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Sample records for previous induced abortion

  1. Rates of induced abortion in Denmark according to age, previous births and previous abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise H. Hansen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whereas the effects of various socio-demographic determinants on a woman's risk of having an abortion are relatively well-documented, less attention has been given to the effect of previous abortions and births. Objective: To study the effect of previous abortions and births on Danish women's risk of an abortion, in addition to a number of demographic and personal characteristics. Data and methods: From the Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset we obtained data on the number of live births and induced abortions by year (1981-2001, age (16-39, county of residence and marital status. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of the explanatory variables on the probability of having an abortion in a relevant year. Main findings and conclusion: A woman's risk of having an abortion increases with the number of previous births and previous abortions. Some interactions were was found in the way a woman's risk of abortion varies with calendar year, age and parity. The risk of an abortion for women with no children decreases while the risk of an abortion for women with children increases over time. Furthermore, the risk of an abortion decreases with age, but relatively more so for women with children compared to childless women. Trends for teenagers are discussed in a separate section.

  2. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  3. Effect of previous induced abortions on postabortion contraception selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Melissa; Roston, Alicia; Keith, Louis; Patel, Ashlesha

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to compare contraceptive method selection in women undergoing their first pregnancy termination versus women undergoing repeat pregnancy termination in an urban abortion clinic. We hypothesized that women undergoing repeat abortions will select highly effective contraceptives (intrauterine device, subdermal implant, tubal ligation) more often than patients undergoing their first abortion. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all women undergoing first-trimester surgical abortion at John H. Stroger, Jr., Hospital of Cook County from October 1, 2009, to October 31, 2011. We compared contraceptive method selection in the postabortion period after receipt of contraceptive counseling for 7466 women, stratifying women by history of no prior abortion versus one or more abortions. Of the 7466 women, 48.6% (3625) had no history of previous abortion. After controlling for age, race and number of living children, women with a history of abortion were more likely to select a highly effective method [odds ratio (OR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.33]. Most significantly, having living children was the strongest predictor of a highly effective method with an OR of 3.17 (95% CI 2.69-3.75). In women having a first-trimester abortion, the factors most predictive of selecting a highly effective method for postabortion contraception include history of previous abortion and having living children. The latter holds true independent of abortion history. This paper is unique in its ability to demonstrate the high interest in highly effective contraceptive selection in high-risk, low-income women with prior abortion history. Efforts to integrate provision of highly effective methods of contraception for postabortion care are essential for the reduction of future unintended pregnancies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Induced Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search FAQs Induced Abortion Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Induced Abortion Patient Education FAQs Induced Abortion Patient ... given for the procedure? Before the procedure, local anesthesia is given to numb the cervix. Sedatives may ...

  5. Reproductive outcomes in adolescents who had a previous birth or an induced abortion compared to adolescents' first pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzlaff Paul

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, attention has been focused on subsequent pregnancies among teenage mothers. Previous studies that compared the reproductive outcomes of teenage nulliparae and multiparae often did not consider the adolescents' reproductive histories. Thus, the authors compared the risks for adverse reproductive outcomes of adolescent nulliparae to teenagers who either have had an induced abortion or a previous birth. Methods In this retrospective cohort study we used perinatal data prospectively collected by obstetricians and midwives from 1990–1999 (participation rate 87–98% of all hospitals in Lower Saxony, Germany. From the 9742 eligible births among adolescents, women with multiple births, >1 previous pregnancies, or a previous spontaneous miscarriage were deleted and 8857 women Results In bivariate logistic regression analyses, compared to nulliparous teenagers, adolescents with a previous birth had higher risks for perinatal [OR = 2.08, CI = 1.11,3.89] and neonatal [OR = 4.31, CI = 1.77,10.52] mortality and adolescents with a previous abortion had higher risks for stillbirths [OR = 3.31, CI = 1.01,10.88] and preterm births [OR = 2.21, CI = 1.07,4.58]. After adjusting for maternal nationality, partner status, smoking, prenatal care and pre-pregnancy BMI, adolescents with a previous birth were at higher risk for perinatal [OR = 2.35, CI = 1.14,4.86] and neonatal mortality [OR = 4.70, CI = 1.60,13.81] and adolescents with a previous abortion had a higher risk for very low birthweight infants [OR = 2.74, CI = 1.06,7.09] than nulliparous teenagers. Conclusion The results suggest that teenagers who give birth twice as adolescents have worse outcomes in their second pregnancy compared to those teenagers who are giving birth for the first time. The prevention of the second pregnancy during adolescence is an important public health objective and should be addressed by health care providers who attend the first birth or the abortion

  6. Induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Abortion is common. Data on abortion rates are inexact but can be used to explore trends. Globally, the estimated rate in the period 2010-2014 was 35 abortions per 1000 women (aged 15-44 years), five points less than the rate of 40 for the period 1990-1994. Abortion laws vary around the world but are generally more restrictive in developing countries. Restrictive laws do not necessarily deter women from seeking abortion but often lead to unsafe practice with significant mortality and morbidity. While a legal framework for abortion is a prerequisite for availability, many laws, which are not evidence based, restrict availability and delay access. Abortion should be available in the interests of public health and any legal framework should be as permissive as possible in order to promote access. In the absence of legal access, harm reduction strategies are needed to reduce abortion-related mortality and morbidity. Abortion can be performed surgically (in the first trimester, by manual or electric vacuum aspiration) or with medication: both are safe and effective. Cervical priming facilitates surgery and reduces the risk of incomplete abortion. Diagnosis of incomplete abortion should be made on clinical grounds, not by ultrasound. Septic abortion is a common cause of maternal death almost always following unsafe abortion and thus largely preventable. While routine follow-up after abortion is unnecessary, all women should be offered a contraceptive method immediately after the abortion. This, together with improved education and other interventions, may succeed in reducing unintended pregnancy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. [Determinants of induced abortion delay].

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    Font-Ribera, Laia; Pérez, Glòria; Espelt, Albert; Salvador, Joaquin; Borrell, Carme

    2009-01-01

    In induced abortion, the method, the risk of complications and the economic cost of the abortion are determined by gestational age. The aim of this study was to describe the determinants of induced abortion delay until the second trimester of pregnancy in Barcelona. We performed a cross-sectional study of induced abortions due to the physical or mental health of the woman (Barcelona, 2004-2005; N=9,175). The city's induced abortion register provided data on gestational age at abortion (dependent variable), educational level, age, cohabitation with the partner, number of children previous abortions, and type of center. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated with log-binomial regression models. A total of 7.7% of induced abortions were second-trimester abortions and 99.3% were performed in private centers. Compared with women with a university education, those with primary education or less had an aPR of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.4-2.2) of delaying the abortion until the second trimester. A higher proportion of second-trimester abortions were also recorded in women aged less than 18 years old (aPR=2.6; 95%CI: 2.0-3.4), women not cohabiting with their partners (aRP=1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.6) and in public centers (aPR=2.8; 95% CI: 2.2-3.7). No differences were found in induced abortion delay among women with previous abortions and those without. Induced abortion delay until the second trimester of pregnancy was associated with low educational level, young ages, not cohabiting with a partner, and public centers. This study demonstrates the existence of socioeconomic inequalities in access conditions to abortion services.

  8. Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor after induced abortion with previous broad choriocarcinoma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Shi, Haiyan; Chen, Xiaoduan

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid trophoblastic tumor (ETT) is a rare trophoblastic tumor originating from chorionic-type intermediate trophoblasts (ITs). It is usually associated with a prior gestational event. We present a 44-year-old woman who had unusual pregnancy related history. The patient received her second spontaneous abortion at the age of 25 years and had suffered from choriocarcinoma in left board ligament at the age of 29 years. She admitted no more treatment after 3 courses of multiagent chemotherapy when serum β-hCG returned to normal. Then she had Full-term delivery, induced abortion at the ages of 32, 33 years. The patient had high serum levels of beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (6587 IU/L). Microscopically, the tumor was composed of mainly mononuclear tumor cells, grew in cords, nests, and sheets within which were aggregates of hyaline material. Most were with distinct cell borders, eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical staining revealed strong diffuse reactivity for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, CK18), P63, focal reactivity for beta-human chorionic gonadotropin, human placental lactogen, and inhibin-alpha. The Ki-67 index was 77%. The histological and immunohistochemical features were characteristic of epithelioid trophoblastic tumor. This is the first reported case of these two gestational trophoblastic tumor happened on one person with the intervening normal pregnancy.

  9. [Induced abortion, epidemiological problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasević, M

    1995-01-01

    A large number of induced abortions exist in central Serbia, in spite of the fact that modern science made new methods and devices for the birth control available, which are more acceptable both from the medical and personal point of view. This fact shows contradictory situation and opens several questions. The crucial being: why do wome rely on abortion and do not use modern contraception? In research done in 1991--it refers to Belgrade and it includes four hundred women--confirmed was the accepted hypothesis that the extension of induced abortion developed from the discordance between comprehension of the need of birth control and the way it should be accomplished. The main causes of the discordance are insufficient knowledge about modern contraception, phychological barriers, insufficient cultural level (general, health, sex) of the population and lack of institutionalized contemporary concept fof family planning. Duration of prevalence of induced abortions indicates that underlying causes of frequency are numerous and stable over time. Considering this, and the slowness of any spontaneous change, it may be expected that the problem of abortions will be present in the years to come. However, duration of abortion prevalence will depend, to a large extent, on the ability and willingness of the State to cope with this issue.

  10. Sequelae of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, P

    1985-01-01

    In the long-term prospective controlled study reported here, 1509 general practitioners and 795 gynaecologists in England, Scotland and Wales are cooperating in providing information on the sequelae of abortion, especially on the problems of later pregnancies, subfertility and all reported morbidity, in particular psychiatric illness. Morbidity within 21 days after induced abortion, and considered to be related to induced abortion, was found in 10% of 6105 women who had an induced abortion in their index pregnancy, and there were major complications in 2.1%. The main factors affecting morbidity were the place of operation, gestation at termination, the method of termination, sterilization at the time of operation, and smoking habits. Several differences between National Health Service and private sector operations were found which could affect the morbidity rates. Possible means of reducing early morbidity are discussed. The outcome of the first post-index pregnancy in 745 women whose index pregnancy had ended in induced abortion and in 1339 controls was also compared. There was no statistically significant difference between cases and controls. Further analysis of a large number of pregnancies is required to permit confident interpretation of these observations.

  11. [Complications of induced abortions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, D; Fortuna, P

    1989-02-01

    All physicians should be aware of the possible complications of induced abortions if only because the procedure is so commonplace. Some 250,000 induced abortions occur annually in France, amounting to 24.4 abortions per 100 live births. The rates of different complications of induced abortions before 12 weeks are .5-5/1000 for uterine perforation, .5-3.4% for hemorrhage with or without placental retention, 1% for endometritis, .3% for salpingitis .5% for continuing pregnancy, and .006 to .3/10,000 for death. A well done curettage is preferable to a poorly performed aspiration procedure. If an aspiration is done, the practitioner should bear in mind that retention of 50-200 cc of blood clots may occur if dilatation is insufficient. Symptoms appear 1-5 days after the abortion and end with expulsion of the clots or aspiration. Curettage is useless, as the clots do not represent a true retention. Uterine contractions during the aspiration can occasionally prompt a premature decision that evacuation is complete. Retention is difficult to diagnose immediately after aspiration but can be sonographically confirmed after the 8th day. Aspiration should be done after the 6th week and before the 12th week. Aspiration before the 6th week is often painful and is associated with higher rates of partial retention and of complete failure. Endouterine aspiration, regardless of technical proficiency, establishes a pathway between the vagina and the uterine cavity, which exposes the latter to the risk of trauma, endometrial lesions, and perforation. Induced abortion promotes infection by 2 mechanisms. Latent infections that were not detected in the medical history or physical examination can emerge and cause endometritis, which should be treated by ice, rest, and antibiotics. Or contamination of the passage by an infected cervical mucus can lead to salpingitis, abscess, and pelviperitonitis, or even general peritonitis. More often, these conditions develop from inadequately treated

  12. [Induced abortion. Legislation, epidemiology, complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, E; Nisand, I

    1995-11-15

    In France, induced abortion was legalized under certain conditions since the January 1975 and December 1979 laws suspended the effects of Article 317 of the French Penal Code that forbade induced abortion. For more than 15 years, induced abortion has been part of current gynecological practice. Adverse effects of abortions have been reduced. In the upcoming years, the interest in drug-induced abortion and abortion under local anesthesia will increase due to a concern for reducing risks that deteriorate physical integrity and women's gynecological/obstetrical future. Induced abortion still remains a very important act, if not serious, in a woman's life. Prevention of induced abortion remains the absolute medical objective and is necessary for information campaigns on contraceptives, especially among youth. If accessible and equal access to induced abortion is becoming a reality in France, abortion will always remain a failure and proof for women that they have recourse to abortion. Induced abortions have remained relatively stable in France (170,000 in 1980; 181,154 in 1991). The abortion rate ranges from 20 to 25 per 100 live births. 50% of women of reproductive age will have an induced abortion in their life. The fertility rate in France has been 1.8 since 1976. First trimester abortion-related mortality is less than 1/100,000. Abortion-related mortality increases with gestational age (0.5/100,000 at 8 weeks vs. 1.1/100,000 at 12 weeks). It is also associated with the anesthesia used (0.15 for local anesthesia vs. 0.58 for general anesthesia). The leading causes of abortion-related mortality are infection, pulmonary embolism, and anesthetic accidents. Immediate complications of induced abortion are anesthetic accidents, hemorrhage, uterine perforations, accumulation of blood in the uterus, cervical tears, and vagal discomfort. In France, the induced abortion related-perforation rate is between 0.2% and 1.2%. Perforation is more likely after 10 weeks and under

  13. Self-Reports of Induced Abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Muhammad, H; Urassa, E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of incomplete abortions that are induced in hospital-based settings in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2 phases at 3 hospitals in Tanzania. Phase 1 included 302 patients with a diagnosis of incomplete abortion......, and phase 2 included 823 such patients. RESULTS: In phase 1, in which cases were classified by clinical criteria and information from the patient, 3.9% to 16.1% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. In phase 2, in which the structured interview was changed to an empathetic dialogue...... and previously used clinical criteria were omitted, 30.9% to 60.0% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. CONCLUSIONS: An empathetic dialogue improves the quality of data collected among women with induced abortion....

  14. Sex ratios at birth after induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquia, Marcelo L; Moineddin, Rahim; Jha, Prabhat; O'Campo, Patricia J; McKenzie, Kwame; Glazier, Richard H; Henry, David A; Ray, Joel G

    2016-06-14

    Skewed male:female ratios at birth have been observed among certain immigrant groups. Data on abortion practices that might help to explain these findings are lacking. We examined 1 220 933 births to women with up to 3 consecutive singleton live births between 1993 and 2012 in Ontario. Records of live births, and induced and spontaneous abortions were linked to Canadian immigration records. We determined associations of male:female infant ratios with maternal birthplace, sex of the previous living sibling(s) and prior spontaneous or induced abortions. Male:female infant ratios did not appreciably depart from the normal range among Canadian-born women and most women born outside of Canada, irrespective of the sex of previous children or the characteristics of prior abortions. However, among infants of women who immigrated from India and had previously given birth to 2 girls, the overall male:female ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.75-2.21) for the third live birth. The male:female infant ratio after 2 girls was 1.77 (95% CI 1.26-2.47) times higher if the current birth was preceded by 1 induced abortion, 2.38 (95% CI 1.44-3.94) times higher if preceded by 2 or more induced abortions and 3.88 (95% CI 2.02-7.50) times higher if the induced abortion was performed at 15 weeks or more gestation relative to no preceding abortion. Spontaneous abortions were not associated with male-biased sex ratios in subsequent births. High male:female ratios observed among infants born to women who immigrated from India are associated with induced abortions, especially in the second trimester of pregnancy. © 2016 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  15. [Medical induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettahar, K; Pinton, A; Boisramé, T; Cavillon, V; Wylomanski, S; Nisand, I; Hassoun, D

    2016-12-01

    Updated clinical recommendations for medical induced abortion procedure. A systematic review of French and English literature, reviewing the evidence relating to the provision of medical induced abortion was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and international scientific societies recommendations. The effectiveness of medical abortion is higher than 95% when the protocols are adjusted to gestational age (EL1). Misoprostol alone is less effective than a combination of mifepristone and misoprostol (EL1). Gemeprost is less effective than misoprostol (EL2). The dose of 200mg of mifepristone should be preferred to 600mg (NP1, Rank A). Mifepristone can be taken at home (professional agreement). The optimum interval between mifepristone and misoprostol intake should be 24 to 48 hours (EL1, grade A). Before 7 weeks LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol should be given orally (EL1, grade A) eventually repeated after 3hours if no bleeding occurs. For optimal effectiveness between 7 and 14 LMP, the interval between mifepristone and misoprostol should not be shortened to less than 8hours (grade 1). An interval of 24 to 48hours will not affect the effectiveness of the method provided misoprostol dosage is 800μg (EL1). Vaginal, sublingual or buccal routes of administration are more effective and better tolerated than the oral route, which should be abandoned (EL1). An amount of 800μg sublingual or buccal misoprostol route has the same effectiveness than the vaginal route but more gastrointestinal side effects (EL1, grade A). Between 7 and 9 LMP, it does not seem necessary to repeat misoprostol dose whereas it should be repeated beyond 9 SA (grade B). Between 9 and 14 LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol given either vaginally, buccally or sublingually should be repeated every 3hours if needed (with a maximum of 5 doses) (EL2, grade B). There is no strong evidence supporting routine antibiotic prophylaxis for medical abortion (professional agreement). Rare contraindications

  16. The association between previous single first trimester abortion and pregnancy outcome in nulliparous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiersch, Liran; Ashwal, Eran; Aviram, Amir; Rayman, Shlomi; Wiznitzer, Arnon; Yogev, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    To determine the association between single previous abortion and pregnancy outcome in nulliparous women. A retrospective cohort study of all nulliparous women who delivered in a university-affiliated tertiary hospital (2009-2014). Pregnancy outcome of women with single previous first trimester abortion (study group) was compared to those of primigravida (control group). Of the 44 371 deliveries during the study period, 14 498 (32.6%) were of nulliparous women, of them 1501 (10.3%) had single previous abortion (abortion was independently associated with induction of labor (OR = 1.31, 95%C.I 1.04-1.63, p = 0.01), cesarean section (OR = 1.38, 95%C.I 1.18-1.60, p abortion no difference in pregnancy outcome was observed between those with previous induced termination of pregnancy and spontaneous abortion, except for increased risk for retained placenta in those with previous spontaneous abortion. Single early previous abortion in nulliparous women was associated with higher rate of induction of labor, cesarean section and retained placenta compared to primigravida women.

  17. The Marquis de Sade and induced abortion.

    OpenAIRE

    Farr, A D

    1980-01-01

    In 1795 the Marquis de Sade published his La Philosophic dans le boudoir, in which he proposed the use of induced abortion for social reasons and as a means of population control. It is from this time that medical and social acceptance of abortion can be dated, although previously the subject had not been discussed in public in modern times. It is suggested that it was largely due to de Sade's writing that induced abortion received the impetus which resulted in its subsequent spread in wester...

  18. Sociocultural determinants of induced abortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korejo, R.; Noorani, K.J.; Bhutta, S.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of induced abortion and identity the role of sociocultural factors contributing to termination of pregnancy and associated morbidity and mortality in hospital setting. Subjects and Methods: The patients who were admitted for induced abortion were interviewed in privacy. On condition of anonymity they were asked about the age, parity, family setup and relationships, with particular emphasis on sociocultural reasons and factors contributing to induction of abortion. Details of status of abortionist and methods used for termination of pregnancy, the resulting complications and their severity were recorded. Results: Out of total admissions, 57(2.35%) gave history of induced abortion. All women belonged to low socioeconomic class and 59.6% of them were illiterate. Forty-three (75.5%) of these women had never practiced concentration. Twenty-four (42%) were grandmultiparae and did not want more children. In 29 women (50.9%) the decision for abortion had been supported by the husband. In 25 (43.8%) abortion was carried out by Daiyan (traditional midwives). Serious complications like uterine perforation with or without bowel injury were encouraged in 25 (43.8%) of these women. During the study period illegally induced abortion accounted for 6 (10.5%) maternal deaths. Conclusion: Prevalence of poverty, illiteracy, grand multiparity and non-practice of contraception are strong determinants of induced abortion. (author)

  19. Induced abortion and subsequent pregnancy duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Wei Jin; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Olsen, Jørn

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether induced abortion influences subsequent pregnancy duration. METHODS: Women who had their first pregnancies during 1980, 1981, and 1982 were identified in three Danish national registries. A total of 15,727 women whose pregnancies were terminated by first-trimester ind......OBJECTIVE: To examine whether induced abortion influences subsequent pregnancy duration. METHODS: Women who had their first pregnancies during 1980, 1981, and 1982 were identified in three Danish national registries. A total of 15,727 women whose pregnancies were terminated by first......-trimester induced abortions were compared with 46,026 whose pregnancies were not terminated by induced abortions. All subsequent pregnancies until 1994 were identified by register linkage. RESULTS: Preterm and post-term singleton live births were more frequent in women with one, two, or more previous induced...... abortions. After adjusting for potential confounders and stratifying by gravidity, the odds ratios of preterm singleton live births in women with one, two, or more previous induced abortions were 1.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.70, 2.11), 2.66 (95% CI 2.09, 3.37), and 2.03 (95% CI 1.29, 3...

  20. Induced abortion and placenta complications in the subsequent pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Wei Jin; Nielsen, Gunnar Lauge; Larsen, Helle

    2001-01-01

    Background. To study the risk of placenta complications following an induced abortion as a function of the interpregnancy interval. Methods. This study is based on three Danish national registries; the Medical Birth Registry, the Hospital Discharge Registry, and the Induced Abortion Registry. All...... primigravida women from 1980 to 1982 were identified in these three registries. A total of 15,727 women who terminated the pregnancy with a first trimester induced abortion were selected to the abortion cohort, and 46,026 women who did not terminate the pregnancy with an induced abortion constituted...... or the Medical Birth Registry records. Results. A slightly higher risk of placenta complications following an abortion was found. Retained placenta occurred more frequently in women with one, two or more previous abortions, compared with women without any previous abortion of similar gravidity. Adjusting...

  1. Mifepristone-induced abortion and vaginal bleeding in subsequent pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Gao, Er-sheng; Chen, Ai-min; Luo, Lin; Cheng, Yi-min; Yuan, Wei

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of first-trimester mifepristone-induced abortion on vaginal bleeding in subsequent pregnancy. This observational cohort study was conducted during 1998-2001 at antenatal clinics in Beijing, Chengdu, and Shanghai, China. The study enrolled 4,931 women with one previous mifepristone-induced abortion, 4,925 women with no history of induced abortion, and 4,800 women with one previous surgical abortion and followed them through pregnancy and childbirth. The rates of vaginal bleeding in pregnant women with a history of medical abortion, no abortion, and surgical abortion were 16.5%, 13.9%, and 17.3%, respectively. The women with medical abortion had a higher risk (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.29) of vaginal bleeding compared with those with no abortion but similar risk to prior surgical abortion. When the correlation between medical abortion and vaginal bleeding was examined by period, increased risk was observed only in the early period (abortion and no abortion showed that the observed risks increased particularly in those with abortion at gestational age ≤ 7 weeks (aRR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.49), those followed by a postabortion curettage (aRR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.37, 1.84) or complications (aRR=1.99, 95% CI: 1.67, 2.37). There was no difference between women with medical abortion and women with surgical abortion in the occurrence of vaginal bleeding for either period. One previous mifepristone-induced abortion increased the risk of vaginal bleeding in early gestation period of subsequent pregnancy compared with no abortion, especially if abortion occurred before 7 weeks of gestation and was followed by a curettage or complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Induced abortion in Cartagena, Colombia: estimation using Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa-Castro, Alvaro; Paternina-Caicedo, Angel J; Alcalá-Cerra, Gabriel

    2011-04-01

    Estimating induced abortion incidence in a reference hospital and the city of Cartagena, Colombia. This was an ecological study that used Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology (AICM). Data from the Rafael Calvo Maternity Clinic (CMRC) was used for estimating post-abortion attention in Cartagena, Colombia. Induced abortion rates and ratios were estimated in the CMRC and the city of Cartagena from CMRC data using the AICM model. The estimated induced abortion ratio in Cartagena was 261/1,000 births in 2005, 244 in 2006 and 259 in 2007. The estimated rate per 1,000 females aged 15-44 for induced abortion was 22 in 2005, 22 in 2006 and 21 in 2007. The estimated rate was similar to the rate found in previous research using Colombian data from 1989. Public health measures should be focused on reducing unwanted pregnancies and thereby reduce induced abortion rates.

  3. [Induced abortion in Greenland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, P; Kristensen, L M; Kiil-Nielsen, J; Egelund, B; Kollemorten, I K

    1996-10-21

    The purpose of the study was to seek knowledge about the reasons for the very high rate of legal abortions in Greenland. In four municipalities in the Disko Bay region of West Greenland all pregnant women were asked to fill in a questionnaire. Due to organisational problems only 39% of the women were asked to participate and a total of 82 women seeking abortion and 175 women who wished to continue the pregnancy were enrolled in the study. A few Danish women (22) were subsequently removed from the study base. The women who wanted an abortion were more often than the other women single, their knowledge of Danish as a second language was poorer, and they less often had a job. Although the age distributions of the two groups were similar the women who wanted an abortion had more often been pregnant before (more births and more abortions). The women who wanted an abortion more often than the other women reported having been drunk, having had a pelvic inflammation or VD, and having been admitted to hospital. Half of the women who wanted an abortion reported that they had forgotten to use their contraception and one fourth were opposed to the use of contraception. There seems not to be a well defined high risk group for legal abortion but a general need for a more realistic view on contraception.

  4. Factors associated with repeat induced abortion in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Beatrice W; Mutua, Michael M; Sidze, Estelle M

    2015-10-12

    Over six million induced abortions were reported in Africa in 2008 with over two million induced abortions occurring in Eastern Africa. Although a significant proportion of women in the region procure more than one abortion during their reproductive period, there is a dearth of research on factors associated with repeat abortion. Data for this study come from the Magnitude and Incidence of Unsafe Abortion Study conducted by the African Population and Health Research Center in Kenya in 2012. The study used a nationally-representative sample of 350 facilities (level II to level VI) that offer post-abortion services for complications following induced and spontaneous abortions. A prospective morbidity survey tool was used by health providers in 328 facilities to collect information on socio-demographic charateristics, reproductive health history and contraceptive use at conception for all patients presenting for post-abortion services. Our analysis is based on data recorded on 769 women who were classified as having had an induced abortion. About 16 % of women seeking post abortion services for an induced abortion reported to have had a previous induced abortion. Being separated or divorced or widowed, having no education, having unwanted pregnancy, having 1-2 prior births and using traditional methods of contraception were associated with a higher likelihood of a repeat induced abortion. The findings point to the need to address the reasons why women with first time induced abortion do not have the necessary information to prevent unintended pregnancies and further induced abortions. Possible explanations linked to the quality of post-abortion family planning and coverage of long-acting methods should be explored.

  5. Late induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W

    1990-09-01

    In the UK in 1988, 13.3% of abortions were performed at 13 weeks' gestation or later. Reasons for this delay, in addition to the diagnosis through amniocentesis of a fetal abnormality, include late recognition of pregnancy, a change of mind about completing the pregnancy, a failure of primary care physicians to entertain the diagnosis of pregnancy, travel or financial problems, and referral difficulties and scheduling delays. Women with little education and very young women are most likely to present for late abortions. From 13-16 weeks, dilatation and evacuation is the safest method of pregnancy termination. The procedure can be made easier through preparation of the cervix with a prostaglandin pessary or Foley catheter. After 16 weeks, an instillation method is recommended; prostaglandin administration can be intro- or extra-amniotic. Complication rates at 13-19 weeks are 14.5/1000 for vaginal methods of abortion and 7.2/1000 for prostaglandin methods. The risk of complications is 3 times higher for women who have 2nd-trimester abortions through the National Health Service. Although it is not realistic to expect that late abortions ever can be eliminated, improved sex education and contraceptive reliability as well as reforms in the National Health Service could reduce the number substantially. To reduce delay, it is suggested that the National Health Service set up satellite day care units and 1-2 central units in each region to deal quickly with midtrimester abortions. Delays would be further reduced by legislation to allow abortion on request in at least the 1st trimester of pregnancy.

  6. [Induced abortion: a world perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, S K

    1987-01-01

    This article presents current estimates of the number, rate, and proportion of abortions for all countries which make such data available. 76% of the world's population lives in countries where induced abortion is legal at least for health reasons. Abortion is legal in almost all developed countries. Most developing countries have some laws against abortion, but it is permitted at least for health reasons in the countries of 67% of the developing world's population. The other 33%--over 1 billion persons--reside mainly in subSaharan Africa, Latin America, and the most orthodox Muslim countries. By the beginning of the 20th century, abortion had been made illegal in most of the world, with rules in Africa, Asia, and Latin America similar to those in Europe and North America. Abortion legislation began to change first in a few industrialized countries prior to World War II and in Japan in 1948. Socialist European countries made abortion legal in the first trimester in the 1950s, and most of the industrialized world followed suit in the 1960s and 1970s. The worldwide trend toward relaxed abortion restrictions continues today, with governments giving varying reasons for the changes. Nearly 33 million legal abortions are estimated to be performed annually in the world, with 14 million of them in China and 11 million in the USSR. The estimated total rises to 40-60 million when illegal abortions added. On a worldwide basis some 37-55 abortions are estimated to occur for each 1000 women aged 15-44 years. There are probably 24-32 abortions per 100 pregnancies. The USSR has the highest abortion rate among developed countries, 181/1000 women aged 15-44, followed by Rumania with 91/1000, many of them illegal. The large number of abortions in some countries is due to scarcity of modern contraception. Among developing countries, China apparently has the highest rate, 62/1000 women aged 15-44. Cuba's rate is 59/1000. It is very difficult to calculate abortion rates in countries

  7. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited.

  8. INDUCED ABORTION IN NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... unwanted pregnancy, abortion and adoption of children, and the laws relating to them.. Results: Participants felt that ... education of the young girl would be disrupted, if paternity of pregnancy is in dispute, or if it would save the ... Married young women, 15-24 years, rural/urban. 3. Married women, 25-49 ...

  9. INDUCED ABORTION IN NIGERIA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... unwanted pregnancy, abortion and adoption of children, and the laws relating to them.. Results: Participants felt that there was high .... of cultural differences, formative research was first conducted and a set of ..... paternity, there is a problem of the stigma of bearing a child who would be regarded as a ...

  10. Prevalence of Abortion and Contraceptive Practice among Women Seeking Repeat Induced Abortion in Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamina, Mustafa Adelaja

    2015-01-01

    Induced abortion contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries yet women still seek repeat induced abortion in spite of availability of contraceptive services. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of abortion and contraceptive use among women seeking repeat induced abortion in Western Nigeria. A prospective cross-sectional study utilizing self-administered questionnaires was administered to women seeking abortion in private hospitals/clinics in four geopolitical areas of Ogun State, Western Nigeria, from January 1 to December 31 2012. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.0. The age range for those seeking repeat induced abortion was 15 to 51 years while the median age was 25 years. Of 2934 women seeking an abortion, 23% reported having had one or more previous abortions. Of those who had had more than one abortion, the level of awareness of contraceptives was 91.7% while only 21.5% used a contraceptive at their first intercourse after the procedure; 78.5% of the pregnancies were associated with non-contraceptive use while 17.5% were associated with contraceptive failure. The major reason for non-contraceptive use was fear of side effects. The rate of women seeking repeat abortions is high in Nigeria. The rate of contraceptive use is low while contraceptive failure rate is high.

  11. Prevalence of Abortion and Contraceptive Practice among Women Seeking Repeat Induced Abortion in Western Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamina, Mustafa Adelaja

    2015-01-01

    Background. Induced abortion contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries yet women still seek repeat induced abortion in spite of availability of contraceptive services. The aim of this study is to determine the rate of abortion and contraceptive use among women seeking repeat induced abortion in Western Nigeria. Method. A prospective cross-sectional study utilizing self-administered questionnaires was administered to women seeking abortion in private hospitals/clinics in four geopolitical areas of Ogun State, Western Nigeria, from January 1 to December 31 2012. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17.0. Results. The age range for those seeking repeat induced abortion was 15 to 51 years while the median age was 25 years. Of 2934 women seeking an abortion, 23% reported having had one or more previous abortions. Of those who had had more than one abortion, the level of awareness of contraceptives was 91.7% while only 21.5% used a contraceptive at their first intercourse after the procedure; 78.5% of the pregnancies were associated with non-contraceptive use while 17.5% were associated with contraceptive failure. The major reason for non-contraceptive use was fear of side effects. Conclusion. The rate of women seeking repeat abortions is high in Nigeria. The rate of contraceptive use is low while contraceptive failure rate is high. PMID:26078881

  12. [Spountaneous and induced abortion: anxiety, depression and guilty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benute, Gláucia Rosana Guerra; Nomura, Roseli Mieko Yamamoto; Pereira, Pedro Paulo; Lucia, Mara Cristina Souza de; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy has a symbolic meaning for each woman. It varies according to personality structure and is related to women's previous life experiences. the aim was to characterize the women that suffered abortion, asking about anxiety and depression, looking for guilty feelings after abortion, and to compare results between women who suffered spontaneous abortion and those who had intentional abortion. fifty women with spontaneous and fifty with induced abortion were interviewed 30 days after the procedure. A semistructured questionnaire with open and closed-end questions and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. woman who induced abortion revealed to be more anxious (mean 11) and depressed (mean 8.3) than woman with spontaneous abortion (means 8.7 and 6.1 respectively, pabortion were more anxious and depressed, as shown by later life events, full of problematic feelings and the need for psychological support.

  13. Induced abortion among Jimma comprehensive high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knew the health hazards of abortion, and 69% were not aware of contraceptive methods. Almost 35% had no information on legal issues of induced abortion, 20.72% wished induced abortion be legalized while 67.4% opposed. Based on the study findings, intensification of sex education, and provision of family planning ...

  14. Incidence of induced abortion in Malawi, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polis, Chelsea B; Mhango, Chisale; Philbin, Jesse; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Chipeta, Effie; Msusa, Ausbert

    2017-01-01

    In Malawi, abortion is legal only if performed to save a woman's life; other attempts to procure an abortion are punishable by 7-14 years imprisonment. Most induced abortions in Malawi are performed under unsafe conditions, contributing to Malawi's high maternal mortality ratio. Malawians are currently debating whether to provide additional exceptions under which an abortion may be legally obtained. An estimated 67,300 induced abortions occurred in Malawi in 2009 (equivalent to 23 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-44), but changes since 2009, including dramatic increases in contraceptive prevalence, may have impacted abortion rates. We conducted a nationally representative survey of health facilities to estimate the number of cases of post-abortion care, as well as a survey of knowledgeable informants to estimate the probability of needing and obtaining post-abortion care following induced abortion. These data were combined with national population and fertility data to determine current estimates of induced abortion and unintended pregnancy in Malawi using the Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology. We estimate that approximately 141,044 (95% CI: 121,161-160,928) induced abortions occurred in Malawi in 2015, translating to a national rate of 38 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-49 (95% CI: 32 to 43); which varied by geographical zone (range: 28-61). We estimate that 53% of pregnancies in Malawi are unintended, and that 30% of unintended pregnancies end in abortion. Given the challenges of estimating induced abortion, and the assumptions required for calculation, results should be viewed as approximate estimates, rather than exact measures. The estimated abortion rate in 2015 is higher than in 2009 (potentially due to methodological differences), but similar to recent estimates from nearby countries including Tanzania (36), Uganda (39), and regional estimates in Eastern and Southern Africa (34-35). Over half of pregnancies in Malawi are unintended. Our

  15. Induced abortion and relevant factors among women seeking abortion in Nanjing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenghui; Tian, Linwei; Xu, Fei

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the sociological characteristics of abortion seekers according to marital status and previous induced abortions in a major regional hospital in Nanjing, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire in women seeking abortion at Nanjing Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital in China in 2003. The average age of the participants was 26.0 ± 4.5 years. Of the 462 abortion seekers, 95.9% had one previous induced abortion. The majority (49.6%) of the ever-married women were in the age group of 25-29 while the majority (76.9%) of the unmarried women were aged 20-24 years. Unprotected intercourse (53.6%) and contraception failure (43.9%) were the primary reasons given for the current induced abortion for ever-married women. Unmarried women terminated their current pregnancies mainly because they did not want children (62.1%). Of the 182 unmarried subjects, 86.8% had psychological problems in their premarital pregnancy. Education and communication about sexual morality, contraception and reproductive health, as well as post-abortion counseling and services, especially for young women, are needed to reduce the rate of induced abortions. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [Psychological aspects of induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sz Makó, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla

    2011-01-01

    The present paper, based on the results of international studies, is focused on the reconsideration of the psychological aspects of induced abortion. By presenting a narrow cross-section of the Hungarian demographic data, we would like to emphasise the necessity and the significance of a deeper understanding of the subject. Factors behind the decision-making, short- and long term outcomes of the intervention influencing primarily the mental health of women and partner-relationship aspects are discussed in details. While acknowledging the complexity of the subject deriving from the legal, ethical, moral, religious, medical, social and sociological concerns, our aim is to call attention to the psychological aspects of induced abortion and the importance of psychological care of women undergoing surgical operation.

  17. [Induced abortion--a historical outline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenc, F

    1974-11-11

    An historical review of the use of induced abortion is presented, beginning with early eras. The Chinese were the 1st to record the practice of induced abortion, with this operation being administered to royal concubines recorded at 500-515 B.C. Induced abortion was not used in ancient Greece, either for criminal or ethical reason. However, the ancient Greeks did utilize compulsory abortion for serious economic indications, as a means of controlling natural growth. Greek medical, gyneoclogigcal instruments for adminsitering abortions were described by Hippocrates. The Greek moral attitudes on abortion were largely adopted by the Romans, which were later altered by the appearance of Christianity and new ethical ideas. These ideas dominated European attitudes, along with the Church of Rome, limiting induced abortion to cases where the life of the mother was threatened. This attitude has existed until the present century, when these moral ideas are being challanged seriously for the 1st time in modern history.

  18. The incidence of induced abortion in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levandowski, Brooke A; Mhango, Chisale; Kuchingale, Edgar; Lunguzi, Juliana; Katengeza, Hans; Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Singh, Susheela

    2013-06-01

    Abortion is legally restricted in Malawi, and no data are available on the incidence of the procedure. The Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology was used to estimate levels of induced abortion in Malawi in 2009. Data on provision of postabortion care were collected from 166 public, nongovernmental and private health facilities, and estimates of the likelihood that women who have abortions experience complications and seek care were obtained from 56 key informants. Data from these surveys and from the 2010 Malawi Demographic and Health Survey were used to calculate abortion rates and ratios, and rates of pregnancy and unintended pregnancy. Approximately 18,700 women in Malawi were treated in health facilities for complications of induced abortion in 2009. An estimated 67,300 induced abortions were performed, equivalent to a rate of 23 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-44 and an abortion ratio of 12 per 100 live births. The abortion rate was higher in the North (35 per 1,000) than in the Central region or the South (20-23 per 1,000). The unintended pregnancy rate in 2010 was 139 per 1,000 women aged 15-44, and an estimated 52% of all pregnancies were unintended. Unsafe abortion is common in Malawi. Interventions are needed to help women and couples avoid unwanted pregnancy, reduce the need for unsafe abortion and decrease maternal mortality.

  19. Induced abortion among Brazilian female sex workers: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeiro, Alberto Pereira; Diniz, Debora

    2015-02-01

    Prostitutes are vulnerable to unplanned pregnancies and abortions. In Brazil, abortion is a crime and there is no data about unsafe abortions for this population. The study describes how prostitutes perform illegal abortions and the health consequences thereof. Semi-structured interviews with 39 prostitutes from three cities in Brazil with previous induced abortion experience were conducted. Sixty-six abortions, with between one and eight occurrences per woman, were recorded. The majority of the cases resulted from sexual activity with clients. The inconsistent use of condoms with regular clients and the consumption of alcohol during work were indicated as the main causes of unplanned pregnancies. The main method to perform abortion was the intravaginal and oral use of misoprostol, acquired in pharmacies or on the black market. Invasive measures were less frequently reported, however with more serious health complications. The fear of complaint to the police meant that most women do not inform the health team regarding induced abortion. The majority of prostitutes aborted with the use of illegally-acquired misoprostol, ending abortion in a public hospital with infection and hemorrhagic complications. The data indicate the need for a public policy focusing on the reproductive health of prostitutes.

  20. Induced abortion among Brazilian female sex workers: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Pereira Madeiro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostitutes are vulnerable to unplanned pregnancies and abortions. In Brazil, abortion is a crime and there is no data about unsafe abortions for this population. The study describes how prostitutes perform illegal abortions and the health consequences thereof. Semi-structured interviews with 39 prostitutes from three cities in Brazil with previous induced abortion experience were conducted. Sixty-six abortions, with between one and eight occurrences per woman, were recorded. The majority of the cases resulted from sexual activity with clients. The inconsistent use of condoms with regular clients and the consumption of alcohol during work were indicated as the main causes of unplanned pregnancies. The main method to perform abortion was the intravaginal and oral use of misoprostol, acquired in pharmacies or on the black market. Invasive measures were less frequently reported, however with more serious health complications. The fear of complaint to the police meant that most women do not inform the health team regarding induced abortion. The majority of prostitutes aborted with the use of illegally-acquired misoprostol, ending abortion in a public hospital with infection and hemorrhagic complications. The data indicate the need for a public policy focusing on the reproductive health of prostitutes.

  1. [Update in current care guidelines: induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The rate of induced abortions (9/1000 women aged 15-49 y in 2011) is low in Finland. Ninety-two per cent of them are performed on grounds of social reasons. Use of medical abortion (combination of mifepristone and misoprostol) has increased to nearly 90 % of abortions, also in abortions of 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. Intrauterine contraception started at the time of abortion lowers the risk of future unplanned pregnancies. Prophylactic antibiotics are recommended in cases of surgical evacuation of the uterus. Written instructions for patients and professionals are introduced in the guideline.

  2. Uterine contraction induced by Tanzanian plants used to induce abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Tine; Nielsen, Frank; Rasch, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Women in Tanzania use plants to induce abortion. It is not known whether the plants have an effect.......Women in Tanzania use plants to induce abortion. It is not known whether the plants have an effect....

  3. Induced abortion and unintended pregnancy in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Susheela; Prada, Elena; Kestler, Edgar

    2006-09-01

    Although Guatemalan law permits induced abortion only to save a woman's life, many women obtain abortions, often under unsafe conditions and in response to an unintended pregnancy. Recent studies indicate that unsafe abortion is a key factor contributing to maternal morbidity and mortality in the country, but no national data on the incidence of abortion exist. Surveys of all hospitals that treat women for postabortion complications and of 74 professionals who are knowledgeable about the conditions of abortion provision in Guatemala were conducted in 2003. Indirect estimation techniques were used to calculate the number of induced abortions performed annually. Abortion rates and ratios and the level of unintended pregnancy were calculated for the nation and its eight regions. Nearly 65,000 induced abortions are performed annually in Guatemala, and about 21,600 women are hospitalized for treatment of complications. Abortions occur at a rate of 24 per 1,000 women aged 15-49, and there is one abortion for every six births. The abortion rate is higher than average in the Southwest (less developed, mainly indigenous population) and Metropolitan (more developed, mainly nonindigenous population) regions (29-30 per 1,000 women). Over a quarter of all births are unplanned; combining unplanned births with abortions yields estimates that 32% of pregnancies in Guatemala are unintended, with an unintended pregnancy rate of 66 per 1,000 women. Unsafe abortion has a significant impact on women's health in Guatemala. Comprehensive government programs are needed to address the issues of unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion, with attention to regional differences.

  4. Is Induced Abortion Really Declining in Armenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilozian, Ann; Agadjanian, Victor

    2016-06-01

    As in other post-Soviet settings, induced abortion has been widely used in Armenia. However, recent national survey data point to a substantial drop in abortion rates with no commensurate increase in modern contraceptive prevalence and no change in fertility levels. We use data from in-depth interviews with women of reproductive age and health providers in rural Armenia to explore possible underreporting of both contraceptive use and abortion. While we find no evidence that women understate their use of modern contraception, the analysis suggests that induced abortion might indeed be underreported. The potential for underreporting is particularly high for sex-selective abortions, for which there is growing public backlash, and medical abortion, a practice that is typically self-administered outside any professional supervision. Possible underreporting of induced abortion calls for refinement of both abortion registration and relevant survey instruments. Better measurement of abortion dynamics is necessary for successful promotion of effective modern contraceptive methods and reduction of unsafe abortion practices. © 2016 The Population Council, Inc.

  5. Incidence of induced abortion in Malawi, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhango, Chisale; Philbin, Jesse; Chimwaza, Wanangwa; Chipeta, Effie; Msusa, Ausbert

    2017-01-01

    Background In Malawi, abortion is legal only if performed to save a woman’s life; other attempts to procure an abortion are punishable by 7–14 years imprisonment. Most induced abortions in Malawi are performed under unsafe conditions, contributing to Malawi’s high maternal mortality ratio. Malawians are currently debating whether to provide additional exceptions under which an abortion may be legally obtained. An estimated 67,300 induced abortions occurred in Malawi in 2009 (equivalent to 23 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–44), but changes since 2009, including dramatic increases in contraceptive prevalence, may have impacted abortion rates. Methods We conducted a nationally representative survey of health facilities to estimate the number of cases of post-abortion care, as well as a survey of knowledgeable informants to estimate the probability of needing and obtaining post-abortion care following induced abortion. These data were combined with national population and fertility data to determine current estimates of induced abortion and unintended pregnancy in Malawi using the Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology. Results We estimate that approximately 141,044 (95% CI: 121,161–160,928) induced abortions occurred in Malawi in 2015, translating to a national rate of 38 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–49 (95% CI: 32 to 43); which varied by geographical zone (range: 28–61). We estimate that 53% of pregnancies in Malawi are unintended, and that 30% of unintended pregnancies end in abortion. Given the challenges of estimating induced abortion, and the assumptions required for calculation, results should be viewed as approximate estimates, rather than exact measures. Conclusions The estimated abortion rate in 2015 is higher than in 2009 (potentially due to methodological differences), but similar to recent estimates from nearby countries including Tanzania (36), Uganda (39), and regional estimates in Eastern and Southern Africa (34–35). Over

  6. Frequency and profile of induced abortions: hospital based study in tertiary hospitals in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, H; Habil, I

    2013-09-01

    To determine the frequency and profile of induced abortions among hospitalized cases of abortions in three tertiary hospitals in Egypt. A total of 517 consecutive cases of abortions with complete records were enrolled from three tertiary hospitals in Egypt: two hospitals in Cairo and one hospital in Alexandria. A data extraction sheet was designed to extract the required information from the records. It included: File No., Age, marital status, occupation, parity, number of children, previous abortion, history of contraception, trial of induction for this abortion and management of abortion in the hospital. The World Health Organization (WHO) criteria of categorizing the abortion as possible, probable or certainly induced abortion was used for classification of abortion cases. The proportion of classified induced abortions (certainly, probably and possibly induced abortions) was 30.6% in the total sample, being higher in Alexandria hospital (60.9%) compared to 14 and 19% in the other two hospitals respectively. Using the multiple logistic regression, the following factors were found independently related to induced abortions: Alexandria hospital (as proxy for residence), age > or = 30 years and having more than 2 children. The current study revealed that about one third of hospitalized cases of abortion can be suspected of being induced. Induced abortion may be linked to elder age, higher number of children in the family and probably have geographical variation in Egypt.

  7. Barriers to Rural Induced Abortion Services in Canada: Findings of the British Columbia Abortion Providers Survey (BCAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Wendy V.; Soon, Judith A.; Maughn, Nanamma; Dressler, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background Rural induced abortion service has declined in Canada. Factors influencing abortion provision by rural physicians are unknown. This study assessed distribution, practice, and experiences among rural compared to urban abortion providers in the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC). Methods We used mixed methods to assess physicians on the BC registry of abortion providers. In 2011 we distributed a previously-published questionnaire and conducted semi-structured interviews. Results Surveys were returned by 39/46 (85%) of BC abortion providers. Half were family physicians, within both rural and urban cohorts. One-quarter (17/67) of rural hospitals offer abortion service. Medical abortions comprised 14.7% of total reported abortions. The three largest urban areas reported 90% of all abortions, although only 57% of reproductive age women reside in the associated health authority regions. Each rural physician provided on average 76 (SD 52) abortions annually, including 35 (SD 30) medical abortions. Rural physicians provided surgical abortions in operating rooms, often using general anaesthesia, while urban physicians provided the same services primarily in ambulatory settings using local anaesthesia. Rural providers reported health system barriers, particularly relating to operating room logistics. Urban providers reported occasional anonymous harassment and violence. Conclusions Medical abortions represented 15% of all BC abortions, a larger proportion than previously reported (under 4%) for Canada. Rural physicians describe addressable barriers to service provision that may explain the declining accessibility of rural abortion services. Moving rural surgical abortions out of operating rooms and into local ambulatory care settings has the potential to improve care and costs, while reducing logistical challenges facing rural physicians. PMID:23840578

  8. Barriers to rural induced abortion services in Canada: findings of the British Columbia Abortion Providers Survey (BCAPS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy V Norman

    Full Text Available Rural induced abortion service has declined in Canada. Factors influencing abortion provision by rural physicians are unknown. This study assessed distribution, practice, and experiences among rural compared to urban abortion providers in the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC.We used mixed methods to assess physicians on the BC registry of abortion providers. In 2011 we distributed a previously-published questionnaire and conducted semi-structured interviews.Surveys were returned by 39/46 (85% of BC abortion providers. Half were family physicians, within both rural and urban cohorts. One-quarter (17/67 of rural hospitals offer abortion service. Medical abortions comprised 14.7% of total reported abortions. The three largest urban areas reported 90% of all abortions, although only 57% of reproductive age women reside in the associated health authority regions. Each rural physician provided on average 76 (SD 52 abortions annually, including 35 (SD 30 medical abortions. Rural physicians provided surgical abortions in operating rooms, often using general anaesthesia, while urban physicians provided the same services primarily in ambulatory settings using local anaesthesia. Rural providers reported health system barriers, particularly relating to operating room logistics. Urban providers reported occasional anonymous harassment and violence.Medical abortions represented 15% of all BC abortions, a larger proportion than previously reported (under 4% for Canada. Rural physicians describe addressable barriers to service provision that may explain the declining accessibility of rural abortion services. Moving rural surgical abortions out of operating rooms and into local ambulatory care settings has the potential to improve care and costs, while reducing logistical challenges facing rural physicians.

  9. Barriers to rural induced abortion services in Canada: findings of the British Columbia Abortion Providers Survey (BCAPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Wendy V; Soon, Judith A; Maughn, Nanamma; Dressler, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Rural induced abortion service has declined in Canada. Factors influencing abortion provision by rural physicians are unknown. This study assessed distribution, practice, and experiences among rural compared to urban abortion providers in the Canadian province of British Columbia (BC). We used mixed methods to assess physicians on the BC registry of abortion providers. In 2011 we distributed a previously-published questionnaire and conducted semi-structured interviews. Surveys were returned by 39/46 (85%) of BC abortion providers. Half were family physicians, within both rural and urban cohorts. One-quarter (17/67) of rural hospitals offer abortion service. Medical abortions comprised 14.7% of total reported abortions. The three largest urban areas reported 90% of all abortions, although only 57% of reproductive age women reside in the associated health authority regions. Each rural physician provided on average 76 (SD 52) abortions annually, including 35 (SD 30) medical abortions. Rural physicians provided surgical abortions in operating rooms, often using general anaesthesia, while urban physicians provided the same services primarily in ambulatory settings using local anaesthesia. Rural providers reported health system barriers, particularly relating to operating room logistics. Urban providers reported occasional anonymous harassment and violence. Medical abortions represented 15% of all BC abortions, a larger proportion than previously reported (under 4%) for Canada. Rural physicians describe addressable barriers to service provision that may explain the declining accessibility of rural abortion services. Moving rural surgical abortions out of operating rooms and into local ambulatory care settings has the potential to improve care and costs, while reducing logistical challenges facing rural physicians.

  10. Do Induced Abortions Affect the First Birth Probability?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marie-Louise H; Stage, Louise; Knudsen, Lisbeth B.

    and methods: The data are obtained by linking several national public registers in Denmark, using the unique personal identification number. Initially, a logistic regression analysis is employed in order to model the first birth probability in a given year. Secondly, the long-term effect of an induced......Objective: The focus of this paper is to study, on a national basis, how the event of an induced abortion modifies the transition to first birth for Danish women aged 20-39 years in the period 1982-2001, taking into account also educational level, family situation, and urbanisation. Data...... abortion is examined by cumulative first birth probabilities, derived from a life table analysis. Main findings and conclusion: Previous abortions increased the first birth probability, though this effect was almost entirely confined to single women. For cohabiting and married women, previous abortions had...

  11. Attitudes of medical students to induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buga, G A B

    2002-05-01

    Unsafe abortion causes 13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Safe abortion can only be offered under conditions where legislation has been passed for legal termination of unwanted pregnancy. Where such legislation exists, accessibility of safe abortion depends on the attitudes of doctors and other healthcare workers to induced abortion. Medical students as future doctors may have attitudes to abortion that will affect the provision of safe abortion. Little is known about the attitudes of South African medical students to abortion. To assess sexual practices and attitudes of medical students to induced abortion and to determine some of the factors that may influence these attitudes. A cross-sectional analytic study involving the self-administration of an anonymous questionnaire. The questionnaire was administered to medical students at a small, but growing, medical school situated in rural South Africa. Demographic data, sexual practices and attitudes to induced abortion. Two hundred and forty seven out of 300 (82.3%) medical students responded. Their mean age was 21.81 +/- 3.36 (SD) years, and 78.8% were Christians, 17.1% Hindus and 2.6% Muslims. Although 95% of the respondents were single, 68.6% were already sexually experienced, and their mean age at coitarche was 17.24+/-3.14 (SD) years. Although overall 61.2% of the respondents felt abortion is murder either at conception or later, the majority (87.2%) would perform or refer a woman for abortion under certain circumstances. These circumstances, in descending order of frequency, include: threat to mother's life (74.1%), in case of rape (62.3%), the baby is severely malformed (59.5%), threat to mother's mental health (53.8%) and parental incompetence (21.0%). Only 12.5% of respondents would perform or refer for abortion on demand, 12.8% would neither perform nor refer for abortion under any circumstances. Religious affiliation and service attendance significantly influenced some of these attitudes and beliefs

  12. Self-reporting of induced abortion by women attending prenatal clinics in urban Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonofua, Friday; Omo-Aghoja, Lawrence; Bello, Zainab; Osughe, Mary; Agholor, Kingsley

    2010-11-01

    To determine the proportion of all clinically confirmed pregnancies that end as induced abortion in a cohort of pregnant women in Nigeria. A total of 490 women who attended prenatal clinics at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital were interviewed with the preceding birth technique (PBT) on the outcomes of their previous pregnancies, including abortions. Of the 490 women, 384 women (78.4%) reported previous abortions. A total of 1883 previous pregnancies were reported by the women, of which 914 ended in abortion, 545 in live births, and 421 in stillbirths, with 3 unclassified. The total abortion ratio was 914/1842 (49.6%), when 41 women who reported no previous pregnancies were excluded. Of the 914 abortions, 751 (82.25) were induced abortions, 146 (16.0%) were spontaneous abortions, 9 (0.98%) were missed abortions, and 8 were unclassified. Results of logistic regression analysis showed that women aged 25-29 years were 4 times more likely to report induced abortion compared with older women. Induced abortion was found to be highly prevalent in this region of Nigeria, according to self-reports of women who were asked questions on abortion in the context of medical care. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fertility Profile Following Induced Abortion in Calabar, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: The incidence of induced abortion in Nigeria is high. Pelvic infection as a complication of this abortion is also common and with the rising prevalence of infertility in the population, there is a need to assess the impact of induced abortions on fertility in our women. Objective: To establish the impact of induced abortion ...

  14. Ethnocultural identity and induced abortion in Kazakstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agadjanian, V; Qian, Z

    1997-12-01

    This study analyzes ethnic differences in induced abortion among ever-married women in Kazakstan, drawing on data from the 1995 Kazakstan Demographic and Health Survey. Instead of conventional ethnic markers, such as "Kazak" or "Russian," it focuses on more complex ethnocultural identities that combine ascribed ethnicity with language use. Because of the history of russification in Kazakstan, three ethnocultural groups are defined and compared--Kazak women who chose to be interviewed in Kazak, Kazak women who chose to be interviewed in Russian, and women of European background interviewed in Russian. Whereas women of European origin were the most likely to undergo induced abortion, the Russian-interviewed Kazaks had higher abortion ratios and were more likely to terminate their pregnancies than were the Kazak-interviewed Kazaks, net of other characteristics. The implications of the results for induced abortion trends and family planning policy in Kazakstan are discussed in addition to other findings.

  15. Induced abortion in developed countries:trends and law

    OpenAIRE

    Pachlová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Induced abortion in developed countries: trends and law Abstract The objective of this study is to give a comprehensive overview of law and trends in induced abortion in developed countries and to analyse and to evaluate patterns, which are typical for selected countries. In the first part, approaches to induced abortion are discussed and development in abortion law is described, in the second part, trends of induced abortion are analysed over time and by age of woman. As a tool, methods of d...

  16. Microchimerism after induced or spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoko; Fujimori, Keiya; Sato, Akira; Ohto, Hitoshi

    2008-09-01

    To investigate fetomaternal microchimerism in women with induced abortion or spontaneous pregnancy loss. Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 76 healthy women who underwent dilation and curettage in the first trimester but had never had an abortion or male delivery before. Samples were collected at three time points: just before, 7 days after, and 30 days after abortion. Y chromosome-specific, nested polymerase chain reaction targeting the sex-determining region of Y (SRY) was used to test DNA extracted from buffy coat cells. DNA was also extracted from the chorion to determine sex. The sensitivity of our assay allowed detection of approximately one male cell in 100,000 female cells. Thirty-six male and 40 female chorions were obtained. Male DNA was found in 52.8% of women who had a male chorion before abortion, decreasing to 5.6% at 7 days after abortion. At 30 days after abortion, no male DNA was detected. Male DNA was never detected at any point from women with a female chorion. Fetal cells in the maternal circulation are undetectable 30 days after induced abortion or spontaneous pregnancy loss. Fetal cells may be harbored in maternal organs.

  17. Induced abortion and psychological sequelae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Sharon

    2010-10-01

    The decision to seek an abortion is never easy. Women have different reasons for choosing an abortion and their social, economic and religious background may influence how they cope. Furthermore, once pregnant, the alternatives of childbirth and adoption or keeping the baby may not be psychologically neutral. Research studies in this area have been hampered by methodological problems, but most of the better-quality studies have shown no increased risk of mental health problems in women having an abortion. A consistent finding has been that of pre-existing mental illness and subsequent mental health problems after either abortion or childbirth. Furthermore, studies have shown that only a minority of women experience any lasting sadness or regret. Risk factors for this include ambivalence about the decision, level of social support and whether or not the pregnancy was originally intended. More robust, definitive research studies are required on mental health after abortion and alternative outcomes such as childbirth. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SOCIOECONOMIC VARIATIONS IN INDUCED ABORTION IN TURKEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankara, Hasan Giray

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the levels of, and socioeconomic variations in, income-related inequality in induced abortion among Turkish women. The study included 15,480 ever-married women of reproductive age (15-49) from the 2003 and 2008 waves of the Turkish Demographic and Health Survey. The measured inequalities in abortion levels and their changes over time were decomposed into the percentage contributions of selected socioeconomic factors using ordinary least square analysis and concentration indices were calculated. The inequalities and their first difference (difference in inequalities between 2003 and 2008) were decomposed using the approaches of Wagstaff et al. (2003). Higher socioeconomic characteristics (such as higher levels of wealth and education and better neighbourhood) were found to be associated with higher rates of abortion. Inequality analyses indicated that although deprived women become more familiar with abortion over time, abortion was still more concentrated among affluent women in the 2008 survey. The decomposition analyses suggested that wealth, age, education and level of regional development were the most important contributors to income-related inequality in abortion. Therefore policies that (i) increase the level of wealth and education of deprived women, (ii) develop deprived regions of Turkey, (iii) improve knowledge about family planning and, especially (iv) enhance the accessibility of family planning services for deprived and/or rural women, may be beneficial for reducing socioeconomic variations in abortion in the country.

  19. The effects of induced abortion on subsequent reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, C J; Cates, W; Tietze, C

    1982-01-01

    -fold rise in relative risk; 3) midtrimester spontaneous abortion is not more frequent for women who have experienced 1 previous abortion than for women who are in their 1st pregnancy; 4) shortened gestation in pregnancies after 1 induced abortion has an incidence similar to that in 1st pregnancies; 5) low birth weight is more frequent in 1st births after abortion performed by dilatation and curettage under general anesthesia, but it is not more frequent in 1st births after abortions performed by other methods, when compared with 1st pregnancy births; 6) 1 induced abortion does not protect a woman from the higher risks of low birth weight and pregnancy complications associated with a 1st birth; 7) repeat induced abortion has not been studied sufficiently to clarify whether the increased risks associated with it in some studies are caused by confounding factors or the procedures performed; and 8) 1st born infants whose mothers had 1 induced abortion are at similar risk of morbidity and infant mortality as other 1st born children.

