary group to a Markovian dynamics and unifies the reversible and irreversible aspects of quantum mechanics. This requires a new representation outside the Hilbert space. In terms of H, we show the entropy production and the entropy flow during the emission and absorption of radiation by an atom. Analyzing the time inversion experiment, we emphasize the importance of pre- and postcollisional correlations, which break the symmetry between incoming and outgoing waves. We consider the angle dependence of the H function in a three-dimensional situation. A model including virtual transitions is discussed in a subsequent paper

  3. Embryos, microscopes, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maienschein, Jane

    2016-06-01

    Embryos have different meanings for different people and in different contexts. Seen under the microscope, the biological embryo starts out as one cell and then becomes a bunch of cells. Gradually these divide and differentiate to make up the embryo, which in humans becomes a fetus at eight weeks, and then eventually a baby. At least, that happens in those cases that carry through normally and successfully. Yet a popular public perception imagines the embryo as already a little person in the very earliest stages of development, as if it were predictably to become an adult. In actuality, cells can combine, pull apart, and recombine in a variety of ways and still produce embryos, whereas most embryos never develop into adults at all. Biological embryos and popular imaginations of embryos diverge. This paper looks at some of the historical reasons for and social implications of that divergence. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Microscopic Theory of Transconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Jauho

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of momentum transfer between two closely spaced mesoscopic electronic systems, which couple via Coulomb interaction but where tunneling is inhibited, have proven to be a fruitful method of extracting information about interactions in mesoscopic systems. We report a fully microscopic theory for transconductivity σ12, or, equivalently, momentum transfer rate between the system constituents. Our main formal result expresses the transconductivity in terms of two fluctuation diagrams, which are topologically related, but not equivalent to, the Azlamazov-Larkin and Maki-Thompson diagrams known for superconductivity. In the present paper the magnetic field dependence of σ12 is discussed, and we find that σ12(B is strongly enhanced over its zero field value, and it displays strong features, which can be understood in terms of a competition between density-of-states and screening effects.

  5. Optical coherence tomography-enhanced microlaryngoscopy: preliminary report of a noncontact optical coherence tomography system integrated with a surgical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokes, David E; Jackson, Ryan; Guo, Shuguang; Perez, Jorge A; Su, Jianping; Ridgway, James M; Armstrong, William B; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-07-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a new imaging modality that uses near-infrared light to produce cross-sectional images of tissue with a resolution approaching that of light microscopy. We have previously reported use of OCT imaging of the vocal folds (VFs) during direct laryngoscopy with a probe held in contact or near-contact with the VFs. This aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel OCT system integrated with a surgical microscope to allow hands-free OCT imaging of the VFs, which could be performed simultaneously with microscopic visualization. We performed a prospective evaluation of a new method of acquiring OCT images of the VFs. An OCT system was successfully integrated with a surgical microscope to permit noncontact OCT imaging of the VFs of 10 patients. With this novel device we were able to identify VF epithelium and lamina propria; however, the resolution was reduced compared to that achieved with the standard contact or near-contact OCT. Optical coherence tomography is able to produce high-resolution images of vocal fold mucosa to a maximum depth of 1.6 mm. It may be used in the diagnosis of VF lesions, particularly early squamous cell carcinoma, in which OCT can show disruption of the basement membrane. Mounting the OCT device directly onto the operating microscope allows hands-free noncontact OCT imaging and simultaneous conventional microscopic visualization of the VFs. However, the lateral resolution of the OCT microscope system is 50 microm, in contrast to the conventional handheld probe system (10 microm). Although such images at this resolution are still useful clinically, improved resolution would enhance the system's performance, potentially enabling real-time OCT-guided microsurgery of the larynx.

  6. Analytical model of the optical vortex microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płocinniczak, Łukasz; Popiołek-Masajada, Agnieszka; Masajada, Jan; Szatkowski, Mateusz

    2016-04-20

    This paper presents an analytical model of the optical vortex scanning microscope. In this microscope the Gaussian beam with an embedded optical vortex is focused into the sample plane. Additionally, the optical vortex can be moved inside the beam, which allows fine scanning of the sample. We provide an analytical solution of the whole path of the beam in the system (within paraxial approximation)-from the vortex lens to the observation plane situated on the CCD camera. The calculations are performed step by step from one optical element to the next. We show that at each step, the expression for light complex amplitude has the same form with only four coefficients modified. We also derive a simple expression for the vortex trajectory of small vortex displacements.

  7. Design considerations of a real-time clinical confocal microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Barry R.

    1991-06-01

    A real-time clinical confocal light microscope provides the ophthalmologist with a new tool for the observation of the cornea and the ocular lens. In addition, the ciliary body, the iris, and the sclera can be observed. The real-time light microscopic images have high contrast and resolution. The transverse resolution is about one half micron and the range resolution is one micron. The following observations were made with visible light: corneal epithelial cells, wing cells, basal cells, Bowman's membrane, nerve fibers, basal lamina, fibroblast nuclei, Descemet's membrane, endothelial cells. Observation of the in situ ocular lens showed lens capsule, lens epithelium, lens fibrils, the interior of lens fibrils. The applications of the confocal microscope include: eye banking, laser refractive surgery, observation of wound healing, observation of the iris, the sciera, the ciliary body, the ocular lens, and the intraocular lens. Digital image processing can produce three-dimensional reconstructions of the cornea and the ocular lens.

  8. Femtosecond photoelectron point projection microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinonez, Erik; Handali, Jonathan; Barwick, Brett

    2013-01-01

    By utilizing a nanometer ultrafast electron source in a point projection microscope we demonstrate that images of nanoparticles with spatial resolutions of the order of 100 nanometers can be obtained. The duration of the emission process of the photoemitted electrons used to make images is shown to be of the order of 100 fs using an autocorrelation technique. The compact geometry of this photoelectron point projection microscope does not preclude its use as a simple ultrafast electron microscope, and we use simple analytic models to estimate temporal resolutions that can be expected when using it as a pump-probe ultrafast electron microscope. These models show a significant increase in temporal resolution when comparing to ultrafast electron microscopes based on conventional designs. We also model the microscopes spectroscopic abilities to capture ultrafast phenomena such as the photon induced near field effect

  9. Microscopic techniques in biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoppert, M

    2003-01-01

    ... techniques. Over the past 50 years, electron microscopy has opened new pathways for biologists to understand structure-function interrelations at the subcellular level. New lightbased optical techniques involving the detection of fluorescent molecules have introduced a new dimension of imaging into light microscopy, enabling cellular events to be studied in vivo d...

  10. Scanning Electron Microscope Analysis System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides the capability to examine surfaces microscopically with high resolution (5 nanometers), perform micro chemical analyses of these surfaces, and...

  11. A microscope for Fermi gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    This thesis reports on a novel quantum gas microscope to investigate many-body systems of fermionic atoms in optical lattices. Single-site resolved imaging of ultracold lattice gases has enabled powerful studies of bosonic quantum many-body systems. The extension of this capability to Fermi gases offers new prospects to studying complex phenomena of strongly correlated systems, for which numerical simulations are often out of reach. Using standard techniques of laser cooling, optical trapping, and evaporative cooling, ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li are prepared and loaded into a large-scale 2D optical lattice of flexible geometry. The atomic distribution is frozen using a second, short-scaled lattice, where we perform Raman sideband cooling to induce fluorescence on each atom while maintaining its position. Together with high-resolution imaging, the fluorescence signals allow for reconstructing the initial atom distribution with single-site sensitivity and high fidelity. Magnetically driven evaporative cooling in the plane allows for producing degenerate Fermi gases with almost unity filling in the initial lattice, allowing for the first microscopic studies of ultracold gases with clear signatures of Fermi statistics. By preparing an ensemble of spin-polarised Fermi gases, we detect a flattening of the density profile towards the centre of the cloud, which is a characteristic of a band-insulating state. In one set of experiments, we demonstrate that losses of atom pairs on a single lattice site due to light-assisted collisions are circumvented. The oversampling of the second lattice allows for deterministic separation of the atom pairs into different sites. Compressing a high-density sample in a trap before loading into the lattice leads to many double occupancies of atoms populating different bands, which we can image with no evidence for pairwise losses. We therefore gain direct access to the true number statistics on each lattice site. Using this feature, we can

  12. Thermal Variations of Operative Microscopes in Otology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, T Edward; Tampio, Alex J; Nicholas, Brian D

    2017-07-01

    Objectives (1) Measure temperature variations achieved by common otomicroscopes. (2) Raise awareness about possible thermal injury during otologic procedures with the advent of newer, high-powered otomicroscopes. (3) Describe optical technology that aims to reduce the potential for thermal injury. Methods A variety of otomicroscopes, with different light sources (ranging from 100W halogen to 300W xenon), were studied. Temperatures were recorded from human auricular skin with a noncontact infrared thermometer at various microscope light intensities and with use of irrigation. Multiple recordings were done at 5-minute intervals, and a working distance of 225 mm was maintained. Results Maximum skin temperatures were found to plateau relatively quickly, with higher-wattage xenon light sources reaching greater temperatures. One-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in temperatures with decreased light intensities. High-wattage xenon light sources reached significantly higher temperatures when compared with halogen models. Discussion There is substantial variation in maximal skin temperatures reached by otomicroscopes. Temperatures can be decreased to safe levels by reducing light intensity and with use of irrigation. The maximum temperature obtained in our study was 41.4°C. Second-degree skin burns have been described with prolonged exposures to temperatures >44°C. Implications for Practice Given the described potential for burns, surgeons performing procedures on the ear and temporal bone should take precautions to diminish temperature in the operative field.

  13. Photon scanning tunneling microscope in combination with a force microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Moers, M.H.P.; Tack, R.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Bölger, B.; Bölger, B.

    1994-01-01

    The simultaneous operation of a photon scanning tunneling microscope with an atomic force microscope is presented. The use of standard atomic force silicon nitride cantilevers as near-field optical probes offers the possibility to combine the two methods. Vertical forces and torsion are detected

  14. The Latest in Handheld Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wighting, Mervyn J.; Lucking, Robert A.; Christmann, Edwin P.

    2004-01-01

    Around 1590, Zacharias Jansenn of Holland invented the microscope. Jansenn, an eyeglass maker by trade, experimented with lenses and discovered that things appeared closer with combinations of lenses. Over the past 400 years, several refinements to microscopes have occurred, making it possible to magnify objects between 200 and 1,500 times their…

  15. Midfield microscope : Exploring the extraordinary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Docter, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis the development of the midfield microscope is presented. This is a microscope in which the extraordinary transmission (EOT) through sub-wavelength hole-arrays is applied. Before trying to combine microscopy and EOT, we look at them separately. In chapter 1 an overview is given of the

  16. Testing experiment of KBA X-ray microscope in laser prototype facility using Ni-grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jianjun; Cao Zhurong; Yuan Yongteng; Zhan Xiayu; Liu Shenye; Ding Yongkun

    2010-01-01

    The KBA microscope imaging is simulated by ray-tracing calculation which can determine the direction of optical axis and obtain geometrical modulation transfer function (GMTF) of KBA microscope. According to the simulation results, a new method is proposed for the aiming and adjustment of KBA microscope at the laser prototype facility using visible light as the simulated optical axis of KBA microscope. The precision of grazing angle is about 0.25 degree. Experiment of KBA microscope at the laser prototype facility is implemented using Ni-grids whose period is 20 μm, and clear X-ray image of grids is obtained by CCD camera. (authors)

  17. Realistic microscopic level densities for spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerf, N.

    1994-01-01

    Nuclear level densities play an important role in nuclear reactions such as the formation of the compound nucleus. We develop a microscopic calculation of the level density based on a combinatorial evaluation from a realistic single-particle level scheme. This calculation makes use of a fast Monte Carlo algorithm allowing us to consider large shell model spaces which could not be treated previously in combinatorial approaches. Since our model relies on a microscopic basis, it can be applied to exotic nuclei with more confidence than the commonly used semiphenomenological formuals. An exhaustive comparison of our predicted neutron s-wave resonance spacings with experimental data for a wide range of nuclei is presented

  18. Biophysics and the microscopic theory of He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chela-Flores, J.; Ghassib, H.B.

    1985-08-01

    Bose-Einstein condensation and solitonic propagation have recently been shown to be intimately related in biosystems. From our previous demonstration of the existence of solitons in a dilute Bose gas we set out the basis for a full microscopic theory of He II. This is used to understand recent experiments in He II, which are in apparent contradiction. New experiments are suggested by the microscopic theory. (author)

  19. Designs for a quantum electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruit, P.; Hobbs, R.G.; Kim, C-S.; Yang, Y.; Manfrinato, V.R.; Hammer, J.; Thomas, S.; Weber, P.; Klopfer, B.; Kohstall, C.; Juffmann, T.; Kasevich, M.A.; Hommelhoff, P.; Berggren, K.K.

    2016-01-01

    One of the astounding consequences of quantum mechanics is that it allows the detection of a target using an incident probe, with only a low probability of interaction of the probe and the target. This ‘quantum weirdness’ could be applied in the field of electron microscopy to generate images of beam-sensitive specimens with substantially reduced damage to the specimen. A reduction of beam-induced damage to specimens is especially of great importance if it can enable imaging of biological specimens with atomic resolution. Following a recent suggestion that interaction-free measurements are possible with electrons, we now analyze the difficulties of actually building an atomic resolution interaction-free electron microscope, or “quantum electron microscope”. A quantum electron microscope would require a number of unique components not found in conventional transmission electron microscopes. These components include a coherent electron beam-splitter or two-state-coupler, and a resonator structure to allow each electron to interrogate the specimen multiple times, thus supporting high success probabilities for interaction-free detection of the specimen. Different system designs are presented here, which are based on four different choices of two-state-couplers: a thin crystal, a grating mirror, a standing light wave and an electro-dynamical pseudopotential. Challenges for the detailed electron optical design are identified as future directions for development. While it is concluded that it should be possible to build an atomic resolution quantum electron microscope, we have also identified a number of hurdles to the development of such a microscope and further theoretical investigations that will be required to enable a complete interpretation of the images produced by such a microscope. - Highlights: • Quantum electron microscopy has the potential of reducing radiation damage. • QEM requires a fraction of the electron wave to pass through the sample

  20. The head-mounted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Dailey, Seth H; Naze, Sawyer A; Jiang, Jack J

    2012-04-01

    Microsurgical equipment has greatly advanced since the inception of the microscope into the operating room. These advancements have allowed for superior surgical precision and better post-operative results. This study focuses on the use of the Leica HM500 head-mounted microscope for the operating phonosurgeon. The head-mounted microscope has an optical zoom from 2× to 9× and provides a working distance from 300 mm to 700 mm. The headpiece, with its articulated eyepieces, adjusts easily to head shape and circumference, and offers a focus function, which is either automatic or manually controlled. We performed five microlaryngoscopic operations utilizing the head-mounted microscope with successful results. By creating a more ergonomically favorable operating posture, a surgeon may be able to obtain greater precision and success in phonomicrosurgery. Phonomicrosurgery requires the precise manipulation of long-handled cantilevered instruments through the narrow bore of a laryngoscope. The head-mounted microscope shortens the working distance compared with a stand microscope, thereby increasing arm stability, which may improve surgical precision. Also, the head-mounted design permits flexibility in head position, enabling operator comfort, and delaying musculoskeletal fatigue. A head-mounted microscope decreases the working distance and provides better ergonomics in laryngoscopic microsurgery. These advances provide the potential to promote precision in phonomicrosurgery. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Mobile microscope complex GIB-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, A.V.; Gorbachev, A.N.

    2002-01-01

    To study microstructure in operating pipelines of power units a mobile microscope system is developed and successfully used. The system includes a portable microscope, a monitor, power supply and a portable computer. The monitor is used for surveying images from a video camera mounted on the microscope. The magnification on visual examination constitutes x 100 and x 500. Diameters of pipelines examined should not be less than 130 mm. Surface preparation for microstructural studies includes routine mechanical rough grinding and polishing with subsequent etching [ru

  2. A LEGO Mindstorms Brewster angle microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernsler, Jonathan; Nguyen, Vincent; Wallum, Alison; Benz, Nicholas; Hamlin, Matthew; Pilgram, Jessica; Vanderpoel, Hunter; Lau, Ryan

    2017-09-01

    A Brewster Angle Microscope (BAM) built from a LEGO Mindstorms kit, additional LEGO bricks, and several standard optics components, is described. The BAM was built as part of an undergraduate senior project and was designed, calibrated, and used to image phospholipid, cholesterol, soap, and oil films on the surface of water. A BAM uses p-polarized laser light reflected off a surface at the Brewster angle, which ideally yields zero reflectivity. When a film of different refractive index is added to the surface a small amount of light is reflected, which can be imaged in a microscope camera. Films of only one molecule (approximately 1 nm) thick, a monolayer, can be observed easily in the BAM. The BAM was used in a junior-level Physical Chemistry class to observe phase transitions of a monolayer and the collapse of a monolayer deposited on the water surface in a Langmuir trough. Using a photometric calculation, students observed a change in thickness of a monolayer during a phase transition of 7 Å, which was accurate to within 1 Å of the value determined by more advanced methods. As supplementary material, we provide a detailed manual on how to build the BAM, software to control the BAM and camera, and image processing software.