  20. Incidence of Induced Abortion and Post-Abortion Care in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Sarah C; Kimaro, Godfather; Muganyizi, Projestine; Philbin, Jesse; Kahwa, Amos; Ngadaya, Esther; Bankole, Akinrinola

    2015-01-01

    Tanzania has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios in the world, and unsafe abortion is one of its leading causes. Yet little is known about its incidence. To provide the first ever estimates of the incidence of unsafe abortion in Tanzania, at the national level and for each of the 8 geopolitical zones (7 in Mainland plus Zanzibar). A nationally representative survey of health facilities was conducted to determine the number of induced abortion complications treated in facilities. A survey of experts on abortion was conducted to estimate the likelihood of women experiencing complications and obtaining treatment. These surveys were complemented with population and fertility data to obtain abortion numbers, rates and ratios, using the Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology. In Tanzania, women obtained just over 405,000 induced abortions in 2013, for a national rate of 36 abortions per 1,000 women age 15-49 and a ratio of 21 abortions per 100 live births. For each woman treated in a facility for induced abortion complications, 6 times as many women had an abortion but did not receive care. Abortion rates vary widely by zone, from 10.7 in Zanzibar to 50.7 in the Lake zone. The abortion rate is similar to that of other countries in the region. Variations by zone are explained mainly by differences in fertility and contraceptive prevalence. Measures to reduce the incidence of unsafe abortion and associated maternal mortality include expanding access to post-abortion care and contraceptive services to prevent unintended pregnancies.

  1. Contraception and induced abortion in the West Indies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, A A; de Bruijn, J G M

    2011-10-01

    Most islands in the West Indies do not have liberal laws on abortion, nor laws on pregnancy prevention programmes (contraception). We present results of a literature review about the attitude of healthcare providers and women toward (emergency) contraception and induced abortion, prevalence, methods and juridical aspects of induced abortion and prevention policies. Articles were obtained from PubMed, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychlNFO and Soclndex (1999 to 2010) using as keywords contraception, induced abortion, termination of pregnancy, medical abortion and West Indies. Thirty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria: 18 on contraception, 17 on induced abortion and two on both subjects. Main results indicated that healthcare providers' knowledge of emergency contraception was low. Studies showed a poor knowledge of contraception, but counselling increased its effective use. Exact numbers about prevalence of abortion were not found. The total annual number of abortions in the West Indies is estimated at 300 000; one in four pregnancies ends in an abortion. The use of misoprostol diminished the complications of unsafe abortions. Legislation of abortion varies widely in the different islands in the West Indies: Cuba, Puerto Rico, Martinique, Guadeloupe and St Martin have legal abortions. Barbados was the first English-speaking island with liberal legislation on abortion. All other islands have restrictive laws. Despite high estimated numbers of abortion, research on prevalence of abortion is missing. Studies showed a poor knowledge of contraception and low use among adolescents. Most West Indian islands have restrictive laws on abortion.

  2. [Epidemiology of induced abortion in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigoureux, S

    2016-12-01

    Conduct a synthesis of existing knowledge about the frequency of induced abortion or termination of pregnancy and unplanned pregnancies, the exposure factors of unplanned pregnancies and abortion and the associated morbidity and mortality. Consultation of The Medline database, and national and international reports on abortions in France and in developed countries. Voluntary termination of pregnancy is an induced abortion, opted for non-medical reasons, which in France can be performed before 14 weeks of gestation. Abortion is a common procedure, with rare complications, amounting to about 220,000 procedures per year in France with a stable rate over decades. Similarly to births, women aged 20 to 24 are most affected. The possibility of an abortion exists for all women; this potential event, however, is not equal for each and varies by age of women, socio-professional situations, geographical origins, marital status and past or present domestic and sexual violence. The French historical analysis shows that for 50 years the increase in contraceptive prevalence rate is associated with a decrease in the frequency of unplanned pregnancies. It is therefore possible that the prevention of unplanned pregnancy through early uptake of contraception and contraception options by women is related to a woman's lifestyle. Nonetheless, the number of abortion remains stable since its decriminalization despite the large increase in medicalized contraceptive prevalence rate. Good knowledge of the epidemiology of voluntary termination of pregnancy and unplanned pregnancies is a prerequisite to better adopt prevention and case management strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Induced abortion and adolescent mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotland, Nada L

    2011-10-01

    Induced abortion is widely believed - by the public, healthcare professionals, and policy-makers - to lead to adverse mental health sequelae. This belief is false, as it applies both to adult women and adolescents. However, it has been used to rationalize, and been quoted in, restrictive and intrusive legislation in several states and in proposed federal legislation. It is essential for gynecologists to have accurate information, as clinicians, for their patients, and, as key experts, for policy makers. New articles concluding that there are adverse psychological outcomes from induced abortion continue to be published. The methodological flaws in these articles are so serious as to invalidate those conclusions. Several recent scholarly analyses detail these flaws. Methodologically sound studies and reviews continue to demonstrate that psychosocial problems play a role in unwanted conception and the decision to abort unwanted pregnancies but are not the result of abortion. Clinicians may have to reassure patients making decisions about their pregnancies that abortion does not cause psychiatric illness. They can do so on the basis of recent analyses substantiating that finding. (C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  4. Induced abortion in Colombia: new estimates and change between 1989 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Elena; Biddlecom, Ann; Singh, Susheela

    2011-09-01

    Although abortion was made legal in Colombia under selected circumstances in 2006, no national studies have examined whether the incidence of the procedure has changed since the previous estimate in 1989. Data on the number of women treated for abortion complications were obtained from a nationally representative survey of 300 public and private health facilities, and estimates of the likelihood that women obtaining abortions experience complications and receive treatment at a facility were obtained from a survey of 102 knowledgeable professionals. Indirect estimation techniques were used to calculate national and regional abortion measures for 2008, which were compared with previously published 1989 estimates. Numbers and rates of unintended pregnancy were also calculated. In 2008, an estimated 93,300 women were treated for induced abortion complications in public and private health facilities. An estimated 400,400 induced abortions were performed, which translates to a rate of 39 per 1,000 women aged 15-44, a slight increase from 1989 (36 per 1,000). Rates varied widely across regions, from 66 in Bogotá to 18 in Oriental. Despite the new abortion law, only 322 legal abortions were performed in 2008. Between 1989 and 2008, the proportion of pregnancies ending in induced abortion increased from 22% to 29%, and the proportion of pregnancies that were unintended rose from 52% to 67%. Improvements in provision of and access to contraceptive and legal abortion services are needed to meet the increased demand among women and couples to prevent unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion.

  5. Motherhood and induced abortion among teenagers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mogens

    The study investigates the social background of teenagers before being teenage mothers or having an induced abortion. A discrete-time proportional hazard modelling was used to analyse the longitudinal observations of population-based registers covering all children born in Denmark in 1966...

  6. Risk factors and the choice of long-acting reversible contraception following medical abortion: effect on subsequent induced abortion and unwanted pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korjamo, Riina; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Mentula, Maarit

    2018-04-01

    To analyse the post-abortion effect of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) plans and initiation on the risk of subsequent unwanted pregnancy and abortion. retrospective cohort study of 666 women who underwent medical abortion between January-May 2013 at Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. Altogether 159 (23.8%) women planning post-abortion use of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) participated in a randomized study and had an opportunity to receive the LNG-IUS free-of-charge from the hospital. The other 507 (76.2%) women planned and obtained their contraception according to clinical routine. Demographics, planned contraception, and LARC initiation at the time of the index abortion were collected. Data on subsequent abortions were retrieved from the Finnish Abortion Register and electronic patient files until the end of 2014. During the 21 months ([median], IQR 20-22) follow-up, 54(8.1%) women requested subsequent abortions. When adjusted for age, previous pregnancies, deliveries, induced abortions and gestational-age, planning LARC for post-abortion contraception failed to prevent subsequent abortion (33 abortions/360 women, 9.2%) compared to other contraceptive plans (21/306, 6.9%) (HR 1.22, 95% CI 0.68-2.17). However, verified LARC initiation decreased the abortion rate (4 abortions/177 women, 2.3%) compared to women with uncertain LARC initiation status (50/489, 10.2%) (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06-0.48). When adjusted for LARC initiation status, age abortion (27 abortions/283 women, 9.5%) compared to women ≥25 years (27/383, 7.0%, HR1.95, 95% CI 1.04-3.67). Initiation of LARC as part of abortion service at the time of medical abortion is an important means to prevent subsequent abortion, especially among young women.

  7. Induced abortion frequency in Ankara, Turkey, before and after the legal regulation of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maral, Işil; Durukan, Elif; Albyrak, Selda; Oztimur, Neşe; Biri, Aydan; Bumin, M Ali

    2007-09-01

    To determine the effects of the 1983 law that legalized induced abortion on the number and place of abortions, and on the use of family planning (FP) methods before and after abortion, and to determine the demographic characteristics and reproductive health features according to the order of abortion. This study included 2455 married, widowed or divorced women presenting at Mother and Child Health-Family Planning Centres in Ankara. A questionnaire was used for data collection. Nearly three out of 10 (28.7%) of the women had undergone at least one induced abortion. In the age groups 45-54 and 55-64, 49 and 37.3%, respectively, had had one or more terminations of pregnancy (TOPs). The induced abortion rate increased following the enacting of the law. In the 15-24 and in the 55-64 age group, 55.6 and 89%, respectively, of the women had been aborted by a private physician. Before the index pregnancy, 63.1% were not using contraception compared with 37.3% thereafter. The rate of use of FP increased after the law was passed. Although the most common reason for having an abortion was unwanted pregnancy in all age groups and nearly 60.0% of the women aged less than 55 reported that they were not using any FP method at the time of the TOP, the proportion of women having undergone at least one of these procedures increased after the law was passed, indicating that abortion is used as a FP method.

  8. Factors Associated with Induced Abortion among Women in Hohoe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    In Hohoe, Ghana, induced abortion is the second highest cause of hospital admissions. We aimed to describe factors influencing induced abortion among 408 randomly selected women aged 15-49 years. 21% of the women had had an abortion; of those, 36% said they did not want to disrupt their education or employment ...

  9. Factors Associated with Induced Abortion among Women in Hohoe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Hohoe, Ghana, induced abortion is the second highest cause of hospital admissions. We aimed to describe factors influencing induced abortion among 408 randomly selected women aged 15-49 years. 21% of the women had had an abortion; of those, 36% said they did not want to disrupt their education or employment; ...

  10. Is induced abortion with misoprostol a risk factor for late abortion or preterm delivery in subsequent pregnancies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Norbert; Resche-Rigon, Mathieu; Morin, Christine; Ville, Yves; Rozenberg, Patrick

    2009-07-01

    To examine whether a first or second trimester induced abortion with misoprostol influences the risk of late abortion or preterm delivery in subsequent pregnancies. Case-control study in a teaching hospital from January 2005 to June 2006. The cases had singleton pregnancies delivered at 16-36 weeks of gestation after spontaneous late abortions, preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membrane, or induction of labor for preterm premature rupture of membrane before 37 weeks. The control group was composed of the two consecutive spontaneous singleton deliveries at >or=37 weeks of gestation after each new case (ratio 2/1). The principal outcome measure was late abortion or preterm delivery. The association between late abortion or preterm delivery and a previous induced abortion with misoprostol was first assessed with the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Conditional logistic regression models adapted for clustered data were then further used to quantify the effect size, measured by estimated odds ratios (ORs) with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The study included 245 cases and 490 controls. There was no significant difference in mean maternal age, number of pregnancies, parity, smoking, or history of first trimester miscarriage between cases and controls. However, a history of late abortion or previous preterm delivery was significantly more frequent among cases than controls. Forty (16.3%) cases and 56 (11.5%) controls had a history of cervical ripening with misoprostol before vacuum curettage or evacuation, or of medical abortion by misoprostol alone or with mifepristone (OR 1.51, 95% CI: 0.95-2.39; p=0.08). After adjustment for maternal age and number of pregnancies with a multivariable conditional regression model, the adjusted OR was estimated at 1.33 (95% CI: 0.81-2.17; p=0.25). Despite the need for prudence, these results provide some reassurance that induced abortion with misoprostol during the first or second trimester of pregnancy is

  11. The estimated incidence of induced abortion in Ethiopia, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Susheela; Fetters, Tamara; Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Abdella, Ahmed; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Kumbi, Solomon; Audam, Suzette

    2010-03-01

    Unsafe abortion is an important health problem in Ethiopia; however, no national quantitative study of abortion incidence exists. In 2005, the penal code was revised to broaden the indications under which induced abortion is legal. It is important to measure the incidence of legal and illegal induced abortion after the change in the law. A nationally representative survey of a sample of 347 health facilities that provide postabortion or safe abortion services and a survey of 80 professionals knowledgeable about abortion service provision were conducted in Ethiopia in 2007-2008. Indirect estimation techniques were applied to calculate the incidence of induced abortion. Abortion rates, abortion ratios and unintended pregnancy rates were calculated for the nation and for major regions. In 2008, an estimated 382,000 induced abortions were performed in Ethiopia, and 52,600 women were treated for complications of such abortions. There were an estimated 103,000 legal procedures in health facilities nationwide--27% of all abortions. Nationally, the annual abortion rate was 23 per 1,000 women aged 15-44, and the abortion ratio was 13 per 100 live births. The abortion rate in Addis Ababa (49 per 1,000 women) was twice the national level. Overall, about 42% of pregnancies were unintended, and the unintended pregnancy rate was 101 per 1,000 women. Unsafe abortion is still common and exacts a heavy toll on women in Ethiopia. To reduce rates of unplanned pregnancy and unsafe abortion, increased access to high-quality contraceptive care and safe abortion services is needed.

  12. Induced Abortion: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastgiri, Saeed; Yoosefian, Maryam; Garjani, Mehraveh; Kalankesh, Leila R

    2017-03-01

    Induced abortion accounts for 1 in 8 of approximately 600000 maternal deaths that occur annually worldwide. Induced abortion rate can be considered as one of the indicators for assessing availability of the appropriate reproductive health plans for women and identifying needs for appropriate related health policies and programs. Researchers searched Pubmed, Google Scholar, CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane, Iranian Scientific Information Database (SID), Iranian biomedical journals (Iranmedex), and Iranian Research Institute of Information and Documentation (Irandoc) between January 2000 and June 2013, which reported induced abortion. Search terms from two categories including abortion and termination of pregnancy were compiled. The search terms were "induced abortion", "illegal abortion", "illegal abortion", "unsafe abortion", and "criminal abortion". The search was also conducted with "induced termination of pregnancy", "illegal termination of pregnancy", "illegal termination of pregnancy", "unsafe termination of pregnancy" and "criminal termination of pregnancy". Meta-analysis was carried out by using OpenMeta software. Induced abortion rates were calculated based on the random effect model. Overall induced abortion rate was obtained 58.1 per 1000 women (95%CI: 55.16-61.04). In continental level, rate of induced abortion was 14 per 1000 women (95%CI: 11-16). Nation-wide and local rates were obtained 67.27 per 1000 women (95% CI: 60.02-74.23) and 148.92 (95% CI: 140.06-157.79) respectively. Induced abortion is a major public health problem that occurs worldwide whether under the legal restriction or freedom, and it remains as reproductive health concern globally. To eliminate the need for induced abortion is at the core of any effort for preventing this issue. Option with the highest priority is to prevent unwanted pregnancies through promoting reproductive health plans for women of reproductive age. In case the prevention strategies fail, universal provision of

  13. [Induced abortion. Epidemiological study after eight years of enforcement of Law 194].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danero, S; Capitani, S; La Rosa, R; Morgante, G; Marsiglietti, C; Turillazzi, E; Oliveti, C; Ricci, M G

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe a study of induced abortions performed at the obstetric and gynecological university clinic in Siena, Italy, during the period 6/1/84-5/31/86, contrasting data with the experience of the first two years (6/1/78-5/31/80) of existence of law no. 194 introduced in 1978. The law legalized abortion--until then considered a social wound on society--thus making abortions more easily quantifiable from an epidemiological point of view. Since that initial period the socio- sanitary reality has changed substantially, i.e., a national progressive increase in the number of abortions was followed by a downward trend that has persisted since then, due to greater openness toward the use of contraceptive methods, in the mass media. A correct evaluation of the number of abortions cannot be obtained due to continued secret abortions. The study reflects the national trend, since during the first period, 2171 induced abortions were performed versus 1450 during the second period (a 13.14% decrease). Questionnaires asked patients about their age, geographic origin, occupation, marital status, week of pregnancy, possible previously induced abortions, length of stay in the hospital, and birth control method used at the time of induced abortion. The most significant variations in the parameters studied for the two periods demonstrated reduced waiting periods before an induced abortion operation was performed (during early pregnancy), a reduced number of requests by patients living in remote areas of the province, reduced time spent as inpatient in the clinic, and an increased percentage of women with previously induced abortions. The number of women preferring a certain type of birth control method during the two periods is comparable, except a slight increase was noted for those using IUD. It is concluded that there are still large lacunae in the area of abortion prevention in Italy, e.g., coitus interruptus is still widely practiced.

  14. The persistence of induced abortion in Cuba: exploring the notion of an "abortion culture".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Danièle; Flynn, Andrea

    2009-03-01

    Cuba's annual induced abortion rate persistently ranks among the highest in the world, and abortion plays a prominent role in Cuban fertility regulation despite widespread contraceptive prevalence and state promotion of modern contraceptives. We explore this phenomenon using the concept of an "abortion culture," typically used in reference to Soviet and post-Soviet countries. We synthesize existing literature to provide a historical account of abortion and contraception in Cuba. We also provide a qualitative analysis of abortion and contraceptive use based on in-depth interviews conducted in 2005 in Havana with 24 women who have had an abortion and 10 men whose partners have had an abortion. Information gained from a focus-group discussion with medical professionals also informed the study. Our four principal findings are: (a) longstanding awareness of abortion, (b) the view of abortion as a personal decision, (c) the influence of economic constraints on the decision to induce an abortion, and (d) general skepticism toward contraceptives. We discuss our results on abortion in Cuba in relation to the notion of social diffusion, an approach commonly used to explain the spread of fertility control throughout a population.

  15. Post-abortion and induced abortion services in two public hospitals in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darney, Blair G; Simancas-Mendoza, Willis; Edelman, Alison B; Guerra-Palacio, Camilo; Tolosa, Jorge E; Rodriguez, Maria I

    2014-07-01

    Until 2006, legal induced abortion was completely banned in Colombia. Few facilities are equipped or willing to offer abortion services; often adolescents experience even greater barriers of access in this context. We examined post abortion care (PAC) and legal induced abortion in two large public hospitals. We tested the association of hospital site, procedure type (manual vacuum aspiration vs. sharp curettage), and age (adolescents vs. women 20 years and over) with service type (PAC or legal induced abortion). Retrospective cohort study using 2010 billing data routinely collected for reimbursement (N=1353 procedures). We utilized descriptive statistics, multivariable logistic regression and predicted probabilities. Adolescents made up 22% of the overall sample (300/1353). Manual vacuum aspiration was used in one-third of cases (vs. sharp curettage). Adolescents had lower odds of documented PAC (vs. induced abortion) compared with women over age 20 (OR=0.42; 95% CI=0.21-0.86). The absolute difference of service type by age, however, is very small, controlling for hospital site and procedure type (.97 probability of PAC for adolescents compared with .99 for women 20 and over). Regardless of age, PAC via sharp curettage is the current standard in these two public hospitals. Both adolescents and women over 20 are in need of access to legal abortion services utilizing modern technologies in the public sector in Colombia. Documentation of abortion care is an essential first step to determining barriers to access and opportunities for quality improvement and better health outcomes for women. Following partial decriminalization of abortion in Colombia, in public hospitals nearly all abortion services are post-abortion care, not induced abortion. Sharp curettage is the dominant treatment for both adolescents and women over 20. Women seek care in the public sector for abortion, and must have access to safe, quality services. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Induced abortion and duration of third stage labour in a subsequent pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Wei Jin; Gao, E; Che, Y

    1999-01-01

    We set out to evaluate the impact of first trimester induced abortion on the duration of third stage labour and related complications in a subsequent pregnancy. The study was conducted in Shanghai city at 15 general hospitals (or maternity and infant health institutes) from November 1993 to March...... that a history of one or more first trimester induced abortions was related to an increased risk of prolonged third stage labour in the following pregnancy, particularly if the induced abortion was performed after 49 days of gestation....... stage labour in minutes was longer in women with one or more previous induced abortions (mean=7.32 minutes) compared with primigravid women (mean=6.79 minutes). Prolonged third stage labour (>30 minutes) following one or more induced abortions was seen for 3.4% versus 1.0% in primigravid women. After...

  17. 20 POST-INDUCED ABORTION MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients requiring immediate and sympathetic help in procuring induced abortion because the pregnancy was. “unwanted” at the time. Inspite of this, abortion law in Nigeria is still restrictive2 , hence abortions are clandestinely and illegally undertaken everyday by those least qualified to do so3,4 and in substandard medical.

  18. A comparison of women with induced abortion, spontaneous abortion and ectopic pregnancy in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Hilary M; Creanga, Andreea A; Danso, Kwabena A; Adanu, Richard M K; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Hindin, Michelle J

    2011-07-01

    Despite having one of the most liberal abortion laws in sub-Saharan Africa, complications from induced abortion are the second leading cause of maternal mortality in Ghana. The sample is composed of patients with pregnancy termination complications in Ghana between June and July 2008. The majority of patients report having had a spontaneous abortion (75%; n=439), while 17% (n=100) and 8% (n=46) report having had an induced abortion or an ectopic pregnancy, respectively. Factors associated with women in each of the three groups were explored using multinomial logistic regression. When compared to women with spontaneous abortions, women with induced abortions were younger, poorer, more likely to report no religious affiliation, less likely to be married, more likely to report making the household decisions and more likely to fail to disclose this pregnancy to their partners. Within the induced abortion subsample, failure to disclose the most recent pregnancy was associated with already having children and autonomous household decision making. Identifying the individual and relationship characteristics of induced abortion patients is the first step toward targeted policies and programs aimed at reducing unsafe abortion in Ghana. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimates of the Incidence of Induced Abortion And Consequences of Unsafe Abortion in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgh, Gilda; Sylla, Amadou Hassane; Philbin, Jesse; Keogh, Sarah; Ndiaye, Salif

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT Abortion is highly restricted by law in Senegal. Although women seek care for abortion complications, no national estimate of abortion incidence exists. METHODS Data on postabortion care and abortion in Senegal were collected in 2013 using surveys of a nationally representative sample of 168 health facilities that provide postabortion care and of 110 professionals knowledgeable about abortion service provision. Indirect estimation techniques were applied to the data to estimate the incidence of induced abortion in the country. Abortion rates and ratios were calculated for the nation and separately for the Dakar region and the rest of the country. The distribution of pregnancies by planning status and by outcome was estimated. RESULTS In 2012, an estimated 51,500 induced abortions were performed in Senegal, and 16,700 (32%) resulted in complications that were treated at health facilities. The estimated abortion rate was 17 per 1,000 women aged 15–44 and the abortion ratio was 10 per 100 live births. The rate was higher in Dakar (21 per 1,000) than in the rest of the country (16 per 1,000). Poor women were far more likely to experience abortion complications, and less likely to receive treatment for complications, than nonpoor women. About 31% of pregnancies were unintended, and 24% of unintended pregnancies (8% of all pregnancies) ended in abortion. CONCLUSIONS Unsafe abortion exacts a heavy toll on women in Senegal. Reducing the barriers to effective contraceptive use and ensuring access to postabortion care without the risk of legal consequences may reduce the incidence of and complications from unsafe abortion. PMID:25856233

  20. Estimates of the incidence of induced abortion and consequences of unsafe abortion in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgh, Gilda; Sylla, Amadou Hassane; Philbin, Jesse; Keogh, Sarah; Ndiaye, Salif

    2015-03-01

    Abortion is highly restricted by law in Senegal. Although women seek care for abortion complications, no national estimate of abortion incidence exists. Data on postabortion care and abortion in Senegal were collected in 2013 using surveys of a nationally representative sample of 168 health facilities that provide postabortion care and of 110 professionals knowledgeable about abortion service provision. Indirect estimation techniques were applied to the data to estimate the incidence of induced abortion in the country. Abortion rates and ratios were calculated for the nation and separately for the Dakar region and the rest of the country. The distribution of pregnancies by planning status and by outcome was estimated. In 2012, an estimated 51,500 induced abortions were performed in Senegal, and 16,700 (32%) resulted in complications that were treated at health facilities. The estimated abortion rate was 17 per 1,000 women aged 15-44 and the abortion ratio was 10 per 100 live births. The rate was higher in Dakar (21 per 1,000) than in the rest of the country (16 per 1,000). Poor women were far more likely to experience abortion complications, and less likely to receive treatment for complications, than nonpoor women. About 31% of pregnancies were unintended, and 24% of unintended pregnancies (8% of all pregnancies) ended in abortion. Unsafe abortion exacts a heavy toll on women in Senegal. Reducing the barriers to effective contraceptive use and ensuring access to postabortion care without the risk of legal consequences may reduce the incidence of and complications from unsafe abortion.

  1. Association between previous spontaneous abortion and pre-eclampsia during a subsequent pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepidarkish, Mahdi; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Maroufizadeh, Saman; Vesali, Samira; Pirjani, Reihaneh; Samani, Reza O

    2017-01-01

    To determine the impact of a history of spontaneous abortion on pre-eclampsia during a subsequent pregnancy. A cross-sectional study enrolled pregnant women admitted to obstetrics and gynecology wards at 103 hospitals in Tehran, Iran for delivery between July 6 and July 21, 2015. Consenting participants were interviewed by midwives; data were collected using a five-part questionnaire and patients' medical records were retrieved. Patient data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression to identify variables associated with increased odds of pre-eclampsia. In total, 5170 patients were interviewed and 252 had experienced pre-eclampsia. The number of previous spontaneous abortions was found to be associated with pre-eclampsia, and a higher number of previous spontaneous abortions was associated with increased odds of patients having experienced pre-eclampsia (adjusted odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.59; P=0.025). A history of spontaneous abortion was associated with increased odds of pre-eclampsia during a subsequent pregnancy. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  2. [History of induced abortion in Denmark from 1200 to 1979].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manniche, E

    1982-10-01

    History of induced abortion in Denmark from 1200 to 1979 is reviewed. The 1st Danish law of 1200 did not touch upon the question of induced abortion. From the beginning of the 13th century to Religious Reformation in 1536, Roman Catholic law influenced every aspect of Danish life including induced abortion. In 1683 in King Christian V's constitution called Dansk Lov induced abortion was discussed. Immoral women who aborted fetuses or killed newborn babies were decapitated. In Copenhagen in the years 1624-1632 and 1638-1663 17 women were executed because of induced abortion or murder of newborn babies. Although Dansk Lov was effective till 1866, Danish kings came to treat female criminals less severely since about 1780-1800. For example, between 1855 and 1866 42 women convicted of murder of newborn babies or abortion were given pardon (12 years of imprisonment instead of life sentence). In 1866, abortion and murder of babies were treated separately in the Danish criminal law. Induced abortion meant up to 8 years of imprisonment and labor. In 1930 life sentence was abolished; induced abortion called for only up to 2 years of imprisonment, while those who assisted for money were punished more severely (up to 8 years in prison). In 1937 the Danes legalized induced abortion for medical, ethical, (e.g. rape case) and eugenic reasons. By 1973 legalized abortion was available, free of charge, to every Danish female resident within 12 weeks of pregnancy. In 1980 abortion rate was about 41% of total births. It is estimated 2/3 of Danish women experience abortion. Lastly, illegitimate births and miscarriages are on the rise due to changes in women's social status and role.

  3. Interleukin-15 is required for maximal lipopolysaccharide-induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amanda J; Kandiah, Nalaayini; Karimi, Khalil; Clark, David A; Ashkar, Ali A

    2013-06-01

    The maternal immune response during pregnancy is critical for the survival of the fetus yet can be detrimental during infection and inflammation. Previously, IL-15 has been observed to mediate inflammation during LPS-induced sepsis. Therefore, we sought to determine whether IL-15 mediates the inflammatory process during LPS-induced abortion through the use of IL-15(-/-) and WT mice. Administration of 2.5 μg LPS i.p. on gd 7.5 drastically reduced fetal viability in WT mice, whereas it had a minimal effect on fetal survival in IL-15(-/-) mice. The uteroplacental sites of LPS-treated WT mice were characterized by vast structural degradation and inflammation compared with treated IL-15(-/-) and untreated controls. This suggests that IL-15 may mediate the inflammation responsible for LPS-induced resorption. As IL-15(-/-) mice are deficient in NK cells and resistant to LPS-induced abortion, these effects suggest that IL-15 may mediate abortion through their homeostatic and/or activation effects on NK cells. WT uteroplacental units exposed to LPS had an increase in the overall number and effector number of NK cells compared with their control counterparts. Furthermore, NK cell depletion before administration of LPS in WT mice partially restored fetal viability. Overall, this paper suggests that IL-15 mediates the inflammatory environment during LPS-induced fetal resorption, primarily through its effects on NK cells.

  4. Self-reports of induced abortion: an empathetic setting can improve the quality of data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Muhammad, H; Urassa, E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of incomplete abortions that are induced in hospital-based settings in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2 phases at 3 hospitals in Tanzania. Phase 1 included 302 patients with a diagnosis of incomplete abortion......, and phase 2 included 823 such patients. RESULTS: In phase 1, in which cases were classified by clinical criteria and information from the patient, 3.9% to 16.1% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. In phase 2, in which the structured interview was changed to an empathetic dialogue...... and previously used clinical criteria were omitted, 30.9% to 60.0% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. CONCLUSIONS: An empathetic dialogue improves the quality of data collected among women with induced abortion....

  5. Knowledge and attitudes of Swedish politicians concerning induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydsjö, Adam; Josefsson, Ann; Bladh, Marie; Muhrbeck, Måns; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2012-12-01

    Induced abortion is more frequent in Sweden than in many other Western countries. We wanted to investigate attitudes and knowledge about induced abortion among politicians responsible for healthcare in three Swedish counties. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all 375 elected politicians in three counties; 192 (51%) responded. The politicians stated that they were knowledgeable about the Swedish abortion law. More than half did not consider themselves, in their capacity as politicians, sufficiently informed about abortion-related matters. Most politicians (72%) considered induced abortion to be primarily a 'women's rights issue' rather than an ethical one, and 54% considered 12 weeks' gestational age an adequate upper limit for induced abortion. Only about a third of the respondents were correctly informed about the number of induced abortions annually carried out in Sweden. Information and knowledge on induced abortion among Swedish county politicians seem not to be optimal. Changes aimed at reducing the current high abortion rates will probably not be easy to achieve as politicians seem to be reluctant to commit themselves on ethical issues and consider induced abortion mainly a women's rights issue.

  6. Women's experiences in connection with induced abortion - a feminist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aléx, Lena; Hammarström, Anne

    2004-06-01

    Although abortions are common, few researchers have explored the experiences of women related to abortions. The aim of this qualitative study was to analyse women's experiences of induced abortion from a feminist perspective. Five women aged 19-33 years were interviewed about 1 month after their abortion. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis from which the following themes were identified: experiences connected with the decision-making process, experiences connected with the abortion and experiences after the abortion. Childhood experiences of divided families, financial problems, being too young, and an insecure partnership influenced the women's decision to have an abortion. Ambivalence about abortion was strongly expressed throughout the process. Despite positive attitudes towards abortion in general, the women had negative attitudes towards their own abortion. They described receiving most support from their mothers and friends, in the decision-making process, and least from their partners. After the abortion the women gained a feeling of maturity and experience although their ambivalence persisted. One conclusion drawn from our study is that nurses and midwives need to be aware of women's complex experiences with abortions in order to support and empower women who seek an abortion.

  7. Induced abortion as a public health problem in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-12-01

    The complex and multiple aspects of induced abortion are reflected in the report of a working group on induced abortion as a public health problem which was convened in Helsinki by the WHO Regional Office for Europe in April 1971. Wide variations exist in legislaion on abortion in the countries of western and southern Europe, those of eastern Europe, and those of northern Europe. Except for Romania, the numerical relationship between induced abortion and fertility is not known. The frequency of induced abortion in married women suggests that it is used in some countries for the desired spacing of children. The group noted that the decrease in fertility in Europe has been chiefly achieved by means of coitus interruptus and abortion. Over the period 1957-1959, the reported number of legally induced abortions increased in many European countries. Information from 4 European countries on the number of legally induced abortions showed that the highest rates were found in the age-group 20-34. While in most countries the number of abortions is highest in the age group 20-34, the number of legally induced abortions per 1000 live births increases with the age of the woman, the highest ratios being found in women over 35 years of age. The legal and administrative situation, the ethnic structure, religion, the extent of industrialization, and urbanization, educational resources, and the availability of medical and social services influence the abortion behavior of the community. Conflicts between individuals' needs and society's needs must be resolved. In the view of the group, the most efficient and the safest means of preventing unwanted births is by contraception or by legal abortion carried out by doctors in the hospital. Education for responsible parenthood is essential if contraception is to be fully exploited and the use of legally induced abortion reduced to a minimum.

  8. Induced abortion in Iran: prevalence, reasons, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranji, Azar

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this descriptive study were to determine the prevalence of illegal induced abortion among participants, the factors that influence decision making to have an abortion, and the health consequences of abortion in Iran. Women who attended health centers or an antenatal clinic in Iran were interviewed to complete a questionnaire. Among the 2705 participants, 17% had experienced at least 1 illegal induced abortion. Education level, family income, religion, ethnicity, number of children, and age at marriage are associated with having an induced abortion. One-third of abortions (33%) were performed by nonmedical providers. The desire to stop or postpone childbearing and family economic problems were the most common reasons for having an abortion. Most women (84%) experienced a complication of abortion that required hospitalization. Strategies to prevent abortion complications are needed and could include training midwives and general physicians to perform abortions and promoting the availability of post-abortion care. © 2012 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  9. Legally induced abortions in Denmark after Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, L B

    1991-01-01

    During the months following the accident in Chernobyl, Denmark experienced an increasing rate of induced abortion, especially in regions with the largest measured increase in radiation. As the increase in radiation in Denmark was so low that almost no increased risk of birth defects was expected, the public debate and anxiety among the pregnant women and their husbands "caused" more fetal deaths in Denmark than the accident. This underlines the importance of public debate, the role of the mass media and of the way in which National Health authorities participate in this debate.

  10. Turkish nursing students' attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanikkerem, Emre; Üstgörül, Sema; Karakus, Asli; Baydar, Ozge; Esmeray, Nicole; Ertem, Gül

    2018-03-01

    To evaluate Turkish nursing students' attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion.. This cross-sectional study was conducted between January and June 2015, comprising students of Ege University Nursing Faculty and Celal Bayar University School of Health, located in two different cities of Turkey. Data was collected with a three-part questionnaire, focussing on students' characteristics, the knowledge of abortion law in Turkey and attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion. SPSS 15 was used for data analysis.. The mean score of students' attitude towards voluntary induced abortion was 39.8±7.9 which shows that nursing students moderately support abortion. Female students, students coming from upper class in society, and students who had higher family income and sexual experiences had more supportiveness attitudes towards voluntary induced abortion (pabortion.

  11. Serious infection associated with induced abortion in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Angela

    2012-12-01

    Though serious infection after induced abortion is rare, infections account for one third of abortion-related deaths in the United States. Most fatal cases of infection after induced medical abortion have involved clostridial species. These reported cases share important clinical features that may guide clinicians to earlier recognition and institution of therapy. This article reviews our current knowledge regarding serious clostridial infections postabortion including the typical clinical presentation, pathophysiology, modes of diagnosis, and available treatment.

  12. Urinary estrogen excretion and concentration of serum human placental lactogen in pregnancies following legally induced abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, E B; Madsen, Mette

    1980-01-01

    Feto-placental function was assessed by 24-hour excretion of estrogen in urine and by the concentration of human Placental Lactogen (hPL) in serum in pregnant women whose previous pregnancy was terminated by legally induced abortion. The mean 24-hour excretion of estrogens in urine and the mean...... an increased frequency of dysfunction of the feto-placental unit during the last part of pregnancy in women with previous legally induced abortion. These findings indicate that legal abortion does not seem to increase the frequency of retarded intrauterine growth in a subsequent pregnancy....... concentration of hPL in serum were no lower in this group than in women without previous induced abortion. Neither was the frequency of a low 24-hour excretion of estrogens in urine or low concentration of hPL in serum (values less than mean - 1.96 s) found to be increased. This study could not demonstrate...

  13. Shared risk aversion in spontaneous and induced abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catalano, Ralph; Bruckner, Tim A.; Karasek, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: Does the incidence of spontaneous abortion correlate positively over conception cohorts with the incidence of non-clinically indicated induced abortion as predicted by shared risk aversion? SUMMARY ANSWER: We find that the number of spontaneous and non-clinically indicated induced...... abortions correlates in conception cohorts, suggesting that risk aversion affects both the conscious and non-conscious mechanisms that control parturition. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Much literature speculates that natural selection conserved risk aversion because the trait enhanced Darwinian fitness. Risk...... and spontaneous abortion over time. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION: Using data from Denmark, we test the hypothesis that monthly conception cohorts yielding unexpectedly many non-clinically indicated induced abortions also yield unexpectedly many spontaneous abortions. The 180 month test period (January 1995...

  14. Conscientious objection and induced abortion in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heino, Anna; Gissler, Mika; Apter, Dan; Fiala, Christian

    2013-08-01

    The issue of conscientious objection (CO) arises in healthcare when doctors and nurses refuse to have any involvement in the provision of treatment of certain patients due to their religious or moral beliefs. Most commonly CO is invoked when it comes to induced abortion. Of the EU member states where induced abortion is legal, invoking CO is granted by law in 21 countries. The same applies to the non-EU countries Norway and Switzerland. CO is not legally granted in the EU member states Sweden, Finland, Bulgaria and the Czech Republic. The Icelandic legislation provides no right to CO either. European examples prove that the recommendation that CO should not prevent women from accessing services fails in a number of cases. CO puts women in an unequal position depending on their place of residence, socio-economic status and income. CO should not be presented as a question that relates only to health professionals and their rights. CO mainly concerns women as it has very real consequences for their reproductive health and rights. European countries should assess the laws governing CO and its effects on women's rights. CO should not be used as a subtle method for limiting the legal right to healthcare.

  15. The Relationship between Neutralization Techniques and Induced Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalateh Sadati, Ahmad; Tabei, Seyed Ziaaddin; Salehzadeh, Hamzeh; Rahnavard, Farnaz; Namavar Jahromi, Bahia; Hemmati, Soroor

    2014-04-01

    Induced abortion is not only a serious threat for women's health, but also a controversial topic for its ethical and moral problems. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between neutralization techniques and attempting to commit abortion in married women with unintended pregnancy. After in-depth interviews with some women who had attempted abortion, neutralization themes were gathered. Next, to analyze the data quantitatively, a questionnaire was created including demographic and psychosocial variables specifically related to neutralization. The participants were divided into two groups (abortion and control) of unintended pregnancy and were then compared. Analysis of psychosocial variables revealed a significant difference in the two groups at neutralization, showing that neutralization in the control group (56.97±10.24) was higher than that in the abortion group (44.19±12.44). To evaluate the findings more accurately, we examined the causal factors behind the behaviors of the abortion group. Binary logistic regression showed that among psychosocial factors, neutralization significantly affected abortion (95% CI=1.07-1.35). Despite the network of many factors affecting induced abortion, neutralization plays an important role in reinforcing the tendency to attempt abortion. Furthermore, the decline of religious beliefs, as a result of the secular context of the modern world, seems to have an important role in neutralizing induced abortion.

  16. Induced and Spontaneous Abortion and Risk of Uterine Fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lulu; Shen, Lijun; Mandiwa, Chrispin; Yang, Siyi; Liang, Yuan; Yuan, Jing; Wang, Youjie

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between abortion and uterine fibroids has received little attention. The aim of the present study was to explore the association between number of induced and spontaneous abortions and the risk of uterine fibroids in middle-aged and older Chinese women. A total of 14,595 retired female employees from the Dongfeng-Tongji cohort study were included in our analysis. Information on induced and spontaneous abortions was collected by trained interviewers through face-to-face interviews. Diagnosis of uterine fibroids was based on ultrasound or self-reported physician diagnosis of uterine fibroids. Logistic regression models were used to explore the associations between number of induced and spontaneous abortions and the risk of uterine fibroids. The prevalence of uterine fibroids was 15.1% among all participants. Higher number of induced abortions was associated with an increased risk of uterine fibroids (1 induced abortion: odds ratios [ORs] = 1.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.48; 2 induced abortions: OR = 1.45, 95% CI 1.28-1.64; and ≥3 induced abortions: OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.39-1.90). Compared with women without induced abortion, ORs for women with 1, 2, and ≥3 were 1.17 (95% CI 1.03-1.32), 1.21 (95% CI 1.06-1.39), and 1.36 (95% CI 1.15-1.61), respectively, after adjustment for potential confounders. No association was observed between the number of spontaneous abortions and the risk of uterine fibroids. The findings of this study showed that induced abortion may be an independent risk factor for uterine fibroids in middle-aged and older Chinese women.

  17. Induced first-trimester abortion and risk of mental disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2011-01-01

    Background Concern has been expressed about potential harm to women's mental health in association with having an induced abortion, but it remains unclear whether induced abortion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent psychiatric problems. Methods We conducted a population-based coho...

  18. Trends in the Pattern of Induced Abortions in Ilorin | Adeleke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Induced abortion remains a major cause of maternal mortality in developing countries. Reports from Nigeria put it's contribution to maternal death at between 15-40%. Prevention of maternal mortality project (Which trys to eliminate hospital delay in the treatment of complication of induced abortion) was introduced ...

  19. Induced abortion; a continuing tragedy | Daru | Highland Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Induced abortion remains one of the gravest problems associated with women's reproductive health in Nigeria. Induced abortion is commonly practiced in Nigeria with a prevalence ranging from 25-53% amongst adolescents in schools and 88-94% amongst out of school single women. It is a major contributor ...

  20. Five Year Review Of Complicated Induced Abortions In University Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five Year Review Of Complicated Induced Abortions In University Of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City. ... This is a retrospective study of 104 cases of complicated induced abortion, seen at the University of Benin over a 5 year period. One hundred ... causes of death were sepsis with visceral injury and acute renal failure.

  1. Uterine contraction induced by Ghanaian plants used to induce abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Birgitte HV; Soelberg, Jens; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Ethnomedicinal observations from the time of the Atlantic slave trade show women in Ghana historically used plants as emmenagogues (menstruation stimulants) and to induce abortion. This study investigates the effect of four of these plants on uterine contraction. The historically used plants were...

  2. Medication abortion failure in women with and without previous cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehlendorf, Christine E; Fox, Edith E; Ali, Rose F; Anderson, Nora C; Reed, Reiley D; Lichtenberg, E Steve

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the association between previous cesarean delivery and medication abortion failure and the association between parity and failure. Data were abstracted from 2035 consecutive charts of women who underwent medication abortion in 2011. All women were at 63 days gestation or less and received mifepristone 200mg orally and misoprostol 800 mcg buccally. We used multivariate logistic regression to assess the relationship between failure, defined as requiring either curettage or additional medication, and prior cesarean delivery. We also examined the relationship between failure and parity. Follow-up was available on 1609 (79%) patients. Overall, 4.5% of patients experienced failure. Neither cesarean delivery nor parity was associated with failure; 6.5% of women with prior cesarean delivery experienced failure, compared to 3.7% of nulliparous women [adjusted odds ratio (aOR), 1.79, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.83-3.87]. With regard to parity, 4.7% of women with two or more previous births experienced failure, compared to 3.7% of nulliparous women (aOR, 1.07, 95% CI, 0.54-2.14). We did not find significant associations between prior cesarean delivery and failure or parity and failure. A previous study of patients who had received a less effective regimen reported significant associations between cesarean delivery and failure and parity and failure. While our results do not rule out the possibility of modest associations due to our limited statistical power, they are reassuring relative to previous findings. Our results suggest that if there are differences in women's odds of medication abortion failure by obstetric history, such differences are unlikely to be large. Providers and patients may factor this information into decision making about methods of pregnancy termination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Induced abortion rate in Iran: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghi, Zahra; Poorolajal, Jalal; Keramat, Afsaneh; Shariati, Mohammad; Yunesian, Masud; Masoumi, Seyyedeh Zahra

    2013-10-01

    About 44 million induced abortions take place worldwide annually, of which 50% are unsafe. The results of studies investigated the induced abortion rate in Iran are inconsistent. The aim of this meta-analysis was to estimate the incidence rate of induced abortion in Iran. National and international electronic databases, as well as conference databases until July 2012 were searched. Reference lists of articles were screened and the studies' authors were contacted for additional unpublished studies. Cross-sectional studies addressing induced abortion in Iran were included in this meta-analysis. The primary outcome of interest was the induced abortion rate (the number of abortions per 1000 women aged 15-44 years in a year) or the ratio (the number of abortions per 100 live births in a year). The secondary outcome of interest was the prevalence of unintended pregnancies (the number of mistimed, unplanned, or unwanted pregnancies per total pregnancies). Data were analyzed using random effect models. Of 603 retrieved studies, using search strategy, 10 studies involving 102,394 participants were eventually included in the meta-analysis. The induced abortion rate and ratio were estimated as 8.9 per 1000 women aged 15-44 years (95% CI: 5.46, 12.33) and 5.34 per 100 live births (95% CI: 3.61, 7.07), respectively. The prevalence of unintended pregnancy was estimated as 27.94 per 100 pregnant women (95% CI: 23.46, 32.42). The results of this meta-analysis helped a better understanding of the incidence of induced abortion in Iran compared to the other developing countries in Asia. However, additional sources of data on abortion other than medical records and survey studies are needed to estimate the true rate of unsafe abortion in Iran.

  4. Changes in association between previous therapeutic abortion and preterm birth in Scotland, 1980 to 2008: a historical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Oliver-Williams

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have demonstrated that therapeutic termination of pregnancy (abortion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent preterm birth. However, the literature is inconsistent, and methods of abortion have changed dramatically over the last 30 years. We hypothesized that the association between previous abortion and the risk of preterm first birth changed in Scotland between 1 January 1980 and 31 December 2008.We studied linked Scottish national databases of births and perinatal deaths. We analysed the risk of preterm birth in relation to the number of previous abortions in 732,719 first births (≥24 wk, adjusting for maternal characteristics. The risk (adjusted odds ratio [95% CI] of preterm birth was modelled using logistic regression, and associations were expressed for a one-unit increase in the number of previous abortions. Previous abortion was associated with an increased risk of preterm birth (1.12 [1.09-1.16]. When analysed by year of delivery, the association was strongest in 1980-1983 (1.32 [1.21-1.43], progressively declined between 1984 and 1999, and was no longer apparent in 2000-2003 (0.98 [0.91-1.05] or 2004-2008 (1.02 [0.95-1.09]. A statistical test for interaction between previous abortion and year was highly statistically significant (p<0.001. Analysis of data for abortions among nulliparous women in Scotland 1992-2008 demonstrated that the proportion that were surgical without use of cervical pre-treatment decreased from 31% to 0.4%, and that the proportion of medical abortions increased from 18% to 68%.Previous abortion was a risk factor for spontaneous preterm birth in Scotland in the 1980s and 1990s, but the association progressively weakened and disappeared altogether by 2000. These changes were paralleled by increasing use of medical abortion and cervical pre-treatment prior to surgical abortion. Although it is plausible that the two trends were related, we could not test this directly as the data on

  5. Induced abortion and contraception use: among immigrant and Canadian-born women in Calgary, Alta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prey, Beatrice du; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A; Drummond, Neil

    2014-09-01

    To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks' gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of abortion services by immigrant women. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of

  6. Unintended Pregnancy, Induced Abortion, and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Sarah; Schreiber, Courtney A

    2017-09-14

    The early medical literature on mental health outcomes following abortion is fraught with methodological flaws that can improperly influence clinical practice. Our goal is to review the current medical literature on depression and other mental health outcomes for women obtaining abortions. The Turnaway Study prospectively enrolled 956 women seeking abortion in the USA and followed their mental health outcomes for 5 years. The control group was comprised of women denied abortions based on gestational age limits, thereby circumventing the major methodological flaw that had plagued earlier studies on the topic. Rates of depression are not significantly different between women obtaining abortion and those denied abortion. Rates of anxiety are initially higher in women denied abortion care. Counseling on decision-making for women with unintended pregnancies should reflect these findings.

  7. Factors Associated with Incidence of Induced Abortion in Hamedan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hatam; Erfani, Amir; Nojomi, Marzieh

    2017-05-01

    There is limited reliable information on abortion in Iran, where abortion is illegal and many women of reproductive age seek clandestine abortion to end their unintended pregnancy. This study aims to examine the determinants of induced abortion in the city of Hamedan, Iran. The study utilizes recent data from the 2015 Hamedan Survey of Fertility, conducted in a representative sample of 3,000 married women aged 15-49 years in the city of Hamedan, Iran. Binary logistic regression models are used to examine factors associated with the incidence of abortion. Overall, 3.8% of respondents reported having had an induced abortion in their life. Multivariate results showed that the incidence of abortion was strongly associated with women's education, type of contraceptive and family income level, after controlling for confounding factors. Women using long-acting contraceptive methods, those educated under high school diploma or postsecondary education, and those with high level of income were more likely to report having an induced abortion. The high incidence of abortion among less or more educated women and those with high income level signifies unmet family planning needs among these women, which must be addressed by focused reproductive health and family planning programs.

  8. What Do Married Couples Think About Induced Abortion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dönmez, Sevgül; Kısa, Sezer

    2017-11-17

    This study examined the opinions of married couples concerning induced abortion in a sample of 674 married couples obtaining services at a large obstetrical/gynecological outpatient service. Although approximately half of the sample were not using birth control, a similar percentage felt that curettage (selective abortion) should never be performed. A larger percentage felt that selective abortion is a sin and should be banned. Sex differences in attitudes were minimal. Couples may benefit from a birth control education program in a hospital that is designed to cover abortion in order to provide accurate information in a more professional environment.

  9. Women's experiences after an induced second trimester abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkavaara, Iris; Öhrling, Kerstin; Lindberg, Inger

    2012-10-01

    to describe women's experiences of an abortion in the second trimester. qualitative design using semi-structured interviews. six women were interviewed after a second trimester abortion. the women were interviewed in person after they were discharged from the hospital. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and then analysed using qualitative content analysis. four categories were identified: to consider and accept the decision; to lack understanding about the abortion procedure; to be in need of support and information; to have memories for life. Findings show that information and support during the whole abortion process is important. Women found it difficult to make the decision and going through abortion left memories for life. information and support is of great importance for women in this vulnerable situation. The need for further support points out the need to have follow-up contacts with women after an induced second trimester abortion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association between intimate partner violence and induced abortion in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alio, Amina P; Salihu, Hamisu M; Nana, Philip N; Clayton, Heather B; Mbah, Alfred K; Marty, Phillip J

    2011-02-01

    To examine the association between intimate partner violence (IPV; physical, sexual, and emotional violence) and induced abortion in Cameroon. We used data from the 2004 Cameroon Demographic Health Survey (DHS) and hierarchic multivariate modeling to compare the rates of induced abortion by IPV type. In 2004, 2570 women were administered the domestic violence module of the DHS. Of those women, 126 (4.9%) reported having had at least 1 induced abortion. Cameroonian women reported high rates of IPV: physical violence (995 [38.7%]); emotional violence (789 [30.7%]); and sexual violence (381 [14.8%]). After adjusting for covariates, physical and sexual IPV increased the risk for induced abortion, whereas the association between emotional violence and induced abortion was not significant in multivariate models. Given the increased risk for maternal morbidity and mortality following unsafe induced abortions in Cameroon, the association between induced abortion and IPV is of interest in terms of public health. Programs targeted at preventing IPV might reduce the rate of maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Induced Abortion And Risk For Breast Cancer: Observed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: Biodata, risk factors, parity and abortion profile of all 145 female breast cancer patients seen in over a three year period were entered into a data sheet and analyzed by simple proportions and percentages. Results: Breast cancer patients who had procured induced abortion were diagnosed with the ...

  12. Induced abortion among women attending antenatal clinics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Unsafe abortion is a public health concern because of its impact on maternal morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to document on induced abortion in Yaounde, Cameroon. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Six antenatal clinics in Yaounde, Cameroon. Methods: Women attending ...

  13. Reasons, fears, and emotions behind induced abortions in Accra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Induced abortion is reported to be the third leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. Accra being a capital city with its accompanying problems of rapid population increases and issues of migration also has its own problems with abortion. Figures from the Obstetrics and Gynaecology unit of Korle Bu Teaching Hospital ...

  14. Microbial Isolates in Induced and Spontaneous Abortion | Olatunji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective study of patients with induced and spontaneous abortion to compare the microorganisms isolated from their endocervical canals was carried out at Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu Nigeria over an eight year period, January 1997 to December 2004. There were 132 cases of abortion ...

  15. Key determinants of induced abortion in women seeking postabortion care in hospital facilities in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, Patrick Gc; Somda, Serge Ma; Sundby, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    Despite the universal recognition of unsafe abortion as a major public health problem, very little research has been conducted to document its precipitating factors in Burkina Faso. Our aim was to investigate the key determinants of induced abortion in a sample of women who sought postabortion care. A cross-sectional household survey was carried out from February to September 2012 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Data of 37 women who had had an induced abortion and 267 women who had had a spontaneous abortion were prospectively collected on sociodemographic characteristics, pregnancy and birth history, abortion experience, including previous abortion experience, and selected clinical information, including the type of abortion. A two-step regression analysis consisting of a univariate and a multivariate logistic regression was run on Stata version 11.2 in order to identify the key determinants of induced abortion. The findings indicated that 12% of all abortions were certainly induced. Three key factors were significantly and positively associated with the probability of having an induced abortion: whether the woman reported that her pregnancy was unwanted (odds ratio [OR] 10.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59-30.41); whether the woman reported was living in a household headed by her parents (OR 6.83, 95% CI 2.42-19.24); and if the woman reported was divorced or widowed (OR 3.47, 95% CI 1.08-11.10). On the contrary, being married was protective against induced abortion, with women who reported being married having an 83% (OR 0.17, CI 0.03-0.89) lower chance of having an induced abortion, even when the pregnancy was unwanted. This study has identified three major determinants of induced abortion in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Improved targeted programs on family planning counseling, methods of contraception, and availability of contraceptives should be widely promoted.

  16. Intrauterine adhesions following an induced abortion: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentula, M; Männistö, J; Gissler, M; Heikinheimo, O; Niinimäki, M

    2018-03-13

    Intrauterine adhesions (IUA) are a problematic complication after abortion, but their incidence is unknown. Our objective was to assess the incidence of IUA following induced abortion and the risk factors for IUA. Retrospective cohort study. A nationwide registry study. All women undergoing induced abortion (n = 80 015) in Finland between 2000 and 2008. The data were retrieved from the Finnish Abortion Registry and the Hospital Discharge Registry. The diagnosis of IUA or complications was based on the diagnostic codes (ICD-10) and operative codes according to the NOMESCO Classification of Surgical Procedures (NCSP). IUA were defined as ICD-10 code N85.6 or operative code LCG02. A sub-analysis of IUA cases and five matched controls was performed. The incidence of and risk factors for IUA. A total of 12 (1.5 per 10 000) IUA diagnoses were identified from 79 960 eligible induced abortions. The rate of IUA was 1.5 and 2.0 cases per 10 000 abortions following medically and surgically induced abortion, respectively (P = 0.19). In a subgroup analysis of IUA cases and five matched controls, surgical treatment of the remaining products of conception following abortion significantly increased the risk of IUA [odds ratio 5.50 (95% CI 1.46-20.79; P = 0.012)]. IUA that require further treatment are rare after induced abortion. Surgical evacuation following medical or surgical abortion was a risk factor for diagnosis of IUA. These results suggest that trauma to a recently pregnant uterus is an important risk factor for IUA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Shared risk aversion in spontaneous and induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Ralph; Bruckner, Tim A; Karasek, Deborah; Adler, Nancy E; Mortensen, Laust H

    2016-05-01

    Does the incidence of spontaneous abortion correlate positively over conception cohorts with the incidence of non-clinically indicated induced abortion as predicted by shared risk aversion? We find that the number of spontaneous and non-clinically indicated induced abortions correlates in conception cohorts, suggesting that risk aversion affects both the conscious and non-conscious mechanisms that control parturition. Much literature speculates that natural selection conserved risk aversion because the trait enhanced Darwinian fitness. Risk aversion, moreover, supposedly influences all decisions including those that individuals can and cannot report making. We argue that these circumstances, if real, would manifest in conscious and non-conscious decisions to invest in prospective offspring, and therefore affect incidence of induced and spontaneous abortion over time. Using data from Denmark, we test the hypothesis that monthly conception cohorts yielding unexpectedly many non-clinically indicated induced abortions also yield unexpectedly many spontaneous abortions. The 180 month test period (January 1995 through December 2009), yielded 1 351 800 gestations including 156 780 spontaneous as well as 233 280 induced abortions 9100 of which were clinically indicated. We use Box-Jenkins transfer functions to adjust the incidence of spontaneous and non-clinically indicated induced abortions for autocorrelation (including seasonality), cohort size, and fetal as well as gestational anomalies over the 180-month test period. We use cross-correlation to test our hypothesized association. We find a positive association between spontaneous and non-clinically indicated induced abortions. This suggests, consistent with our theory, that mothers of conception cohorts that yielded more spontaneous abortions than expected opted more frequently than expected for non-clinically indicated induced abortion. Limitations of our work include that even the world's best registration system

  18. [Induced abortion among women with foreign cultural background in Oslo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskild, Anne; Helgadottir, Linda Bjørk; Jerve, Fridtjof; Qvigstad, Erik; Stray-Pedersen, Sverre; Løset, Ase

    2002-05-30

    A large proportion of women requesting induced abortion in Oslo, Norway are of non-Western origin. The aim of this study was to investigate whether non-Western immigrant women are over-represented among women requesting induced abortion. For comparative purposes the proportion of non-Western women with deliveries was also assessed. Included in the study were all women 16-50 years of age, living in Oslo in 1999. Age specific data on the number of female residents and the number of women with deliveries according to immigrant status were obtained from the City of Oslo's Statistical Office. Information on the number of induced abortions according to age and immigrant status was obtained from the medical records of all women requesting induced abortion in Oslo during a four-months period. 25% of all women requesting induced abortion (262/1,069) and 15.5% (20,637/132,843) of the general population were non-Western (ratio between proportions = 1.6, p abortion; this was most pronounced in the age groups > 35 years. Non-Western women were also over-represented in all age groups of women who had delivery. Half of all deliveries in women abortion.

  19. [Historical background of the acceptance of induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, M

    1982-12-01

    Japanese attitude toward induced abortion with its historical background is examined. There is a record of induced abortion as early as the beginning of the 12th century. Abortion was practiced frequently as a means of family planning during Edo Period (1603-1867), especially among the poor. Shogunate and feudal lords were aware of the problem but generally acquiesced. Some Buddhist priest preached on the vice of abortion from a humanitarian point of view and suggested that each community should cooperate and regulate the practice. In 1842 Shogunate at last banned induced abortion in the capital, Edo, but left the rest of the country alone. Ironically this practice of voluntary abortion among the poor and the killing of newborns among peasants controlled the size of population of the nation throughout Edo Period, which saw 35 famines and undue taxation on peasants. In 1868 the new government of Meiji announced to have a tight control over midwives who performed abortion in most cases. In modernizing the nation the government advocated enlarged population under the slogan: rich nation with strong soldiers. This trend persisted till the end of World War II. Overpopulation and shortage of food after World War II with soldiers and people from lost colonies returning home prompted Japan to control her population and adopt a eugenic law. It was not until 1970's in the midst of women's liberation movement that Japanese women became aware of their own right to the reproductive aspect of their life. In comparison, in the United States Supreme Court decision in 1973 virtually legalized abortion and each state has responded to it differently. Prior to 1900 induced abortion was accepted as a means of birth control in the United States, and midwives had monopolized that area of medicine. Crusaders of anti-abortion from the turn of the century were not necessarily well publicized Catholics but "licensed" doctors who joined forces in their attempt to shut out midwives from

  20. Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    An abortion is a procedure to end a pregnancy. It uses medicine or surgery to remove the embryo or ... personal. If you are thinking of having an abortion, most health care providers advise counseling.

  1. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  2. Repeat induced abortion - a matter of individual behaviour or societal factors? A cross-sectional study among Swedish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenzius, Marlene; Tydén, Tanja; Darj, Elisabeth; Larsson, Margareta

    2011-10-01

    Almost 40% of all induced abortions in Sweden are repeat abortions; little is known about the risk factors. To investigate differences between women who had a first-time abortion and those with repeat abortion, and to identify factors associated with repeat abortion. A questionnaire was answered by 798 abortion-seeking women in Sweden during 2009. A regression model was used to assess risk factors for repeat abortions. In the age range 20-49 years, 41% of women had experienced at least one previous abortion. Risk factors for repeat abortion were parity (OR 2.57), lack of emotional support (OR 2.09), unemployment or sick leave (OR 1.65), tobacco use (OR 1.56), and low educational level (OR 1.5). Some women (n = 55) considered economic support and work opportunities could have enabled them to continue the pregnancy. Increased Sex and Relationship Education (SRE), easy access to high-quality contraception and counselling, were suggested (n = 86) as interventions for preventing unintended pregnancies. Even in a country with long established SRE and a public health policy to enhance sexual and reproductive health over a third of women requesting abortion have experienced one previously and the rate is maintained. Some specific factors are identified but, overall, a picture of vulnerability among women seeking repeat abortion stands out that needs to be considered in the prevention of unintended pregnancies.

  3. Self-reports of induced abortion: an empathetic setting can improve the quality of data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Muhammad, H; Urassa, E

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of incomplete abortions that are induced in hospital-based settings in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2 phases at 3 hospitals in Tanzania. Phase 1 included 302 patients with a diagnosis of incomplete aborti...... and previously used clinical criteria were omitted, 30.9% to 60.0% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. CONCLUSIONS: An empathetic dialogue improves the quality of data collected among women with induced abortion.......OBJECTIVES: This study estimated the proportion of incomplete abortions that are induced in hospital-based settings in Tanzania. METHODS: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted in 2 phases at 3 hospitals in Tanzania. Phase 1 included 302 patients with a diagnosis of incomplete abortion......, and phase 2 included 823 such patients. RESULTS: In phase 1, in which cases were classified by clinical criteria and information from the patient, 3.9% to 16.1% of the cases were classified as induced abortion. In phase 2, in which the structured interview was changed to an empathetic dialogue...

  4. Induced abortion in Pakistan: community-based research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ayesha

    2013-04-01

    This paper highlights the findings pertaining to profiles of abortion seekers, reasons for induced abortions and methods used, and treatment for post-abortion complications (PACs). This paper is a review of community studies on induced abortion in Pakistan between 1969 and 2010, including the Induced Abortion Survey (IAS) 2010, in which the author took part. Findings from the review show that the profile of abortion seekers has remained by and large that of uneducated women aged over 30 with at least three children. A predominant reason for seeking abortion was contraceptive failure. Providers fall into both trained and untrained categories, yet complication rates are high even when women believe that they are going to safe providers in clinics or hospital settings. Dilation and curettage (D&C) (or evacuation) predominates among methods used while the use of folk methods may be on the decline. The IAS shows that women seek assistance for complications sooner than earlier studies have found. The review shows that despite a perceived stigma around the subject, community-level research is possible and further studies need to be done in other parts of the country. The paper concludes with suggestions for more community studies to explore these findings further and capture the diversity of the Pakistani context. It also suggests that advocacy and further research into the role of "semi-safe" providers be explored.

  5. Invited Commentary: Induced Abortion and the Risk of Preeclampsia in a Subsequent Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Olga

    2015-10-15

    Although it is well established that a having a pregnancy that ends in a birth protects against subsequent preeclampsia, it is unclear whether a pregnancy ending in miscarriage or induced abortion confers any protection. In this issue of the Journal, Parker et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2015;182(8):663-669) examine whether, in nulliparous women, a history of induced abortion is associated with a lower risk of preeclampsia in a later pregnancy, focusing on the hypothesis that endometrial injury facilitates later implantation. The authors take advantage of data obtained by linking several Finnish population-based registries that include detailed data on induced abortions, although information on miscarriages was of lower quality. Parker et al. found a modest reduction in risk among women with a history of induced abortion. However, there was little evidence that risk differed between women who had medical abortions and those who had surgical abortions (the latter of which is presumably associated with a higher degree of injury). History of miscarriage was not associated with preeclampsia risk. Although the study by Parker et al. adds to the evidence that suggests that women with a history of induced abortion have a lower risk of preeclampsia, it is difficult to evaluate whether the observed association is due to having had a previous pregnancy (however short) versus none, to confounding, or to an actual effect of induced abortion. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Morbidity and mortality following induced abortion in Nnewi, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikechebelu, J I; Okoli, C C

    2003-07-01

    We present a study of the maternal morbidity and mortality among 76 patients treated at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi for complications of induced abortion from January 1996 to December 2000. The total number of maternal admissions over this period was 5750, and illegal induced abortion was responsible for 1.3% of the admissions, with a mortality rate of 5.3% (n = 4) for induced abortion. This accounted for 21.1% of the total maternal deaths (n = 19) for the period. The mean age of the women was 20.6 years (range 15-34 years), 94.7% (n = 72) were unmarried, 93.5% (n = 71) were nulliparous and 76.5% (n = 58) were unemployed, 67.1% (n = 51) had had a mid-trimester termination at > 13 weeks gestational age. It is significant that 55.3% of the patients were teenagers and 45.1% of the mid-trimester abortions occurred in this group. Genital sepsis, haemorrhage, pelvic infection with peritonitis and abscess formation, uterine perforation, and gut injury were the major complications encountered. This study demonstrates that induced abortion is still a major cause of maternal mortality in Nigeria. Integrated family health education, planned parenthood and contraceptive education, a mass literacy campaign and improvement of the existing national health services are recommended in order to ameliorate the problems of illegally induced abortion in Nigeria.

  7. Patterns of induced abortion in the Czech Republic, France, Italy, and Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Mistrová, Aneta

    2013-01-01

    Goal of this diploma thesis is to present trends of induced abortions attitudes towards abortion in four European countries at the end of 20th century and beginning of 21st century. At first, study mentions definitions and legislations related to induced abortions. Furthemore there is mentioned methodology which is used in this study. In this part issue of international comparison of induced abortion is emphasized. Introduction into matter of induced abortion is provided by next part and it i...

  8. History of induced abortion as a risk factor for preterm birth in European countries: results of the EUROPOP survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancel, Pierre-Yves; Lelong, Nathalie; Papiernik, Emile; Saurel-Cubizolles, Marie-Josèphe; Kaminski, Monique

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between history of induced abortion and preterm delivery in various parts of Europe, and according to the main cause of preterm birth. We used data from a case-control survey, the EUROPOP study; 2938 preterm births and 4781 controls at term from ten European countries were included. Based on national statistics, we distinguished three groups of countries with high, intermediate and low rates of induced abortion. Previous induced abortions were significantly associated with preterm delivery and the risk of preterm birth increased with the number of abortions. Odds ratios did not differ significantly between the three groups of countries. The extent of association with previous induced abortion varied according to the cause of preterm delivery. Previous induced abortions significantly increased the risk of preterm delivery after idiopathic preterm labour, preterm premature rupture of membranes and ante-partum haemorrhage, but not preterm delivery after maternal hypertension. The strength of the association increased with decreasing gestational age at birth. Identifying subgroups of preterm births on the basis of the complications involved in delivery increases our understanding of the mechanisms by which previous induced abortion affects subsequent pregnancy outcomes.

  9. [Contribution of immigration to increase of legal induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orjuela, María; Ronda, Elena; Regidor, Enrique

    2009-07-11

    We aimed to estimate what proportion of the increase in the frequency of legally induced abortions in Spain can be attributed to abortions performed in immigrant women. All women of reproductive age residing in Asturias, Catalonia, Valencia and Madrid were included. The rates of legally induced abortion in Spanish and immigrant women were calculated in 2005. It was estimated the rate in all women in 1991 assuming that that rate refers to Spanish women only. The rate of legal abortions in immigrant women tripled those of Spanish women. A 76% increase in the rate was due to abortions carried out in immigrant women. Moreover, in women older than 30 years, the immigrant group represented 100% of the increment. Women aged 15 to 19 represented the exception, since the increase in these rates were primarily due to abortions performed in Spanish women. The increase in the number of immigrants in Spain since the second half of the 90s explains the increase in the rate of abortions between 1991 and 2005 in women aged 30 years and older.

  10. Concealing emotions: nurses' experiences with induced abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Fang; Che, Hui-Lian; Hsieh, Hsin-Wan; Wu, Shu-Mei

    2016-05-01

    To explore the experiences of nurses involved with induced abortion care in the delivery room in Taiwan. Induced abortion has emotional, ethical and legal facets. In Taiwan, several studies have addressed the ethical issues, abortion methods and women's experiences with abortion care. Although abortion rates have increased, there has been insufficient attention on the views and experiences of nurses working in the delivery room who are involved with induced abortion care. Qualitative, semistructured interviews. This study used a purposive sampling method. In total, 22 nurses involved with induced abortion care were selected. Semistructured interviews with guidelines were conducted, and the content analysis method was used to analyse the data. Our study identified one main theme and five associated subthemes: concealing emotions, which included the inability to refuse, contradictory emotions, mental unease, respect for life and self-protection. This is the first specific qualitative study performed in Taiwan to explore nurses' experiences, and this study also sought to address the concealing of emotions by nurses when they perform induced abortion care, which causes moral distress and creates ethical dilemmas. The findings of this study showed that social-cultural beliefs profoundly influence nurses' values and that the rights of nurses are neglected. The profession should promote small-group and case-study discussions, the clarification of values and reflective thinking among nurses. Continued professional education that provides stress relief will allow nurses to develop self-healing and self-care behaviours, which will enable them to overcome the fear of death while strengthening pregnancy termination counselling, leading to better quality professional care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Mifepristone-induced abortion and placental complications in subsequent pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian-Xi; Gao, Er-Sheng; Chen, Ai-Min; Luo, Lin; Cheng, Yi-Min; Yuan, Wei

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the effect of first-trimester mifepristone-induced abortion (MA) on placental complications in subsequent pregnancy. Two cohorts of nulliparous pregnant women were recruited in China during early pregnancy, one with a history of one MA and the other with no abortion (NA). Women were followed up until delivery. The incidence proportions of abruptio placenta, placenta previa, placenta accreta and retained placenta in the MA group (4673) and NA group (4690) were, respectively, 0.5 and 0.3, 0.8 and 0.9, 0.5 and 0.5, and 0.7 and 0.8% (all differences non-significant). After adjustment for center, age, education, occupation, residence, income, BMI and type of delivery, the incidence rates of placenta previa, accreta and retained placenta in the MA and NA groups showed no significant differences. The risk of abruptio placenta in women with a MA was nearly double that of women with no abortion, although this apparent increased risk was not statistically significant. Furthermore, this increased risk of abruptio placenta was found only in those with a gestational age >6 weeks at abortion (aOR: 2.46; 95% CI: 1.00-6.04), a curettage after abortion (aOR: 3.00; 95% CI: 1.25-7.20) or a longer inter-pregnancy interval (P-value for trend: 0.022). Mifepristone-induced abortion itself is not associated with placental complications in subsequent pregnancy, but other factors related to medical abortion-such as a gestational age >6 weeks at abortion, a curettage after abortion, and a longer interpregnancy interval-may increase the risk of abruptio placenta.

  12. Young women who underwent induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H; Zhang, M

    1989-01-01

    Premarital sex is becoming increasingly more common in China. As a result, there is a greater need for pregnancy termination, often in very young women. This paper presents case vignettes of 4 Chinese women who were forced, by a variety of circumstances, to undergo induced abortion. C, a 23-year-old shop assistant, was planning marriage and had obtained housing when she discovered she was pregnant. However, her shop manager, whose sexual advances she had spurned, refused to give her a letter of reccommendation for a marriage certificate. M came from the countryside to Shanghai, hoping that through her work as a maid, she would be able to amass modern possessions such as a television and stereo. When this proved impossible on her wage of 40 yuan/month, she engaged in prostitution for 10 yuan/night and did not even know the name of the man who impregnated her. W, a 13-year-old aspiring actress, found that having sexual relations with the director of her theater troupe was the only way to get a leading role. She won the role, but was unable to perform due to her pregnancy. B, a college woman, planned to marry when she learned she was pregnant but broke off the relationship when she discovered the extent of her financee's possessiveness. She became engaged to another man, but he rejected her when she revealed that she was not a virgin. These vignettes demonstrate the extent to which modernization has placed Chinese women in complex psychological situations as they struggle to liberate themselves from traditionalism.

  13. Unintended pregnancy and induced abortion among unmarried women in China: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garner Paul

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, premarital examination for both men and women was a legal requirement before marriage in China. Researchers have carried out surveys of attendees' sexual activity, pregnancy and abortion before their marriages, trying to map out reproductive health needs in China, according to this unique population-based data. To systematically identify, appraise and summarise all available studies documenting pregnancy and induced abortion among unmarried Chinese women attending premarital examinations. Methods We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Index from 1978 to 2002; PUBMED; and EMBASE. Trials were assessed and data extracted by two people independently. Results Nine studies, of which seven were conducted in the urban areas, one in the rural areas, and one in both urban and rural areas, met the inclusion criteria. In the seven studies in urban areas, the majority of unmarried women had experienced sexual intercourse, with estimates ranging from 54% to 82% in five studies. Estimates of a previous pregnancy ranged from 12% to 32%. Abortion rates were high, ranging between 11 to 55% in 8 studies reporting this, which exclude the one rural study. In the three studies reporting both pregnancy and abortion, most women who had become pregnant had an induced abortion (range 86% to 96%. One large rural study documented a lower low pregnancy rate (20% and induced abortion rate (0.8%. Conclusions There is a large unmet need for temporary methods of contraception in urban areas of China.

  14. The determinants of induced abortion among women in Ukraine, results of 2007 survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranovska, Anastasia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND. In Ukraine, an estimated 8.5 million induced abortions have been performed during the years of independence. To examine the reproductive health of Ukrainians, the National Health Survey was conducted in 2007 as a nationally representative cross-sectional survey involving 6841 women and 3178 men aged 15-49. Based on the survey data we aimed to identify the determinants of induced abortion. METHODS. The sample for analysis included 4953 women that have ever been pregnant. As an outcome measure we took induced abortion as the result of the last pregnancy versus all other pregnancy outcomes (live births, miscarriages, and stillbirths. Independent variables included age at the time of pregnancy, region, type of place of residence, religion, time since the end of pregnancy, age at first intercourse, whether first intercourse was at first marriage, and number of previous pregnancies. The first step of the analysis was conducted using the bivariate analysis (crosstabulation and chi-square test. The multivariate analysis was done using the binary logistic regression (backward conditional methods. RESULTS. In multivariate analysis, only five variables were associated at the 0.05 level: region, type of place of residence, religion, age at the time of pregnancy, and number of previous pregnancies. Women from the Western regions and those who live in large cities were less likely to have an induced abortion at the last pregnancy. With the increasing of age and number of previous pregnancies the risk of having an induced abortion at the last pregnancy increases as well. CONCLUSIONS. Women of older age groups, who already have children, those living in smaller settlements and in non-Western regions, are at increased risk of induced abortion. These groups are to be considered while developing programs to facilitate access to effective contraception.

  15. Induced abortion in villages of Ballabgarh HDSS: rates, trends, causes and determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Shashi; Srivastava, Rahul; Rai, Sanjay Kumar; Misra, Puneet; Charlette, Lena; Pandav, Chandrakant S

    2015-05-29

    Induced abortion has been legal in India on a broad range of medical and social grounds since 1980s. Often, induced abortion is resorted to as a means for contraception, and has a potential to be misused for sex selective feticide. We assessed the rates, trends, causes and determinants of induced abortions from 2008-12 in a rural community of northern India. Present study is a secondary data analysis of pregnancy outcomes at Ballabgarh Health and Demographic Surveillance System from 2008-12. The data was retrieved from the Health and Management Information System maintained at Ballabgarh. Cause of abortion was self-reported by the women who underwent abortion. Of the 11,102 pregnancies, 1,226 (11%) culminated as abortions of which 425 (3.8%) were induced abortions. Spontaneous abortion rate (7.2%) was twice that of induced abortion rate (3.8%). Both abortion rates had an increasing trend during the course of the study period. Self-reported reasons for opting for induced abortions were bleeding per vaginum (23%), unwanted pregnancy (16%), and unviable fetus diagnosed by ultrasonography (11%). Eight percent of the induced abortions were due to the female sex of the fetus. About 11% of the abortions were performed beyond 20 weeks of gestation which was the upper legal permissible gestational age for performing induced abortions in India. About 10% of the abortions were performed by unqualified practitioners. Caste, wealth index, birth order and size of the village population were the factors that were significantly associated with induced abortion. Though the abortion rate was low, the proportionate contribution of induced abortion was more than what could be expected. Unsafe and sex selective abortion, though illegal, was prevalent. Upper caste and higher socio-economic status families were more likely to opt for induced abortion.

  16. Induced abortion and concurrent adoption of contraception in the rural areas of India (an ICMR task force study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, B S; Chandhiok, N; Kambo, I; Saxena, N C

    2004-11-01

    Despite a liberal Medical Termination of Pregnancy (MTP) act and awareness of family planning, maternal mortality attributable to induced abortion is high. Assess attitude, behavior, practices and utilization of services by rural women for induced abortion and concurrent acceptance of contraception. Cross sectional survey of eligible married women in 13 states in India over one year. A total of 1851 women who had an induced abortion during the previous 3 years were interviewed. Includes proportions, rates and chi-square test. The main reason for seeking abortion was "don't need any more children" (42%), and in 12.4 per cent they specifically mentioned that they "don't need any more daughters". Around 46% of women accessed abortion services from private clinics as compared to government hospital (37.1%) and Primary Health Centre/Community Health Centre (14.0%). The decision to terminate the pregnancy and place of abortion was made by the husband in 42.8% and 52.5% respectively. Regret for abortion was expressed by 29.6% of the women. However, only 7.2% said they would not advice others for induced abortion. Nearly one half of the women undergoing abortion accepted a family planning method concurrently; of these Intra Uterine Device/oral contraceptives and a permanent method was adopted by 37.2% and 49.1% respectively. Acceptance of vasectomy by male partner was found to be low (1.3%). "Husband objected" (32.3%) was the main reason for not accepting post abortal contraception. Majority of the acceptors said they would recommend to others the same place where they had undergone abortion, thus indicating their satisfaction with the source and services received. Counselling for post-abortal contraceptive should be provided to the couple so that they can make an informed choice.

  17. Contextual determinants of induced abortion: a panel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Llorente-Marrón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE Analyze the contextual and individual characteristics that explain the differences in the induced abortion rate, temporally and territorially. METHODS We conducted an econometric analysis with panel data of the influence of public investment in health and per capita income on induced abortion as well as a measurement of the effect of social and economic factors related to the labor market and reproduction: female employment, immigration, adolescent fertility and marriage rate. The empirical exercise was conducted with a sample of 22 countries in Europe for the 2001-2009 period. RESULTS The great territorial variability of induced abortion was the result of contextual and individual socioeconomic factors. Higher levels of national income and investments in public health reduce its incidence. The following sociodemographic characteristics were also significant regressors of induced abortion: female employment, civil status, migration, and adolescent fertility. CONCLUSIONS Induced abortion responds to sociodemographic patterns, in which the characteristics of each country are essential. The individual and contextual socioeconomic inequalities impact significantly on its incidence. Further research on the relationship between economic growth, labor market, institutions and social norms is required to better understand its transnational variability and to reduce its incidence.

  18. Contextual determinants of induced abortion: a panel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente-Marrón, Mar; Díaz-Fernández, Montserrat; Méndez-Rodríguez, Paz

    2016-01-01

    Analyze the contextual and individual characteristics that explain the differences in the induced abortion rate, temporally and territorially. We conducted an econometric analysis with panel data of the influence of public investment in health and per capita income on induced abortion as well as a measurement of the effect of social and economic factors related to the labor market and reproduction: female employment, immigration, adolescent fertility and marriage rate. The empirical exercise was conducted with a sample of 22 countries in Europe for the 2001-2009 period. The great territorial variability of induced abortion was the result of contextual and individual socioeconomic factors. Higher levels of national income and investments in public health reduce its incidence. The following sociodemographic characteristics were also significant regressors of induced abortion: female employment, civil status, migration, and adolescent fertility. Induced abortion responds to sociodemographic patterns, in which the characteristics of each country are essential. The individual and contextual socioeconomic inequalities impact significantly on its incidence. Further research on the relationship between economic growth, labor market, institutions and social norms is required to better understand its transnational variability and to reduce its incidence.

  19. [Female teenager students: what they know about induced abortion complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Divanise Suruagy; Monteiro, Vera Grácia Neumann; Cavalcante, Jairo Calado; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to identify the knowledge about induced abortion complications and its relation to age. This is a cross-sectional study performed in schools of Maceió, state of Alagoas, Brazil, with students 12 to 19 years old. The sample was calculated considering post-abortion curettage data. The Epi Info computer program was used for data analysis. From 2,592 female adolescents studied 65.64% didn't know about any complications of induced abortion. The most mentioned complications were death and sterility. Clinical manifestations of abortion were wrongly mentioned by them as complications. Signification was found between the knowledge of the complications sterility, hemorrhage, and age. Death was significant fo rgirls under 15 and sterility for the older ones. The conclusion is that female adolescents don't have a correct knowledge of induced abortion complications, which shows the risk suffered by the ones that induce it. Thus, there is a need to further clarify the issue and for sexual education.

  20. Treatment of early pregnancy failure: does induced abortion training affect later practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Vanessa K; Harris, Lisa H; Bell, Jason D; Schulkin, Jay; Steinauer, Jodi; Zochowski, Melissa; Fendrick, A Mark

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between induced abortion training and views toward, and use of, office uterine evacuation and misoprostol in early pregnancy failure (EPF) care. We surveyed 308 obstetrician-gynecologists on their knowledge and attitudes toward treatment options for EPF and previous training in office-based uterine evacuation. Sixty-seven percent of respondents reported training in office uterine evacuation, and 20.3% reported induced abortion training. Induced abortion training was associated with strongly positive views toward both office-based uterine evacuation and misoprostol as treatment for EPF compared with those with office uterine evacuation training in other settings (odds ratio [OR], 2.64; P abortion training was associated with the use of office uterine evacuation for EPF treatment compared with those with office evacuation training in other settings (OR, 2.90; P = .004). Training experiences, especially induced abortion training, are associated with the use of office uterine evacuation for EPF. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk factors among men who have repeated experience of being the partner of a woman who requests an induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makenzius, Marlene; Tydén, Tanja; Darj, Elisabeth; Larsson, Margareta

    2012-03-01

    Prevention of unintended pregnancies is a public health objective; however, the profiles of male partners of women who choose to abort are relatively unexplored. To investigate risk factors among men who have repeated experience of being the partner of a woman electing an induced abortion. A questionnaire was used to collect information from 590 men recruited through their pregnant partner who applied for an abortion in Sweden during 2009. A binary logistic regression model assessed risk factors associated with repeated experience of abortion. One-third of the men had previous experience of a pregnant partner electing an induced abortion. Univariate analysis indicated these men were older, had a lower educational level and less emotional support, and were more often tobacco users than men for whom it was the first experience of a partner choosing to abort. Independent risk factors were being a victim of physical, psychological, or sexual violence or abuse over the past year (OR 2.62, 95% CI 1.36-5.08), unemployment or sick leave (OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.57-4.25), and having children (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.22-3.28). The men suggested improved sex and relationship education in school and lower unemployment rates could prevent unintended pregnancies and abortions. Men with experience of repeat abortions present a picture of vulnerability that should be recognised in the prevention of unintended pregnancies. Increased work opportunities might be one important intervention to reduce the number of abortions.

  2. Determinants of late presentation for induced abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, Ashley; Hahn, Philip M; Reid, Robert

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether demographic or patient factors contribute to later presentation (10 to 12 weeks' gestational age) for induced abortion in a Canadian abortion clinic. Women attending a hospital-based abortion clinic between April and September 2012 were asked to complete a survey. The characteristics of women who presented early (EPs; gestational age abortion" (26.45% for EPs, 32.4% for LPs; P = 0.421), LPs were more likely to report that discouragement "caused a delay in making arrangements" (45.5% vs. 16.7%; P = 0.019). Of women who had access to a primary care provider, it was more common for the primary care provider to be aware of the pregnancy among LPs than among EPs (80.6% vs. 63.1%; P = 0.015). Some women delay presenting for abortion because of discouragement from friends and family. It is unclear whether there are educational or policy interventions that can have an impact on this delay, and this warrants further study. There may be ways of addressing the delay in referral by primary care providers. Further study into the causes for delay in referral for abortion is warranted.

  3. Contraceptive practice, unwanted pregnancies and induced abortion in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omideyi, Adekunbi Kehinde; Akinyemi, Akanni Ibukun; Aina, Olabisi Idowu; Adeyemi, Adebanjo Babalola; Fadeyibi, Opeyemi Abiola; Bamiwuye, Samson Olusina; Akinbami, Catherine Abiola; Anazodo, Amechi

    2011-01-01

    Despite widespread awareness of and access to modern contraception, high rates of unwanted pregnancies and abortions still persist in many parts of the world, even where abortion is legally restricted. This article explores perspectives on contraception and abortion, contraceptive decision-making within relationships, and the management of unplanned pregnancies. It presents findings from an exploratory qualitative study based on 17 in-depth interviews and 6 focus group discussions conducted in 2 locations in Nigeria in 2006. The results suggest that couples do not practice contraception consistently because of perceived side effects and partner objections. Abortion is usually resorted to because pregnancy was unwanted due to incomplete educational attainment, economic hardship, immaturity, close pregnancy interval, and social stigma. Males usually have greater influence in contraceptive-decision making than females. Though induced abortion is negatively viewed in the community, it is still common, and women usually patronise quacks to obtain such services. An abortion experience can change future views and decisions towards contraception. Family planning interventions should include access to and availability of adequate family planning information. Educational campaigns should target males since they play an important role in contraceptive decision-making.

  4. The prevalence of posttraumatic stress among women requesting induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin Lundell, Inger; Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Frans, Orjan; Helström, Lotti; Högberg, Ulf; Moby, Lena; Nyberg, Sigrid; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Georgsson Öhman, Susanne; Östlund, Ingrid; Skoog Svanberg, Agneta

    2013-12-01

    To describe the prevalence and pattern of traumatic experiences, to assess the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), to identify risk factors for PTSD and PTSS, and to analyse the association of PTSD and PTSS with concomitant anxiety and depressive symptoms in women requesting induced abortion. A Swedish multi-centre study of women requesting an induced abortion. The Screen Questionnaire - Posttraumatic Stress Disorder was used for research diagnoses of PTSD and PTSS. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Of the 1514 respondents, almost half reported traumatic experiences. Lifetime- and point prevalence of PTSD were 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.8-8.5) and 4% (95% CI: 3.1-5.2), respectively. The prevalence of PTSS was 23% (95% CI: 21.1-25.4). Women who reported symptoms of anxiety or depression when requesting abortion were more likely to have ongoing PTSD or PTSS. Also single-living women and smokers displayed higher rates of ongoing PTSD. Although PTSD is rare among women who request an induced abortion, a relatively high proportion suffers from PTSS. Abortion seeking women with trauma experiences and existing or preexisting mental disorders need more consideration and alertness when counselled for termination.

  5. Adolescent Girls with illegally Induced Abortion in Dar es Salaam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Silberschmidt, Margrethe; Mchumvu, Y

    2000-01-01

    This article reports on a study of induced abortion among adolescent girls in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who were admitted to a district hospital in Dar es Salaam because of an illegally induced abortion in 1997. In the quantitative part of the study, 197 teenage girls (aged 14-19) were asked...... contraception or condoms though they were also at risk of STDs and HIV. These girls were getting pregnant expecting their boyfriends to marry them, or because they did not think they could become pregnant or failed to use contraception correctly. Most adolescent girls are not aware of the 1994 Tanzanian policy...... adolescent girls....

  6. Key determinants of induced abortion in women seeking postabortion care in hospital facilities in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilboudo PGC

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Patrick GC Ilboudo,1–3 Serge MA Somda,4 Johanne Sundby3 1Département de Santé Publique, Unité de Recherche sur les Politiques et Systèmes de Santé, Centre Muraz, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso; 2Agence de Formation, de Recherche et d'Expertise en Santé pour l'Afrique (AFRICSanté, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso; 3Department of Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 4Département des Maladies Non Transmissibles, Unité de Formation et d'Appui Méthodologique, Centre Muraz, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso Introduction: Despite the universal recognition of unsafe abortion as a major public health problem, very little research has been conducted to document its precipitating factors in Burkina Faso. Our aim was to investigate the key determinants of induced abortion in a sample of women who sought postabortion care. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional household survey was carried out from February to September 2012 in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Data of 37 women who had had an induced abortion and 267 women who had had a spontaneous abortion were prospectively collected on sociodemographic characteristics, pregnancy and birth history, abortion experience, including previous abortion experience, and selected clinical information, including the type of abortion. A two-step regression analysis consisting of a univariate and a multivariate logistic regression was run on Stata version 11.2 in order to identify the key determinants of induced abortion. Results: The findings indicated that 12% of all abortions were certainly induced. Three key factors were significantly and positively associated with the probability of having an induced abortion: whether the woman reported that her pregnancy was unwanted (odds ratio [OR] 10.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.59–30.41; whether the woman reported was living in a household headed by her parents (OR 6.83, 95% CI 2.42–19.24; and if the woman reported was divorced or widowed (OR 3.47, 95

  7. Induced abortion and prematurity in a subsequent pregnancy: a study from Shanghai

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Che, Yan; Zhou, Wei Jin; Gao, Ersheng

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of a first trimester induced abortion on the risks of low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth in a subsequent pregnancy we conducted a pregnancy-based cohort study in Shanghai, China with recruitment from 15 general hospitals (or maternity and infant health institutes) from...... singleton live births were analysed in this study. A total of 2953 pregnant women were enrolled and 2707 gave birth to live singletons. The overall incidence of LBW was 1·7%, 2·0% in the abortion cohort and 1·4% in the reference cohort. After controlling the potential confounders using logistic regression...... at recruitment, couples' occupation, education, age, infant sex, maternal body mass index at recruitment, contraceptive use and gestation age. Previous first trimester induced abortion did not significantly increase the risk of LBW or preterm birth. The study was performed in a low-risk population and results...

  8. Provision of intrauterine contraception in association with first trimester induced abortion reduces the need of repeat abortion: first-year results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjoranta, Elina; Mentula, Maarit; Gissler, Mika; Suhonen, Satu; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2015-11-01

    -up visit and further contraceptive services according to national guidelines. The women were followed-up to 28 February 2014 by using the Finnish National Abortion Registry, Helsinki University Hospital electronic database and clinical follow-up visit at 1 year. The median age of the whole study group was 27 years and 44% had a history of induced abortion(s). During the follow-up year the number of women requesting subsequent abortion was significantly lower in the intervention than in the control group (9/375 [2.4%] versus 20/373 [5.4%], difference -3.0 [95% CI -6.0 to -0.2] percentage points, P = 0.038, according to intention-to-treat analysis and 5/346 [1.4%] versus 20/357 [5.6%], difference -4.2(-7.2 to -1.4) percentage points, P = 0.003, according to per-protocol analysis, respectively). Provision of intrauterine contraception was safe with rate of infection and expulsion similar to those reported previously. The power calculation was calculated for a 5-year follow-up. However, significant differences between the two groups were already seen after 1 year. The present study was performed in a single clinic, where, ∼15% of all abortions in Finland are performed. In order to decrease the need of subsequent abortions, IUDs should be provided at the time of abortion. The study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01223521). 18 October 2010. 18 October 2010. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. The relation of son preference and religion to induced abortion: the case of South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woojin

    2007-09-01

    This paper explores the factors that influence the practice of induced abortion in a very low fertility society, with particular emphasis on son preference and three distinct religions: Confucianism, Buddhism and Christianity. Using multivariate logistic regression models fitted by the generalized estimating equation (GEE) method, this paper analysed the data collected by the 2000 Korea National Fertility and Family Health Survey of 6348 married women aged 15-49 years with a total of 1217 pregnancy outcomes. The results showed that the likelihood of induced abortions in women with two or more children, compared with those with one child, was significantly influenced by the sex composition of the previous children: odds ratio (OR)=12.71 (95% CI=5.49, 29.42) for women with only son(s), and OR=3.91 (95% CI=1.67, 9.14) for women with only daughter(s). At parity two, women with two sons were much more likely to have induced abortions than women with two daughters (OR=5.88, 95% CI=2.70, 12.85). Although Buddhist women were not significantly different from Confucian women in induced abortion practice, Christian women were much less likely than Confucian women to have an induced abortion (OR=0.39, 95% CI=0.18, 0.88 for women with only sons and OR=0.44, 95% CI=0.24, 0.81 for women with two children). This suggests that even in this very low fertility society, son preference and religious affiliation are significant predictors of women's practice of induced abortion.

  10. [Fetal experimentation, transplantations, cosmetics and their connection with induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo Calderón, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    The increase in induced abortion produces large numbers of cells, tissues and organs, which are used in several fields of Medicine, either in research or in treatment. The main uses are in Cardiology, Hematology, Metabolism, Embryology, Neurology, Immunology, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and Transplantations. Flavor enhancers and cosmetics also benefit. Utilitarianism has led to an increase in abortion-originated cell and tissue banks. Abortion is justified through the manipulation of language. Vested interests give rise to complicity in researchers and society as a whole. Abortion and tissue 'donation' cannot be split; since fresh tissues are involved there is a symbiotic relationship between them. Valid consent is not possible. A contradiction emerges, the nasciturus is not desired or valued but fetal organs are. When someone is deprived of his rights it is because another wants to enslave them. Research must have a moral base. Knowledge should not be increased at any price. Something that is legal and well intentioned is not always morally acceptable. The duty of omission is applicable. Means to achieve a goal must be ethical means. Educational efforts to restore respect for the human embryo and fetus must be promoted. Technical advances are not always in accordance with human nature and dignity. Research and treatment that do not resort to cells, tissues and organs obtained from induced abortions should be promoted.

  11. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  12. Decision-Making for Induced Abortion in the Accra Metropolis, Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Decision-making for induced abortion can be influenced by various circumstances including those surrounding onset of a pregnancy. There are various dimensions to induced abortion decision-making among women who had an elective induced abortion in a cosmopolitan urban setting in Ghana, which this paper ...

  13. Decision-Making for Induced Abortion in the Accra Metropolis, Ghana

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    2015-03-09

    Mar 9, 2015 ... that religious attitudes towards induced abortion were different from practices and there were also differences between nominal and multi- dimensional religion and concerns and practices towards induced abortion. In a systematic review of unintended pregnancies and induced abortions. Quin et al.28 ...

  14. Induced abortion among women veterans: data from the ECUUN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Eleanor Bimla; Sileanu, Florentina E; Zhao, Xinhua; Mor, Maria K; Callegari, Lisa S; Borrero, Sonya

    2018-01-01

    We compared rates of induced abortion among women veterans receiving Veterans Affairs (VA) healthcare to rates in the general US population, as current policy prohibits VA provision of abortion counseling or services even when pregnancy endangers a veteran's life. We analyzed data from 2298 women veterans younger than 45 years who completed a telephone-based, cross-sectional survey of randomly sampled English-speaking women from across the United States who had received VA healthcare. We compared lifetime, last-5-year and last-year rates of unintended pregnancy and abortion among participants to age-matched data from the National Survey of Family Growth. As few abortions were reported in the last year, we used multivariable logistic regression to examine associations between abortion in the last 5 years and age, race/ethnicity, income, education, religion, marital status, parity, geography, deployment history, housing instability, and past medical and mental health among VA patients. Women veterans were more likely than matched US women to report ever having an abortion [17.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 16.1%-19.3% vs. 15.2% of US women]. In the last 5 years, unintended pregnancy and abortion were reported by veterans at rates similar to US women. In multivariable models, VA patients were more likely to report abortion in the last 5 years if their annual income was less than $40,000 (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.95, 95% CI 1.30-6.70), they had experienced homelessness or housing instability (adjusted OR 1.91, 95% CI 1.01-3.62), they were single (adj. OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.23-4.91) and/or they had given birth (adjusted OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.19-4.40). Women veterans face unintended pregnancy and seek abortion as often as the larger US population. The Veterans Health Care Act, which prohibits provision of abortion services, increases vulnerable veterans' out-of-pocket healthcare costs and limits veterans' reproductive freedom. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. 13 FIVE YEAR REVIEW OF COMPLICATED INDUCED ABORTIONS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    concept of induced abortion which is the extraction of a pregnancy before the age of viability1. .... Vaginal bleeding. Lower abdominal pain. Vaginal discharge. Abdominal swelling. Fever. Anaemia. Hypotension/Shock. Oliguria/Anuria. Vomiting. Constipation/Diarrhoea. Jaundice. Urinary incontinence. 61. 57. 26. 17. 16. 12.

  16. Bowel injuries secondary to induced abortion: a dilemma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.; Fatima, S.; Soomro, N.

    2006-01-01

    To study the pattern of bowel injuries incurred by induced abortion, and the morbidity and mortality associated with them. All patients with bowel injuries due to induced abortion. Detailed data of all the patients was collected and analyzed. A total of 22 patients, mostly young with an average age of 26.86 years, presented with bowel injuries following induced abortion. Severe hemorrhage occurred in 8(36.4%) patients while 11(50%) had ileal perforation; 9(40.9%) underwent primary repair and 2(9.1%) ileostomy formation. Two (9.1%) patients with jejunal perforation had primary repair, whereas two with both jejunal and ileal perforations underwent resections with anastomosis in one and ileostomy in another. Seven (31.8%) with large gut involvement had colostomy formation. Septicemia and wound infection occurred in 7(31.8%) patients each, faecal fistula and abdominal wound dehiscence in 3(13.6%), and pelvic abscess in 1(4.6%) patient. The total mortality in this series was 6(27.3%) patients. Iatrogenic injuries during induced abortion, most commonly caused by quacks, can be minimized substantially if the procedure is performed by qualified medical personnel in proper health care facilities. There is a need for radical overhauling of the mind set in our society together with legislation. (author)

  17. Vesicovaginal fistula following an induced abortion with a huge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of a 26 year old P +1 woman who developed vesico-vaginal fistula (VVF) following an induced 1 abortion is presented. She presented with five year history of continous leakage of urine following a voluntary termination of pregnancy at about 11 weeks of gestation using metallic instruments in a chemist shop by a ...

  18. The social context of induced abortions among young couples in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The background of the study is the very high prevalence of mortality and morbidity in Sub-Saharan countries due to abortions induced by unsafe methods. This paper draws on fieldwork conducted in 1998 and 1999 in the city of Bouaké in Côte d\\'Ivoire. The study is based upon qualitative semi-structured interviews with ...

  19. Post induced abortion morbidity and mortality in Oleh, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the maternal morbidity and mortality among 87patient treated at the Central Hospital, Oleh, Delta State, Nigeria, for complications of induced abortion from January 1st 2004 to December 31st 2008. The total number of maternal admissions and deaths, over the period ...

  20. Use of contraception by women with induced abortion in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnacci, A; Carluccio, A; Piacenti, I; Olena, B; Arangino, S; Volpe, A

    2014-12-01

    Aim of the present study was to investigate type of contraception, if any, used by women with induced abortion. Retrospective analysis on the medical records of 1782 women with induced abortion performed at the University Hospital of Modena (Italy) between 2009 and 2011. Some kind of contraception was used by 81.1% of women with induced abortion. At time of conception most of these women (39%) had used withdrawal, 19% natural methods, 15.2% condom, 7% hormonal contraception (95% estrogen plus progestin for any route) and 0.4% copper-IUD. None was using implants or levonorgestrel-IUD. Figures of past use of hormonal contraception were much higher than those present at the time of the unwanted pregnancy (50.3% vs. 7%; Pabortion (22.2% vs. 14.2%; Pabortion infrequently use long term or hormonal contraception. In half of the cases the latter has been used at least once in life, but then it has been abandoned. Appropriate education and contraceptive counselling, personalization and follow-up may reduce induced abortion.

  1. Contraception and Induced Abortion in the West Indies: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.A.; de Bruijn, J.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Most islands in the West Indies do not have liberal laws on abortion, nor laws on pregnancy prevention programmes (contraception). We present results of a literature review about the attitude of healthcare providers and women toward (emergency) contraception and induced

  2. Comparison of condition specific indicators among illegal induced abortion: septic and non-septic abortion in Songkla Center Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaumvichit, Tatpong; Chandeying, Verapol

    2012-05-01

    Determine the clinical indications of illegal induced abortion, comparison between septic and non-septic abortion. The present retrospective descriptive study was conducted among pregnant women who were admitted in the hospital with the illegal induced abortion. The demographic data, gestational age, the method used, and personnel performing were gathered, as well as symptomatology, basic laboratory, condition progression, and medical and surgical intervention. There were 92 patients with illegal induced abortion between March 2009 and December 2010. The three main induced methods for termination of pregnancy was vaginal suppository, likely to be misoprostol-a synthetic prostaglandin E, analog (43.5%), oral Thai herbal medicine (19.6%) and combined medication (16.3%), respectively. Of septic/non-septic abortion, the first visit body temperature of 38.0 degrees Celsius or more (74.1/12.3%), heart rate of 100 per minutes or more (74.1/12.3%), fever index 3 degree-hours or more in the first 24 hours (81.5/12.3%) and fever index 5 degree-hours or more in the first 24 hours (59.3/1.5%), were statistically significant (all p-values of abortion was incomplete abortion 68 in 92 cases (73.9%). The first visit body temperature of 38.0 degrees C or more, heart rate of 100 per minutes or more and fever index of 3 and 5 degree-hours, are clinically helpful in the early diagnosis and treatment of septic abortion.

  3. Acceptance of family planning methods by induced abortion seekers: An observational study over five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathpalia, S K

    2016-01-01

    Prior to legalization of abortion, induced abortions were performed in an illegal manner and that resulted in many complications hence abortion was legalized in India in 1971 and the number of induced abortions has been gradually increasing since then. One way of preventing abortions is to provide family planning services to these abortion seekers so that same is not repeated. The study was performed to find out the acceptance of contraception after abortion. A prospective study was performed over a period of five years from 2010 to 2014. The study group included all the cases reporting for abortion. A proforma was filled in detail to find out the type of contraception being used before pregnancy and acceptance of contraception after abortion. The existing facilities were also evaluated. 1228 abortions were performed over a period of five years. 94.5% of abortions were during the first trimester. 39.9% had not used any contraceptive before, contraceptives used were natural and barrier which had high failure. The main indication for seeking abortion was failure of contraception and completion of family. 39.6% of patients accepted sterilization as a method of contraception. The existing post abortion family planning services are inadequate. Post abortion period is one which is important to prevent subsequent abortions and family planning services after abortion need to be strengthened.

  4. Ruling Allowing Induced Abortion in Colombia: a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez Orozco, Camilo Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present and examine the ruling on which the Colombian Constitutional Court declared the blanket criminalization of induced abortion to be unconstitutional: ruling C-355/061; all of this based in the understanding I have achieved of the Courts’ reasoning. In the first section I will present the norms that constituted the blanket prohibition of abortion, as well as the likely situation of its practice, both by the time the Constitutional Court took up the analysis of ...

  5. The effects of induced abortion on emotional experiences and relationships: a critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Zoë; Slade, Pauline

    2003-12-01

    This paper reviews post-1990 literature concerning psychological experiences and sexual relationships prior to and following induced abortion. It assesses whether conclusions drawn from earlier reviews are still supported and evaluates the extent to which previous methodological problems have been addressed. Following discovery of pregnancy and prior to abortion, 40-45% of women experience significant levels of anxiety and around 20% experience significant levels of depressive symptoms. Distress reduces following abortion, but up to around 30% of women are still experiencing emotional problems after a month. Women due to have an abortion are more anxious and distressed than other pregnant women or women whose pregnancy is threatened by miscarriage, but in the long term they do no worse psychologically than women who give birth. Self-esteem appears unaffected by the process. Less research has considered impact on the quality of relationships and sexual functioning, but negative effects were reported by up to 20% of women. Conclusions were generally concordant with previous reviews. However, anxiety symptoms are now clearly identified as the most common adverse response. There has been increasing understanding of abortion as a potential trauma, and studies less commonly explore guilt. The quality of studies has improved, although there are still some methodological weaknesses.

  6. [Abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, J P

    1998-01-01

    Abortion is the interruption of a dynamic process in a final and irreversible form. The legalization of abortion is applied to human ontogenesis, that is, the development of the human being. However, the embryo that is growing in the uterus is not a human being because a human being is a complex organism with differentiated systems, its own identity and intrinsic autonomy in its process of development. There are basically four levels of the analysis of the problem of abortion: 1) fundamental emotional arguments; 2) profound ignorance of technical and scientific facts; 3) rational positions obfuscated by the dramatic intensity of everyday situations; and 4) the conjunction of deliberated position where culpability is avoided with solidarity for all subjects of the process with a socially oriented view. The phenomenon of abortion from an epidemiological point of view summons the facts with which it is associated: poverty, illiteracy, shortage or lack of community health resources, absence of centers for adolescents, degradation of the environment, and precariousness of employment.

  7. The Incidence of Self Induced Abortion in Ghana: What are the Facts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Ghana, despite the growing number of studies, induced abortion remains a relatively unknown aspect of the national demographics. Interest in abortion research is, however, reemerging, partly as a result of political changes and partly due to evidence of the contribution of induced abortion to the high level of maternal ...

  8. The incidence of induced abortion in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayembe, Patrick K.; Philbin, Jesse; Mabika, Crispin; Bankole, Akinrinola

    2017-01-01

    Background In the Democratic Republic of Congo, the penal code prohibits the provision of abortion. In practice, however, it is widely accepted that the procedure can be performed to save the life of a pregnant woman. Although abortion is highly restricted, anecdotal evidence indicates that women often resort to clandestine abortions, many of which are unsafe. However, to date, there are no official statistics or reliable data to support this assertion. Objectives Our study provides the first estimates of the incidence of abortion and unintended pregnancy in Kinshasa. Methods We applied the Abortion Incidence Complications Method (AICM) to estimate the incidence of abortion and unintended pregnancy. We used data from a Health Facilities Survey and a Prospective Morbidity Survey to determine the annual number of women treated for abortion complications at health facilities. We also employed data from a Health Professionals Survey to calculate a multiplier representing the number of abortions for every induced abortion complication treated in a health facility. Results In 2016, an estimated 37,865 women obtained treatment for induced abortion complications in health facilities in Kinshasa. For every woman treated in a facility, almost four times as many abortions occurred. In total, an estimated 146,713 abortions were performed, yielding an abortion rate of 56 per 1,000 women aged 15–49. Furthermore, more than 343,000 unintended pregnancies occurred, resulting in an unintended pregnancy rate of 147 per 1,000 women aged 15–49. Conclusions Increasing contraceptive uptake can reduce the number of women who experience unintended pregnancies, and as a consequence, result in fewer women obtaining unsafe abortions, suffering abortion complications, and dying needlessly from unsafe abortion. Increasing access to safe abortion and improving post-abortion care are other measures that can be implemented to reduce unsafe abortion and/or its negative consequences, including

  9. Estimates of induced abortion in Mexico: what's changed between 1990 and 2006?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Fatima; Singh, Susheela; Garcia, Sandra G; Olavarrieta, Claudia Diaz

    2008-12-01

    In Mexico, where abortion remains largely illegal and clandestine, reliable data on induced abortion and related morbidity are critical for informing policies and programs. The only available national estimate of abortion is for 1990, and demographic and socioeconomic changes since then have likely affected abortion incidence. This study used official statistics on women treated for abortion-related complications in public hospitals in 2006 and data from a survey of informed health professionals. Indirect estimation techniques were used to calculate national and regional abortion measures, which were compared with 1990 estimates. In 2006, an estimated 150,000 women were treated for induced abortion complications in public-sector hospitals, and one in every 5.8 women having an induced abortion were estimated to have received such treatment. The estimated total number of induced abortions in 2006 was 875,000, and the abortion rate was 33 per 1,000 women aged 15-44. Between 1990 and 2006, the abortion rate increased by 33% (from a rate of 25). The severity of morbidity due to unsafe abortion declined (as seen in shorter hospital stays), but the annual rate of hospitalization did not-it was 5.4 per 1,000 women in 1990 and 5.7 in 2006. The abortion rate was similar to the national average in three regions (34-36), but substantially lower in one (25 in the South/East region). Clandestine abortion continues to negatively affect women's health in Mexico. Recommended responses include broadening the legal criteria for abortion throughout Mexico, improving contraceptive and postabortion services, and expanding training in the provision of safe abortion, including medical abortion.

  10. Abortion Surveillance - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatlaoui, Tara C; Shah, Jill; Mandel, Michele G; Krashin, Jamie W; Suchdev, Danielle B; Jamieson, Denise J; Pazol, Karen

    2017-11-24

    8 weeks' gestation that were eligible for early medical abortion on the basis of gestational age, 32.2% were completed by this method. In 2014, women with one or more previous live births accounted for 59.5% of abortions, and women with no previous live births accounted for 40.4%. Women with one or more previous induced abortions accounted for 44.9% of abortions, and women with no previous abortion accounted for 55.1%. Women with three or more previous births accounted for 13.8% of abortions, and women with three or more previous abortions accounted for 8.6% of abortions. Deaths of women associated with complications from abortion for 2014 are being assessed as part of CDC's Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System. In 2013, the most recent year for which data were available, four women were identified to have died as a result of complications from legal induced abortion. Among the 48 areas that reported data every year during 2005-2014, the decreases in the total number, rate, and ratio of reported abortions that occurred during 2010-2013 continued from 2013 to 2014, resulting in historic lows for all three measures of abortion. The data in this report can help program planners and policymakers identify groups of women with the highest rates of abortion. Unintended pregnancy is the major contributor to induced abortion. Increasing access to and use of effective contraception can reduce unintended pregnancies and further reduce the number of abortions performed in the United States.

  11. The effects of the Chernobyl explosion on induced abortion in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinelli, A.; Osborn, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Four regression models have been fitted to data of the monthly number of induced abortions in Italy between January 1984 and April 1986, in order to predict the number which would have occurred in the 5 months following the Chernobyl explosion. In model I the average number of abortions per day in each month was the dependent variable and calendar months, a linear time trend and previous month's value were the independent variables. Model II included a quadratic time trend term in addition to the independent variables used in model I. Models III and IV were like models I and II except that the dependent variable was the average number of abortions per working day in each month and the effect of the previous month's value was omitted. The 4 models all implied that an excess number of abortions were performed in the 5 months following the Chernobyl accident. The mean daily excess was estimated to be 28 and 52 per day for models I and II and the mean excess per working day was estimated to be 20 and 30 by models III and IV, respectively. Clearly the estimated magnitude of the excess depends on whether the quadratic time trend is included among the explanatory variables, but these results imply that the excess is unlikely to be merely due to chance

  12. Knowledge, behaviour and attitudes on induced abortion and family planning among Sri Lankan women seeking termination of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Jennifer; de Silva, Tharangi; Gange, Harshana

    2004-03-01

    In Sri Lanka over 500 induced abortions are done daily in spite of restrictive legislation. Experiences in other countries show that liberal laws alone have not solved the issues of induced abortions which may harm a woman's physical and mental health. To determine the socio-demographic features of women seeking termination of pregnancy, and their knowledge, attitude and behaviour with respect to induced abortion and family planning. A prospective study on a randomly selected group of 210 women attending a clinic in Colombo requesting termination of pregnancy. A pre-tested interviewer-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Over 80% of women seeking abortion were between 20 and 40 years of age. All religions were represented. 13% were single and 10% wanted to postpone a pregnancy. 38.6% had three or more children. In 90% the period of gestation was less than 10 weeks. Presence of a young child was the commonest reason for termination, followed by poverty. Only 0.9% were due to incest and foetal abnormality. 96% were not aware of adverse effects of abortion. 91% thought that induced abortion was immoral and 94% did not know that it was illegal. 29% had previous terminations and post-abortion contraception counselling was poor. Although 78% were knowledgeable on at least one method of contraception, only 16.3% were using it regularly. A majority used induced abortion as a family planning method. Improving accessibility and the quality of family planning services is of paramount importance. Every encounter of a woman with a health care worker should be an opportunity for counselling.

  13. Determinants of first and second trimester induced abortion - results from a cross-sectional study taken place 7 years after abortion law revisions in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnen, Kristine Ivalu; Tuijje, Dereje Negussie; Rasch, Vibeke

    2014-12-19

    In 2005 Ethiopia took the important step to protect women's reproductive health by liberalizing the abortion law. As a result women were given access to safe pregnancy termination in first and second trimester. This study aims to describe socio-economic characteristics and contraceptive experience among women seeking abortion in Jimma, Ethiopia and to describe determinants of second trimester abortion. A cross-sectional study conducted October 2011 - April 2012 in Jimma Town, Ethiopia among women having safely induced abortion and women having unsafely induced abortion. In all 808 safe abortion cases and 21 unsafe abortion cases were included in the study. Of the 829 abortions, 729 were first trimester and 100 were second trimester abortions. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to determine risk factors associated with second trimester abortion. The associations are presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidential intervals. Age stratified analyses of contraceptive experience among women with first and second trimester abortions are also presented. Socio-economic characteristics associated with increased ORs of second trimester abortion were: age abortion where only 15% and 19% stated they had ever used contraception. Young age, poor education and the prospect of single parenthood were associated with second trimester abortion. Young girls and young women were using contraception comparatively less often than older women. To ensure women full right to control their fertility in the setting studied, modern contraception should be made available, accessible and affordable for all women, regardless of age.

  14. Multiple visceral injuries suffered during an illegal induced abortion - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaba, Godwin O; Adeka, Benard I; Ogolekwu, Pius I

    2013-08-01

    Abortion in Nigeria is permitted only to save a woman's life. Most abortions in that country take place under unsafe conditions and constitute a major source of maternal morbidity and mortality. We present a case of multiple visceral injuries complicating an induced abortion. A 28-year-old multiparous woman at 12 weeks' gestation had an induced abortion by dilatation and curettage in a private clinic. The procedure was complicated by uterine perforation and bowel injury, with protrusion of gangrenous loops of bowel from the vagina. At laparotomy the uterus was repaired, and a bowel resection with re-anastomosis was performed. The patient's recovery was uneventful. Increasing the uptake of contraception, training healthcare providers in safe methods of induced abortion, and liberalising abortion laws can reduce abortion-related morbidity and mortality in Nigeria.

  15. [Epidemiology of induced abortion in Côte d'Ivoire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroh, Joseph Benie Bi; Tiembre, Issaka; Attoh-Toure, Harvey; Kouadio, Daniel Ekra; Kouakou, Lucien; Coulibaly, Lazare; Kouakou, Hyacinthe Andoh; Tagliante-Saracino, Janine

    2012-06-08

    The objective of this study was to examine induced abortion in Côte d'Ivoire. A nationwide cross-sectional descriptive study of induced abortion was carried out in 2007 among 3,057 women aged 15-49 years. The study showed that induced abortion is a widespread practice in Côte d'Ivoire, with a prevalence estimated at 42.5%. The women who had undergone an abortion were generally under 25, unmarried, and illiterate, and had used contraception. More than half (52.1%) of all induced abortions were performed at home by traditional abortionists or were self-induced with plants or decoctions. The main reasons for induced abortion were concern about the reaction of parents (27.7%), age (22.2%), a lack of financial resources (21.3%) and the desire of women to continue their education. More than half of the participants (55.8%) stated that they had suffered complications, which were more common after a home abortion than after a hospital abortion. Political and legal measures or reforms aimed at changing abortion laws in Côte d'Ivoire and better access to family planning are required in order to prevent or treat the social issue of induced abortion.

  16. Historical perspective on induced abortion through the ages and its links with maternal mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drife, James Owen

    2010-08-01

    Abortion is mentioned in ancient medical texts but the effectiveness of the methods described is doubtful. Attitudes varied from apparent disapproval by Hippocrates to open approval in Ancient Rome. In mediaeval times abortion was practised by women in secret and this continued during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Despite being illegal in England induced abortion became more common in Victorian times as the population grew. At the same time the link between criminal abortion and maternal mortality became increasingly clear, and if a woman died after a procedure the abortionist (sometimes a midwife) could be sentenced to death. The law was more tolerant of abortions performed by registered doctors. In the 20th century pressure grew for its legalisation. At the time of the 1967 Abortion Act, abortion was the leading cause of maternal death in the UK but within fifteen years death from illegal abortion had been abolished. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unintended pregnancies, induced abortions and risk factors in women admitted to hospitals due to birth or abortion in Hatay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazan Savaş

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to determine the frequency of unintended pregnancies, induced abortions and associated risk factors in women who have been admitted to hospitals in Hatay. Method: The subjects of this cross-sectional study were women who had been admitted to hospitals for the purposes of delivery or abortion, during a month-long period. A structured questionnaire was taken by 635 women. Unintended pregnancy was dependent variable. The independent variables were: age, husband’s age, civil status, total number of pregnancies, employment, use of family planning methods and family planning consultation services. Chi-square and Student's t-test were used to analyze of data. Results:21.4% of women reported using a family planning method when they got pregnant and 15.1% of the women said they did not want to be this pregnant. Ages of the women and their husbands, as well as the total number of pregnancies, were higher among unintended pregnancies (p<0.05. The frequency of unintended pregnancies increased where the husbands were unemployed, education levels of the couple were low, women were single or not officially married, disabled, or did not receive consultancy from their family physicians about family planning (p<0.05. 45.8% of all unintended pregnancies happened without the use of any family planning methods (p<0.01. 10.4% ended with spontaneous abortions and 4.25% were ended with induced abortions. The primary reason given for induced abortion was economic difficulties (44%. Conclusion: Unintended pregnancy rate is high in Hatay. It is estimated that almost half of all induced abortions are reported as spontaneous or therapeutic abortions.

  18. The estimated incidence of induced abortion in Kenya: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Shukri F; Izugbara, Chimaraoke; Moore, Ann M; Mutua, Michael; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth W; Ziraba, Abdhalah K; Bankole, Akinrinola; Singh, Susheela D; Egesa, Caroline

    2015-08-21

    The recently promulgated 2010 constitution of Kenya permits abortion when the life or health of the woman is in danger. Yet broad uncertainty remains about the interpretation of the law. Unsafe abortion remains a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in Kenya. The current study aimed to determine the incidence of induced abortion in Kenya in 2012. The incidence of induced abortion in Kenya in 2012 was estimated using the Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology (AICM) along with the Prospective Morbidity Survey (PMS). Data were collected through three surveys, (i) Health Facilities Survey (HFS), (ii) Prospective Morbidity Survey (PMS), and (iii) Health Professionals Survey (HPS). A total of 328 facilities participated in the HFS, 326 participated in the PMS, and 124 key informants participated in the HPS. Abortion numbers, rates, ratios and unintended pregnancy rates were calculated for Kenya as a whole and for five geographical regions. In 2012, an estimated 464,000 induced abortions occurred in Kenya. This translates into an abortion rate of 48 per 1,000 women aged 15-49, and an abortion ratio of 30 per 100 live births. About 120,000 women received care for complications of induced abortion in health facilities. About half (49%) of all pregnancies in Kenya were unintended and 41% of unintended pregnancies ended in an abortion. This study provides the first nationally-representative estimates of the incidence of induced abortion in Kenya. An urgent need exists for improving facilities' capacity to provide safe abortion care to the fullest extent of the law. All efforts should be made to address underlying factors to reduce risk of unsafe abortion.

  19. Induced abortion: incidence and trends worldwide from 1995 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgh, Gilda; Singh, Susheela; Shah, Iqbal H; Ahman, Elisabeth; Henshaw, Stanley K; Bankole, Akinrinola

    2012-02-18

    Data of abortion incidence and trends are needed to monitor progress toward improvement of maternal health and access to family planning. To date, estimates of safe and unsafe abortion worldwide have only been made for 1995 and 2003. We used the standard WHO definition of unsafe abortions. Safe abortion estimates were based largely on official statistics and nationally representative surveys. Unsafe abortion estimates were based primarily on information from published studies, hospital records, and surveys of women. We used additional sources and systematic approaches to make corrections and projections as needed where data were misreported, incomplete, or from earlier years. We assessed trends in abortion incidence using rates developed for 1995, 2003, and 2008 with the same methodology. We used linear regression models to explore the association of the legal status of abortion with the abortion rate across subregions of the world in 2008. The global abortion rate was stable between 2003 and 2008, with rates of 29 and 28 abortions per 1000 women aged 15-44 years, respectively, following a period of decline from 35 abortions per 1000 women in 1995. The average annual percent change in the rate was nearly 2·4% between 1995 and 2003 and 0·3% between 2003 and 2008. Worldwide, 49% of abortions were unsafe in 2008, compared to 44% in 1995. About one in five pregnancies ended in abortion in 2008. The abortion rate was lower in subregions where more women live under liberal abortion laws (pabortion rate observed earlier has stalled, and the proportion of all abortions that are unsafe has increased. Restrictive abortion laws are not associated with lower abortion rates. Measures to reduce the incidence of unintended pregnancy and unsafe abortion, including investments in family planning services and safe abortion care, are crucial steps toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals. UK Department for International Development, Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and

  20. INDUCED ABORTION FROM AN ISLAMIC PERSPECTIVE: IS IT CRIMINAL OR JUST ELECTIVE?

    OpenAIRE

    Albar, Mohammed A.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Induced Abortion for social reasons is spreading all over the world. It is estimated that globally 50 million unborn babies are killed annually, resulting in the deaths of 200,000 pregnant women and the suffering of millions. The complications of illegal abortion are very serious. Abortion is still used in many countries as a means of family planning. The medical reasons for abortion are limited and con-sti-tute a small proportion of all abortion cases. This paper discusses the di...