  3. Scanning optical microscope with long working distance objective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Sylvain G.

    2010-10-19

    A scanning optical microscope, including: a light source to generate a beam of probe light; collimation optics to substantially collimate the probe beam; a probe-result beamsplitter; a long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective; scanning means to scan a beam spot of the focused probe beam on or within a sample; relay optics; and a detector. The collimation optics are disposed in the probe beam. The probe-result beamsplitter is arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light from the sample. The beamsplitter reflects the probe beam into the objective and transmits resultant light. The long working-distance, infinity-corrected objective is also arranged in the optical paths of the probe beam and the resultant light. It focuses the reflected probe beam onto the sample, and collects and substantially collimates the resultant light. The relay optics are arranged to relay the transmitted resultant light from the beamsplitter to the detector.

  4. 9Be scattering with microscopic wave functions and the continuum-discretized coupled-channel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descouvemont, P.; Itagaki, N.

    2018-01-01

    We use microscopic 9Be wave functions defined in a α +α +n multicluster model to compute 9Be+target scattering cross sections. The parameter sets describing 9Be are generated in the spirit of the stochastic variational method, and the optimal solution is obtained by superposing Slater determinants and by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian. The 9Be three-body continuum is approximated by square-integral wave functions. The 9Be microscopic wave functions are then used in a continuum-discretized coupled-channel (CDCC) calculation of 9Be+208Pb and of 9Be+27Al elastic scattering. Without any parameter fitting, we obtain a fair agreement with experiment. For a heavy target, the influence of 9Be breakup is important, while it is weaker for light targets. This result confirms previous nonmicroscopic CDCC calculations. One of the main advantages of the microscopic CDCC is that it is based on nucleon-target interactions only; there is no adjustable parameter. The present work represents a first step towards more ambitious calculations involving heavier Be isotopes.

  5. Histological and electron microscopic study of the postulated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    CL; Wang H and Heber D. Bioavailability and antioxidant effect of epigallocatechin gallate administered in purified form versus as green tea extract in healthy individuals. Journal of Nutritional. Biochemistry. 2005; 16:610-6. 13. Ahmed A & Hosney S. Light and electron microscopic study of the effect of furosemide on the liver ...

  6. Microscopic examination of deteriorated concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, T.G.; Larbi, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Concrete petrography is the integrated microscopic and mesoscale (hand specimen size) investigation of hardened concrete, that can provide information on the composition of concrete, the original relationships between the concrete's various constituents, and any changes therein, whether as a result

  7. Center of excellence: Microlaser microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R. H.

    This Center-of-Excellence grant has two components: development of an imaging system based on microlaser arrays forms a central project among a group of laser diagnostic and therapeutic efforts primarily funded outside the grant. In these first 8 months we have set up the Microlaser Microscope using small microlaser arrays. We have emphasized the basics of microlaser handling and electronic addressing and the optics of the microscope. Details of electronics and optics given here will be used in the larger arrays which should be available soon. After a description of the central Microlaser Microscope project, we touch briefly on the other projects of the Center, which have been outstandingly fruitful this year. Publications are necessarily concerned with the smaller projects, since the Microlaser Microscope is in its early stages.

  8. Macular photostress and visual experience between microscope and intracameral illumination during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyejin; Nam, Dong Heun; Lee, Jong Yeon; Park, Su Jin; Kim, Yu Jeong; Kim, Seong-Woo; Chung, Tae-Young; Inoue, Makoto; Kim, Terry

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate macular photostress and visual experience between coaxial microscope illumination versus oblique intracameral illumination during cataract surgery. Gachon University Gil Hospital, Incheon, South Korea. Prospective case series. Consecutive patients who had cataract surgery using microscope illumination and intracameral illumination were included. The patients were asked to complete a questionnaire (seeing strong lights, feeling photophobia, feeling startled (fright) when seeing lights, seeing any colors, seeing any instruments or surgical procedures, and estimating intraoperative visual function) designed to describe their cataract surgery experience. The images projected on the retina of the model eye (rear view) with artificial opaque fragments in the anterior chamber during simulating cataract surgery were compared between the 2 illumination types. Sixty patients completed the questionnaire. Scores for strong lights, photophobia, fright, and color perception were significantly higher with microscope illumination than with intracameral illumination (all P microscope illumination (13 [21.7%]). In the rear-view images created in a model eye, only the bright microscope light in the center was seen without any lens image in the microscope illumination. However, in the intracameral illumination, the less bright light from the light pipe in the periphery and the lens fragments were seen more clearly. In a view of the patients' visual experience, oblique intracameral illumination caused less subjective photostress and was preferred over coaxial microscope illumination. Objective findings from the model-eye experiment correlated to the result of visual experience. Copyright © 2018 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crooks, Gavin E

    2011-01-01

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa

  10. Commentary: Giuseppe Campani (1635-1715, Rome, Italy): the First Use of a Microscope in Medicine and Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogna, Christian; Millesi, Matthias; Fiengo, Leslie; Richardson, Mark; Bhangoo, Ranjeev; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Türe, Ugur

    2018-02-01

    Giuseppe Campani (1635-1715) was a polymath in Rome, Italy, during the Scientific Revolution in the XVIIth century. In particular, he forged the screw barrel microscope and was manufacturing his own lenses for microscopes and telescopes. He mastered the art of lens grinding. Those lenses have been analyzed with modern methods and turned out to be of extremely good quality, shining light on the fact that Giuseppe Campani mastered the theories of optics. Moreover, in a letter that Giuseppe Campani sent to Pope Innocent XI, he clearly described the use of a microscope for the examination of wounds of legs. This letter dates back to 15 August 1686 and is the first evidence of the use of microscopes to analyze wounds, sores, and anatomic specimens in medical and surgical settings. MG Yasargil previously showed the lithography accompanying this letter and was the first to recognize its great importance. We accessed this original letter in the Vatican Library, and for the first time we have translated it from Latin to English in order to unveil its significance in the context of the Scientific Revolution and the history of medicine and surgery. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons.

  11. MICROSCOPIC USES OF NANOGOLD.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAINFELD,J.F.POWELL,R.D.FURUYA,F.R.

    2003-04-17

    Gold has been used for immunocytochemistry since 1971 when Faulk and Taylor discovered adsorption of antibodies to colloidal gold. It is an ideal label for electron microscopy (EM) due to its high atomic number, which scatters electrons efficiently, and the fact that preparative methods have been developed to make uniform particles in the appropriate size range of 5 to 30 nm. Use in light microscopy (LM) generally requires silver enhancement (autometallography; AMG) of these small gold particles. Significant advances in this field since that time have included a better understanding of the conditions for best antibody adsorption, more regular gold size production, adsorption of other useful molecules, like protein A, and advances in silver enhancement. Many studies have also been accomplished showing the usefulness of these techniques to cell biology and biomedical research. A further advance in this field was the development of Nanogold{trademark}, a 1.4 nm gold cluster. A significant difference from colloidal gold is that Nanogold is actually a coordination compound containing a gold core covalently linked to surface organic groups. These in turn may be covalently attached to antibodies. This approach to immunolabeling has several advantages compared to colloidal gold such as vastly better penetration into tissues, generally greater sensitivity, and higher density of labeling. Since Nanogold is covalently coupled to antibodies, it may also be directly coupled to almost any protein, peptide, carbohydrate, or molecule of interest, including molecules which do not adsorb to colloidal gold. This increases the range of probes possible, and expands the applications of gold labeling.

  12. Faraday rotation imaging microscope with microsecond pulse magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, Masayori, E-mail: msuwa@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Tsukahara, Satoshi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Watarai, Hitoshi, E-mail: watarai@chem.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp [Institute for NanoScience Design, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-11-01

    We have fabricated a high-performance Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope that uses a microsecond pulse magnet comprising an insulated gated bipolar transistor and a 2 μF capacitor. Our microscope produced images with greater stability and sensitivity than those of previous microscopes that used millisecond pulse magnet; these improvements are likely due to high repetition rate and negligible Joule heating effects. The mechanical vibrations in the magnet coil caused by the pulsed current were significantly reduced. The present FR microscope constructed an averaged image from 1000 FR images within 10 min under 1.7 T. Applications of the FR microscope to discriminating three benzene derivatives in micro-capillaries and oscillation-free imaging of spherical polystyrene and polymethyl methacrylate microparticles demonstrated its high performance. - Highlights: • A microsecond pulse magnet with high repetition rate of 10 Hz was fabricated. • Faraday rotation (FR) imaging microscope with the μs magnet was constructed. • Benzene derivatives in microcapillaries were distinguished with the FR microscope. • FR images of single polymer microspheres of 20 μm were correctly acquired. • Observed FR angles agreed quantitatively with those expected from Verdet constants.

  13. Generic distortion model for metrology under optical microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingjian; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Chao, YuhJin; Miraldo, Pedro; Shi, Yusheng

    2018-04-01

    For metrology under optical microscopes, lens distortion is the dominant source of error. Previous distortion models and correction methods mostly rely on the assumption that parametric distortion models require a priori knowledge of the microscopes' lens systems. However, because of the numerous optical elements in a microscope, distortions can be hardly represented by a simple parametric model. In this paper, a generic distortion model considering both symmetric and asymmetric distortions is developed. Such a model is obtained by using radial basis functions (RBFs) to interpolate the radius and distortion values of symmetric distortions (image coordinates and distortion rays for asymmetric distortions). An accurate and easy to implement distortion correction method is presented. With the proposed approach, quantitative measurement with better accuracy can be achieved, such as in Digital Image Correlation for deformation measurement when used with an optical microscope. The proposed technique is verified by both synthetic and real data experiments.

  14. A method for fast automated microscope image stitching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Deng, Zhen-Sheng; Fan, Qiu-Hong

    2013-05-01

    Image stitching is an important technology to produce a panorama or larger image by combining several images with overlapped areas. In many biomedical researches, image stitching is highly desirable to acquire a panoramic image which represents large areas of certain structures or whole sections, while retaining microscopic resolution. In this study, we develop a fast normal light microscope image stitching algorithm based on feature extraction. At first, an algorithm of scale-space reconstruction of speeded-up robust features (SURF) was proposed to extract features from the images to be stitched with a short time and higher repeatability. Then, the histogram equalization (HE) method was employed to preprocess the images to enhance their contrast for extracting more features. Thirdly, the rough overlapping zones of the images preprocessed were calculated by phase correlation, and the improved SURF was used to extract the image features in the rough overlapping areas. Fourthly, the features were corresponded by matching algorithm and the transformation parameters were estimated, then the images were blended seamlessly. Finally, this procedure was applied to stitch normal light microscope images to verify its validity. Our experimental results demonstrate that the improved SURF algorithm is very robust to viewpoint, illumination, blur, rotation and zoom of the images and our method is able to stitch microscope images automatically with high precision and high speed. Also, the method proposed in this paper is applicable to registration and stitching of common images as well as stitching the microscope images in the field of virtual microscope for the purpose of observing, exchanging, saving, and establishing a database of microscope images. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shearing interference microscope for step-height measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trịnh, Hưng-Xuân; Lin, Shyh-Tsong; Chen, Liang-Chia; Yeh, Sheng-Lih; Chen, Chin-Sheng; Hoang, Hong-Hai

    2017-05-01

    A shearing interference microscope using a Savart prism as the shear plate is proposed for inspecting step-heights. Where the light beam propagates through the Savart prism and microscopic system to illuminate the sample, it then turns back to re-pass through the Savart prism and microscopic system to generate a shearing interference pattern on the camera. Two measurement modes, phase-shifting and phase-scanning, can be utilized to determine the depths of the step-heights on the sample. The first mode, which employs a narrowband source, is based on the five-step phase-shifting algorithm and has a measurement range of a quarter-wavelength. The second mode, which adopts a broadband source, is based on peak-intensity identification technology and has a measurement range up to a few micrometres. This paper is to introduce the configuration and measurement theory of this microscope, perform a setup used to implement it, and present the experimental results from the uses of the setup. The results not only verify the validity but also confirm the high measurement repeatability of the proposed microscope. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Fabrication of a microphotometer to be attached to microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Junsuke; Yamashita, Masafumi; Tabuki, Takaaki; Yoshiwara, Hiroshi.

    1982-01-01

    A microphotometer was designed and constructed for the purpose of observing cosmic-ray with emulsion chambers (EC). The photometer can make simultaneously the scanning of specimens and the blackness measurement. The photometer was attached to a microscope. The light for observation is introduced from the part where a camera in attached. The light to illuminate the microscope is used for the observation. The light of observation is monitored to increase the stability of measurement. The observation is made by using photomultipliers. The logarithmic linearity of the present apparatus was good within the input voltage range of four digits. The test measurement was performed. The results were compared with the results obtained by a NARUMI photometer, and the agreement between both results was good. This apparatus will be a good tool to observe the blackness constant of showers with energy above 10 TeV. (Kato, T.)

  17. The sinusoidal lining cells in "normal" human liver. A scanning electron microscopic investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, T; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Christoffersen, P

    1986-01-01

    The scanning electron microscopic was used to study the fenestrations of human liver sinusoids. Thirteen biopsies, where light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy revealed normal sinusoidal architecture, were investigated. The number of fenestrae was calculated in acinar zone 3...

  18. Observation of bio-fibres with a hard x-ray microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youn, Hwa Shik

    2009-01-01

    PLS (Pohang Light Source) hard x-ray microscope is briefly introduced. Zernike phase contrast is evaluated with images of polymer structures with various thicknesses. Images of bio-fibres taken with Zernike phase contrast are shown

  19. Increasing Student Understanding of Microscope Optics by Building and Testing the Limits of Simple, Hand-Made Model Microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Drace

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek’s design using simple materials—paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory’s learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics.

  20. Increasing student understanding of microscope optics by building and testing the limits of simple, hand-made model microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drace, Kevin; Couch, Brett; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    The ability to effectively use a microscope to observe microorganisms is a crucial skill required for many disciplines within biology, especially general microbiology and cell biology. A basic understanding of the optical properties of light microscopes is required for students to use microscopes effectively, but this subject can also be a challenge to make personally interesting to students. To explore basic optical principles of magnification and resolving power in a more engaging and hands-on fashion, students constructed handmade lenses and microscopes based on Antony van Leeuwenhoek's design using simple materials-paper, staples, glass, and adhesive putty. Students determined the power of their lenses using a green laser pointer to magnify a copper grid of known size, which also allowed students to examine variables affecting the power and resolution of a lens such as diameter, working distance, and wavelength of light. To assess the effectiveness of the laboratory's learning objectives, four sections of a general microbiology course were given a brief pre-activity assessment quiz to determine their background knowledge on the subject. One week after the laboratory activity, students were given the same quiz (unannounced) under similar conditions. Students showed significant gains in their understanding of microscope optics.

  1. Axiomatic electrodynamics and microscopic mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1981-04-01

    A new approach to theoretical physics, along with the basic formulation of a new MICROSCOPIC MECHANICS for the motion of small charged particles is described in this set of lecture notes. Starting with the classical (Newtonian) mechanics and classical fields, the important but well known properties of Classical Electromagnetic field are discussed up to section 4. The next nection describes the usual radiation damping theory and its difficulties. It is argued that the usual treatment of radiation damping is not valid for small space and time intervals and the true description of motion requires a new type of mechanics - the MICROSCOPIC MECHANICS: Section 6 and 7 are devoted to showing that not only the new microscopic mechanics goes over to Newtonian mechanics in the proper limit, but also it is closely connected with Quantum Mechanics. All the known results of the Schroedinger theory can be reproduced by microscopic mechanics which also gives a clear physical picture. It removes Einstein's famous objections against Quantum Theory and provides a clear distinction between classical and Quantum behavior. Seven Axioms (three on Classical Mechanics, two for Maxwell's theory, one for Relativity and a new Axiom on Radiation damping) are shown to combine Classical Mechanics, Maxwellian Electrodynamics, Relativity and Schroedinger's Quantum Theory within a single theoretical framework under Microscopic Mechanics which awaits further development at the present time. (orig.)

  2. The high resolution X-ray microscope, XM-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Johnson, L.E.; Bates, W.; Lucero, A.; Anderson, E.H.; Denbeaux, G.

    2000-01-01

    We give an overview of the activities at the high-resolution x-ray microscope XM-1 at the Advanced Light Source, including both scientific programs and instrumental enhancements. The instrument is being actively used in many fields including biology, environmental and material sciences. A new high efficiency condenser zone plate and precision computer control of the microscope allow users to obtain many hundreds of images in a day. Further developments at XM-1 include a cryogenic sample stage for sample preservation and plans for the implementation of a cryo-tilt stage to capture stereoscopic information

  3. Microscopical observations of Sphaerellopsis filum, a parasite of Puccinia recondita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Płachecka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphaerellopsis filum is a well-known parasite associated with many species of rust fungi. It is of frequent occurrence as parasite of cereal rusts: Puccinia recondita, P. coronata, P. graminis, P. hordei and P. striiformis. Uredial sori of Puccinia recondita f.sp. tritici infected with Sphaerellopsis filum were examined by light and scanning microscope to determine morphology of hyperparasite as well as the parasite-hyperparasite contact. The microscopical examination of infected uredinia clearly showed the intimate connection of S. filum with its rust host.

  4. A virtual petrological microscope for teaching and outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Simon P.; Whalley, Peter; Tindle, Andrew G.; Anand, Mahesh

    2010-05-01

    sections (held as 1GB files on a remote server); zoom in and out, change from plane polarised light to cross polarised light conditions, and study the changing mineral pleochroism and birefringence in rotating view 'hot spots'. The microscope also includes tools such as hyper-linked descriptive teaching text, labels on the slide, XY coordinates and measurement tools. The fully developed system is for individual users each accessing the slides via a browser window, but we are also developing mobile version and exploring a shared version which will allow students and tutors to collaborate at distance.

  5. Microscope and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongianni, Wayne L.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for electronically focusing and electronically scanning microscopic specimens are given. In the invention, visual images of even moving, living, opaque specimens can be acoustically obtained and viewed with virtually no time needed for processing (i.e., real time processing is used). And planar samples are not required. The specimens (if planar) need not be moved during scanning, although it will be desirable and possible to move or rotate nonplanar specimens (e.g., laser fusion targets) against the lens of the apparatus. No coupling fluid is needed, so specimens need not be wetted. A phase acoustic microscope is also made from the basic microscope components together with electronic mixers.

  6. Light Microscopy at Maximal Precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Matthew; Leahy, Brian D.; Alemi, Alexander A.; Cohen, Itai; Sethna, James P.

    2017-10-01

    Microscopy is the workhorse of the physical and life sciences, producing crisp images of everything from atoms to cells well beyond the capabilities of the human eye. However, the analysis of these images is frequently little more accurate than manual marking. Here, we revolutionize the analysis of microscopy images, extracting all the useful information theoretically contained in a complex microscope image. Using a generic, methodological approach, we extract the information by fitting experimental images with a detailed optical model of the microscope, a method we call parameter extraction from reconstructing images (PERI). As a proof of principle, we demonstrate this approach with a confocal image of colloidal spheres, improving measurements of particle positions and radii by 10-100 times over current methods and attaining the maximum possible accuracy. With this unprecedented accuracy, we measure nanometer-scale colloidal interactions in dense suspensions solely with light microscopy, a previously impossible feat. Our approach is generic and applicable to imaging methods from brightfield to electron microscopy, where we expect accuracies of 1 nm and 0.1 pm, respectively.

  7. Synthetic Fourier transform light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeoreh; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Youngchan; Hillman, Timothy R; Min, Bumki; Park, Yongkeun

    2013-09-23

    We present synthetic Fourier transform light scattering, a method for measuring extended angle-resolved light scattering (ARLS) from individual microscopic samples. By measuring the light fields scattered from the sample plane and numerically synthesizing them in Fourier space, the angle range of the ARLS patterns is extended up to twice the numerical aperture of the imaging system with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Extended ARLS patterns of individual microscopic polystyrene beads, healthy human red blood cells (RBCs), and Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized RBCs are presented.

  8. Atomic force microscope featuring an integrated optical microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1992-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to image the surface of both conductors and nonconductors. Biological specimens constitute a large group of nonconductors. A disadvantage of most AFM's is the fact that relatively large areas of the sample surface have to be scanned to pinpoint a biological

  9. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...... component (100) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an external image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...

  10. Excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Peter F.; Hernandez, Clarissa; Heaster, Tiffany; Alvarez, Diego F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Prabhat, Prashant; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Hyperspectral imaging is a versatile tool that has recently been applied to a variety of biomedical applications, notably live-cell and whole-tissue signaling. Traditional hyperspectral imaging approaches filter the fluorescence emission over a broad wavelength range while exciting at a single band. However, these emission-scanning approaches have shown reduced sensitivity due to light attenuation from spectral filtering. Consequently, emission scanning has limited applicability for time-sensitive studies and photosensitive applications. In this work, we have developed an excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging microscope that overcomes these limitations by providing high transmission with short acquisition times. This is achieved by filtering the fluorescence excitation rather than the emission. We tested the efficacy of the excitation-scanning microscope in a side-by-side comparison with emission scanning for detection of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing endothelial cells in highly autofluorescent lung tissue. Excitation scanning provided higher signal-to-noise characteristics, as well as shorter acquisition times (300  ms/wavelength band with excitation scanning versus 3  s/wavelength band with emission scanning). Excitation scanning also provided higher delineation of nuclear and cell borders, and increased identification of GFP regions in highly autofluorescent tissue. These results demonstrate excitation scanning has utility in a wide range of time-dependent and photosensitive applications. PMID:24727909

  11. Measuring voltage transients with an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keil, Ulrich Dieter Felix; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1997-01-01

    We use an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve propagating voltage transients in space and time. We demonstrate that the previously observed dependence of the transient signal amplitude on the tunneling resistance was only caused by the electrical sampling circuit. With a modified c......-gating photoconductive switch with a rigidly attached fiber, the probe is scanned without changing the probe characteristics. (C) 1997 American Institute of Physics.......We use an ultrafast scanning tunneling microscope to resolve propagating voltage transients in space and time. We demonstrate that the previously observed dependence of the transient signal amplitude on the tunneling resistance was only caused by the electrical sampling circuit. With a modified...... circuit, where the tunneling tip is directly connected to the current amplifier of the scanning tunneling microscope, this dependence is eliminated. Ail results can be explained with coupling through the geometrical capacitance of the tip-electrode junction. By illuminating the current...

  12. The Role of Next-Generation Sequencing in Sarcomas: Evolution From Light Microscope to Molecular Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groisberg, Roman; Roszik, Jason; Conley, Anthony; Patel, Shreyaskumar R; Subbiah, Vivek

    2017-10-13

    Sarcomas are rare, heterogeneous group of soft tissue and bone tumors. Precise diagnosis of specific subtypes is challenging using conventional methods. Herein, we review the role of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology that is used for rapid sequencing of DNA and RNA. Recent sarcoma specific studies recommend that molecular genetic testing should be added at diagnosis for appropriate clinical management in addition to diagnosis by expert pathologists. NGS has already been used to identify potentially actionable mutations, copy number alterations, and gene fusions. Rationally, choosing a drug based on an individual patient profile aka: "precision oncology" has been so far limited to few case reports in sarcomas. As we improve our ability to deliver personalized medicine using all modalities including conventional therapy, more patients may eventually benefit. As the cost and capacity of NGS outpace Moore's law, so does the probability of success.

  13. Dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, S L

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation is a detailed study of dopant profiling with the scanning electron microscope (SEM) using secondary electrons. The technique has been applied to a wide variety of doped silicon, gallium arsenide and gallium nitride semiconductor test structures as well as a metal-oxide field effect transistor and several light emitting diodes. A concise set of guide-lines are provided for users of this technique, including the optimum SEM operating conditions that should be used for maximum contrast, an image manipulation procedure, and the resolution and sensitivity limits that can be expected. Dopant contrast observed with the SEM has been studied over the past few years by a number of researchers, and a theory for the contrast has evolved. This theory considers the patch fields outside the specimen to be the dominant factor determining the secondary electron intensity. In this dissertation the contrast mechanism has been further investigated by examining the contrast at different temperatures and after su...

  14. Light Sources and Lighting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisashi; Suwa, Takumi; Yasuda, Takeo; Ohtani, Yoshihiko; Maehara, Akiyoshi; Okada, Atsunori; Komatsu, Naoki; Mannami, Tomoaki

    According to the Machinery Statistics of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, the production of incandescent lamps in Japan in 2007 was 990 million units (90.0% of the previous year's total), in which the production of incandescent lamps for general lighting was 110 million units (90.0% of the previous year's total) and of tungsten-halogen lamps was 44 million units (96.6% of the previous year's total). The production of fluorescent lamps was 927 million units (93.9% of the previous year's total), in which general fluorescent lamps, excluding those for LCD back lighting, was 320 million units (87.2% of the previous year's total). Also, the production of HID lamps was 10 million units (101.5% of the previous year's total). On the other hand, when the numbers of sales are compared with the sales of the previous year, incandescent lamps for general use was 99.8%, tungsten-halogen lamps was 96.9%, fluorescent lamps was 95.9%, and HID lamps was 98.9%. Self-ballasted fluorescent lamps alone showed an increase in sales as strong as 29 million units, or 121.7% of the previous year's sales. It is considered that the switchover of incandescent lamps to HID lamps was promoted for energy conservation and carbon dioxide reduction with the problem of global warming in the background. In regard to exhibitions, Lighting Fair 2007 was held in Tokyo in March, and LIGHTFAIR INTERNATIONAL 2007 was held in New York in May. Regarding academic conferences, LS:11 (the 11th International Symposium on the Science & Technology of Light Sources) was held in Shanghai in May, and the First International Conference on White LEDs and Solid State Lighting was held in Tokyo in November. Both conferences suggested that there are strong needs and concerns now about energy conservation, saving natural resources, and restrictions of hazardous materials. In regard to incandescent lamps, the development of products aiming at higher efficacy, electric power savings, and longer life was advanced by

  15. Research on improving performance to metallographic microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Socaciu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Precision optical components from an old optical microscope can be improved and emphasized with a dedicated digital microscope camera. This is an affordable way to obtain a high performance metallographic or biological microscope, with minimum of spending. This paper study those ways and adapts a camera to existing microscopes for researchers use, Optimizing visualization by projecting the image and improving the microscope use by different options of capture and image processing.

  16. Optical design of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope for ICF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu Baozhong; Yi Shengzhen; Huang Shengling; Wang Zhanshan

    2008-01-01

    A new flux-resolution optical design method of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope (KB microscope) is proposed. In X-ray imaging diagnostics of inertial confinement fusion(ICF), spatial resolution and flux are always the key parameters. While the traditional optical design of KB microscope is to correct on-axis spherical aberration and astigmatic aberration, flux-resolution method is based on lateral aberration of full field and astigmatic aberration. Thus the spatial resolution related to field dimension and light flux can be estimated. By the expressions of spatial resolution and actual limits in ICF, rules of how to set original structure and optical design flow are summarized. An instance is presented and it shows that the design has met the original targets and overcome the shortcomings of image characterization in compressed core by traditional spherical aberration correction. (authors)

  17. Multispectral Video-Microscope Modified for Skin Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubins U.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercial DinoLite AD413 digital microscope was modified for skin diagnostics purposes. The original LED ring (4 white and 4 ultraviolet light emitters of microscope was replaced by a custom-designed 16-LED ring module consisting of four LED groups (450, 545, 660 and 940 nm, and an onboard LED controller with USB hub was added. The video acquisition and LED switching are performed using custom-designed Matlab software which provides real-time spectral analysis of multi-spectral images and calculation of skin chromophore optical density. The developed multispectral video-microscope is mainly meant for diagnostics of skin malformations, e.g. skin cancerous lesions.

  18. Curriculum Guidelines for Microscopic Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1993

    1993-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curricula in microscopic anatomy offer an overview of the histology curriculum, note primary educational goals, outline specific content for general and oral histology, suggest prerequisites, and make recommendations for sequencing. Appropriate faculty and facilities are also suggested.…

  19. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, S. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF 91 (France); Koning, A.J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, PO Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus de la Plaine, CP 226, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  20. Microscopic cross sections: An utopia?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilaire, S.; Koning, A.J.; Goriely, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematical relations.While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical bases, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all major ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. We have implemented all these microscopic ingredients in the TALYS nuclear reaction code, and we are now almost able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. (authors)

  1. Light microscopic detection of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olalekan Michael

    2014-02-19

    Feb 19, 2014 ... 2Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pure and Applied Sciences, Kwara State University,. Ilorin, Nigeria. 3Department of Anatomy ... A stirrer magnet covered with a tephlon was inserted into the solution, the .... and application in cancer cell imaging. Langmuir. 28(9):4464-4471.

  2. Microscope sterility during spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; O'Neill, Kevin R; Crosby, Colin G; Schoenecker, Jonathan G; McGirt, Matthew J; Devin, Clinton J

    2012-04-01

    Prospective study. Assess the contamination rates of sterile microscope drapes after spine surgery. The use of the operating microscope has become more prevalent in certain spine procedures, providing superior magnification, visualization, and illumination of the operative field. However, it may represent an additional source of bacterial contamination and increase the risk of developing a postoperative infection. This study included 25 surgical spine cases performed by a single spine surgeon that required the use of the operative microscope. Sterile culture swabs were used to obtain samples from 7 defined locations on the microscope drape after its use during the operation. The undraped technician's console was sampled in each case as a positive control, and an additional 25 microscope drapes were swabbed immediately after they were applied to the microscope to obtain negative controls. Swab samples were assessed for bacterial growth on 5% sheep blood Columbia agar plates using a semiquantitative technique. No growth was observed on any of the 25 negative control drapes. In contrast, 100% of preoperative and 96% of postoperative positive controls demonstrated obvious contamination. In the postoperative group, all 7 sites of evaluation were found to be contaminated with rates of 12% to 44%. Four of the 7 evaluated locations were found to have significant contamination rates compared with negative controls, including the shafts of the optic eyepieces on the main surgeon side (24%, P = 0.022), "forehead" portion on both the main surgeon (24%, P = 0.022) and assistant sides (28%, P = 0.010), and "overhead" portion of the drape (44%, P = 0.0002). Bacterial contamination of the operative microscope was found to be significant after spine surgery. Contamination was more common around the optic eyepieces, likely due to inadvertent touching of unsterile portions. Similarly, all regions above the eyepieces also have a propensity for contamination because of unknown contact

  3. Electron-microscopic examination of effects of yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, on degeneration of cerebral cells in thiamine-deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Seiichi; Kawakami, Zenji; Imamura, Sachiko; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Kanno, Hitomi; Ueki, Toshiyuki; Kase, Yoshio; Ikarashi, Yasushi

    2010-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that yokukansan ameliorated not only learning disturbance but also behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia-like behaviors (anxiety, aggressiveness) and neurological symptoms (opisthotonus) induced in rats by dietary thiamine deficiency (TD). In the present study, the effects of yokukansan on degeneration of cerebral cells were further examined electron-microscopically during pre-symptomatic and symptomatic stages in TD rats. In the pre-symptomatic TD stage, which appeared as increase in aggressive behaviors on the 21st and 28th days of TD diet-feeding, severe edematous degeneration of astrocytes was detected by electron microscopy, although the changes were not observed by light microscopy. In the symptomatic TD stage (the 34th day) characterized by development of neurological symptoms, severe sponge-like degeneration and multiple hemorrhages in the parenchyma were obvious by light microscopy. The electron-microscopic examination showed degeneration in neurons, oligodendroglias, and myelin sheaths in addition to astrocytes. TD rats, which exhibited multiple hemorrhages light microscopically, showed severe edematous changes and hypertrophy of the foot processes of astrocytes surrounding blood vessels. Administration of yokukansan ameliorated not only the TD-induced aggressive behavior and neurological symptoms but also degeneration of the cerebral cells. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of yokukansan on degeneration in various brain cells might be closely related to the amelioration of aggression and neurological symptoms in TD rats. © 2010 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  4. Classification of Salmonella serotypes with hyperspectral microscope imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous research has demonstrated an optical method with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) based hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) had potential for classifying gram-negative from gram-positive foodborne pathogenic bacteria rapidly and nondestructively with a minimum sample preparation. In t...

  5. Microscopic simulation of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninokata, Hisashi; Aoki, Takayuki; Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2000-01-01

    On three-dimensional behavior, multi-phase and multi-component thermal-hydraulics co-existing complex phase change and chemical reaction seen at severe accident, and so on under complex systems such as liquid film and drop behavior in a fuel assembly, inside of reactor pressure vessel, and so on, on aiming at further precise analysis on thermal-hydraulics phenomena in a reactor, researches on simulation focusing at microscopic mechanism of the phenomena have been carried out. And, simulations on microscopic thermal-hydraulics phenomena using numerical analysis such as super fine mesh method based on continuous body dynamic procedure, particle method, lattice Boltzmann method, Automaton method, Monte Carlo method at a view point of molecular dynamics, and so on have also become to be found out. This report was summary of previous survey actions under the research special committee on the 'microscopic simulation on reactor thermal-hydraulics' of the Japanese Society of Atomic Energy started in 1996. Here were elucidated a relationship between previous applicable technologies such as macroscopic simulation focusing a motion at local mean field and microscopic simulation one as well as survey and systematization of present condition of microscopic understanding on various physical phenomena, to scope directivity and subject on future research. (G.K.)