  1. Dezocine for anesthesia and stress reduction in induced abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng M

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Mengliang Zheng, Yanru Guo, Shiqiang Shan, Sen Yang Department of Anesthesiology, Cangzhou Central Hospital, Hebei, People’s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dezocine with regard to analgesic and stress reduction outcomes in women undergoing induced abortion.Methods: A total of 126 women in early pregnancy (up to 14 weeks’ gestation who underwent induced abortion at Cangzhou Central Hospital from May 2012 to May 2013 were randomly assigned to a control (propofol group (n=63 or an intervention (propofol + dezocine group (n=63. Wake-up time, orientation force recovery time, incidence of adverse reactions, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS score, analgesic effect, and respiratory and circulatory monitoring before the operation, 5 minutes into the operation, and 5 minutes after the operation were compared between the two groups.Results: The surgical procedure and anesthesia were performed successfully in all patients. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin saturation in the intervention group were significantly higher than in the control group; however, heart rate was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group 5 minutes into the operation (all P<0.05. There were no statistically significant differences in these parameters before surgery and after recovery. The postoperative VAS score (2.82±0.72, Ramsay score (2.65±0.65, and anesthetic effect in the intervention group were better than in the control group (3.90±0.84 and 2.21±0.49, respectively, and all differences were statistically significant (P<0.05. The wake-up time (3.41±0.79 minutes and orientation force recovery time (4.28±0.92 minutes were all significantly shorter (P<0.05 in the intervention group than in the control group, as was the incidence of adverse reactions (7.94% versus 26.98%, respectively.Conclusion: Adverse reactions of propofol combined with dezocine in painless

  2. Legally-induced abortions in Denmark after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, L.B.

    1991-01-01

    During the months following the accident in Chernobyl, Denmark experienced an increasing rate of induced abortion, especially in regions with the largest measured increase in radiation. As the increase in radiation in Denmark was so low that almost no increased risk of birth defects was expected, the public debate and anxiety among the pregnant women and their husbands caused more fetal deaths in Denmark than the accident. This underlines the importance of public debate, the role of the mass media and of the way in which National Health authorities participate in this debate

  3. Reimbursement of hormonal contraceptives and the frequency of induced abortion among teenagers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydsjö, Adam; Sydsjö, Gunilla; Bladh, Marie; Josefsson, Ann

    2014-05-29

    Reduction in costs of hormonal contraceptives is often proposed to reduce rates of induced abortion among young women. This study investigates the relationship between rates of induced abortion and reimbursement of dispensed hormonal contraceptives among young women in Sweden. Comparisons are made with the Nordic countries Finland, Norway and Denmark. Official statistics on induced abortion and numbers of prescribed and dispensed hormonal contraceptives presented as "Defined Daily Dose/thousand women" (DDD/T) aged 15-19 years were compiled and related to levels of reimbursement in all Swedish counties by using public official data. The Swedish numbers of induced abortion were compared to those of Finland, Norway and Denmark. The main outcome measure was rates of induced abortion and DDD/T. No correlation was observed between rates of abortion and reimbursement among Swedish counties. Nor was any correlation found between sales of hormonal contraceptives and the rates of abortion. In a Nordic perspective, Finland and Denmark, which have no reimbursement at all, and Norway all have lower rates of induced abortion than Sweden. Reimbursement does not seem to be enough in order to reduce rates of induced abortion. Evidently, other factors such as attitudes, education, religion, tradition or cultural differences in each of Swedish counties as well as in the Nordic countries may be of importance. A more innovative approach is needed in order to facilitate safe sex and to protect young women from unwanted pregnancies.

  4. Determinants of induced abortion: an analysis of individual, household and contextual factors in Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elul, Batya

    2011-01-01

    In the developing world, little is known about the risk and precipitating factors for abortion, due to a dearth of community-based surveys. Most analyses of determinants of induced abortion consider only a small set of household and individual socio-demographic factors and treat abortion as an isolated outcome, which ignores its relationship with prior reproductive health behaviours and experiences. In this paper, data from a cross-sectional survey of abortion knowledge, attitudes and practices among 2571 currently married women of reproductive age in Rajasthan, India, were used to examine contextual-, household- and individual-level determinants of abortion. Bivariate probit models, which jointly determine the probability of pregnancy and the conditional probability of abortion, were used to reflect the probability of abortion as a result of interrelated and sequential events. Increased socioeconomic status and life-cycle factors were associated with both the probability of pregnancy and with the conditional likelihood of abortion. Women who reported personal networks were also more likely to terminate pregnancies, particularly if their network members purportedly had abortion experience. Community knowledge of sex-selective abortion also exerted a significant positive effect on the propensity to terminate a pregnancy. For rural women only, community beliefs regarding spousal consent requirements pre-abortion were also significantly associated with abortion.

  5. An Epidemiological Study of Leptospira-Induced Abortion in Mares in Central Kentucky (1990-2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-02

    an estimated prevalence for leptospira-induced abortions , a better understanding of the horse population in which these incidents occur can be...EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF LEPTOSPIRA-INDUCED ABORTION IN MARES IN CENTRAL KENTUCKY (1990-2004) 6. AUTHOR(S) CAPT HALL DAVID C 7. PERFORMING... ABORTION IN MARES IN CENTRAL KENTUCKY (1990-2004) THESIS A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of

  6. Association between induced abortion history and later in vitro fertilization outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Sun, Yun; Di, Wen; Kuang, Yan-Ping; Xu, Bing

    2018-03-06

    To establish an effective and safe clinical fertility strategy by investigating the relationship between abortion history and pregnancy outcomes of in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment. In the present retrospective cohort study, data from IVF treatment cycles performed at a reproductive center in China between October 1, 2014, and October 31, 2015, were assessed. Outcomes were compared between women with a history of induced abortion and those without. There were 1532 IVF treatment cycles included; 454 patients had a history of induced abortion and 1078 did not. The spontaneous abortion rate was significantly higher (30/170 [17.6%] vs 41/420 [9.8%]; P=0.002) and the endometrium was significantly thinner (8.8 ± 1.8 vs 9.7 ± 1.8 cm; P=0.001) among patients with a history of induced abortion compared with those without. In a subgroup analysis of patients with a history of induced abortion, women who had undergone surgical abortions had a lower live delivery rate compared with medical abortions (29/76 [38%] vs 101/378 [27%]; P=0.039). Further, women who had a history of more than two surgical abortions had lower live delivery and clinical pregnancy rates (both Pabortion was associated with worse IVF outcomes, especially a history of more than two surgical abortions. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. Induced abortion in Canada 1974-2005: trends over the first generation with legal access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Wendy V

    2012-02-01

    Canadian women currently entering menopause are the first generation with access to legal induced abortion throughout their reproductive years. Statistics Canada data from 1974 to 2005 on age-specific abortion and first-abortion rates were analyzed to determine the proportion of the cohort hypothetically and actually undergoing at least one induced abortion, as well as the age-specific trends. Among Canadian women who turned 45 years old in 2005, 31% had at least one abortion, with a median age at first abortion of 24 years. Since 1997, age-specific induced abortion rates overall and among teenagers have declined significantly, while rates among older women show less decline as age increases. Annually from 1974 to 2005, women aged 20-29 years account for 52% (SD 1.8%) of all abortions in Canada. Induced abortion is a common procedure experienced by nearly a third of Canadian women during their reproductive years. Consistently, half of all women accessing abortion are in their twenties. These findings suggest that Canadian women, particularly those in their twenties, experience a significant unmet need for effective contraception. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Induced abortion in Thailand: current situation in public hospitals and legal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warakamin, Suwanna; Boonthai, Nongluk; Tangcharoensathien, Viroj

    2004-11-01

    Abortion is illegal in Thailand unless the woman's health is at risk or pregnancy is due to rape. This study, carried out in 1999 in 787 government hospitals, examined the magnitude and profile of abortion in Thailand, using data collected prospectively through a review of 45,990 case records (of which 28.5% were classified as induced and 71.5% as spontaneous abortions) and face-to-face interviews with a sub-set of 1854 women patients. The estimated induced abortion ratio was 19.5 per 1000 live births. Almost half the induced abortions were in young women under 25 years of age, many of whom had little or no access to contraception. Socio-economic reasons accounted for 60.2% of abortions. Serious complications were observed in almost a third of cases, especially following abortions performed by non-health personnel. Government physicians' current provision of induced abortion went beyond the provisions of the law in almost half of cases, most commonly for intrauterine death and for congenital anomalies. The paper proposes a framework for policy discussions of the grey areas of maternal and fetal indications leading to legal reform, in order to facilitate safe abortion. A recommendation to amend the abortion law has been proposed to the Ministry of Public Health and the Thai Medical Council.

  9. [Induced abortion because of fetal abnormality in Norway, 1996-7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskild, A; Nesheim, B I; Berglund, T; Totlandsdal, J K; Andresen, J F

    2000-03-30

    The objective of this study was to estimate the national and regional rates of induced abortions after the 12th gestational week attributed to fetal maldevelopment in Norway during 1996 and 1997. In 1998, the National Board of Health requested from all hospitals copies of relevant documents in the medical records of women who had applied for induced abortion after 12th gestational week. There were 303 women in 1996 and 1997 who applied for induced abortion because of diagnosed fetal maldevelopment. For all of these women the application was accepted. One woman did not have an abortion. The national rate of induced abortion attributed to fetal maldevelopment was 2.5 per 1000 births. There were regional differences in the rate of abortion. In 53% of all applications for induced abortion the fetal diagnosis was not reported. Among the reported diagnoses, 28% were chromosomal abnormalities. There is a need for better knowledge of factors influencing the number of induced abortions attributed to fetal malformations. We also need a better understanding of the impact of such abortions on the observed perinatal mortality and occurrence of birth defects.

  10. [Socio-demographic characteristics of females who had undergone induced abortion in a public hospital in Bucaramanga].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Roa, Eliana M; Ortiz-Serrano, Ricardo; Ochoa-Vera, Miguel E; Consuegra-Rodríguez, Mónika P; Oliveros, Carol A

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the socio-demographic characteristics of females who admitted to having previously undergone induced abortion who were attended at Hospital Local del Norte in Bucaramanga from the viewpoint of distributive justice. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of patients who consulted the Hospital Local del Norte's Emergency Gynaecology-Obstetrics Service in Bucaramanga between March 1/2008 and February 28/2009 who had a diagnosis of abortion in any of their presentations. The sample involved 93 patients, 16 of whom accepted that they had undergone an induced abortion. Factors associated with the event were belonging to a low socioeconomic stratum, lacking adequate health care and education in family planning, lack of a stable partner or that their relationship was dysfunctional and that the couple had pressured for an induced abortion for economic reasons or that their desire for parenting had already been satisfied. Contrasting these results with existing health legislation bioethics from a social justice in health viewpoint revealed that current legislation is deficient in both its coverage and extension to educational activity regarding sexual and reproductive health. Enabling patients to enjoy their sexuality responsibly and improving opportunities for access to better economic options may reduce induced abortions in the population living in Bucaramanga's northern commune.

  11. Cost of abortions in Zambia: A comparison of safe abortion and post abortion care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Divya; Leone, Tiziana; Coast, Ernestina; Murray, Susan Fairley; Hukin, Eleanor; Vwalika, Bellington

    2017-02-01

    Unsafe abortion is a significant but preventable cause of maternal mortality. Although induced abortion has been legal in Zambia since 1972, many women still face logistical, financial, social, and legal obstacles to access safe abortion services, and undergo unsafe abortion instead. This study provides the first estimates of costs of post abortion care (PAC) after an unsafe abortion and the cost of safe abortion in Zambia. In the absence of routinely collected data on abortions, we used multiple data sources: key informant interviews, medical records and hospital logbooks. We estimated the costs of providing safe abortion and PAC services at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka and then projected these costs to generate indicative cost estimates for Zambia. Due to unavailability of data on the actual number of safe abortions and PAC cases in Zambia, we used estimates from previous studies and from other similar countries, and checked the robustness of our estimates with sensitivity analyses. We found that PAC following an unsafe abortion can cost 2.5 times more than safe abortion care. The Zambian health system could save as much as US$0.4 million annually if those women currently treated for an unsafe abortion instead had a safe abortion.

  12. Induced and spontaneous abortion and incidence of breast cancer among young women: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Karin B; Xue, Fei; Colditz, Graham A; Willett, Walter C

    2007-04-23

    Induced abortion has been inconsistently associated with breast cancer risk in case-control studies. Retrospective cohort studies using registry information in Scandinavia have not suggested an increase in the incidence of breast cancer, although data on individual reproductive factors were not accounted for. We examined the association between induced and spontaneous abortion and the incidence of breast cancer in a prospective cohort of young women, the Nurses' Health Study II. The study included 105 716 women 29 to 46 years old at the start of follow-up in 1993. Information on induced or spontaneous abortions was collected in 1993 and updated biennially. During 973 437 person-years of follow-up between 1993 and 2003, 1458 newly diagnosed cases of invasive breast cancer were ascertained. A total of 16 118 participants (15%) reported a history of induced abortion, and 21 753 (21%) reported a history of spontaneous abortions. The hazard ratio for breast cancer among women who had 1 or more induced abortions was 1.01 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.17) after adjustment for established breast cancer risk factors; among women with 1 or more spontaneous abortions, the covariate-adjusted hazard ratio was 0.89 (95% confidence interval, 0.78-1.01). The relation between induced abortion and the incidence of breast cancer did not differ materially by number of abortions (P for trend = .98), age at abortion (P for trend = .68), parity (P for interaction = .54), or timing of abortion with respect to a full-term pregnancy (P for interaction = .10). Among this predominantly premenopausal population, neither induced nor spontaneous abortion was associated with the incidence of breast cancer.

  13. Dezocine for anesthesia and stress reduction in induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mengliang; Guo, Yanru; Shan, Shiqiang; Yang, Sen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of dezocine with regard to analgesic and stress reduction outcomes in women undergoing induced abortion. A total of 126 women in early pregnancy (up to 14 weeks' gestation) who underwent induced abortion at Cangzhou Central Hospital from May 2012 to May 2013 were randomly assigned to a control (propofol) group (n=63) or an intervention (propofol + dezocine) group (n=63). Wake-up time, orientation force recovery time, incidence of adverse reactions, postoperative visual analog scale (VAS) score, analgesic effect, and respiratory and circulatory monitoring before the operation, 5 minutes into the operation, and 5 minutes after the operation were compared between the two groups. The surgical procedure and anesthesia were performed successfully in all patients. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and oxyhemoglobin saturation in the intervention group were significantly higher than in the control group; however, heart rate was significantly lower in the intervention group than in the control group 5 minutes into the operation (all Peffect in the intervention group were better than in the control group (3.90±0.84 and 2.21±0.49, respectively), and all differences were statistically significant (Pabortion are less while the analgesic effect is better.

  14. Perspectives on induced abortion among Palestinian women: religion, culture and access in the occupied Palestinian territories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahawy, Sarrah; Diamond, Megan B

    2018-03-01

    Induced abortion is an important public health issue in the occupied Palestinian territories (OPT), where it is illegal in most cases. This study was designed to elicit the views of Palestinian women on induced abortion given the unique religious, ethical and social challenges in the OPT. Sixty Palestinian women were interviewed on their perceptions of the religious implications, social consequences and accessibility of induced abortions in the OPT at Al-Makassed Islamic Charitable Hospital in East Jerusalem. Themes arising from the interviews included: the centrality of religion in affecting women's choices and views on abortion; the importance of community norms in regulating perspectives on elective abortion; and the impact of the unique medico-legal situation of the OPT on access to abortion under occupation. Limitations to safe abortion access included: legal restrictions; significant social consequences from the discovery of an abortion by one's community or family; and different levels of access to abortion depending on whether a woman lived in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, or Gaza. This knowledge should be incorporated to work towards a legal and medical framework in Palestine that would allow for safe abortions for women in need.

  15. Women's attitudes to safe-induced abortion in Iran: Findings from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakhani, Nader; Cleary, Michelle; Zarei, Abbas; Lopez, Violeta

    2018-01-01

    To explore attitudes to safe-induced abortion among pregnant women in Iran. In Islamic teachings, abortion is generally forbidden. However in specific circumstances, abortion may be permitted and currently, in Iran, the law allows termination of pregnancy only if three specialist physicians confirm that the pregnancy outcome may be harmful for the mother during pregnancy or after birth. Pilot, descriptive survey. A 15-item structured questionnaire focusing on attitudes to safe-induced abortion was developed and pilot tested. Participants were pregnant women who were referred to the Legal Medical Centre (July-December 2015) to obtain permission for abortion. On obtaining their informed consent, the women were asked to respond to each item if they agreed (Yes) or disagreed (No). Only their age, education, employment, marital status and religion were obtained. Of the 80 survey participants referred for a safe-induced abortion, 90% were carrying foetuses with a diagnosed congenital malformation and 10% were experiencing complications of pregnancy that endangered their health. The majority of women (85%) perceived abortion to be dangerous to health; 86% indicated that partners should be involved in decision-making about abortion, while 83% believed that public health officials should have complete control of abortion law. There is a need to improve women's and couples' awareness and practice of effective contraceptive methods. Further research is needed to better understand the complex issues that lead to unintended pregnancies and abortions considering religious beliefs and cultural and legal contexts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Incidence of Induced Abortion in Uganda, 2013: New Estimates Since 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Elena; Atuyambe, Lynn M.; Blades, Nakeisha M.; Bukenya, Justine N.; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Bankole, Akinrinola

    2016-01-01

    Background In Uganda, abortion is permitted only when the life of a woman is in danger. This restriction compels the perpetuation of the practice in secrecy and often under unsafe conditions. In 2003, 294,000 induced abortions were estimated to occur each year in Uganda. Since then, no other research on abortion incidence has been conducted in the country. Methods Data from 418 health facilities were used to estimate the number and rate of induced abortion in 2013. An indirect estimation methodology was used to calculate the annual incidence of induced abortions ─ nationally and by major regions. The use of a comparable methodology in an earlier study permits assessment of trends between 2003 and 2013. Results In 2013, an estimated 128,682 women were treated for abortion complications and an estimated 314,304 induced abortions occurred, both slightly up from 110,000 and 294,000 in 2003, respectively. The national abortion rate was 39 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–49, down from 51 in 2003. Regional variation in abortion rates is very large, from as high as an estimated 77 per 1,000 women 15–49 in Kampala region, to as low as 18 per 1,000 women in Western region. The overall pregnancy rate also declined from 326 to 288; however the proportion of pregnancies that were unintended increased slightly, from 49% to 52%. Conclusion Unsafe abortion remains a major problem confronting Ugandan women. Although the overall pregnancy rate and the abortion rate declined in the past decade, the majority of pregnancies to Ugandan women are still unintended. These findings reflect the increase in the use of modern contraception but also suggest that a large proportion of women are still having difficulty practicing contraception effectively. Improved access to contraceptive services and abortion-related care are still needed. PMID:27802338

  17. Incidence of Induced Abortion in Uganda, 2013: New Estimates Since 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Elena; Atuyambe, Lynn M; Blades, Nakeisha M; Bukenya, Justine N; Orach, Christopher Garimoi; Bankole, Akinrinola

    2016-01-01

    In Uganda, abortion is permitted only when the life of a woman is in danger. This restriction compels the perpetuation of the practice in secrecy and often under unsafe conditions. In 2003, 294,000 induced abortions were estimated to occur each year in Uganda. Since then, no other research on abortion incidence has been conducted in the country. Data from 418 health facilities were used to estimate the number and rate of induced abortion in 2013. An indirect estimation methodology was used to calculate the annual incidence of induced abortions ─ nationally and by major regions. The use of a comparable methodology in an earlier study permits assessment of trends between 2003 and 2013. In 2013, an estimated 128,682 women were treated for abortion complications and an estimated 314,304 induced abortions occurred, both slightly up from 110,000 and 294,000 in 2003, respectively. The national abortion rate was 39 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-49, down from 51 in 2003. Regional variation in abortion rates is very large, from as high as an estimated 77 per 1,000 women 15-49 in Kampala region, to as low as 18 per 1,000 women in Western region. The overall pregnancy rate also declined from 326 to 288; however the proportion of pregnancies that were unintended increased slightly, from 49% to 52%. Unsafe abortion remains a major problem confronting Ugandan women. Although the overall pregnancy rate and the abortion rate declined in the past decade, the majority of pregnancies to Ugandan women are still unintended. These findings reflect the increase in the use of modern contraception but also suggest that a large proportion of women are still having difficulty practicing contraception effectively. Improved access to contraceptive services and abortion-related care are still needed.

  18. Induced abortion in Tehran, Iran: estimated rates and correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Amir

    2011-09-01

    Abortion is severely restricted in Iran, and many women with an unwanted pregnancy resort to clandes-tine, unsafe abortions. Accurate information on abortion incidence is needed to assess the extent to which women ?experience unwanted pregnancies and to allocate resources for contraceptive services. Data for analysis came from 2,934 married women aged 15-49 who completed the 2009 Tehran Survey of Fertility. Estimated abortion rates and proportions of known pregnancies that end in abortion were calculated for all women and for demographic and socioeconomic subgroups, and descriptive data were used to examine women's contraceptive use and reasons for having an abortion. Annually, married women in Tehran have about 11,500 abortions. In the year before the survey, the estimated total abortion rate was 0.16 abortions per woman, and the annual general abortion rate was 5.5 abortions per 1,000 women; the general abortion rate peaked at 11.7 abortions among those aged 30-34. An estimated 8.7 of every 100 known pregnancies ended in abortion. The abortion rate was elevated among women who were employed or had high levels of income or education, as well as among those who reported a low level of religiosity, had two children or wanted no more. Fertility-related and socioeconomic reasons were cited by seven in 10 women who obtained an abortion. More than two-thirds of pregnancies that were terminated resulted from method failures among women who had used withdrawal, the pill or a condom. Estimated abortion rates and their correlates can help policymakers and program planners identify subgroups of women who are in particular need of services and counseling to prevent unwanted pregnancy.

  19. "These things are dangerous": Understanding induced abortion trajectories in urban Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coast, Ernestina; Murray, Susan F

    2016-03-01

    Unsafe abortion is a significant but preventable cause of global maternal mortality and morbidity. Zambia has among the most liberal abortion laws in sub-Saharan Africa, however this alone does not guarantee access to safe abortion, and 30% of maternal mortality is attributable to unsafe procedures. Too little is known about the pathways women take to reach abortion services in such resource-poor settings, or what informs care-seeking behaviours, barriers and delays. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted in 2013 with 112 women who accessed abortion-related care in a Lusaka tertiary government hospital at some point in their pathway. The sample included women seeking safe abortion and also those receiving hospital care following unsafe abortion. We identified a typology of three care-seeking trajectories that ended in the use of hospital services: clinical abortion induced in hospital; clinical abortion initiated elsewhere, with post-abortion care in hospital; and non-clinical abortion initiated elsewhere, with post-abortion care in hospital. Framework analyses of 70 transcripts showed that trajectories to a termination of an unwanted pregnancy can be complex and iterative. Individuals may navigate private and public formal healthcare systems and consult unqualified providers, often trying multiple strategies. We found four major influences on which trajectory a woman followed, as well as the complexity and timing of her trajectory: i) the advice of trusted others ii) perceptions of risk iii) delays in care-seeking and receipt of services and iv) economic cost. Even though abortion is legal in Zambia, girls and women still take significant risks to terminate unwanted pregnancies. Levels of awareness about the legality of abortion and its provision remain low even in urban Zambia, especially among adolescents. Unofficial payments required by some providers can be a major barrier to safe care. Timely access to safe abortion services depends on chance rather

  20. Induced abortion is not associated with a higher likelihood of depression in Curacao women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Adriana A.; van den Berg, Desirée; van Lunsen, Rik H. W.; Laan, Ellen T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk of developing a depression after induced abortion. Methods A prospective cohort study conducted in Curacao which involved 92 women having an induced abortion and 37 women delivering after an unplanned or unwanted pregnancy, who served as controls. All participants

  1. [No increase in medical consumption in general practice after induced abortion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooistra, P.A.; Vastbinder, M.B.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare medical consumption in general practice between women who underwent an induced abortion and women who did not. DESIGN: Historical cohort study. METHOD: We selected 19o women who underwent an induced abortion in the period 1975-2004 and 145 control patients. Women were selected

  2. Victims and/or active social agents? A study of adolescent girls with induced abortion in urban Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silberschmidt, Margrethe

    2001-01-01

    High-risk sexual behaviour, adolescent girls, induced abortion, sugar-daddies, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania......High-risk sexual behaviour, adolescent girls, induced abortion, sugar-daddies, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania...

  3. Induced abortion in the Republic of Srpska: Characteristics and impact on mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niškanović Jelena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced abortion is an important aspect of sexual and reproductive health, with potentially negative impact on physical and emotional health of women. The aim of this paper is to investigate the presence of abortion in our society, characteristics of women who had induced abortion and its impact on mental health. The results presented in this paper are part of the bigger study "Health Status, Health Needs and Utilization of Health Services", which was carried out in Republic of Srpska during 2010. Survey covered 1042 women age from 18 to 49. A standardized set of instruments in the field of sexual-reproductive and mental health (NHS, EUROHIS, ECHIM was applied. Results indicate that 28.8 % of women had induced abortion, while nearly half of them (48.2% had more than one abortion in their life. Induced abortion is more common among women over 38 years who already have children (97.1% and live in rural parts of country (61.7%. Abortion is mostly preferred method of birth control among married woman (88.6%, woman with secondary school (64.5%, but is equally present among employed or unemployed woman and housewife's (around 1/3. There was a statistically significant but low correlation between current life satisfaction, mental health and induced abortion (F=8.0, p=0.000; Wilks' lambda =0.97; partial Eta-squared=0.03. More precisely, women who have had abortions have expressed higher levels of stress, lower levels of vitality, and were less satisfied with present life compared to those who did not have an abortion. High rates of induced abortion are present in Balkans countries for a long time (Rašević, 1994: 86; Rašević, 2011: 3. Higher rates of abortion, compared to the European Union and western neighbors, raises the question of presence of "abortion culture" (Rasevic and Sedlecki, 2011: 4. Abortion culture is the conse-quence of frequent use of traditional method of contraception (coitus interruptus in combination with low availability of

  4. Attitudes of medical students to induced abortion | Buga | East ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unsafe abortion causes 13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Safe abortion can only be offered under conditions where legislation has been passed for legal termination of unwanted pregnancy. Where such legislation exists, accessibility of safe abortion depends on the attitudes of doctors and other healthcare ...

  5. Pattern and outcome of induced abortion in Abakaliki, southeast of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Unsafe abortion accounts for a greater proportion of maternal deaths, yet it is often not adequately considered in discussions around reducing maternal mortality. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the pattern of unsafe abortion and the extent to which unsafe abortion contributes to maternal morbidity and ...

  6. Factors associated with induced abortion at selected hospitals in the Volta Region, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutsey, Ellen Eyi; Ankomah, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Background Induced abortion rates remained persistently high in the Volta Region of Ghana in the 5 years from 2006 to 2011. Some hospitals, both rural and urban, report induced abortion-related complications as one of the top ten conditions in hospital admissions. This study explored demographic and other factors associated with induced abortion, and also assessed awareness of abortion-related complications among women of reproductive age in the Volta Region. Methods A quantitative, hospital-based, unmatched case-control study was performed. The Volta Region was stratified into two health administration zones, ie, north and south. For each zone, hospitals were stratified into government and private hospitals. Employing simple random sampling, one private and three government hospitals were selected from each zone. This study is therefore based on eight hospitals, ie, six government hospitals and two private hospitals. Results Marital status, employment status, number of total pregnancies, and knowledge about contraception were found to be associated with induced abortion. Multiple logistic regression showed a 4% reduction in the odds of induced abortion in married women compared with women who were single (odds ratio [OR] 0.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07–0.22). Unemployed women of reproductive age were found to be 0.35 times less likely to seek induced abortion compared with their employed counterparts (OR 0.35, CI 0.19–0.65). It was also observed that women with their second pregnancies were 3.8 times more likely to seek induced abortion and women with more than two pregnancies were 6.6 times more likely to do so (OR 3.81, CI 1.94–7.49 and OR 6.58, CI 2.58–16.79, respectively). Women with no knowledge of contraceptive methods were 4.6 times likely to seek induced abortion (OR 4.64, CI 1.39–15.4). Compared with women who had not had induced abortion, women with a high number of pregnancies and no contraceptive knowledge were more likely to have

  7. Factors associated with induced abortion at selected hospitals in the Volta Region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutsey, Ellen Eyi; Ankomah, Augustine

    2014-01-01

    Induced abortion rates remained persistently high in the Volta Region of Ghana in the 5 years from 2006 to 2011. Some hospitals, both rural and urban, report induced abortion-related complications as one of the top ten conditions in hospital admissions. This study explored demographic and other factors associated with induced abortion, and also assessed awareness of abortion-related complications among women of reproductive age in the Volta Region. A quantitative, hospital-based, unmatched case-control study was performed. The Volta Region was stratified into two health administration zones, ie, north and south. For each zone, hospitals were stratified into government and private hospitals. Employing simple random sampling, one private and three government hospitals were selected from each zone. This study is therefore based on eight hospitals, ie, six government hospitals and two private hospitals. Marital status, employment status, number of total pregnancies, and knowledge about contraception were found to be associated with induced abortion. Multiple logistic regression showed a 4% reduction in the odds of induced abortion in married women compared with women who were single (odds ratio [OR] 0.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.07-0.22). Unemployed women of reproductive age were found to be 0.35 times less likely to seek induced abortion compared with their employed counterparts (OR 0.35, CI 0.19-0.65). It was also observed that women with their second pregnancies were 3.8 times more likely to seek induced abortion and women with more than two pregnancies were 6.6 times more likely to do so (OR 3.81, CI 1.94-7.49 and OR 6.58, CI 2.58-16.79, respectively). Women with no knowledge of contraceptive methods were 4.6 times likely to seek induced abortion (OR 4.64, CI 1.39-15.4). Compared with women who had not had induced abortion, women with a high number of pregnancies and no contraceptive knowledge were more likely to have induced abortion. It was found that lack

  8. Role of induced abortion in attaining reproductive goals in Kyrgyzstan: a study based on KRDHS-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Chander; Sekher, T V; Sulaimanova, Alina

    2010-07-01

    Estimates indicate that about 42 million pregnancies are voluntarily terminated every year at the global level, of which more than 80% occur in developing countries. Abortion has been one of the major reproductive health concerns in post-Soviet nations, especially when it is commonly used as a means of fertility regulation. On average, every woman has had around 1.6 abortions in Kyrgyzstan. This paper attempts to measure the role of abortion in fertility regulation using data from the Kyrgyz Republic Demographic and Health Survey (KRDHS), 1997. The analysis reveals that Kyrgyzstan can attain replacement level fertility in the absence of induced abortion by raising the contraceptive prevalence to 70% at the current level of effectiveness. The study also shows that women's attitude towards becoming pregnant and their partner's perception about abortion are significantly associated with the propensity to opt for an induced abortion. Reproductive health programmes need to address these issues, including the enhancement of male involvement in family planning.

  9. Attitude of Reproductive Age Women towards Factors Affecting Induced Abortion in Hamedan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Zahra Masoumi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Abortion is the third leading cause of maternal mortality. The attitude of women towards abortion is one of the most important factors involved in this issue. This study aimed to evaluate the attitude of women of reproductive age towards induced abortion. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed on 450 women of reproductive age in Fatemieh Hospital in Hamedan, Iran in 2014. Data was collected using abortion attitude scale consisting of five sections: socioeconomic status, family status, maternal and fetal health status, psycho -cultural background, and fertility status. Mean score less than three in each domain was considered as negative attitude, while scores higher or equal to three indicated positive attitude towards induced abortion. To analyze the data, logistic regression analysis, Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed using SPSS version 21. P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In this study, induced abortion had no significant relationship with family status, maternal and fetal health, and fertility domains (82.1%, 77.3%, and 64.4%, respectively. A relationship was observed between induced abortion and socioeconomic and psycho-cultural domains (61.8% and 56%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that the predictors of induced abortion were the attitude towards the effect of abortion on the health of mother and fetus (P= 0.01, as well as the psychocultural status of the mothers (P= 0.02. Conclusion: Evaluation of the results indicated a strong belief in the majority of the participants in psychocultural and socioeconomic domains as the most significant predictive factors for induced abortion. Since it is difficult to alter the socioeconomic and psychocultural domains of individuals, changes are recommended in predominant attitudes towards induced abortion.

  10. Induced Abortion and Women’s Reproductive Health in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa Agrawal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the intensive national campaign for safe motherhood and legalization of induced abortion (IA, morbidity from abortion has remained a serious problem for Indian women. This study examined the consequences of IA on women’s reproductive health. Analysis used data of 90,303 ever-married women age 15-49 years, included in India’s second National Family Health Survey (NFHS-2, 1998-99. Binary logistic regression methods were used to examine the consequences of IA on women’s reproductive health. Independent of other factors, the likelihood of experiencing any reproductive health problems was 1.5 times higher (OR,1.46;95%CI,1.33-1.60;P<0.001 among women who had one IA and 1.9 times higher (OR,1.85;95%CI,1.52-2.27;P<0.001 among women who had two or more IA compared to women with no history of IA. Study suggests that IA may have negative consequences for women’s reproductive health.

  11. Which outcomes do women expect to achieve after undergoing induced abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhjah, Sedigheh; Zamani-Alavijeh, Fereshteh; Heydarabadi, Akbar Babaei; Hozaili, Maedeh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Unsafe abortion is one of the most important health problems in many countries. Because of legal and moral issues, abortion is one of the most sensitive decisions. The aim of this study was to understand women’s expected gains from undergoing induced abortion. Methods To explain the factors leading to induced abortion, we collected the stories and experiences of a total of 21 people, including 18 women who underwent induced abortion in their most recent pregnancies, two women’s health providers, and a companion of a mother who died after an induced abortion. This qualitative study was conducted in Imam Khomeini and Razi hospital of Ahvaz and also a number of health centers, from February to September 2014. To collect the required data, we used open and semi-structured deep interviews. Content analysis method was used to analyze the data. Results Three major themes emerged from the analysis of the collected data, which included the following: 1) Expected favorable health-related outcomes, 2) Expected favorable economic outcomes, and 3. Expected favorable outcomes in social level and family relationships. Conclusion The results of this study showed that the studied women, to achieve to desirable outcomes in areas of health, economic and social, have undergone induced abortion. Hence, to develop programs for the prevention of induced abortion it is necessary to consider the motivations of women to intentionally terminate a pregnancy. PMID:28465801

  12. Developments in laws on induced abortion: 1998-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Reed; Katzive, Laura

    2008-09-01

    Women's lack of access to legal abortion is a major contributing factor to high rates of worldwide maternal mortality and morbidity. This article describes changes in the legal status of abortion in countries around the world since 1998. The complete texts of new abortion legislation, most often obtained directly from government Web sites, were reviewed to determine changes. Background information was, where possible, also based on a review of complete legal texts. Other sources include the International Digest of Health Legislation (published by the World Health Organization) and Abortion Policies: A Global Review (published in 2002 by the Population Division of the United Nations). Since 1998, 16 countries have increased the number of grounds on which abortions may be legally performed; in two other countries, state jurisdictions expanded grounds for abortion. Two countries have removed grounds for legal abortion. Other countries maintained existing indications for abortion but adopted changes affecting access to the procedure. The worldwide trend toward liberalization of abortion laws observed in 1998 has continued. Recognition of the impact of abortion restrictions on women's human rights has played an increasing role in efforts to provide access to abortion.

  13. Induced Abortion Practices in an Urban Indian Slum: Exploring Reasons, Pathways and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Deepanjali; Bharat, Shalini; Chandrakant Gawde, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    To explore the context, experiences and pathways of seeking abortion care among married women in a minority dominated urban slum community in Mumbai city of India. A mixed-method study was conducted using a systematic random sampling method to select 282 respondents from the slum community. One fifth of these womenreported undergoing at least one induced abortion over past five years. A quantitative survey was conducted among these women (n = 57) using structured face-to-face interviews. Additionally, in-depths interviews involving 11 respondents, 2 community health workers and 2 key informants from the community were conducted for further exploration of qualitative data. The rate of induced abortion was 115.6 per 1000 pregnancies in the study area with an abortion ratio of 162.79 per 1000 live births. Frequent pregnancies with low birth spacing and abortions were reported among the women due to restricted contraception use based on religious beliefs. Limited supportfrom husband and family compelled the women to seek abortion services, mostly secretly, from private, unskilled providers and unregistered health facilities. Friends and neighbors were main sources of advice and link to abortion services. Lack of safe abortion facilities within accessible distance furtherintensifies the risk of unsafe abortions. Low contraception usage based on rigid cultural beliefs and scarcely accessible abortion services were the root causes of extensive unsafe abortions.Contraception awareness and counseling with involvement of influential community leaders as well as safe abortion services need to be strengthened to protect these deprived women from risks of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions.

  14. Induced Abortion Practices in an Urban Indian Slum: Exploring Reasons, Pathways and Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepanjali Behera

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To explore the context, experiences and pathways of seeking abortion care among married women in a minority dominated urban slum community in Mumbai city of India.Materials and methods:A mixed-method study was conducted using a systematic random sampling method to select 282 respondents from the slum community. One fifth of these womenreported undergoing at least one induced abortion over past five years. A quantitative survey was conducted among these women (n=57 using structured face-to-face interviews. Additionally, in-depths interviews involving 11 respondents, 2 community health workers and 2 key informants from the community were conducted for further exploration of qualitative data.Results:The rate of induced abortion was 115.6 per 1000 pregnancies in the study area with an abortion ratio of 162.79 per 1000 live births. Frequent pregnancies with low birth spacing and abortions were reported among the women due to restricted contraception use based on religious beliefs. Limited supportfrom husband and family compelled the women to seek abortion services, mostly secretly, from private, unskilled providers and unregistered health facilities. Friends and neighbors were main sources of advice and link to abortion services. Lack of safe abortion facilities within accessible distance furtherintensifies the risk of unsafe abortions.Conclusion:Low contraception usage based on rigid cultural beliefs and scarcely accessible abortion services were the root causes of extensive unsafe abortions.Contraception awareness and counseling with involvement of influential community leaders as well as safe abortion services need to be strengthened to protect these deprived women from risks of unwanted pregnancies and unsafe abortions.

  15. Marmara University Medical Students' Perception on Sexual Violence against Women and Induced Abortion in Turkey.

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    Lüleci, Nimet Emel; Kaya, Eda; Aslan, Ece; Şenkal, Ece Söylem; Çiçek, Zehra Nadide

    2016-03-01

    Historically, sexual assault is a common issue in Turkey. As doctors are one of the steps to help sexually assaulted women, medical students should have basic knowledge of and sensitivity regarding this subject. Another common women's public health issue is induced abortion. In countries where access to abortion is restricted, there is a tendency towards unhealthy abortion. The aims of this study are: (1) to determine the attitudes and opinions of Marmara University Medical Faculty students about sexual assault against women and induced abortion and (2) to propose an educational program for medical students about sexual assault and abortion. Cross-sectional study. The questionnaires were self-administered and the data were analyzed using SPSS v.15.0. First, the descriptive statistics were analyzed, followed by Chi-square for contingency tests assessing differences in attitudes toward sexual assault and induced abortion by factors such as gender and educational term. Differences were considered statistically significant at p0.05). Although there was no significant difference regarding the extent of punishment by victim's status as a virgin, 21.3% (n=63) agreed that punishment should be more severe when the victim was a virgin. About 40.7% (n=120) agreed that the legal period of abortion in Turkey (10 weeks) should be longer. The majority (86.1%, n=255) agreed that legally prohibiting abortions causes an increase in unhealthy abortions. An educational program on these issues should be developed for medical students.

  16. The comparative safety of legal induced abortion and childbirth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Grimes, David A

    2012-02-01

    To assess the safety of abortion compared with childbirth. We estimated mortality rates associated with live births and legal induced abortions in the United States in 1998-2005. We used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System, birth certificates, and Guttmacher Institute surveys. In addition, we searched for population-based data comparing the morbidity of abortion and childbirth. The pregnancy-associated mortality rate among women who delivered live neonates was 8.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The mortality rate related to induced abortion was 0.6 deaths per 100,000 abortions. In the one recent comparative study of pregnancy morbidity in the United States, pregnancy-related complications were more common with childbirth than with abortion. Legal induced abortion is markedly safer than childbirth. The risk of death associated with childbirth is approximately 14 times higher than that with abortion. Similarly, the overall morbidity associated with childbirth exceeds that with abortion. II.

  17. Decreased suicide rate after induced abortion, after the Current Care Guidelines in Finland 1987-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissler, Mika; Karalis, Elina; Ulander, Veli-Matti

    2015-02-01

    Women with a recent induced abortion have a 3-fold risk for suicide, compared to non-pregnant women. The increased risk was recognised in unofficial guidelines (1996) and Current Care Guidelines (2001) on abortion treatment, highlighting the importance of a check-up 2 - 3 weeks after the termination, to monitor for mental health disorders. We studied the suicide trends after induced abortion in 1987 - 2012 in Finland. We linked the Register on Induced Abortions (N = 284,751) and Cause-of-Death Register (N = 3798 suicides) to identify women who had committed suicide within 1 year after an induced abortion (N = 79). The abortion rates per 100,000 person-years were calculated for 1987 - 1996 (period with no guidelines), 1997 - 2001 (with unofficial guidelines) and 2002 - 2012 (with Current Care Guidelines). The suicide rate after induced abortion declined by 24%, from 32.4/100,000 in 1987 - 1996 to 24.3/100,000 in 1997 - 2001 and then 24.8/100,000 in 2002 - 2012. The age-adjusted suicide rate among women aged 15 - 49 decreased by 13%; from 11.4/100,000 to 10.4/100,000 and 9.9/100,000, respectively. After induced abortions, the suicide rate increased by 30% among teenagers (to 25/100,000), stagnated for women aged 20 - 24 (at 32/100,000), but decreased by 43% (to 21/100,000) for women aged 25 - 49. The excess risk for suicide after induced abortion decreased, but the change was not statistically significant. Women with a recent induced abortion still have a 2-fold suicide risk. A mandatory check-up may decrease this risk. The causes for the increased suicide risk, including mental health prior to pregnancy and the social circumstances, should be investigated further. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  18. Induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Gezahegn; Hambisa, Mitiku Teshome; Semahegn, Agumasie

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion is one of the major medical and public health problems in developing countries including Ethiopia. However, there is a lack of up-to-date and reliable information on induced abortion distribution and its determinant factors in the country. This study was intended to assess induced abortion and associated factors in health facilities of Guraghe zone, Southern Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in eight health facilities in Guraghe zone. Client exit interview was conducted on 400 patients using a structured questionnaire. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with induced abortion. Out of 400 women, 75.5% responded that the current pregnancy that ended in abortion is unwanted. However, only 12.3% of the respondents have admitted interference to the current pregnancy. Having more than four pregnancies (AOR = 4.28, CI: (1.24-14.71)), age of 30-34 years (AOR = 0.15, CI: (0.04-0.55)), primary education (AOR = 0.26, CI: (0.13-0.88)), and wanted pregnancy (AOR = 0.44, CI: (0.14-0.65)) were found to have association with induced abortion. The study revealed high level of induced abortion which is underpinned by high magnitude of unwanted pregnancy. There is requirement for widespread expansion of increased access to high quality family planning service and post-abortion care.

  19. [Clinical study of induced abortion of early-early pregnancy: an analysis of 10, 404 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Wang, Xue-fen; Zhang, Li; Liu, Jian-hua

    2012-01-03

    To evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of early-early pregnancy induced abortion (EPIA). A total of 10 404 cases of EPIA performed at our hospital from January 1993 to December 2003 were retrospectively analyzed and compared with 9434 cases of common induced abortion (CIA). The amount of hemorrhage and operative duration, degree of pain, rate of induced-abortion syndrome, rate of incomplete abortion, menstrual changes and post-operative onset of Asherman's syndrome were observed and compared between 2 groups. The average age, ratio of parous cases, ratio of the cases of first-pregnancy induced abortion were not different between 2 groups (P > 0.05). The amount of hemorrhage bleeding ((4.9 ± 3.2) ml), operative duration ((90.3 ± 12.4) s), degree of pain, rate of induced-abortion syndrome, menstrual changes and the rate of Asherman's syndrome in the EPIA group were all significantly less than those in the CIA group (P abortion (0.44%) in the EPIA group was significantly higher than that (0.21%) in the CIA group (P abortion stays high.

  20. Attitudes and perceptions about prenatal diagnosis and induced abortion among adults of Pakistani population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Muhammad Osman; Fatmi, Zafar; Pardeep, Bhisham; Ali, Tuba; Iqbal, Hameed; Bangash, Haider Khan; Pervaiz, Rushna; Altaf, Hira; Baba, Javed Ali

    2008-12-01

    Perception and attitude regarding prenatal screening and induced abortion vary across different populations. This study assesses the attitudes and perceptions regarding prenatal screening and induced abortion among Pakistani adults. We conducted a cross-sectional study among adults (18+) coming to the Aga Khan University Hospital, a private tertiary care hospital in Karachi, Pakistan. Majority (65%) of the study population had knowledge about prenatal screening and it was acceptable to most (85.5%) of them. Significant proportion had high acceptance for induced abortion (23%) of a fetus that has serious congenital anomalies. On the other hand, 15% were unwilling to consider termination of pregnancy (TOP) in any circumstances. Women had more favorable attitude toward induced abortion. Most of the respondents (63%) were in favor of abortion if fetal death was imminent as a result of a congenital abnormality. Majority wanted mutual consultation of husband and wife for making decision regarding induced abortion (84%). There was a considerable discord in opinion about abortion in the study population. Health care providers should involve both parents in making decisions about abortions and counsel them adequately about congenital disorders. Copyright (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Hospital Admission following Induced Abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea – A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallely, Lisa M.; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D. L.; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Methods Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Findings Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. Conclusion In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion. PMID:25329982

  2. Hospital admission following induced abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea--a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallely, Lisa M; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D L; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion.

  3. Hospital admission following induced abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea--a descriptive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Vallely

    Full Text Available In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion.Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information.Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119 of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119 of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported.In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion.

  4. Reasons why women have induced abortions: a synthesis of findings from 14 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sophia; Desai, Sheila; Crowell, Marjorie; Sedgh, Gilda

    2017-10-01

    Many reasons inform women's reproductive decision-making. This paper aims to present the reasons women give for obtaining induced abortions in 14 countries. We examined nationally representative data from 14 countries collected in official statistics, population-based surveys, and facility-based surveys of abortion patients. In each country, we calculated the percentage distribution of women who have abortions by main reason given for the abortion. We examined these reasons across countries and within countries by women's sociodemographic characteristics (age, marital status, educational attainment, and residence). Where data are available, we also studied the multiple reasons women give for having an abortion. In most countries, the most frequently cited reasons for having an abortion were socioeconomic concerns or limiting childbearing. With some exceptions, little variation existed in the reasons given by women's sociodemographic characteristics. Data from three countries where multiple reasons could be reported in the survey showed that women often have more than one reason for having an abortion. This study shows that women have abortions for a variety of reasons, and provides a broad picture of the circumstances that inform women's decisions to have abortions. Future research should examine in greater depth the personal, social, economic, and health factors that inform a woman's decision to have an abortion as these reasons may shed light on the potential consequences that unintended births can have on women's lives. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Induced abortion and risk of small-for-gestational-age birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parazzini, F; Cipriani, S; Chiaffarino, F; Sandretti, F; Bortolus, R; Chiantera, V

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the possibility of an association between previous induced abortion and subsequent birth of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infant. Case-control study. General and university hospitals. Cases were 555 women who delivered SGA babies. Controls were 1966 women who gave birth at term (>37 weeks of gestation) to healthy infants of normal weight on randomly selected days at the hospital where cases had been identified. All women in the case and control categories were interviewed on the obstetric wards by one of a team of six interviewers. During the interviews, information was obtained regarding general socio-demographic factors, personal characteristics and habits, gynaecological and obstetric history, general anamnesis, family history of obstetric and gynaecological diseases, and the age of the father of the child. Further information on current pregnancy and delivery was also collected. We used conditional multiple logistic regression (with age as the matching variable), with maximum likelihood fitting, to obtain odds ratios and their corresponding 95% CIs. Included in the regression equations were terms for education, plus terms significantly associated in this data set with the risk of SGA birth (smoking in pregnancy, history of SGA, gestational hypertension and parity). Women admitted to a general and a university hospital. No significant increase in the risk of SGA birth was observed in women with a previous induced abortion [odds ratio (OR) 1.0; 95% CI 0.6-1.7]. The OR for SGA birth was 1.2 (95% CI 0.7-2.1) for preterm and 1.0 (95% CI 0.7-1.4) for term SGA births. This study found no association between risk of SGA birth and induced abortion.

  6. Induced abortion patterns and determinants among married women in China: 1979 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cuntong

    2014-05-01

    China has launched the one-child policy to control its rapidly expanding population since 1979. Local governments, tasked with limiting regional birth rates, commonly imposed induced abortions. After 1994, China's family planning policy was relatively loosened and mandatory induced abortion gradually gave way to client-centered and informed-choice contraceptive policy and the "Compensation" Fee policy. This study assesses trends in and determinants of induced abortion among married women aged 20-49 in China from 1979 to 2010, using data from national statistics and nationally representative sample surveys. The incidence of induced abortions among married women aged 20-49 began to decrease in the mid-1990s. The induced abortion rate reached its highest level in the early 1980s (56.07%) and its lowest level in the 2000s (18.04%), with an average annual rate of 28.95% among married women 20-49 years old. The likelihood of a pregnant woman undergoing an induced abortion during this period depended not only on individual characteristics (including ethnicity, age, education level, household registration, number of children, and sex of children), but also on the stringency of the family planning policy in place. The less stringent the family planning policy, the less likely married women were to undergo an induced abortion. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Decision-Making for Induced Abortion in the Accra Metropolis, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbagbo, Fred Yao; Amo-Adjei, Joshua; Laar, Amos

    2015-06-01

    Decision-making for induced abortion can be influenced by various circumstances including those surrounding onset of a pregnancy. There are various dimensions to induced abortion decision-making among women who had an elective induced abortion in a cosmopolitan urban setting in Ghana, which this paper examined. A cross-sectional mixed method study was conducted between January and December 2011 with 401 women who had undergone an abortion procedure in the preceding 12 months. Whereas the quantitative data were analysed with descriptive statistics, thematic analysis was applied to the qualitative data. The study found that women of various profiles have different reasons for undergoing abortion. Women considered the circumstances surrounding onset of pregnancy, person responsible for the pregnancy, gestational age at decision to terminate, and social, economic and medical considerations. Pressures from partners, career progression and reproductive intentions of women reinforced these reasons. First time pregnancies were mostly aborted regardless of gestational ages and partners' consent. Policies and programmes targeted at safe abortion care are needed to guide informed decisions on induced abortions.

  8. Why do women present late for induced abortion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ellie; Ingham, Roger

    2010-08-01

    This article summarises the findings of studies relating to why women present for abortion at gestations of more than 12 weeks. Its primary focus is on British experience, but relevant studies from other countries are described. Key findings reveal that there are many different reasons. Much of the delay occurs prior to women requesting an abortion; other key issues include women's concerns about what is involved in having the abortion and aspects of relationships with their partners and/or parents. Further, after requesting an abortion, delays are partly 'service-related' - for example, waiting for appointments - and partly 'woman-related' for example, missing or cancelling appointments. The relative contributions to the delay of these various factors are discussed. The implications of the research for abortion education and service provision are considered. Abortion for reasons linked to foetal abnormality is not covered in this article. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bowel perforation secondary to illegally induced abortion: a tertiary hospital experience in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabula Joseph B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bowel perforation though rarely reported is a serious complication of induced abortion, which is often performed illegally by persons without any medical training in developing countries. A sudden increase in the number of patients in our centre in recent years prompted the authors to analyze this problem. The study was conducted to describe our own experiences in the surgical management of these patients. Methods This was a retrospective study involving patients who were jointly managed by the surgical and gynecological teams at Bugando Medical Centre (BMC for bowel perforation secondary to illegally induced abortion from January 2002 to December 2011. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 17.0. Results A total of 68 patients (representing 4.2% of cases were enrolled in the study. Their ages ranged from 14 to 45 years with a median age of 21 years. Majority of patients were, secondary school students/leavers (70.6%, unmarried (88.2%, nulliparous (80.9%, unemployed (82.4% and most of them were dependent member of the family. Previous history of contraceptive use was reported in only 14.7% of cases. The majority of patients (79.4% had procured the abortion in the 2nd trimester. Dilatation and curettage (82.4% was the most common reported method used in procuring abortion. The interval from termination of pregnancy to presentation in hospital ranged from 1 to 14 days (median 6 days . The ileum (51.5% and sigmoid colon (22.1% was the most common portions of the bowel affected. Resection and anastomosis with uterine repair was the most common (86.8% surgical procedure performed. Complication and mortality rates were 47.1% and 10.3% respectively. According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, gestational age at termination of pregnancy, delayed presentation, delayed surgical treatment and presence of complications were significantly associated with mortality (P Conclusion Bowel perforation following

  10. [Spontaneous and induced abortion: feelings experienced by men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Márcia Melo Laet; Hoga, Luiza Akiko Komura

    2006-01-01

    The insertion of male perspective in reproductive health is an international recommendation. The aim of this research was to know the men's feelings related to the abortion shared with their partners. The narrative analysis was the research method. The narratives of seventeen men were analysed. The spontaneous abortion related feelings were the loss related anguish and, the provoked abortion, the culpability related feelings and its consequences. Men who share the abortion experience with their partners require sensibility and professionals involvement. Their main care demands were related to the desire of favorable reception, to get emotional support as well as a whole and correct information about the process.

  11. Induced abortion and breast cancer: results from a population-based case control study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Qing; Li, Yu-Yan; Ren, Jing-Chao; Zhao, Rui; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Er-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether induced abortion (IA) increases breast cancer (BC) risk. A population-based case-control study was performed from Dec, 2000 to November, 2004 in Shanghai, China, where IA could be verified through the family planning network and client medical records. Structured questionnaires were completed by 1,517 cases with primary invasive epithelial breast cancer and 1,573 controls frequency- matched to cases for age group. The information was supplemented and verified by the family planning records. Statistical analysis was conducted with SAS 9.0. After adjusting for potential confounders, induced abortions were not found to be associated with breast cancer with OR=0.94 (95%CI= 0.79-1.11). Compared to parous women without induced abortion, parous women with 3 or more times induced abortion (OR=0.66, 95%CI=0.46 to 0.95) and women with 3 or more times induced abortion after the first live birth (OR=0.66, 95%CI =0.45 to 0.97) showed a lower risk of breast cancer, after adjustment for age, level of education, annual income per capita, age at menarche, menopause, parity times, spontaneous abortion, age at first live birth, breast-feeding, oral contraceptives, hormones drug, breast disease, BMI, drinking alcohol, drinking tea, taking vitamin/calcium tablet, physical activity, vocation, history of breast cancer, eating the bean. The results suggest that a history of induced abortions may not increase the risk of breast cancer.

  12. Recourse to induced abortion among native and foreign women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth B.; Rasch, Vibeke; Gammeltoft, Tine

    A register-based study in Denmark covering 1994-1998 revealed higher rates of legally induced abortion among groups of immigrant/descendant women than among Danish women. To elucidate the development of induced abortion among Danes and non-Danes, the National Board of Health initiated studies...... on abortion. We conducted a study using a triangle of methods: register-based quantitative analyses, hospital-based questionnaires and in-depth qualitative interviews with a number of women (40). This paper presents primarily results from the register-based part of the study, analysing the rates of induced...

  13. Induced second trimester abortion and associated factors in Amhara region referral hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulat, Amlaku; Bayu, Hinsermu; Mellie, Habtamu; Alemu, Amare

    2015-01-01

    Although the vast majority of abortions are performed in the first trimester, still 10-15% of terminations of pregnancies have taken place in the second trimester period globally. As compared to first trimester, second trimester abortions are disproportionately contribute for maternal morbidity and mortality especially in low-resource countries where access to safe second trimester abortion is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and associated factors of induced second trimester abortion in Amhara region referral hospitals, northwest Ethiopia. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in Amhara region referral hospitals among 416 women who sought abortion services. Participants were selected using systematic sampling technique. Data were collected using pretested structured questionnaire through interviewing. After the data were entered and analyzed; variables which have P value effect with 95% CI and P value abortion was 19.2%. Being rural (AOR = 1.86 [95% CI = 1.11-3.14]), having irregular menstrual cycle (AOR = 1.76 [95% CI = 1.03-2.98]), not recognizing their pregnancy at early time (AOR = 2.05 [95% CI = 1.21-3.48]), and having logistics related problems (AOR = 2.37 [95% CI = 1.02-5.53]) were found to have statistically significant association with induced second trimester abortion. Induced second trimester abortion is high despite the availability of first trimester abortion services. Therefore, increase accessibility and availability of safe second trimester abortion services below referral level, counseling and logistical support are helpful to minimize late abortions.

  14. "My friend who bought it for me, she has had an abortion before." The influence of Ghanaian women's social networks in determining the pathway to induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rominski, Sarah D; Lori, Jody R; Morhe, Emmanuel Sk

    2017-07-01

    Even given the liberal abortion law in Ghana, abortion complications are a large contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality. This study sought to understand why young women seeking an abortion in a legally enabling environment chose to do this outside the formal healthcare system. Women being treated for complications arising from a self-induced abortion as well as for elective abortions at three hospitals in Ghana were interviewed. Community-based focus groups were held with women as well as men, separately. Interviews and focus group discussions were conducted until saturation was reached. A total of 18 women seeking care for complications from a self-induced abortion and 11 seeking care for an elective abortion interviewed. The women ranged in age from 13 to 35 years. There were eight focus groups; two with men and six with women. The reasons women self-induce are: (1) abortion is illegal; (2) attitudes of the healthcare workers; (3) keeping the pregnancy a secret; and (4) social network influence. The meta-theme of normalisation of self-inducing' an abortion was identified. When women are faced with an unplanned and unwanted pregnancy, they consult individuals in their social network whom they know have dealt with a similar situation. Misoprostol is widely available in Ghanaian cities and is successful at inducing an abortion for many women. In this way, self-inducing abortions using medication procured from pharmacists and chemical sellers has become normalised for women in Kumasi, Ghana. © Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. [Personal experiences with induced abortions in private clinics in Northeast Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Paloma; McCallum, Cecilia; Menezes, Greice

    2016-02-01

    Based on a qualitative study conducted in 2012, the article analyzes middle-class individuals' experiences with induced abortions performed in private clinics. Thirty-four stories of induced abortions were narrated by 19 women and five men living in two state capitals in Northeast Brazil. Thematic analysis revealed differences in types of clinics and care provided by the physicians. The article shows that abortion in private clinics fails to guarantee safe or humane care. The narratives furnish descriptions of diverse situations and practices, ranging from flaws such as lack of information on medicines to others involving severe abuses like procedures performed without anesthesia. The article concludes that criminalization of abortion in Brazil allows clinics to operate with no state regulation; it does not prevent women from having abortions, but exposes them to total vulnerability and violation of human rights.

  16. The role of men in induced abortion decision making in an urban area of the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirz, Alanna E; Avila, Josephine L; Gipson, Jessica D

    2017-09-01

    To understand beliefs about unintended pregnancy and abortion, and perceptions about male roles related to pregnancy decision-making among men in the Philippines. Qualitative data were collected during in-depth interviews and focus group discussions with men in an urban area of the Philippines between October 2007 and July 2008. Interview participants were purposively sampled from a local survey based on their having reported being "afraid or troubled" or "afraid and planned to terminate" in response to a recent pregnancy. Focus group participants were selected from the same communities. Data were analyzed using the constant comparative method. In-depth interview data from 15 men-each interviewed twice-and five focus group discussions were included. Male interview participants reported feeling morally responsible for the pregnancy and as wanting to avoid the "sin" of induced abortion; however, they were concerned about being able to support a family financially. Participants expressed resentment towards partners who attempted or completed an induced abortion without their knowledge. In such cases, men would disparage their partner and cease interacting with them to avoid the "sin" of induced abortion. Participants described negative feelings towards women seeking induced abortions, and their own desire to avoid associated "sin". This highlights the effects of unintended pregnancy and induced abortion on young Filipino men, including their own experience of abortion stigma. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  17. Social Determinants and Access to Induced Abortion in Burkina Faso: From Two Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramatou Ouédraogo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsafe abortion constitutes a major public health problem in Burkina Faso and concerns mainly young women. The legal restriction and social stigma make abortions most often clandestine and risky for women who decide to terminate a pregnancy. However, the exposure to the risk of unsafe induced abortion is not the same for all the women who faced unwanted pregnancy and decide to have an abortion. Drawn from a qualitative study on the issue of abortion in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso’s capital, the contrasting cases of two young women who had abortion allow us to show how the women’s personal resources (such as the school level, financial resources, the compliance to social norms, the social network, etc. may determine the degree of vulnerability of women, the delay to have an abortion, the type of care they are likely to benefit from, and the cost they have to face. This study concludes that the poorest always pay more (cost and consequences, take longer to have an abortion, and have more exposure to the risk of unsafe abortion.

  18. Illegal induced abortion: a study of 74 cases in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonofua, F E; Onwudiegwu, U; Odunsi, O A

    1992-04-01

    Seventy-four women with complications of induced abortion were studied prospectively at the Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria. Twenty of the women were interviewed privately to elicit confidential information and also to determine their attitudes to contraception and to the Nigerian national abortion law. The results showed that abortion is prevalent in all classes of women and in married as well as unmarried women. There were 13 maternal deaths, accounting for 35% of the maternal mortality in the hospital during the period. Sepsis was the most common cause of death, and most of the abortions complicated by sepsis had been performed by medical practitioners. Interviews with the women revealed that most of them had knowledge of contraception but were unwilling to use it because of wrong information. Most women did not know that abortion is illegal in Nigeria, but felt that it should be. Measures that could be of value in reducing abortion-associated maternal mortality in Nigeria include training and retraining of physicians in the management of abortion and of abortion complications, family planning education of all fertile women, provision of confidential family planning services and liberalization of the abortion law.

  19. Social determinants and access to induced abortion in burkina faso: from two case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouédraogo, Ramatou; Sundby, Johanne

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion constitutes a major public health problem in Burkina Faso and concerns mainly young women. The legal restriction and social stigma make abortions most often clandestine and risky for women who decide to terminate a pregnancy. However, the exposure to the risk of unsafe induced abortion is not the same for all the women who faced unwanted pregnancy and decide to have an abortion. Drawn from a qualitative study on the issue of abortion in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso's capital, the contrasting cases of two young women who had abortion allow us to show how the women's personal resources (such as the school level, financial resources, the compliance to social norms, the social network, etc.) may determine the degree of vulnerability of women, the delay to have an abortion, the type of care they are likely to benefit from, and the cost they have to face. This study concludes that the poorest always pay more (cost and consequences), take longer to have an abortion, and have more exposure to the risk of unsafe abortion.