  6. 21 CFR 884.6190 - Assisted reproductive microscopes and microscope accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction.... Assisted reproduction microscopes and microscope accessories (excluding microscope stage warmers, which are classified under assisted reproduction accessories) are optical instruments used to enlarge images of gametes...

  7. Differential magnetic force microscope imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zuobin; Liu, Jinyun; Hou, Liwei

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging based on a two-pass scanning procedure to extract differential magnetic forces and eliminate or significantly reduce background forces with reversed tip magnetization. In the work, the difference of two scanned images with reversed tip magnetization was used to express the local magnetic forces. The magnetic sample was first scanned with a low lift distance between the MFM tip and the sample surface, and the magnetization direction of the probe was then changed after the first scan to perform the second scan. The differential magnetic force image was obtained through the subtraction of the two images from the two scans. The theoretical and experimental results have shown that the proposed method for differential magnetic force microscope imaging is able to reduce the effect of background or environment interference forces, and offers an improved image contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...... component (100) has an entrance pupil with a first diameter D1, and an optical component system which is arranged for forming an external image (136) of the back-focal plane (132) of the objective optical component (100), which has a diameter (given by the diameter of a circle enclosing all optical paths...... at the plane of the 10 external image) which is denominated D2 and wherein D1 is larger than a second diameter D2....

  9. Microscopic images dataset for automation of RBCs counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Abbas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs counting has been developed using RBCs light microscopic images and Matlab algorithm. The Dataset consists of Red Blood Corpuscles (RBCs images and there RBCs segmented images. A detailed description using flow chart is given in order to show how to produce RBCs mask. The RBCs mask was used to count the number of RBCs in the blood smear image.

  10. Virtual Environment for Manipulating Microscopic Particles With Optical Tweezers

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Gu; Lyons, Kevin W.; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, virtual reality techniques are used to define an intuitive interface to a nanoscale manipulation device. This device utilizes optical methods to focus laser light to trap and reposition nano-to-microscopic particles. The underlying physics are simulated by the use of Lagrange mechanics. A unique control method for the manipulation of the particles is also provided. The user can naturally grab and steer the particles. Behind the scene, a complex computation is performed to find ...

  11. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kociak, M; Zagonel, L F

    2017-05-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  13. Duties to Extraterrestrial Microscopic Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, C. S.

    Formulating a normative axiology for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms, should they ever be found, requires an extension of environmental ethics to beyond the Earth. Using an ethical framework for the treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms, this paper elaborates a similar ethic for the treatment of extraterrestrial microscopic organisms. An ethic of `teloempathy' allows for the moral considerability of any organism that has `interests', based on rudimentary qualities of conativism, and therefore allows for an identical treatment of all life, related or not related to life on Earth. Although, according to this ethic, individual extraterrestrial microscopic organisms have a good of their own and even `rights', at this level the ethic can only be theoretical, allowing for the inevitable destruction of many individual organisms during the course of human exploratory missions, similarly to the daily destruction of microbes by humans on Earth. A holistic teloempathy, an operative ethic, not only provides a framework for human exploration, but it also has important implications for planetary protection and proposals to implement planetary-scale atmospheric alterations on other bodies. Even prior to the discovery of extraterrestrial life, or the discovery of a complete absence of such life, this exercise yields important insights into the moral philosophy that guides our treatment of terrestrial micro-organisms.

  14. Measurement of step height by traceable interference microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y L; Wang, C Y

    2005-01-01

    A Traceable Interference Microscope (TIM) to calibrate the step height standards is presented. The construction of the TIM includes an interference microscope, a stabilized He-Ne laser, and a rotated ground glass. The instrument's original white light source is replaced by the stabilized laser through an optical fiber. The step height is measured by calculating the phase difference of two fringe patterns both on the upper and lower surfaces of the specimen. A new methodology called Double-Tilt Imaging (DTI) method is proposed to determine the Numerical Aperture Correction Factor (NACF). The wavelength of the light source and the difference both in angles and in spatial frequencies between the positive and negative tilts would reveal sufficient information to allow for the determination of the NACF directly. The light source used is a stabilized He-Ne laser traceable to the definition of the meter and the angle measurement to the angle standards by an autocollimator. The calculation of the aperture correction factor for the interference microscope with a 10x Mirau-type objective lens yields a traceable average value of 1.01936 with a relative standard uncertainty of about 5.74 x 10 -4 . The expanded uncertainty of this step height calibration system is determined to be approximately 3 nm

  15. Phase control algorithms for focusing light through turbid media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellekoop, Ivo Micha; Mosk, Allard

    2008-01-01

    Light propagation in materials with microscopic inhomogeneities is affected by scattering. In scattering materials, such as powders, disordered metamaterials or biological tissue, multiple scattering on sub-wavelength particles makes light diffuse. Recently, we showed that it is possible to

  16. Light fragment preformation in cold fission of {sup 282}Cn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Gherghescu, R.A. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), P.O. Box MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    In a previous article, published in Phys. Rev. C 94, 014309 (2016), we have shown for the first time that the best dynamical trajectory during the deformation toward fission of the superheavy nucleus {sup 286}Fl is a linearly increasing radius of the light fragment, R{sub 2}. This macroscopic-microscopic result reminds us about the α or cluster preformation at the nuclear surface, assumed already in 1928, and proved microscopically many times. This time we give more detailed arguments for the nucleus {sup 282}Cn. Also similar figures are presented for heavy nuclei {sup 240}Pu and {sup 252} Cf. The deep minimum of the total deformation energy near the surface is shown for the first time as a strong argument for cluster preformation. (orig.)

  17. Histologic changes in previously irradiated thyroid glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdiserri, R.O.; Borochovitz, D.

    1980-03-01

    Thyroid tissue from 90 patients with a history of therapeutic irradiation to the head and neck in childhood and adolescence was examined microscopically. In addition to the well-known observation that these individuals have an increased incidence of primary thyroid carcinoma, it was also demonstrated that they have an increased incidence of benign histologic changes. These changes represent a spectrum from nonspecific hyperplastic lesions to benign neoplasis and thyroidltis.

  18. Literature survey on microscopic friction modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hol, J.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand contact and friction conditions, experimental and theoretical studies have been performed in order to take microscopic dependencies into account. Friction is developed on microscopic level by adhesion between contacting asperities, the ploughing effect between asperities and the

  19. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milas, Mirko [Port Jefferson, NY; Zhu, Yimei [Stony Brook, NY; Rameau, Jonathan David [Coram, NY

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  20. Biological applications of an LCoS-BASED PROGRAMMABLE ARRAY MICROSCOPE (PAM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, G.M.; Caarls, W.; Thomas, M.; Hill, A.; Lidke, K.A.; Rieger, B.; Fritsch, C.; Van Geest, B.; Jovin, T.M.; Arndt-Jovin, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on a new generation, commercial prototype of a programmable array optical sectioning fluorescence microscope (PAM) for rapid, light efficient 3D imaging of living specimens. The stand-alone module, including light source(s) and detector(s), features an innovative optical design and a

  1. Elemental and topographical imaging of microscopic variations in deposition on NSTX-U and DIII-D samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, C. H.; Kaita, R.; Koel, B. E.; Chrobak, C. P.; Wampler, W. R.

    2017-10-01

    Tokamak plasma facing components (PFCs) have surface roughness that can cause microscopic spatial variations in erosion and deposition and hence influence material migration. Previous RBS measurements showed indirect evidence for this but the spatial (0.5mm) resolution was insufficient for direct imaging. We will present elemental images at sub-micron resolution of deposition on NSTX-U and DiMES samples that show strong microscopic variations and correlate this with 3D topographical maps of surface irregularities. The elemental imaging is performed with a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM) that measures element-specific Auger electrons excited by an SEM electron beam. 3D topographical maps of the samples are performed with a Leica DCM 3D confocal light microscope and compared to the elemental deposition pattern. The initial results appear consistent with erosion at the downstream edges of the surface pores exposed to the incident ion flux, whereas the deeper regions are shadowed and serve as deposition traps. Support was provided through DOE Contract Numbers DE-AC02-09CH11466, DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-NA0003525.

  2. Volume 10, Issue 11-12© 2001 WILEY-VCH Verlag Berlin GmbH, Fed. Rep. of GermanySave Title to My ProfileSet E-Mail Alert Previous Issue | Next Issue > Full Issue Listing-->Volume 10, Issue 11-12, Pages 887-984(November 2001)Original PaperImaging of atomic orbitals with the Atomic Force Microscope - experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessibl, F. J.; Bielefeldt, H.; Hembacher, S.; Mannhart, J.

    2001-11-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a mechanical profiling technique that allows to image surfaces with atomic resolution. Recent progress in reducing the noise of this technique has led to a resolution level where previously undetectable symmetries of the images of single atoms are observed. These symmetries are related to the nature of the interatomic forces. The Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface is studied by AFM with various tips and AFM images are simulated with chemical and electrostatic model forces. The calculation of images from the tip-sample forces is explained in detail and the implications of the imaging parameters are discussed. Because the structure of the Si(111)-(7 × 7) surface is known very well, the shape of the adatom images is used to determine the tip structure. The observability of atomic orbitals by AFM and scanning tunneling microscopy is discussed.

  3. A high-resolution multimode digital microscope system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Edward D; Shaw, Sidney L; Waters, Jennifer C; Waterman-Storer, Clare M; Maddox, Paul S; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes the development of a high-resolution, multimode digital imaging system based on a wide-field epifluorescent and transmitted light microscope, and a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The three main parts of this imaging system are Nikon FXA microscope, Hamamatsu C4880 cooled CCD camera, and MetaMorph digital imaging system. This chapter presents various design criteria for the instrument and describes the major features of the microscope components-the cooled CCD camera and the MetaMorph digital imaging system. The Nikon FXA upright microscope can produce high resolution images for both epifluorescent and transmitted light illumination without switching the objective or moving the specimen. The functional aspects of the microscope set-up can be considered in terms of the imaging optics, the epi-illumination optics, the transillumination optics, the focus control, and the vibration isolation table. This instrument is somewhat specialized for microtubule and mitosis studies, and it is also applicable to a variety of problems in cellular imaging, including tracking proteins fused to the green fluorescent protein in live cells. The instrument is also valuable for correlating the assembly dynamics of individual cytoplasmic microtubules (labeled by conjugating X-rhodamine to tubulin) with the dynamics of membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (labeled with DiOC6) and the dynamics of the cell cortex (by differential interference contrast) in migrating vertebrate epithelial cells. This imaging system also plays an important role in the analysis of mitotic mutants in the powerful yeast genetic system Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Student-Built Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekkens, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Many introductory and nanotechnology textbooks discuss the operation of various microscopes including atomic force (AFM), scanning tunneling (STM), and scanning electron microscopes (SEM). In a nanotechnology laboratory class, students frequently utilize microscopes to obtain data without a thought about the detailed operation of the tool itself.…

  5. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  6. Microscopic Observation of Self-Propagation of Calcifying Nanoparticles (Nanobacteria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Grace; McKay, David S.; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    2007-01-01

    Biologists typically define living organisms as carbon and water-based cellular forms with :self-replication" as the fundamental trait of the life process. However, this standard dictionary definition of life does not help scientists to categorize self-replicators like viruses, prions, proteons and artificial life. CNP also named nanobacteria were discovered in early 1990s as about 100 nanometer-sized bacteria-like particles with unique apatite mineral-shells around them, and found to be associated with pathological-calcification related diseases. Although CNP have been isolated and cultured from mammalian blood and diseased calcified tissues, and their biomineralizing properties well established, their biological nature and self-replicating capability have always been severely challenged. The terms "self-replication", "self-assembly" or "self-propagation" have been widely used for all systems including nanomachines, crystals, computer viruses and memes. In a simple taxonomy, all biological and non-biological "self replicators", have been classified into "living" or "nonliving" based on the properties of the systems and the amount of support they require to self-replicate. To enhance our understanding about self-replicating nature of CNP, we have investigated their growth in specific culture conditions using conventional inverted light microscope and BioStation IM, Nikon s latest time-lapse imaging system. Their morphological structure was examined using scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. This present study, in conjunction with previous findings of metabolic activity, antibiotic sensitivity, antibody specificity, morphological aspects and infectivity, all concomitantly validate CNP as living self-replicators.

  7. Microscope use in clinical veterinary practice and potential implications for veterinary school curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Sherry M; Dowers, Kristy L; Cerda, Jacey R; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina M; Kogan, Lori R

    2014-01-01

    Microscopy (skill of using a microscope) and the concepts of cytology (study of cells) and histology (study of tissues) are most often taught in professional veterinary medicine programs through the traditional method of glass slides and light microscopes. Several limiting factors in veterinary training programs are encouraging educators to explore innovative options for teaching microscopy skills and the concepts of cytology and histology. An anonymous online survey was administered through the Colorado Veterinary Medical Association to Colorado veterinarians working in private practice. It was designed to assess their current usage of microscopes for cytological and histological evaluation of specimens and their perceptions of microscope use in their veterinary education. The first part of the survey was answered by 183 veterinarians, with 104 indicating they had an onsite diagnostic lab. Analysis pertaining to the use of the microscope in practice and in veterinary programs was conducted on this subset. Most respondents felt the amount of time spent in the curriculum using a microscope was just right for basic microscope use and using the microscope for viewing and learning about normal and abnormal histological sections and clinical cytology. Participants felt more emphasis could be placed on clinical and diagnostic cytology. Study results suggest that practicing veterinarians frequently use microscopes for a wide variety of cytological diagnostics. However, only two respondents indicated they prepared samples for histological evaluation. Veterinary schools should consider these results against the backdrop of pressure to implement innovative teaching techniques to meet the changing needs of the profession.

  8. Microscopic structure of liquid hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, M

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen makes the simplest molecular liquid. Nonetheless, due to several different reasons, measuring its microscopic structure has been one of the most challenging tasks in neutron diffraction experiments. The recent development of modern pulsed neutron sources triggered a renewed experimental interest which, in turn, led to new knowledge and also to a more effective use of the classic reactor-based experimental data. The contemporary development of quantum mechanical computer simulation techniques, and a critical comparison among the results of different experiments using steady and pulsed neutron sources, resulted in a quantitatively reliable solution of the problem. (topical review)

  9. X-ray microscopes at BESSY II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttmann, P.; Niemann, B.; Thieme, J.; Wiesemann, U.; Rudolph, D.; Schmahl, G.

    2000-01-01

    The undulator U41 at BESSY II will be used as source for X-ray microscopes. An overview of the X-ray microscopy area is presented. After finishing the construction phase a transmission X-ray microscope, a scanning transmission X-ray microscope and an X-ray test chamber will be available. The transmission X-ray microscope will allow investigations with high lateral resolution at moderate energy resolution while the scanning transmission X-ray microscope will allow high energy resolution at moderate lateral resolution of the same specimen

  10. Wolter x-ray microscope calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerassimenko, M.

    1986-01-01

    A 22 x Wolter microscope was calibrated after several months of operation in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Placing a point x-ray source at the microscope focus, I recorded the image plane spectrum, as well as the direct spectrum, and from the ratio of these two spectra derived an accurate estimate of the microscope solid angle in the 1-4 keV range. The solid angle was also calculated using the microscope geometry and composition. Comparison of this calculated value with the solid angle that was actually measured suggests contamination of the microscope surface

  11. Wolter x-ray microscope calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerassimenko, M.

    1986-06-01

    A 22 x Wolter microscope was calibrated after several months of operation in the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion program. Placing a point x-ray source at the microscope focus, I recorded the image plane spectrum, as well as the direct spectrum, and from the ratio of these two spectra derived an accurate estimate of the microscope solid angle in the 1 to 4 keV range. The solid angle was also calculated using the microscope geometry and composition. Comparison of this calculated value with the solid angle that was actually measured suggests contamination of the microscope surface

  12. Robotic autopositioning of the operating microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenlander, Mark E; Chowdhry, Shakeel A; Merkl, Brandon; Hattendorf, Guido M; Nakaji, Peter; Spetzler, Robert F

    2014-06-01

    Use of the operating microscope has become pervasive since its introduction to the neurosurgical world. Neuronavigation fused with the operating microscope has allowed accurate correlation of the focal point of the microscope and its location on the downloaded imaging study. However, the robotic ability of the Pentero microscope has not been utilized to orient the angle of the microscope or to change its focal length to hone in on a predefined target. To report a novel technology that allows automatic positioning of the operating microscope onto a set target and utilization of a planned trajectory, either determined with the StealthStation S7 by using preoperative imaging or intraoperatively with the microscope. By utilizing the current motorized capabilities of the Zeiss OPMI Pentero microscope, a robotic autopositioning feature was developed in collaboration with Surgical Technologies, Medtronic, Inc. (StealthStation S7). The system is currently being tested at the Barrow Neurological Institute. Three options were developed for automatically positioning the microscope: AutoLock Current Point, Align Parallel to Plan, and Point to Plan Target. These options allow the microscope to pivot around the lesion, hover in a set plane parallel to the determined trajectory, or rotate and point to a set target point, respectively. Integration of automatic microscope positioning into the operative workflow has potential to increase operative efficacy and safety. This technology is best suited for precise trajectories and entry points into deep-seated lesions.