  20. First-time first-trimester induced abortion and risk of readmission to a psychiatric hospital in women with a history of treated mental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk-Olsen, Trine; Laursen, Thomas Munk; Pedersen, Carsten B; Lidegaard, Ojvind; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2012-02-01

    Mental health problems are associated with women's reproductive decisions and predict poor mental health outcomes after abortion and childbirth. To study whether having a first-trimester induced abortion influenced the risk of psychiatric readmission and compare findings with readmission risk in women with mental disorders giving birth. Survival analyses were performed in a population-based cohort study merging data from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Register from January 1,1994, to December 31, 2007. Denmark. All women born in Denmark between 1962 and 1992 with a record of 1 or more psychiatric admissions at least 9 months before a first-time first-trimester induced abortion or childbirth. Main Outcome Measure  Readmission at a psychiatric hospital with any type of mental disorder from 9 months before to 12 months after a first-time first-trimester induced abortion or childbirth. Relative risk (RR) for readmission risk 9 to 0 months before a first-trimester induced abortion was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.73-1.23) compared with the first year after the abortion. This contrasts with a reduced risk of readmission before childbirth (RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.42-0.75) compared with the first year post partum. Proximity to previous psychiatric admission in particular predicted rehospitalization risks in both the abortion and the childbirth group. Risk of readmission is similar before and after first-time first-trimester abortion, contrasting with a marked increased in risk of readmission post partum. We speculate that recent psychiatric episodes may influence women's decisions to have an induced abortion; however, this decision does not appear to influence the illness course in women with a history of treated mental disorders.

  1. Pattern and Outcome of Induced Abortion in Abakaliki, Southeast of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Even contraceptive counseling to help women avoid a future unwanted pregnancy is often unavailable. The cost ... experience, professional level of the provider, place at which abortion was procured and duration of ..... beneficial to teens and adolescents who are major victims of unsafe abortion. In all cases, women should ...

  2. Maternal Deaths from Induced Abortions | Adefuye | Tropical Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Unsafe abortion has grave implications for the life of a woman and her future reproductive career. Efforts to find the reasons underlying how a woman gets to the point of having an unsafe abortion, and means of preventing and minimising complications arising thereby are highly desirable. Objective: To find the ...

  3. Association between childhood psychosocial factors and induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Venla; Sourander, Andre; Polo-Kantola, Päivi; Sillanmäki, Lauri; Tamminen, Tuula; Kumpulainen, Kirsti

    2013-02-01

    To examine the predictive associations between psychosocial risk factors in childhood and having an abortion in adolescence or young adulthood. This study is based on a nationwide cohort consisting of 2867 girls born in Finland in 1981. The baseline assessment was conducted at age eight by three informants, and it included information on psychiatric symptoms, school performance and family related risk factors. Register-based follow-up data on abortions were collected until the end of the year when the participants turned 28 years. They were available for 2694 participants. Cox proportional hazards model and logistic regression model were used for statistical analysis. Altogether 357 women (13.3%) had had an abortion for other than medical reasons during the follow-up. Of the childhood factors, a high level of conduct problems, poor school performance, family structure other than two biological parents, and mother with a low level of education were independently associated with having an abortion. Comparison of the strength of associations between childhood risk factors and first abortion under the age of 20 versus first abortion at a later age, showed no significant differences. Neither did the comparison between one and more abortions. At age eight there are already psychosocial factors which predict later abortion. This finding needs to be considered when targeting preventive interventions and developing sexual health services. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Induced abortion in immigrant women in a urban setting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmusi, Davide; Pérez, Glòria

    2009-12-01

    Given the new reality of foreign immigration in Barcelona, the aim is to describe the rate of legal abortion in the city in the years 2005 and 2006 according to women's place of origin. The rates of legal abortion of women residing in Barcelona were computed by country of origin and age group, grouping 2005 and 2006 and using data from the abortions register and the municipal continuous register. Immigrant women from developing countries had a combined abortion rate of 25.4 per 1,000 women of 15-49 years, surpassing that of native women (8.9 per 1,000). The relationship is maintained in all age groups. Rates vary substantially between countries (range 5.8-82.0). In Barcelona, immigrant women from disadvantaged countries have the highest rates of abortion. Socioeconomic level and knowledge and practices in the use of contraception could generate these differences.

  5. Pathways and consequences of unsafe abortion: a comparison among women with complications after induced and spontaneous abortions in Madhya Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sushanta K; Andersen, Kathryn L; Warvadekar, Janardan

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to understand women's pathways of seeking care for postabortion complications in Madhya Pradesh, India. The study recruited 786 women between July and November 2007. Data were collected on service provision, abortion-related complications, care-seeking behavior, knowledge about abortion legality and availability, methods used, symptoms, referral source, and out-of-pocket costs. Women seeking care for complications from induced abortion followed more complex pathways to treatment than women with complications of spontaneous abortion. More complex pathways were associated with higher out-of-pocket costs. Improving community awareness on legal aspects, safe abortion methods, and trained providers are necessary to reduce morbidity associated with unsafe abortion. Copyright © 2012 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A mapping of the positions of adults in Toulouse, France, regarding induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Sastre, Maria Teresa; Petitfils, Charlotte; Sorum, Paul Clay; Mullet, Etienne

    2015-06-01

    Are people's views on abortion as polarised as is suggested by the 'marches for life' that regularly take place in Paris and other capitals? Objective To map French people's positions regarding the acceptability of induced abortion. One hundred and fifty-nine participants were presented with stories composed according to a three within-subject design: Reason for abortion (e.g., the woman's life is endangered) × Gestational age × Woman's age. They assessed the extent to which abortion would be, in each case, an acceptable medical/surgical procedure. Five qualitatively different positions were identified: (i) always acceptable, irrespective of circumstances (31% of the sample), (ii) strictly depends on the reason for abortion (27%), (iii) legalist (23%), (iv) depends on the reason and on the gestational age (18%), and (v) always unacceptable (1%). Only one-fifth of the participants agreed with the part of the French law that permits abortion on request when gestational age does not exceed ten weeks. The others disagreed either because they thought that abortion on demand should never be permitted or because they thought that the age limit should be extended. This divide in people's opinions guarantees that the debate over induced abortions will continue.

  7. A maternal death from self-induced medical abortion: a call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdzuli, Nino; Pestvenidze, Ekaterine; Lomia, Nino; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2017-10-01

    In Georgia, which has a longstanding, liberalised abortion law, the abortion procedure is generally safe if it is performed in a medical facility. However, when socioeconomic barriers prevent women from seeking safe abortion services, some risk their life by self-terminating an unintended pregnancy. We present a case of maternal mortality after a self-induced medical abortion, with the aim to investigate the underlying non-clinical causes of maternal death and the relevant policy implications. A 34-year-old socially vulnerable woman self-administered 10 tablets of oral misoprostol to terminate an 18-week pregnancy. She expelled the fetus the following day. A week later, she developed excessive vaginal bleeding, difficulty in breathing and tachycardia. She was hospitalised and diagnosed with sepsis due to a retained placenta. Uterine curettage and aggressive conservative management, followed by total abdominal hysterectomy, failed to stop the fulminant septic process. The patient's condition deteriorated rapidly and she died 15 h after admission to hospital. Socially disadvantaged women in Georgia have limited access to safe abortion services, and some are impelled to self-induce abortion in order to terminate an unintended pregnancy. Inclusion of family planning and abortion services in the Universal Health Care benefits package for socially vulnerable families may reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with unsafe abortion practices.

  8. Induced abortion and breast cancer among parous women: a Danish cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braüner, Christina Marie; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Attermann, Jørn

    2013-06-01

    We investigated whether induced abortion is associated with breast cancer when lifestyle confounders, including smoking and alcohol consumption, are adjusted for. Design. Prospective cohort study. Danish women from the Diet, Cancer and Health study. A total of 25,576 women. We obtained exposure data from baseline questionnaires filled in by the women between 1993 and 1997. Information on breast cancer and emigration was retrieved from Danish national registries. The study power was approximately 85% when applying a minimum detection hazard ratio of 1.2. Long-term effects of induced abortion on the risk of breast cancer among women above 50 years of age. During a follow up of approximately 12 years, 1215 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. When comparing parous women who had an abortion with parous women who never had an abortion, there was no association between breast cancer risk and induced abortion (ever vs. never), with a hazard ratio 0.95 (95% confidence interval 0.83-1.09), regardless of whether the abortion occurred before the first birth (hazard ratio 0.86; 95% confidence interval 0.65-1.14), or after the first birth (hazard ratio 0.97; 95% confidence interval 0.84-1.13). Our study did not show evidence of an association between induced abortion and breast cancer risk. © 2013 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Induced abortion and intimate relationship quality in the Chicago Health and Social Life Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, P K; Rue, V M; Coyle, C T

    2009-04-01

    To examine associations between abortion and relationship functioning. Independent variables included abortion in a previous relationship and abortion in a current relationship. Perceptions of quality-of-life changes associated with terminating the relationship, conflict, aggressiveness and sexual dysfunction were the outcome measures. Data were derived from interviews with an ethnically diverse urban sample of men (n=658) and women (n=906). Surveys were conducted in person using computer-assisted personal interview technology by the National Opinion Research Center affiliated with the University of Chicago, USA. For men and women, the experience of an abortion in a previous relationship was related to negative outcomes in the current relationship; perceptions of improved quality of life if the current relationship also ended and intimate partner violence. Experience of an abortion within a current relationship was associated with 116% and 196% increased risk of arguing about children for women and men, respectively. Among females, experience of an abortion within a current relationship was associated with increased risk for various forms of sexual dysfunction (122-182%), increased risk of arguments about money (75%), increased risk of conflict about the partner's relatives (80%), and increased risk of arguing about the respondent's relatives (99%). Men whose current partners had experienced an abortion were more likely to report jealousy (96% greater risk) and conflict about drugs (385% greater risk). Abortion may play a vital role in understanding the aetiology of relationship problems.

  10. Triangular assessment of the etiology of induced abortion in iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghi, Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Shariati, Mohammad; Yunesian, Masud

    2013-11-01

    About 46 million induced abortions occur in the world annually. The studies have reported 80000 cases of induced abortions in Iran annually. This qualitative study was conducted to identify the causes of unsafe abortion in Iran from the standpoint of three groups of experts, women with a history of abortion or unwanted pregnancy and service providers. A total of 72 in-depth semi structured interviews were conducted in 2012 in Tehran and Shahroud. After coordination with 8 experts, sampling from them was done using the Snowballing method in their offices. Sampling from 28 married and 10 engaged women with a history of unwanted pregnancy or unsafe abortion and 12 providers was done in health care centers and a in number of gynecologists' and midwives' offices. Sampling from women with a history of unwanted pregnancy or unsafe abortion such as single women, HIV positive women and drug users, and women who had sexual intercourse for money was started by referring to the social rehabilitation center for women and continued using the snowballing method due to difficulties in accessing them. Participants were from different ethnic groups including Fars, Gilaks, Mazandarani, Arab, Azerbaijani, and Lor. Content analysis was performed on collected data. BASED ON THE RESULTS OF THE INTERVIEWS, PARTICIPANTS HAVE ABORTION FOR FOLLOWING REASONS: 1. Wanted pregnancy (sub categories: fetal abnormalities, Concern about fetal health and lack of trust to prenatal diagnostic methods, Fetal sex, Lack of independent and free decision making regarding pregnancy in women, 2. Unwanted pregnancy (sub-categories: Socio-economic factors, Beliefs and feelings, Lack of information about family planning) 3. Predisposing factors (sub-categories: Lack of information on religious aspects of abortion, Easy access to easy abortion methods). Some people, despite having unwanted pregnancy due to social, economic, cultural and family grounds, continued their pregnancy and did not have an abortion for

  11. Sexual history and contraception among women with induced and spontaneous abortion in Dar es Salaam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Mary, V; Urassa, E

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create sexual history profiles of women with illegally induced abortion (IA) and women with spontaneous abortion (SA) and describe the women's knowledge of, attitude to, and practice of contraception. The study was carried out in two settings, Temeke District...... the rate of ever users of contraception was low in both groups, although significantly lower among IA women than among SA women. Outcome of first pregnancy had been an induced abortion in significantly higher proportion of IA than of SA women. In conclusion, sexual intercourse before marriage is common...

  12. United States aid policy and induced abortion in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendavid, Eran; Avila, Patrick; Miller, Grant

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether the Mexico City Policy, a United States government policy that prohibits funding to nongovernmental organizations performing or promoting abortion, was associated with the induced abortion rate in sub-Saharan Africa. Women in 20 African countries who had induced abortions between 1994 and 2008 were identified in Demographic and Health Surveys. A country's exposure to the Mexico City Policy was considered high (or low) if its per capita assistance from the United States for family planning and reproductive health was above (or below) the median among study countries before the policy's reinstatement in 2001. Using logistic regression and a difference-in-difference design, the authors estimated the differential change in the odds of having an induced abortion among women in high exposure countries relative to low exposure countries when the policy was reinstated. The study included 261,116 women aged 15 to 44 years. A comparison of 1994-2000 with 2001-2008 revealed an adjusted odds ratio for induced abortion of 2.55 for high-exposure countries versus low-exposure countries under the policy (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.76-3.71). There was a relative decline in the use of modern contraceptives in the high-exposure countries over the same time period. The induced abortion rate in sub-Saharan Africa rose in high-exposure countries relative to low-exposure countries when the Mexico City Policy was reintroduced. Reduced financial support for family planning may have led women to substitute abortion for contraception. Regardless of one's views about abortion, the findings may have important implications for public policies governing abortion.

  13. Estimating the costs of induced abortion in Uganda: A model-based analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The demand for induced abortions in Uganda is high despite legal and moral proscriptions. Abortion seekers usually go to illegal, hidden clinics where procedures are performed in unhygienic environments by under-trained practitioners. These abortions, which are usually unsafe, lead to a high rate of severe complications and use of substantial, scarce healthcare resources. This study was performed to estimate the costs associated with induced abortions in Uganda. Methods A decision tree was developed to represent the consequences of induced abortion and estimate the costs of an average case. Data were obtained from a primary chart abstraction study, an on-going prospective study, and the published literature. Societal costs, direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs, indirect (productivity) costs, costs to patients, and costs to the government were estimated. Monte Carlo simulation was used to account for uncertainty. Results The average societal cost per induced abortion (95% credibility range) was $177 ($140-$223). This is equivalent to $64 million in annual national costs. Of this, the average direct medical cost was $65 ($49-86) and the average direct non-medical cost was $19 ($16-$23). The average indirect cost was $92 ($57-$139). Patients incurred $62 ($46-$83) on average while government incurred $14 ($10-$20) on average. Conclusion Induced abortions are associated with substantial costs in Uganda and patients incur the bulk of the healthcare costs. This reinforces the case made by other researchers--that efforts by the government to reduce unsafe abortions by increasing contraceptive coverage or providing safe, legal abortions are critical. PMID:22145859

  14. Estimating the costs of induced abortion in Uganda: a model-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babigumira, Joseph B; Stergachis, Andy; Veenstra, David L; Gardner, Jacqueline S; Ngonzi, Joseph; Mukasa-Kivunike, Peter; Garrison, Louis P

    2011-12-06

    The demand for induced abortions in Uganda is high despite legal and moral proscriptions. Abortion seekers usually go to illegal, hidden clinics where procedures are performed in unhygienic environments by under-trained practitioners. These abortions, which are usually unsafe, lead to a high rate of severe complications and use of substantial, scarce healthcare resources. This study was performed to estimate the costs associated with induced abortions in Uganda. A decision tree was developed to represent the consequences of induced abortion and estimate the costs of an average case. Data were obtained from a primary chart abstraction study, an on-going prospective study, and the published literature. Societal costs, direct medical costs, direct non-medical costs, indirect (productivity) costs, costs to patients, and costs to the government were estimated. Monte Carlo simulation was used to account for uncertainty. The average societal cost per induced abortion (95% credibility range) was $177 ($140-$223). This is equivalent to $64 million in annual national costs. Of this, the average direct medical cost was $65 ($49-86) and the average direct non-medical cost was $19 ($16-$23). The average indirect cost was $92 ($57-$139). Patients incurred $62 ($46-$83) on average while government incurred $14 ($10-$20) on average. Induced abortions are associated with substantial costs in Uganda and patients incur the bulk of the healthcare costs. This reinforces the case made by other researchers--that efforts by the government to reduce unsafe abortions by increasing contraceptive coverage or providing safe, legal abortions are critical.

  15. [Ultrasonographic view and women's behaviour before first-trimester induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendittelli, F; Lachcar, P

    2004-11-01

    Women's behaviour before induced abortion during an ultrasonographic exam was described. A psychosomatic analysis was carried out in the discussion to try to explain the different women's attitudes. Most women do not want to see ultrasonographic scan or keep photographs. One must of course respect women's choices as to their desire to see or not the ultrasound image of their foetus when pre-induced abortion ultrasound examination is performed. One should nonetheless be able to listen to their request, be it implicit.

  16. The effects of programs of birth control education on the practice of induced abortion in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figa-talamanca, I

    1970-01-01

    The impact of family planning education on abortion in Japan is discussed. At the present time, Japan has a low birthrate (18.5% population) and a low death rate (7.1% population) which allows an annual average 1% natural increase rate. The birthrate has been halved in 30 years. Although it is a common assertion that Japan solved its population problem by induced abortion, this view is both inaccurate and a simplification of the actual demographic situation. There are at least 3 important demographic factors that contributed to the reduction of the Japanese fertility: 1) the decline of the age-specific fertility among married women achieved by birth control methods, including abortion; 2) emigration, especially from the rural areas; and 3) the change in the marriage pattern of the population. The present family planning movement was started in the 1920s by the socialists and the leaders of the labor movement, but the government discouraged the movement and continued the strong pronatalist policy. After World War II, the Eugenic Protection Law was enacted in 1948. In 1951, as a result of the increasing numbers of reported induced abortions, the government officially disapproved of induced abortion as a usual means of birth control and endorsed an official plan to promote conception control. From 1950 to 1965, women using contraceptive methods increased from 19.5% to 51.9%. From 1950 to 1965, women who had experienced induced abortion decreased from 35.6% to 29.7%. But during that period, the percentage of women who had experienced induced abortion fluctuated up and down. In fact, induced abortions have been on the upswing since 1961. Having no data on the rate of illegal induced abortion, the observed reduction of abortion in favor of contraception is always open to alternative explanations in addition to the family planning programs. It appears that there has been a greater impact of family planning education in cities than in rural areas. Early reduction of the

  17. [Induced abortion--a doctor's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierer, O

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, the medical community has sided against abortion. However, over the past century there has been a change in this stance. This paper will explore the position of the physician and the medical community in regards to abortion. From the physician's perspective, is there not a conflict between performing an abortion and the physician's duty to save life? Does the physician not feel some hypocrisy in working to save some fetuses and aborting others? The issue of abortion can also lead to the question of what the physician's obligations are; is he or she obligated to the woman and her best interests or to the principle of upholding life? Another discussion will be devoted to abortion in Israel and the factors affecting the decision making process of the "Abortion Committees". Members of these committees weigh issues that are not expressed forthrightly in the law, such as the social situation of the pregnant woman under consideration. Furthermore, the physician's outlook and even conscience can sway his or her decision in some cases. A review committee set up by the Ministry of Health found that in many cases in which abortion was permitted, there was no legal back up for the decision. That is to say, in some cases there was found to be no correlation between the decision and the legal guidelines set out. In light of this, the committee made a number of recommendations. One of these recommendations was that in cases that permission for an abortion was granted based on a reasonable concern for the welfare of the mother or fetus, this decision should be based on medical evidence that there was in fact danger to the mother or fetus.

  18. Contraceptive attitudes and contraceptive failure among women requesting induced abortion in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Knudsen, L B; Gammeltoft, T

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To elucidate how contraceptive attitudes among Danish-born and immigrant women influence the request of induced abortion. METHODS: A case-control study, the case group comprising 1095 Danish-born women and 233 immigrant women requesting abortion, in comparison with a control group...... lacking knowledge had a 6-fold increased odds ratio (OR) and women having experienced problems a 5-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Further, in this group of women, a partner's negative attitude towards contraception was associated with an 8-fold increased OR for requesting abortion...... of 1295 pregnant women intending to give birth. The analysis used hospital-based questionnaire interviews. RESULTS: Lack of contraceptive knowledge and experience of contraceptive problems were associated with the choice of abortion. This association was most pronounced among immigrant women, where women...

  19. Contraceptive attitudes and contraceptive failure among women requesting induced abortion in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Knudsen, Lisbeth B.; Gammeltoft, Tine

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate how contraceptive attitudes among Danish-born and immigrant women influence the request of induced abortion. Method: A case-control study, the case group comprising 1,095 Danish-born women and 233 immigrant women requesting abortion, in comparison with a control group of 1...... experienced problems a five-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Further, in this group of women, a partner's negative attitude toward contraception was associated with an eight-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Contraceptive failure was prevalent; 21% of the women who did not plan to become......,295 pregnant women intending to give birth. Results: Lack of contraceptive knowledge and experience of contraceptive problems were associated with the choice of abortion. This association was most pronounced among immigrant women, where women lacking knowledge had a six-fold increased OR and women having...

  20. Pathological findings in equine herpesvirus 9-induced abortion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Habashi, N; El-Nahass, E; Haridy, M; Nayel, M; Abdelaziz, A A; Fukushi, H; Kuroda, K; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2014-11-01

    Pregnant rats were infected experimentally with equine herpesvirus (EHV)-9, a new neurotropic equine herpesvirus serologically similar to EHV-1, during the first and third trimesters. The inoculated dams had mild to severe neurological signs and gave birth to dead fetuses or undersized pups. Rats inoculated during the first and last trimesters had varying degrees of encephalitis as well as abnormalities of the placentas in the form of marked dilation of maternal blood sinusoids and varying degrees of atrophy and necrosis of the trophoblast cells of the labyrinth, the spongiotrophoblasts and the giant cell layer. Virus antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry in the brain and the trophoblast cells of labyrinth, the spongiotrophoblasts and giant cell layer of the placenta in rats inoculated during the first trimester. Virus antigen was detected in fetuses from rats inoculated in the first and last trimesters. Virus DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the placenta and fetuses of inoculated rats. EHV-9 may induce fetal death and abortion in pregnant dams, possibly caused by direct EHV-9 infection of the placenta and/or fetus as well as the secondary effect of vascular injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Induced Abortion among Chinese Women with Living Child-A National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Han, Jingnan; Donovan, Connor; Ali, Gholam; Xu, Tan; Zheng, Yumei; Sun, Wenjie

    2017-01-01

    Objective Induced abortion is widely practiced in China. However, the information on induced abortion is limited. A national cross-sectional survey was designed to determine the risk factors of induced abortion among Chinese women with one child. Methods We sampled 16,881 Chinese women with one living child for the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect induced abortion and related health information. The National Research Institute for Family Planning of China conducted a cross-sectional study among women who had delivered a baby between 2006 and 2008. Information was collected in relation to demographic characteristics (age, ethnicity, region, area etc.), social economic status (education level and occupation), marriage, and the attitude towards potential child’s gender. Multi-logistic regression was used to test potential predictors for conducting abortion stratified by consistency between gender preference and current infants’ gender, and indicating adjusted estimation on selected models of risk factors for abortion. Results The mean age of participants was 27.96 ± 4.10 years (median 27 years). Among those women, the prevalence of induced abortion was 8.13 %. In the final model, females living in rural areas (OR = 1.21, 95 %CI: 1.04–1.39), individuals ages 18–25 (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72–0.99), individuals ages 30 or older (OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.42–1.86), and single individuals (OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.05–2.83) were more likely to experience induced abortion. Wife gender preference (OR = 0.66, 95 %CI: 0.53–0.83), husband gender preference (Boy: OR = 1.33, 95 %CI: 1.10–1.63; Girl: OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.22–1.86), and the area where the individuals were located were significantly associated with the reporting of induced abortion. Conclusion The prevalence of induced abortion is high among married women with child in China. There are also socio-demographic characteristics associated with induced abortion in China. PMID:28845482

  2. Induced Abortion among Chinese Women with Living Child-A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Han, Jingnan; Donovan, Connor; Ali, Gholam; Xu, Tan; Zheng, Yumei; Sun, Wenjie

    2017-01-01

    Induced abortion is widely practiced in China. However, the information on induced abortion is limited. A national cross-sectional survey was designed to determine the risk factors of induced abortion among Chinese women with one child. We sampled 16,881 Chinese women with one living child for the study. A structured questionnaire was used to collect induced abortion and related health information. The National Research Institute for Family Planning of China conducted a cross-sectional study among women who had delivered a baby between 2006 and 2008. Information was collected in relation to demographic characteristics (age, ethnicity, region, area etc.), social economic status (education level and occupation), marriage, and the attitude towards potential child's gender. Multi-logistic regression was used to test potential predictors for conducting abortion stratified by consistency between gender preference and current infants' gender, and indicating adjusted estimation on selected models of risk factors for abortion. The mean age of participants was 27.96 ± 4.10 years (median 27 years). Among those women, the prevalence of induced abortion was 8.13 %. In the final model, females living in rural areas (OR = 1.21, 95 %CI: 1.04-1.39), individuals ages 18-25 (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.72-0.99), individuals ages 30 or older (OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 1.42-1.86), and single individuals (OR = 1.72, 95% CI: 1.05-2.83) were more likely to experience induced abortion. Wife gender preference (OR = 0.66, 95 %CI: 0.53-0.83), husband gender preference (Boy: OR = 1.33, 95 %CI: 1.10-1.63; Girl: OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.22-1.86), and the area where the individuals were located were significantly associated with the reporting of induced abortion. The prevalence of induced abortion is high among married women with child in China. There are also socio-demographic characteristics associated with induced abortion in China.

  3. Mortality of induced abortion, other outpatient surgical procedures and common activities in the United States.

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    Raymond, Elizabeth G; Grossman, Daniel; Weaver, Mark A; Toti, Stephanie; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-11-01

    The recent surge of new legislation regulating induced abortion in the United States is ostensibly motivated by the desire to protect women's health. To provide context for interpreting the risk of abortion, we compared abortion-related mortality to mortality associated with other outpatient surgical procedures and selected nonmedical activities. We calculated the abortion-related mortality rate during 2000-2009 using national data. We searched PubMed and other sources for contemporaneous data on mortality associated with other outpatient procedures commonly performed on healthy young women, marathon running, bicycling and driving. The abortion-related mortality rate in 2000-2009 in the United States was 0.7 per 100,000 abortions. Studies in approximately the same years found mortality rates of 0.8-1.7 deaths per 100,000 plastic surgery procedures, 0-1.7deaths per 100,000 dental procedures, 0.6-1.2 deaths per 100,000 marathons run and at least 4 deaths among 100,000 cyclists in a large annual bicycling event. The traffic fatality rate per 758 vehicle miles traveled by passenger cars in the United States in 2007-2011 was about equal to the abortion-related mortality rate. The safety of induced abortion as practiced in the United States for the past decade met or exceeded expectations for outpatient surgical procedures and compared favorably to that of two common nonmedical voluntary activities. The new legislation restricting abortion is unnecessary; indeed, by reducing the geographic distribution of abortion providers and requiring women to travel farther for the procedure, these laws are potentially detrimental to women's health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Fatal ectopic pregnancy after attempted legally induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, G L; Cates, W; Gold, J; Rochat, R W; Tyler, C W

    1980-10-10

    From 1973 through 1978, the Center for Disease Control identified ten deaths caused by ruptured ectopic pregnancy after attempted legal abortions for those pregnancies. The women ranged in age from 18 to 31 years, seven were black, three were white, and five were nulliparous. The estimated gestational age was 16 menstrual weeks or earlier. In seven cases tissue obtained at abortion was sent for outside microscopic pathological examination; attempts to contact four of the patients when no products of conception were found were unsuccessful. An important factor in preventing fatal ectopic pregnancy for women who have legal abortions is the identification of products of conception at the time of the abortion procedure while the patient is still available for reexamination and recurretage.

  5. The association and a potential pathway between gender-based violence and induced abortion in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Nguyen, Son Van; Nguyen, Manh Quang; Nguyen, Nam Truong; Keithly, Sarah Colleen; Mai, Lan Tran; Luong, Loan Thi Thu; Pham, Hoa Quynh

    2012-11-29

    Gender-based violence (GBV) has profound adverse consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. Although Vietnam has high rates of induced abortion and GBV, literature examining this relationship is lacking. This study examines the association of GBV with induced abortion among married or partnered women of reproductive age in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. In addition, we explore contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy as mediators in the pathway between GBV and induced abortion. Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 1,281 women aged 18-49 years in four districts of Thai Nguyen province. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between lifetime history of GBV, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy, induced abortion, and repeat abortion, controlling for other covariates. One-third of respondents had undergone induced abortion in their lifetime (33.4%), and 11.5% reported having repeat abortions. The prevalence of any type of GBV was 29.1% (17.0% physical violence, 10.4% sexual violence, and 20.1% emotional violence). History of GBV was associated with induced abortion (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.20-2.16) and repeat abortion (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.48-3.32). Physical violence was significantly associated with induced abortion, and all three types of violence were associated with repeat abortion. Abused women were more likely than non-abused women to report using contraceptives and having an unintended pregnancy, and these factors were in turn associated with increased risk of induced abortion. GBV is pervasive in Thai Nguyen province and is linked to increased risks of induced abortion and repeat abortion. The findings suggest that a pathway underlying this relationship is increased risk of unintended pregnancy due in part to ineffective use of contraceptives. These findings emphasize the importance of screening and identification of GBV and incorporating women's empowerment in

  6. Management of early pregnancy failure and induced abortion by family medicine educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbitter, Cara; Bennett, Ariana; Schubert, Finn D; Bennett, Ian M; Gold, Marji

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive health care, including treatment of early pregnancy failure (EPF) and induced abortion, is an integral part of patient-centered care provided by family physicians, but data suggest that comprehensive training is not widely available to family medicine residents. The purpose of this study was to assess EPF and induced abortion management practices and attitudes of family medicine physician educators throughout the United States and Canada. These data were collected as part of a cross-sectional survey conducted by the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance that was distributed via E-mail to 3152 practicing physician members of Council of Academic Family Medicine organizations. The vast majority of respondents (88.2%) had treated EPF, whereas few respondents (15.3%) had provided induced medication or aspiration abortions. Of those who had treated EPF, most had offered medication management (72.7%), whereas a minority had provided aspiration management (16.4%). Almost all respondents (95%) agreed that EPF management is within the scope of family medicine, and nearly three-quarters (73.2%) agreed that early induced abortion is within the scope of family medicine. Our findings suggest that family physician educators are more experienced with EPF management than elective abortion. Given the overlap of skills needed for provision of these services, there is the potential to increase the number of family physician faculty members providing induced abortions.

  7. Marmara University Medical Students’ Perception on Sexual Violence against Women and Induced Abortion in Turkey

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    Nimet Emel Lüleci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Historically, sexual assault is a common issue in Turkey. As doctors are one of the steps to help sexually assaulted women, medical students should have basic knowledge of and sensitivity regarding this subject. Another common women’s public health issue is induced abortion. In countries where access to abortion is restricted, there is a tendency towards unhealthy abortion. Aims: The aims of this study are: (1 to determine the attitudes and opinions of Marmara University Medical Faculty students about sexual assault against women and induced abortion and (2 to propose an educational program for medical students about sexual assault and abortion. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The questionnaires were self-administered and the data were analyzed using SPSS v.15.0. First, the descriptive statistics were analyzed, followed by Chi-square for contingency tests assessing differences in attitudes toward sexual assault and induced abortion by factors such as gender and educational term. Differences were considered statistically significant at p0.05. Although there was no significant difference regarding the extent of punishment by victim’s status as a virgin, 21.3% (n=63 agreed that punishment should be more severe when the victim was a virgin. About 40.7% (n=120 agreed that the legal period of abortion in Turkey (10 weeks should be longer. The majority (86.1%, n=255 agreed that legally prohibiting abortions causes an increase in unhealthy abortions. Conclusion: An educational program on these issues should be developed for medical students.

  8. [Is it possible to obtain reliable information about the long-term effects of induced abortion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Grete Alræk; Løkeland, Mette; Fjereide, Anneli Katrine; Bjørge, Line; Iversen, Ole-Erik

    2012-06-26

    The psychological long-term effects of an induced abortion are the subject of constant debate, but the scientific basis of experience is limited and by no means unambiguous. We wanted to study how a random selection of women felt about pre-agreed follow-up studies after an induced abortion. All abortion patients who attended the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at Haukeland University Hospital during a three-month period received a questionnaire. They were asked if they would be willing to be contacted in writing with questions about long-term effects 1-2 years and 5-10 years after the intervention, and to give reasons for their decisions by setting crosses in the multiple choice responses that were listed. During the period of the study, 300 abortions were carried out at the department. Questionnaires were distributed to 227 of these patients, and 181 (80 %) of them were included. 43 % of the women in the study agreed to take part in a questionnaire survey concerning the long-term effects, if any, of induced abortion 1-2 years after the intervention, and 35 % 5-10 years afterwards. It appears that it may be difficult to study the psychological long-term effects of induced abortion by means of questionnaire surveys. Our results indicate that the percentage of participants in long-term studies would be too low, and hence not representative of the group as a whole.

  9. Association between perceived social support and induced abortion: A study in maternal health centers in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Siancas, Luis E; Rodríguez-Medina, Angélica; Piscoya, Alejandro; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the association between perceived social support and induced abortion among young women in Lima, Peru. In addition, prevalence and incidence of induced abortion was estimated. A cross-sectional study enrolling women aged 18-25 years from maternal health centers in Southern Lima, Peru, was conducted. Induced abortion was defined as the difference between the total number of pregnancies ended in abortion and the number of spontaneous abortions; whereas perceived social support was assessed using the DUKE-UNC scale. Prevalence and incidence of induced abortion (per 100 person-years risk) was estimated, and the association of interest was evaluated using Poisson regression models with robust variance. A total of 298 women were enrolled, mean age 21.7 (± 2.2) years. Low levels of social support were found in 43.6% (95%CI 38.0%-49.3%), and 17.4% (95%CI: 13.1%- 21.8%) women reported at least one induced abortion. The incidence of induced abortion was 2.37 (95%CI: 1.81-3.11) per 100 person-years risk. The multivariable model showed evidence of the association between low perceived social support and induced abortion (RR = 1.94; 95%CI: 1.14-3.30) after controlling for confounders. There was evidence of an association between low perceived social support and induced abortion among women aged 18 to 25 years. Incidence of induced abortion was similar or even greater than rates of countries where abortion is legal. Strategies to increase social support and reduce induced abortion rates are needed.

  10. Clandestine induced abortion: prevalence, incidence and risk factors among women in a Latin American country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio; White, Peter J; Carcamo, Cesar P; Hughes, James P; Gonzales, Marco A; Garcia, Patricia J; Garnett, Geoff P; Holmes, King K

    2009-02-03

    Clandestine induced abortions are a public health problem in many developing countries where access to abortion services is legally restricted. We estimated the prevalence and incidence of, and risk factors for, clandestine induced abortions in a Latin American country. We conducted a large population-based survey of women aged 18-29 years in 20 cities in Peru. We asked questions about their history of spontaneous and induced abortions, using techniques to encourage disclosure. Of 8242 eligible women, 7992 (97.0%) agreed to participate. The prevalence of reported induced abortions was 11.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.9%-12.4%) among the 7962 women who participated in the survey. It was 13.6% (95% CI 12.8%-14.5%) among the 6559 women who reported having been sexually active. The annual incidence of induced abortion was 3.1% (95% CI 2.9%-3.3%) among the women who had ever been sexually active. In the multivariable analysis, risk factors for induced abortion were higher age at the time of the survey (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% CI 1.07-1.15), lower age at first sexual intercourse (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.84-0.91), geographic region (highlands: OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.23-1.97; jungle: OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.41-2.31 [v. coastal region]), having children (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.68-0.98), having more than 1 sexual partner in lifetime (2 partners: OR 1.61, 95% CI 1.23-2.09; > or = 3 partners: OR 2.79, 95% CI 2.12-3.67), and having 1 or more sexual partners in the year before the survey (1 partner: OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.01-1.72; > or = 2 partners: OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.14-2.02). Overall, 49.0% (95% CI 47.6%-50.3%) of the women who reported being currently sexually active were not using contraception. The incidence of clandestine, potentially unsafe induced abortion in Peru is as high as or higher than the rates in many countries where induced abortion is legal and safe. The provision of contraception and safer-sex education to those who require it needs to be greatly improved and could potentially

  11. [Estimating the frequency of induced abortion: a comparison of two methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinto, Maria Teresa Anselmo; Moreira Filho, Djalma de Carvalho

    2004-05-01

    To compare two methods-the "ballot box" method and the "indirect questioning" method-for estimating the frequency of induced abortions in population-based studies. A cross-sectional population-based study was conducted with a representative sample of 3 002 women between 15 and 49 years of age living in the city of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The women were selected through multistage sampling and randomly assigned to answer questions concerning induced abortion with one of the two methods, after they had answered a general questionnaire that collected socioeconomic and demographic information. With the "ballot box" method, women received a small piece of paper containing direct questions on abortion. Each woman marked her answers on the paper and then deposited it into a small "ballot box" carried by the interviewer, thus assuring the confidentiality of the responses. With the second method, the interviewer verbally asked the woman a series of questions that indirectly inquired about abortion. Among the women assigned to the ballot box method, 7.2% reported having induced at least one abortion, versus 3.8% of the women assigned to the indirect questioning method. The ratio between the two methods was 1.89 (95% confidence interval: 1.39 to 2.60; P abortion in their lifetime. Among the women who answered using the ballot box method, the main reasons they gave for having had an abortion were economic difficulties, being too young, and being single. Approximately half of the women responding to the ballot box method questions reported they had used unsafe procedures to induce abortion, with 13% of them using misoprostol. The ballot box method was suitable for studying the frequency of induced abortion and for researching other topics that may lead to underreporting by the persons interviewed, especially in population-based samples. Rephrasing the ballot box method question about abortion (for example, eliminating the word "child") would probably increase the

  12. [Reasons and meanings attributed by women who experienced induced abortion: an integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Sandra Elisa; Santos, Evanguelia Kotzias Atherino Dos; Velho, Manuela Beatriz; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini; Rodriguez, Maria de Jesus Hernandes

    2015-06-01

    Identifying the contribution of developed research on what motivates women to induce an abortion and the meaning attributed to these experiences in their lives. An integrative review conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS, BDENF, CINAHL and SciELO databases, covering the periods from 2001 to 2011. We selected and analyzed 11 studies with selection criteria being reasons given by women for inducing abortion and/or the meaning attributed to this experience in their lives, including social, religious, ethical and moral aspects related to this practice, as well as the suffering experienced from the experience. The illegality of abortion is identified as a risk factor for unsafe abortions, reaffirming this issue as a public health and social justice problem. Results evidence aspects that can contribute to improving health quality and ratify the importance of research to support nursing practices.

  13. Reasons and meanings attributed by women who experienced induced abortion: an integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Elisa Sell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Identifying the contribution of developed research on what motivates women to induce an abortion and the meaning attributed to these experiences in their lives. METHOD An integrative review conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed, LILACS, BDENF, CINAHL and SciELO databases, covering the periods from 2001 to 2011. RESULTS We selected and analyzed 11 studies with selection criteria being reasons given by women for inducing abortion and/or the meaning attributed to this experience in their lives, including social, religious, ethical and moral aspects related to this practice, as well as the suffering experienced from the experience. The illegality of abortion is identified as a risk factor for unsafe abortions, reaffirming this issue as a public health and social justice problem. CONCLUSION Results evidence aspects that can contribute to improving health quality and ratify the importance of research to support nursing practices.

  14. Reproductive outcomes following induced abortion: a national register-based cohort study in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Lowit, Alison; Bhattacharya, Sohinee; Raja, Edwin Amalraj; Lee, Amanda Jane; Mahmood, Tahir; Templeton, Allan

    2012-01-01

    To investigate reproductive outcomes in women following induced abortion (IA). Retrospective cohort study. Hospital admissions between 1981 and 2007 in Scotland. Data were extracted on all women who had an IA, a miscarriage or a live birth from the Scottish Morbidity Records. A total of 120 033, 457 477 and 47 355 women with a documented second pregnancy following an IA, live birth and miscarriage, respectively, were identified. Obstetric and perinatal outcomes, especially preterm delivery in a second ongoing pregnancy following an IA, were compared with those in primigravidae, as well as those who had a miscarriage or live birth in their first pregnancy. Outcomes after surgical and medical termination as well as after one or more consecutive IAs were compared. IA in a first pregnancy increased the risk of spontaneous preterm birth compared with that in primigravidae (adjusted RR (adj. RR) 1.37, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.42) or women with an initial live birth (adj. RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.58 to 1.74) but not in comparison with women with a previous miscarriage (adj. RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.79 to 0.91). Surgical abortion increased the risk of spontaneous preterm birth compared with medical abortion (adj. RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.45). The adjusted RRs (95% CI) for spontaneous preterm delivery following two, three and four consecutive IAs were 0.94 (0.81 to 1.10), 1.06 (0.76 to 1.47) and 0.92 (0.53 to 1.61), respectively. The risk of preterm birth after IA is lower than that after miscarriage but higher than that in a first pregnancy or after a previous live birth. This risk is not increased further in women who undergo two or more consecutive IAs. Surgical abortion appears to be associated with an increased risk of spontaneous preterm birth in comparison with medical termination of pregnancy. Medical termination was not associated with an increased risk of preterm delivery compared to primigravidae.

  15. Abortion surveillance--United States, 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Sonya B; Strauss, Lilo T; Parker, Wilda Y; Cook, Douglas A; Zane, Suzanne B; Hamdan, Saeed

    2008-11-28

    reported since 1995, the number of abortions has steadily declined over the previous 10 years. The abortion rate declined from 1995 to 2000, but remained unchanged since 2000. In 2004, as in the previous years, deaths related to legal induced abortions occurred rarely. Abortion surveillance in the United States continues to provide the data necessary for examining trends in numbers and characteristics of women who obtain legal induced abortions and to increase understanding of this pregnancy outcome. Policymakers and program planners use these data to improve the health and well-being of women and evaluate efforts to prevent unintended pregnancies.

  16. Induced abortion ratio in modern Sweden falls with age, but rises again before menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullberg, B S.; Lummaa, V

    2001-01-01

    A woman's reproductive value decreases over her reproductive life span and it is therefore predicted that the likelihood of termination of investment in a child decreases with increasing age. An eventual increase in termination ratio in the oldest age groups, as is often found in abortion statistics, could depend on older women on average having larger families rather than on age per se. We used data on abortions and births in Sweden during 1994 to investigate how abortion ratio is related to age and parity of women. We found that age-specific abortion ratio is U-shaped (i.e. that it is highest for the youngest and for the oldest age groups) in each parity class from zero to four children but that age-dependence breaks down in higher parity classes (5, >/=6). Thus, for each of the parity classes 0-4, the incidence of abortion decreases with age up to a point, but increases again as women approach menopause. This late increase in induced abortion ratio seems to depend on age per se. The data indicate that abortion ratio is an inverse function of fertility, and that investment in new reproduction gradually decreases as a woman approaches menopause. Assuming grandmothering as an important driving force in human life history evolution, such a pattern might indicate that the transition from behavioural investment in one's own children to one's grandchildren is a gradual process similar to the decline in ovarian function.

  17. Contraceptive attitudes and contraceptive failure among women requesting induced abortion in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Knudsen, L B; Gammeltoft, T; Christensen, J T; Erenbjerg, M; Christensen, J J Platz; Sorensen, J B

    2007-05-01

    To elucidate how contraceptive attitudes among Danish-born and immigrant women influence the request of induced abortion. A case-control study, the case group comprising 1095 Danish-born women and 233 immigrant women requesting abortion, in comparison with a control group of 1295 pregnant women intending to give birth. The analysis used hospital-based questionnaire interviews. Lack of contraceptive knowledge and experience of contraceptive problems were associated with the choice of abortion. This association was most pronounced among immigrant women, where women lacking knowledge had a 6-fold increased odds ratio (OR) and women having experienced problems a 5-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Further, in this group of women, a partner's negative attitude towards contraception was associated with an 8-fold increased OR for requesting abortion. Contraceptive failure was prevalent; 21% of the women who did not plan to become pregnant but intended to give birth had experienced contraceptive failure. The same applied, respectively, for 45% of the Danish-born women and 36% of immigrant women, who requested abortion. Women who had experienced contraceptive failure were significantly more likely to request abortion. Immigrant women seem to have more difficulties in using contraception than Danish-born women. To address this problem, there is a need for culturally sensitive information campaigns targeting this heterogonous group of women.

  18. Induced Abortion: Risk Factors for Adolescent Female Students, a Brazilian Study

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    Divanise S. Correia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze risk factors for abortion among female teenagers from 12 to 19 years of age in the city of Maceió, Brazil. This is a cross-sectional study, conducted in ten schools. The sample was calculated by considering the number of admissions for postabortion curettage, obtained from the Information System of Hospitalization. Data were obtained through a semi-structured questionnaire divided into three basic blocks of data: sociodemographic, sexual life, and pregnancy/abortion. To analyze the data, the logistic regression model was used. The Forward Method was chosen to set the final model that minimizes the number of variables and maximizes the accuracy of the model. The significant analysis between the dichotomous variables provided eight significant variables. Two of them are protective for abortion: the ages 12-14 years and talking with parents about sex. After the logistic regression, the receipt of support for abortion was the most significant variable of all. The adolescent with an active sexual life, a previous pregnancy, who is married, and has received support for an abortion has a 99.74% probability for an abortion. The results of this study, demonstrating the importance of the group in adolescence, and the statistical significance of having a partner to support and approve the pregnancy appears as a preventive factor for abortion. It shows the importance of support and companionship for adolescent women.

  19. Evaluation of the Prevalence, Reasons and Consequences of Induced Abortion in Women of Ardabil in 2011

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    Roya Motavalli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Induced and unhealthy abortion is common condition in the worldwide, particularly in developing countries as Iran which accompanies with maternal mortality and morbidity. The aim of this study was to obtain the prevalence, risk factors and complications of induced abortion.   Methods : A retrospective study was conducted in 1200 women, who referred to health centers of Ardabil. The eligible participants were included by random sampling. We used a prepared questionnaire with questions on demographic characteristics, pregnancy history and contraception methods. To determine the validity and reliability of questionnaire the content validity and re-test methods were used respectively. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS software (pakage 16 using t-test and chi-square.   Results: The prevalence of induced abortion was 8.3%. The main reason was represented having desired number of children. Other reasons were economic hardship situation, low pregnancy interval, undesirable fetus gender, parents age, academic education and occupation of mother and increased duration of being married (p<0.0001. The complication of induced abortion were vaginal bleeding (70/5%, bleeding and infection (7/4%, and hospitalization (49/5%.   Conclusion: According to the results of this research it is expected that authorities and health personnel detect the high risk group of society and present necessary education and individual consultations to more awareness and change their attitude and beliefs on acute complication resulted from induced abortion.

  20. Determinantes del retraso de la interrupción voluntaria del embarazo Determinants of induced abortion delay

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    Laia Font-Ribera

    2009-10-01

    -sectional study of induced abortions due to the physical or mental health of the woman (Barcelona, 2004-2005; N=9,175. The city's induced abortion register provided data on gestational age at abortion (dependent variable, educational level, age, cohabitation with the partner, number of children previous abortions, and type of center. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR were calculated with log-binomial regression models. Results: A total of 7.7% of induced abortions were second-trimester abortions and 99.3% were performed in private centers. Compared with women with a university education, those with primary education or less had an aPR of 1.8 (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 1.4-2.2 of delaying the abortion until the second trimester. A higher proportion of second-trimester abortions were also recorded in women aged less than 18 years old (aPR=2.6; 95%CI: 2.0-3.4, women not cohabiting with their partners (aRP=1.4; 95% CI: 1.2-1.6 and in public centers (aPR=2.8; 95% CI: 2.2-3.7. No differences were found in induced abortion delay among women with previous abortions and those without. Conclusion: Induced abortion delay until the second trimester of pregnancy was associated with low educational level, young ages, not cohabiting with a partner, and public centers. This study demonstrates the existence of socioeconomic inequalities in access conditions to abortion services.

  1. Linking two opposites of pregnancy loss: Induced abortion and infertility in Yoruba society, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Winny

    2010-11-01

    Involuntary infertility and induced abortion exist on opposite sides of the spectrum: the first being the unwanted loss of childbearing potential while the second is the intentional termination of pregnancy. However, this paper proposes that these two poles of pregnancy loss are in fact related in Yoruba society, Nigeria. This argument is supported by qualitative and quantitative data drawn from an applied research project in communities and health institutions of Lagos State, from 1996 to 1999, where a total of 693 women recounted 1114 personal abortion experiences, and 233 women shared their experiences of fertility problems. Study statistics show that 37% of secondary infertility was most probably the result of induced abortion and that half of women with abortion complications interviewed in a referral hospital will have fertility problems. This paper provides insight into the reasons why single and married women decide to abort, and use unsafe methods, despite awareness of the serious health risks, including infertility. This is paradoxical given that fear of infertility is a major reason why women do not use modern contraceptives when trying to prevent unwanted pregnancy. By analysing the relations between infertility and abortion within the socio-cultural, economic, and services-related structures that influence women's decisions, this paper suggests ways of addressing the problems related to both types of pregnancy loss. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Knowledge and attitudes of medical students on decriminalized induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero-Roa, Eliana M; Ochoa-Vera, Miguel E

    2015-12-01

    Objective To explore if the academic exposure to legal abortion affects the knowledge and attitudes of medical students. Method To asses this relationship, both qualitative and quantitative approaches were performed. We analyzed a medical student cohort enrolled in gynecology and obstetrics at two accredited universities in Bucaramanga, Colombia during the second half of 2011. Students were invited to participate in two anonymous surveys. One survey was conducted in the first three weeks of the semester, and the second was done in the last three weeks. A quantitative approach was taken by a group interview of two random groups of participants. One group was composed of medical students of gynecology and obstetrics (fourth year of medicine), and the other group was composed of medical students in their last year (internal medical students). Results The items pregnancy with risk to the mother´s life, or affected by a non-viable fetal malformation, or result of rape were recognized and accepted. 46% of the participants changed their attitude about legal abortion at the end of the semester. Three out of every four participants changed their attitude to accept the decriminalized conditions, while one out of every four people had the opposite change of opinion. Medical student´s don´t believe that general practitioners are trained to advice patients in these cases. Conclusions Educating and training general practitioners in issues related to legal abortion may decrease the risk of inadequate medical assessment in cases of legal abortion.

  3. Induced abortion among HIV-positive women in Northern Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Tine; Rasch, Vibeke; Nguyen Thi, Thuy Hanh

    2010-01-01

    an abortion after being diagnosed as HIV-positive, exploring their reflections, concerns and dilemmas. The results show that the HIV-positive pregnant women sought to balance their desires for a child with their worries of being unable to fulfill their responsibilities as mothers. Even while strongly desiring...

  4. Induced Abortion in Nigeria | Lamina | East African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Participants felt that there was high prevalence of unwanted pregnancy and abortion particularly among youths. They had high level of awareness of contraceptives and attributed its low use to negative side-effects, high cost and provider bias. More Christians than Muslims favoured planning of pregnancies.

  5. The Estimated Incidence of Induced Abortion in Ethiopia, 2014: Changes in the Provision of Services Since 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ann M.; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Fetters, Tamara; Wado, Yohannes Dibaba; Bankole, Akinrinola; Singh, Susheela; Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Getachew, Yonas

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT In 2005, Ethiopia’s parliament amended the penal code to expand the circumstances in which abortion is legal. Although the country has expanded access to abortion and postabortion care, the last estimates of abortion incidence date from 2008. METHODS Data were collected in 2014 from a nationally representative sample of 822 facilities that provide abortion or postabortion care, and from 82 key informants knowledgeable about abortion services in Ethiopia. The Abortion Incidence Complications Methodology and the Prospective Morbidity Methodology were used to estimate the incidence of abortion in Ethiopia and assess trends since 2008. RESULTS An estimated 620,300 induced abortions were performed in Ethiopia in 2014. The annual abortion rate was 28 per 1,000 women aged 15–49, an increase from 22 per 1,000 in 2008, and was highest in urban regions (Addis Ababa, Dire Dawa and Harari). Between 2008 and 2014, the proportion of abortions occurring in facilities rose from 27% to 53%, and the number of such abortions increased substantially; nonetheless, an estimated 294,100 abortions occurred outside of health facilities in 2014. The number of women receiving treatment for complications from induced abortion nearly doubled between 2008 and 2014, from 52,600 to 103,600. Thirty-eight percent of pregnancies were unintended in 2014, a slight decline from 42% in 2008. CONCLUSIONS Although the increases in the number of women obtaining legal abortions and postabortion care are consistent with improvements in women’s access to health care, a substantial number of abortions continue to occur outside of health facilities, a reality that must be addressed. PMID:28825902

  6. Medical Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin; Guilbert, Edith; Bernardin, Jeanne; Black, Amanda; Dunn, Sheila; Fitzsimmons, Brian; Norman, Wendy V; Pymar, Helen; Soon, Judith; Trouton, Konia; Wagner, Marie-Soleil; Wiebe, Ellen; Gold, Karen; Murray, Marie-Ève; Winikoff, Beverly; Reeves, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    This guideline reviews the evidence relating to the provision of first-trimester medical induced abortion, including patient eligibility, counselling, and consent; evidence-based regimens; and special considerations for clinicians providing medical abortion care. Gynaecologists, family physicians, registered nurses, midwives, residents, and other healthcare providers who currently or intend to provide pregnancy options counselling, medical abortion care, or family planning services. Women with an unintended first trimester pregnancy. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed, MEDLINE, and Cochrane Library between July 2015 and November 2015 using appropriately controlled vocabulary (MeSH search terms: Induced Abortion, Medical Abortion, Mifepristone, Misoprostol, Methotrexate). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, clinical trials, and observational studies published from June 1986 to November 2015 in English. Additionally, existing guidelines from other countries were consulted for review. A grey literature search was not required. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force for Preventive Medicine rating scale (Table 1). Medical abortion is safe and effective. Complications from medical abortion are rare. Access and costs will be dependent on provincial and territorial funding for combination mifepristone/misoprostol and provider availability. Introduction Pre-procedure care Medical abortion regimens Providing medical abortion Post-abortion care Introduction Pre-procedure care Medical abortion regimens Providing medical abortion Post-abortion care. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Overestimation of the ocurrence of induced abortions in Colombia and other Latinoamerican countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Bravo, Miguel; Gatica, Sebastián; Stecher, Juan F; Aracena, Paula; Valenzuela, Sergio; Ahlers, Ivonne

    2012-05-01

    Recently, the Guttmacher Institute estimated a number of 400,400 clandestine abortions for Colombia. Because of the strong implications that such brief could have in different areas of interest, a full revision of the methodology of estimation was performed. The methodology used by the Guttmacher Institute was as follows: first, the authors estimated the losses from spontaneous and induced abortions from the opinion of 289 subjects who work in an equal number of Colombian health institutions through the opinion survey entitled "Health Facilities Survey". Subsequently, an expansive multiplier (x3, x4, x5, etc.) was applied to the numbers obtained by this survey that also emerges from a subjective opinion of another 102 respondents of the "Health Professional Survey" selected by convenience. There is no objective data based on real vital events, the whole estimate is based on imagining/numbers underlying mere opinions. Even as public opinion survey, the sampling technique introduced serious selection bias in the gathering of information. Valid epidemiological methods using standardized rates, choosing the paradigmatic cases of Chile and Spain as standard populations, it was observed that Guttmacher Institute methodology overestimates more than 9 times the complications due to induced abortion in hospital discharges and more than 18 times the total number of induced abortions. In other Latin American countries where the same methodology was applied including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Peru, Guatemala, and Dominican Republic, the number of induced abortions was also largely overestimated. These results call for caution with this type of reports that alarm public opinion.

  8. Induced abortion, pregnancy loss and intimate partner violence in Tanzania: a population based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stöckl Heidi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Violence by an intimate partner is increasingly recognized as an important public and reproductive health issue. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence is associated with induced abortion and pregnancy loss from other causes and to compare this with other, more commonly recognized explanatory factors. Methods This study analyzes the data of the Tanzania section of the WHO Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence, a large population-based cross-sectional survey of women of reproductive age in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya, Tanzania, conducted from 2001 to 2002. All women who answered positively to at least one of the questions about specific acts of physical or sexual violence committed by a partner towards her at any point in her life were considered to have experienced intimate partner violence. Associations between self reported induced abortion and pregnancy loss with intimate partner violence were analysed using multiple regression models. Results Lifetime physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence was reported by 41% and 56% of ever partnered, ever pregnant women in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya respectively. Among the ever pregnant, ever partnered women, 23% experienced involuntary pregnancy loss, while 7% reported induced abortion. Even after adjusting for other explanatory factors, women who experienced intimate partner violence were 1.6 (95%CI: 1.06,1.60 times more likely to report an pregnancy loss and 1.9 (95%CI: 1.30,2.89 times more likely to report an induced abortion. Intimate partner violence had a stronger influence on induced abortion and pregnancy loss than women's age, socio-economic status, and number of live born children. Conclusions Intimate partner violence is likely to be an important influence on levels of induced abortion and pregnancy loss in Tanzania. Preventing intimate partner violence may therefore be beneficial

  9. The pathway to induced abortion: women's experiences and general practitioner attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnie, Sarah; Foy, Robbie; Mather, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Secondary care services are struggling to manage demand for induced abortion, but less is known about what scope exists to improve the primary care of women requiring abortion. The study objective was to identify service-related delays and barriers faced by women seeking abortion care. The study comprised case note review and cross-sectional surveys conducted in South Durham in the North East of England, UK. We surveyed and reviewed the case notes of women attending two fertility control clinics. We also surveyed general practitioners (GPs) who referred women to these clinics. The outcomes were waiting times within the pathway to induced abortion, women's rating of care, GPs' attitudes and self-reported practice. Of 210 women surveyed, 132 (63%) responded. Of 107 referred by GPs, 16 (15%) had to make a second appointment with another GP willing to refer them and 34 (32%) waited two or more days to receive a date for their hospital appointment. The national standard waiting time of 3 weeks from first appointment with the referring doctor to the procedure was achieved for 56/127 women (44%; 95% CI, 35-53). Women rated global satisfaction, provision of information and staff interaction more highly in secondary than primary care. Of 170 GPs surveyed, 140 (82%) responded; 33 (24%) considered themselves 'broadly anti-abortion'. Women face delays in accessing induced abortion care, both before and after referral from primary care. Whilst scope exists for improving quality of care and access within present service configurations, alternative approaches that bypass traditional gatekeepers to abortion care should be evaluated.

  10. Prevention of infection after induced abortion: release date October 2010: SFP guideline 20102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, Sharon L; Reeves, Matthew F

    2011-04-01

    One known complication of induced abortion is upper genital tract infection, which is relatively uncommon in the current era of safe, legal abortion. Currently, rates of upper genital tract infection in the setting of legal induced abortion in the United States are generally less than 1%. Randomized controlled trials support the use of prophylactic antibiotics for surgical abortion in the first trimester. For medical abortion, treatment-dose antibiotics may lower the risk of serious infection. However, the number-needed-to-treat is high. Consequently, the balance of risk and benefits warrants further investigation. Perioperative oral doxycycline given up to 12 h before a surgical abortion appears to effectively reduce infectious risk. Antibiotics that are continued after the procedure for extended durations meet the definition for a treatment regimen rather than a prophylactic regimen. Prophylactic efficacy of antibiotics begun after abortion has not been demonstrated in controlled trials. Thus, the current evidence supports pre-procedure but not post-procedure antibiotics for the purpose of prophylaxis. No controlled studies have examined the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis for induced surgical abortion beyond 15 weeks of gestation. The risk of infection is not altered when an intrauterine device is inserted immediately post-procedure. The presence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae or acute cervicitis carries a significant risk of upper genital tract infection; this risk is significantly reduced with antibiotic prophylaxis. Women with bacterial vaginosis (BV) also have an elevated risk of post-procedural infection as compared with women without BV; however, additional prophylactic antibiotics for women with known BV has not been shown to reduce their risk further than with use of typical pre-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis. Accordingly, evidence to support pre-procedure screening for BV is lacking. Neither povidone-iodine nor chlorhexidine have

  11. [Pregnancy termination in Bulgaria – past, present and future perspectives. Drugs induced abortion – guidelines by WHO].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, B; Andreeva, A

    2013-01-01

    There are still too many unsafe abortions performed worldwide. Together with the efforts to reduce the abortion by choice, we note a rise in the need for mid trimester pregnancy termination for medical reasons. The article looks at the past present and future perspective of the abortion as a procedure in Bulgaria. States the fact that medical abortion is officially not widely performed. We reckon that with the existing guidelines by WHO and with Mifepriston and Misoprostol recently registered in Bulgaria, it is time for the medical abortion to become part of the clinical practice in Bulgaria. We believe that early medical abortion as well as mid trimester induced abortion is and adequate if not better alternative to the existing in Bulgaria procedures.

  12. Access, equity and costs of induced abortion services in Australia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Mridula; Black, Kirsten I; Goldstone, Philip; Hussainy, Safeera; Mazza, Danielle; Petersen, Kerry; Lucke, Jayne; Taft, Angela

    2017-06-01

    To examine access and equity to induced abortion services in Australia, including factors associated with presenting beyond nine weeks gestation. Cross-sectional survey of 2,326 women aged 16+ years attending for an abortion at 14 Dr Marie clinics. Associations with later presentation assessed using multivariate logistic regression. Over a third of eligible women opted for a medical abortion. More than one in 10 (11.2%) stayed overnight. The median Medicare rebated upfront cost of a medical abortion was $560, compared to $470 for a surgical abortion at ≤9 weeks. Beyond 12 weeks, costs rose considerably. More than two-thirds (68.1%) received financial assistance from one or more sources. Women who travelled ≥4 hours (AdjOR: 3.0, 95%CI 1.2-7.3), had no prior knowledge of the medical option (AdjOR: 2.1, 95%CI 1.4-3.1), had difficulty paying (AdjOR: 1.5, 95%CI 1.2-1.9) and identified as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander (AdjOR: 2.1, 95%CI 1.2-3.4) were more likely to present ≥9 weeks. Abortion costs are substantial, increase at later gestations, and are a financial strain for many women. Poor knowledge, geographical and financial barriers restrict method choice. Implications for public health: Policy reform should focus on reducing costs and enhancing early access. © 2017 The Authors.