  13. Circularly polarized light emission in scanning tunneling microscopy of magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apell, S.P.; Penn, D.R.; Johansson, P.

    2000-01-01

    Light is produced when a scanning tunneling microscope is used to probe a metal surface. Recent experiments on cobalt utilizing a tungsten tip found that the light is circularly polarized; the sense of circular polarization depends on the direction of the sample magnetization, and the degree of polarization is of order 10%. This raises the possibility of constructing a magnetic microscope with very good spatial resolution. We present a theory of this effect for iron and cobalt and find a degree of polarization of order 0.1%. This is in disagreement with the experiments on cobalt as well as previous theoretical work which found order of magnitude agreement with the experimental results. However, a recent experiment on iron showed 0.0±2%. We predict that the use of a silver tip would increase the degree of circular polarization for a range of photon energies

  14. A Simple Metric for Determining Resolution in Optical, Ion, and Electron Microscope Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Alexandra E; Skinner, Ryan; Sanders, Aric W

    2015-06-01

    A resolution metric intended for resolution analysis of arbitrary spatially calibrated images is presented. By fitting a simple sigmoidal function to pixel intensities across slices of an image taken perpendicular to light-dark edges, the mean distance over which the light-dark transition occurs can be determined. A fixed multiple of this characteristic distance is then reported as the image resolution. The prefactor is determined by analysis of scanning transmission electron microscope high-angle annular dark field images of Si. This metric has been applied to optical, scanning electron microscope, and helium ion microscope images. This method provides quantitative feedback about image resolution, independent of the tool on which the data were collected. In addition, our analysis provides a nonarbitrary and self-consistent framework that any end user can utilize to evaluate the resolution of multiple microscopes from any vendor using the same metric.

  15. Malaria Diagnosis Using a Mobile Phone Polarized Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirnstill, Casey W.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2015-08-01

    Malaria remains a major global health burden, and new methods for low-cost, high-sensitivity, diagnosis are essential, particularly in remote areas with low-resource around the world. In this paper, a cost effective, optical cell-phone based transmission polarized light microscope system is presented for imaging the malaria pigment known as hemozoin. It can be difficult to determine the presence of the pigment from background and other artifacts, even for skilled microscopy technicians. The pigment is much easier to observe using polarized light microscopy. However, implementation of polarized light microscopy lacks widespread adoption because the existing commercial devices have complicated designs, require sophisticated maintenance, tend to be bulky, can be expensive, and would require re-training for existing microscopy technicians. To this end, a high fidelity and high optical resolution cell-phone based polarized light microscopy system is presented which is comparable to larger bench-top polarized microscopy systems but at much lower cost and complexity. The detection of malaria in fixed and stained blood smears is presented using both, a conventional polarized microscope and our cell-phone based system. The cell-phone based polarimetric microscopy design shows the potential to have both the resolution and specificity to detect malaria in a low-cost, easy-to-use, modular platform.

  16. Aiming of Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope based on auxiliary optical system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shengling; Mu Baozhong; Yi Shengzhen; Wang Xin; Wang Zhanshan; Ding Yongkun; Miao Wenyong; Dong Jianjun

    2009-01-01

    An auxiliary optical system has been designed, which can provide precise positioning for aiming Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope object location. An 8 keV X-ray imaging system by KB microscope with periodic multilayer films has been designed. The field of view and depth of field in the resolution of 5 μm are got, and then the corresponding point and depth of field in diagnostic experiments are calculated. Based on the object-image relations and precision of the KB microscope, an auxiliary visible light imaging system is designed and X-ray imaging experiments are performed, which can achieve equivalent aiming between the visible imaging system and the KB microscope. The results show that ±20 μm vertical axis plane and ±300 μm axial accuracy are achieved through the auxiliary optical path, which can meet the object point positioning requirements of the KB microscope. (authors)

  17. Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optical switch that operates with a few hundred photons per switching pulse. The light-light interaction is mediated by laser-cooled atoms. The required strong interaction between atoms and light is achieved by simultaneously confining photons and atoms inside the microscopic...

  18. A portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Yang, Chaoyu; Gan, Qi; Ma, Rong; Zhang, Zeshu; Chang, Shufang; Shao, Pengfei; Zhang, Shiwu; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we proposed a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system to prevent iatrogenic biliary injuries from occurring during cholecystectomy due to misidentification of the cystic structures. The system consisted of a light source module, a CMOS camera, a Raspberry Pi computer and a 5 inch HDMI LCD. Specifically, the light source module was composed of 690 nm and 850 nm LEDs, allowing the CMOS camera to simultaneously acquire both fluorescence and background images. The system was controlled by Raspberry Pi using Python programming with the OpenCV library under Linux. We chose Indocyanine green(ICG) as a fluorescent contrast agent and then tested fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels by our fluorescence microscopic system compared with the commercial Xenogen IVIS system. The spatial resolution of the proposed fluorescence microscopic imaging system was measured by a 1951 USAF resolution target and the dynamic response was evaluated quantitatively with an automatic displacement platform. Finally, we verified the technical feasibility of the proposed system in mouse models of bile duct, performing both correct and incorrect gallbladder resection. Our experiments showed that the proposed system can provide clear visualization of the confluence between the cystic duct and common bile duct or common hepatic duct, suggesting that this is a potential method for guiding cholecystectomy. The proposed portable system only cost a total of $300, potentially promoting its use in resource-limited settings.

  19. Modulus design multiwavelength polarization microscope for transmission Mueller matrix imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jialing; He, Honghui; Chen, Zhenhua; Wang, Ye; Ma, Hui

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a polarization microscope based on a commercial transmission microscope. We replace the halogen light source by a collimated LED light source module of six different colors. We use achromatic polarized optical elements that can cover the six different wavelength ranges in the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state analyzer (PSA) modules. The dual-rotating wave plate method is used to measure the Mueller matrix of samples, which requires the simultaneous rotation of the two quarter-wave plates in both PSG and PSA at certain angular steps. A scientific CCD detector is used as the image receiving module. A LabView-based software is developed to control the rotation angels of the wave plates and the exposure time of the detector to allow the system to run fully automatically in preprogrammed schedules. Standard samples, such as air, polarizers, and quarter-wave plates, are used to calibrate the intrinsic Mueller matrix of optical components, such as the objectives, using the eigenvalue calibration method. Errors due to the images walk-off in the PSA are studied. Errors in the Mueller matrices are below 0.01 using air and polarizer as standard samples. Data analysis based on Mueller matrix transformation and Mueller matrix polarization decomposition is used to demonstrate the potential application of this microscope in pathological diagnosis. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  20. Accurate measurement of microscopic forces and torques using optical tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Forbes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is now well known that matter may be trapped by optical fields with high intensity gradients. Once trapped, it is then possible to manipulate microscopic particles using such optical fields, in so-called optical tweezers. Such optical trapping and tweezing systems have found widespread application across diverse fields in science, from applied biology to fundamental physics. In this article we outline the design and construction of an optical trapping and tweezing system, and show how the resulting interaction of the laser light with microscopic particles may be understood in terms of the transfer of linear and angular momentum of light. We demonstrate experimentally the use of our optical tweezing configuration for the measurement of microscopic forces and torques. In particular, we make use of digital holography to create so-called vortex laser beams, capable of transferring orbital angular momentum to particles. The use of such novel laser beams in an optical trapping and tweezing set-up allows for the control of biological species at the single-cell level.

  1. Sensing of Streptococcus mutans by microscopic imaging ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaleel, Mai Ibrahim; Chen, Yu-Da; Chien, Ching-Hang; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2017-05-01

    Microscopic imaging ellipsometry is an optical technique that uses an objective and sensing procedure to measure the ellipsometric parameters Ψ and Δ in the form of microscopic maps. This technique is well known for being noninvasive and label-free. Therefore, it can be used to detect and characterize biological species without any impact. Microscopic imaging ellipsometry was used to measure the optical response of dried Streptococcus mutans cells on a glass substrate. The ellipsometric Ψ and Δ maps were obtained with the Optrel Multiskop system for specular reflection in the visible range (λ=450 to 750 nm). The Ψ and Δ images at 500, 600, and 700 nm were analyzed using three different theoretical models with single-bounce, two-bounce, and multibounce light paths to obtain the optical constants and height distribution. The obtained images of the optical constants show different aspects when comparing the single-bounce analysis with the two-bounce or multibounce analysis in detecting S. mutans samples. Furthermore, the height distributions estimated by two-bounce and multibounce analyses of S. mutans samples were in agreement with the thickness values measured by AFM, which implies that the two-bounce and multibounce analyses can provide information complementary to that obtained by a single-bounce light path.

  2. Modulus design multiwavelength polarization microscope for transmission Mueller matrix imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jialing; He, Honghui; Chen, Zhenhua; Wang, Ye; Ma, Hui

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a polarization microscope based on a commercial transmission microscope. We replace the halogen light source by a collimated LED light source module of six different colors. We use achromatic polarized optical elements that can cover the six different wavelength ranges in the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state analyzer (PSA) modules. The dual-rotating wave plate method is used to measure the Mueller matrix of samples, which requires the simultaneous rotation of the two quarter-wave plates in both PSG and PSA at certain angular steps. A scientific CCD detector is used as the image receiving module. A LabView-based software is developed to control the rotation angels of the wave plates and the exposure time of the detector to allow the system to run fully automatically in preprogrammed schedules. Standard samples, such as air, polarizers, and quarter-wave plates, are used to calibrate the intrinsic Mueller matrix of optical components, such as the objectives, using the eigenvalue calibration method. Errors due to the images walk-off in the PSA are studied. Errors in the Mueller matrices are below 0.01 using air and polarizer as standard samples. Data analysis based on Mueller matrix transformation and Mueller matrix polarization decomposition is used to demonstrate the potential application of this microscope in pathological diagnosis.

  3. Ultrashort pulse-propagation effects in a semiconductor optical amplifier: Microscopic theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, S.; Borri, P.; Knorr, A.

    2001-01-01

    We present microscopic modeling and experimental measurements of femtosecond-pulse interactions in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Two novel nonlinear propagation effects are demonstrated: pulse breakup in the gain regime and pulse compression in the transparency regime. These propagation...... phenomena highlight the microscopic origin and important role of adiabatic following in semiconductor optical amplifiers. Fundamental light-matter interactions are discussed in detail and possible applications are highlighted....

  4. Single-cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D R; Lee, K; Park, H; Weissleder, R; Yacoby, A; Lukin, M D; Lee, H; Walsworth, R L; Connolly, C B

    2015-08-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope for detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and a field of view (∼1 mm(2)) two orders of magnitude larger than that of previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantified cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells.

  5. Single cell magnetic imaging using a quantum diamond microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H.; Weissleder, R.; Yacoby, A.; Lukin, M. D.; Lee, H.; Walsworth, R. L.; Connolly, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    We apply a quantum diamond microscope to detection and imaging of immunomagnetically labeled cells. This instrument uses nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond for correlated magnetic and fluorescence imaging. Our device provides single-cell resolution and two orders of magnitude larger field of view (~1 mm2) than previous NV imaging technologies, enabling practical applications. To illustrate, we quantify cancer biomarkers expressed by rare tumor cells in a large population of healthy cells. PMID:26098019

  6. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  7. The impact of loupes and microscopes on vision in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, P; Neuhaus, K W; Lussi, A

    2014-05-01

    To report on an intraradicular visual test in a simulated clinical setting under different optical conditions. Miniaturized visual tests with E-optotypes (bar distance from 0.01 to 0.05 mm) were fixed inside the root canal system of an extracted maxillary molar at different locations: at the orifice, a depth of 5 mm and the apex. The tooth was mounted in a phantom head for a simulated clinical setting. Unaided vision was compared with Galilean loupes (2.5× magnification) with integrated light source and an operating microscope (6× magnification). The influence of the dentists' age within two groups was evaluated: endodontic instruments. Dentists over 40 years of age were dependent on the microscope to inspect the root canal system. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. An optoelectronic system for trans microscopic registration of oscillatory contraction phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shraideh, A. Z.; Salman, Y. M.

    1998-01-01

    A trans microscope registration electronic system using cadmium sulphide photoconductive cell as light dependent resistor is described. This photocell has a spectral response similar to that of the human eye and enable registration of cellular motion phenomena along with their microscopic observation. The photocell is of the type ORP 12 which when replacing one of the oculars of the light microscope, can register changes in light intensity caused due to any movement of the studied living objects. The large diameter sensing element allows registration of full size of the contractile objects with a wide range of spectral sensitivity. Its application is reported for investigating the oscillatory contraction activity of plasmodial strands of the slime mold physarum polycephalum. (authors). 15 refs., 7 figs.,

  9. Design of a transmission electron positron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, Masao; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshii, T.; Kurihara, T.; Tsuno, K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the plans and design of positron-electron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan. A used electron microscope is altered. The kinetic energies of positrons produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays are not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam is guided to a transmission electron microscope (JEM100SX). Positrons are moderated by a tungsten foil, are accelerated and are focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam is injected into an electron microscope. The focusing and aberration of positrons are the same as electrons in a magnetic system which are used in commercial electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (author)

  10. Sparsity based sub-wavelength imaging with partially incoherent light via quadratic compressed sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Yoav; Eldar, Yonina C; Szameit, Alexander; Segev, Mordechai

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate that sub-wavelength optical images borne on partially-spatially-incoherent light can be recovered, from their far-field or from the blurred image, given the prior knowledge that the image is sparse, and only that. The reconstruction method relies on the recently demonstrated sparsity-based sub-wavelength imaging. However, for partially-spatially-incoherent light, the relation between the measurements and the image is quadratic, yielding non-convex measurement equations that do not conform to previously used techniques. Consequently, we demonstrate new algorithmic methodology, referred to as quadratic compressed sensing, which can be applied to a range of other problems involving information recovery from partial correlation measurements, including when the correlation function has local dependencies. Specifically for microscopy, this method can be readily extended to white light microscopes with the additional knowledge of the light source spectrum.

  11. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties.

  12. Testing microscopes between market and scientific strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ratcliff, Marc

    2007-01-01

    This paper claims that the testing of microscopes during the eighteenth century reveals specific types of interaction between makers and users and links between scientific and economic interests. Basic procedures for the comparison and test of microscopes existed already in the Enlightenment although many historians thought that these were invented during the nineteenth century. The paper discusses three kinds of tests, advertising, the admission of a microscope in the laboratory, and finally...

  13. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  14. Microscopic description of magnetized plasma: quasiparticle concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosenko, P.P.; Decyk, V.K.

    1993-01-01

    A quasiparticle concept is developed systematically, from first principles, within the context of microscopic description of magnetized plasma. It is argued that the zeroth velocity-gyroangle harmonic of the microscopic particle distribution function under the gyrokinetic change of variables can be taken as a microscopic quasi-particle density in a reduced phase space. The nature of quasiparticles is discussed and equations of their motion are derived within both exact and reduced microscopic descriptions. The reduced one employs explicitly the separation of interesting time scales. (orig.)

  15. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  16. Occupant Controlled Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Logadóttir, Ásta

    2011-01-01

    preferences for correlated colour temperature (CCT). The results suggest that the method of adjustment, previously used in the lighting literature, is not adequate to generalize about occupant preferences for illuminance or CCT. Factors that influence occupants’ lighting preference when applying the method...

  17. Microsphere-based super-resolution scanning optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszka, Gergely; Yang, Hui; Gijs, Martin A M

    2017-06-26

    High-refractive index dielectric microspheres positioned within the field of view of a microscope objective in a dielectric medium can focus the light into a so-called photonic nanojet. A sample placed in such nanojet can be imaged by the objective with super-resolution, i.e. with a resolution beyond the classical diffraction limit. However, when imaging nanostructures on a substrate, the propagation distance of a light wave in the dielectric medium in between the substrate and the microsphere must be small enough to reveal the sample's nanometric features. Therefore, only the central part of an image obtained through a microsphere shows super-resolution details, which are typically ∼100 nm using white light (peak at λ = 600 nm). We have performed finite element simulations of the role of this critical distance in the super-resolution effect. Super-resolution imaging of a sample placed beneath the microsphere is only possible within a very restricted central area of ∼10 μm 2 , where the separation distance between the substrate and the microsphere surface is very small (∼1 μm). To generate super-resolution images over larger areas of the sample, we have fixed a microsphere on a frame attached to the microscope objective, which is automatically scanned over the sample in a step-by-step fashion. This generates a set of image tiles, which are subsequently stitched into a single super-resolution image (with resolution of λ/4-λ/5) of a sample area of up to ∼10 4 μm 2 . Scanning a standard optical microscope objective with microsphere therefore enables super-resolution microscopy over the complete field-of-view of the objective.

  18. A transmission positron microscope and a scanning positron microscope being built at KEK, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyama, M.; Inoue, M.; Kogure, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Yagishita, A.; Shidara, T.; Nakahara, K.; Hayashi, Y.; Yoshiie, T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the plans of positron microscopes being built at KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization), Tsukuba, Japan improving used electron microscopes. The kinetic energies of positron produced by accelerators or by nuclear decays have not a unique value but show a spread over in a wide range. Positron beam will be guided near electron microscopes, a transmission electron microscope (JEM100S) and a scanning electron microscope (JSM25S). Positrons are slowed down by a tungsten foil, accelerated and focused on a nickel sheet. The monochromatic focused beam will be injected into an electron microscope. The focusing of positrons and electrons is achieved by magnetic system of the electron microscopes. Imaging plates are used to record positron images for the transmission electron microscope. (orig.)

  19. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-21

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  20. Hamiltonian mechanics limits microscopic engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, James; Gilz, Lukas; Thesing, Eike

    2015-05-01

    We propose a definition of fully microscopic engines (micro-engines) in terms of pure mechanics, without reference to thermodynamics, equilibrium, or cycles imposed by external control, and without invoking ergodic theory. This definition is pragmatically based on the observation that what makes engines useful is energy transport across a large ratio of dynamical time scales. We then prove that classical and quantum mechanics set non-trivial limits-of different kinds-on how much of the energy that a micro-engine extracts from its fuel can be converted into work. Our results are not merely formal; they imply manageable design constraints on micro-engines. They also suggest the novel possibility that thermodynamics does not emerge from mechanics in macroscopic regimes, but rather represents the macroscopic limit of a generalized theory, valid on all scales, which governs the important phenomenon of energy transport across large time scale ratios. We propose experimental realizations of the dynamical mechanisms we identify, with trapped ions and in Bose-Einstein condensates (``motorized bright solitons'').

  1. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  2. Microcircuit failure analysis using the SEM. [Scanning Electron Microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    The scanning electron microscope adds a new dimension to the knowledge that can be obtained from a failed microcircuit. When used with conventional techniques, SEM assists and clarifies the analysis, but it does not replace light microscopy. The most advantageous features for microcircuit analysis are long working distances and great depth of field. Manufacturer related failure modes of microcircuits are metallization defects, poor bonding, surface and particle contamination, and design and fabrication faults. User related failure modes are caused by abuse, such as overstress. The Physics of Failure Procedure followed by the Astrionics Laboratory in failure analysis is described, which is designed to obtain maximum information available from each step.

  3. Cathodoluminescence studies of phosphors in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Paul; Den Engelsen, Daniel; Ireland, Terry; Fern, George; Silver, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence studies are reported of phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). A number of phosphor materials have been studied and exhibited a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates, because the particle continued to emit light after the beam had moved onto subsequent pixels. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. This technique provides a simple and convenient way to study the decay times of individual particles. (paper)

  4. Multibeam scanning electron microscope : Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the first results obtained with their multibeam scanning electron microscope. For the first time, they were able to image 196 (array of 14×14) focused beams of a multielectron beam source on a specimen using single beam scanning electron microscope (SEM) optics. The system

  5. Microscopic colitis : an unfamiliar but treatable disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, E. J.; Karrenbeld, A.; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Dijkstra, G.

    Chronic diarrhoea is a frequent complaint in clinical practice. Microscopic colitis is the cause of this symptom in 10% of these cases and the prevalence is rising. To exclude microscopic colitis a colonoscopy with multiple biopsies of different regions of the colon is mandatory. A sigmoidoscopy

  6. Quantum theory and microscopic mechanics. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yussouff, M.

    1984-08-01

    The need for theoretical descriptions and experimental observations on 'small' individual systems is emphasized. It is shown that the mathematical basis for microscopic mechanics is very simple in one dimension. The square well problem is discussed to clarify general points about stationary states and the continuity of (p'/p) across potential boundaries in the applications of microscopic mechanics. (author)

  7. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  8. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  9. Microscopic Characterization of Scalable Coherent Rydberg Superatoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiher, Johannes; Schauß, Peter; Hild, Sebastian; Macrı, Tommaso; Bloch, Immanuel; Gross, Christian

    2015-07-01

    Strong interactions can amplify quantum effects such that they become important on macroscopic scales. Controlling these coherently on a single-particle level is essential for the tailored preparation of strongly correlated quantum systems and opens up new prospects for quantum technologies. Rydberg atoms offer such strong interactions, which lead to extreme nonlinearities in laser-coupled atomic ensembles. As a result, multiple excitation of a micrometer-sized cloud can be blocked while the light-matter coupling becomes collectively enhanced. The resulting two-level system, often called a "superatom," is a valuable resource for quantum information, providing a collective qubit. Here, we report on the preparation of 2 orders of magnitude scalable superatoms utilizing the large interaction strength provided by Rydberg atoms combined with precise control of an ensemble of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. The latter is achieved with sub-shot-noise precision by local manipulation of a two-dimensional Mott insulator. We microscopically confirm the superatom picture by in situ detection of the Rydberg excitations and observe the characteristic square-root scaling of the optical coupling with the number of atoms. Enabled by the full control over the atomic sample, including the motional degrees of freedom, we infer the overlap of the produced many-body state with a W state from the observed Rabi oscillations and deduce the presence of entanglement. Finally, we investigate the breakdown of the superatom picture when two Rydberg excitations are present in the system, which leads to dephasing and a loss of coherence.

  10. Microscopic Characterization of Scalable Coherent Rydberg Superatoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Zeiher

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Strong interactions can amplify quantum effects such that they become important on macroscopic scales. Controlling these coherently on a single-particle level is essential for the tailored preparation of strongly correlated quantum systems and opens up new prospects for quantum technologies. Rydberg atoms offer such strong interactions, which lead to extreme nonlinearities in laser-coupled atomic ensembles. As a result, multiple excitation of a micrometer-sized cloud can be blocked while the light-matter coupling becomes collectively enhanced. The resulting two-level system, often called a “superatom,” is a valuable resource for quantum information, providing a collective qubit. Here, we report on the preparation of 2 orders of magnitude scalable superatoms utilizing the large interaction strength provided by Rydberg atoms combined with precise control of an ensemble of ultracold atoms in an optical lattice. The latter is achieved with sub-shot-noise precision by local manipulation of a two-dimensional Mott insulator. We microscopically confirm the superatom picture by in situ detection of the Rydberg excitations and observe the characteristic square-root scaling of the optical coupling with the number of atoms. Enabled by the full control over the atomic sample, including the motional degrees of freedom, we infer the overlap of the produced many-body state with a W state from the observed Rabi oscillations and deduce the presence of entanglement. Finally, we investigate the breakdown of the superatom picture when two Rydberg excitations are present in the system, which leads to dephasing and a loss of coherence.

  11. Evaluation of a miniature microscope objective designed for fluorescence array microscopy detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Brian; Olsen, Randall J; Nelles, Nicole J; Williams, Dawn L; Jackson, Kevin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Graviss, Edward A; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S

    2014-03-01

    A prototype miniature objective that was designed for a point-of-care diagnostic array microscope for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and previously fabricated and presented in a proof of concept is evaluated for its effectiveness in detecting acid-fast bacteria. To evaluate the ability of the microscope to resolve submicron features and details in the image of acid-fast microorganisms stained with a fluorescent dye, and to evaluate the accuracy of clinical diagnoses made with digital images acquired with the objective. The lens prescription data for the microscope design are presented. A test platform is built by combining parts of a standard microscope, a prototype objective, and a digital single-lens reflex camera. Counts of acid-fast bacteria made with the prototype objective are compared to counts obtained with a standard microscope over matched fields of view. Two sets of 20 smears, positive and negative, are diagnosed by 2 pathologists as sputum smear positive or sputum smear negative, using both a standard clinical microscope and the prototype objective under evaluation. The results are compared to a reference diagnosis of the same sample. More bacteria are counted in matched fields of view in digital images taken with the prototype objective than with the standard clinical microscope. All diagnostic results are found to be highly concordant. An array microscope built with this miniature lens design will be able to detect M tuberculosis with high sensitivity and specificity.

  12. Line-scanning tomographic optical microscope with isotropic transfer function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajdátsy, Gábor; Dudás, László; Erdélyi, Miklós; Szabó, Gábor

    2010-01-01

    An imaging method and optical system, referred to as a line-scanning tomographic optical microscope (LSTOM) using a combination of line-scanning technique and CT reconstruction principle, is proposed and studied theoretically and experimentally. In our implementation a narrow focus line is scanned over the sample and the reflected light is measured in a confocal arrangement. One such scan is equivalent to a transverse projection in tomography. Repeating the scanning procedure in several directions, a number of transverse projections are recorded from which the image can be obtained using conventional CT reconstruction algorithms. The resolution of the image is independent of the spatial dimensions and structure of the applied detector; furthermore, the transfer function of the system is isotropic. The imaging performance of the implemented confocal LSTOM was compared with a point-scanning confocal microscope, based on recorded images. These images demonstrate that the resolution of the confocal LSTOM exceeds (by 15%) the resolution limit of a point-scanning confocal microscope

  13. An Assemblable, Multi-Angle Fluorescence and Ellipsometric Microscope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Nguyen

    Full Text Available We introduce a multi-functional microscope for research laboratories that have significant cost and space limitations. The microscope pivots around the sample, operating in upright, inverted, side-on and oblique geometries. At these geometries it is able to perform bright-field, fluorescence and qualitative ellipsometric imaging. It is the first single instrument in the literature to be able to perform all of these functionalities. The system can be assembled by two undergraduate students from a provided manual in less than a day, from off-the-shelf and 3D printed components, which together cost approximately $16k at 2016 market prices. We include a highly specified assembly manual, a summary of design methodologies, and all associated 3D-printing files in hopes that the utility of the design outlives the current component market. This open design approach prepares readers to customize the instrument to specific needs and applications. We also discuss how to select household LEDs as low-cost light sources for fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate the utility of the microscope in varied geometries and functionalities, with particular emphasis on studying hydrated, solid-supported lipid films and wet biological samples.

  14. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  15. Light Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegel, Kurt W.

    1973-01-01

    Outdoor lighting is light pollution which handicaps certain astronomical programs. Protective measures must be adopted by the government to aid observational astronomy without sacrificing legitimate outdoor lighting needs. (PS)

  16. Development of new microscope unit for single molecule spectroscopy under various ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, T; Kaji, T; Ueda, R; Otomo, A

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces techniques we previously developed for single molecule spectroscopy and continues on to describe our studies on dipole orientation imaging of single molecules under various ambient conditions. In these studies, we successfully obtained defocused images of single perylene diimide (PDI) molecules under air, high-vacuum, and pure N 2 gas conditions by utilizing the advantages of our new microscope unit. The studies are positioned as one of the important applications of our microscope unit for single molecule spectroscopy. We expect a wide range of applications for this unit for various microscope measurements for many types of materials.

  17. Differentiating characteristic microstructural features of cancerous tissues using Mueller matrix microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; He, Honghui; Chang, Jintao; Zeng, Nan; Liu, Shaoxiong; Li, Migao; Ma, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Polarized light imaging can provide rich microstructural information of samples, and has been applied to the detections of various abnormal tissues. In this paper, we report a polarized light microscope based on Mueller matrix imaging by adding the polarization state generator and analyzer (PSG and PSA) to a commercial transmission optical microscope. The maximum errors for the absolute values of Mueller matrix elements are reduced to 0.01 after calibration. This Mueller matrix microscope has been used to examine human cervical and liver cancerous tissues with fibrosis. Images of the transformed Mueller matrix parameters provide quantitative assessment on the characteristic features of the pathological tissues. Contrast mechanism of the experimental results are backed up by Monte Carlo simulations based on the sphere-cylinder birefringence model, which reveal the relationship between the pathological features in the cancerous tissues at the cellular level and the polarization parameters. Both the experimental and simulated data indicate that the microscopic transformed Mueller matrix parameters can distinguish the breaking down of birefringent normal tissues for cervical cancer, or the formation of birefringent surrounding structures accompanying the inflammatory reaction for liver cancer. With its simple structure, fast measurement and high precision, polarized light microscope based on Mueller matrix shows a good diagnosis application prospect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Atomic force microscopic imaging of Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Ateeq, Muhammad; Raza Shah, Muhammad; Kulsoom, Huma; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy have been successfully used in the study of microbes, as well as free-living protists. Unlike light microscopy, which enables us to observe living organisms or the electron microscope which provides a two-dimensional image, atomic force microscopy provides a three-dimensional surface profile. Here, we observed two free-living amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii and Balamuthia mandrillaris under the phase contrast inverted microscope, transmission electron microscope and atomic force microscope. Although light microscopy was of lower magnification, it revealed functional biology of live amoebae such as motility and osmoregulation using contractile vacuoles of the trophozoite stage, but it is of limited value in defining the cyst stage. In contrast, transmission electron microscopy showed significantly greater magnification and resolution to reveal the ultra-structural features of trophozoites and cysts including intracellular organelles and cyst wall characteristics but it only produced a snapshot in time of a dead amoeba cell. Atomic force microscopy produced three-dimensional images providing detailed topographic description of shape and surface, phase imaging measuring boundary stiffness, and amplitude measurements including width, height and length of A. castellanii and B. mandrillaris trophozoites and cysts. These results demonstrate the importance of the application of various microscopic methods in the biological and structural characterization of the whole cell, ultra-structural features, as well as surface components and cytoskeleton of protist pathogens. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  19. And then there were 12--distinguishing Van Leeuwenhoek microscopes from old or new copies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Lesley A

    2015-07-01

    In the wake of announcements of the authentications of two previously unknown Van Leeuwenhoek microscopes in one month, this paper reviews the possibilities and potential pitfalls that might be involved in distinguishing 17th/18th century single-lensed microscopes from historical and modern copies. It is clear that a combination of characteristics must be considered, no single parameter will do. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Microscopic single-crystal refractometry as a function of wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L.D.

    1994-01-01

    The refractive indices of crystal fragments 50--200 μm in size can be measured for light wavelengths between 365 and 1100 nm with a spindle-stage refractometer. Established methods from optical crystallograpy are used to orient a crystal on the microscope spindle stage and then to match its refractive index to an immersion fluid. The refractive index of the fluid for the wavelength of light and matching temperature is determined by comparison of a reference crystal on a second spindle axis with the fluid under the match conditions. Investigations of new nonlinear-optical crystals admirably demonstrate the advantages of measuring the refractive index to ± 0.0004 in small single crystals

  1. Handbook of advanced lighting technology

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Ching-Cherng; Zissis, Georges; Ma, Ruiqing

    2017-01-01

    The Handbook of Advanced Lighting Technology is a major reference work on the subject of light source science and technology, with particular focus on solid-state light sources – LEDs and OLEDs – and the development of 'smart' or 'intelligent' lighting systems; and the integration of advanced light sources, sensors, and adaptive control architectures to provide tailored illumination which is 'fit to purpose.' The concept of smart lighting goes hand-in-hand with the development of solid-state light sources, which offer levels of control not previously available with conventional lighting systems. This has impact not only at the scale of the individual user, but also at an environmental and wider economic level. These advances have enabled and motivated significant research activity on the human factors of lighting, particularly related to the impact of lighting on healthcare and education, and the Handbook provides detailed reviews of work in these areas. The potential applications for smart lighting span ...

  2. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  3. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  4. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  5. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  6. Comparative study of image contrast in scanning electron microscope and helium ion microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhou, Y; Fox, D; Maguire, P; Wang, J J; Rodenburg, C

    2017-12-01

    Images of Ga + -implanted amorphous silicon layers in a 110 n-type silicon substrate have been collected by a range of detectors in a scanning electron microscope and a helium ion microscope. The effects of the implantation dose and imaging parameters (beam energy, dwell time, etc.) on the image contrast were investigated. We demonstrate a similar relationship for both the helium ion microscope Everhart-Thornley and scanning electron microscope Inlens detectors between the contrast of the images and the Ga + density and imaging parameters. These results also show that dynamic charging effects have a significant impact on the quantification of the helium ion microscope and scanning electron microscope contrast. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  7. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  8. Operating microscopes: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluç, Kutluay; Kujoth, Gregory C; Başkaya, Mustafa K

    2009-09-01

    The operating microscope is a fixture of modern surgical facilities, and it is a critically important factor in the success of many of the most complex and difficult surgical interventions used in medicine today. The rise of this key surgical tool reflects advances in understanding the principles of optics and vision that have occurred over centuries. The development of reading spectacles in the late 13th century led to the construction of early compound microscopes in the 16th and 17th centuries by Lippershey, Janssen, Galileo, Hooke, and others. Perhaps surprisingly, Leeuwenhoek's simple microscopes of this era offered improved performance over his contemporaries' designs. The intervening years saw improvements that reduced the spherical and chromatic aberrations present in compound microscopes. By the late 19th century, Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe ushered the compound microscope into the beginnings of the modern era of commercial design and production. The introduction of the microscope into the operating room by Nylén in 1921 initiated a revolution in surgical practice that gained momentum throughout the 1950s with multiple refinements, the introduction of the Zeiss OPMI series, and Kurze's application of the microscope to neurosurgery in 1957. Many of the refinements of the last 50 years have greatly improved the handling and practical operation of the surgical microscope, considerations which are equally important to its optical performance. Today's sophisticated operating microscopes allow for advanced real-time angiographic and tumor imaging. In this paper the authors discuss what might be found in the operating rooms of tomorrow.