  13. Exploring the relationship between induced abortion and HIV infection in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Regina M; Pinho, Adriana A; Santos, Naila S; Villela, Wilza V

    2012-12-01

    The impact of HIV on the decision to interrupt pregnancy remains an understudied topic in Brazil and the world. The technical means to implement HIV prevention and treatment interventions are widely available in Brazil. Although Brazil has restrictive abortion laws, induced abortion occurs frequently. This qualitative study investigates the extent to which Brazilian women are motivated to seek abortion as a consequence of having HIV disease, and the extent to which the decision is part of a larger reproductive decision-making context. Researchers interviewed 30 women who were living with HIV and had terminated pregnancies or attempted to do so. Many women identified their HIV status as an important aspect of their decision-making regarding abortion. Women also took into account issues such as the stage of life when the pregnancy occurred and the absence of support from partners and families. Contraceptive practices, pregnancy and abortion in this population are influenced by multiple factors that act on the structural, social, interpersonal and individual levels. We hypothesize that HIV infection and abortion are sometimes associated with similar contexts of vulnerability. Health services therefore should address HIV and reproductive issues together, with reproductive and sexual rights serving as the fundamental basis of health care. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of interpregnancy interval after a mifepristone-induced abortion on neonatal outcomes in subsequent pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xiao-Xu; Gao, Er-Sheng; Cheng, Yi-Min; Luo, Lin; Liang, Hong; Huang, Guo-Ying; Miao, Mao-Hua; Yuan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluated effects of interpregnancy interval (IPI) on neonatal outcomes after mifepristone-induced abortion in the first pregnancy. This observational cohort study, conducted from 1998 to 2001 at antenatal clinics in Shanghai, Beijing, and Chengdu, China, included 4682 nulliparous women with one mifepristone-induced abortion in their first pregnancy, who were enrolled and followed up until delivery. We compared neonatal outcomes among women with different IPIs between their mifepristone-induced abortion and subsequent pregnancy. When compared to IPI of 18-24 months, there was an increased risk of the neonate being small for gestational age (SGA) [adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-3.88] when IPI was abortion (aOR: 2.49; 95% CI: 1.13-5.50). The associations between IPI and preterm delivery (abortion in first pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of SGA in the subsequent pregnancy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Induced abortion: Guidelines for clinical practice - Text of the Guidelines (short text)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayssière, C; Gaudineau, A; Attali, L; Bettahar, K; Eyraud, S; Faucher, P; Fournet, P; Hassoun, D; Hatchuel, M; Jamin, C; Letombe, B; Linet, T; Msika Razon, M; Ohanessian, A; Segain, H; Vigoureux, S; Winer, N; Wylomanski, S; Agostini, A

    2016-12-01

    Develop recommendations for the practice of induced abortion. The Pubmed database, the Cochrane Library and the recommendations from the French and foreign Gyn-Obs societies or colleges have been consulted. The number of induced abortions (IA) has been stable for several decades. There are a lot of factors explaining the choice of abortion when there is an unplanned pregnancy (UPP). Early initiation and choice of contraception in connection to the woman's life are associated with lower NSP. Reversible contraceptives of long duration of action should be positioned fist in line for the teenager because of its efficiency (grade C). Ultrasound before induced abortion must be encouraged but should not be obligatory before performing IA (Professional consensus). As soon as the sonographic apparition of the embryo, the estimated date of pregnancy is done by measuring the crown-rump length (CRL) or by measuring the biparietal diameter (BIP) from 11 weeks on (grade B). Reliability of these parameters being±5 days, IA could be done if measurements are respectively less than 90mm for CRL and less than 30mm for BIP (Professional consensus). A medical IA performed with a dose of 200mg mifepristone combined with misoprostol is effective at any gestational age (EL1). Before 7 weeks, mifepristone followed between 24 and 48hours by taking misoprostol orally, buccally sublingually or eventually vaginally at a dose of 400 ug possibly renewed after 3hours (EL1, grade A). Beyond 7 weeks, misoprostol given vaginally, sublingually or buccally are better tolerated with fewer side effects than oral route (EL1). It is recommended to always use a cervical preparation during an instrumental abortion (Professional consensus). Misoprostol is a first-line agent for cervical preparation at a dose of 400 mcg (grade A). Aspiration evacuation is preferable to curettage (grade B). A perforated uterus during an instrumental suction should not be considered as a scarred uterus (Professional

  16. Induced abortion in Nigeria: findings from focus group discussion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of them supported abortion if the education of the young girl would be disrupted, if paternity of pregnancy is in dispute, or if it would save the family from ... Ils avaient un niveau élevé de la connaissance des contraceptifs et ils ont attribué son faible utilisation aux effets secondaires, le coût élevé et le préjugé des ...

  17. Lifetime induced abortion: a comparison between women living and not living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecco, Flávia Bulegon; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Vigo, Alvaro; Dewey, Michael E; Knauth, Daniela Riva

    2014-01-01

    Studies aimed at understanding the association between induced abortion and HIV are scarce and differ on the direction of the association. This paper aims to show the prevalence of induced abortion in a sample of pregnancies of women living and not living with HIV/Aids, determining variables associated with pregnancy termination and linked to the life course of women and to the specific context of the pregnancy. Data came from a cross-sectional study, using interviewer-administered questionnaire, developed with women that attended public health services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. A generalized estimating equation model with logit link measured the association between determinants and abortion. The final sample was composed of 684 women living with HIV/Aids (2,039 pregnancies) and 639 women not living with HIV/Aids (1,539 pregnancies). The prevalence of induced abortion among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids was 6.5%, while in women not living with HIV/Aids was 2.9%. Among women living with HIV/Aids, the following were associated with induced abortion in the multivariable analysis: being older, having a higher education level, having had more sexual partners (i.e., variables linked to the life course of women), having had children prior to the index pregnancy and living with a sexual partner during pregnancy (i.e., variables linked to the context of each pregnancy). On the other hand, among women not living with HIV/Aids, only having a higher education level and having had more sexual partners (i.e., determinants linked to the life course of women) were associated with voluntary pregnancy termination in multivariable analysis. Although determinants are similar between women living and not living with HIV/Aids, prevalence of induced abortion is higher among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids, pointing to their greater social vulnerability and to the need for public policy to address prevention and treatment of HIV associated with reproductive issues.

  18. Birth outcomes after induced abortion: a nationwide register-based study of first births in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemetti, R; Gissler, M; Niinimäki, M; Hemminki, E

    2012-11-01

    Is the perinatal health of first-born children affected by the mother's previous induced abortion(s) (IAs)? Prior IAs, particularly repeat IAs, are correlated with an increased risk of some health problems at first birth; even in a country with good health care quality. A positive association between IA and risk of preterm birth or a dose-response effect has been found in some previous studies. Limited information and conflicting results on other infant outcomes are available. Nationwide register-based study including 300 858 first-time mothers during 1996-2008 in Finland. All the first-time mothers with a singleton birth (obtained from the Medical Birth Register) in the period 1996-2008 (n = 300 858) were linked to the Abortion Register for the period 1983-2008. Of the first-time mothers, 10.3% (n = 31 083) had one, 1.5% had two and 0.3% had three or more IAs. Most IAs were surgical (88%) performed before 12 weeks (91%) and carried out for social reasons (97%). After adjustment, perinatal deaths and very preterm birth (<28 gestational week) suggested worse outcomes after IA. Increased odds for very preterm birth were seen in all the subgroups and exhibited a dose-response relationship: 1.19 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.44] after one IA, 1.69 (1.14-2.51) after two and 2.78 (1.48-5.24) after three IAs. Increased odds for preterm birth (<37 weeks) and low birthweight (<2500 g and <1500 g) were seen only among mothers with three or more IAs: 1.35 (1.07-1.71), 1.43 (1.12-1.84) and 2.25 (1.43-3.52), respectively. Observational studies like ours, however large and well-controlled, will not prove causality. In terms of public health and practical implications, health education should contain information of the potential health hazards of repeat IAs, including very preterm birth and low birthweight in subsequent pregnancies. Health care professionals should be informed about the potential risks of repeat IAs on infant outcomes in subsequent pregnancy. National

  19. [Access to health care for an induced abortion: qualitative and quantitative approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajos, N; Moreau, C; Ferrand, M; Bouyer, J

    2003-12-01

    Despite recent studies showing evidence that the organisation of the French health care system raises some problems concerning access to abortion, far little is known on the reality of access conditions and the views of women on the difficulties they experience when they attend an abortion clinic. In this article, we discuss the complementarity of materials from two surveys one qualitative, the other quantitative in the study of patterns of care for an abortion. The qualitative survey included 51 women who reported a history of induced abortion, selected from a qualitative study on unintended pregnancy in France. The quantitative survey included 480 women, who had an abortion in the past 10 years. These women were selected from a representative sample of 2863 women aged 18 to 44, who participated in a study on contraception and abortion. The variety of patterns of care for an abortion, the rareness of dysfunctions in the health care system and the importance of the first professional women contacted, demonstrated in the qualitative survey, were confirmed in the quantitative survey. The quantitative survey enabled quantifying the distribution of the different patterns of care. It also permitted to identify factors associated with the choice of first professional contacted and with the type of subsequent patterns of care. The qualitative survey permitted to explore these patterns of care and to highlight the interaction between the women's request and the representation of the legitimacy of their request. Difficulties of access seemed to be linked to the lack of support women experienced in the process of finding an abortion clinic. Results suggest that general practitioners are less well informed of the procedures required for an abortion than other professionals. However, the qualitative survey also shows that problems of access cannot be reduced to the lack of information of professionals, as their practice was also linked to their own representation of abortion

  20. Triangular Assessment of the Etiology of Induced Abortion in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaghi, Zahra; Keramat, Afsaneh; Shariati, Mohammad; Yunesian, Masud

    2013-01-01

    Background About 46 million induced abortions occur in the world annually. The studies have reported 80000 cases of induced abortions in Iran annually. Objectives This qualitative study was conducted to identify the causes of unsafe abortion in Iran from the standpoint of three groups of experts, women with a history of abortion or unwanted pregnancy and service providers. Patients and Methods A total of 72 in-depth semi structured interviews were conducted in 2012 in Tehran and Shahroud. After coordination with 8 experts, sampling from them was done using the Snowballing method in their offices. Sampling from 28 married and 10 engaged women with a history of unwanted pregnancy or unsafe abortion and 12 providers was done in health care centers and a in number of gynecologists’ and midwives’ offices. Sampling from women with a history of unwanted pregnancy or unsafe abortion such as single women, HIV positive women and drug users, and women who had sexual intercourse for money was started by referring to the social rehabilitation center for women and continued using the snowballing method due to difficulties in accessing them. Participants were from different ethnic groups including Fars, Gilaks, Mazandarani, Arab, Azerbaijani, and Lor. Content analysis was performed on collected data. Results Based on the results of the interviews, participants have abortion for following reasons: 1. Wanted pregnancy (sub categories: fetal abnormalities, Concern about fetal health and lack of trust to prenatal diagnostic methods, Fetal sex, Lack of independent and free decision making regarding pregnancy in women, 2. Unwanted pregnancy (sub-categories: Socio-economic factors, Beliefs and feelings, Lack of information about family planning) 3. Predisposing factors (sub-categories: Lack of information on religious aspects of abortion, Easy access to easy abortion methods). Some people, despite having unwanted pregnancy due to social, economic, cultural and family grounds

  1. Sexual history and contraception among women with induced and spontaneous abortion in Dar es Salaam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Mary, V; Urassa, E

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create sexual history profiles of women with illegally induced abortion (IA) and women with spontaneous abortion (SA) and describe the women's knowledge of, attitude to, and practice of contraception. The study was carried out in two settings, Temeke District...... Hospital (TDH) and Muhimbili Medical Centre (MMC) in Dar es Salaam. At TDH 362/603 (60 per cent) were identified as IA and 241/603 (40 per cent) as SA. At MMC the figures were 68/220 (31 per cent) IA and 152/220 (69 per cent) SA. Both groups were well informed about modern contraception. As a contrast...... the rate of ever users of contraception was low in both groups, although significantly lower among IA women than among SA women. Outcome of first pregnancy had been an induced abortion in significantly higher proportion of IA than of SA women. In conclusion, sexual intercourse before marriage is common...

  2. Acceptance of induced abortion amongst medical students and physicians in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Rubén; Carnevale, Alessandra; Villa, Antonio R

    2006-01-01

    Abortion is illegal in most of Mexico, except in the case of rape or physical risk to the mother, but there are several indicators that suggest that at least in Mexico City, society would like to have a more liberal law. The present study was performed to learn what several groups of physicians and medical students residing outside of Mexico City think in this regard. Seven colleagues working in different cities agreed to apply a questionnaire to physicians and or medical students available to them, to learn their opinions regarding the acceptability of induced abortion in several scenarios. Questions one to tree inquires if abortion is acceptable up to week 20 of pregnancy at the simple request of the parents, if the fetus has a severe malformation or anencephaly. Questions four to six personalize the situations by supposing that the physician or spouse have a high risk of having a malformed child. Question seven asks if they would offer prenatal diagnosis to a mother who would abort a malformed fetus. Statistical procedure includes multivariate analysis. The inter-city physicians-students composition was very heterogeneous. The majority of respondents disagreed with abortion on demand of the parents, but clearly agrees to it in the presence of severe malformations. In general males, above 30 years old physicians and less religious individuals, are more in favor to abortion than their respective counterparts. The proportion of acceptance is over 70% in most cases. We believe that this work shows a preliminary indication of a national trend amongst physicians and medical students favoring induced early abortion if the fetus has a severe malformation.

  3. [A comparative study of effects of electroacupuncture with different stimulation parameters on medicine-induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang-xiao; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Jiang; He, Zhi-ping; Chen, Yan; Xu, Hong-yan; Liu, Yu-qi; Chen, Yin-ying

    2008-07-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) with different stimulation parameters on medicine-induced abortion. One hundred and nine cases of early pregnancy who asked medicine-induced abortion were allocated to an EA group A (n = 37), an EA group B (n = 38) and a medication group (n = 34). Within 30-60 min after oral administration of Misoprostol, in the EA group A, EA was given at bilateral Hegu (LI 4) and Sanyinjiao (SP 6) with cluster waves of 100 Hz and in the EA group B, EA was given at Hegu (LI 4) for 20 min and then at Sanyinjiao (SP 6) for 5 min with continuous waves of 50 Hz. EA was not given to the medication group. The complete abortion rate, duration of eliminating embryonic sac, colporrhagia lasting time and abdominal pain condition were recorded. The complete abortion rate was 91.9% in the EA group A and 86.8% in the EA group B, which were higher than 82.4% in the medication group, with no significant differences between the 3 groups (P>0.05); the duration of eliminating embryonic sac and the colporrhagia lasting time in the two EA groups were significantly shorter than those in the medication group (Peffects on abortion.

  4. [Analysis of nursing students' attitude toward bioethics (3). Attitude toward induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, O; Ishizaka, K; Mizutani, N

    1986-04-01

    Nursing students were found to be somewhat hesitant and indecisive about induced abortion in general. They are in favor of some cases of abortion but feel that it should be avoided if possible. They agree to abortion in cases of a mother's health being in danger and possible deformity of the child, but are opposed to it for such selfish reasons as parents' sex preference of their child and motherhood's interference with parents' study or career. They are most undecided about abortion because of financial difficulties since each case would be different. Quantitative analysis via computer was made of the results of a questionnaire given to 112 nursing students. The students were encouraged to give their candid opinion in exchange for their complete anonymity. They were asked to respond to the following reasons for having induced abortion by circling agree, somewhat agree, somewhat opposed, or opposed: 1) unexpected pregnancy at financially difficult times, 2) unwanted sex of fetus revealed by amniocentesis, 3) unwanted pregnancy with a possible hereditary disease 4) some disability of the child revealed by the fetal examination, 5) pregnancy due to rape, 6) pregnancy due to wife's adultery, 7) maternal health risk, 8) unwanted pregnancy, 9) teenage pregnancy (junior high age), 10) German measles contracted during the 1st trimester, 11) untimely pregnancy interfering with a woman's career or college studies, and 12) women's freedom of choice. Problems such as 2), 3), and 4) arose only because of advancement in medical technology, i.e., amniocentesis. Induced abortion because of unwanted sex of the fetus revealed by amniocentesis was the most clear-cut case of disapproval by nursing students.

  5. Prevalence and Correlates of Having a Regular Physician among Women Presenting for Induced Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chor, Julie; Hebert, Luciana E; Hasselbacher, Lee A; Whitaker, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and correlates of having a regular physician among women presenting for induced abortion. We conducted a retrospective review of women presenting to an urban, university-based family planning clinic for abortion between January 2008 and September 2011. We conducted bivariate analyses, comparing women with and without a regular physician, and multivariable regression modeling, to identify factors associated with not having a regular physician. Of 834 women, 521 (62.5%) had a regular physician and 313 (37.5%) did not. Women with a prior pregnancy, live birth, or spontaneous abortion were more likely than women without these experiences to have a regular physician. Women with a prior induced abortion were not more likely than women who had never had a prior induced abortion to have a regular physician. Compared with women younger than 18 years, women aged 18 to 26 years were less likely to have a physician (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.25; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10-0.62). Women with a prior live birth had increased odds of having a regular physician compared with women without a prior pregnancy (aOR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.13-3.16). Women without medical/fetal indications and who had not been victims of sexual assault (self-indicated) were less likely to report having a regular physician compared with women with medical/fetal indications (aOR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.17-0.82). The abortion visit is a point of contact with a large number of women without a regular physician and therefore provides an opportunity to integrate women into health care. Copyright © 2016 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Induced abortions and teenage births among asylum seekers in The Netherlands: analysis of national surveillance data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, Simone; Uitenbroek, Daan; Wijsen, Cecile; Stronks, Karien

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asylum seekers are assumed to be a vulnerable group with respect to sexual and reproductive health. The objective of this study was to quantify induced abortion and teenage birth indicators for this group. Methods: The population comprised all female asylum seekers aged 15-49 in The

  7. [Effect of short-acting combined oral contraceptives on bleeding after induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X F; Zhong, M; Liu, J

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To explore the effect of short-acting combined oral contraceptives on vaginal bleeding after induced abortion. Methods: A total of 726 patients, who had took induced abortion from July 2016 to September 2016 in obstetrics and gynecology outpatient department of Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, were included and divided into the observation group and the control group according to whether they took short-acting combined oral contraceptives after induced abortion, with 312 cases, 414 cases respectively.The vaginal bleeding days, amounts of bleeding, the endometrial thickness 3 weeks later, and whether the patient had menstrual recovery on time were observed and analyzed. Results: The observation group had less bleeding days and amount of bleeding, compared with the control group.69.87% (218/312) patients of the observation group had more than 8mm of endometrial thickness on postoperative day 21, while 61.11% (253/414) of the observation group did, the difference was statistically significant ( P =0.034).90.06% (281/312) patients of the observation group had menstrual recovery on time, while 82.61% (342/414) of the observation group did, the difference was statistically significant ( P =0.004). Conclusion: Short-acting combined oral contraceptives after induced abortion can significantly shorten the vaginal bleeding days, reduce the amount of bleeding, promote endometrial repair and menstrual recovery.There fore, it has important clinical significance and application value.

  8. Contraceptive knowledge and attitudes among women seeking induced abortion in Kathmandu, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berin, Emilia; Sundell, Micaela; Karki, Chanda; Brynhildsen, Jan; Hammar, Mats

    2014-01-01

    To map the knowledge about and attitudes toward birth control methods among women in Kathmandu, Nepal, and to compare the results between women seeking an induced abortion and a control group. This was a cross-sectional cohort study with matched controls. Women aged 15-49 years seeking medical care at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Kathmandu Medical College were included and interviewed. A case was defined as a woman who sought an elective medical or surgical abortion. A control was defined as a woman who sought medical care at the outpatient department or had already been admitted to the ward for reasons other than elective abortion. A questionnaire developed for the study - dealing with different demographic characteristics as well as knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives - was filled out based on the interview. A total of 153 women were included: 64 women seeking an abortion and 89 controls. Women seeking an abortion had been pregnant more times than the control group and were more likely to have been informed about contraceptives. Women with higher education were less likely to seek an abortion than women with lower education. There was no significant difference in knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives between cases and controls. The women considered highest possible effectiveness to be the most important feature when deciding on a birth control method. Women seeking abortion in Kathmandu had shorter education and a history of more pregnancies and deliveries than women in the control group. Education and counseling on sex and reproduction as well as on contraceptive methods probably need to be improved in Nepal to avoid unwanted pregnancies. Attitudes about contraceptives need to be further investigated to develop better and more effective methods to educate women about family planning in order to increase reproductive health.

  9. The association and a potential pathway between gender-based violence and induced abortion in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Hong Nguyen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gender-based violence (GBV has profound adverse consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. Although Vietnam has high rates of induced abortion and GBV, literature examining this relationship is lacking. Objective: This study examines the association of GBV with induced abortion among married or partnered women of reproductive age in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. In addition, we explore contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy as mediators in the pathway between GBV and induced abortion. Design and methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 1,281 women aged 18–49 years in four districts of Thai Nguyen province. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between lifetime history of GBV, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy, induced abortion, and repeat abortion, controlling for other covariates. Results: One-third of respondents had undergone induced abortion in their lifetime (33.4%, and 11.5% reported having repeat abortions. The prevalence of any type of GBV was 29.1% (17.0% physical violence, 10.4% sexual violence, and 20.1% emotional violence. History of GBV was associated with induced abortion (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.20–2.16 and repeat abortion (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.48–3.32. Physical violence was significantly associated with induced abortion, and all three types of violence were associated with repeat abortion. Abused women were more likely than non-abused women to report using contraceptives and having an unintended pregnancy, and these factors were in turn associated with increased risk of induced abortion. Conclusions: GBV is pervasive in Thai Nguyen province and is linked to increased risks of induced abortion and repeat abortion. The findings suggest that a pathway underlying this relationship is increased risk of unintended pregnancy due in part to ineffective use of contraceptives. These findings emphasize the importance of

  10. The association and a potential pathway between gender-based violence and induced abortion in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong Hong; Van Nguyen, Son; Nguyen, Manh Quang; Nguyen, Nam Truong; Keithly, Sarah Colleen; Tran Mai, Lan; Thi Thu Luong, Loan; Pham, Hoa Quynh

    2012-01-01

    Background Gender-based violence (GBV) has profound adverse consequences on women's physical, mental, and reproductive health. Although Vietnam has high rates of induced abortion and GBV, literature examining this relationship is lacking. Objective This study examines the association of GBV with induced abortion among married or partnered women of reproductive age in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam. In addition, we explore contraceptive use and unintended pregnancy as mediators in the pathway between GBV and induced abortion. Design and methods Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey of 1,281 women aged 18–49 years in four districts of Thai Nguyen province. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between lifetime history of GBV, contraceptive use, unintended pregnancy, induced abortion, and repeat abortion, controlling for other covariates. Results One-third of respondents had undergone induced abortion in their lifetime (33.4%), and 11.5% reported having repeat abortions. The prevalence of any type of GBV was 29.1% (17.0% physical violence, 10.4% sexual violence, and 20.1% emotional violence). History of GBV was associated with induced abortion (OR=1.61, 95% CI: 1.20–2.16) and repeat abortion (OR=2.22, 95% CI: 1.48–3.32). Physical violence was significantly associated with induced abortion, and all three types of violence were associated with repeat abortion. Abused women were more likely than non-abused women to report using contraceptives and having an unintended pregnancy, and these factors were in turn associated with increased risk of induced abortion. Conclusions GBV is pervasive in Thai Nguyen province and is linked to increased risks of induced abortion and repeat abortion. The findings suggest that a pathway underlying this relationship is increased risk of unintended pregnancy due in part to ineffective use of contraceptives. These findings emphasize the importance of screening and

  11. An attempt for clarifying some complications due to induced abortion by means of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasov, A.; Mlychkov, Kh.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility and degree of tissue and plasmic elements invasion and deportation during induced abortion depending on the operative method used are studied comparatively. To this end before the operation a lavage of the uterine cavity with technecium was performed. Ten minutes later blood radionuclide concentration was measured. A greater radionuclide blood concentration was observed after abortion made after the aspiration method than after abortion by the classical abrasive method. This indicates a greater invasion and deportation of tissue and plasmic elements from the embryo in the mother's blood circulation and is a substantial failure of the aspiration method which accounts for the more frequently occurring protracted menstruation disorders in such cases. (A.B.)

  12. Exploring contraceptive knowledge and use among women experiencing induced abortion in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biney, Adriana A E

    2011-03-01

    Using a qualitative research methodology, twenty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted with women with induced abortion experiences at Korle Bu and Tema Hospitals in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana. Results suggest that these women tended not to have knowledge of contraceptive methods prior to the abortion, while others were informed but failed to use for a variety of reasons ranging from rumours of side effects to personal negative experiences with modem contraceptive methods. A few women also stated contraceptive failure as a reason for their unintended pregnancies that were later aborted. Peer and reproductive health education must be reinforced in communities in the Greater Accra Region to curb adolescents engaging in early sex and should challenge the existing rumours associated with contraception in Ghana. In addition, family planning services in terms of appropriate methods with no side effects must be made available to women in the reproductive ages.

  13. Examining the association between motivations for induced abortion and method safety among women in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biney, Adriana A E; Atiglo, D Yaw

    2017-10-01

    This article draws on data from 552 women interviewed in the 2007 Ghana Maternal Health Survey to examine the association between motivations for women's pregnancy terminations and the safety of methods used. Women's reasons for induced abortions represented their vulnerability types at the critical time of decision making. Different motivations can result in taking various forms of action with the most vulnerable potentially resorting to the most harmful behaviors. Analysis of survey data pointed to spacing/delaying births as the main reason for abortion. Furthermore, women were more likely to terminate pregnancies unsafely if their main motivation for abortion was financial constraints. Especially among rural women, abortions for any reason were more likely associated with safe methods than if for financial reasons. These findings suggest a theme of vulnerability, resulting from poverty, as the motivations for women to resort to harmful abortion methods. Therefore, interventions formulated to reduce instances of unsafe pregnancy terminations should target reducing poverty and capacity building with the aim of economic advancement, in addition to curbing the root of the problem: unintended pregnancy.

  14. Induced abortion in Denmark: effect of socio-economic situation and country of birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Gammeltoft, Tine; Knudsen, Lisbeth B

    2007-01-01

    study focuses on how socio-economic characteristics and country of birth are associated with induced abortion. METHODS: A structured questionnaire was used to collect information among 1351 women requesting abortion and a control group of 1306 women intending birth. RESULTS: The strongest factor...... associated with the decision to have an abortion was being single (OR 39.1; 23.8-64.2), followed by being aged 19 years or below (OR 29.6; 13.4-65.5), having two children or more (OR 7.05; 5.29-9.39) and being unskilled (OR 2.48; 1.49-4.10), student (OR 2.29; 1.52-3.43) or unemployed (OR 1.65; 1.......11-2.46). When evaluating the effect of social exposure on abortion among Danish-born and foreign-born women, the higher rate of abortion among non-Westerners was found to be caused by the composition of non-Westerners more often being unemployed, having a low income and having two or more children rather than...

  15. Effect of leonurine hydrochloride on endothelin and the endothelin receptor-mediated signal pathway in medically-induced incomplete abortion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Yi-Qing; Lu, Wei-Guo; Li, Cheng-Wan; He, Chun-Hui

    2013-07-01

    Endothelin (ET) is involved in uterine contractions. Our previous study showed that leonurine hydrochloride (LH) inhibits abnormal bleeding caused by incomplete abortion through an increase in uterine contractions in rats. The present study was conducted to show that LH treatment regulates the ET-mediated signal pathway in abortion in rats. Early pregnancies in rats had incomplete abortions induced using mifepristone in combination with misoprostol. After the abortions, the rats were treated with LH orally for 7 days and surgery was performed. The sinistro-uterus was dissected for measurement of ET and nitric oxide (NO); the dextro-uterus was stored at -80°C for ET receptor (ETA and ETB) analysis. Myometrial cells from the dextro-uterus were cultured for measurement of phospholipase C (PLC) activity, intra-cellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), and protein kinase C (PKC) activity. In in vivo experiments, LH treatment elevated the ET level and ET/NO ratio in rats with induced abortions and up-regulated ETA mRNA expression (Pabortions by modulating the ET receptor-mediated signal pathway. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  16. Methods and complications of septic induced abortion in patients managed at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabeen, Alia; Dawood, Nasira Sabiha; Riaz, Shazia; Tanveer, Shamaila

    2013-01-01

    To study the methods used for the termination of pregnancy and associated complications of induced abortion. This descriptive study was conducted in the department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Fauji Foundation Hospital Rawalpindi. One Hundred patients were included in the study who was admitted with the history of induced abortion. The patients were assessed by detailed history and thorough clinical examination according to the study protocol. Data was collected on a specially designed Performa. Patients were interviewed in privacy and factors contributing to termination of pregnancy like age, parity, socioeconomic status and contraceptive failure were determined. Methods used for the procedure, status of abortionist were asked. Complications were determined by history, clinical examination and ultrasound examination. In view of all above data recommendations of preventing unwanted pregnancies were made. All patients were married and 57% of women belonged to age group of 31-40 years. Fifty-four 54% were grand multipara. In 63% of patients, induced abortion was carried out by Dai's. Most commonly used method was instrumentation (72%). Financial problems (46.7% ) and high parity (40%) were the most common factors contributing to termination of pregnancy. Serious complications like uterine perforation with or without bowel injury were accounted in 13% of women, septicaemia in 61%, peritonitis in 15% and DIC in 2%. During the study period illegally induced abortion accounted for 2% maternal deaths. Prevalence of poverty, illiteracy, grand multiparity and non-compliance of contraception were strong determinants of induced abortion, instrumentation being the most commonly used procedure resulting in high morbidity and mortality.

  17. The association between education and induced abortion for three cohorts of adults in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Heini

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores whether the likelihood of abortion by education changed over time in Finland, where comprehensive family planning services and sexuality education have been available since the early 1970s. This subject has not previously been studied longitudinally with comprehensive and reliable data. A unique longitudinal set of register data of more than 250,000 women aged 20–49 born in 1955–59, 1965–69, and 1975–79 was analysed, using descriptive statistics, concentration curves, and discrete-time event-history models. Women with basic education had a higher likelihood of abortion than others and the association grew stronger for later cohorts. Selection into education may explain this phenomenon: although it was fairly common to have only basic education in the 1955–59 cohort, it became increasingly unusual over time. Thus, even though family planning services were easily available, socio-economic differences in the likelihood of abortion remained. PMID:26449684

  18. The association between education and induced abortion for three cohorts of adults in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väisänen, Heini

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores whether the likelihood of abortion by education changed over time in Finland, where comprehensive family planning services and sexuality education have been available since the early 1970s. This subject has not previously been studied longitudinally with comprehensive and reliable data. A unique longitudinal set of register data of more than 250,000 women aged 20-49 born in 1955-59, 1965-69, and 1975-79 was analysed, using descriptive statistics, concentration curves, and discrete-time event-history models. Women with basic education had a higher likelihood of abortion than others and the association grew stronger for later cohorts. Selection into education may explain this phenomenon: although it was fairly common to have only basic education in the 1955-59 cohort, it became increasingly unusual over time. Thus, even though family planning services were easily available, socio-economic differences in the likelihood of abortion remained.

  19. Alcohol consumption in relation to maternal deaths from induced-abortions in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Benedict O; Agardh, Anette

    2012-08-06

    The fight against maternal deaths has gained attention as the target date for Millennium Development Goal 5 approaches. Induced-abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal deaths in developing countries which hamper this effort. In Ghana, alcohol consumption and unwanted pregnancies are on the ascendancy. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and maternal mortality from induced-abortion. We further analyzed the factors that lie behind the alcohol consumption patterns in the study population. The data we used was extracted from the Ghana Maternal Health Survey 2007. This was a national survey conducted across the 10 administrative regions of Ghana. The survey identified 4203 female deaths through verbal autopsy, among which 605 were maternal deaths in the 12 to 49 year-old age group. Analysis was done using Statistical software IBM SPSS Statistics 20. A case control study design was used. Cross-tabulations and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between the different variables. Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with abortion-related maternal deaths. Women who had ever consumed alcohol (OR (adjusted) 2.6, 95% CI 1.38-4.87), frequent consumers (OR (adjusted) 2.6, 95% CI 0.89-7.40) and occasional consumers (OR (adjusted) 2.7, 95% CI 1.29-5.46) were about three times as likely to die from abortion-related causes compared to those who abstained from alcohol. Maternal age, marital status and educational level were found to have a confounding effect on the observed association. Policy actions directed toward reducing abortion-related deaths should consider alcohol consumption, especially among younger women. Policy makers in Ghana should consider increasing the legal age for alcohol consumption. We suggest that information on the health risks posed by alcohol and abortion be disseminated to communities in the informal sector where vulnerable groups can best be reached.

  20. Alcohol consumption in relation to maternal deaths from induced-abortions in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asamoah Benedict O

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The fight against maternal deaths has gained attention as the target date for Millennium Development Goal 5 approaches. Induced-abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal deaths in developing countries which hamper this effort. In Ghana, alcohol consumption and unwanted pregnancies are on the ascendancy. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and maternal mortality from induced-abortion. We further analyzed the factors that lie behind the alcohol consumption patterns in the study population. Method The data we used was extracted from the Ghana Maternal Health Survey 2007. This was a national survey conducted across the 10 administrative regions of Ghana. The survey identified 4203 female deaths through verbal autopsy, among which 605 were maternal deaths in the 12 to 49 year-old age group. Analysis was done using Statistical software IBM SPSS Statistics 20. A case control study design was used. Cross-tabulations and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between the different variables. Results Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with abortion-related maternal deaths. Women who had ever consumed alcohol (OR adjusted 2.6, 95% CI 1.38–4.87, frequent consumers (OR adjusted 2.6, 95% CI 0.89–7.40 and occasional consumers (OR adjusted 2.7, 95% CI 1.29–5.46 were about three times as likely to die from abortion-related causes compared to those who abstained from alcohol. Maternal age, marital status and educational level were found to have a confounding effect on the observed association. Conclusion Policy actions directed toward reducing abortion-related deaths should consider alcohol consumption, especially among younger women. Policy makers in Ghana should consider increasing the legal age for alcohol consumption. We suggest that information on the health risks posed by alcohol and abortion be disseminated to communities in the informal sector where

  1. Induced abortion in Denmark: effect of socio-economic situation and country of birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasch, Vibeke; Gammeltoft, Tine; Knudsen, Lisbeth B; Tobiassen, Charlotte; Ginzel, Annelie; Kempf, Lillan

    2008-04-01

    Equal access to health care is considered a key in Scandinavian healthcare policy. However, problematic differences between the socio-economic situation of immigrants and that of native Scandinavians are increasingly challenging this aspect of the Scandinavian welfare model. The present study focuses on how socio-economic characteristics and country of birth are associated with induced abortion. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information among 1351 women requesting abortion and a control group of 1306 women intending birth. The strongest factor associated with the decision to have an abortion was being single (OR 39.1; 23.8-64.2), followed by being aged 19 years or below (OR 29.6; 13.4-65.5), having two children or more (OR 7.05; 5.29-9.39) and being unskilled (OR 2.48; 1.49-4.10), student (OR 2.29; 1.52-3.43) or unemployed (OR 1.65; 1.11-2.46). When evaluating the effect of social exposure on abortion among Danish-born and foreign-born women, the higher rate of abortion among non-Westerners was found to be caused by the composition of non-Westerners more often being unemployed, having a low income and having two or more children rather than the fact that they are coming from a non-Western country. Immigrant women comprise a vulnerable group, with a poor socio-economic status. This situation exposes immigrant women to increased risk of induced abortion. In a society with an increasing heterogeneous population, the vulnerable situation of immigrant women has to be addressed, if equal access to health care is to be maintained.

  2. Alcohol consumption in relation to maternal deaths from induced-abortions in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The fight against maternal deaths has gained attention as the target date for Millennium Development Goal 5 approaches. Induced-abortion is one of the leading causes of maternal deaths in developing countries which hamper this effort. In Ghana, alcohol consumption and unwanted pregnancies are on the ascendancy. We examined the association between alcohol consumption and maternal mortality from induced-abortion. We further analyzed the factors that lie behind the alcohol consumption patterns in the study population. Method The data we used was extracted from the Ghana Maternal Health Survey 2007. This was a national survey conducted across the 10 administrative regions of Ghana. The survey identified 4203 female deaths through verbal autopsy, among which 605 were maternal deaths in the 12 to 49 year-old age group. Analysis was done using Statistical software IBM SPSS Statistics 20. A case control study design was used. Cross-tabulations and logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between the different variables. Results Alcohol consumption was significantly associated with abortion-related maternal deaths. Women who had ever consumed alcohol (OR adjusted 2.6, 95% CI 1.38–4.87), frequent consumers (OR adjusted 2.6, 95% CI 0.89–7.40) and occasional consumers (OR adjusted 2.7, 95% CI 1.29–5.46) were about three times as likely to die from abortion-related causes compared to those who abstained from alcohol. Maternal age, marital status and educational level were found to have a confounding effect on the observed association. Conclusion Policy actions directed toward reducing abortion-related deaths should consider alcohol consumption, especially among younger women. Policy makers in Ghana should consider increasing the legal age for alcohol consumption. We suggest that information on the health risks posed by alcohol and abortion be disseminated to communities in the informal sector where vulnerable groups can best be

  3. Hypovolemic shock following induced abortion and spontaneous heterotopic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakniyat, Abdolghader; Yazdanbakhsh, Arash; Moshar-Mowahed, Ghasem; Talebi, Fatimah

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous heterotopic pregnancy is a rare clinical condition in which intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies occur at the same time. It is rare, estimated to occur in 1 in 30,000 pregnancies. The case was a 38-year-old woman with spontaneously conceived heterotopic pregnancy. She was admitted to our center with hypovolemic shock. Focused assessment sonography for trauma examination in emergency department showed large amount of free fluid in peritoneal cavity. She was managed surgical laparotomy. Considering spontaneous pregnancies, physician should be aware of the possibility of heterotopic pregnancy in all reproductive age women, especially those with history of recent abortion. It can occur without any predisposing risk factors. Patients should be informed about possible side effects of nonprescription medicines, and also the health care centers must be safe peaceful environment for them without severe legal consequences.

  4. Trends in induced abortion among Nordic women aged 40-44 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydsjö Adam

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives Women aged 40-44 years in 2005 ought to have been subjected to much more influence on attitudes and knowledge on contraceptive methods during their fertile period than women who were in the same age span in 1975 when the abortion laws were introduced. Material From official statistics, the rates of induced abortion and birth rates in women aged 40-44 years were collected for Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland for each five-year during the period 1975-2005. Results With the exception of Sweden all other studied Scandinavian countries have lowered their abortion rates since 1975 (p Conclusion There is a significant change in rates of induced abortion in women aged 40-44 years in Finland, Norway, Denmark, and at status quo in Sweden. 40-44 years in Finland, Norway, Denmark, and at status quo in Sweden. This indicates that family planning programs works well in the Nordic countries. The differences found may be assumed to possible diverging focus on attitudes or ethical considerations.

  5. Effects of leonurine hydrochloride on medically induced incomplete abortion in early pregnancy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Yi-Qing; Chen, Fei-Hu; Lu, Wei-Guo; Li, Cheng-Wan; Li, Jian-Ping

    2011-12-01

    To determine the effect of leonurine hydrochloride (LH) on abnormal bleeding induced by medical abortion. Rats had incomplete abortions induced in early pregnancy using mifepristone in combination with misoprostol. After abortion, rats were treated with LH for 7 days, and the duration and volume of uterine bleeding were observed. Approximately 30min after the last treatment, the animals were killed and the uterine shape was observed. The sinistro-uteri were suspended in organ baths to record the contraction curves, including the frequency and tension for 10min; the dextro-uteri were fixed with formaldehyde for pathologic evaluation. In addition, blood samples were collected from the femoral artery for the measurement of estradiol (E₂) and progesterone (P) levels by radioimmunoassay. In in vivo experiments, compared with the model group, LH treatment markedly reduced the volume of bleeding and intrauterine residual, and significantly shortened the duration of bleeding. From the contraction curve, LH notably reinforced the frequency and tension of uterine contractions. LH remarkably elevated the serum estradiol level in rats, but had no obvious effect on progesterone level. LH has an inhibitory effect on bleeding caused by incomplete abortion; the mechanism may be related to up-regulation of the E₂ level, leading to an increase in uterine contractions and evacuation of intrauterine residuum. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. [Case of systemic lupus erythematosus occurring after induced abortion and drug eruption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuhito; Baba, Shunu; Takahashi, Susumu; Itou, Harumasa; Kowada, Kouko; Shikanai, Toshiki; Nakamura, Yutaka; Yamauchi, Kohei; Inoue, Hiroshi; Sawai, Takashi

    2008-07-01

    We describe a19 year-old woman who was diagnosed as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) after abortion. She had taken anti-convulsants for epilepsy since she was 8 years old. Induced abortion surgery was performed at six weeks in her pregnancy. She showed pyrexia and a general rash 2 days after the abortion. She was introduced to our hospital because the administration of antibiotics was not effective. Since the anti-convulsants had been changed after pregnancy, we returned to those administered before pregnancy and followed her up. Her eruption improved, but she became aware of thirstiness and dry eye. She was diagnosed as Sjögren syndrome by ophthalmologic examination, lip biopsy, and elevation of an anti-SS-A antibody and an anti-SS-B antibody in the serum. Since we could not rule out SLE because of the low concentration of complement activity in blood, we followed her up carefully by checking serum markers of SLE. Protein urine developed after the improvement of the eruption 2 weeks later. Low complement activity was recognized and double stranded (ds)-DNA antibody became positive. In addition to these findings, she had an episode of hypersensitivity to sunlight and was therefore diagnosed as SLE. Since induced abortion and drug eruption might be associated with the onset of SLE, the case is thought to be a valuable from the view point of understanding the mechanism of SLE onset.

  7. Prevention and treatment of vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion by Yaoliuan capsule and its effects on menses recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhichun; Huang, Guangying

    2005-01-01

    In order to explore the effect of Yaoliuan capsule in the prevention and treatment of vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion and menses recovery after drug-induced abortion, 323 cases of gestation period abortion, 7 cases (4.2%) of incomplete abortion; In the control group, there were 146 cases (94.2%) of complete abortion, 6 cases (3.9%) of incomplete abortion, 3 cases (1.9%) of abortion failure. The vaginal bleeding time was 5-25 days (mean 10.8 days) in study group, while that was 6-62 days (mean 19.1 days) in control group. The menstrual cycle was 30.5+/-5. 2 days and 33.8 d+/-8.6 days respectively in study and control groups. The menstrual period was 6.1+/-3. 5 days and 9.9+/-5.1 days respectively in study and control groups. Yaoliuan capsule is an effective drug to prevent and treat vaginal bleeding following drug-induced abortion, promote menstruation recovery and prevent pelvic infection.

  8. Opinions on conscientious objection to induced abortion among Finnish medical and nursing students and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Petteri; Lappalainen, Saara; Ristimäki, Pauliina; Myllykangas, Markku; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2015-03-25

    Conscientious objection (CO) to participating in induced abortion is not present in the Finnish health care system or legislation unlike in many other European countries. We conducted a questionnaire survey with the 1(st)- and the last-year medical and nursing students and professionals (548 respondents; response rate 66-100%) including several aspects of the abortion process and their relation to CO in 2013. The male medical respondents chose later time points of pregnancy than the nursing respondents when considering when the embryo/fetus "becomes a person". Of all respondents, 3.5-14.1% expressed a personal wish to CO. The medical professionals supported the right to CO more often (34.2%) than the nursing professionals (21.4%), while ≥62.4% could work with someone expressing CO. Yet ≥57.9% of the respondents anticipated social problems at work communities caused by CO. Most respondents considered self-reported religious/ethical conviction to be adequate for CO but, at the same time, 30.1-50.7% considered that no conviction would be sufficient. The respondents most commonly included the medical doctor conducting surgical or medical abortion to be eligible to CO. The nursing respondents considered that vacuum suction would be a better justification for CO than medical abortion. The indications most commonly included to potential CO were second-trimester abortions and social reasons. Among the medical respondents, the men were more willing to grant CO also in case of a life-threatening emergency of the pregnant woman. While the respondents mostly seemed to consider the continuation of adequate services important if CO is introduced, the viewpoint was often focused on the staff and surgical abortion procedure instead of the patients. The issue proved to be complex, which should be taken into consideration for legislation.

  9. Induced abortion, pregnancy loss and intimate partner violence in Tanzania: a population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckl, Heidi; Filippi, Veronique; Watts, Charlotte; Mbwambo, Jessie K K

    2012-03-05

    Violence by an intimate partner is increasingly recognized as an important public and reproductive health issue. The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence is associated with induced abortion and pregnancy loss from other causes and to compare this with other, more commonly recognized explanatory factors. This study analyzes the data of the Tanzania section of the WHO Multi-Country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence, a large population-based cross-sectional survey of women of reproductive age in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya, Tanzania, conducted from 2001 to 2002. All women who answered positively to at least one of the questions about specific acts of physical or sexual violence committed by a partner towards her at any point in her life were considered to have experienced intimate partner violence. Associations between self reported induced abortion and pregnancy loss with intimate partner violence were analysed using multiple regression models. Lifetime physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence was reported by 41% and 56% of ever partnered, ever pregnant women in Dar es Salaam and Mbeya respectively. Among the ever pregnant, ever partnered women, 23% experienced involuntary pregnancy loss, while 7% reported induced abortion. Even after adjusting for other explanatory factors, women who experienced intimate partner violence were 1.6 (95%CI: 1.06,1.60) times more likely to report an pregnancy loss and 1.9 (95%CI: 1.30,2.89) times more likely to report an induced abortion. Intimate partner violence had a stronger influence on induced abortion and pregnancy loss than women's age, socio-economic status, and number of live born children. Intimate partner violence is likely to be an important influence on levels of induced abortion and pregnancy loss in Tanzania. Preventing intimate partner violence may therefore be beneficial for maternal health and pregnancy outcomes. © 2012 Stöckl et al

  10. Contraceptive knowledge and attitudes among women seeking induced abortion in Kathmandu, Nepal

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    Berin E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Emilia Berin,1,* Micaela Sundell,1,* Chanda Karki,2 Jan Brynhildsen,1 Mats Hammar1 1Obstetrics and Gynecology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kathmandu Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To map the knowledge about and attitudes toward birth control methods among women in Kathmandu, Nepal, and to compare the results between women seeking an induced abortion and a control group. Method: This was a cross-sectional cohort study with matched controls. Women aged 15–49 years seeking medical care at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Kathmandu Medical College were included and interviewed. A case was defined as a woman who sought an elective medical or surgical abortion. A control was defined as a woman who sought medical care at the outpatient department or had already been admitted to the ward for reasons other than elective abortion. A questionnaire developed for the study – dealing with different demographic characteristics as well as knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives – was filled out based on the interview. Results: A total of 153 women were included: 64 women seeking an abortion and 89 controls. Women seeking an abortion had been pregnant more times than the control group and were more likely to have been informed about contraceptives. Women with higher education were less likely to seek an abortion than women with lower education. There was no significant difference in knowledge about and attitudes toward contraceptives between cases and controls. The women considered highest possible effectiveness to be the most important feature when deciding on a birth control method. Conclusion: Women seeking abortion in Kathmandu had shorter education and a history of more pregnancies and deliveries than women in the control group. Education and counseling on sex

  11. Lifetime induced abortion: a comparison between women living and not living with HIV.

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    Flávia Bulegon Pilecco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies aimed at understanding the association between induced abortion and HIV are scarce and differ on the direction of the association. This paper aims to show the prevalence of induced abortion in a sample of pregnancies of women living and not living with HIV/Aids, determining variables associated with pregnancy termination and linked to the life course of women and to the specific context of the pregnancy. METHODS: Data came from a cross-sectional study, using interviewer-administered questionnaire, developed with women that attended public health services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. A generalized estimating equation model with logit link measured the association between determinants and abortion. FINDINGS: The final sample was composed of 684 women living with HIV/Aids (2,039 pregnancies and 639 women not living with HIV/Aids (1,539 pregnancies. The prevalence of induced abortion among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids was 6.5%, while in women not living with HIV/Aids was 2.9%. Among women living with HIV/Aids, the following were associated with induced abortion in the multivariable analysis: being older, having a higher education level, having had more sexual partners (i.e., variables linked to the life course of women, having had children prior to the index pregnancy and living with a sexual partner during pregnancy (i.e., variables linked to the context of each pregnancy. On the other hand, among women not living with HIV/Aids, only having a higher education level and having had more sexual partners (i.e., determinants linked to the life course of women were associated with voluntary pregnancy termination in multivariable analysis. CONCLUSION: Although determinants are similar between women living and not living with HIV/Aids, prevalence of induced abortion is higher among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids, pointing to their greater social vulnerability and to the need for public policy to address prevention

  12. Lifetime Induced Abortion: A Comparison between Women Living and Not Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilecco, Flávia Bulegon; Teixeira, Luciana Barcellos; Vigo, Álvaro; Dewey, Michael E.; Knauth, Daniela Riva

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies aimed at understanding the association between induced abortion and HIV are scarce and differ on the direction of the association. This paper aims to show the prevalence of induced abortion in a sample of pregnancies of women living and not living with HIV/Aids, determining variables associated with pregnancy termination and linked to the life course of women and to the specific context of the pregnancy. Methods Data came from a cross-sectional study, using interviewer-administered questionnaire, developed with women that attended public health services in Porto Alegre, Brazil. A generalized estimating equation model with logit link measured the association between determinants and abortion. Findings The final sample was composed of 684 women living with HIV/Aids (2,039 pregnancies) and 639 women not living with HIV/Aids (1,539 pregnancies). The prevalence of induced abortion among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids was 6.5%, while in women not living with HIV/Aids was 2.9%. Among women living with HIV/Aids, the following were associated with induced abortion in the multivariable analysis: being older, having a higher education level, having had more sexual partners (i.e., variables linked to the life course of women), having had children prior to the index pregnancy and living with a sexual partner during pregnancy (i.e., variables linked to the context of each pregnancy). On the other hand, among women not living with HIV/Aids, only having a higher education level and having had more sexual partners (i.e., determinants linked to the life course of women) were associated with voluntary pregnancy termination in multivariable analysis. Conclusion Although determinants are similar between women living and not living with HIV/Aids, prevalence of induced abortion is higher among pregnancies in women living with HIV/Aids, pointing to their greater social vulnerability and to the need for public policy to address prevention and treatment of HIV

  13. [Maltreatment and discrimination in induced abortion care: perception of women in Teresina, State of Piauí, Brazil].

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    Madeiro, Alberto Pereira; Rufino, Andréa Cronemberger

    2017-08-01

    Treatment of complications resulting from induced abortion may be hampered by discriminatory attitudes manifested by healthcare professionals in hospitals and abortion services. This article retrieved stories of institutional abuse directed at women who had an induced abortion in illegal and unsafe conditions. Seventy-eight women admitted to a public hospital in Teresina for complications after an induced abortion were interviewed. A semi-structured script was used with questions about practices and itineraries of abortion and institutional violence during hospitalization. Discriminatory practices and maltreatment during care were reported by 26 women, especially among those who confessed to induction of the abortion. Moral judgement, threat of filing a complaint to the police, negligence in the control of pain, long wait for uterine curettage, and hospitalization with mothers who have recently given birth were the main types of institutional violence reported by women. Cases of institutional violence in the care of induced abortion violates the duty of the healthcare service and prevents women from receiving the necessary health care.

  14. Induced abortion is not associated with a higher likelihood of depression in Curaçao women.

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    Boersma, Adriana A; van den Berg, Desirée; van Lunsen, Rik H W; Laan, Ellen T M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the risk of developing a depression after induced abortion. A prospective cohort study conducted in Curaçao which involved 92 women having an induced abortion and 37 women delivering after an unplanned or unwanted pregnancy, who served as controls. All participants completed the Center of Epidemiological Studies Depression (CES-D) scale before and two to three weeks after the abortion or delivery. Following the abortion, significantly fewer women were at risk of depression (30%) as compared to when still pregnant (60%). Mean depression scores were significantly lower after- than before the procedure. The likelihood of depression post-abortum (30%) was similar to that after delivery of an unplanned/unwanted child (22%). Even though women in the abortion group more often reported having suffered from depression in the past than controls, they were not at greater risk of depression after their pregnancy had ended. Curaçao women's risk of developing a depression following an (early) induced abortion is not greater than that after carrying to term an unplanned/unwanted pregnancy. We recommend that the results of this study be taken into account in case the Curaçao government should consider legalisation of induced abortion in the near future.

  15. Report: a study of morbidity of induced abortion data from women belonging to Karachi, Pakistan.

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    Aslam, Farah; Aslam, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity of induced abortion in relation to facilities, service providers and social responses of general population of women, from Karachi, Pakistan. Cross-sectional survey, conducted from February to December 2010, through a researcher-administered questionnaire from 61 randomly selected women, who underwent for Induced Abortion, aged 18-50 years. The questionnaire included open and closed ended questions, regarding demography, facilities, service providers and various complications observed. Overall, 98 immediate health problems were reported by 40 (65.5%) of the respondents, 153 late adverse effects or chronic by 46 (75.4%); while 101 mental complications had been reported by 45 (73.8%) of the 61 aborting women; respectively. Private clinics surfaced as the most frequently adopted source as reported by 40.7% of the respondents. Two third majorities had the procedure in satisfactory, good hygienic conditions by skilled professionals. Around 59% of the aborting women were aware of the religious perspective of the subject. Marked incidence of complications had been registered, regardless of type of method adopted, hygienic condition of the procedure or skill of the provider. Although, awareness of religious perspective of the subject was there, still quite a lot opted for abortion. This suggests that strong socioeconomic factors influence women to take peril of such an attempt. It also reveals the existence of a big gap for the awareness services for educating the risks involved to the women's health. Study revealed that services are easily accessible; without any legal, religious or social barriers. Semi or un-educated women, mostly from low socioeconomic sector are opting the procedure in majority, being less aware and stalwartly influenced by environmental factors; hence excessive availability of abortion services should be revisited. Lack of deep awareness of the consequences also contributes for deteriorating

  16. Induced abortion during youth: social inequalities in the outcome of the first pregnancy

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    Menezes Greice M. S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the factors associated with induced abortion in the first pregnancy in young women and in the first time young men got their partners pregnant. The methodology was a household survey with face-to-face interviews in a probabilistic sample in three stages with 4,634 subjects, aged 18 to 24 years of age residing in the cities of Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, and Porto Alegre, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used with a hierarchical strategy for entering variables into the model. Abortion was the reported outcome of the first pregnancy for 16.7% of the women and 45.9% of the men (in relation to their partners. Key factors associated with abortion included higher schooling and the occasional nature of the relationship with the male or female partner in the respective pregnancy. Inclusion of males in the study provided new elements for understanding the abortion phenomenon, including in the gender issues in discussion of the theme. The authors recommend greater public investment to warrant access to information and means for young people to achieve their reproductive plans in a security and healthy way, respecting their sexual and reproductive rights.

  17. Induced abortion during youth: social inequalities in the outcome of the first pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Greice M S; Aquino, Estela M L; da Silva, Diorlene Oliveira

    2006-07-01

    This study aimed to identify the factors associated with induced abortion in the first pregnancy in young women and in the first time young men got their partners pregnant. The methodology was a household survey with face-to-face interviews in a probabilistic sample in three stages with 4,634 subjects, aged 18 to 24 years of age residing in the cities of Salvador, Rio de Janeiro, and Porto Alegre, Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used with a hierarchical strategy for entering variables into the model. Abortion was the reported outcome of the first pregnancy for 16.7% of the women and 45.9% of the men (in relation to their partners). Key factors associated with abortion included higher schooling and the occasional nature of the relationship with the male or female partner in the respective pregnancy. Inclusion of males in the study provided new elements for understanding the abortion phenomenon, including in the gender issues in discussion of the theme. The authors recommend greater public investment to warrant access to information and means for young people to achieve their reproductive plans in a security and healthy way, respecting their sexual and reproductive rights.

  18. Normal breast physiology: the reasons hormonal contraceptives and induced abortion increase breast-cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanfranchi, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A woman gains protection from breast cancer by completing a full-term pregnancy. In utero, her offspring produce hormones that mature 85 percent of the mother's breast tissue into cancer-resistant breast tissue. If the pregnancy ends through an induced abortion or a premature birth before thirty-two weeks, the mother's breasts will have only partially matured, retaining even more cancer-susceptible breast tissue than when the pregnancy began. This increased amount of immature breast tissue will leave the mother with more sites for cancer initiation, thereby increasing her risk of breast cancer. Hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk by their proliferative effect on breast tissue and their direct carcinogenic effects on DNA. Hormonal contraceptives include estrogen-progestin combination drugs prescribed in any manner of delivery: orally, transdermally, vaginally, or intrauterine. This article provides the detailed physiology and data that elucidate the mechanisms through which induced abortion and hormonal contraceptives increase breast-cancer risk.

  19. Clinical pitfalls in misoprostol-based medical management of first-trimester induced and presumed spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wax, Joseph R; Conroy, Kelley; Pinette, Michael G; Litton, Christian; Cartin, Angelina

    2017-12-28

    When administered inappropriately, first-trimester misoprostol management of induced or spontaneous abortion can result in loss or damage of a continuing pregnancy. Despite these serious consequences, such misoprostol exposures continue to occur. Unfortunately, contributing factors and preventive measures receive little attention. We describe the cases of 4 women in whom misoprostol was inappropriately administered during management of induced and presumed spontaneous abortion. In each case, careful adherence to published clinical guidance could have avoided the exposures. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [Study on SHI's Bian stone comprehensive therapy for rehabilitation after induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Qing-zhen; Shi, An-li

    2009-02-01

    To explore the rehabilitation effect of SHI's Bian stone comprehensive therapy on the patient after induced abortion. Thirty cases of induced abortion were treated with SHI's Bian stone comprehensive therapy in peri-operative period. Before the operation, scraping therapy was given at the parts of The Urinary Bladder Channel and The Governor Vessel on the back and 30 min after the operation, the patient took a rest in a horizontal position on a mild heat Bian stone blanket and hot compress with a Bian stone plate was given at the lower abdomen. They received thrice return visits respectively on 1, 2, 3 weeks after the operation and SHI's Bian stone comprehensive therapy, including warm massage on The Governor Vessel, scraping the channel, patting Baliao (BL 31, BL 32, BL 33, BL 34), penetration needling Sanyinjiao (SP 6), oblique needling Qihai (CV 6), Guanyuan (CV 4), Zhongji (CV 3), Zigong (EX-CA 1), and the Bian stone plate was placed on the needle hand for warm compress. Colporrhagia, menstrual return, soreness of waist and other symptoms after the operation were observed. After SHI's Bian stone comprehensive therapy, in the patient of induced abortion the colporrhagia volume was less within 3 days after the operation and the colporrhagia stopped more early; of the 30 cases, only 2 has soreness of waist, abdominal pain, fearing cool and other symptoms, and only one case had obviously delayed mestrual cycle. SHI's Bian stone comprehensive therapy used in peri-operative period of induced abortion has a good promoting action on post operative rehabilitation.

  1. Abortion surveillance--United States, 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Lilo T; Gamble, Sonya B; Parker, Wilda Y; Cook, Douglas A; Zane, Suzanne B; Hamdan, Saeed

    2006-11-24

    .2% at 16--20 weeks and 1.4% at > or =21 weeks. A total of 36 reporting areas submitted data documenting that they performed and enumerated medical (nonsurgical) procedures, making up 8.0% of all known reported procedures from the 45 areas with adequate reporting on type of procedure. During 1990-1997, the number of legal induced abortions gradually declined. When the same 47 reporting areas are compared, the number of abortions decreased during 1996-2001, then slightly increased in 2002 and again decreased in 2003. In 2000 and 2001, even with one additional reporting state, the number of abortions declined slightly, with a minimal increase in 2002 and a further decrease in 2003. In 2001 and 2002, as in the previous years, deaths related to legal induced abortions occurred rarely. Abortion surveillance in the United States continues to provide the data necessary for examining trends in numbers and characteristics of women who obtain legal induced abortions and to increase understanding of this pregnancy outcome. Policymakers and program planners use these data to improve the health and well-being of women and infants.

  2. [Application of flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia combined with intravenous propofol anesthesia in induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-xing; Zhang, Yong-fu; Tan, Shu-xia; Lao, Jian-xin

    2008-04-01

    To investigate the effect of flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia combined with intravenous propofol anesthesia in induced abortion. Totally 175 women (ASA class I) undergoing induced abortion were randomized into 5 groups. In K10, K5, and K1 groups, the patients were given 50 mg flurbiprofen 10, 5 and 1 min before the operation, respectively, and in F group, 1 microg/kg of fentanyl was administered 10 min before the operation. All the 4 groups had intravenous induction with 2 mg/kg propofo1. The patients in P group received propofol at 2 mg/kg as the control group. The heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and SpO2 were monitored during the operation, and the induction time, recovery time, propofol dosage and adverse effect were recorded. The anesthetic effect of the protocols was assessed according to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the overall patient satisfaction. HR, MAP, propofol consumption and the incidences of adverse effects during the operation were significantly higher in P group than in the other groups. F group had the highest incidence of respiratory depression among the 5 groups. The VAS in K10 group was significantly lower than that in K5 and K1 groups (P0.05). The overall patients' satisfaction was significantly higher than that in the other 4 groups. Flurbiprofen preemptive analgesia combined with intravenous propofol is safe and effective for anesthesia during induced abortion.