  9. Microscope-Based Fluid Physics Experiments in the Fluids and Combustion Facility on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Motil, Susan M.; Snead, John H.; Malarik, Diane C.

    2000-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the Microgravity Science Program is planning to conduct a large number of experiments on the International Space Station in both the Fluid Physics and Combustion Science disciplines, and is developing flight experiment hardware for use within the International Space Station's Fluids and Combustion Facility. Four fluids physics experiments that require an optical microscope will be sequentially conducted within a subrack payload to the Fluids Integrated Rack of the Fluids and Combustion Facility called the Light Microscopy Module, which will provide the containment, changeout, and diagnostic capabilities to perform the experiments. The Light Microscopy Module is planned as a fully remotely controllable on-orbit microscope facility, allowing flexible scheduling and control of experiments within International Space Station resources. This paper will focus on the four microscope-based experiments, specifically, their objectives and the sample cell and instrument hardware to accommodate their requirements.

  10. The Mathematical Microscope - Making the inaccessible accessible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2011-01-01

      In this chapter we introduce a new term, the "Mathematical Microscope", as a method of using mathematics in accessing information about reality when this information is otherwise inaccessible. Furthermore, we discuss how models and experiments are related: none of which are important without...... the other. In the sciences and medicine, a link that is often missing in the chain of a system can be made visible with the aid of the mathematical microscope. The mathematical microscope serves not only as a lens to clarify a blurred picture but more important as a tool to unveil profound truths...

  11. Microscopes for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    One part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer instrument for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is a pair of telescopes with a special wheel (on the right in this photograph) for presenting samples to be inspected with the microscopes. A horizontally mounted optical microscope (on the left in this photograph) and an atomic force microscope will examine soil particles and possibly ice particles. The shapes and the size distributions of soil particles may tell scientists about environmental conditions the material has experienced. Tumbling rounds the edges. Repeated wetting and freezing causes cracking. Clay minerals formed during long exposure to water have distinctive, platy particles shapes.

  12. Imaging optical scattering of butterfly wing scales with a microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jinxin; Yoon, Beom-Jin; Park, Jung Ok; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2017-08-06

    A new optical method is proposed to investigate the reflectance of structurally coloured objects, such as Morpho butterfly wing scales and cholesteric liquid crystals. Using a reflected-light microscope and a digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, we have successfully measured the two-dimensional reflection pattern of individual wing scales of Morpho butterflies. We demonstrate that this method enables us to measure the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). The scattering image observed in the back focal plane of the objective is projected onto the camera sensor by inserting a Bertrand lens in the optical path of the microscope. With monochromatic light illumination, we quantify the angle-dependent reflectance spectra from the wing scales of Morpho rhetenor by retrieving the raw signal from the digital camera sensor. We also demonstrate that the polarization-dependent reflection of individual wing scales is readily observed using this method, using the individual wing scales of Morpho cypris . In an effort to show the generality of the method, we used a chiral nematic fluid to illustrate the angle-dependent reflectance as seen by this method.

  13. Parallel electron-beam-induced deposition using a multi-beam scanning electron microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, P.C.; Mohammadi-Gheidari, A.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2011-01-01

    Lithography techniques based on electron-beam-induced processes are inherently slow compared to light lithography techniques. The authors demonstrate here that the throughput can be enhanced by a factor of 196 by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a multibeam electron source. Using

  14. Microscopic Cluster Models: application to the structure of the {sup 16}B nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, M [IPHC Bat27, IN2P3-CNRS/Universite de Strasbourg BP28, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Descouvemont, P, E-mail: marianne.dufour@iphc.cnrs.fr [Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, C.P. 229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-09-16

    General aspects of microscopic cluster models based on the combination of the Generator-Coordinate-Method and of the R-matrix method are presented. The adequacy of such methods to describe the physics of exotic light nuclei is illustrated with the unbound {sup 16}B nucleus.

  15. Quasi interference of perpendicularly polarized guided modes observed with a photon scanning tunneling microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balistreri, M.L.M.; Driessen, A.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Kuipers, L.; van Hulst, N.F.

    2000-01-01

    The simultaneous detection of TE- as well as TM-polarized light with a photon scanning tunneling microscope leads to a quasi- interference pattern of these mutually perpendicular polarized fields. This interference pattern has been observed in the optical field distribution as a function of both

  16. Configurations of the Re-scan Confocal Microscope (RCM) for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Luca, G. M. R.; Desclos, E.; Breedijk, R. M. P.; Dolz-Edo, L.; Smits, G. J.; Bielefeld, P.; Picavet, L.; Fitzsimons, C. P.; Hoebe, R.; Manders, E. M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The new high-sensitive and high-resolution technique, Re-scan Confocal Microscopy (RCM), is based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan detection unit. The re-scan unit includes a pair of re-scanning mirrors that project the emission light onto a camera in a scanning manner. The

  17. Three-dimensional automated nanoparticle tracking using Mie scattering in an optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gineste, J-M; Macko, P; Patterson, E A; Whelan, M P

    2011-08-01

    The forward scattering of light in a conventional inverted optical microscope by nanoparticles ranging in diameter from 10 to 50nm has been used to automatically and quantitatively identify and track their location in three-dimensions with a temporal resolution of 200ms. The standard deviation of the location of nominally stationary 50-nm-diameter nanoparticles was found to be about 50nm along the light path and about 5nm in the plane perpendicular to the light path. The method is based on oscillating the microscope objective along the light path using a piezo actuator and acquiring images with the condenser aperture closed to a minimum to enhance the effects of diffraction. Data processing in the time and spatial domains allowed the location of particles to be obtained automatically so that the technique has potential applications both in the processing of nanoparticles and in their use in a variety of fields including nanobiotechnology, pharmaceuticals and food processing where a simple optical microscope maybe preferred for a variety of reasons. © 2011 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2011 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Macro-microscopic anatomy: obtaining a composite view of barrier zone formation in Acer saccharum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth Dudzik

    1988-01-01

    The technique for constructing a montage of large wood sections cut on a sliding microtome is discussed. Briefly, the technique involves photographing many serial micrographs in a pattern under a light microscope similar to the way flight lines are run in aerial photography. Assembly of the resulting overlapping photographs requires careful trimming. A composite of...

  19. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  20. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  1. "Tangible Lights"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tor; Merritt, Timothy; Andersen, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    interaction with lighting technology beyond the smartphone and physical controllers. We examine the usefulness of the in-air gestural interaction style for lighting control. We bring forward "Tangible Lights", which serves as a novel interface for in-air interaction with lighting, drawing on existing...

  2. Light contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepeda Pena, William Enrique

    1998-01-01

    The article tries on the wrong use of the artificial light, of the main problems of the light contamination, dispersion of the light, noxious effects of the light contamination, ecological effects, effects on the man's biological rhythm, economic effects and effects about the civic and vial security, among other topics

  3. phytochemical and microscopical evaluation of desmodium velutinum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-06-01

    , transverse and longitudinal sections of the leaves of .... quantity for preliminary screening and biological studies. Microscopical Examination .... subnitrate dissolved in 20ml acetic acid, made up to 100ml with distilled water).

  4. Feedback regulation of microscopes by image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukada, Yuki; Hashimoto, Koichi

    2013-05-01

    Computational microscope systems are becoming a major part of imaging biological phenomena, and the development of such systems requires the design of automated regulation of microscopes. An important aspect of automated regulation is feedback regulation, which is the focus of this review. As modern microscope systems become more complex, often with many independent components that must work together, computer control is inevitable since the exact orchestration of parameters and timings for these multiple components is critical to acquire proper images. A number of techniques have been developed for biological imaging to accomplish this. Here, we summarize the basics of computational microscopy for the purpose of building automatically regulated microscopes focus on feedback regulation by image processing. These techniques allow high throughput data acquisition while monitoring both short- and long-term dynamic phenomena, which cannot be achieved without an automated system. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  5. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F

    2014-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nucleon relativistic phenomenological and microscopic optical potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Qingbiao; Feng Dachun; Zhuo Yizhong

    1991-01-01

    In this talk, both the phenomenological and microscopic nucleon relativistic optical potentials are presented. The global neutron relativistic phenomenological optical potential (RPOP) based on the available experimental data for various nuclei ranging from C to U with incident energies En=20-1000 MeV has been obtained through automatic search of the best parameters by computer. Then the nucleon relativistic microscopic optical potential (RMOP) is studied by utilizing effective lagrangian based on popular Walecka model. Through comparison between the theoretical results and experimental data we have shed some insight into both the RMOP and RPOP. We have concluded that both the phenomenological and microscopic relativistic optical potentials proposed here can be extensively used for intermediate energy nucleon data evaluation. Further improvement concerning how to combine the phenomenological potential with the microscopic one in order to reduce the number of free parameters appearing in RPOP is suggested. (author). 33 refs, 24 figs

  7. Understanding and caring for an operating microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael Cordero

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An operating or surgical microscope is an optical instrument that provides the surgeon with a stereoscopic, high quality magnified and illuminated image of the small structures in the surgical area.

  8. Assessing and benchmarking multiphoton microscopes for biologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, Kaitlin; Pinkard, Henry; Peck, Sebastian; Beemiller, Peter; Krummel, Matthew F.

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become staple tool for tracking cells within tissues and organs due to superior depth of penetration, low excitation volumes, and reduced phototoxicity. Many factors, ranging from laser pulse width to relay optics to detectors and electronics, contribute to the overall ability of these microscopes to excite and detect fluorescence deep within tissues. However, we have found that there are few standard ways already described in the literature to distinguish between microscopes or to benchmark existing microscopes to measure the overall quality and efficiency of these instruments. Here, we discuss some simple parameters and methods that can either be used within a multiphoton facility or by a prospective purchaser to benchmark performance. This can both assist in identifying decay in microscope performance and in choosing features of a scope that are suited to experimental needs. PMID:24974026

  9. X ray imaging microscope for cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA technology employed during the Stanford MSFC LLNL Rocket X Ray Spectroheliograph flight established that doubly reflecting, normal incidence multilayer optics can be designed, fabricated, and used for high resolution x ray imaging of the Sun. Technology developed as part of the MSFC X Ray Microscope program, showed that high quality, high resolution multilayer x ray imaging microscopes are feasible. Using technology developed at Stanford University and at the DOE Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Troy W. Barbee, Jr. has fabricated multilayer coatings with near theoretical reflectivities and perfect bandpass matching for a new rocket borne solar observatory, the Multi-Spectral Solar Telescope Array (MSSTA). Advanced Flow Polishing has provided multilayer mirror substrates with sub-angstrom (rms) smoothnesss for the astronomical x ray telescopes and x ray microscopes. The combination of these important technological advancements has paved the way for the development of a Water Window Imaging X Ray Microscope for cancer research.

  10. A lensless, automated microscope for disease diagnostics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available using a conventional bright field microscope. Applications of this work are targeted towards the implementation of a full blood count, which could provide resource-limited areas with improved healthcare facilities and diagnosis times....

  11. A lensless, automated microscope for disease diagnostics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hugo, S

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available microscope. Applications of this work are targeted towards the implementation of a full blood count, which could provide resource-limited areas with improved healthcare facilities and diagnosis times....

  12. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes*

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, H H

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by...

  13. Focal Molography: Coherent Microscopic Detection of Biomolecular Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Fattinger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce and theoretically investigate here a novel analytical method that we have called focal molography, in which molecular interactions are made visible through scattering of coherent light by a coherent pattern of molecules. The scattered light quantifies the presence of molecules at molecular interaction sites. It is separated from noncoherent background scatter by a combination of local dark-field illumination, interference enhancement, and spatial filtering. The latter is achieved by holographic focusing of the wave field generated by the coherently assembled molecules onto an Airy disk and by subtraction of the noncoherent irradiance in the focal plane outside the disk from the irradiance in the disk. This new microscopic method allows distinct detection of low-refractive-index contrast in the nanoenvironment of biomolecules from which information on the interaction of the coherently assembled molecules with molecules in a liquid or gaseous sample may be deduced. The noncoherent surroundings of the coherently assembled molecules consist of freely diffusing solvent and solute molecules. The surroundings, as well as changes in temperature, do not contribute to the coherent signal in the diffraction focus. Interference lithography or high-resolution-imaging lithography can be used to synthesize the coherent pattern of molecules on a monolithic substrate. The coherent pattern of molecules constitutes a synthetic phase hologram that creates a diffraction-limited light wave. We suggest the term “mologram” for the coherent assembly of functional nanostructures and the term “focal molography” for label-free or labeled analysis of molecular interactions through the measurement of the properties of light in the focus of the mologram. We derive analytical formulas that express the detection signal and the sensitivity of focal molography on the surface of a high-refractive-index thin-film optical waveguide in terms of known parameters

  14. Structure and reactions of light exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Yabana, Y.; Lovas, R.G.; Varga, K.

    1998-01-01

    With the advent of radioactive beams, light exotic nuclei have come to the focus of a great number of investigations. The most prominent phenomena found are the neutron halos. A fundamental and yet feasible microscopic approach has been developed to the description of light exotic nuclei. A comprehensive and didactically balanced review of the structure and reaction theory of light exotic nuclei is being developed. This general structure theory has been written up. This is followed by a brief review of cluster models, and that paves the way before introducing the multicluster approximation. That is the apt point to clarify the relationship of the microscopic multicluster approach to other microscopic approaches and to macroscopic models. The structure theory part is then completed with a review of calculations for actual cases. (K.A.)

  15. Single-channel stereoscopic ophthalmology microscope based on TRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Edalat; Park, Jihoon; Lee, Sangyeob; Ha, Myungjin; Yu, Sungkon; Jang, Seulki; Jung, Byungjo

    2016-03-01

    A stereoscopic imaging modality was developed for the application of ophthalmology surgical microscopes. A previous study has already introduced a single-channel stereoscopic video imaging modality based on a transparent rotating deflector (SSVIM-TRD), in which two different view angles, image disparity, are generated by imaging through a transparent rotating deflector (TRD) mounted on a stepping motor and is placed in a lens system. In this case, the image disparity is a function of the refractive index and the rotation angle of TRD. Real-time single-channel stereoscopic ophthalmology microscope (SSOM) based on the TRD is improved by real-time controlling and programming, imaging speed, and illumination method. Image quality assessments were performed to investigate images quality and stability during the TRD operation. Results presented little significant difference in image quality in terms of stability of structural similarity (SSIM). A subjective analysis was performed with 15 blinded observers to evaluate the depth perception improvement and presented significant improvement in the depth perception capability. Along with all evaluation results, preliminary results of rabbit eye imaging presented that the SSOM could be utilized as an ophthalmic operating microscopes to overcome some of the limitations of conventional ones.

  16. Microscopic contact area and friction between medical textiles and skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derler, S; Rotaru, G-M; Ke, W; El Issawi-Frischknecht, L; Kellenberger, P; Scheel-Sailer, A; Rossi, R M

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical contact between medical textiles and skin is relevant in the health care for patients with vulnerable skin or chronic wounds. In order to gain new insights into the skin-textile contact on the microscopic level, the 3D surface topography of a normal and a new hospital bed sheet with a regular surface structure was measured using a digital microscope. The topographic data was analysed concerning material distribution and real contact area against smooth surfaces as a function of surface deformations. For contact conditions that are relevant for the skin of patients lying in a hospital bed it was found that the order of magnitude of the ratio of real and apparent contact area between textiles and skin or a mechanical skin model lies between 0.02 and 0.1 and that surface deformations, i.e. penetration of the textile surface asperities into skin or a mechanical skin model, range from 10 to 50µm. The performed analyses of textile 3D surface topographies and comparisons with previous friction measurement results provided information on the relationship between microscopic surface properties and macroscopic friction behaviour of medical textiles. In particular, the new bed sheet was found to be characterised by a trend towards a smaller microscopic contact area (up to a factor of two) and by a larger free interfacial volume (more than a factor of two) in addition to a 1.5 times lower shear strength when in contact with counter-surfaces. The applied methods can be useful to develop improved and skin-adapted materials and surfaces for medical applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Low-Cost Digital Microscope with Real-Time Fluorescent Imaging Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md. Mehedi; Wahid, Khan A.; Miah, Sayem; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype of a low-cost digital fluorescent microscope built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The prototype was tested to detect malignant tumor cells taken from a living organism in a preclinical setting. This experiment was accomplished by using Alexa Fluor 488 conjugate dye attached to the cancer cells. Our prototype utilizes a torch along with an excitation filter as a light source for fluorophore excitation, a dichroic mirror to reflect the excitation and pass the emitted green light from the sample under test and a barrier filter to permit only appropriate wavelength. The system is designed out of a microscope using its optical zooming property and an assembly of exciter filter, dichroic mirror and transmitter filter. The microscope is connected to a computer or laptop through universal serial bus (USB) that allows real-time transmission of captured florescence images; this also offers real-time control of the microscope. The designed system has comparable features of high-end commercial fluorescent microscopes while reducing cost, power, weight and size. PMID:27977709

  18. A Low-Cost Digital Microscope with Real-Time Fluorescent Imaging Capability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mehedi Hasan

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a prototype of a low-cost digital fluorescent microscope built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS components. The prototype was tested to detect malignant tumor cells taken from a living organism in a preclinical setting. This experiment was accomplished by using Alexa Fluor 488 conjugate dye attached to the cancer cells. Our prototype utilizes a torch along with an excitation filter as a light source for fluorophore excitation, a dichroic mirror to reflect the excitation and pass the emitted green light from the sample under test and a barrier filter to permit only appropriate wavelength. The system is designed out of a microscope using its optical zooming property and an assembly of exciter filter, dichroic mirror and transmitter filter. The microscope is connected to a computer or laptop through universal serial bus (USB that allows real-time transmission of captured florescence images; this also offers real-time control of the microscope. The designed system has comparable features of high-end commercial fluorescent microscopes while reducing cost, power, weight and size.

  19. A Low-Cost Digital Microscope with Real-Time Fluorescent Imaging Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md Mehedi; Alam, Mohammad Wajih; Wahid, Khan A; Miah, Sayem; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a prototype of a low-cost digital fluorescent microscope built from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The prototype was tested to detect malignant tumor cells taken from a living organism in a preclinical setting. This experiment was accomplished by using Alexa Fluor 488 conjugate dye attached to the cancer cells. Our prototype utilizes a torch along with an excitation filter as a light source for fluorophore excitation, a dichroic mirror to reflect the excitation and pass the emitted green light from the sample under test and a barrier filter to permit only appropriate wavelength. The system is designed out of a microscope using its optical zooming property and an assembly of exciter filter, dichroic mirror and transmitter filter. The microscope is connected to a computer or laptop through universal serial bus (USB) that allows real-time transmission of captured florescence images; this also offers real-time control of the microscope. The designed system has comparable features of high-end commercial fluorescent microscopes while reducing cost, power, weight and size.

  20. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  1. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  2. Design and operation of an inexpensive far-field laser scanning microscope suitable for use in an undergraduate laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallone, Arthur; Hawk, Eric

    2013-03-01

    Scanning microscope applications span the science disciplines yet their costs limit their use at educational institutions. The basic concepts of scanning microscopy are simple. The microscope probe - whether it produces a photon, electron or ion beam - moves relative to the surface of the sample object. The beam interacts with the sample to produce a detected signal that depends on the desired property to be measured at the probe location on the sample. The microscope transforms the signal for output in a form desired by the user. Undergraduate students can easily construct a far-field laser scanning microscope that illustrates each of these principles from parts available at local electronics and hardware stores and use the microscope to explore properties of devices such as light dependent resistors and biological samples such as leaves. Students can record, analyze and interpret results using a computer and free software.

  3. Interactions of light gravitinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Lee, T.; Love, S.T.; Wu, G.

    1998-01-01

    In models of spontaneously broken supersymmetry, certain light gravitino processes are governed by the coupling of their Goldstino components. The rules for constructing SUSY and gauge invariant actions involving the Goldstino couplings to matter and gauge fields are presented. The explicit operator construction is found to be at variance with some previously reported claims. A phenomenological consequence arising from light gravitino interactions in supernova is reexamined and scrutinized. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  4. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We are presenting so-called Wave-guided Optical Waveguides (WOWs) fabricated by two-photon polymerization and capable of being optically manipulated into any arbitrary orientation. By integrating optical waveguides into the structures we have created freestanding waveguides which can be positioned...... anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light...... propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation...

  5. Schwarzschild microscopes in vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, M.; Yanagihara, M.; Ejima, T.; Toyoda, M.; Kondo, Y.; Hatano, T.; Tsuru, T.; Yamamoto, M.

    2005-01-01

    Microscopes in vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions using a normal incidence type of Schwarzschild objective are reviewed. The objective consists of a concave mirror and a convex mirror coated with a high reflectance multilayer, having a large numerical aperture comparing with other objectives. The microscopes have been used to diagnose inertia-confinement-fusion plasmas, and to investigate small samples or microstructures of inorganic and organic materials by imaging them using laboratory light sources. Synchrotron radiation has been also used to obtain a microbeam for a photoelectron scanning microscope with a spatial resolution of 0.1 μm. The structure and performance of two laboratory microscopes developed at Tohoku University are demonstrated. One of them is a soft X-ray emission imaging microscope. An image of an artificial pattern made of W and SiO 2 on Si wafer by focusing Si L emission was presented. The other is an ultraviolet photoelectron scanning microscope using a He (helium) gas discharge lamp. The valence band spectra of a microcrystal of FeWO 4 were presented. Furthermore other applications such as demagnifying optics for lithography and optics to gather fluorescence for emission spectroscopy are introduced. (authors)

  6. Darkfield illumination improves microscopic detection of metals in Timm's stained tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Frederickson, C J

    1989-01-01

    Deposits of trace or toxic metals can be quickly identified by light microscopical surveys of tissue sections stained for metals by variants of Timm's silver enhancement method. The present work shows that the small, isolated silver grains that label isolated deposits of metal in tissue are undet...... are undetectable in brightfield light microscopy but are easily detected in darkfield microscopy. Darkfield illumination is therefore recommended for improving the detection of trace or toxic metals in tissue. Udgivelsesdato: 1989-Aug......Deposits of trace or toxic metals can be quickly identified by light microscopical surveys of tissue sections stained for metals by variants of Timm's silver enhancement method. The present work shows that the small, isolated silver grains that label isolated deposits of metal in tissue...

  7. Cost-effective design of a concurrent photoacoustic-ultrasound microscope using single laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Shao; Liu, Wei-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    A method for concurrent photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) imaging with single laser pulses was previously demonstrated. An optical-absorbing multilayer film that can generate a US pulse based on the thermoelastic effect is used. With such a film, the generated US can be adjusted so that it does not overlap with the spectrum of the PA signal generated by the light transmitting through the layer. Thus, the US signal and the PA signal can be generated and separated by using a single laser pulse with spectral filtering. In this study, we continue with the same concurrent imaging approach and propose a cost-effective and portable design. The design consists of a pulsed laser diode with the repetition rate up to 25 kHz and energy of 2 μJ/pulse. A multilayer film is employed to generate narrow band US signals under laser excitation for US imaging. With simple spectral filtering, the PA signals and the US signals can be separated. With optical resolution, the system has a theoretical lateral resolution of 2 μm in PA imaging and 200 μm in US imaging. One of the applications of the proposed microscope is for tumor biology, where angiogenesis is an essential topic for understanding tumor growth and tumor metastasis. We will demonstrate performance of the proposed system by imaging vasculature networks.

  8. Microscopic evidence for inclusion of Parvamoeba Rogerson, 1993 into the order Himatismenida (Amoebozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    I have re-investigated the light-microscopic features of Parvamoeba rugata Rogerson, 1993, type strain CCAP 1556/1. The major characters of amoebae correspond to the initial description of this species. However, one peculiarity demonstrated by the cells during adhesion to the substratum, seems to have been partly underestimated previously. At the same time it is crucial for the explanation of this species' position in the molecular phylogenetic trees and the recent system of Amoebozoa. This feature is the formation of a thin sheet of hyaloplasm on the ventral side of the cell that is used for adhesion to the substratum and locomotion, shared between Parvamoeba and members of the order Himatismenida. This explains the position of Parvamoeba as a sister clade to Cochliopodiidae in the molecular phylogenetic trees and justifies the recent inclusion of this genus into the order Himatismenida. In addition I sequenced the small-subunit ribosomal RNA of P. rugata and demonstrated that it was 99.5-99.7% similar to that of P. monoura Cole et al., 2010. This raises a question of the possible identity of these two species, however, several persistent morphological differences do not permit the unification of them, at least until more genes demonstrate identical sequences between these species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. A microscopic model for gas diffusion dynamics in a [NiFe]-hydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Po-hung; Best, Robert B; Blumberger, Jochen

    2011-05-07

    We describe and apply a microscopic model for the calculation of gas diffusion rates in a [NiFe]-hydrogenase. This enzyme has attracted much interest for use as a H(2) oxidising catalyst in biofuel cells, but a major problem is their inhibition by CO and O(2). In our model, the diffusive hopping of gas molecules in the protein interior is coarse grained using a master equation approach with transition rates estimated from equilibrium and non-equilibrium pulling simulations. Propagating the rate matrix in time, we find that the probability for a gas molecule to reach the enzyme active site follows a mono-exponential increase. Fits to a phenomenological rate law give an effective diffusion rate constant for CO that is in very good agreement with experimental measurements. We find that CO prefers to move along the canonical 'hydrophobic' main channel towards the active site, in contrast to O(2) and H(2), which were previously shown to explore larger fractions of the protein. Differences in the diffusion of the three gases are discussed in light of recent efforts to engineer a gas selectivity filter in the enzyme. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  10. Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Light Robotics - Structure-Mediated Nanobiophotonics covers the latest means of sculpting of both light and matter for achieving bioprobing and manipulation at the smallest scales. The synergy between photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology spans the rapidly growing field of nanobiophotonics...

  11. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulleau, Patrick P; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2011-07-10

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  12. A frameless stereotaxic operating microscope for neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friets, E.M.; Strohbehn, J.W.; Hatch, J.F.; Roberts, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    A new system, which we call the frameless stereotaxic operating microscope, is discussed. Its purpose is to display CT or other image data in the operating microscope in the correct scale, orientation, and position without the use of a stereotaxic frame. A nonimaging ultrasonic rangefinder allows the position of the operating microscope and the position of the patient to be determined. Discrete fiducial points on the patient's external anatomy are located in both image space and operating room space, linking the image data and the operating room. Physician-selected image information, e.g., tumor contours or guidance to predetermined targets, is projected through the optics of the operating microscope using a miniature cathode ray tube and a beam splitter. Projected images superpose the surgical field, reconstructed from image data to match the focal plane of the operating microscope. The algorithms on which the system is based are described, and the sources and effects of errors are discussed. The system's performance is simulated, providing an estimate of accuracy. Two phantoms are used to measure accuracy experimentally. Clinical results and observations are given

  13. Optical modeling of Fresnel zoneplate microscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naulleau, Patrick P.; Mochi, Iacopo; Goldberg, Kenneth A.

    2011-01-01

    Defect free masks remain one of the most significant challenges facing the commercialization of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Progress on this front requires high-performance wavelength-specific metrology of EUV masks, including high-resolution and aerial-image microscopy performed near the 13.5 nm wavelength. Arguably the most cost-effective and rapid path to proliferating this capability is through the development of Fresnel zoneplate-based microscopes. Given the relative obscurity of such systems, however, modeling tools are not necessarily optimized to deal with them and their imaging properties are poorly understood. Here we present a modeling methodology to analyze zoneplate microscopes based on commercially available optical modeling software and use the technique to investigate the imaging performance of an off-axis EUV microscope design. The modeling predicts that superior performance can be achieved by tilting the zoneplate, making it perpendicular to the chief ray at the center of the field, while designing the zoneplate to explicitly work in that tilted plane. Although the examples presented here are in the realm of EUV mask inspection, the methods described and analysis results are broadly applicable to zoneplate microscopes in general, including full-field soft-x-ray microscopes routinely used in the synchrotron community.

  14. Microscopic fungi as significant sesquiterpene emission sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    HorváTh, Eszter; Hoffer, AndráS.; SebőK, Flóra; Dobolyi, Csaba; Szoboszlay, SáNdor; Kriszt, BaláZs; GelencséR, AndráS.

    2011-08-01

    Among the volatile organic compounds emitted by vegetation, isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and their derivatives are thought to contribute to secondary organic aerosol formation. Although it is well known that microscopic fungi globally turn over vast amount of carbon by decomposing the organic matter in the soil, vegetation is considered as the exclusive source of biogenic secondary organic aerosol precursors in various atmospheric models. Secondary fungal metabolites including sesquiterpenes have been recognized as characteristic volatile organic compounds emitted by fungi. In the present study, we investigated the rates of sesquiterpene emission of microscopic fungi to establish their potential significance compared to those from vegetation. To sample the headspace of the pure culture of some common fungi, we used an aseptic flow-through apparatus designed for solid phase microextraction in our laboratory. The identified sesquiterpenes in the headspace extracts were quantified for eight strains of microscopic fungi belonging to four different genera. Our results showed that microscopic fungi emit a considerable amount of sesquiterpenes. Based on our first estimations microscopic fungi may be considered as potentially significant sesquiterpene emission sources whose contribution to secondary organic aerosol formation may be comparable to that of vegetation.

  15. SCHOOL LIGHTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965

    SEVERAL ARTICLES ON SCHOOL LIGHTING ARE CONTAINED IN THIS JOURNAL. THE TITLES AND AUTHORS INCLUDED ARE AS FOLLOWS--(1) "TODAY'S CONCEPTS IN SCHOOL LIGHTING" BY CHARLES D. GIBSON, (2) "CHALLENGE OF TOMMORROW'S LIGHTING" BY S.K. GUTH AND E.H. WITTE, (3) "PEEK PREVIEW OF THE WINDOWLESS SCHOOL" BY JAMES J. MORISSEAU, (4) "MAINTENANCE BEGINS BEFORE…

  16. Twisted light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Research at the Mathematical Optics Group uses "twisted" light to study new quatum-based information security systems. In order to understand the structure of "twisted" light, it is useful to start with an ordinary light beam with zero twist, namely...

  17. Rapid adaptive remote focusing microscope for sensing of volumetric neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žurauskas, Mantas; Barnstedt, Oliver; Frade-Rodriguez, Maria; Waddell, Scott; Booth, Martin J

    2017-10-01

    The ability to record neural activity in the brain of a living organism at cellular resolution is of great importance for defining the neural circuit mechanisms that direct behavior. Here we present an adaptive two-photon microscope optimized for extraction of neural signals over volumes in intact Drosophila brains, even in the presence of specimen motion. High speed volume imaging was made possible through reduction of spatial resolution while maintaining the light collection efficiency of a high resolution, high numerical aperture microscope. This enabled simultaneous recording of odor-evoked calcium transients in a defined volume of mushroom body Kenyon cell bodies in a live fruit fly.

  18. Complex microscopic express-analysis for biomedical full-scale investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datsenko A.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available To perform biomedical full-scale investigation there had been developed a set of microscopic analysis of histologi-cal preparations. This complex includes cryotome for histological sections, a set of chemical reagents and laboratory glassware for staining, binocular loupes for registration microstructural changes, a microscope with a camera and lighting system on swivel stand, modernized otoscope, a laptop with graphics programs. The complex provides quantitative indicators needed to diagnose the severity and probability estimates of the effect estimation of impacts of extreme factors of different nature.

  19. Phenomenological and microscopic optical potentials for 88 MeV 7Li scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steeden, M.F.; Coopersmith, J.; Cartwright, S.J.; Cohler, M.D.; Clarke, N.M.; Griffiths, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    The elastic scattering cross sections for 88 MeV 7 Li ions have been measured for targets of 24 26 Mg and 40 48 Ca. Analyses using both phenomenological and microscopic optical potentials provide information on the energy dependence of optical parameters, and the extent to which the potentials are determined for these light ions. The use of a double-folding microscopic model demonstrates the need for normalisation of the real potential by a factor of 0.5 in contrast to measurements at lower energies. The contribution of exchange effects, density dependence and break-up are discussed. (author)

  20. [Microscopic innervation of the spermatic ducts and testis. I. Vas deferens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Garnacho, S; Vega, J A; Alvarez Arenal, A; Pérez Casas, A; Alvarez Menéndez, J C; Hernández, L C

    1989-01-01

    The microscopic innervation of the vas deferens in the rat was studied both in light and electron microscope. The nerve fibres form perivascular, intramuscular and subepithelial plexuses. Inside the connective tissue surrounding the vas deferens both isolated nerve fibres and sensory corpuscles (glomerular and Ruffine-like types) were observed. The varicosities and endings of nerve fibres contain synaptic vesicles of different sizes and electron characteristics. These varicosities were closely related to the smooth muscle cells and some of them lacked of Schwannian sheath. The nervous fibres were not in direct contact with the epithelial cells.