  3. [Anesthetic effect of preemptive analgesia of frequency acupoint electrical stimulation on painless-induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Hong; Zhu, Hong-Xia; Su, Xin-Jing; Hao, Wen-Bin

    2014-07-01

    To explore the anesthetic effect of preemptive analgesia of frequency acupoint electrical stimulation on painless-induced abortion as well as its effect on anesthetics dosage. Ninety cases of early pregnancy who selected painless-induced abortion were randomly divided into two groups, 45 cases in each group. Frequency acupoint electrical stimulation at Ciliao (BL 32) and Shenshu (BL 23), disperse-densewave, 2 Hz/100 Hz in frequency for 15 to 20 min, was applied in the group A, which was followed by intravenous anesthesia of propofol. The intravenous anesthesia of propofol was applied in the group B. The blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and SpO2 before, during and after surgery, anesthetic effect and dosage, waking time and adverse events were observed in the two groups. The BP and HR during and after the surgery in the group A were not statistically different from those before the surgery (all P > 0.05). The BP was reduced and HR was slowed down during the surgery in the group B, which was significantly different from those before the surgery as well as those in the group A (all P effect, the incidence of Grade I in the group A was more than the group B (P effect of painless-induced abortion, reduce dosage of anesthetics, shorten waking time of surgery and guarantee the safety of surgery.

  4. Unmet counselling need amongst women accessing an induced abortion service in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, Graeme; Crankshaw, Tamaryn L; Mould, Sean; Ramklass, Serela S

    2016-11-01

    Provision of objective, evidence-based counselling in the context of induced abortion services is considered global good practise. However, there is limited understanding over the counselling needs of women accessing abortion services, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to explore the content and quality of pre-abortion counselling amongst women accessing an abortion service in South Africa as well as client experience of the counselling process. Perceptions of nurse counsellors were also sought. This was a mixed methods study conducted at a Choice of Termination of Pregnancy clinic based at a district level hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Sixty women requesting an abortion were interviewed via a semi-structured questionnaire. In-depth interviews were conducted with four nurses who provided pre-abortion counselling at the clinic. Interviews were coded for emergent themes and categories. Clinic nurses had widely variable counselling training and experience, ranging from less than 2 months to 8 years, but all clients reported that they had been treated with respect at their counselling session. The group-based counselling format and biomedical and health promotion content did not accommodate clients' differential counselling needs, which included requests for support from women experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). There was limited provider awareness of client's additional counselling needs. Abortion counselling services should be tailored to clients' differential counselling needs. Group-based counselling followed by optional one-on-one counselling sessions is one possible strategy to address unmet client need in South Africa. Provision of abortion provider training in IPV is recommended as well as establishment of referral pathways for women experiencing IPV. Paying attention to the differential counselling needs of women seeking an abortion should be a key component to the provision of abortion services. In this way, abortion

  5. Evaluation of effect of letrozole prior to misoprostol in comparison with misoprostol alone in success rate of induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozi-Lak, T; Derakhshan-Aydenloo, S; Broomand, F

    2018-03-01

    Abortion, spontaneous or induced, is a common complication of pregnancy and exploration of available and safe regimens for medical abortion in developing countries seems crucial. The present study was aimed to assess the effect of letrozole in combination with misoprostol in women eligible for legal therapeutic abortion with gestational age ≤14weeks. This clinical randomized trial was conducted on 78 women who were candidate of medical abortion and eligible for legal abortion with gestational age ≤14 weeks that were randomly divided into two groups of case and controls. Case group received daily oral dose of 10mg letrozole for three days followed by vaginal misoprostol. In control group the patients received only vaginal misoprostol. The rate of complete abortion, induction-of-abortion time, and side-effects were assessed. Complete abortion was observed in 30 patients (76.9%) in case group and 9 (23.1%) cases were failed. In control group there was 16 (41.03%) complete abortions and 23 (58.97%) cases were failed to abort. Patients with gestational age of between 6 and 10 weeks did not show significant difference in both groups (P=0.134). Regarding pregnancy remnants there were significant differences between two groups (P=0.034). The time form admission to discharge in case groups were significantly shorter than those in control group (P=0.001). The indication for curettage in case group was significantly less than control group (P=0.001). A 3-day course of letrozole (10mg/daily) followed by misoprostol was associated with a higher complete abortion and lower curettage rates and reduction in time from admission to discharge in women with gestational age ≤14 weeks compared to misoprostol alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence and associated factors of induced abortion among rural married women: a cross-sectional survey in Anhui, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guo-Peng; Zhang, Ren-Jie; Zhang, Xiu-Jun; Jia, Xiao-Min; Li, Xiu-De; Li, Xiang; Wang, Cheng-Cheng; Tong, Fei; Sun, Ye-Huan

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to assess the prevalence of and factors associated with induced abortion among married women in rural areas of Anhui Province, China. A multistage probability sampling method was used to identify a representative sample of 53,652 married women aged 18-49 years in rural areas of Anhui Province, China. All women were interviewed in the form of a standardized questionnaire. We found that 32.0% (16,800) of these women had had at least one induced abortion: 21.1% (11,090) of women had had one; 7.6% (3976) of women had had two; and 4.1% (1734) of women had had at least three. The number of induced abortions per 100 pregnancies was found to be 22.0. Multivariate analysis showed that education, the age of a woman at her first marriage, number of total births, number of total pregnancies, and contraceptive methods were significant predictors for induced abortion after controlling for women's current age, employment and family yearly income. The study shows that the prevalence of induced abortion is still very high among married women in rural China, and highly effective methods of contraception (sterilization, intrauterine device) decrease women's recourse to induced abortion. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Exploring the pattern of complications of induced abortion in a rural mission tertiary hospital in the Niger Delta, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igberase, G O; Ebeigbe, P N

    2008-07-01

    Unsafe abortion remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries including Nigeria. We report a 10-year descriptive review of 118 consecutive cases of complicated induced abortions. At our centre, complications of induced abortion constituted 2.3% of maternal admissions, 5.6% of gynaecological admissions and 22.6% of maternal deaths. Fifty-nine percent of the women were married and the mean age was 25.6 +/- 7.9 years. Doctors performed 51.7% of the induced abortion and nurses performed 13.9%. Of the mortalities, medical doctors did 61 of the abortions in which 18 died (29.5%); traditional medical practitioners were responsible for 13 of the abortions in which two died (15.4%); of the 16 abortions performed by nurses, two died (12.5%). Sepsis was the most common cause of death (73%). There is an urgent need to improve the knowledge and utilization of modern contraception by rural women in order to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Doctors need to be continuously trained inn the basic principles of postabortion care.

  8. Role of dilatation and curettage performed for spontaneous or induced abortion in the etiology of endometrial thinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azumaguchi, Atsushi; Henmi, Hirofumi; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Endo, Toshiaki; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the role of dilatation and curettage (D&C) performed for spontaneous or induced abortion in the etiology of endometrial thinning. This was a retrospective and cross-sectional study of 310 infertile patients from January 2013 through December 2015. Endometrial thickness observed 5-7 days after ovulation in a natural menstrual cycle was correlated with the number of D&C noted in each patient's history. Study 1 was an investigation of patients without D&C (group A: n = 232) and patients with D&C performed for spontaneous abortion (group B: n = 46). Study 2 was an investigation of patients in group A and patients with D&C performed for induced abortion (group C: n = 32). A significant negative correlation (P spontaneous or induced abortion may play a causal role in endometrial thinning. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  9. Abortamento espontâneo e provocado: ansiedade, depressão e culpa Spountaneous and induced abortion: anxiety, depression and guilty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Rosana Guerra Benute

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Caracterizar a população que sofreu abortamento; investigar a existência de ansiedade e depressão; verificar se existe ou não sentimento de culpa após o abortamento e comparar os resultados entre mulheres que sofreram abortamento espontâneo e as que provocaram-no. MÉTODOS: 50 mulheres com abortamento espontâneo e 50 com provocado foram entrevistadas 30 dias após o abortamento. Foi realizada entrevista com questões abertas e fechadas e aplicada a escala Hospital Anxiety and depression. RESULTADOS: As mulheres que viveram o abortamento espontâneo encontram-se mais culpadas (30% que as que provocaram-no (18%. No entanto, as mulheres que provocaram o abortamento encontraram-se mais ansiosas (média de 11 e mais deprimidas (média de 8,3 que as mulheres que viveram abortamento espontâneo (médias de 8,7 e 6,1; respectivamente, pBACKGROUND: Pregnancy has a symbolic meaning for each woman. It varies according to personality structure and is related to women's previous life experiences. OBJECTIVES: the aim was to characterize the women that suffered abortion, asking about anxiety and depression, looking for guilty feelings after abortion, and to compare results between women who suffered spontaneous abortion and those who had intentional abortion. METHODS: fifty women with spontaneous and fifty with induced abortion were interviewed 30 days after the procedure. A semistructured questionnaire with open and closed-end questions and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. RESULTS: woman who induced abortion revealed to be more anxious (mean 11 and depressed (mean 8.3 than woman with spontaneous abortion (means 8.7 and 6.1 respectively, p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: women who presented induced abortion were more anxious and depressed, as shown by later life events, full of problematic feelings and the need fort sychological support.

  10. Factors associated with induced abortion among female entertainment workers: a cross-sectional study in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Tuot, Sovannary; Chhoun, Pheak; Pal, Khuondyla; Tith, Khimuy; Brody, Carinne

    2015-07-31

    To explore risk factors associated with induced abortion among sexually active female entertainment workers (FEWs) in Cambodia. Cross-sectional study. Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, Cambodia. This study included 556 FEWs aged 18-47 years randomly selected from entertainment establishments in the two cities in 2014 using a two-stage cluster sampling method. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews using a structured questionnaire. History of induced abortion during the time working as a FEW. Of the total sample, 45.6% reported currently using a contraceptive method with condom (42.4%) being the most common method, followed by pills (25.6%). One-fourth (25%) of the respondents reported having been pregnant at least once, and 21.4% reported having at least one induced abortion during the time working as a FEW. After controlling for other covariates in a multivariate logistic regression model, FEWs with a history of induced abortion remained significantly more likely to be currently working in a karaoke bar (AOR=1.75, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.78), to have worked longer as a FEW (AOR=1.42, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.43), to have had a greater number of sexual partners in the past 12 months (AOR=1.86, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.54), to be currently using a contraceptive method (AOR=1.52, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.29), to be able to find condoms when they needed them (AOR=2.03, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.82), and to report inconsistent condom use with non-commercial partners in the past 3 months (AOR=1.62, 95% CI 1.06 to 3.44). This study highlights the high rates of unwanted pregnancies that ended in induced abortions among FEWs in Cambodia. Access of FEWs to quality sexual and reproductive healthcare services is deemed a high priority. Integrated interventions to improve sexual and reproductive health among these vulnerable women should be tailored to reach the most-at-risk groups. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go

  11. Attitudes towards family planning among women seeking induced abortion in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, Senay Ünsal; Kavlak, Oya; Kulak, Eylül; Bozkaya, Mürüvet

    2011-06-01

    To assess contraceptive knowledge, use of emergency contraception (EC) and the motives of women seeking induced abortion. A descriptive and cross-sectional study conducted at the T. C. Izmir Dr. Hayri Ekrem Ustundag Gynaecology and Maternity Hospital and the Izmir Ataturk Research and Teaching Hospital, Turkey. The research sample consisted of 440 women who requested an abortion between January and May 2010, and voluntarily agreed to participate. Sixty-two percent of the women became pregnant while using family planning (FP) methods. The contraceptive used by 42% was the condom, and 45% believed that they had become pregnant because of improper use of the contraceptive. Ninety-three percent had never used EC. Thirty-seven percent wanted their pregnancy terminated because they did not want another child, whereas 26% viewed induced abortion as a method of FP. Sixty-nine percent of the women received FP counselling from health professionals, and 80% found the information provided adequate. The women assessed were insufficiently knowledgeable about FP in general and EC in particular. Many had become pregnant as a result of inaccurate information.

  12. Comparison of gemeprost and vaginal misoprostol in first trimester mifepristone-induced abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Pernille Fog; Rørbye, Christina; Vejborg, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare efficacy and side effects of gemeprost and vaginal misoprostol in mifepristone-induced abortions in women up to 63 days of gestation. Methods A retrospective study of 833 consecutive patients admitted for medical termination of first...... trimester pregnancy was conducted. Four-hundred ten patients received mifepristone 600 mg, followed 48 h later by gemeprost 1 mg (regimen I), and 423 patients received mifepristone 200 mg followed by vaginal misoprostol 800 µg (regimen II). Success rates were evaluated after 2 weeks and after 3 months......, gemeprost and vaginal misoprostol are equally effective for termination of first trimester abortion, but may be associated with varying intensity of side effects....

  13. Comparison of gemeprost and vaginal misoprostol in first trimester mifepristone-induced abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Pernille Fog; Rørbye, Christina; Vejborg, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare efficacy and side effects of gemeprost and vaginal misoprostol in mifepristone-induced abortions in women up to 63 days of gestation. Methods A retrospective study of 833 consecutive patients admitted for medical termination of first......, gemeprost and vaginal misoprostol are equally effective for termination of first trimester abortion, but may be associated with varying intensity of side effects........ The severity of bleeding and side effects (pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea) was scored by the patients, and requests for supplementary analgesic treatment were recorded by the attending nurse. Results Success rates were 99% in both groups after 2 weeks of follow-up. At 3 months of follow-up, success rates...

  14. Socio-clinical profile of married women with history of induced abortion: A community-based cross-sectional study in a rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitra Pattanaik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Induced abortion contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries yet women still seek repeat induced abortion in spite of the availability of contraceptive services. Objectives: (1 To study the sociodemographic profile of abortion seekers. (2 To study the reasons for procuring abortions by married women of reproductive age group. Materials and Methods: It was a cross-sectional community-based study. All the married women of reproductive age group (15–49 years with a history of induced abortion were selected as the subjects. Results: The most common reason for seeking an abortion was poverty (39.4%, followed by girl child and husband's insistence, which accounted for 17.2% each. More complications were noted in women undergoing an abortion in places other than government hospitals and also who did it in the second trimester. Conclusions: To reduce maternal deaths from unsafe abortion, several broad activities require strengthening such as decreasing unwanted pregnancies, increasing geographic accessibility and affordability, upgrading facilities that offers medical termination of pregnancy (MTP services, increasing awareness among the reproductive age about the legal and safe abortion facilities, the consequences of unsafe abortion, ensuring appropriate referral facilities, increasing access to safe abortion services and increasing the quality of abortion care, including postabortion care.

  15. Socio-clinical profile of married women with history of induced abortion: A community-based cross-sectional study in a rural area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Sumitra; Patnaik, Lipilekha; Subhadarshini, Arpita; Sahu, Trilochan

    2017-01-01

    Induced abortion contributes significantly to maternal mortality in developing countries yet women still seek repeat induced abortion in spite of the availability of contraceptive services. (1) To study the sociodemographic profile of abortion seekers. (2) To study the reasons for procuring abortions by married women of reproductive age group. It was a cross-sectional community-based study. All the married women of reproductive age group (15-49 years) with a history of induced abortion were selected as the subjects. The most common reason for seeking an abortion was poverty (39.4%), followed by girl child and husband's insistence, which accounted for 17.2% each. More complications were noted in women undergoing an abortion in places other than government hospitals and also who did it in the second trimester. To reduce maternal deaths from unsafe abortion, several broad activities require strengthening such as decreasing unwanted pregnancies, increasing geographic accessibility and affordability, upgrading facilities that offers medical termination of pregnancy (MTP) services, increasing awareness among the reproductive age about the legal and safe abortion facilities, the consequences of unsafe abortion, ensuring appropriate referral facilities, increasing access to safe abortion services and increasing the quality of abortion care, including postabortion care.

  16. Assessment of Risk Factors of Intrauterine Adhesions in Patients With Induced Abortion and the Curative Effect of Hysteroscopic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xiaoliang; Qin, Guirong; Zhou, Zhoulin; Jiang, Xiaoli

    2017-10-03

    To explore the risk factors for intrauterine adhesions in patients with artificial abortion and clinical efficacy of hysteroscopic dissection. 1500 patients undergoing artificial abortion between January 2014 and June 2015 were enrolled into this study. The patients were divided into two groups with or without intrauterine adhesions. Univariate and Multiple logistic regression were conducted to assess the effects of multiple factors on the development of intrauterine adhesions following induced abortion. The incidence rate for intrauterine adhesions following induced abortion is 17.0%. Univariate showed that preoperative inflammation, multiple pregnancies and suction evacuation time are the influence risk factors of intrauterine adhesions. Multiple logistic regression demonstrates that multiple pregnancies, high intrauterine negative pressure, and long suction evacuation time are independent risk factors for the development of intrauterine adhesions following induced abortion. Additionally, intrauterine adhesions were observed in 105 mild, 80 moderate, and 70 severe cases. The cure rates for these three categories of intrauterine adhesions by hysteroscopic surgery were 100.0%, 93.8%, and 85.7%, respectively. Multiple pregnancies, high negative pressure suction evacuation and long suction evacuation time are independent risk factors for the development of intrauterine adhesions following induced abortions. Hysteroscopic surgery substantially improves the clinical outcomes of intrauterine adhesions.

  17. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T

    1993-01-01

    We have studied activation-induced changes in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i, interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion, and clonal abortion of the human leukaemic T-cell line Jurkat and three T-cell receptor (TcR)/CD3 receptor negative clones deficient for the TcR alpha, TcR beta and CD3 gamma chains...... to an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of TcR/CD3...... expression. The present observation suggest the existence of different secondary messenger systems operating in Jurkat cells following activation via the TcR/CD3, CD2 and the MHC class I pathways, respectively....

  18. [Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in induced abortion. A cost benefit analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonne-Holm, S; Heisterberg, L; Hebjørn, S; Dyring-Andersen, K; Andersen, J T; Hejl, B L

    1981-03-30

    The Danish national social expense/annum of 25,000 terminations of pregnancy was calculated to equal 135 million Danish crowns in 1979 (11 million pounds). If prophylactic penicillin/ampicillin treatment is introduced in the treatment of women who had previously had genital infections, 7 million Danish crowns could be saved annually (approximately 580,000 pounds) based on a clinically controlled investigation of the effect of prophylactic antibiotic therapy. To this must be added the savings in expenses for treating secondary infertility and other sequelae of postabortion infection. These calculations are associated with considerable uncertainty because of poorly defined information on the basic economy. (author's)

  19. Access to Contraceptives in Countries With Restrictive Abortion Laws: The Case of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; Tsui, Amy Ong; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Hoga, Luiza Akiko Komura

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether current contraceptive use is affected by a history of abortion for women from a country with abortion-restricted laws. This is an analysis of 2006 Brazil Demographic and Health Survey. Nonpregnant women whose first pregnancy occurred in the previous 5 years were selected for this study (n = 2,181). We used propensity score matching to compare current contraceptive use among women with induced or spontaneous abortion and women with no abortion. We found differences in the use, but women with a history of abortion did not report more effective contraceptive than women with no abortion, as we expected.

  20. Trends in induced abortion among Nordic women aged 40-44 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydsjö, Adam; Josefsson, Ann; Bladh, Marie; Sydsjö, Gunilla

    2011-08-16

    Women aged 40-44 years in 2005 ought to have been subjected to much more influence on attitudes and knowledge on contraceptive methods during their fertile period than women who were in the same age span in 1975 when the abortion laws were introduced. From official statistics, the rates of induced abortion and birth rates in women aged 40-44 years were collected for Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland for each five-year during the period 1975-2005. With the exception of Sweden all other studied Scandinavian countries have lowered their abortion rates since 1975 (pabortions in relation to birth rate (pabortion than Sweden in the age group 40-44 years (pabortion in women aged 40-44 years in Finland, Norway, Denmark, and at status quo in Sweden. 40-44 years in Finland, Norway, Denmark, and at status quo in Sweden. This indicates that family planning programs works well in the Nordic countries. The differences found may be assumed to possible diverging focus on attitudes or ethical considerations.

  1. [Association between contraceptive choice and the risk of induced abortion among floating married women of childbearing age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Li-jun; Zhu, Lin; Guo, Chao; Liu, Hong-yan

    2013-07-01

    To find the association between factors related to contraception, reproductive health and the risk of induced abortion among floating married women of childbearing age, so as to provide basis for improving the access to health services for floating women of childbearing age. Using data from the reproductive health survey on floating population from five cities in 2005, factors as demographic characteristics, contraceptive choice, settings and access to health services, induced abortion among the floating married women of childbearing age were described. Multivariate logistic regression was used to investigate the association the factors relative to contraception, reproductive health and the risk of induced abortion between 543 cases and 1796 controls. The risks of induced abortion among those under 30-years-old floating married women of childbearing age were 2.08-fold (95%CI:1.26-3.42) of the group at the age of 40 years old. The risk of abortion among floating married women at childbearing age who were taking short-acting contraceptive methods, was 2.56-fold (95%CI:1.84-3.56) of those using the long-acting methods of contraception. The induced abortion risk of floating women at childbearing age who paid the contraceptive implement out of their own pockets, was 1.72-fold (95% CI:1.32-2.24) of those who got it free of charge. The risks of abortion among women who received the contraceptive devices through maternal and child health centers, general hospitals or street residential committees were 2.69-fold (95%CI:1.71-4.22), 2.49-fold (95%CI:1.68-3.68)and 1.81-fold (95%CI:1.20-2.72) of those who received them from urban or rural family planning stations, respectively. The induced abortion risk for women who were ignorant of emergency contraception, was 1.41-fold (95% CI: 1.12-1.78) of those who had the knowledge. The abortion risks of floating women at childbearing age who get the contraceptive knowledge from the colleagues, relatives or friends were 1.85 times (95

  2. Social and economic inequalities in induced abortion in Spain as a function of individual and contextual factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Gloria; Ruiz-Muñoz, Dolores; Gotsens, Merce; Cases, Mariona Casals; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica

    2014-02-01

    The socioeconomic position of women who have an induced abortion has been explored extensively, but without taking contextual factors into account. The objective was to describe socioeconomic inequalities in the rate of induced abortion in Spain in 2001, jointly evaluating the effects of both regional and individual socioeconomic characteristics. A cross-sectional study using a multilevel approach was carried out among women who were resident in Spain in 2001, considering the hierarchical structure of relevant factors. Analyses were carried out at the individual and regional level. We fit Poisson regression models to calculate adjusted relative risks (aRR) of induced abortion and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The estimated abortion rate was 6.26 per 1000 women aged 20-49 years. Induced abortion was more frequent among younger women (aRR = 1.55 for women aged 20-24 years, compared with those aged 25-34 years) and those with less than primary education (aRR = 2.25 compared with women with university studies). Women residing in regions with lower public spending on non-university education (aRR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70-0.98) and a higher percentage of non-European Union immigrants (aRR = 1.06, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10) were also more likely to have had an induced abortion. Socioeconomic inequalities in the practice of induced abortion in Spain exist not only at the individual level but also at the regional level. The prevention of unintended pregnancy should be approached using a global political strategy aimed at changing contextual and individual factors that contribute to unintended pregnancy.

  3. Abortions at KCH

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with induced abortion did well after evacuation and antibiotics. Discussion. It has been estimated that up to 20% of reco~ nised pregnancies end in spontaneous abortion , and this usually occurs in the first trimester. The uterus is not efficient at emptying its contents in early pregnancy, so that abortion is often compli-.

  4. Attitudes of Students of Medicine, University of Mostar According to Induced Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trninić, Zoran; Bender, Marija; Šutalo, Nikica; Kozomara, Davorin; Lasić, Valentina; Bevanda, Danijel; Galić, Gordan

    2017-12-01

    Aim of this study was to establish attitudes of medical students on induced abortion and connection of those attitudes with religiousness, length of their studies, sex and various circumstances of pregnancy. In total, 148 students of the first, second, fifth and sixth year of medical faculty participated in the research. The study was conducted at the Medical Faculty of the University in Mostar. While collecting the data, we used a survey taken over from literature. The data were tested with adequate statistical methods afterwards. 81.1% of students would perform an abortion under certain circumstances (χ 2 =57.189; Pabortion in case that a fetus had malformations (χ 2 =3.892; P=0.49) or if the mother's life were endangered (χ 2 =47.676; Pabortion under various circumstances of pregnancy depending on length of medical education, statistically significant difference was proved in the following circumstances: rape (χ 2 =6.097; P=0.014) and if the pregnancy would endanger mother's mental health (χ 2 =4.488; P=0.034). Students with shorter medical education expressed more liberal attitudes in the above stated circumstances. By comparison of students' readiness to perform an abortion under various circumstances of pregnancy depending on religiousness statistically significant difference was proved in the following circumstances: in case of 'abortion on demand', no matter the reason (χ 2 =11.908; P=0.012), teenage pregnancy (χ 2 =33.308; Pabortion was not proved statistically. Impact of religiousness on that attitude cannot be commented due to very small share of unreligious students in the sample.

  5. Expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases in the uterus of bitches after spontaneous and induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanca, H; Walter, I; Miller, I; Schäfer-Somi, S; Izgur, H; Aslan, S

    2011-04-01

    Aim of this study was to determine the intrauterine activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 after cessation of the local effect of progesterone. For this purpose, pregnancy was terminated in 10 bitches at mid-gestation with the progesterone receptor antagonist aglepristone (10 mg/kg body weight, sc, Alizine®; Virbac, France) at two subsequent days (group IRA = induced resorption/abortion). The IRA group was divided into two subgroups (Group I, n = 5, days 25-35 of pregnancy; group II, n = 5, days 36-45). Five further bitches were introduced with beginning abortion (group SRA = spontaneous resorption/abortion). Seven healthy bitches between day 25 and 45 of gestation served as controls. After ovariohysterectomy at the end of abortion and between days 25 and 45 of gestation, respectively, the distribution and activity of collagenases were investigated by immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. At placental sites, MMP-2 activity in the endometrium was significantly lower in IRA groups than in the SRA group (33.7 ± 11.8% and 39.3 ± 5.4% vs 52.2 ± 10.2%, p < 0.05); however, MMP-2 expression was lowest in the control group (control: 21.4 ± 6.3%; p < 0.01) and similarly in the myometrium (controls: 13.1 ± 2.5%; p < 0.05). MMP-9 activity was also lower in the endometrium and myometrium of the control group in comparison to SRA and IRA groups (11.8 ± 3.2%; p < 0.01 and 28.4 ± 32.8%; p < 0.05). At interplacental sites, the amount of active collagenases in the myometrium was significantly lower in the control group. It is concluded that the blockade of the biological progesterone effect was associated with an increase in activity of both collagenases. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Knowledge of Emergency Contraceptive Pills among Hungarian Women Presenting for Induced Abortion or Seeking Emergency Contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinszky, Z; Devosa, I; Fekete, Z; Szabó, D; Sikovanyecz, J; Pásztor, N; Keresztúri, A

    2016-09-01

    Aim: To compare the differences in contraceptive characteristics and the knowledge of emergency contraception (ECP) among women who used ECP after unprotected intercourse and those who sought an abortion. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted in a Hungarian university hospital among women for whom ECP was prescribed after unprotected intercourse (n = 940) as well as women who presented for the termination of pregnancy (n = 1592) between January 1, 2005 and November 20, 2006. Their knowledge of ECP and their experience with and attitudes toward ECP use were targeted. Results: The availability of ECP was well known (87.9 %), but it was still greatly underutilized: applied by only 13 of the 1592 women who resorted to abortion. Primarily, the ECP group consisted of those who experienced a condom failure significantly more often (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1), followed by those cases where ECP applications was a consequence of not using any kind of contraception (OR = 3.8). Fewer than one third (32 %) of the abortion seekers had previously used ECP, and only one fifth knew how to obtain it. Appropriate awareness of ECP was influenced by information obtained from health-care providers (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 3.93) or school education (AOR = 1.82). Conclusions: More thorough education is needed to provide a deeper knowledge of ECP use during contraceptive counseling for women seeking abortion, including those contraceptive mishaps where unintended pregnancy can be prevented by ECP.

  7. The problem of illegally induced abortion: results from a hospital-based study conducted at district level in Dar es Salaam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Muhammad, H; Urassa, E

    2000-01-01

    Illegal abortion is known to be a major contributor to maternal mortality. The objective of the study was firstly to identify women with illegally induced abortion, (IA) and to compare them with women admitted with a spontaneous abortion (SA) or receiving antenatal care (AC), and secondly...... to describe the circumstances which characterized the abortion. The population of this cross-sectional questionnaire study comprised patients from Temeke District Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. After an in-depth confidential interview, 603 women with incomplete abortion were divided into two groups: 362...

  8. Reasons for induced abortion and their relation to women's emotional distress: a prospective, two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broen, Anne Nordal; Moum, Torbjörn; Bödtker, Anne Sejersted; Ekeberg, Oivind

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the most important reasons for induced abortion and to examine their relationship to emotional distress at follow-up. Eighty women were included in the study. The women were interviewed 10 days, 6 months (T2) and 2 years (T3) after they underwent an abortion. At all time points, the participants completed the Impact of Event Scale and a questionnaire about feelings connected to the abortion. Reasons related to education, job and finances were highly rated. Also, "a child should be wished for," "male partner does not favour having a child at the moment," "tired, worn out" and "have enough children" were important reasons. "Pressure from male partner" was listed as the 11th most important reason. When the reasons for abortion and background variables were included in multiple regression analyses, the strongest predictor of emotional distress at T2 and T3 was "pressure from male partner." Male pressure on women to have an induced abortion has a significant, negative influence on women's psychological responses in the 2 years following the event. Women who gave the reason "have enough children" for choosing abortion reported slightly better psychological outcomes at T3.

  9. A politico-medical perspective of induced abortion in a semi-urban community of Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasubaa, O B; Akindele, S T; Adelekan, A; Okwuokenye, H

    2002-01-01

    This study is designed to document a semi-urban community perspective on induced abortion in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, with a view to estimating community awareness, attitudes and implications of its existence in the community and providing relevant sociopolitical policies and pragmatic educational guidelines for policy makers to solve some of its problems within the Nigerian landscape and beyond. This was a cross-sectional study conducted in April 2000, at Oranfe community in Ile-Ife, South West, Nigeria, which has an estimated population of 5250 inhabitants. We used the survey method with the aid of a well-structured questionnaire. One hundred and eighty residents of the community were sampled as our subjects for this study. We used the cluster random sampling technique. The main outcome measures were the sociodemographic characteristics of the respondents, knowledge, attitude with perceived solutions to the problems of abortion and relationship of the sociodemographic factors to respondents' knowledge and attitude. The respondents were highly literate, as only 18 (11.04%) had no formal education. Eighty-five (52.79%) had good knowledge of abortion while 45 (27.95%) and 31 (19.25%) had fair and poor knowledge, respectively. Thirty-eight (24.05%) respondents felt that the solution to the problems of induced abortion can be obtained through its legalisation; 31 (19.62%) respondents believed that the solution lies in liberalising laws on abortion; provision of safe abortion services was suggested by 30 (18.98%) respondents. One hundred and seven (66.88%) felt that legalisation of abortion will increase its practice while 53 (31.12%) felt that such legalisation will not increase the practice. Similarly, 55 (34.37%) of the respondents emphasised that legalisation would reduce the problems of induced abortion compared with 82 (51.25%) who felt otherwise. One hundred and twenty (73.61%) of the respondents did not believe that the position of the law in Nigeria can stop the

  10. Severe morbidities associated with induced abortions among misoprostol users and non-users in a tertiary public hospital in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Misoprostol has become a popular over the counter self-administered abortifacient in Ghana. This study aimed to compare the socio-demographic characteristics and clinical complications associated with misoprostol and non-misoprostol induced abortions among patients admitted to a tertiary public health facility in Ghana. Methods This was a cross sectional study conducted at the gynaecological ward of Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), over a four-month period using a structured pre-tested questionnaire. Data were analysed using Chi-square, Fisher’s exact and student t-tests. Factors associated with severe morbidity were examined using Poisson regression with robust error variance to estimate crude and adjusted relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). P misoprostol users and 126 misoprostol non-users were recruited into the study. About 71% of the clients had self-induced abortions. Misoprostol users were more likely to be younger (p misoprostol non-users. Misoprostol users were more likely than non-users to undergo termination of pregnancy because they wanted to continue schooling (p misoprostol users vs. 65.1% misoprostol non-users; p = 0.01) suffered severe morbidity. Nulliparous women (adjusted RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.08-1.52) and those who had induced abortion after 12 weeks’ gestation (adjusted RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.18-1.57) were at increased risks of experiencing severe morbidity. The association between mode of abortion induction and severe morbidity was not statistically significant (p = 0.06). Conclusion Self-induced abortions using misoprostol is a common practice among women in this study; nearly three quarters of them suffered severe morbidity. Nonetheless, severe morbidity among misoprostol users and non-users did not differ significantly but was directly related to the gestational age at which the induced abortions occurred. Health education on the dangers of self-induced abortions and appropriate use of medication

  11. Perspectiva masculina acerca do aborto provocado Male perspective on induced abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciana Alves Duarte

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a perspectiva de homens de uma comunidade universitária que viviam em união legal ou consensual acerca do aborto provocado. MÉTODOS: Estudo descritivo de corte transversal em que se analisaram informações de 361 entrevistados, pertencentes a diferentes categorias de uma universidade. Utilizou-se o teste de qui-quadrado para avaliar a associação das variáveis dependentes com as independentes. RESULTADOS: Dos entrevistados, 53% afirmaram que as mulheres têm direito a interromper a gestação; as situações de maior aceitação foram: risco de vida da gestante (85%, gravidez resultante de estupro (80% e anomalia fetal (75%. As variáveis associadas à opinião masculina favorável ao aborto foram: maior escolaridade dos homens e das parceiras e o grupo (docente/aluno a que pertencia o entrevistado. CONCLUSÕES: Os entrevistados tenderam a ser mais favoráveis ao aborto nas situações já legitimadas legal e/ou socialmente. O maior grau de escolaridade, tanto deles quanto das parceiras, apareceu como relevante para determinar a postura em relação ao aborto.OBJECTIVE: To analyze the perspective on induced abortion of men of a university community living in legal or consensual wedlock. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out and 361 members of different categories of an university were interviewed. Chi-square test was used to assess the association between dependent and independent variables. RESULTS: Fifth-three percent of the participants acknowledged that women have the right to end pregnancy. Men were more favorable to abortion when there is a risk to woman's life (85%; rape-related pregnancy (80%; and fetal anomalies (75%. Higher schooling of both men and their partners and the interviewees' position (teacher/student were associated to a positive attitude towards abortion. CONCLUSIONS: Men tended to be more prone to abortion in legally and/or socially accepted instances. Better education of

  12. Complications of induced abortion and miscarriage in three African countries: a hospital-based study among WHO collaborating centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyaux, N; Alihonou, E; Diadhiou, F; Leke, R; Thonneau, P F

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to describe two of the outcomes of pregnancy, induced abortion and miscarriage, in three African countries. Major maternal risk factors were also evaluated. The study was prospective and based on the medical files of all 1,957 women admitted to participating health care structures. Overall, 988 women were admitted for complications of miscarriage, and 969 for complications of induced abortion. Gestational age was lower in women with miscarriages (pabortion. In our study, 26 maternal deaths were recorded, 22 of which were associated with induced abortion. Infection was the most important risk factor for death (OR=4.8; 1.9-12.4). Maternal deaths related to abortion complications often occurred shortly after hospital admission and with signs of sepsis. This demonstrates the importance of effective emergency services. Unfortunately, hospital-based studies alone cannot assess all maternal death risk factors, especially those for maternal death related to induced abortion complications. It is therefore important to determine what happened to the woman before hospital admission and during her stay in hospital. Combinations of qualitative and quantitative methods could be used to increase our understanding of this problem and to help us to solve it.

  13. Social stigma and disclosure about induced abortion: results from an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shellenberg, Kristen M; Moore, Ann M; Bankole, Akinrinola; Juarez, Fatima; Omideyi, Adekunbi Kehinde; Palomino, Nancy; Sathar, Zeba; Singh, Susheela; Tsui, Amy O

    2011-01-01

    It is well recognised that unsafe abortions have significant implications for women's physical health; however, women's perceptions and experiences with abortion-related stigma and disclosure about abortion are not well understood. This paper examines the presence and intensity of abortion stigma in five countries, and seeks to understand how stigma is perceived and experienced by women who terminate an unintended pregnancy and influences her subsequent disclosure behaviours. The paper is based upon focus groups and semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with women and men in Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru and the United States (USA) in 2006. The stigma of abortion was perceived similarly in both legally liberal and restrictive settings although it was more evident in countries where abortion is highly restricted. Personal accounts of experienced stigma were limited, although participants cited numerous social consequences of having an abortion. Abortion-related stigma played an important role in disclosure of individual abortion behaviour.

  14. Dynamically observing the value of the changes of serum sex hormone levels of early pregnancy after drug-induced abortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Honggang; Dong Hua; Gu Yan; Zhang Zuncheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To observe the value of the changes of serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG), estradiol (E), progesterone (P) Levels of early pregnancy after drug-induced abortion dynamically. Methods: Assessing 55 women proved pregnant by urine or blood HCG retrospecticly, who had terminated their pregnancy by mifepristonr and misoprostol. Meanwhile the serum levels of β-HCG, E, P were monitored dynamically. Results: Among the 55 patients, the levels of β-HCG, E and P had significant decreased (t β-HCG =4.845, t E =7.655, t P =11.390, P E =9.089, P P =2.910, P<0.05). Conclusion: Detectint the serum hormone's levels after drug-induced abortion by chemiluminescent immunoassay, we can assess indirectly the value of administration of mifepristone and misoprostol, predict the prolonged vaginal bleeding after drug-induced abortion, and the outcome of the treatment, which determine wether need another curestage. (authors)

  15. Induced abortions and birth outcomes of women with a history of severe psychosocial problems in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, V; Gissler, M; Suvisaari, J; Manninen, M

    2015-09-01

    To increase knowledge on the reproductive health of women who have been placed in a residential school, a child welfare facility for adolescents with severe psychosocial problems. All women (n=291) who lived in the Finnish residential schools on the last day of the years 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 were included in this study and compared with matched general population controls. Register-based information on induced abortions and births was collected until the end of the year 2011. Compared to controls, women with a residential school history had more induced abortions. A higher proportion of their births took place when they were teenagers or even minors. They were more often single, smoked significantly more during pregnancy and had a higher risk of having a preterm birth or a baby with a low birth weight. The findings have implications for the planning of preventive and supportive interventions that aim to increase the well-being of women with a residential school history and their offspring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Attitudes and experiences regarding induced abortion among female sex workers, Savannakhet Province, Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeve, Amanda; Phrasisombath, Ketkesone; Sychareun, Vanphanom; Faxelid, Elisabeth

    2014-10-01

    Female sex workers (FSWs) are at risk of unintended pregnancies and induced abortions (IAs). This study aimed to describe attitudes towards and experiences of IA among FSWs in Laos. 258 FSWs were interviewed in Kaysone Phomvihan, Laos. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to analyse the data. Overall, 24% of the respondents reported experience of IA. Fifteen percent reported experience of unintended pregnancy after entering sex work, whereof all had ended in IA. Thirty-six percent had self-induced the last IA and 64% were carried out in private clinics. The main reasons for having IAs were paternity denial and lack of financial and social support. A majority agreed or strongly agreed that IA should not be legal in Laos and that women who undergo IA are immoral, but also that IA is the only option a FSW has when experiencing an unintended pregnancy. A positive attitude towards IA was associated with longer duration of sex work and being unmarried. IAs were common. Respondents' attitudes and practices reflected limited options when experiencing an unintended pregnancy, and were influenced by negative social perceptions. Interventions targeting FSWs should raise awareness of IA and post-abortion care, and promote dual contraceptive use with highly effective contraceptives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spontaneous abortion: a prospective cohort study of younger women from the general population in Denmark. Validation, occurrence and risk determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, L; Tolstrup, J; Munk, C; Bergholt, T; Ottesen, B; Grønbaek, M; Kjaer, S K

    2006-01-01

    To assess the occurrence of spontaneous abortion, comparing two different data sources. To estimate the rate of spontaneous abortion over a 2-year period, and examine potential predictors of the risk for incident spontaneous abortion. We used interview data from a population-based prospective cohort study comprising 11,088 women and data from a linkage of the cohort with the Hospital Discharge Register to compare spontaneous abortions as reported in the interview with those identified in the register. Based on interview data, we estimated the rate of spontaneous abortion during the two-year follow-up. Finally, risk determinants for incident spontaneous abortion were analyzed by means of logistic regression. A total of 654 spontaneous abortions before enrolment in the study were reported by the women compared to 531 abortions found in the register. More than 80% of the spontaneous abortions identified from both sources were recorded in the same year. During follow-up a total of 20.9% of pregnancies intended to be carried to term ended as a spontaneous abortion. In the risk factor analysis, we found that previous spontaneous abortion, being single, never having used oral contraceptives, and use of intrauterine device were associated with increased risk of subsequent spontaneous abortion. In addition, it was indicated that a short interpregnancy interval following a spontaneous abortion may confer an increased risk of abortion in the subsequent pregnancy. We found a high rate of spontaneous abortion in the present study and an acceptable agreement between information obtained by interview and register information. More than 25% of the spontaneous abortions were only reported by the women, and this could not be explained by erroneously reported induced abortions, and may be early, nonhospitalized abortions. We confirm that number of previous spontaneous abortions is a strong determinant, and our data may also indicate a role of previous contraceptive habits. A role of

  18. Abortion - surgical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suction curettage; Surgical abortion; Elective abortion - surgical; Therapeutic abortion - surgical ... Surgical abortion involves dilating the opening to the uterus (cervix) and placing a small suction tube into the uterus. ...

  19. Efficacy and acceptability of a mifepristone-misoprostol combined regimen for early induced abortion among women in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Melanie; Dzuba, Ilana G; Smith, Patricio Sanhueza; Mendoza, Luis Jorge Arellano; Bousiéguez, Manuel; Martínez, María Laura García; Polanco, Ranulfo Ríos; Villalón, Antonio Eduardo Flores; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the experience of women receiving mifepristone-misoprostol for early induced abortion in public sector facilities in the Federal District of Mexico City. An open-label prospective study was conducted with 1000 pregnant women who sought induced abortion with a pregnancy of up to 63days of gestation, as measured from the date of their last menstrual period. The study was conducted in three public sector healthcare facilities: two secondary level hospitals and one primary care clinic. Women ingested 200mg mifepristone on day 1, followed by 800μg buccal misoprostol 24hours later, and they returned for follow-up on day 8. The primary outcome was complete abortion without recourse to surgical intervention. A total of 971 women received mifepristone-misoprostol and were included in the analysis for efficacy of treatment. The overall efficacy of the combined medical abortion regimen studied was 97.3% (n=945); the success rate did not vary significantly by gestational age (95.9%-100%; P=0.449). Most women (n=922, 95.0%) had a successful induced abortion with only one dose of misoprostol. The combined mifepristone and buccal misoprostol regimen was found to be highly effective and acceptable among Mexican women. www.ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00386282. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Induced abortion and risk for breast cancer: reporting (recall) bias in a Dutch case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rookus, M A; van Leeuwen, F E

    1996-12-04

    In general, no association has been found between spontaneous abortion (naturally occurring termination of a pregnancy) and the risk for breast cancer. With respect to induced abortion (termination of a pregnancy by artificial means), the results have been more inconclusive. A positive association was found in five studies, no association was found in six studies, and a negative association was found in the only cohort study. It is thought that part of the inconsistency of the reported results may be attributable to reporting (recall) bias, since all but two studies on induced abortion used the case-control design and were based only on information obtained from study subjects. In comparison with breast cancer case patients, healthy control subjects may be more reluctant to report on a controversial, emotionally charged subject such as induced abortion. Thus, differential underreporting may be a cause of spurious associations in case-control studies. Our goal was threefold: 1) to evaluate the relationship between a history of induced or spontaneous abortion and the risk for breast cancer in a Dutch population-based, case-control study; 2) to examine reporting bias by comparing risks between two geographic areas (i.e., western regions and southeastern regions in The Netherlands that differ in prevalence of and attitudes toward induced abortion); and 3) to compare reporting bias in data on induced abortion with reporting bias in data on oral contraceptive use. Data analyzed in this study were obtained from 918 women (20-54 years of age at diagnosis) who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer during the period from 1986 through 1989 and had been initially enrolled in a population-based, case-control study investigating oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk. The women resided in one of four geographic areas that were covered by Regional Cancer Registries: two western regions (Amsterdam and West) and two southeastern regions (East and Eindhoven). Each case

  1. [Women's opinion on abortion legalization in a middle size county in southern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    César, J A; Gomes, G; Horta, B L; de Oliveira, A K; Saraiva, A K; Pardo, D O; Silva, L M; Rodghiero, C L; Gross, M R

    1997-12-01

    Induced abortion is the main cause of maternal death in Brazil. Question of its legalization has been the subject of frequent discussion. In order to assess the influence of the variables affecting the opinion of women of reproductive age, a population-based systematic sample in the county of Rio Grande (Southern Brazil) was examined. Of a total of 1,456 interviews 30% endorsed the legalization, whatever the circumstances; this percentage was directly associated with age, schooling, family income and previous induced abortion (p opinion. Schooling and previous induced abortion were the main determinants of women's favorable opinions regarding abortion legalization.

  2. Views and practices of induced abortion among Australian Fellows and specialist trainees of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Costa, Caroline M; Russell, Darren B; Carrette, Michael

    2010-07-05

    To determine the opinions and current practice of obstetricians and gynaecologists and trainees in the specialty with regard to induced abortion. A voluntary, anonymous survey of Australian Fellows and specialist trainees of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists was conducted between 23 June and 31 July 2009 using an email invitation to proceed to an online questionnaire. Attitudes to abortion; self-reported usual practice of induced abortion. Of 1498 Fellows and trainees invited to complete the questionnaire, 740 (49%) did so. Of these respondents, 632 (85%) stated that they did not hold religious or conscientious views that would make them totally opposed to abortion; 463 of these (73%) reported performing abortion as part of their personal practice, with 204 (44%) doing so only for severe fetal abnormality or serious maternal medical conditions. 108 respondents reported holding views that made them totally opposed to abortion - 60 (56%) opposed it in any situation at all and 48 (44%) opposed it with limited exceptions. Of those opposed, 34 (32%) added comment that they perform abortion for severe fetal abnormality or serious maternal medical conditions, and a further 17 (16%) commented that they refer women requesting abortion in these circumstances to colleagues. Of the respondents not opposed to abortion, 89% supported the availability of induced abortion within the public health system, and half felt that national availability of mifepristone would modify their practice of induced abortion. There was broad support among responding specialist obstetricians and gynaecologists and trainees for the availability of induced abortion in Australia. This study highlights the difficulties of accurately reporting a wide range of views on a contentious issue.

  3. Unintended Pregnancies, Restrictive Abortion Laws, and Abortion Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Medoff, Marshall H.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effect restrictive state abortion laws have on the pregnancy resolution decisions of women with unintended pregnancies. The empirical results find that the abortion ratio and the abortion rate of unintended pregnancies are more sensitive to increases in the abortion price than previous estimates that analyzed total pregnancies (unintended and intended). A Medicaid funding restriction has very little effect on a state's abortion rate of unintended pregnancies, but cause...

  4. Determinants of pregnancy and induced and spontaneous abortion in a jointly determined framework: evidence from a country-wide, district-level household survey in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Salma; Ray, Ranjan

    2014-07-01

    This study provides evidence on the principal determinants of pregnancy and abortion in India using a large country-wide district-level data set (DLHS 2007). The paper provides an economic framework for the analysis of pregnancy and abortion. The study distinguishes between induced and spontaneous abortion and compares the effects of their determinants. The results show that there are wide differences between induced and spontaneous abortions in terms of the sign and magnitude of the estimated effects of several of their determinants, most notably wealth, the woman's age and her desire for children. The study makes a methodological contribution by proposing a trivariate probit estimation framework that recognizes the joint dependence of pregnancy and induced and spontaneous abortion, and provides evidence in support of this joint dependence. The study reports an inverted U-shaped effect of a woman's age on her pregnancy and both forms of abortion. The turning point in each case is quite robust to the estimation framework. A significant effect of contextual variables, at the village level, constructed from the individual responses, on a woman's pregnancy is found. The effects are weaker in the case of induced abortion, and insignificant in the case of spontaneous abortion. The results are shown to be fairly robust. This paper extends the literature on the relation between son preference and fertility by examining the link between mother's son preference and desire for more children with abortion rates.

  5. Fundamental discrepancies in abortion estimates and abortion-related mortality: A reevaluation of recent studies in Mexico with special reference to the International Classification of Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Elard; Aracena, Paula; Gatica, Sebastián; Bravo, Miguel; Huerta-Zepeda, Alejandra; Calhoun, Byron C

    2012-01-01

    In countries where induced abortion is legally restricted, as in most of Latin America, evaluation of statistics related to induced abortions and abortion-related mortality is challenging. The present article reexamines recent reports estimating the number of induced abortions and abortion-related mortality in Mexico, with special reference to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). We found significant overestimations of abortion figures in the Federal District of Mexico (up to 10-fold), where elective abortion has been legal since 2007. Significant overestimation of maternal and abortion-related mortality during the last 20 years in the entire Mexican country (up to 35%) was also found. Such overestimations are most likely due to the use of incomplete in-hospital records as well as subjective opinion surveys regarding induced abortion figures, and due to the consideration of causes of death that are unrelated to induced abortion, including flawed denominators of live births. Contrary to previous publications, we found important progress in maternal health, reflected by the decrease in overall maternal mortality (30.6%) from 1990 to 2010. The use of specific ICD codes revealed that the mortality ratio associated with induced abortion decreased 22.9% between 2002 and 2008 (from 1.48 to 1.14 deaths per 100,000 live births). Currently, approximately 98% of maternal deaths in Mexico are related to causes other than induced abortion, such as hemorrhage, hypertension and eclampsia, indirect causes, and other pathological conditions. Therefore, only marginal or null effects would be expected from changes in the legal status of abortion on overall maternal mortality rates. Rather, maternal health in Mexico would greatly benefit from increasing access to emergency and specialized obstetric care. Finally, more reliable methodologies to assess abortion-related deaths are clearly required. PMID:23271925

  6. Clinical features and hormonal profiles of cloprostenol-induced early abortions in heifers monitored by ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobago, Fikre; Gustafsson, Hans; Bekana, Merga; Beckers, Jean-François; Kindahl, Hans

    2006-11-23

    The present study describes the clinical features and plasma profiles of bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein 1 (bPAG1), the main metabolite of prostaglandin F2alpha (PG metabolite) and progesterone (P4) in heifers in which early abortions were induced. Early abortions were induced in four heifers with cloprostenol and monitored by ultrasonography. Blood samples were collected and the plasma were analyzed for bPAG 1, P4 and PG metabolite. The foetal heartbeat rates varied from 170-186 beats per minute for all foetuses up to the date of cloprostenol treatment. Foetal death was confirmed within two days after cloprostenol treatment. Prior to cloprostenol injection, blood plasma concentrations of bPAG1, PG metabolite and P4 varied from 8.4-40.0 ng/mL, 158-275 pmol/L and 20.7-46.9 nmol/L, respectively. After the foetus expelled, the plasma level of bPAG1 began to decrease but the decrease was small and gradual. The estimated half-life of bPAG1 was 1.8-6.6 days. The plasma level of the PG metabolite started to have short lasting peaks (above 300 pmol/L) within three hours after cloprostenol treatment. The plasma concentrations of P4 dropped sharply to less than 4 nmol/L after 24 hours of cloprostenol injection. The current findings indicated that after early closprostenol-induced foetal death, the plasma concentration of bPAG1 decreased gradually and showed a tendency of variation with the stages of pregnancy.

  7. Clinical features and hormonal profiles of cloprostenol-induced early abortions in heifers monitored by ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckers Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study describes the clinical features and plasma profiles of bovine pregnancy-associated glycoprotein 1 (bPAG1, the main metabolite of prostaglandin F2α (PG metabolite and progesterone (P4 in heifers in which early abortions were induced. Methods Early abortions were induced in four heifers with cloprostenol and monitored by ultrasonography. Blood samples were collected and the plasma were analyzed for bPAG 1, P4 and PG metabolite. Results The foetal heartbeat rates varied from 170–186 beats per minute for all foetuses up to the date of cloprostenol treatment. Foetal death was confirmed within two days after cloprostenol treatment. Prior to cloprostenol injection, blood plasma concentrations of bPAG1, PG metabolite and P4 varied from 8.4 – 40.0 ng/mL, 158 – 275 pmol/L and 20.7 – 46.9 nmol/L, respectively. After the foetus expelled, the plasma level of bPAG1 began to decrease but the decrease was small and gradual. The estimated half-life of bPAG1 was 1.8 – 6.6 days. The plasma level of the PG metabolite started to have short lasting peaks (above 300 pmol/L within three hours after cloprostenol treatment. The plasma concentrations of P4 dropped sharply to less than 4 nmol/L after 24 hours of cloprostenol injection. Conclusion The current findings indicated that after early closprostenol-induced foetal death, the plasma concentration of bPAG1 decreased gradually and showed a tendency of variation with the stages of pregnancy.

  8. The impact of a liberalisation law on legally induced abortion hospitalisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Pinho, Manuel; Santos, João V; Costa, Antónia; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Freitas, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Legal abortion based purely in maternal option without fetal/maternal pathology was liberalised in Portugal in 2007 and since then abortion rates have increased substantially. The aim of this paper was to study the impact of the liberalisation of abortion by maternal request on total legal abortion related hospitalisation trends. We considered hospitalisations of legal abortion (ICD-9-CM codes 635.x) with discharges from 2000 to 2014. Data was obtained from a Portuguese administrative database, which contains all registered public hospitalisations in mainland Portugal. Performed legal abortions during the same period were obtained from INE (National Statistics Institute). Hospitalisations per abortion were calculated by dividing the number of legal abortions hospitalisations per the number of legal abortions, mean ages, number of hospitalisations per age group, complications, admission type and length of stay were also analysed, throughout the study period. Hospitalisations rose during the study period, (from 618 episodes in 2000 to 1,259 in 2014, with a peak of 1,603 in 2010). Since the liberalisation law was passed there was a significant decrease in the number of hospitalisations per abortion: from 1.07 in 2000 to 0.11 in 2014 (pAbortion related hospitalisations are more frequent in women aged 25-39. A significant decrease from the emergent to the scheduled type of admission occurred from 2000 to 2014 (from 83.5% to 56.7% of emergent admissions) (pabortion have decreased, reflecting the major impact that the liberalisation of legal abortion by maternal request had on abortion trends nationwide. Before the liberalisation, each abortion led to approximately one hospitalisation while after the liberalisation this trend shifted to approximately 10% of the number of abortions. Legal abortion related hospitalisations are more frequent in women aged between 25 and 39 years old, an older age group when compared to the one registered in all cases of legal abortions

  9. [Induced abortion and use of contraceptive methods among prostitutes in Almería (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrerizo Egea, María Jesús; Barroso García, María Pilar; Rodríguez-Contreras Pelayo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the performance of induced abortion (IA) in prostitutes in Almería (Spain) and its association with the use of contraceptive methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 110 women. A bivariate analyses using either the χ(2) test or Fisher's exact test was carried out (significance level used condoms and 35.5% of them also used another contraceptive method. No statistically significant association was found between condom breakage and the performance of IA or in the use of other contraceptive methods. A high percentage of this group of women had undergone IA, despite widespread condom use. However, there was a high percentage of condom breakage and a low percentage of use of emergency contraceptive pills after risky sexual relationships. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Perfil sociodemográfico del aborto inducido Sociodemographic profile of induced abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelio Cabezas-García

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Identificar características sociodemográficas y su fuerza de asociación con el aborto inducido del primer embarazo. Material y métodos. Se realizó un estudio analítico con la información de una encuesta realizada en el municipio Diez de Octubre, de la ciudad de La Habana, en Cuba, durante todo el año de 1991 y el primer semestre de 1992. La población de estudio se dividió en dos grupos de comparación: uno formado por las mujeres cuyo primer embarazo terminó en un aborto inducido y el otro constituido por aquellas cuyo embarazo llegó a término. De las variables estudiadas que mostraron diferencias estadísticamente significativas se obtuvieron las razones de momios crudas y ajustadas por la variable que se consideró como confusora: la edad. Para esta última fase del análisis se utilizó la regresión logística multivariada. Resultados. Las características sociodemográficas identificadas como factores de riesgo asociados al aborto inducido del primer embarazo fueron la edad menor de 24 años (aunque el riesgo se incrementa en las menores de 20 años y ser solteras o unidas. Conclusiones. El riesgo de recurrir a la práctica del aborto inducido en el primer embarazo es elevado en mujeres muy jóvenes que aún no han cumplido sus expectativas profesionales, laborales y relacionadas con el matrimonio. Estas razones parecen incompatibles con la maternidad en el grupo de mujeres estudiadas.Objective. To identify sociodemographic characteristics associated with induced abortion of the first pregnancy and quantify the strength of association between them. Material and methods. Data were gathered from a survey conducted in the district of Diez de Octubre, Havana, Cuba throughout 1991 and the beginning of 1992. The study population was divided into two comparable groups: one group of women whose first pregnancy terminated in induced abortion and a second group of women whose pregnancy terminated in childbirth. For the

  11. Epidemiology and determinants of induced abortion in the U.S.S.R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remennick, L I

    1991-01-01

    Since the mid-50s, induced abortion (IA) has been the principal method of birth control for as much as 80% of the U.S.S.R. population, with more than 9 million of terminations performed annually. After brief discussion of the general and specific reasons for a long-term IA dominance in family planning practices, data of the national statistics and local surveys on IA prevalence, contraceptive use and their determinants are critically reviewed. Although most couples are willing to use contraception, they have to rely on traditional methods with high failure rates (withdrawal, condom, rhythm/calendar). Due to many years of misleading information, population views on pros and cons of various birth control methods are severely biased. Public health implications of multiple IA are summarised.

  12. Rates of induced abortion in Iran: the roles of contraceptive use and religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfani, Amir; McQuillan, Kevin

    2008-06-01

    Iran has experienced a dramatic decline in fertility in recent decades, but limited access to legal abortion continues to lead many women whose pregnancies are unwanted or mistimed to undergo clandestine, unsafe abortions. No official data on the abortion rate in Iran have been collected, however. This study uses the 2000 Iran Demographic and Health Survey to estimate the abortion rate for the country as a whole and for specific regions, and to explore the role of contraceptive use and religiosity in explaining regional variations in abortion rates. We estimate the total abortion rate for the country to be 0.26 abortions per married woman, and the annual general abortion rate to be 7.5 abortions per 1,000 married women aged 15-49. We find that the negative effect of modern contraceptive use on the abortion rate is 51 percent greater than the negative effect of religiosity, and we highlight the implications of these findings for policies on reproductive health and family

  13. Chemokine CCL28 induces apoptosis of decidual stromal cells via binding CCR3/CCR10 in human spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chan; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Tang, Chuan-Ling; Wang, Song-Cun; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tao, Yu; Zhu, Rui; Du, Mei-Rong; Li, Da-Jin

    2013-10-01

    Spontaneous abortion is the most common complication of pregnancy. Immune activation and the subsequent inflammation-induced tissue injury are often observed at the maternal-fetal interface as the final pathological assault in recurrent spontaneous abortion. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for spontaneous abortion involving inflammation are not fully understood. Chemokine CCL28 and its receptors CCR3 and CCR10 are important regulators in inflammatory process. Here, we examined the expression of CCL28 and its receptors in decidual stromal cells (DSCs) by immunochemistry and flow cytometry (FCM), and compared their expression level in DSCs from normal pregnancy versus spontaneous abortion, and their relationship to inflammatory cytokines production by DSCs. We further analyzed regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines on CCL28 expression in DSCs by real-time polymerase chain reaction, In-cell Western and FCM. The effects of CCL28-CCR3/CCR10 interaction on DSC apoptosis was investigated by Annexin V staining and FCM analysis or DAPI staining and nuclear morphology. Higher levels of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17A and tumor necrosis factor-α, and increased CCR3/CCR10 expression were observed in DSCs from spontaneous abortion compared with normal pregnancy. Treatment with inflammatory cytokines differently affected CCL28 and CCR3/CCR10 expression in DSCs. Human recombinant CCL28 promoted DSC apoptosis, which was eliminated by pretreatment with neutralizing antibodies against CCR3/CCR10 and CCL28. However, CCL28 did not affect DSC growth. These results suggest that the inflammation-promoted up-regulation of CCL28 and its receptors interaction in DSCs is involved in human spontaneous abortion via inducing DSC apoptosis.

  14. Contraceptive use following spontaneous and induced abortion and its association with family planning services in primary health care: results from a Brazilian longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Ana Luiza Vilela; OlaOlorun, Funmilola; Fujimori, Elizabeth; Hoga, Luiza Akiko Komura; Tsui, Amy Ong

    2015-10-15

    Although it is well known that post-abortion contraceptive use is high when family planning services are provided following spontaneous or induced abortions, this relationship remains unclear in Brazil and similar settings with restrictive abortion laws. Our study aims to assess whether contraceptive use is associated with access to family planning services in the six-month period post-abortion, in a setting where laws towards abortion are highly restrictive. This prospective cohort study recruited 147 women hospitalized for emergency treatment following spontaneous or induced abortion in Brazil. These women were then followed up for six months (761 observations). Women responded to monthly telephone interviews about contraceptive use and the utilization of family planning services (measured by the utilization of medical consultation and receipt of contraceptive counseling). Generalized Estimating Equations were used to analyze the effect of family planning services and other covariates on contraceptive use over the six-month period post-abortion. Women who reported utilization of both medical consultation and contraceptive counseling in the same month had higher odds of reporting contraceptive use during the six-month period post-abortion, when compared with those who did not use these family planning services [adjusted aOR = 1.93, 95 % Confidence Interval: 1.13-3.30]. Accessing either service alone did not contribute to contraceptive use. Age (25-34 vs. 15-24 years) was also statistically associated with contraceptive use. Pregnancy planning status, desire to have more children and education did not contribute to contraceptive use. In restrictive abortion settings, family planning services offered in the six-month post-abortion period contribute to contraceptive use, if not restricted to simple counseling. Medical consultation, in the absence of contraceptive counseling, makes no difference. Immediate initiation of a contraceptive that suits women's pregnancy

  15. [Induced abortion in Mexico: what do Mexican Ob/Gyn know, think and do].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya-Romero, José de Jesús; Schiavon, Raffaela; Troncoso, Erika; Díaz-Olavarrieta, Claudia; Karver, Tahilin

    2015-01-01

    The causals for legal abortion in Mexico vary as established by the Constitution of each State; from 2007 it is legal in Mexico City. To identify knowledge, attitudes and practice of abortion between gynecologists and obstetricians. Survey study conducted between some of the gynaeco-obstetricians attended the 64th Mexican Congress of Gynecology and Obstetrics held in Mexico City, October 2013. From the 1,085 respondents, 77% correctly identified that abortion is legal accord to Constitutional Signs of each State; 17.5% said it is never legal and 5.7% thought that is always legal. The 67% comment that public institutions should have infrastructure and trained medical personnal to legal abortion practice. The 72% response they would attend or denounce the woman who underwent an abortion outlawed. The remaining 28% showed negative attitudes, from informing the couple or parents (18%), scold women (2%) or reporting it to the authorities (8%). In 39%, they felt that the medical profession who practice discriminates abortions; 28% admit stigmatize partener and 27% feel stigmatized if performing abortions. Percentage high hospitalized patients in case of early abortions, for surgical or medical treatment. It is necessary to increase and improve knowledge technical and legal about abortion, especially among gynaeco-obstetricians, they are who responsibility to comply about prescribed by law, in accordance with international recommendations and the exercise of reproductive rights of women.

  16. [Induced abortion. Report of 180 cases at the Gabriel Toure Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, I; Tall, S; Sogoba, S; Dolo, A

    2008-01-01

    A prospective case study on provocated abortion has been conducted at gynaecology and obstetric department of Hôpital Gabriel Touré from September 2003 to June 2004. We included in the study 180 cases and 360 controls (normal delivery pregnant women) matched by age to the cases. 5 04% of our cases undergone a provocated abortion; in 47.8%, the abortion was provoked by paramedical personal. Hemorrhagic complication was noted in 71.1%. The main reason of provocated abortion was single women, family pressure, fair of society and uncontrolled contraception.

  17. The sociocultural context of family size preference, ideal sex composition, and induced abortion in India: findings from India's National Family Health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sutapa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the author examined the effect of family size preference and sex composition of living children as determinants of induced abortion among women in India by analyzing 90,303 ever-married women aged 15-49, included in India's second National Family Health Survey, conducted in 1998-99. Multivariate logistic regression methods were used to examine the association between induced abortion and possible determinants. The results indicated that a woman's desire to limit family size with preferred sex composition of children, coupled with her autonomy and the sociocultural context, largely determines her experience of induced abortion in India.

  18. The Sociocultural Context of Family Size Preference, Ideal Sex Composition, and Induced Abortion in India: Findings From India’s National Family Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Sutapa

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the author examined the effect of family size preference and sex composition of living children as determinants of induced abortion among women in India by analyzing 90,303 ever-married women aged 15–49, included in India’s second National Family Health Survey, conducted in 1998–99. Multivariate logistic regression methods were used to examine the association between induced abortion and possible determinants. The results indicated that a woman’s desire to limit family size with preferred sex composition of children, coupled with her autonomy and the sociocultural context, largely determines her experience of induced abortion in India. PMID:23066963

  19. Characteristics of presumptive idiopathic disseminated intravascular coagulation during second-trimester induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sloane; Lichtenberg, E Steve

    2012-05-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a serious and relatively uncommon complication of induced or spontaneous abortion or delivery. Occasionally, it has been reported in the absence of predisposing conditions. Little information in the literature describing idiopathic DIC or the treatment of patients with DIC exists. From 2002 through 2008, 24 cases of presumptive idiopathic DIC occurred following dilation and evacuation (D&E) abortion between 13 5/7 and 23 6/7 weeks' estimated gestational age at a Midwestern ambulatory surgical center. The characteristics of each patient, their pregnancies and surgical experiences were examined and compared with a temporally matched control group of D&E patients. We explored whether the index cases had a predominance of any historical, clinical or reproductive characteristics compared with controls matched for demographic and reproductive landmarks. Overall incidence of presumptive idiopathic DIC was 1.8 per 1000 D&E cases. Compared with matched controls, there was a greater likelihood of DIC with more advanced gestation (p=.009); no case of DIC was under 17 weeks' gestational age. Increased bleeding occurred at a mean time of 153 min after completion of surgery (range, 55-491 min; median, 131 min). Nineteen of 24 cases were successfully treated at the surgical center after receiving 6 to 8 units of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP); 5 cases were transferred to a hospital for further treatment. The abnormal bleeding of presumptive DIC typically begins to appear within 2 h after uncomplicated D&E and is more likely to occur at 17 weeks' estimated gestational age and more. With rapid diagnosis and treatment, most patients were able to be treated in an outpatient setting with up to 6 to 8 units of FFP and rehydration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of suppression of lactation with vit B6 after induced abortion in the second trimester of pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Lin; Zhu Chuanrong; Fu Wen; Xue Gaiqing; Xin Yu; Zhang Weijie; Sun Lijing; Chen Aiqun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the action of suppressing lactation with Vit B 6 after induced abortion in second trimester of pregnancy and its clinical application. Methods: 60 Subjects in the second trimester of pregnancy were induced abortion with intra-amniotic injection of 100 mg rivanol. 30 subjects were not given any drug after the procedure (serving as controls) and the another 30 subjects started Vit B 6 2h after operation. With a dose of 60 mg tid x 5 days P.o. Serum levels of PRL, E 2 , P Were determines with RIA before and on the 4 th day post-abortion. Presence or absence of lactation after abortion was observed by squeezing the breast in all subjects. Results: In both groups the post-operative serum levels of the three tested hormones were significantly lower than those before operation. The decrease of PRL was especially marked in the Vit B 6 group (P 6 group (6.66%, 2/30); while it was present in 9 controls (30%, 9/30). Conclusion: Starting Vit B 6 treatment with in 2h after terminal of pregnancy would very effectively suppress milk secretion (93.3%) and could satisfactorily replace the conventional stilbestrol treatment. Marked decrease in serum PRL level (42.85%) reflected a solid laboratory evidence

  1. Demand for abortion and post abortion care in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background While induced abortion is considered to be illegal and socially unacceptable in Nigeria, it is still practiced by many women in the country. Poor family planning and unsafe abortion practices have daunting effects on maternal health. For instance, Nigeria is on the verge of not meeting the Millennium development goals on maternal health due to high maternal mortality ratio, estimated to be about 630 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Recent evidences have shown that a major factor in this trend is the high incidence of abortion in the country. The objective of this paper is, therefore, to investigate the factors determining the demand for abortion and post-abortion care in Ibadan city of Nigeria. Methods The study employed data from a hospital-based/exploratory survey carried out between March to September 2010. Closed ended questionnaires were administered to a sample of 384 women of reproductive age from three hospitals within the Ibadan metropolis in South West Nigeria. However, only 308 valid responses were received and analysed. A probit model was fitted to determine the socioeconomic factors that influence demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Results The results showed that 62% of respondents demanded for abortion while 52.3% of those that demanded for abortion received post-abortion care. The findings again showed that income was a significant determinant of abortion and post-abortion care demand. Women with higher income were more likely to demand abortion and post-abortion care. Married women were found to be less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Older women were significantly less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Mothers’ education was only statistically significant in determining abortion demand but not post-abortion care demand. Conclusion The findings suggest that while abortion is illegal in Nigeria, some women in the Ibadan city do abort unwanted pregnancies. The consequence of this

  2. Demand for abortion and post abortion care in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoyemi, Bosede O; Novignon, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    While induced abortion is considered to be illegal and socially unacceptable in Nigeria, it is still practiced by many women in the country. Poor family planning and unsafe abortion practices have daunting effects on maternal health. For instance, Nigeria is on the verge of not meeting the Millennium development goals on maternal health due to high maternal mortality ratio, estimated to be about 630 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. Recent evidences have shown that a major factor in this trend is the high incidence of abortion in the country. The objective of this paper is, therefore, to investigate the factors determining the demand for abortion and post-abortion care in Ibadan city of Nigeria. The study employed data from a hospital-based/exploratory survey carried out between March to September 2010. Closed ended questionnaires were administered to a sample of 384 women of reproductive age from three hospitals within the Ibadan metropolis in South West Nigeria. However, only 308 valid responses were received and analysed. A probit model was fitted to determine the socioeconomic factors that influence demand for abortion and post-abortion care. The results showed that 62% of respondents demanded for abortion while 52.3% of those that demanded for abortion received post-abortion care. The findings again showed that income was a significant determinant of abortion and post-abortion care demand. Women with higher income were more likely to demand abortion and post-abortion care. Married women were found to be less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Older women were significantly less likely to demand for abortion and post-abortion care. Mothers' education was only statistically significant in determining abortion demand but not post-abortion care demand. The findings suggest that while abortion is illegal in Nigeria, some women in the Ibadan city do abort unwanted pregnancies. The consequence of this in the absence of proper post-abortion

  3. The discourses on induced abortion in Ugandan daily newspapers: a discourse analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Sofia; Eliasson, Miriam; Klingberg Allvin, Marie; Faxelid, Elisabeth; Atuyambe, Lynn; Fritzell, Sara

    2015-06-25

    Ugandan law prohibits abortion under all circumstances except where there is a risk for the woman's life. However, it has been estimated that over 250 000 illegal abortions are being performed in the country yearly. Many of these abortions are carried out under unsafe conditions, being one of the most common reasons behind the nearly 5000 maternal deaths per year in Uganda. Little research has been conducted in relation to societal views on abortion within the Ugandan society. This study aims to analyze the discourse on abortion as expressed in the two main daily Ugandan newspapers. The conceptual content of 59 articles on abortion between years 2006-2012, from the two main daily English-speaking newspapers in Uganda, was studied using principles from critical discourse analysis. A religious discourse and a human rights discourse, together with medical and legal sub discourses frame the subject of abortion in Uganda, with consequences for who is portrayed as a victim and who is to blame for abortions taking place. It shows the strong presence of the Catholic Church within the medial debate on abortion. The results also demonstrate the absence of medial statements related to abortion made by political stakeholders. The Catholic Church has a strong position within the Ugandan society and their stance on abortion tends to have great influence on the way other actors and their activities are presented within the media, as well as how stakeholders choose to convey their message, or choose not to publicly debate the issue in question at all. To decrease the number of maternal deaths, we highlight the need for a more inclusive and varied debate that problematizes the current situation, especially from a gender perspective.

  4. [The aborted abortion counselor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, A

    1983-05-01

    As a psychoanalyst the author takes exception to a paper by Menne and Moersch entitled: "Psychoanalytical Experiences from the Supervision of Pregnancy Counseling," concerning the counseling of abortion applicants under West German Law No. 218. He disagrees with much of the psychoanalytical interpretations of women's desire for children and desire for abortion. Where the authors reason too much from the psychoanalytical viewpoint in the counseling situation this author accuses them of overlooking sociocritical arguments which find more elbow-room in the Law allowing "internal conflict" and "social counseling" as reasons for abortion. He accuses them of adhering too much to the letter of the law and urges them to resolve their not-so-easy task by helping the applicant achieve her desire for abortion as skillfully and responsibly as possible within the letter of that law.

  5. Unintended Pregnancy and Induced Abortion in the Netherlands 1954-2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levels, M.; Need, Ariana; Nieuwenhuis, Rense; Sluiter, Roderick; UItee, W.

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands, abortion is legal, safe, easily available, and free of charge. Paradoxically, it is also extremely rare. Little quantitative research into the Netherlands’ abortion practice has been done. We analyse the fertile life-course of N = 3,793 Dutch women between 1954 and 2002. Using

  6. Unintended pregnancy and induced abortion in the Netherlands 1954-2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levels, M.; Need, A.; Nieuwenhuis, R.; Sluiter, R.; Ultee, W.C.

    2012-01-01

    In the Netherlands, abortion is legal, safe, easily available, and free of charge. Paradoxically, it is also extremely rare. Little quantitative research into the Netherlands' abortion practice has been done. We analyse the fertile life-course of N = 3,793 Dutch women between 1954 and 2002. Using

  7. A survey of providers' knowledge, opinions, and practices regarding induced abortion in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Horace; Gordon-Strachan, Georgiana; McFarlane, Shelly; Hamilton, Pansy; Frederick, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    To determine the stance of providers in Jamaica regarding the suggested change in abortion law and proposal to train providers. A face-to-face anonymous survey of 35 obstetrician-gynecologists (Obs) and 228 general practitioners (GPs) in Kingston was used to assess knowledge, opinions and practice. Demand for abortion was high: 94.7% of GPs and 100% of Obs had been asked to perform an abortion. Although 50.7% of GPs and 70.6% of Obs had performed abortions, 81.2% and 88.6%, respectively, had referred women to another provider. Training was more likely for Obs (65.7% versus 52.2%; Pabortion under any circumstance, but only 25.3% had moral or religious objections, and only 9.4% refused to perform abortions because they were illegal. Most providers felt that abortions should be made more accessible, and almost all felt that abortions should be performed only by Obs. Demand for abortions is high in Jamaica, but many doctors refer clients to another provider. Patient assessment is good, but support services need improvement. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High prevalence of unwanted pregnancies and induced abortions among HIV-infected women from Western India : need to emphasize dual method use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darak, Shrinivas; Hutter, Inge; Kulkarni, Vinay; Kulkarni, Sanjeevani; Janssen, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence, reasons, and predictors of unwanted pregnancies and induced abortions among ever married HIV-infected women attending a care facility in Maharashtra, Western India, and discusses its programmatic and policy implications. Retrospectively collected data of

  9. Generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from chorionic villi of a Turner syndrome spontaneous abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shagufta; Panicker, M M; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2017-03-01

    A major cause of spontaneous abortions is chromosomal abnormality of foetal cells. We report the generation of an induced pluripotent stem cell line from the fibroblasts isolated from chorionic villi of an early spontaneously aborted foetus with Turner syndrome. The Turner syndrome villus induced pluripotent stem cell line is transgene free, retains the original XO karyotype, expresses pluripotency markers and undergoes trilineage differentiation. This pluripotent stem cell model of Turner syndrome should serve as a tool to study the developmental abnormalities of foetus and placenta that lead to early embryo lethality and profound symptoms like infertility in 45 XO survivors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Induced abortion in a Southern European region: examining inequalities between native and immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Elena; Borrell, Luisa N; González-Rábago, Yolanda; Martín, Unai; Lanborena, Nerea

    2016-09-01

    To examine induced abortion (IA) inequalities between native and immigrant women in a Southern European region and whether these inequalities depend on a 2010 Law facilitating IA. We conducted two analyses: (1) prevalence of total IAs, repeat and second trimester IA, in native and immigrant women aged 12-49 years for years 2009-2013 according to country of origin; and (2) log-binomial regression was used to quantify the association of place of origin with repeat and second trimester IAs among women with IAs. Immigrants were more likely to have an IA than Spanish women, with the highest probability in Sub-Saharan Africa (PR 8.32 95 % CI 3.66-18.92). Immigrant women with an IA from countries other than Maghreb and Asia have higher probabilities of a repeat IA than women from Spain. Women from Europe non-EU/Romania were 50 % (95 % CI 0.30-0.79) less likely to have a second trimester IA, while women from Central America/Caribbean were 45 % (95 % CI 1.11-1.89) more likely than Spanish women. The 2010 Law did not affect these associations. There is a need for parenthood planning programs and more information and access to contraception methods especially in immigrant women to help decrease IAs.

  11. Recourse to induced abortion in Spain: profiling of users and the influence of migrant populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurriaga, Oscar; Martínez-Beneito, Miguel A; Galmés Truyols, Antònia; Torne, M Mar; Bosch, Susana; Bosser, Roser; Portell Arbona, Margarita

    2009-12-01

    Social vulnerability implies a higher risk of induced abortion (IA). Immigrant status could be an additional factor. The objective was to identify the patterns surrounding which women resort to IAs, and to study the relationship between socio-economic and health system factors. Another aim was to determine the relationship between the patterns identified and the immigrant's country. A cross-sectional study was performed including all IAs notified during 2006 on women residing in three Spanish autonomous communities (the Balearic Islands, Catalonia and Comunitat Valenciana). We used sociodemographic, nationality and related variables, reproductive history and use of health services. A Categorical Principal Component Analysis was used to summarize the information and to identify profiles. More than a third of IAs were performed on non-Spanish women. Four dimensions have been determined that define the profile of women resorting to IAs: age, reproductive history and marital status; type of health services used; social level; and earlier or late IA and its repetitive use. Age and related factors were important determinants. Economic status and knowledge of the health system were related to access to contraception and IA information. Spanish, Western European and South American women had a higher social level than Romanian and African women. Late IA use and a lower recurrence characterised Asian, North African and Spanish women. Differences on IA use between groups of different women seem to be related to vulnerability (economic, social, knowledge and use of healthcare services). There is a different situation among immigrants of differing nationalities.

  12. Determinants of abortion among clients coming for abortion service at felegehiwot referral hospital, northwest Ethiopia: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilahun, Fikreselassie; Dadi, Abel Fekadu; Shiferaw, Getachew

    2017-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimate, one-third of pregnancies end in miscarriage, stillbirth, or induced abortion in the world. There are various reasons for a woman to seek induced abortion. However, limited information is available so far in the country and particularly in the study area. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to identify the determinants of induced abortion among clients coming for abortion care services at Bahirdar Felegehiwote referral hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. Institutional based unmatched case-control study was conducted from September to December 2014. Interview administered questioner was used to collect primary data. Enumeration and systematic random sampling (K = 3) method was used to select 175 cases and 350 controls. A binary logistic regression model was fitted to identify determinant factors. Odds ratio with 95% CI was computed to assess the strength and significance of the association. All sampled cases and controls were actually interviewed. The likelihood of abortion was higher among non-married women [AOR: 18.23, 95% CI: 8.04, 41.32], students [AOR: 11.46, 95% CI: 6.29, 20.87], and women having a monthly income of less than 500 ETB [AOR: 11.46, 95% CI: 6.29, 20.87]. However, the likelihood of abortion was lower among women age greater than 24 years [AOR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.11, 0.79] and who had the previous history of induced abortion [AOR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.65]. The study identified being non-married, student, women age less than 24 years, having the previous history of induced abortion, and low monthly income as an independent determinant of induced abortion. Interventions focused on the identified determinant factors are recommended.

  13. [Factors associated with the seeking of legal induced abortion services in Mexico City in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Aracena-Genao, Belkis; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Héctor

    2012-01-01

    To identify factors associated with the seeking of the legal-interruption-pregnancy (LIP) services in Mexico City. We used a case-control design. Users who utilized the LIP were defined as cases, while users of the antenatal care service with gestational age 13 or more weeks and who reported having an unwanted pregnancy were defined as controls. Logistic regressions were fitted to estimate odds ratios. Higher level of education (OR=1.47, 95% CI:1.04-2.07), women's occupation (being student OR=7.31, 95% CI:1.58-33.95; worker OR=13.43, 95% CI:2.04-88.54), and number of previous abortions (OR=11.41, 95% CI:1.65-79.07) were identified as factors associated with the lookup of LIP. In Mexico City context, empowered women with a higher level of education, or having a work activity are the users of LIP services. Strategies for improving access of women with low empowerment conditions are needed.

  14. Oral contraception following abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yan; Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Bin; Cheng, Linan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oral contraceptives (OCs) following induced abortion offer a reliable method to avoid repeated abortion. However, limited data exist supporting the effective use of OCs postabortion. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis in the present study reported immediate administration of OCs or combined OCs postabortion may reduce vaginal bleeding time and amount, shorten the menstruation recovery period, increase endometrial thickness 2 to 3 weeks after abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. A total of 8 major authorized Chinese and English databases were screened from January 1960 to November 2014. Randomized controlled trials in which patients had undergone medical or surgical abortions were included. Chinese studies that met the inclusion criteria were divided into 3 groups: administration of OC postmedical abortion (group I; n = 1712), administration of OC postsurgical abortion (group II; n = 8788), and administration of OC in combination with traditional Chinese medicine postsurgical abortion (group III; n = 19,707). In total, 119 of 6160 publications were included in this analysis. Significant difference was observed in group I for vaginal bleeding time (P = 0.0001), the amount of vaginal bleeding (P = 0.03), and menstruation recovery period (P abortion (P abortion, and reduce the risk of complications and unintended pregnancies. PMID:27399060

  15. Misinformation on abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Sam

    2011-08-01

    To find the latest and most accurate information on aspects of induced abortion. A literature survey was carried out in which five aspects of abortion were scrutinised: risk to life, risk of breast cancer, risk to mental health, risk to future fertility, and fetal pain. Abortion is clearly safer than childbirth. There is no evidence of an association between abortion and breast cancer. Women who have abortions are not at increased risk of mental health problems over and above women who deliver an unwanted pregnancy. There is no negative effect of abortion on a woman's subsequent fertility. It is not possible for a fetus to perceive pain before 24 weeks' gestation. Misinformation on abortion is widespread. Literature and websites are cited to demonstrate how data have been manipulated and misquoted or just ignored. Citation of non-peer reviewed articles is also common. Mandates insisting on provision of inaccurate information in some US State laws are presented. Attention is drawn to how women can be misled by Crisis Pregnancy Centres. There is extensive promulgation of misinformation on abortion by those who oppose abortion. Much of this misinformation is based on distorted interpretation of the scientific literature.

  16. Understanding the pregnancy decision-making process among couples seeking induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costescu, Dustin J; Lamont, John A

    2013-10-01

    The role of partners in the abortion experience is complex and poorly understood. We sought to examine how women and their partners navigate the pregnancy decision-making process. Thirty couples presenting for abortion completed questionnaires exploring experiences leading to the abortion. Participants were sequestered from their partners during completion of the study, and booklets were coded to allow comparison within couples. This portion of the study explored partner involvement in the decision-making process. One half of women had decided on abortion before informing their partner of the pregnancy. Of those who were undecided at the time of disclosure, all sought their partner's advice. Most participants (84%) were happy with the amount of discussion that took place with their partners, although one fifth of women and nearly one third of men could have discussed it more. More women than men were happy with the discussions that took place (96.6% vs. 70.4%). Two thirds of respondents viewed the decision to have an abortion as being made by both partners, one quarter viewed the decision as being mostly the woman's choice, and 5% viewed the decision as being mostly the male partner's choice. Although making the choice to have an abortion rests with the woman, her partner may play a role in the decision-making process, particularly when the woman is undecided. For many couples presenting for abortion, the decision is seen as being made jointly by both partners. Further research may identify opportunities to foster greater partner support throughout a woman's abortion experience.

  17. Exercise induced ST elevation and residual myocardial ischemia in previous myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimonagata, Tsuyoshi; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Hayashida, Kohei; Saito, Muneyasu; Sumiyoshi, Tetsuya

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical significance of stress induced ST elevation on infarcted area in 65 patients with previous myocardial infarction (single vessel disease) who had stress thallium scan. Stress induced ST changes on infarcted area were compared with quantitative assessment of myocardial ischemia (thallium ischemic score; TIS) and extent of myocardial infarction (defect score; DS) derived from circumferential profile analysis. In patients with previous myocardial infarction in less than 3 month from the onset (n = 36), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and extent of abnormal LV wall motion were not significantly different between patients with stress induced ST elevation ( ≥ 2 mm, n = 26) and those with stress induced ST elevation ( < 2 mm, n = 10), while, in patients with previous myocardial infarction in more than 3 month (n = 29), patients with stress induced ST elevation ( ≥ 2 mm, n = 15) showed left ventricular dyskinesis more frequently than those with ST elevation ( < 2 mm, n = 14). In addition, the former showed significantly higher DS and significantly lower TIS than the latter. In patients with previous myocardial infarction in less than 3 month, patients with ST elevation ( ≥ 2 mm, n = 15) with prominent upright T wave (n = 15) had transient thallium defect in infarcted area in 73 % and they had significantly higher LVEF and TIS than those with ST elevation ( < 2 mm, n = 11). These results indicated that ST elevation in infarcted area reflect different significance according to the recovery of injured myocardium and stress induced ST elevation with prominent upright T wave in infarcted area reflect residual myocardial ischemia in less than 3 month from the onset of myocardial infarction. (author)

  18. Protective effect of Petroselinum crispum extract in abortion using prostadin-induced renal dysfunction in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazad, Maryam; Farokhi, Farah

    2014-09-01

    Present study investigated the effects of parsley extract on pregnant rat kidneys which have undergone clinical abortion using prostaglandins. The renal protective effect of parsley extract was evaluated in pregnant rats which had an abortion. Parsley was used due to its antioxidant properties. Fifty-four female rats were divided in 9 groups of 6: control pregnant, two pregnant groups which received parsley extract and prostadin, two non-pregnant groups treated with parsley extract and prostadin, a group administered with both treatments, and three groups which received parsley extract in pre-implantation, implantation, and post-implantation periods of embryos. Ethanolic extract (5 mg/kg) was given daily to animals for 18 days of pregnancy period. Parameters such as malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant statues (TAS), creatinine, and urea were measured using biochemical assays. Histopathologic studies were also done with Hematoxylin-Eosin staining method. After 18 days of treatment, significant differences were observed in serum creatinine, urea, and MDA and TAS levels. Kidney cross-sections showed edema in prostadin-treated rats while improvements in parsley + prostadin -treated rats were observed. These results suggested that ethanolic extract of Petroselinum crispum reduced the dysfunction in rats kidney caused by prostadin-induced abortion and could have beneficial effect in reducing the progression of prostaglandin-induced edema.

  19. FIGO society survey: acceptance and use of new ethical guidelines regarding induced abortion for non-medical reasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, H E; Rogo, K O; Dixon, D B

    2001-12-01

    FIGO's Ethical guidelines regarding induced abortion for non-medical reasons offer guidance concerning women's right to safe abortion services and the medical community's attendant responsibilities. Ipas surveyed FIGO constituent societies to determine their agreement with the Guidelines' recommendations and their readiness to use them to improve and expand services. Ten months after the Guidelines publication in IJGO, a ten-item questionnaire was mailed to 283 Officers of the 101 FIGO societies, with follow-up prompts to non-respondents. Officers of 59 societies responded, divided evenly between those in countries whose laws permit induced abortion on non-medical grounds and those in countries prohibiting it. In 'permitting' countries all responding societies supported the recommendations, and 85% said they should adopt them or had already done so. Two-thirds in 'prohibiting' countries supported the recommendations, but less than half believed their FIGO society, or their government, should adopt them. However, 20% in the 'prohibiting' countries had adopted or formally considered the recommendations and 23% had already brought them to the attention of their governments. The FIGO constituent societies showed overall strong support for the recommendations, but efforts need to be made to encourage those in 'prohibiting' countries to promote implementation of the recommendations.

  20. Abortion incidence in Cambodia, 2005 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetters, Tamara; Samandari, Ghazaleh

    2015-01-01

    Although Cambodia now permits elective abortion, scarcity of research on this topic means that information on abortion incidence is limited to regional estimates. This estimation model combines national survey data from Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) with national prospective data of abortion procedures from government health facilities, collected in 2005 and 2010, to calculate the national incidence of safe and unsafe abortion. According to DHS, the proportion of all induced abortions that took place in a health facility in the five years preceding each survey increased from almost 52% to 60%. Projecting from facility-based abortions to national estimates, the national abortion rate increased from 21 to 28 per 1000 women aged 15-44. The abortion ratio also increased from 19 to 28 per 100 live births. This research quantifies an increase in safely induced abortions in Cambodia and provides a deeper understanding of induced abortion trends in Cambodia.

  1. Adolescent girls with illegally induced abortion in Dar es Salaam: the discrepancy between sexual behaviour and lack of access to contraception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, V; Silberschmidt, M; Mchumvu, Y

    2000-01-01

    This article reports on a study of induced abortion among adolescent girls in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, who were admitted to a district hospital in Dar es Salaam because of an illegally induced abortion in 1997. In the quantitative part of the study, 197 teenage girls (aged 14-19) were asked...... for socio-economic details, contraceptive knowledge/use, age at first intercourse and number of sexual partners. In the qualitative part, 51 teenage girls were interviewed in-depth about their relationships with their partners, sexual behaviour, contraceptive use and reasons for non-use, and why they became...... that gave them the right to seek family planning services and in practice these services are not being provided. There is a need for youth-friendly family planning services and to make abortion safe and legal, in order to reduce unwanted pregnancies and abortion-related complications and deaths among...

  2. The Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm induced by stachydrine hydrochloride reduces uterine bleeding in RU486-induced abortion mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Wang, Bin; Li, Yuzhu; Wang, Li; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Zhou, Xianbin; Guo, Yuqi; Jiang, Guosheng; Yao, Chengfang

    2013-01-09

    The Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm plays an important role in achieving maternal-fetal immunotolerance and participates in RU486-induced abortion. Excessive uterine bleeding is the most common side effect of RU486-induced abortion; however, its etiopathogenesis has not been fully understood. Therefore, elucidating the correlation between the Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm and the volume of uterine bleeding may offer novel therapeutic target for reducing uterine bleeding in RU486-induced abortion. Leonurus sibiricus has been used in clinics to reduce postpartum hemorrhage with low toxicity and high efficiency; however, the effective constituents and therapeutic mechanism have not been described. Stachydrine hydrochloride is the main constituent of L. sibiricus, therefore L. sibiricus is regarded as a candidate for reducing uterine bleeding in RU486-induced abortion mice by regulating the Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm in uterine bleeding of RU486-induced abortion mice and to elucidate the immunopharmacologic effects of stachydrine hydrochloride on inducing the Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm in reducing the uterine bleeding volume in RU486-induced abortion mice. To investigate the Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm in uterine bleeding during RU486-induced abortion mice, pregnant BALB/c mice were treated with high- and low-dose RU486 (1.5mg/kg and 0.9 mg/kg, respectively), and the serum progesterone (P(4)) protein level, uterine bleeding volume, and proportions of Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cells in mice at the maternal-fetal interface were detected by ELISA assay, alkaline hematin photometric assay, and flow cytometry, respectively. To determine the regulatory effect of stachydrine hydrochloride on the Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg paradigm in vitro, splenocytes of non-pregnant mice were separated and treated with P(4,) RU486, and/or stachydrine hydrochloride (10(-5)M, 10(-4)M, and 10(-3)M, respectively). The proportions of Th1/Th2/Th17

  3. Use of psychotropic drugs before pregnancy and the risk for induced abortion: population-based register-data from Finland 1996-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gissler, Mika; Artama, Miia; Ritvanen, Annukka; Wahlbeck, Kristian

    2010-06-30

    Some, though not all studies have reported an increased risk for mental health problems after an induced abortion. Problems with design and data have compromised these studies and the generalisation of their results. The Finnish Medication and Pregnancy database (N = 622 671 births and 114 518 induced abortions for other than fetal reasons) in 1996-2006 was utilised to study the use of psychotropic drugs in the three months before a pregnancy ending in a birth or an induced abortion. In total 2.1% of women with a birth and 5.1% of women with an induced abortion had used a psychotropic medicine 0-3 months before pregnancy. Psychotropic drug users terminated their pregnancies (30.9%) more often than other pregnant women (15.5%). Adjustment for background characteristics explained one third of this elevated risk, but the risk remained significantly increased among users of psychotropic medicine (OR 1.94, 95% confidence intervals 1.87-2.02). A similar risk was found for first pregnancies (30.1% vs. 18.9%; adjusted OR 1.53, 95% confidence intervals 1.42-1.65). The rate for terminating pregnancy was the highest for women using hypnotics and sedatives (35.6% for all pregnancies and 29.1% for first pregnancies), followed by antipsychotics (33.9% and 36.0%) and antidepressants (32.0% and 32.1%). The observed increased risk for induced abortion among women with psychotropic medication highlights the importance to acknowledge the mental health needs of women seeking an induced abortion. Further studies are needed to establish the impact of pre-existing differences in mental health on mental health outcomes of induced abortions compared to outcomes of pregnancies ending in a birth.

  4. Schizophrenia and induced abortions: A national register-based follow-up study among Finnish women born between 1965-1980 with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoila, Laura; Isometsä, Erkki; Gissler, Mika; Suvisaari, Jaana; Sailas, Eila; Halmesmäki, Erja; Lindberg, Nina

    2018-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate, in women with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, the number and incidence of induced abortions (= pregnancy terminations performed by a physician), their demographic characteristics, use of contraceptives, plus indications of and complications related to pregnancy termination. Using the Care Register for Health Care, we identified Finnish women born between the years 1965-1980 who were diagnosed with either schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder during the follow-up period ending 31.12.2013. For each case, five age- and place-of-birth- matched controls were obtained from the Population Register of Finland. Information about births and induced abortions were obtained from the Medical Birth Register and the Induced Abortion Register. The number and incidence of induced abortions per 1000 follow-up years did not differ between cases and their controls. However, due to fewer pregnancies, cases exhibited an over 2-fold increased risk of pregnancy termination (RR 2.28; 95% CI 2.20-2.36). Cases were younger, were more often without a partner at the time of induced abortion, and their pregnancies resulted more often from a lack of contraception. Among cases, the indication for pregnancy termination was more often mother-to-be's medical condition. Induced abortions after 12weeks gestation were more common among cases. However, cases had no more complications related to termination. The incidence of induced abortions among Finnish women with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder is similar to the general population, but their risk per pregnancy over two-fold. They need effective, affordable family planning services and long-term premeditated contraception. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of psychotropic drugs before pregnancy and the risk for induced abortion: population-based register-data from Finland 1996-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritvanen Annukka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some, though not all studies have reported an increased risk for mental health problems after an induced abortion. Problems with design and data have compromised these studies and the generalisation of their results. Methods The Finnish Medication and Pregnancy database (N = 622 671 births and 114 518 induced abortions for other than fetal reasons in 1996-2006 was utilised to study the use of psychotropic drugs in the three months before a pregnancy ending in a birth or an induced abortion. Results In total 2.1% of women with a birth and 5.1% of women with an induced abortion had used a psychotropic medicine 0-3 months before pregnancy. Psychotropic drug users terminated their pregnancies (30.9% more often than other pregnant women (15.5%. Adjustment for background characteristics explained one third of this elevated risk, but the risk remained significantly increased among users of psychotropic medicine (OR 1.94, 95% confidence intervals 1.87-2.02. A similar risk was found for first pregnancies (30.1% vs. 18.9%; adjusted OR 1.53, 95% confidence intervals 1.42-1.65. The rate for terminating pregnancy was the highest for women using hypnotics and sedatives (35.6% for all pregnancies and 29.1% for first pregnancies, followed by antipsychotics (33.9% and 36.0% and antidepressants (32.0% and 32.1%. Conclusions The observed increased risk for induced abortion among women with psychotropic medication highlighs the importance to acknowledge the mental health needs of women seeking an induced abortion. Further studies are needed to establish the impact of pre-existing differences in mental health on mental health outcomes of induced abortions compared to outcomes of pregnancies ending in a birth.

  6. Fertilidade de novilhas após aborto induzido com cloprostenol Fertility of heifers after abortion induced by cloprostenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A.C. Fernandes

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available O efeito da interrupção da gestação sobre a fertilidade foi avaliada em 50 novilhas da raça Holandesa, gestantes de fetos do sexo masculino entre 55 e 90 dias de idade. O aborto foi induzido pela administração de cloprostenol sódico, após o diagnóstico do sexo fetal. Os animais foram inseminados no segundo estro normal após o aborto. A interrupção da gestação ocorreu em 86% dos animais tratados e a via de administração, intramuscular ou intravulvar, não afetou a taxa de aborto. Os intervalos do aborto à primeira inseminação e do aborto à concepção foram de 38,94± 4,96 e 47,32± 15,89 dias, respectivamente. Não houve diferença no número médio de serviços por concepção pré e pós-interrupção da gestação (1,22 vs. 1,34; P>0,05. Conclui-se que a indução do aborto no terço inicial da gestação em novilhas não compromete a fertilidade dos animais.The effect of interruption of pregnancy on fertility was evaluated in 50 Holstein heifers, carrying male fetuses ranging from 55 to 90 days post conception. Abortion was induced by administration of sodic cloprostenol after fetal gender diagnosis. Heifers were inseminated on the second normal estrus after abortion. The interruption of gestation was 86% in treated animals, and route of administration, IM ou IV (intra-vulvar, did not affect the rate of abortion. The abortion to first insemination and abortion to conception intervals were 38.94± 4.96 and 47.32± 15.89 days, respectively. No difference on the number of inseminations per conception before or after the interruption of pregnancy (1.22 vs. 1.34; P>0.05 was observed. It was conclude that abortion induction in the first third of pregnancy did not affect heifer fertility.

  7. The role of birthplace and educational attainment on induced abortion inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rábago, Yolanda; Rodriguez-Alvarez, Elena; Borrell, Luisa N; Martín, Unai

    2017-01-13

    Induced abortion (IA) has shown social inequality related to birthplace and education with higher rates of IAs in immigrant and in less educated women relative to their native and highly educated counterparts. This study examined the independent and joint effects of birthplace and education on IA, repeated and IA performed during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy among women residing in the Basque Country, Spain. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study of IA among women aged 25-49 years residing in the Basque Country, Spain, between 2011 and 2013. Log-binomial regression was used to quantify the independent and joint effects of birthplace and education attainment on all outcomes. Immigrant women exhibited higher probability of having an IAs (PR: 5.31), a repeated (PR: 7.23) or a 2nd trimester IAs (PR: 4.07) than women born in Spain. We observed higher probabilities for all outcomes among women with a primary or less education relative to those with a graduate education (All IAs PR: 2.51; repeated PR: 6.00; 2nd trimester PR: 3.08). However, no significant heterogeneity was observed for the effect of education on the association of birthplace with IAs, repeated or 2nd trimester IAs. Birthplace and education are key factors to explain not only an IA decision but also having a repeated or a 2nd trimester IA. However, the effects of birthplace and education may be independent from each other on these outcomes. A better understanding of these factors on IAs is needed when designing programs for sexual and reproductive health aimed to reduce inequalities among women.

  8. The role of birthplace and educational attainment on induced abortion inequalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda González-Rábago

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induced abortion (IA has shown social inequality related to birthplace and education with higher rates of IAs in immigrant and in less educated women relative to their native and highly educated counterparts. This study examined the independent and joint effects of birthplace and education on IA, repeated and IA performed during the 2nd trimester of pregnancy among women residing in the Basque Country, Spain. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional population-based study of IA among women aged 25–49 years residing in the Basque Country, Spain, between 2011 and 2013. Log-binomial regression was used to quantify the independent and joint effects of birthplace and education attainment on all outcomes. Results Immigrant women exhibited higher probability of having an IAs (PR: 5.31, a repeated (PR: 7.23 or a 2nd trimester IAs (PR: 4.07 than women born in Spain. We observed higher probabilities for all outcomes among women with a primary or less education relative to those with a graduate education (All IAs PR: 2.51; repeated PR: 6.00; 2nd trimester PR: 3.08. However, no significant heterogeneity was observed for the effect of education on the association of birthplace with IAs, repeated or 2nd trimester IAs. Conclusions Birthplace and education are key factors to explain not only an IA decision but also having a repeated or a 2nd trimester IA. However, the effects of birthplace and education may be independent from each other on these outcomes. A better understanding of these factors on IAs is needed when designing programs for sexual and reproductive health aimed to reduce inequalities among women.

  9. Fatal pulmonary embolism during legal induced abortion in the United States from 1972 to 1985.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, H W; Atrash, H K; Franks, A L

    1990-04-01

    To determine the risk factors for abortion-related deaths caused by pulmonary embolism, we investigated all deaths from legal abortions in the United States from 1972 through 1985. Of 213 deaths, 45 (21%) were due to air, blood clot, or amniotic fluid embolism. The risk of embolism death was higher among minority women and older women (34 to 44 years). Our analysis revealed that curettage at less than or equal to 21 weeks and abortions at less than or equal to 12 weeks, regardless of method, were both associated with the least risk of embolism death. In comparing 1972 to 1978 and 1979 to 1985, we found that the embolism mortality rate decreased 79%. During 1979 to 1985, the number of abortions performed by noncurettage methods decreased 58%, possibly as a result of earlier abortion morbidity studies, which showed that these methods carried a greater risk of complications. Although a decrease in mortality rates may be partially attributable to the declining use of these methods, our analysis suggests that changes in methods over time have not been universally applied to all racial groups.

  10. Abortamento induzido: vivência de mulheres baianas Induced abortion: the experience of women from the Brazilian state of Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa do Nascimento Pereira

    2012-12-01

    study was conducted in a public maternity hospital in the city of Salvador (Northeastern Brazil, and the subjects were nine women hospitalized due to induced abortion. To collect data, we used the interview accompanied by a semi-structured form. Ethical aspects were considered based on Resolution 196/96 of the National Health Council. For the analysis of the discourses, we used Bardin's content analysis technique. The sample was characterized by predominantly black adult women, married or in a stable union, financially dependent on the partner. In the analysis, two themes emerged: motivation and feelings. Among the reasons leading to abortion, there are financial difficulties, the number of children, the experience of domestic violence and the loss of their autonomy. The process of aborting generates fear of death, sadness and relief. Women experiencing induced abortion revealed a very painful process from the moment they discover the pregnancy until the difficult decision to interrupt it. When they are not helped, these women perpetuate the pain, living days of anguish and guilt. The exercise of listening and welcoming these women must be present in the lives of health professionals, regardless of their views on abortion, so that the women can express their feelings, and then get appropriate help and referral.

  11. Investigations of hormones during early abortion induced by prostaglandin Fsub(2α) and 15(S)-methyl-PGFsub(2α)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, B.; Liedtke, M.P.; Brockmann, J.; Beissert, M.; Gstoettner, H.; Alexander, H.; Herter, U.

    1978-01-01

    In early pregnancy up the 7th week of pregnancy PGFsub(2α) was infused and 15(S)-methyl-PGFsub(2α) was applied i.m. to induce menstruation in 20 or 19 cases, respectively. In the tested form of application 15(S)-methyl-PGFsub(2α) is effective in 89 per cent of the cases and in 74 per cent complete abortion was achieved. PGFsub(2α) produced bleeding in 80 per cent only and complete abortion in 55 per cent. The differences in these two groups were not statistically significant. The steroid hormones estradiol and progesterone decrease in a successful application of PGs for induction of abortion and reach a value of 75 per cent at the onset of bleeding. The LH concentration in plasma becomes smaller too. In some cases there is a temporary increase in hormones shortly after starting treatment. The results could indicate that the considerable decrease in hormones before the onset of bleeding might be caused by an alteration of the corpus luteum, which is effective during early pregnangy. (author)

  12. [Fertility and induced abortion in poor Chilean women from the perspective of medical anthropology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, M

    1988-09-01

    Sociocultural and psychological investigations were conducted to determine why lower class Chilean women undergo abortions despite strong social, religious, and legal sanctions. According to various estimates, there are 2 undetected illegal abortions in Chile for each abortion leading to hospitalization of the woman. Some 120,000-150,000 abortions are estimated to occur each year, compared to perhaps 300,000 live births. Illegal abortion is the principal cause of maternal mortality in Chile, carrying 4 times greater risk of death than term pregnancy. Because of the extreme difficulty of obtaining systematic information on abortion in the society at large, the studies were conducted in hospital wards treating women for septic abortions. Qualitative studies were 1st conducted using intensive methods such as life histories and a test of body image to assess knowledge of reproductive anatomy and physiology. A more extensive study was then done 2 of the 6 health services in metropolitan Santiago and a health service in Valparaiso. The sample of 357 women represented almost all of the women treated for abortion in the services during the time of the study. The women were lower class, primarily of urban origin, and 16-34 years old for the most part. 60% were single and 10% were separated or widowed. 75% had some secondary education but only 20% had finished secondary school. 1/2 of the sample had no gainful employment and 60% of the rest lacked any type of social insurance. 1/2 of the abortions were in single women abandoned by their partners or who lived with their parents and feared their reactions. 15% were single women who feared loss of employment. 30% were married with children and gave economic reasons for seeking abortion. The women were found to have erroneous ideas about the reproductive cycle, believing pregnancy to be possible only around the time of menstruation. Their beliefs were part of a coherent system passed down by oral tradition and not challenged by

  13. Abortion - medical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its own before the 20th week of pregnancy. Surgical abortion uses surgery to end a pregnancy. ... happens, another dose of the medicine or a surgical abortion procedure may need to be done. Physical recovery ...

  14. Insights into potential pathogenesis mechanisms associated with Campylobacter jejuni-induced abortion in ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanad, Yasser M; Jung, Kwonil; Kashoma, Isaac; Zhang, Xiaoli; Kassem, Issmat I; Saif, Yehia M; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2014-11-25

    Campylobacter jejuni is commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract of many food-animals including sheep without causing visible clinical symptoms of disease. However, C. jejuni has been implicated in ovine abortion cases worldwide. Specifically, in the USA, the C. jejuni sheep abortion (SA) clone has been increasingly associated with sheep abortion. In vivo studies in sheep (the natural host) are needed to better characterize the virulence potential and pathogenesis of this clone. Pregnant ewes intravenously (IV) or orally inoculated with ovine or bovine abortion-associated C. jejuni SA clones exhibited partial or complete uterine prolapse with retained placenta, and abortion or stillbirth, whereas delivery of healthy lambs occurred in pregnant ewes inoculated with C. jejuni 81-176 or in the uninfected group. In sheep inoculated with the SA clone, histopathological lesions including suppurative necrotizing placentitis and/or endometritis coincided with: 1) increased apoptotic death of trophoblasts, 2) increased expression of the host genes (e.g. genes encoding interleukin IL-6 and IL-15) related to cellular necrosis and pro-inflammatory responses in uterus, and 3) decreased expression of the genes encoding GATA binding protein 6, chordin, and insulin-like 3 (INSL3) that account for embryonic development in uterus. Immunohistochemistry revealed localization of bacterial antigens in trophoblasts lining the chorioallantoic membrane of ewes inoculated with the C. jejuni SA clone. The results showed that C. jejuni SA clones are capable of causing abortion or stillbirth in experimentally infected sheep. Furthermore, down- or up-regulation of specific genes in the uterus of infected pregnant ewes might implicate host genes in facilitating the disease progression. Since the C. jejuni SA strains share genotypic similarities with clones that have been isolated from human clinical cases of gastroenteritis, these strains might represent a potential public health risk.

  15. Routine follow-up visits after first-trimester induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Daniel; Ellertson, Charlotte; Grimes, David A; Walker, Dilys

    2004-04-01

    Routine follow-up visits after abortion are intended to confirm that the abortion is complete and to diagnose and treat complications. Many clinicians also take advantage of the follow-up visit to provide general reproductive health care: discussing contraceptive plans and providing family planning services; diagnosing sexually transmitted infections; performing a Pap test or discussing abnormal Pap results. We reviewed the evidence related to the routine postabortion follow-up visit. Other than mifepristone medical abortion performed at 50 days of gestation or later and methotrexate medical abortion, we found little evidence that mandatory follow-up visits typically detect conditions that women themselves could not be taught to recognize. In addition, the natural history of the most severe complications after abortion-infection and unrecognized ectopic pregnancy-have time courses inconsistent with the usual timing of the follow-up visit. Costs associated with this visit can be great. These include travel expenses, lost wages, child-care expenses, privacy and emotional burdens for women, and scheduling disruptions and the related opportunity costs caused by "no-shows" for the provider. Follow-up appointments should be scheduled for those women likely to benefit from a physical examination. For the remainder of women, simple instructions and advice about detecting complications, possibly coupled with telephone follow-up, might suffice. Although arguably valuable in their own right, counseling, family planning services, or sexually transmitted infection diagnosis and treatment should not be so inflexibly bundled with postabortion care. Protocols that require in-person follow-up after abortion may not make the best use of a women's time or abilities, or of the medical system.

  16. T-cell activation. V. Anti-major histocompatibility complex class I antibody-induced activation and clonal abortion in Jurkat T-leukaemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Dissing, S; Tscherning, T

    1993-01-01

    respectively, as well as three transfectant clones reconstituted with the appropriate TcR/CD3 cDNA. For activation, the cells were exposed to anti-TcR/CD3, anti-CD2 and anti-major histocompatibility complex (anti-MHC) class I monoclonal antibodies (mAb) respectively. Cellular activation by these mAb leading...... to an increased IL-2 secretion was preceded by a rise in [Ca2+]i and was relatively dependent on the expression of the a TcR/CD3 complex. In contrast, anti-MHC class I mAb-induced clonal abortion in Jurkat T cells may occur without previous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and appeared to be independent of TcR/CD3...

  17. The Other Side: How does Informed Choice Affect Induced Abortions among Reproductive-Age Immigrant Women in China—A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanning Yu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to explore how informed choice on contraceptive methods influenced induced abortions among reproductive-age immigrant women in China. A total of 3230 participants were recruited in Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing. Information on informed choice was collected by questionnaires. The annual incidence rate (spells of induced abortions was 0.46 (1500/3230 among the participants. The sequence from the highest score to the lowest was long-term, short-term and natural contraceptive methods (p < 0.0001. Significant differences of rates in induced abortions were found in region, occupation, length of the first immigration up to now (year, purpose for immigration, number of children, marital status, sex preference, contraceptive methods, deciders of contraceptive methods and side effects. In the zero-inflated negative binomial model, the joint impacts showed when a participant with one child employed condoms or family planning service providers as the deciders of contraceptive methods introduced intrauterine devices, the occurrence of induced abortions was more likely to be reduced. Women who underwent side effects using pills were more likely to have had induced abortions.

  18. Development of Autoimmune Overt Hypothyroidism Is Highly Associated With Live Births and Induced Abortions but Only in Premenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, Allan; Pedersen, Inge Buelow; Knudsen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    replacement therapy, also taking various possible confounders into account. Results: In multivariate regression models with no event as reference, the odds ratios (ORs) for hypothyroidism [95% confidence interval (CI)] after one/two/three or more live births were 1.72 (0.56-5.32)/3.12 (1.14-8.48)/4.51 (1......: In conditional multivariate logistic regression models, we analyzed the associations between the development of autoimmune hypothyroidism and age at menarche/menopause, years of menstruations, pregnancies, spontaneous and induced abortions, live births, and years on oral contraceptives and postmenopausal hormone...

  19. Complicações pós-aborto provocado: fatores associados Factors associated with complications following induced abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Hardy

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available O aborto provocado expõe a mulher a riscos e complicações. Estes diminuem quando o aborto é feito em boas condições. As complicações resultantes de abortos mal feitos podem levar à morte ou afetar as gestações futuras, aumentando, por exemplo, a gravidez ectópica e o abortamento espontâneo. O objetivo do presente trabalho é apresentar dados brasileiros sobre a relação entre complicações do aborto provocado e as condições de sua prática. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida em 1990 em uma universidade brasileira. Os dados foram obtidos através de um questionário distribuído a todas as funcionárias e alunas da graduação. Foram respondidos 42% dos questionários das alunas e 27% dos das funcionárias; 82 alunas e 264 funcionárias tinham feito pelo menos um aborto provocado; 15 e 50, respectivamente, tiveram problemas de saúde (complicações após o último aborto. As mulheres que tiveram o aborto realizado por médico, em clínica ou hospital, e praticado por métodos mais modernos apresentaram menos complicações. As mulheres mais jovens não foram significativamente diferentes das outras com relação à freqüência das complicações. Entretanto, esse grupo esteve representado principalmente por alunas com maior nível de educação e, geralmente, mais recursos econômicos.Illegal induced abortion exposes women to risks and complications. These decrease when the abortion is carried out safely. Complications resulting from unsafe abortions can cause death or may effect future pregnancies, increasing ectopic pregnancy and spontaneous abortion, for example. The purpose of this paper is to present Brazilian data on the association between complications caused by illegal induced abortions and the conditions in which they are performed. The study was done in 1990 in a Brazilian university. Data was obtained through a questionnaire distributed to all the female employees and graduate students. Forty-two percent of the students

  20. Intranasal infection with Chlamydia abortus induces dose-dependent latency and abortion in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Longbottom

    Full Text Available Latency is a key feature of the animal pathogen Chlamydia abortus, where infection remains inapparent in the non-pregnant animal and only becomes evident during a subsequent pregnancy. Often the first sign that an animal is infected is abortion occurring late in gestation. Despite this, little is understood of the underlying mechanisms that control latency or the recrudescence of infection that occurs during subsequent pregnancy. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental model of latency by mimicking the natural route of infection through the intranasal inoculation of non-pregnant sheep with C. abortus.Three groups of sheep (groups 1, 2 and 3 were experimentally infected with different doses of C. abortus (5×10(3, 5×10(5 and 5×10(7 inclusion forming units (IFU, respectively prior to mating and monitored over 2 breeding cycles for clinical, microbiological, pathological, immunological and serological outcomes. Two further groups received either negative control inoculum (group 4a,b or were inoculated subcutaneously on day 70 of gestation with 2×10(6 IFU C. abortus (group 5. Animals in groups 1, 2 and 5 experienced an abortion rate of 50-67%, while only one animal aborted in group 3 and none in group 4a,b. Pathological, microbiological, immunological and serological analyses support the view that the maternal protective immune response is influenced by initial exposure to the bacterium.The results show that intranasal administration of non-pregnant sheep with a low/medium dose of C. abortus results in a latent infection that leads in a subsequent pregnancy to infection of the placenta and abortion. In contrast a high dose stimulates protective immunity, resulting in a much lower abortion rate. This model will be useful in understanding the mechanisms of infection underlying latency and onset of disease, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines for controlling infection.

  1. Intranasal infection with Chlamydia abortus induces dose-dependent latency and abortion in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longbottom, David; Livingstone, Morag; Maley, Stephen; van der Zon, Arjan; Rocchi, Mara; Wilson, Kim; Wheelhouse, Nicholas; Dagleish, Mark; Aitchison, Kevin; Wattegedera, Sean; Nath, Mintu; Entrican, Gary; Buxton, David

    2013-01-01

    Latency is a key feature of the animal pathogen Chlamydia abortus, where infection remains inapparent in the non-pregnant animal and only becomes evident during a subsequent pregnancy. Often the first sign that an animal is infected is abortion occurring late in gestation. Despite this, little is understood of the underlying mechanisms that control latency or the recrudescence of infection that occurs during subsequent pregnancy. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental model of latency by mimicking the natural route of infection through the intranasal inoculation of non-pregnant sheep with C. abortus. Three groups of sheep (groups 1, 2 and 3) were experimentally infected with different doses of C. abortus (5×10(3), 5×10(5) and 5×10(7) inclusion forming units (IFU), respectively) prior to mating and monitored over 2 breeding cycles for clinical, microbiological, pathological, immunological and serological outcomes. Two further groups received either negative control inoculum (group 4a,b) or were inoculated subcutaneously on day 70 of gestation with 2×10(6) IFU C. abortus (group 5). Animals in groups 1, 2 and 5 experienced an abortion rate of 50-67%, while only one animal aborted in group 3 and none in group 4a,b. Pathological, microbiological, immunological and serological analyses support the view that the maternal protective immune response is influenced by initial exposure to the bacterium. The results show that intranasal administration of non-pregnant sheep with a low/medium dose of C. abortus results in a latent infection that leads in a subsequent pregnancy to infection of the placenta and abortion. In contrast a high dose stimulates protective immunity, resulting in a much lower abortion rate. This model will be useful in understanding the mechanisms of infection underlying latency and onset of disease, as well as in the development of novel therapeutics and vaccines for controlling infection.

  2. Factors Associated with Induced Abortion in Women Prostitutes in Asturias (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridu, Domingo Ojer; Franco Vidal, Amalia; Vázquez Valdés, Fernando; Junquera Llaneza, Maria Luisa; Varela Uría, Jose Antonio; Cuesta Rodríguez, Mar; López Sanchez, Carmen; Busto Folgosa, Margarita; Fernández Ollero, Maria Jesús

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim is to investigate the factors that might be associated with the presence of induced abortion (IA) in women prostitutes in Asturias (Spain). Methodology/Principal Findings Cross-sectional descriptive study by self-completion questionnaire of 212 women prostitutes who attended the three Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics in Asturias, between January–December 2003. The questionnaire was designed to investigate the women's perceived knowledge (what they claimed to know), their real knowledge (what they really knew), the use of contraceptive methods and socio-demographic variables. Multivariate analysis was carried out. 92% of the participants were immigrants. 76% were practising at brothel. 37.6% (95%CI:30.7–44.4%) reported to have undergone at least one IA during their life. According to the logistic regression the “presence of IA” was directly associated with the variables “number of pregnancies”(OR:65.82;95%IC:7.73–560.14) and “years of practising prostitution”(OR:1.13;95%CI:0.99–1.29); and inversely associated with “children”(0 = no children;1 = one or more children; OR:0.005;95%CI:0.000–0.057), “women's age”(OR:0.89;95%CI:0.82–0.97) and “real contraceptive knowledge”(OR:0.50; 95%CI:0.34–0.75). Married women were more likely to have undergone an IA (OR:2.74;95%IC:1.05–7.13). No association with “perceived contraceptive knowledge” was found. Conclusions/Significance The characteristics more closely linked to the reproductive history of the women (such as “pregnancies”, “children”), together with the “real contraceptive knowledge” and the “time practising prostitution” explain the presence of IA better than factors more closely linked to the conditions in which the women practise prostitution (“place of activity”, “other activities compatible with prostitution”, “use of safe method in commercial relation”). It is possible that IA is being used as a birth control

  3. Factors associated with induced abortion in women prostitutes in Asturias (Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Ojer Tsakiridu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to investigate the factors that might be associated with the presence of induced abortion (IA in women prostitutes in Asturias (Spain.Cross-sectional descriptive study by self-completion questionnaire of 212 women prostitutes who attended the three Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics in Asturias, between January-December 2003. The questionnaire was designed to investigate the women's perceived knowledge (what they claimed to know, their real knowledge (what they really knew, the use of contraceptive methods and socio-demographic variables. Multivariate analysis was carried out. 92% of the participants were immigrants. 76% were practising at brothel. 37.6% (95%CI:30.7-44.4% reported to have undergone at least one IA during their life. According to the logistic regression the "presence of IA" was directly associated with the variables "number of pregnancies" (OR:65.82;95%IC:7.73-560.14 and "years of practising prostitution" (OR:1.13;95%CI:0.99-1.29; and inversely associated with "children" (0 = no children;1 = one or more children; OR:0.005;95%CI:0.000-0.057, "women's age" (OR:0.89;95%CI:0.82-0.97 and "real contraceptive knowledge" (OR:0.50; 95%CI:0.34-0.75. Married women were more likely to have undergone an IA (OR:2.74;95%IC:1.05-7.13. No association with "perceived contraceptive knowledge" was found.The characteristics more closely linked to the reproductive history of the women (such as "pregnancies", "children", together with the "real contraceptive knowledge" and the "time practising prostitution" explain the presence of IA better than factors more closely linked to the conditions in which the women practise prostitution ("place of activity", "other activities compatible with prostitution", "use of safe method in commercial relation". It is possible that IA is being used as a birth control method, hypothesis suggested by the inverse association observed between the variable "children" and the "presence of IA". Therefore, the

  4. Determinants of first and second trimester induced abortion - results from a cross-sectional study taken place 7 years after abortion law revisions in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnen, K. I.; Tuijje, D. N.; Rasch, V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2005 Ethiopia took the important step to protect women's reproductive health by liberalizing the abortion law. As a result women were given access to safe pregnancy termination in first and second trimester. This study aims to describe socio-economic characteristics and contraceptive......: age education. The contraceptive prevalence rate varied across age groups and was particularly low among young girls and young women experiencing second trimester abortion...... where only 15% and 19% stated they had ever used contraception. Conclusion: Young age, poor education and the prospect of single parenthood were associated with second trimester abortion. Young girls and young women were using contraception comparatively less often than older women. To ensure women full...

  5. Repeated mirtazapine nullifies the maintenance of previously established methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Robin M; Mickiewicz, Amanda L; Napier, T Celeste

    2011-11-20

    The atypical antidepressant mirtazapine enhances monoaminergic transmission; thus, mirtazapine therapy may counter the hypo-activation of monoamine systems associated with withdrawal from methamphetamine abuse. Human addiction therapy will likely require chronic administration that is given after brain and behavioral maladaptations are established. To emulate this scenario in rats, we ascertained if acute or repeated mirtazapine treatments could antagonize previously established consequences of repeated methamphetamine. Methamphetamine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) was used, wherein methamphetamine (1mg/kg, i.p.) was administered in a unique environmental context once-daily for three days interposed by saline injections in an alternate context. Subsequently, mirtazapine (5mg/kg, i.p.) was administered in the home cage either as 10 once-daily injections or a single injection. The expression of CPP was determined in drug-free rats three days after the last mirtazapine injection. Expression of methamphetamine-induced CPP was inhibited by 10 home cage administrations of mirtazapine but not by a single injection of mirtazapine. These findings reveal that mirtazapine can inhibit the maintenance of methamphetamine-induced CPP and that treatment duration and/or treatment timing contributes to this effect of mirtazapine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishii

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial