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Sample records for previous heart attack

  1. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly ... it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if you or ...

  2. Heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part in support groups for people with heart disease . Outlook (Prognosis) After a heart attack, you have a higher ... P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  3. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain Fatigue Heart attack Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  4. About Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Heart Attacks Updated:Jan 11,2018 A heart attack is ... coronary artery damage leads to a heart attack . Heart Attack Questions and Answers What is a heart attack? ...

  5. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Heart attack ...

  6. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle becomes ...

  7. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  8. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Heart Attack Heart Attack Also known as Myocardial infarction Leer en español ... or years after the procedure. Other Treatments for Heart Attack Other treatments for heart attack include: Medicines Medical ...

  9. Heart rate as a predictor of stroke in high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandset, Else Charlotte; Berge, Eivind; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Julius, Stevo; Holzhauer, Björn; Krarup, Lars-Henrik; Hua, Tsushung A

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for first stroke are well established, but less is known about risk factors for recurrent stroke. In the present analysis, we aimed to assess the effect of heart rate and other possible predictors of stroke in a hypertensive population with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). The Valsartan Antihypertensive Long-Term Use Evaluation trial was a multicentre, double-masked, randomized controlled, parallel group trial comparing the effects of an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan) and a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) in patients with hypertension and high cardiovascular risk. We used Cox proportional hazard models to investigate the effect of baseline variables on the risk of stroke. Quadratic terms of the continuous variables were entered in the models to test for linearity. Of 15,245 patients included in the trial, 3014 had a previous stroke or TIA at baseline and were included in the present analysis. Stroke recurrence occurred in 239 patients (7.9%) during a median of 4.5 years of follow-up. Resting heart rate (per 10 beats per minute; hazard ratio [HR], 2.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-6.58) and diabetes mellitus at baseline (HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.03-2.10) were significantly associated with an increased risk of stroke recurrence in the multivariable analysis. In high-risk, hypertensive patients with previous stroke or TIA, resting heart rate was the strongest predictor of recurrent stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass ... pacemaker - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  11. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help prevent your first heart attack. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes A heart-healthy lifestyle can help prevent ... blood to flow to the heart muscle. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Treatment for a heart attack usually includes ...

  12. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  13. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  14. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  15. Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/007488.htm Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... supply blood and oxygen to the heart. A heart attack can occur if a blood clot stops the ...

  16. Depression After Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart Attack? Redford B. Williams Download PDF https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.017285 Circulation. 2011; 123: ... e639-e640 , originally published June 27, 2011 https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.110.017285 Citation Manager Formats ...

  17. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MPI") that uses a nucleotide tracer (e.g. Thallium) that is injected into your veins to view blood flow to your heart muscle. MPI is used in combination with the stress test to improve accuracy in diagnosing heart disease. Women of child-bearing age may wish to opt for ultrasound ...

  18. Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Attack Coronary Artery Disease, Angina Basic Facts & Information What ... and oxygen supply; this is what causes a heart attack. If the damaged area is small, however, your ...

  19. Understand Your Risk of Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart-Health Basics Reducing your risk starts with smart choices. If you smoke, stop. The American Heart ... a Second Heart Attack | Spanish Cardiac Rehab Referral Card | Spanish Heart Attack Warning Signs: Patient sheet | Infographic | ...

  20. Can Vitamins Help Prevent a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamins help prevent a heart attack? Can taking vitamins help prevent heart disease or a heart attack? Answers ... M.D. It's not yet clear if taking vitamins can reduce your risk of developing heart disease ...

  1. [Heart-attack in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Výtisková, T; Suchá, D; Fučíková, Z

    To describe hear-attack on crystal meth addicted pregnant woman. Case report. Acute heart-attack during pregnancy means unexpected obstetric complication. The consequences could be fatal for the mother and the fetus. Although good delivery management and treatment could reduce morbidity and mortality to a minimum.

  2. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some cases, surgical procedures. Your doctor may also run some diagnostic tests to determine how much your heart was damaged and what degree ... some cases, surgical procedures. Your doctor may also run some diagnostic tests to determine how much your heart was damaged and what degree ...

  3. Being active after a heart attack (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best activity when you start exercising after a heart attack. Start slowly, and increase the amount of time ... best activity when you start exercising after a heart attack. Start slowly, and increase the amount of time ...

  4. Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aneurysm More Coronary Artery Dissection: Not Just a Heart Attack Updated:Mar 15,2018 Sometimes a heart attack ... Disease Go Red For Women Types of aneurysms Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS) ...

  5. Outdoor Air Pollution, Heart Attack and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elevated outdoor ambient air particle pollution triggers heart attacks, strokes, and abnormal heart rhythms and worsens heart failure in individuals at high risk due to underlying medical conditions. Emergency Medical Services in communities are the first responders to these eme...

  6. Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetes complications - heart; Coronary artery disease - diabetes; CAD - diabetes; Cerebrovascular disease - diabetes ... People with diabetes have a higher chance of having heart attacks and strokes. Smoking and having high blood pressure and high ...

  7. Calcium Supplements: A Risk Factor for Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for heart attack? I've read that calcium supplements may increase the risk of heart attack. Is ... Some doctors think it's possible that taking calcium supplements may increase your risk of a heart attack. ...

  8. Know the Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... No. 22 Know the Warning Signs of a Heart Attack What is a heart attack? Aheart attack happens when the blood vessels that ... hurting your heart muscle. Another name for a heart attack is myocardial infarction, or MI. If you have ...

  9. Fuzzy Expert System for Heart Attack Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Norlida; Arbaiy, Nureize; Shah, Noor Aziyan Ahmad; Afizah Afif@Afip, Zehan

    2017-08-01

    Heart attack is one of the serious illnesses and reported as the main killer disease. Early prevention is significant to reduce the risk of having the disease. The prevention efforts can be strengthen through awareness and education about risk factor and healthy lifestyle. Therefore the knowledge dissemination is needed to play role in order to distribute and educate public in health care management and disease prevention. Since the knowledge dissemination in medical is important, there is a need to develop a knowledge based system that can emulate human intelligence to assist decision making process. Thereby, this study utilized hybrid artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to develop a Fuzzy Expert System for Diagnosing Heart Attack Disease (HAD). This system integrates fuzzy logic with expert system, which helps the medical practitioner and people to predict the risk and as well as diagnosing heart attack based on given symptom. The development of HAD is expected not only providing expert knowledge but potentially become one of learning resources to help citizens to develop awareness about heart-healthy lifestyle.

  10. Heart Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Attack or Sudden Cardiac Arrest: How Are They Different? Updated:Mar 15,2018 People often use these ... The heart attack symptoms in women can be different than men. What is cardiac arrest? Sudden cardiac ...

  11. Applying the Principles of Homicide by Heart Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Sung, LokMan

    2016-06-01

    Homicide by heart attack is a well-established model in forensic pathology that describes death elicited during or immediately after a criminal act where a threat or fear of physical injury is present. After its introduction nearly 4 decades ago, the principle has undergone a handful of modifications but still maintains its core concepts. All cases of this nature during a 20-year period at the Wayne County Medical Examiner's Office were compared and contrasted for demographics, circumstances and scene investigation, and autopsy and toxicology findings. Of the cases fulfilling the previously established criteria for homicide by heart attack, more than 80% displayed significant changes because of hypertension. This finding coincides with the high prevalence of hypertension in our urban population and highlights the significance of this disease. Also present were minor external and internal injuries in select cases, which reinforce the understanding that physical contact between the decedent and assailant does not preclude this diagnosis.

  12. HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS OPEN HEART SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Transplantation (HTx to date remains the most effective and radical method of treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. The defi cit of donor hearts is forcing to resort increasingly to the use of different longterm mechanical circulatory support systems, including as a «bridge» to the follow-up HTx. According to the ISHLT Registry the number of recipients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass surgery increased from 40% in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 49.6% for the period from 2009 to 2015. HTx performed in repeated patients, on the one hand, involves considerable technical diffi culties and high risks; on the other hand, there is often no alternative medical intervention to HTx, and if not dictated by absolute contradictions the denial of the surgery is equivalent to 100% mortality. This review summarizes the results of a number of published studies aimed at understanding the immediate and late results of HTx in patients, previously underwent open heart surgery. The effect of resternotomy during HTx and that of the specifi c features associated with its implementation in recipients previously operated on open heart, and its effects on the immediate and long-term survival were considered in this review. Results of studies analyzing the risk factors for perioperative complications in repeated recipients were also demonstrated. Separately, HTx risks after implantation of prolonged mechanical circulatory support systems were examined. The literature does not allow to clearly defi ning the impact factor of earlier performed open heart surgery on the course of perioperative period and on the prognosis of survival in recipients who underwent HTx. On the other hand, subject to the regular fl ow of HTx and the perioperative period the risks in this clinical situation are justifi ed as a long-term prognosis of recipients previously conducted open heart surgery and are comparable to those of patients who underwent primary HTx. Studies

  13. Recognizing a heart attack: the process of determining illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherck, K A

    1997-07-01

    To examine the process by which patients with acute myocardial infarction recognize illness and the need for medical treatment. Descriptive, exploratory, qualitative. The coronary care and progressive care units of two midwestern medical centers. Thirty men and women with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction. Open-ended interviews were conducted on the fourth or fifth day of hospitalization. All interviews were recorded on audiotape and transcribed. Data were analyzed by using grounded theory methods. Findings of the study indicated that determining illness and the need for medical attention was often a difficult process involving phases. The first phase involved attending to or ignoring bodily sensations as they come and go or additional sensations develop. Some subjects moved precipitously to seeking treatment; others took days to attend to bodily sensations. The second phase involved comparing sensations with those from a previously experienced illness or with the subject's concept of sensations likely to accompany common ailments such as indigestion or flu or more serious illnesses such as ulcer, gallbladder disease, or heart attack. The quality of sensations experienced had an important influence on assigning probable cause and deciding that medical attention is warranted. The disruptive nature of signs and symptoms and how closely signs and symptoms matched the subject's prototype for a heart attack greatly influenced the determination that illness was present and healthcare was needed. These findings have implications for educating the public about the complex and variable manifestations of a heart attack.

  14. Preventing Heart Attacks and Strokes: Increasing Awareness ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary: Chronic cardiovascular disease imposes a significant health and economic burden on individuals and communities. Despite decades of improvement in cardiovascular mortality, cardiovascular disease and stroke remain the leading cause of death in the U.S. and disparities in health outcomes persist. Moreover, the continuous improvement in cardiovascular mortality typical of the last four decades has ended motivating new and innovative approaches to improve population health and wellbeing. Apart from continued focus on traditional risk factor modification such as identification and treatment of high blood pressure and cholesterol, cessation of smoking, and appropriate use of evidence-based pharmacological prevention measures and disease management, other factors should be considered such as increasing physical activity, dietary sodium reduction and modification of social and environmental determinants known to cause heart attacks and stroke and exacerbate vascular disease. Such an approach will require greater cooperation among public health, environmental health, the broader public and private healthcare delivery and payment systems, and federal agencies. To introduce this concept the U.S. EPA held a workshop in September 2016 bringing together representatives of local and state public health officials, the healthcare system, educators, data analytics, and federal partners (CMS, CDC, Dept. of State and EPA) for the purpose of exploring the idea of prom

  15. Marital history and survival after a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Matthew E; Nelson, Alicia

    2016-12-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and nearly one million Americans will have a heart attack this year. Although the risks associated with a heart attack are well established, we know surprisingly little about how marital factors contribute to survival in adults afflicted with heart disease. This study uses a life course perspective and longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Study to examine how various dimensions of marital life influence survival in U.S. older adults who suffered a heart attack (n = 2197). We found that adults who were never married (odds ratio [OR] = 1.73), currently divorced (OR = 1.70), or widowed (OR = 1.34) were at significantly greater risk of dying after a heart attack than adults who were continuously married; and the risks were not uniform over time. We also found that the risk of dying increased by 12% for every additional marital loss and decreased by 7% for every one-tenth increase in the proportion of years married. After accounting for more than a dozen socioeconomic, psychosocial, behavioral, and physiological factors, we found that current marital status remained the most robust indicator of survival following a heart attack. The implications of the findings are discussed in the context of life course inequalities in chronic disease and directions for future research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise Following a Heart Attack: Some Special Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardy, Paul S.

    This paper presents information on the effectiveness of exercise programs for heart attack victims. Some of the observations come from unpublished results of a two year experiment of the National Exercise and Heart Disease Project. The paper first establishes that a group exercise program with trained supervision is advantageous for people with…

  17. Learn What a Heart Attack Feels Like--It Could Save Your Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn What a Heart Attack Feels Like— It Could Save Your Life. This fact sheet tells you about heart attack signs. It also tells you what to do ... your life. 1. Know the signs of a heart attack. 2. Understand that heart attacks are not all ...

  18. Being active after your heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6 weeks, you may be able to start swimming, but stay out of very cold or very ... American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines (Writing Committee to Revise the ...

  19. Make the call, don't miss a beat: Heart Attack Information for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other resources Learn more about heart disease and heart attacks. Make the Call, Don't Miss a Beat ... symptoms Learn the 7 most common signs of heart attack in men and women. Chest pain or discomfort " ...

  20. Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment Counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2014 Print this issue Can You Recognize a Heart Attack or Stroke? What To Do When Every Moment ... When it comes to life-threatening conditions like heart attack or stroke, every minute counts. Get to know ...

  1. Apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Easton, J Donald; Lopes, Renato D; Bahit, M Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In the ARISTOTLE trial, the rate of stroke or systemic embolism was reduced by apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with AF and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) have a high risk of stroke. We therefore aimed to assess the efficacy...

  2. Emotional and cognitive changes during and post a near fatal heart attack and one-year after: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M; Godfrey, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This case study reports on changes in emotions before and during an unexpected heart rate in a young, apparently healthy male with a life-long history of exercise in the absence of family history of heart problems. He completed the Brunel Mood Scale (Terry et al. , 2003) to assess emotions before, during, and after the heart attack, and also describing his thoughts during these periods. Results indicate he experienced unpleasant emotions in the build up to the heart attack, feelings he attributed at the time to frustration to achieve fitness goals. He maintained an exercise regime prior to having a heart attack, a finding consistent with previous research suggesting that early diagnosis, although vital for survival, is not likely to be identified among seemingly healthy individuals. During the heart attack, he experienced a rapid emotional change characterised by a rapid increase in anger coupled with thoughts of needing to survive. The intensity of emotions and regulation strategies employed before and during the heart attack provide insight this experience, and we suggest future research should investigate emotional change during adverse conditions. Key pointsThe present case study details emotions experienced and attempts to regulate these emotions before, during and post a heart attack. Unpleasant emotions experienced before the heart were attributed to lack of progress toward fitness goals, a perception that is plausible as he was a regular exerciser.Early identification of heart attack is critical as "Time is Muscle" (Whyte et al., 2009) and therefore even people perceived to be at low risk should consider the possibility of such an eventuality, and seek medical treatment early in the process.

  3. EMOTIONAL AND COGNITIVE CHANGES DURING AND POST A NEAR FATAL HEART ATTACK AND ONE-YEAR AFTER: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Lane

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This case study reports on changes in emotions before and during an unexpected heart rate in a young, apparently healthy male with a life-long history of exercise in the absence of family history of heart problems. He completed the Brunel Mood Scale (Terry et al. , 2003 to assess emotions before, during, and after the heart attack, and also describing his thoughts during these periods. Results indicate he experienced unpleasant emotions in the build up to the heart attack, feelings he attributed at the time to frustration to achieve fitness goals. He maintained an exercise regime prior to having a heart attack, a finding consistent with previous research suggesting that early diagnosis, although vital for survival, is not likely to be identified among seemingly healthy individuals. During the heart attack, he experienced a rapid emotional change characterised by a rapid increase in anger coupled with thoughts of needing to survive. The intensity of emotions and regulation strategies employed before and during the heart attack provide insight this experience, and we suggest future research should investigate emotional change during adverse conditions

  4. Patients' perceptions of their heart attack and recovery: the influence of epidemiological "evidence" and personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, R

    1998-06-01

    Secondary prevention of heart disease is widely viewed as likely to be more successful and cost effective than primary prevention. However, people's willingness to adopt lifestyle change is a complex issue in which people's perceptions of disease causation and risk as well as a range of socio-economic factors are important. This paper reports on a qualitative study of people following heart attack which examines their understandings of heart attack and the salience that lifestyle advice has in the light of these understandings. In-depth, qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 people recovering from heart attack. Each person was interviewed twice: at around two weeks and five months following their heart attack. The study found that information about recovery provided by health professionals was based on a simplified version of epidemiological evidence. This information played a central role in people's understandings about the nature of heart attack and their future risk in the early weeks following heart attack. However, as interviewees came to terms with the shock of the event, they tended to lose their trust in "official" accounts of cause and recovery and evidence from lay epidemiology that contradicted official accounts tended to emerge. This evidence encouraged interviewees to question the explanatory power of official accounts and to view the adoption of long-term lifestyle change as an action that would not guarantee protection from a further heart attack. This was true whether or not people's experiences of recovery reflected those "predicted" by health professionals although those awaiting further surgery or tests tended to maintain trust in official accounts over a longer period. It is concluded that the failure of official accounts to acknowledge the random nature of the occurrence of heart attack, the severity of heart attack and the level of recovery from heart attack is a central feature in people's reluctance to view lifestyle change as a

  5. Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or Stroke, Here Is What You Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Before Using Aspirin to Lower Your Risk of Heart Attack or ... care provider can determine whether regular use of aspirin will help to prevent a heart attack or ...

  6. Patterns of presentation of chronic ischemic heart disease with and without previous myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, R.; Rabbani, A.; Awan, Z.A.

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) is on the rise, from increasing lifespan of population and availability of better medical facilities. We studied chronic IHD cases with and without previous myocardial infarction, in Hazara, NWFP, Pakistan to evaluate left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, wall motion abnormalities and complications of IHD. All patients presenting with history of chest pain in Medical 'C' Unit, Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from June 2004 to May 2005 were included in the study. Patients with non-cardiac chest pain were excluded from the study. Cases with congenital and rheumatic heart disease, cardiomyopathies, unstable angina and acute MI were excluded. Patients with IHD with or without myocardial infarction (MI) were studied for left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction, left atrial size, E/A ratio), wall motion abnormalities and complications of IHD (Mitral regurgitation, Ventricular Septal Defect (VSD), LV aneurysm, LV clot). Clinical and echocardiographic evaluation was done in each case. Out of 183 cases of chronic IHD, 123 patients were without previous MI and 60 had had previous MI. Ejection fraction (EF) was 45%+-15 in the group without MI and 35+-11% in cases with MI. Left Atrium (LA) size was 35+-6 mm and 39+-4 mm in the two groups respectively. LV diastolic dysfunction was seen in 17% in the first and 24% in the second group respectively. Global hypokinesia was seen in 8% and 17% in the 2 groups respectively. Regional Wall Motion Abnormality (RWMA) was observed in 12% in patients without MI and in 58% cases with MI. Mitral regurgitation was seen in 10 and 20% in the 2 groups respectively LV clots, VSD, LV and aneurysm were seen in 8.4, 5, and 6.5% respectively, only in cases with previous MI. LV dysfunction, wall motion abnormalities and mitral regurgitation were more common in IHD cases with previous heart attack. (author)

  7. Mortality from heart attack in Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratkov Isidora

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION In most countries, cardiovascular diseases are the leading disorders, with ischemic heart diseases being the leading cause of death. According to WHO data, every year about 17 million people die of cardiovascular diseases, which is 30% of all deaths. Ischemic heart diseases contribute from one-third to one-half of all deaths due to cardiovascular diseases. Three point eight million men and 3.4 million women in the world die every year from ischemic heart diseases, and in Europe about 2 million. The highest mortality rate from ischemic heart diseases occurs in India, China and Russia. OBJECTIVE The aim of this descriptive epidemiological study was to determine heart attack mortality in Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004. METHOD In the study, we conducted investigation of Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004. Mortality data were obtained from the city institution for statistics. The mortality rates were calculated based on the total Belgrade population obtained from the mean values for the last two register years (1991 and 2002. The mortality rates were standardized using the direct method of standardization according to the world (Segi standard population. RESULTS In the Belgrade population during the period 1990-2004, the participation of mortality rate due to heart attack among deaths from cardiovascular diseases was 17% in males and 10% in females. In Belgrade male population, mean standardized mortality rates (per 100,000 habitants were 50.5 for heart attack, 8.3 for chronic ischemic heart diseases and 4.6 for angina pectoris, while in females the rates were 30.8, 6.7 and 4.2, respectively. Mortality from ischemic heart diseases and from heart attack was higher in males than in females. During the studied 15-year period, on average 755 males and 483 females died due to heart attack every year. Mean standardized mortality rates per 100,000 habitants were 50.0 in male and 31.1 in female population. Males

  8. Heart attack risk perception biases among hypertension patients: the role of educational level and worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Laurel M; Helweg-Larsen, Marie; Volpp, Kevin G; Kimmel, Stephen E

    2012-01-01

    Risk biases such as comparative optimism (thinking one is better off than similar others) and risk inaccuracy (misestimating one's risk compared to one's calculated risk) for health outcomes are common. Little research has investigated racial or socioeconomic differences in these risk biases. Results from a survey of individuals with poorly controlled hypertension (N=813) indicated that participants showed (1) comparative optimism for heart attack risk by underestimating their heart attack risk compared to similar others, and (2) risk inaccuracy by overestimating their heart attack risk compared to their calculated heart attack risk. More highly educated participants were more comparatively optimistic because they rated their personal risk as lower; education was not related to risk inaccuracy. Neither race nor the federal poverty level was related to risk biases. Worry partially mediated the relationship between education and personal risk. Results are discussed as they relate to the existing literature on risk perception.

  9. Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and Stroke: Know the Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the-Counter Medicines Safe Daily Use of Aspirin Aspirin for Reducing Your Risk of Heart Attack and ... any pharmacy, grocery or convenience store and buy aspirin without a prescription. The Drug Facts label on ...

  10. Knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke among Singapore residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Joy Li Juan; Yap, Susan; Cheah, Si Oon; Ng, Yih Yng; Goh, E Shaun; Doctor, Nausheen; Leong, Benjamin Sieu-Hon; Tiah, Ling; Chia, Michael Yih Chong; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2014-01-01

    To determine the level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore resident population, in comparison to the global community. A population based, random sample of 7,840 household addresses was selected from a validated national sampling frame. Each participant was asked eight questions on signs and symptoms of heart attack and 10 questions on stroke. The response rate was 65.2% with 4,192 respondents. The level of knowledge for preselected, common signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke was 57.8% and 57.1%, respectively. The respondents scored a mean of 5.0 (SD 2.4) out of 8 for heart attack, while they scored a mean of 6.8 (SD 2.9) out of 10 for stroke. Respondents who were ≥ 50 years, with lower educational level, and unemployed/retired had the least knowledge about both conditions. The level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore is comparable to USA and Canada. We found a comparable knowledge of stroke and heart attack signs and symptoms in the community to countries within the same economic, educational, and healthcare strata. However older persons, those with lower educational level and those who are unemployed/retired, require more public health education efforts.

  11. Knowledge of Signs and Symptoms of Heart Attack and Stroke among Singapore Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Li Juan Quah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore resident population, in comparison to the global community. Methods. A population based, random sample of 7,840 household addresses was selected from a validated national sampling frame. Each participant was asked eight questions on signs and symptoms of heart attack and 10 questions on stroke. Results. The response rate was 65.2% with 4,192 respondents. The level of knowledge for preselected, common signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke was 57.8% and 57.1%, respectively. The respondents scored a mean of 5.0 (SD 2.4 out of 8 for heart attack, while they scored a mean of 6.8 (SD 2.9 out of 10 for stroke. Respondents who were ≥50 years, with lower educational level, and unemployed/retired had the least knowledge about both conditions. The level of knowledge of signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke in Singapore is comparable to USA and Canada. Conclusion. We found a comparable knowledge of stroke and heart attack signs and symptoms in the community to countries within the same economic, educational, and healthcare strata. However older persons, those with lower educational level and those who are unemployed/retired, require more public health education efforts.

  12. Previous exposure to the World Trade Center terrorist attack and posttraumatic symptoms among older adults following Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrira, Amit; Palgi, Yuval; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Goodwin, Robin; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the maturation and inoculation hypotheses by examining whether age and previous exposure to the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC) terrorist attack moderated the relationship between degree of exposure to Hurricane Sandy and related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. An online sample of 1,000 participants from affected states completed self-report questionnaires one month after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast. Participants reported their degree of exposure to the WTC terrorist attack and to Hurricane Sandy, and their posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following Hurricane Sandy. The positive relationship between degree of exposure to Hurricane Sandy and level of PTSD symptoms was weaker among older adults. An additional significant three-way interaction suggested that both age and previous exposure to the WTC terrorist attack moderated the relationship between degree of exposure to Hurricane Sandy and level of PTSD symptoms. Previous high degree of exposure to the WTC terrorist attack was related to a weaker effect of current exposure to Hurricane Sandy on PTSD symptoms among older adults. However, among younger adults, previous high degree of exposure to the WTC terrorist attack was related to a stronger effect of current exposure on PTSD symptoms. When confronted by a natural disaster, American older adults are generally resilient. Supporting the inoculation hypothesis, resilience of older adults may be partly related to the strength successfully extracted from previous exposure to adverse events.

  13. 'Heart attack' symptoms and decision-making: the case of older rural women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M N G; McCulloch, B J

    2014-01-01

    analysis. The study showed that women had difficulty identifying heart attack symptoms when they did not have previous exposure to the symptoms either through personal experience or educational programs. Individuals incorrectly identified symptoms of a heart attack by associating symptoms with sleep problems, stroke, arthritis, stiffness in the neck, influenza, nerve damage, osteoporosis, bone cancer, tooth infection, and a pulled muscle. Misdiagnosis of symptoms most often led to a delay in seeking treatment in these women. Additionally, the women in this study discussed a reluctance to access care because of concerns related to maintaining their privacy, belief that the ambulance would take too long to reach them, and they did not want to bother their relatives for help. The findings of this study suggest implications for educational programs and interventions in rural environments and provide information that can facilitate better-informed communication between healthcare professionals and rural women.

  14. Dysfunction of Right Heart in Attack Period of Bronchial Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.А. Kondratiev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There were performed Doppler echocardiography investigations of functional state of the right heart in 42 children aged 5–17 years old in attack period of bronchial asthma of moderate to severe degree. Changes of intra-cardiac hemodynamics of the right heart in children in attack period of bronchial asthma were characterized by disturbance of systolic and diastolic function of the right ventricle and right atrium. Combined systolic-diastolic variant of the right ventricle dysfunction was typical for attack period of bronchial asthma in children and developed in 95.5 % of cases. Elevation of pressure in pulmonary artery was typical and significantly more often occurred in severe asthma attack, herewith pulmonary hypertension of the second degree predominated.

  15. Does uninsurance affect the health outcomes of the insured? Evidence from heart attack patients in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daysal, N Meltem

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999-2006). My results indicate that uninsured patients have an economically significant effect that increases the mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I show that these results are not driven by alternative explanations, including reverse causality, patient composition effects, sample selection or unobserved trends and that they are robust to a host of specification checks. The primary channel for the observed spillover effects is increased hospital uncompensated care costs. Although data limitations constrain my capacity to check how hospitals change their provision of care to insured heart attack patients in response to reduced revenues, the evidence I have suggests a modest increase in the quantity of cardiac services without a corresponding increase in hospital staff. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Attributing heart attack and stroke to "Old Age": Implications for subsequent health outcomes among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Tara L; Chipperfield, Judith G; Perry, Raymond P; Hamm, Jeremy M

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which older adults attribute a recent heart attack/stroke to "old age," and examined consequences for subsequent lifestyle behavior and health-care service utilization. Community-dwelling adults (N = 57, ages 73-98 years) were interviewed about their heart attack/stroke, and an objective health registry provided data on health-care utilization over a 3-year period. Endorsement of "old age" as a cause of heart attack/stroke negatively predicted lifestyle behavior change, and positively predicted frequency of physician visits and likelihood of hospitalization over the subsequent 3 years. Findings suggest the importance of considering "old age" attributions in the context of cardiovascular health events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. Symptom recognition of heart attack and stroke in nine European countries: a representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Jutta; Frank, Ronald; Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death and a source of chronic disability. To assess recognition of and reaction to symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and how recognition is related to the frequency of consulting physicians and other information sources. Face-to-face computer-assisted personal interviews. Representative sample of 10,228 persons in Austria, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Spain and UK, aged 14-98. Recognition of heart attack and stroke symptoms and proper reaction to symptoms. Chest pain was the only heart attack symptom recognized by more than 50% of participants. Eight percent knew no symptoms. Of 14 stroke symptoms, none was recognized by more than 50% of participants; 19% could not identify any symptom. For both heart attack and stroke, Germans and Austrians recognized the largest number of symptoms. Persons in Italy, Poland, Russia and Spain knew only about half as many symptoms as in Germany or Austria. Only 51% of Europeans would call an ambulance when someone suffers a stroke, the fewest (33 and 34%) in Germany and Austria. In most countries, people who consulted their physician more frequently had no better recognition of heart attack or stroke symptoms. The majority of persons in nine European countries recognize few heart attack and stroke symptoms; many do not know how to react. This low level of knowledge constitutes a major health risk and likely leads to delay in treatment, contributing to the high mortality and morbidity from these diseases. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Predictors of influenza vaccination uptake among adults with a history of heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; de Andres, Ana Lopez; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Esteban, Jesus; Gil, Angel; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2010-07-01

    Influenza vaccination can reduce morbidity and mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to evaluate influenza vaccination coverage among adults with a history of heart attack and to determine which variables were associated with vaccine uptake. A total of 716 adults reported having suffered a heart attack. The coverage among sufferers was 67.9% as against 35% for non sufferers. The variables that were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of receiving the vaccine among sufferers were: higher age; male gender, no smoking habit, "Physician visits in the preceding four weeks"; and, "Blood pressure control in the preceding three months". A descriptive study was conducted using individual data from adults aged ≥40 years included in the year 2006/7 Spanish Health Survey and comparing subjects with a history of heart attack with those who had not suffered this event. The number of participants surveyed was 20,060. Subjects were classified as heart attack sufferers if they answered affirmatively to the question: "Has your doctor told you that you have suffered a heart attack?" To assess influenza vaccination status we considered the response to the question, "Did you have a 'flu shot in the latest campaign?". Independent variables included sociodemographic, health-related, lifestyles and periodic control of cardiovascular risk factors. Influenza vaccination coverage among subjects who have suffered a heart attack is below desirable levels. Multiple strategies focused on providers and patients are needed to improve influenza vaccination coverage among these high risk subjects, particularly now with the emerging H1N1 pandemic.

  19. Awareness of heart attack and stroke symptoms among Hispanic male adults living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Bardales, Ricardo; Bales, Robert; Aguero, Carlos; Brady, Shelly; Tobar, Adriana; McGrath, Cynthia; Zaiser, Julia; Lipsky, Martin S

    2010-10-01

    There is evidence that Hispanic men are a high risk group for treatment delay for both heart attack and stroke. More targeted research is needed to elucidate this specific population's knowledge of warning signs for these acute events. This study sought to describe within-group disparities in Hispanic men's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology. Multivariate techniques were used to analyze a multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Heart and Stroke module database. The data were cross-sectional and focused on health risk factors and behaviors. The research participants were U.S. male Hispanic adults aged 18-99. The main outcome measure for the study was heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge score. Multivariate logistic regression analysis yielded that Hispanic men aged >or=18 years who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to: have less than a high school education, have deferred medical care because of cost, not have an identified health care provider, and be uninsured. There were significant within-group differences. Targeting educational efforts toward older (>or=55 years) Hispanic men with less than high school education, those who do not have an identified health care provider or health insurance, and who defer health care because of cost could be ways to improve the outcome of acute vascular events among the U.S. Hispanic adult male population.

  20. Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of High Cholesterol Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital ... chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too. It is best to call EMS for rapid transport to the emergency room. Learn more about ... More about stroke Immediately ...

  1. Valsartan in the treatment of heart attack survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodh I Jugdutt

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bodh I JugduttDivision of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Survivors of myocardial infarction (MI are at high risk of disability and death. This is due to infarct-related complications such as heart failure, cardiac remodeling with progressive ventricular dilation, dysfunction, and hypertrophy, and arrhythmias including ventricular and atrial fibrillation. Angiotensin (Ang II, the major effector molecule of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system (RAAS is a major contributor to these complications. RAAS inhibition, with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors were first shown to reduce mortality and morbidity after MI. Subsequently, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, that produce more complete blockade of the effects of Ang II at the Ang II type 1 (AT1 receptor, were introduced and the ARB valsartan was shown to be as effective as an ACE inhibitor in reducing mortality and morbidity in high-risk post-MI suvivors with left ventricular (LV systolic dysfunction and and/or heart failure and in heart failure patients, respectively, in two major trials (VALIANT and Val-HeFT. Both these trials used an ACE inhibitor as comparator on top of background therapy. Evidence favoring the use of valsartan for secondary prevention in post-MI survivors is reviewed.Keywords: valsartan, myocardial infarction, infarct survivors, remodeling, heart failure

  2. Does Uninsurance Affect the Health Outcomes of the Insured? Evidence from Heart Attack Patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the health of the insured, focusing on one health outcome - the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California

  3. Poor sleep linked to increased risk of heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    Insomnia is associated with an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to a study in China. Researchers carried out a meta-analysis of 15 cohort studies to assess the association between insomnia symptoms and incidence or death from cardiovascular disease and stroke.

  4. Does uninsurance affect the health outcomes of the insured? Evidence from heart attack patients in California

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meltem Daysal, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, I examine the impact of uninsured patients on the in-hospital mortality rate of insured heart attack patients. I employ panel data models using patient discharge and hospital financial data from California (1999–2006). My results indicate that uninsured patients have an economically

  5. Racial disparities in knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fussman, Chris; Rafferty, Ann P; Reeves, Mathew J; Zackery, Shannon; Lyon-Callo, Sarah; Anderson, Beth

    2009-01-01

    To describe the level of knowledge regarding risk factors and warning signs for stroke and heart attack among White and African American adults in Michigan and to quantify racial disparities. Knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs was assessed by using data from the 2004 Michigan Behavioral Risk Factor Survey. Prevalence estimates of knowledge were generated, and statistical differences in knowledge between Whites and African Americans were assessed. Adequate knowledge was defined as knowing 3 correct warning signs or risk factors. Logistic regression models were used to quantify the racial disparity in knowledge while controlling for potential confounding. Whites had substantially higher levels of adequate knowledge of risk factors (stroke: 31.6% vs 13.8%; heart attack: 52.6% vs 24.3%) and warning signs (stroke: 30.0% vs 17.2%; heart attack: 29.3% vs 13.8%) compared with African Americans (all observed differences were significant at P heart attack: AOR 3.4) and warning signs (stroke: AOR 2.0; heart attack: AOR 2.4) were significantly higher for Whites than for African Americans. A strong racial disparity in the knowledge of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs exists among Michigan adults. Communitywide public education programs in conjunction with targeted interventions for at-risk populations are necessary to produce meaningful improvements in the awareness of stroke and heart attack risk factors and warning signs among Michigan adults.

  6. Self-reported heart attack in Mexican-American elders: examination of incidence, prevalence, and 7-year mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otiniano, Max E; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Markides, Kyriakos S; Ray, Laura A; Du, Xianglin L

    2003-07-01

    To examine the prevalence, incidence, and mortality of self-reported heart attack in older Mexican Americans and to identify significant factors associated with heart attack. Cross-sectional and longitudinal study. Baseline and three follow-up interviews in five southwestern states (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas) of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiological Study of the Elderly. Three thousand fifty Mexican Americans aged 65 to 107 (mean age = 73). Sociodemographic factors (age, sex, marital status, language of interview, health insurance coverage, living arrangements, and financial strain) and health factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, stroke, cancer, hip fracture, arthritis, depression, limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and mortality) were determined at baseline (1993-94). New heart attacks were assessed at follow-ups in 1995-96, 1998-99, and 2000-01. Vital status was determined over the 7-year follow-up. Prevalence of self-reported heart attack was 9.1% at baseline. Incidence of self-reported heart attack was 6.1%, 9.1%, and 7.9%, respectively, for the three subsequent follow-ups. Older age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and stroke were significantly associated with heart attack at baseline. Age was a significant predictor for new heart attack at each follow-up. Having ADL (odds ratio (OR) = 2.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.19-3.86) and IADL (OR = 2.25, CI = 1.72-2.94) disabilities was significantly associated with self-reported heart attack. Subjects with heart attack were significantly more likely to die at 7 years (hazard ratio = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.29-1.91). Of those with self-reported heart attack, 42.4% had died of heart attack as the underlying cause of death by 7-year follow-up. In Mexican Americans, self-reported heart attack was associated with being older and male and having diabetes

  7. A REVIEW ON THE DETECTION OF HEART ATTACK USING DATA MINING BY ACO TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Pise Satish Prakashrao*1, Anoop Singh 2 & Ritesh Kumar Yadav3

    2018-01-01

    The goal of data mining is to extract knowledge from huge amount of data. Now a day’s data mining technique used in the field of medical diagnose of critical diesis and clinical data. In this research propose model give a solution to predict heart diseases. In this paper proposes a novel approach of applying the Ant Colony Optimization technique (ACO) for extracting the Association Rules (AR) from the database to detect heart attack. This algorithm is broadly are many types of heart disease ...

  8. Women at risk for cardiovascular disease lack knowledge of heart attack symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flink, Laura E; Sciacca, Robert R; Bier, Michael L; Rodriguez, Juviza; Giardina, Elsa-Grace V

    2013-03-01

    It is not known whether cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk level is related to knowledge of the leading cause of death of women or heart attack symptoms. Women with higher CVD risk estimated by Framingham Risk Score (FRS) or metabolic syndrome (MS) have lower CVD knowledge. Women visiting primary care clinics completed a standardized behavioral risk questionnaire. Blood pressure, weight, height, waist size, fasting glucose, and lipid profile were assessed. Women were queried regarding CVD knowledge. Participants (N = 823) were Hispanic women (46%), non-Hispanic white (37%), and non-Hispanic black (8%). FRS was determined in 278: low (63%), moderate (29%), and high (8%); 24% had ≥3 components of MS. The leading cause of death was answered correctly by 54%, heart attack symptoms by 67%. Knowledge was lowest among racial/ethnic minorities and those with less education (both Pheart attack symptoms (P = 0.018), but not after multivariable adjustment. Women with higher FRS were less likely to know heart attack symptoms. Efforts to target those at higher CVD risk must persist, or the most vulnerable may suffer disproportionately, not only because of risk factors but also inadequate knowledge. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Depression and coronary artery disease -real heart attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, S.; Ahmed, B.

    2001-01-01

    Both depression and ischaemic heart disease are said to become the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developing countries during the next two decades. The relationship between these two disorders has long been speculated but only recently addressed scientifically. A Medline search was conducted to obtain the articles that address the association between depressive disorders and coronary artery disease (CAD). Most studies following large cohorts over a period ranging from 4.5 to 27 years have shown that depression is associated with a significantly high risk of developing CAD. These studies also show that patients who have depression following myocardial infarction hat poorer prognosis on major cardiac end points like reoccurrence of myocardial infarction and death as compared to the non-depressed group. The psychosocial variables associated with depression like social isolation, acute and chronic stressful life events are also associated with increased risk of developing CAD. The mechanisms underlying this association between depression and CAD are unknown at present. The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions in reducing this increased risks have been demonstrated while the trials assessing the efficacy and safety of anti depressed drugs are underway. The implications of these finding are discussed in the context of developing countries. (author)

  10. Applying Magneto-rheology to Reduce Blood Viscosity and Suppress Turbulence to Prevent Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, R.

    Heart attacks are the leading causes of death in USA. Research indicates one common thread, high blood viscosity, linking all cardiovascular diseases. Turbulence in blood circulation makes different regions of the vasculature vulnerable to development of atherosclerotic plaque. Turbulence is also responsible for systolic ejection murmurs and places heavier workload on heart, a possible trigger of heart attacks. Presently, neither medicine nor method is available to suppress turbulence. The only method to reduce the blood viscosity is to take medicine, such as aspirin. However, using medicine to reduce the blood viscosity does not help suppressing turbulence. In fact, the turbulence gets worse as the Reynolds number goes up with the viscosity reduction by the medicine. Here we report our new discovery: application of a strong magnetic field to blood along its flow direction, red blood cells are polarized in the magnetic field and aggregated into short chains along the flow direction. The blood viscosity becomes anisotropic: Along the flow direction the viscosity is significantly reduced, but in the directions perpendicular to the flow the viscosity is considerably increased. In this way, the blood flow becomes laminar, turbulence is suppressed, the blood circulation is greatly improved, and the risk for heart attacks is reduced. While these effects are not permanent, they last for about 24 hours after one magnetic therapy treatment.

  11. Factors influencing body image in individuals after a first heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarek, Aleksandra; Barański, Jarosław

    Experiencing a heart attack can change the attitude of patients towards their corporeality. Body image may significantly influence the recovery of patients, their adherence to medical recommendations, and adopting a healthy lifestyle. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between body image and personality characteristics, as well as sociodemographic, physical and medical factors in patients after a first myocardial infarction. The study comprised 160 patients after a first heart attack (80 women and 80 men) aged 34–65 years (mean = 53.44; SD = 6.40). Body image was measured with the Body Image Questionnaire, and personality was analyzed according to the Adjective Check List. The level of body satisfaction was shaped by two dimensions of personality (Sociability, Weakness and inhibition) and by respondents’ gender. In respondents’ personality profile, lower body satisfaction was associated with elevated Weakness and inhibition and with lowered Sociability. Women were less satisfied with their bodies than men. The significance attributed to one’s own body was shaped by two dimensions of personality (Expansiveness, Weakness and inhibition) and by respondents’ age. Patients with a higher degree of Expansiveness, a lower degree of Weakness and inhibition and more advanced in age gave greater priority to corporeality. Improving body image in persons after a first heart attack should be combined with the development of personality abilities important for self-efficacy and social competency.

  12. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well-Being Mental Health ...

  13. Awareness of heart attack symptoms among US adults in 2007, and changes in awareness from 2001 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Gillespie, Cathleen; Keenan, Nora L; Greenlund, Kurt J

    2011-05-01

    Timely access to emergency care, prompt receipt of advanced treatment and survival from heart attack is dependent on both the early recognition of heart attack symptoms, by both victims and bystanders, and by immediately calling the emergency services. The objective of this study is to measure the awareness of heart attack symptoms and the emergency response among US adults. We analyzed data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System's module on heart attack and stroke, which was conducted in 17 states/territories in 2001 and 12 states/territories in 2007. The module included five questions related to heart attack symptoms, one decoy question and one question regarding the first action to take if someone is having a heart attack. Age-adjusted prevalence of awareness was estimated, and odds ratios were calculated. Differences between 2001 and 2007 were assessed for five states that used the module in both years. In 2007, among 76,864 adults, awareness of individual heart attack symptoms ranged from 49% (pain in jaw, neck or back) to 92% (chest pain). Although 97% of adults recognized at least one symptom, only 10.7% recognized all five symptoms, knew that 'sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes' was not a symptom of heart attack and recognized the need to call the emergency services. This estimate varied significantly by age, sex, race/ethnicity and level of education. The estimate was significantly higher for women (12.2%) than men (7.7%), White (11.6%) than Black (5.7%) or Hispanic people (4.5%), those with a higher level of education (13.5%) than lower educational level (4.5%) and for those with coronary heart disease (16.2%) than without the disease (9.5%). Comparison of awareness between 2001 (the referent) and 2007, in five states, revealed that awareness of all symptoms and calling the emergency services, were 9.7 and 10.3% for 2001 and 2007, respectively (p heart attack symptoms among adults in 12 states was low and little improvement was

  14. Smartphone Based Heart Attack Risk Prediction System with Statistical Analysis and Data Mining Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Raihan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD (Heart Attack is ubiquitous and one of the major reasons of death worldwide. Early screening of people at risk of having IHD may lead to minimize morbidity and mortality. A simple approach is proposed in this paper to predict risk of developing heart attack using smartphone and data mining. Clinical data from 835 patients was collected, analyzed and also correlated with their risk existing clinical symptoms which may suggest underlying non detected IHD. A user friendly Android application was developed by incorporating clinical data obtained from patients who admitted with chest pain in a cardiac hospital. Upon user input of risk factors, the application categorizes the level of IHD risks of the user as high, low or medium. It was found by analyzing and correlating the data that there was a significant correlation of having an IHD and the application results in high & low, medium & low and medium & high categories; where the p values were 0.0001, 0.0001 and 0.0001 respectively. The experimental results showed that the sensitivity and accuracy of the proposed technique were 89.25 % and 76.05 % respectively, whereas, using C4.5 decision tree, accuracy was found 86% and sensitivity was obtained 91.6%. Existing tools need mandatory input of lipid values which makes them underutilized by general people; though these risk calculators bear significant academic importance. Our research is motivated to reduce that limitation and promote a risk evaluation on time.

  15. [Cardiac markers in different degrees of chronic kidney disease: influence of inflammation and previous heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Borja; Goicoechea, Marian; García de Vinuesa, Soledad; Verde, Eduardo; Verdalles, Ursula; Yuste, Claudia; Reque, Javier; Luño, José

    2012-06-30

    Troponin T (TnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its precursor (NT-proBNP) are useful markers of acute coronary events and heart failure. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of chronic renal failure, inflammation and heart disease in these biomarkers. In 266 patients with different stages of chronic renal diseases, the following parameters were measured: cardiac markers (TnT, BNP and NT-proBNP), renal function, inflammatory markers (hsCRP, fibrinogen, albumin, uric acid and white blood cells). We recorded the cardiovascular history. Ventricular dysfunction and left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed by echocardiography. A significant correlation between cardiac markers and inflammatory parameters such as fibrinogen, hsCRP and albumin was found. Age (OR 1.05, P = .021), serum albumin (OR: 0.06, P=.006), ischemic heart disease (OR: 8.17, P=.0092) and renal failure (OR: 1.67, P=.05) were predictors of higher BNP levels. Age (OR 1.05, P=.0097), serum albumin (OR: 0.12, P=.001), ischemic heart disease (OR: 3.43, P=.034), renal failure (OR: 1, 65, P=.036) and heart failure (OR: 4.33, P=.0312) were predictors of elevated NT-proBNP. Previous ischemic heart disease alone increased TnT levels (OR: 6.51, P=.0012). Age, previous cardiac disease and inflammation increase cardiac marker levels in patients with different stages of renal disease, but the degree of renal failure is an important factor influencing NT-proBNP levels. However, ischemic heart disease alone increases the levels of TnT. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. US State-level income inequality and risks of heart attack and coronary risk behaviors: longitudinal findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabayo, Roman; Kawachi, Ichiro; Gilman, Stephen E

    2015-07-01

    To examine prospectively the association between US state income inequality and incidence of heart attack. We used data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (n = 34,445). Respondents completed interviews at baseline (2001-2002) and follow-up (2004-2005). Weighted multilevel modeling was used to determine if US state-level income inequality (measured by the Gini coefficient) at baseline was a predictor of heart attack during follow-up, controlling for individual-level and state-level covariates. In comparison to residents of US states in the lowest quartile of income inequality, those living in the second [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 1.71, 95 % CI 1.16-2.53)], third (AOR = 1.81, 95 % CI 1.28-2.57), and fourth (AOR = 2.04, 95 % CI 1.26-3.29) quartiles were more likely to have a heart attack. Similar findings were obtained when we excluded those who had a heart attack prior to baseline. This study is one of the first to empirically show the longitudinal relationship between income inequality and coronary heart disease. Living in a state with higher income inequality increases the risk for heart attack among US adults.

  17. Heart lesion after the first attack of the rheumatic Fever 22 years experience in single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-02-01

    Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded.

  18. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was established over the last 20 years. Aims: In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease in children from Kosovo population with first attack of acute rheumatic fever. Also, we presented that echocardiography examination detects a greater prevalence of rheumatic heart disease than other diagnostic procedures. We aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of cardiac auscultation, ECG record, lab analysis to echocardiography and to determine the feasibility of specific age in this setting. Methods: To optimize accurate diagnosis of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, we utilized two group models. In the first group of 388 children, hospitalized and treated before 1999, diagnosis of rheumatic fever was decided basing on the clinical and laboratory findings whereas in second group (221 children treated from1999 to 2010) clinical and lab diagnosis were amplified also on the detection by echocardiography. Conclusion: In second group, using echocardiography as a method of diagnosis and assessment children with rheumatic fever, we found high rates of undetected rheumatic heart disease in this high-risk group population. Echocardiographic examination of children with rheumatic fever for rheumatic heart disease may over diagnose rheumatic heart disease unless congenital mitral valve anomalies and physiological regurgitation are excluded. PMID:25870479

  19. Health and cost benefits associated with the use of metoprolol in heart attack patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Ibanez, Borja

    2014-11-01

    Heart attack (myocardial infarction) is a highly prevalent entity worldwide. Widespread implementation of reperfusion strategies has dramatically reduced the mortality associated with infarction. Paradoxically, the mortality reduction has significantly increased the incidence of chronic heart failure (HF). Treatment of HF, once present, represents a huge socioeconomic burden on individuals and healthcare systems. The possibility of preventing rather than treating post-infarction HF would be of paramount importance. Given that infarct size is the main determinant of adverse post-infarction outcomes (including chronic HF), therapies able to reduce infarct size are needed. The single administration of intravenous metoprolol before reperfusion has been recently shown to reduce infarct size and reduce the cases of chronic HF in a proof-of-concept trial. If confirmed in larger trials, this low-cost therapy is expected to have a major health and socioeconomic impact.

  20. Pregnancy in a Previously Conjoined Thoracopagus Twin with a Crisscross Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam H. Rimawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Crisscross heart (CCH is a complex, rare, congenital, rotational, cardiac abnormality that accounts for <0.1% of congenital heart defects (CHD. CCH is characterized by the crossing of the inflow streams of the two ventricles due to an abnormal twisting of the heart. A case of maternal CCH has not been previously reported. Case. We report a case of a primigravida with a CCH, who was separated at birth from her thoracopagus conjoined twin. Pregnancy was managed by congenital cardiology, maternal-fetal medicine, anesthesiology, and obstetrics. She underwent a 39-week vaginal delivery without maternal or neonatal complication. Conclusion. A successful term pregnancy outcome was achieved in a patient with CCH using a multidisciplinary approach to address her cardiac condition.

  1. Ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody based nanohybrid sensor for rapid detection of human heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kaur, Inderpreet; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-02-01

    An ultrasensitive cardiac troponin I antibody conjugated with graphene quantum dots (GQD) and polyamidoamine (PAMAM) nanohybrid modified gold electrode based sensor was developed for the rapid detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) in human. Screen printed gold (Au) electrode was decorated with 4-aminothiophenol for amine functionalization of the Au surface. These amino groups were further coupled with carboxyl functionalities of GQD with EDC-NHS reaction. In order to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor, PAMAM dendrimer was successively embedded on GQD through carbodiimide coupling to provide ultra-high surface area for antibody immobilization. The activated cardiac troponin I (cTnI) monoclonal antibody was immobilized on PAMAM to form nanoprobe for sensing specific heart attack marker cTnI. Various concentrations of cardiac marker, cTnI were electrochemically measured using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) in human blood serum. The modifications on sensor surface were characterized by FTIR and AFM techniques. The sensor is highly specific to cTnI and showed negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensitivity of the sensor was 109.23μAcm -2 μg -1 and lower limit of detection of cTnI was found 20fgmL -1 . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology: a cross-sectional comparison of rural and non-rural US adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanoski, Michael T; Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Amaro, Maria L; Akers, Michael F; Huot, Krista L

    2012-06-01

    Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, attained education, health insurance status, having a health care provider (HCP), timing of last routine medical check-up, medical care deferment because of cost, self-defined health status and geographic locale. The weighted n for this study overall was 103,262,115 U.S. adults  > =18 years of age. Approximately 22.0% of these respondents were U.S. adults living in rural locales. Logistic regression analysis revealed that those U.S. adults who had low composite heart attack and stroke knowledge scores were more likely to be rural (OR=1.218 95%CI 1.216-1.219) rather than non-rural residents. Furthermore, those with low scores were more likely to be: male (OR=1.353 95%CI 1.352-1.354), >65 years of age (OR=1.369 95%CI 1.368-1.371), African American (OR=1.892 95%CI 1.889-1.894), not educated beyond high school (OR=1.400 955CI 1.399-1.402), uninsured (OR=1.308 95%CI 1.3-6-1.310), without a HCP (OR=1.216 95%CI 1.215-1.218), and living in a household with an

  3. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology: a cross-sectional comparison of rural and non-rural US adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanoski Michael T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the signs and symptoms of heart attacks and strokes are important not only in saving lives, but also in preserving quality of life. Findings from recent research have yielded that the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors are higher in rural populations, suggesting that adults living in rural locales may be at higher risk for heart attack and/or stroke. Knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomology as well as calling 911 for a suspected heart attack or stroke are essential first steps in seeking care. This study sought to examine the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among rural adults in comparison to non-rural adults living in the U.S. Methods Using multivariate techniques, a cross-sectional analysis of an amalgamated multi-year Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS database was performed. The dependent variable for this analysis was low heart attack and stroke knowledge score. The covariates for the analysis were: age, sex, race/ethnicity, annual household income, attained education, health insurance status, having a health care provider (HCP, timing of last routine medical check-up, medical care deferment because of cost, self-defined health status and geographic locale. Results The weighted n for this study overall was 103,262,115 U.S. adults > =18 years of age. Approximately 22.0% of these respondents were U.S. adults living in rural locales. Logistic regression analysis revealed that those U.S. adults who had low composite heart attack and stroke knowledge scores were more likely to be rural (OR = 1.218 95%CI 1.216-1.219 rather than non-rural residents. Furthermore, those with low scores were more likely to be: male (OR = 1.353 95%CI 1.352-1.354, >65 years of age (OR = 1.369 95%CI 1.368-1.371, African American (OR = 1.892 95%CI 1.889-1.894, not educated beyond high school (OR = 1.400 955CI 1.399-1.402, uninsured (OR = 1.308 95%CI 1

  4. [The daily rhythm of heart attack morbidity and mortality may be influenced by the time of sunrise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Csoboth, Ildikó; Boncz, Imre; Bódis, József

    2008-11-16

    The morbidity and mortality of a myocardial infarction show characteristic seasonal and diurnal changes that may be influenced by the time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight during the day. We wish to study whether the time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight influence the seasonality of heart attack morbidity and mortality, and whether these have an effect on the diurnal rhythm of a heart attack. We have carried out the retrospective analysis of patients received at Hungarian hospitals with the diagnose of an acute heart attack ( n = 32,329) and those deceased due to a heart attack ( n = 5,142) between 2004 and 2005. Data were gained from the data-base of the National Health Insurance Fund according to the International Classification of Diseases. Positive correlation showed between the time of sunrise and both the incidence of an acute myocardial infarction and related mortality ( p heart attack morbidity and mortality, however, other factors are assumed to take a role as well.

  5. Knowledge of heart attack symptoms and risk factors among native Thais: a street-intercept survey method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poomsrikaew, Ornwanya; Ryan, Catherine J; Zerwic, Julie J

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to determine Thais' knowledge of heart attack symptoms and risk factors and whether that knowledge was related to age, gender or education. Via a street-intercept survey method, a convenience sample of people aged ≥ 35 years (n = 192) was recruited. Mean age was 47 ± 9.6 years (range 35-81), and 55.2% were female. Participants identified on average 5.6 of 9 heart attack symptoms (SD 1.8) and 5.3 of 8 heart attack risk factors (SD 2.1). However, 66.7% mistakenly thought the chest discomfort would be severe, sharp and stabbing, and many subjects erroneously selected symptoms that are actually stroke symptoms. There were no gender or educational differences in knowledge of heart attack symptoms and risk factors. Older adults recognized fewer total symptoms than did younger adults. These findings could direct health-care providers to help the Thai population differentiate symptoms of heart attack from stroke. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Cooperative Strategies to Develop Effective Stroke and Heart Attack Awareness Messages in Rural American Indian Communities, 2009–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C.; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S.; Harwell, Todd S.; Helgerson, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. Methods During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Results Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Conclusion Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities. PMID:23680509

  7. Cooperative strategies to develop effective stroke and heart attack awareness messages in rural american Indian communities, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Carrie S; Gohdes, Dorothy; Fogle, Crystelle C; Tadios, Fawn; Doore, Velva; Bell, Doreen S; Harwell, Todd S; Helgerson, Steven D

    2013-05-16

    National initiatives to improve the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs have encouraged symptomatic people to seek early treatment, but few have shown significant effects in rural American Indian (AI) communities. During 2009 and 2010, the Montana Cardiovascular Health Program, in collaboration with 2 tribal health departments, developed and conducted culturally specific public awareness campaigns for signs and symptoms of heart attack and stroke via local media. Telephone surveys were conducted before and after each campaign to evaluate the effectiveness of the campaigns. Knowledge of 3 or more heart attack warning signs and symptoms increased significantly on 1 reservation from 35% at baseline to 47% postcampaign. On the second reservation, recognition of 2 or more stroke signs and symptoms increased from 62% at baseline to 75% postcampaign, and the level of awareness remained at 73% approximately 4 months after the high-intensity campaign advertisements ended. Intent to call 9-1-1 did not increase in the heart attack campaign but did improve in the stroke campaign for specific symptoms. Recall of media campaigns on both reservations increased significantly from baseline to postcampaign for both media outlets (ie, radio and newspaper). Carefully designed, culturally specific campaigns may help eliminate disparities in the recognition of heart attack and stroke warning signs in AI communities.

  8. Sodium Valproate, a Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, Is Associated With Reduced Stroke Risk After Previous Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Rebecca L; Crichton, Siobhan; Wolfe, Charles D A; Yi, Qilong; Li, Linxin; Hankey, Graeme J; Rothwell, Peter M; Markus, Hugh S

    2018-01-01

    A variant in the histone deacetylase 9 ( HDAC9 ) gene is associated with large artery stroke. Therefore, inhibiting HDAC9 might offer a novel secondary preventative treatment for ischemic stroke. The antiepileptic drug sodium valproate (SVA) is a nonspecific inhibitor of HDAC9. We tested whether SVA therapy given after ischemic stroke was associated with reduced recurrent stroke rate. Data were pooled from 3 prospective studies recruiting patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack and long-term follow-up: the South London Stroke Register, The Vitamins to Prevent Stroke Study, and the Oxford Vascular Study. Patients receiving SVA were compared with patients who received antiepileptic drugs other than SVA using survival analysis and Cox Regression. A total of 11 949 patients with confirmed ischemic event were included. Recurrent stroke rate was lower in patient taking SVA (17 of 168) than other antiepileptic drugs (105 of 530; log-rank survival analysis P =0.002). On Cox regression, controlling for potential cofounders, SVA remained associated with reduced stroke (hazard ratio=0.44; 95% confidence interval: 0.3-0.7; P =0.002). A similar result was obtained when patients taking SVA were compared with all cases not taking SVA (Cox regression, hazard ratio=0.47; 95% confidence interval: 0.29-0.77; P =0.003). These results suggest that exposure to SVA, an inhibitor of HDAC, may be associated with a lower recurrent stroke risk although we cannot exclude residual confounding in this study design. This supports the hypothesis that HDAC9 is important in the ischemic stroke pathogenesis and that its inhibition, by SVA or a more specific HDAC9 inhibitor, is worthy of evaluation as a treatment to prevent recurrent ischemic stroke. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Should Antihypertensive Treatment Recommendations Differ in Patients With and Without Coronary Heart Disease? (from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial [ALLHAT]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Michael H; Davis, Barry R; Piller, Linda B; Ford, Charles E; Baraniuk, M Sarah; Pressel, Sara L; Assadi, Mahshid A; Einhorn, Paula T; Haywood, L Julian; Ilamathi, Ekambaram; Oparil, Suzanne; Retta, Tamrat M

    2016-01-01

    Thiazide-type diuretics have been recommended for initial treatment of hypertension in most patients, but should this recommendation differ for patients with and without coronary heart disease (CHD)? The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) was a randomized, double-blind hypertension treatment trial in 42,418 participants with high risk of combined cardiovascular disease (CVD) (25% with preexisting CHD). This post hoc analysis compares long-term major clinical outcomes in those assigned amlodipine (n = 9048) or lisinopril (n = 9,054) with those assigned chlorthalidone (n = 15,255), stratified by CHD status. After 4 to 8 years, randomized treatment was discontinued. Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national databases for deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. For most CVD outcomes, end-stage renal disease, and total mortality, there were no differences across randomized treatment arms regardless of baseline CHD status. In-trial rates of CVD were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of heart failure were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in those with and without CHD (overall hazard ratios [HRs] 1.10, p heart failure in amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone (HR 1.12; p = 0.01) during extended follow-up did not differ by baseline CHD status. In conclusion, these results provide no reason to alter our previous recommendation to include a properly dosed diuretic (such as chlorthalidone 12.5 to 25 mg/day) in the initial antihypertensive regimen for most hypertensive patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimism and death: predicting the course and consequences of depression trajectories in response to heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R; Bonanno, George A

    2014-12-01

    The course of depression in relation to myocardial infarction (MI), commonly known as heart attack, and the consequences for mortality are not well characterized. Further, optimism may predict both the effects of MI on depression as well as mortality secondary to MI. In the current study, we utilized a large population-based prospective sample of older adults (N=2,147) to identify heterogeneous trajectories of depression from 6 years prior to their first-reported MI to 4 years after. Findings indicated that individuals were at significantly increased risk for mortality when depression emerged after their first-reported MI, compared with resilient individuals who had no significant post-MI elevation in depression symptomatology. Individuals with chronic depression and those demonstrating pre-event depression followed by recovery after MI were not at increased risk. Further, optimism, measured before MI, prospectively differentiated all depressed individuals from participants who were resilient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Recovery From Heart Attack, Biomedicalization, and the Production of a Contingent Health Citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdridge, Darren

    2017-07-01

    In this article, I explore the experience of recovery from a heart attack through an analytic autoethnography. I discuss the tensions inherent in biomedical subjectivities of health and ill-health during cardiac recovery through three key themes: (a) the transfer of responsibility and becoming a subject "at risk," (b) technologies of biomedicine and the disciplining of subjectivities, and (c) the transformation of a body toward a new pharmaceuticalized bodily normal. Through an analysis driven by the biomedicalization thesis of Clarke, alongside work on biopower and the governmentality of health by Foucault, Rose, and Rabinow, I seek to provide new insights into the process of cardiac recovery and the relationship between individual experience and broader socio-political processes. Key to this analysis is a focus on the contingent subjectivities brought into being through biomedicalization that constitute a new form of health citizenship that is otherwise not accounted for in narratives of recovery.

  12. AN EFFICIENT APPROACH FOR DETECTION OF HEART ATTACK USING NOBLE ANT COLONY OPTIMIZATION CONCEPT OF DATA MINING

    OpenAIRE

    Pise Satish Prakashrao*1, Anoop Singh 2 & Ritesh Kumar Yadav3

    2018-01-01

    The goal of data mining is to extract knowledge from large amounts of data. Data Mining is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on machine learning, statistics and databases. In this article, we highlight a new framework that uses a combination of data extraction and ant colony optimization to collect heart disease such as early heart attacks to protect them and reduce mortality rates. This study focused on the formulation and implementation of an improved and reliable model for the diagno...

  13. The role of the emergency services in the optimisation of primary angioplasty: experience from London and the Heart Attack Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Miles; Whitbread, Mark

    2013-08-22

    Early ambulance services often confined their activities to a "scoop and run" approach, conveying sick patients quickly to the nearest emergency department. With the advent of modern ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) management and primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI), the role of the emergency medical service (EMS) has expanded significantly. This review discusses the critical and evolving collaboration between the EMS and the heart attack centre. Speed of reperfusion is a major determinant of outcome in STEMI and, whilst the patient delay (symptom to call time) has a central role in this, system delay (first medical contact to balloon time) is linked to mortality and is used to measure the response of a PPCI programme and is a key element of contemporary guidelines. In addition to rapid diagnosis and transfer to the heart attack centre, the EMS has to deliver a growing number of established treatments including resuscitation and drug therapy. EMS also continually needs to develop expertise in new techniques such as advanced management of cardiac arrest patients, including automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and will need to deliver newer therapies if trials support their use, including cooling and preconditioning. Ultimately, the EMS has a central role in the management of STEMI patients which needs to be fully aligned with the heart attack centres. This integration of services is perhaps best regarded as the Heart Attack Team.

  14. Disparities in adult African American women's knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptomatology: an analysis of 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfiyya, May Nawal; Cumba, Marites T; McCullough, Joel Emery; Barlow, Erika Laverne; Lipsky, Martin S

    2008-06-01

    Heart disease and stroke are the first and third leading causes of death of American women, respectively. African American women experience a disproportionate burden of these diseases compared with Caucasian women and are also more likely to delay seeking treatment for acute symptoms. As knowledge is a first step in seeking care, this study examined the knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms among African American women. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing 2003-2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) data. A composite heart attack and stroke knowledge score was computed for each respondent from the 13 heart attack and stroke symptom knowledge questions. Multivariate logistic regression was performed using low scores on the heart attack and stroke knowledge questions as the dependent variable. Twenty percent of the respondents were low scorers, and 23.8% were high scorers. Logistic regression analysis showed that adult African American women who earned low scores on the composite heart attack and stroke knowledge questions (range 0-8 points) were more likely to be aged 18-34 (OR = 1.36, CI 1.35, 1.37), be uninsured (OR = 1.32, CI 1.31, 1.33), have an annual household income heart attack and stroke symptoms varied significantly among African American women, depending on socioeconomic variables. Targeting interventions to African American women, particularly those in lower socioeconomic groups, may increase knowledge of heart attack and stroke symptoms, subsequently improving preventive action taken in response to these conditions.

  15. Statins and the Risk of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Patients With Previous Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Goldstein, Larry B; Cea Soriano, Lucía

    2017-01-01

    of preadmission statin use with the risk of ICH in patients with a history of IS or TIA in a population-based cohort. METHODS: The Health Improvement Network primary care database in the United Kingdom was used to identify new users of low-dose aspirin and a matched comparison. Both cohorts were followed......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Although there is no overall association between statin use and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), whether there is an increased risk among those with a history of ischemic stroke (IS) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) remains controversial. We evaluated the relationship...... to identify incident cases of ICH, with validation by manual review of patient records and linkage to hospitalization data. In a nested case-control study, we compared the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for ICH based on statin use in the subgroup of individuals with history...

  16. Faith and use of complementary and alternative medicine among heart attack patients in a secular society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekke-Hansen, Sidsel; Pedersen, Christina Gundgaard; Thygesen, Kristian; Christensen, Søren; Waelde, Lynn C; Zachariae, Robert

    2012-10-01

    To explore the associations of religious and spiritual faith (unambiguous, ambiguous and no faith), existential considerations and disease severity with use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) among heart patients in a secular society, and to address patients' perceived influence of CAM on their quality of life and heart disease. Prospective questionnaire study among 97 consecutively recruited patients (72.2% male; mean age 60.6 years) with acute coronary syndrome from a Danish cardiac university hospital unit. Total CAM use in the 6 months following hospitalisation. Altogether 24.7% used CAM with dietary/exercise counselling and dietary/nutritional supplements being the most prevalent types. In a final multivariate logistic regression model entering faith in God, faith in a spiritual power and previous CAM use, only unambiguous faith in God predicted CAM use following the event (OR: 11.24, CI: 2.19-57.65, p=0.004). No significant association was found between heart disease severity and CAM use. The majority of CAM treatments were rated as having some degree of positive influence on quality of life (75.9%) and the heart disease (58.6%). Faith among heart patients in a secular society was associated with CAM use. It may be speculated that believers in God were more inclined to use lifestyle-oriented CAM types such as dietary/exercise counselling. Patients' perceived benefits of CAM may be strong motivational factors for present or future use. However, considering the potential adverse effect of combining some complementary therapies with conventional medicine, an open dialogue on CAM use is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cancer and heart attack survivors' expectations of employment status: results from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijts, Saskia F A; van der Beek, Allard J; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Smith, Lee; Wardle, Jane

    2017-08-07

    Sociodemographic, health- and work-related factors have been found to influence return to work in cancer survivors. It is feasible though that behavioural factors, such as expectation of being at work, could also affect work-related outcomes. Therefore, the effect of earlier identified factors and expectation of being at work on future employment status in cancer survivors was explored. To assess the degree to which these factors specifically concern cancer survivors, a comparison with heart attack survivors was made. Data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing were used. Cancer and heart attack survivors of working age in the UK were included and followed up for 2 years. Baseline characteristics of both cancer and heart attack survivors were compared regarding employment status. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed in survivors at work, and the interaction between independent variables and diagnose group was assessed. In cancer survivors at work (N = 159), alcohol consumption, participating in moderate or vigorous sport activities, general health and participation were univariate associated with employment status at two-year follow-up. Only fair general health (compared to very good general health) remained statistically significant in the multivariate model (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.76; p = 0.010). In heart attack survivors at work (N = 78), gender, general health and expectation of being at work were univariate associated with employment status at follow-up. Female gender (OR 0.03; 95% CI 0.00-0.57; p = 0.018) and high expectation of being at work (OR 10.68; 95% CI 1.23-93.92; p = 0.033) remained significant in the multivariate model. The influence of gender (p = 0.066) and general health (p = 0.020) regarding employment status was found to differ significantly between cancer and heart attack survivors. When predicting future employment status in cancer survivors in the UK, general health is the most relevant factor

  18. The relationship between knowledge and risk for heart attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Cameron; Vinson, Seth; Shofer, Frances; Brice, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) represent 2 of the leading causes of death in the United States. The early recognition of risk factors and event symptoms allows for the mitigation of disability or death. We sought to compare subject knowledge of stroke and MI, assess subject risk for cardiovascular disease, and determine if an association exists between knowledge and risk. In this cross-sectional survey, adult, non-health care professionals were presented with a written knowledge test and risk assessment tool. Subjects were classified into 3 categories of cardiovascular risk. Associations were then calculated between knowledge, risk, and population demographics. Of 500 subjects approached, 364 were enrolled. The subjects were mostly white, middle-aged, and high school educated. Gender and income were evenly distributed. Forty-eight (14%) subjects were identified as ideal risk, 130 (38%) as low risk, and 168 (49%) as moderate/high risk. MI and stroke knowledge scores decreased as cardiovascular risk increased (85%, 79%, and 73% for ideal, low, and moderate/high risk groups, respectively; P heart attack knowledge scores. Knowledge about stroke and MI was modest, with knowledge of MI exceeding that of stroke at every level of risk. Subjects with higher risk were less knowledgeable about the stroke signs, symptoms, and risk factors than those of MI. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Graphene quantum dots FRET based sensor for early detection of heart attack in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Deepika; Kumar, Vanish; Kumar, Ashok; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2016-05-15

    Cardiac immunosensor for early detection of heart attack (myocardial infarction) was developed using amine functionalized graphene quantum dots (afGQDs) conjugated with antibody anti-cardiac Troponin I (anti-cTnI) to detect cardiac marker antigen Troponin I (cTnI) in blood based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between conjugate and graphene (quencher) only in 10 min. The anti-cTnI was covalently conjugated to afGQDs through carbodiimide coupling reaction. The conjugate was characterized by zeta potential UV-vis spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The sensing performance of the sensor was studied with respect to changes in the photon count and photoluminescence of GQDs based on interaction of target cTnI with its specific anti-cTnI antibody. The sensor is highly specific and shows negligible response to non-specific antigens. The sensor displayed a linear response to cTnI from 0.001 to 1000 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 0.192 pg mL(-1). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The inoculating role of previous exposure to potentially traumatic life events on coping with prolonged exposure to rocket attacks: A lifespan perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgi, Yuval; Gelkopf, Marc; Berger, Rony

    2015-06-30

    Relatively little research have addressed the effect of prolonged exposure to rocket attacks with a lifespan perspective and only a handful of these studies focused on the effect of this exposure as a function of aging. The present study examined the effects of seven years of rocket attacks fired toward the south of Israel on adult participants of different ages. We examined whether potentially traumatic life events (PTLEs) unrelated to rocket attacks moderated the association between post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and age. Data were obtained from a 2007 telephone survey using the Random Digit Dialing method and including 343 individuals (76.7% participation rate). Exposure to rockets, PTLEs, global distress, and post-traumatic symptomatology were assessed. Older age was associated with a higher level of PTS symptoms. Higher PTLE levels attenuated the association between age and PTS symptoms. Our results suggest that age is a risk factor for developing PTS symptoms under prolonged exposure to rocket attacks. However, previous levels of exposure to other negative events, as well as gender, appear to inoculate a person to stress, thus modulating the age-PTS association. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Among Heart Attack Survivors - 20 States and the District of Columbia, 2013 and Four States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Ayala, Carma; Luncheon, Cecily; Ritchey, Matthew; Loustalot, Fleetwood

    2017-08-25

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States (1). Each year, approximately 790,000 adults have a myocardial infarction (heart attack), including 210,000 that are recurrent heart attacks (2). Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) includes exercise counseling and training, education for heart-healthy living, and counseling to reduce stress. Cardiac rehab provides patients with education regarding the causes of heart attacks and tools to initiate positive behavior change, and extends patients' medical management after a heart attack to prevent future negative sequelae (3). A systematic review has shown that after a heart attack, patients using cardiac rehab were 53% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 41%-62%) less likely to die from any cause and 57% (95% CI = 21%-77%) less likely to experience cardiac-related mortality than were those who did not use cardiac rehab (3). However, even with long-standing national recommendations encouraging use of cardiac rehab (4), the intervention has been underutilized. An analysis of 2005 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data found that only 34.7% of adults who reported a history of a heart attack also reported subsequent use of cardiac rehab (5). To update these estimates, CDC used the most recent BRFSS data from 2013 and 2015 to assess the use of cardiac rehab among adults following a heart attack. Overall use of cardiac rehab was 33.7% in 20 states and the District of Columbia (DC) in 2013 and 35.5% in four states in 2015. Cardiac rehab use was underutilized overall and differences were evident by sex, age, race/ethnicity, level of education, cardiovascular risk status, and by state. Increasing use of cardiac rehab after a heart attack should be encouraged by health systems and supported by the public health community.

  2. Tracks FAQs: How Do Heart Attack Hospitalization Rates In My Community Compare With Other Counties Or States?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-09-01

    In this podcast, CDC Tracking experts discuss how to compare heart attack hospitalization rates in your community with other counties or states. Do you have a question for our Tracking experts? Please e-mail questions to trackingsupport@cdc.gov.  Created: 9/1/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health, Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, Environmental Health Tracking Branch.   Date Released: 9/1/2011.

  3. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stroke symptoms. Popular Topics TIA Cardiac Catheter Cholesterol Heart Attack Stent © 2018, American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. ...

  4. Significance of estimated glomerular filtration rate in predicting brain or heart attacks in obese and non-obese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuji; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Konta, Tsuneo; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Moriyama, Toshiki; Yamagata, Kunihiro; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Kenjiro; Narita, Ichiei; Kondo, Masahide; Asahi, Koichi; Kurahashi, Issei; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2015-10-01

    The Japanese Specific Health Checkup mainly focuses on metabolic syndrome for preventing cardiovascular events. Subjects are stratified by measuring waist circumference, body mass index, blood pressure, triglycerides, and fasting plasma glucose. However, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is not considered essential. A longitudinal cohort study assessed the association of eGFR with new-onset brain or heart attacks in a large Japanese nationwide Specific Health Checkup database. A total of 109,349 Japanese subjects (mean age 63.2 years, 39.5 % men) were examined for the events 2 years later. The odds ratios were calculated for new events in the total and subgroup populations divided by BMI proteinuria (dipstick test ≥1+), lower eGFR, and higher systolic and diastolic BP, fasting plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and triglycerides (TG). Rates of new-onset brain or heart attacks were 3.1 and 4.0 % in the groups of non-obese and obese subjects, respectively. In the total population, eGFR as well as higher BMI (≥25 kg/m(2)), higher BP (high-normal hypertension or greater), higher TG (≥150 mg/dl), and proteinuria were significant risk factors for developing brain or heart attacks. The eGFR was significant in non-obese subjects, but not in the obese. As the ultimate aim of 'Specific Health Checkup' is to prevent cardiovascular events, our study suggests that eGFR should be evaluated in non-obese subjects.

  5. Comparing Asian American Women's Knowledge, Self-Efficacy, and Perceived Risk of Heart Attack to Other Racial and Ethnic Groups: The mPED Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Lisha, Nadra E; Vittinghoff, Eric

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare knowledge and awareness of heart attacks/heart disease and perceived risk for future heart attack in Asian/Pacific Islander women, compared to other racial and ethnic groups. In this cross-sectional study, 318 women enrolled in a mobile phone-based physical activity education trial were analyzed. Heart attack knowledge, self-efficacy for recognizing and responding to heart attack symptoms, and perceived risk for a future heart attack were measured. Analyses were conducted using logistic, proportional odds, and linear regression models, depending on the outcome and adjusting for age. Pairwise differences between Asian/Pacific Islanders and the other four groups were assessed using a Bonferroni correction (p perceived risk did not differ among the groups. Forty-six percent of the Asian American women, compared to 25% of Caucasian women, falsely believed "breast cancer is the number one cause of death for women (p = 0.002)." In addition, Asian/Pacific Islander women were less likely to report "arm pain, numbness, tingling, or radiating" as one of the heart attack symptoms compared to the Caucasian and the multiracial group (34%, 63% [p < 0.001], and 66% [p = 0.004], respectively). These findings highlight the urgent need to develop effective, tailored campaigns to close the knowledge gap between Asian/Pacific Islander women and Caucasian women.

  6. The time of sunrise and the number of hours with daylight may influence the diurnal rhythm of acute heart attack mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriszbacher, Ildikó; Bódis, József; Boncz, Imre; Koppan, Agnes; Koppan, Miklós

    2010-04-01

    We investigated whether the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours have an effect on the seasonality, or the daily rhythm of heart attack mortality. We analyzed retrospectively data of patients admitted to hospitals with the diagnosis of heart attack (n=32,329) and patients who deceased of a heart attack (n=5142) between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2005 in Hungary. Heart attack mortality was highest during winter, while lowest number of events was recorded during summer . The daily peak of diurnality was between 6:00 am and 12:00 pm (33.77%). A positive correlation was found between the time of sunrise, time of sunset and the mortality caused by myocardial infarction (pheart attack mortality we found a negative correlation (r=-0.105, pheart attack mortality. Our data suggest, that the occurrence and the mortality of heart attack may be related to the time of sunrise and the number of daylight hours. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A qualitative study of younger men's experience of heart attack (myocardial infarction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Christopher J; de Zoysa, Nicole; Hutton, Jane M

    2017-09-01

    The effects of heart attack, or myocardial infarction (MI), across psychosocial domains may be particularly acute in younger adults, for whom serious health events are non-normative. MI morbidity is declining in Western countries, but in England MI numbers have plateaued for the under-45 cohort, where approximately 90% of patients are male. Qualitative research on younger adults' experience of MI is limited, and no study has sampled exclusively under-45s. This study aimed to understand how a sample of men under 45 adjusted to and made sense of MI. Qualitative research design based on semi-structured in-depth interviews. Ten men aged under 45 who had experienced MI in the past 3-6 months were purposively recruited and interviewed. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Seven superordinate themes were identified. This article focuses in depth on the three most original themes: (1) 'I'm less of a man', which described experiences of losing 'maleness' (strength, independence, ability to provide) post-MI; (2) 'Shortened horizons', which covered participants' sense of foreshortened future and consequent reprioritization; and (3) 'Life loses its colour', describing the loss of pleasure from lifestyle-related changes. Themes broadly overlapped with the qualitative literature on younger adult MI. However, some themes (e.g., loss of 'maleness' post-MI, and ambivalence towards MI risk factors) appeared unique to this study. Themes were also discussed in relation to risk factors for anxiety and depression and how this might inform clinical care for a younger, male population. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Myocardial infarction (MI) morbidity is not declining in England for under-45s. Adjustment to MI is particularly challenging for younger adults, perhaps because it is non-normative. However, little is known about the experience of MI in younger adults. What does this study add? This

  8. Cerebral correlates of heart rate variations during a spontaneous panic attack in the fMRI scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Hornyak, Magdolna; Kyle, Simon David; Paul, Dominik; Blechert, Jens; Seifritz, Erich; Hennig, Jürgen; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Riemann, Dieter; Feige, Bernd

    2009-12-01

    We report the first published case study of a suddenly occurring panic attack in a patient with no prior history of panic disorder during combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, 1.5 Tesla) and electrocardiogram (ECG) recording. The single case was a 46-year-old woman who developed a panic attack near the planned end of the fMRI acquisition session, which therefore had to be aborted. Correlational analysis of heart rate fluctuations and fMRI data revealed a significant negative association in the left middle temporal gyrus. Additionally, regions-of-interest (ROI) analyses indicated significant positive associations in the left amygdala, and trends towards significance in the right amygdala and left insula.

  9. Health related quality of life and health status in adult survivors with previously operated complex congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Ottenkamp, J.; Vliegen, H. W.; Vogels, T.; Zwinderman, K. H.; Kamphuis, R. P.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    To examine the impact of previously operated complex congenital heart disease on health related quality of life and subjective health status and to determine the relation between these parameters and physical status. Cross sectional; information on medical follow up was sought retrospectively.

  10. "First-hit" heart attack risk calculators on the world wide web: implications for laypersons and healthcare practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Elved B; Ramnath, Rajesh; Fallows, Stephen; Sykes, Kevin

    2008-06-01

    Heart attack risk calculators are readily accessible on the world wide web, offering potentially powerful means of health education and risk awareness. Laypersons may be unaware of differences in applicability, risk calculation algorithms and output formats among such calculators. This study assesses the impact of basic web searching terms on type of calculator accessed and on the resulting risk score. Observational study. Seventy-two notional individual risk factor profiles were constructed, based on six combinations of presence or absence of smoking habit, hypercholesterolaemia, mixed hyperlipidaemia, hypertension and family history of premature coronary disease among males and females in age groups 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 and 80 years. The term heart attack risk calculator was entered into the Google, Yahoo, MSN, AltaVista and Excite search engines. The first five web pages purporting to contain heart attack risk calculators were included. Subpages of URLs leading to duplicate calculators were excluded. All search engines provided similar "hits" for the same search term. Framingham or PROCAM risk prediction models were the templates for all calculators. Different calculators often gave different absolute percentage risk scores for the same notional risk factor profiles. Differences were clinically insignificant in most cases when comparisons were made between bracketed risk scores within 5% of one another. One calculator gave disproportionately high risk estimates for women compared to men with the same risk factor profile and compared to other calculators into which identical risk profiles were entered. Simple search terms resulted in appropriate "hits". All calculators were based on reputable risk assessment models. There was broad agreement across different calculators for the range of risk factor profiles entered, but one calculator gave inconsistent risk scores.

  11. Patient confidence regarding secondary lifestyle modification and knowledge of 'heart attack' symptoms following percutaneous revascularisation in Japan: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitakata, Hiroki; Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Fujino, Junko; Nakano, Naomi; Fukuoka, Ryoma; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Maekawa, Yuichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2018-03-16

    To assess patient perspectives on secondary lifestyle modification and knowledge of 'heart attack' after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for coronary artery disease (CAD). Observational cross-sectional study. A single university-based hospital centre in Japan. In total, 236 consecutive patients with CAD who underwent PCI completed a questionnaire (age, 67.4±10.1 years; women, 14.8%; elective PCI, 75.4%). The survey questionnaire included questions related to confidence levels about (1) lifestyle modification at the time of discharge and (2) appropriate recognition of heart attack symptoms and reactions to these symptoms on a four-point Likert scale (1=not confident to 4=completely confident). The primary outcome assessed was the patients' confidence level regarding lifestyle modification and the recognition of heart attack symptoms. Overall, patients had a high level of confidence (confident or completely confident,>75%) about smoking cessation, alcohol restriction and medication adherence. However, they had a relatively low level of confidence (heart attack, almost all respondents answered 'yes' to the item 'I should go to the hospital as soon as possible when I have a heart attack'; however, only 28% of the responders were confident in their ability to distinguish between heart attack symptoms and other conditions. There were substantial disparities in the confidence levels associated with lifestyle modification and recognition/response to heart attack. These gaps need to be studied further and disseminated to improve cardiovascular care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Evaluation of heart attack by cardiac magnetic resonance and its association with collateral circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lluberas, N.; Mila, R.; Parma, G.; Florio, L.; Vignolo, G.; Trujillo, P.; Lluberas, R.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: It is known that infarct size depends on the magnitude of the area at risk (territory irrigation culprit vessel), ischemic time and presence of collateral circulation. MRI Heart (RMC) has high accuracy in estimating infarct area. To study the relationship between the presence of collateral circulation and infarct size assessed by RMC. 38 patients were included with STEMI reperfused medianteATC primary (34 above) those who had made an RMC in the acute phase (<30 days). Collateral circulation graduated as the classification Rentrop Quantification of delayed enhancement (mass of myocardial infarction and% relative to VI) He performed with software by manually tracing RT areas. Microvascular obstruction (OMV) was defined as areas of low signal intensity within the necrotic tissue. They were compared RMC parameters between two groups: group No Collateral (n = 30) [Rentrop 0-1] vs group Yes Collaterals (n = 8) [Rentrop 2-3]. The mean age was 57 ± 14 years, 68% were women. 87% of patients with circulation collateral event had previous angina vs 28% no collaterals (p = 0.004). The main results em is the table. According to the international literature, the group of patients with collateral circulation to the artery responsible for AMI showed a smaller infarct size assessed both by release Enzymatic as RMC and OMV lesser extent. These findings highlight the importance of circulation collateral and validates our methodology to quantify infarct size for future studies research

  13. Contemporary trends in cardiogenic shock: Incidence, intra-aortic balloon pump utilisation and outcomes from the London Heart Attack Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Krishnaraj S; Koganti, Sudheer; Iqbal, M Bilal; Jain, Ajay K; Kalra, Sundeep S; Astroulakis, Zoe; Lim, Pitt; Rakhit, Roby; Dalby, Miles C; Lockie, Tim; Malik, Iqbal S; Knight, Charles J; Whitbread, Mark; Mathur, Anthony; Redwood, Simon; MacCarthy, Philip A; Sirker, Alexander; O'Mahony, Constantinos; Wragg, Andrew; Jones, Daniel A

    2018-02-01

    Cardiogenic shock remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. We aimed to assess the current trends in cardiogenic shock management, looking specifically at the incidence, use of intra-aortic balloon pump therapy and outcomes in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. We undertook an observational cohort study of 21,210 ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients treated between 2005-2015 at the eight Heart Attack Centres in London, UK. Patients' details were recorded at the time of the procedure into local databases using the British Cardiac Intervention Society percutaneous coronary intervention dataset. There were 1890 patients who presented with cardiogenic shock. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality at a median follow-up of 4.1 years (interquartile range: 2.2-5.8 years). Increasing rates of cardiogenic shock were seen over the course of the study with consistently high mortality rates of 45-70%. A total of 685 patients underwent intra-aortic balloon pump insertion during primary percutaneous coronary intervention for cardiogenic shock with decreasing rates over time. Those patients undergoing intra-aortic balloon pump therapy were younger, more likely to have poor left ventricular function and less likely to have had previous percutaneous coronary intervention compared to the control group. Procedural success rates were similar (86.0% vs 87.1%, p=0.292) although crude, in-hospital major adverse cardiac event rates were higher (43.8% vs 33.7%, p<0.0001) in patients undergoing intra-aortic balloon pump therapy. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated significantly higher mortality rates in patients receiving intra-aortic balloon pump therapy (50.9% intra-aortic balloon pump vs 39.9% control, p<0.0001) during the follow-up period. After multivariate Cox analysis (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% confidence interval 0

  14. Clinical case: paroxysmal tachycardia attack in a newborn with multiple heart rhabdomyomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernenkov Yu.V.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the clinical observation is to study the early symptoms of multiple heart rhabdomiomas of a newborn; to draw the attention of specialists on one of the rarely occurred problems in the neonatal practice.

  15. Clinical case: paroxysmal tachycardia attack in a newborn with multiple heart rhabdomyomas

    OpenAIRE

    Chernenkov Yu.V.; Pozgaleva N.V.; Panina O.S.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the clinical observation is to study the early symptoms of multiple heart rhabdomiomas of a newborn; to draw the attention of specialists on one of the rarely occurred problems in the neonatal practice.

  16. Mortality and morbidity during and after Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial: results by sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparil, Suzanne; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Ford, Charles E; Furberg, Curt D; Habib, Gabriel B; Haywood, L Julian; Margolis, Karen; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Wright, Jackson T

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) or calcium channel blocker (amlodipine) is superior to a diuretic (chlorthalidone) in reducing cardiovascular disease incidence in sex subgroups, we carried out a prespecified subgroup analysis of 15 638 women and 17 719 men in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). Total follow-up (active treatment + passive surveillance using national administrative databases to ascertain deaths and hospitalizations) was 8 to 13 years. The primary outcome was fatal coronary heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included all-cause mortality, stroke, combined cardiovascular disease (coronary heart disease death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, angina, coronary revascularization, heart failure [HF], or peripheral vascular disease), and end-stage renal disease. In-trial rates of HF, stroke, and combined cardiovascular disease were significantly higher for lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and rates of HF were significantly higher for amlodipine compared with chlorthalidone in both men and women. There were no significant treatment sex interactions. These findings did not persist through the extension period with the exception of the HF result for amlodipine versus chlorthalidone, which did not differ significantly by sex. For both women and men, rates were not lower in the amlodipine or lisinopril groups than in the chlorthalidone group for either the primary coronary heart disease outcome or any other cardiovascular disease outcome, and chlorthalidone-based treatment resulted in the lowest risk of HF. Neither lisinopril nor amlodipine is superior to chlorthalidone for initial treatment of hypertension in either women or men. Clinical Trial Registration- clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00000542.

  17. 'BeAWARE': supporting non-clinical staff within general practice to promptly identify patients presenting with warning signs of heart attack or stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Christopher; Stewart, Michelle; Fitzpatrick, Cliona; Keech, Wendy; Stavreski, Bill; Grenfell, Robert

    2014-06-01

    General practice requires systems to deal with patients presenting with urgent needs. BeAWARE was developed to support non-clinical staff to promptly identify patients with symptoms of heart attack or stroke. Data were collected from May 2012 to December 2012 on participants completing the BeAWARE learning module, including pre- and post-assessments on knowledge, confidence and intended action. From May 2012 to December 2012, 1865 participants completed the module. There were significant increases in recall of heart attack and stroke symptoms among non-clinical participants, including chest tightness (23.4-48.7%, P DISCUSSION: BeAWARE fulfils a practice gap in patient safety by improving non-clinical staff's knowledge, confidence and intended action in response to patients presenting with heart attack or stroke warning signs.

  18. The effect of matrix stiffness of injectable hydrogels on the preservation of cardiac function after a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Marian; Vaibavi, Srirangam Ramanujam; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Nithya, Venkateswaran; Wang, Jing; Shachaf, Yonatan; Kofidis, Theo; Seliktar, Dror

    2014-02-01

    This study compares the effect of four injectable hydrogels with different mechanical properties on the post-myocardial infarction left ventricle (LV) remodeling process. The bioactive hydrogels were synthesized from Tetronic-fibrinogen (TF) and PEG-fibrinogen (PF) conjugates; each hydrogel was supplemented with two levels of additional cross-linker to increase the matrix stiffness as measured by the shear storage modulus (G'). Infarcts created by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in a rodent model were treated with the hydrogels, and all four treatment groups showed an increase in wall thickness, arterial density, and viable cardiac tissue in the peri-infarct areas of the LV. Echocardiography and hemodynamics data of the PF/TF treated groups showed significant improvement of heart function associated with the attenuated effects of the remodeling process. Multi-factorial regression analysis indicated that the group with the highest modulus exhibited the best rescue of heart function and highest neovascularization. The results of this study demonstrate that multiple properties of an injectable bioactive biomaterial, and notably the matrix stiffness, provide the multifaceted stimulation necessary to preserve cardiac function and prevent adverse remodeling following a heart attack. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Family history and body mass index predict perceived risks of diabetes and heart attack among community-dwelling Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans--DiLH Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Choi, JiWon; S Bender, Melinda; Gonzalez, Prisila; Arai, Shoshana

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the perceived risk for diabetes and heart attack and associated health status of Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans without diabetes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 904 urban adults (mean age 44.3±16.1 years; 64.3% female) in English, Spanish or Korean between August and December 2013. Perceived risk for developing diabetes was indicated by 46.5% (n=421), and 14.3% (n=129) perceived themselves to be at risk for having a heart attack in their lifetime. Significant predictors of pessimistic diabetes risk perceptions: Filipino (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=1.7; 95% CI: 1.04-2.86) and Korean (AOR=2.4; 1.33-4.48) ethnicity, family history of diabetes (AOR=1.4; 1.00-1.84), female gender (AOR=1.4; 1.04-1.96), high cholesterol (AOR= 1.6; 1.09-2.37) and higher body mass index (BMI) (AOR=1.1; 1.08-1.15). Predictors of pessimistic heart attack risk perceptions were family history of an early heart attack (AOR=2.9; 1.69-5.02), high blood pressure (AOR=2.4; 1.45-3.84), and higher BMI (AOR=1.1; 1.04-1.12) after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Older age, physical inactivity, smoking, and low HDL levels were not associated with risk perceptions. Multiple risk factors were predictive of greater perceived diabetes risk, whereas, only family history of heart attack, high blood pressure and increases in BMI significantly contributed to perceived risk of heart attack among ethnically diverse at risk middle-aged adults. It is important that healthcare providers address the discordance between an individual's risk perceptions and the presence of actual risk factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Total Dietary Fiber, and Selected Vegetable, Fruit, Legume and Cereal Fiber Intake and Risk of Heart Attack in Periodontitis Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Wood

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidemiological studies have found an association between periodontal disease and coronary artery disease(Arbes, Slade et al. 1999; Beck, Elter et al. 2001; Genco, Offenbacher et al. 2002, and have even implicated periodontal disease as a risk factor(Arbes, Slade et al. 1999; Beck, Elter et al. 2001, however have not proven causality(Hujoel, Drangholt et al. 2000. Although dietary amounts, sources, and types (soluble versus insoluble of fiber have been shown to reduce the risk of heart attack (Liu, Buring et al. 2002; Negri, Vecchia et al. 2003, this author is unaware of studies that have examined the association between food sources of dietary fiber and heart attack risk in subjects with periodontitis.This study was designed to determine whether total dietary fiber and fiber from different plant sources (vegetables, fruits, legumes, or cereals modified self-reported HA risk, as well as acute-phase inflammatory responses in subjects with periodontitis using NHANES III data.Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the association between total dietary fiber intake levels, and selected vegetables, fruits, legumes, and cereal fiber intake and the risk of self-reported history of heart attack (HA in periodontitis subjects using data available in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III.Materials and Methods: Adult participants in NHANES III were used in this study. Zero to thirty three (0-33 percent of sites with periodontal attachment loss > 3 mm was considered a healthy periodontium, while greater than thirty three percent (>33 of sites with periodontal attachment loss of > 3 mm as periodontitis. The outcome variable was the self-reported history of HA. Total dietary fiber, and monthly selected vegetable, fruit, legume and cereal consumption were divided into low and adequate levels. Data was analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis, ANOVA and multivariate analyses using SPSS ®. P<0.05 was used to

  1. Apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack: a subgroup analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, J Donald; Lopes, Renato D; Bahit, M Cecilia; Wojdyla, Daniel M; Granger, Christopher B; Wallentin, Lars; Alings, Marco; Goto, Shinya; Lewis, Basil S; Rosenqvist, Mårten; Hanna, Michael; Mohan, Puneet; Alexander, John H; Diener, Hans-Christoph

    2012-06-01

    In the ARISTOTLE trial, the rate of stroke or systemic embolism was reduced by apixaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Patients with AF and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA) have a high risk of stroke. We therefore aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of apixaban compared with warfarin in prespecified subgroups of patients with and without previous stroke or TIA. Between Dec 19, 2006, and April 2, 2010, patients were enrolled in the ARISTOTLE trial at 1034 clinical sites in 39 countries. 18,201 patients with AF or atrial flutter were randomly assigned to receive apixaban 5 mg twice daily or warfarin (target international normalised ratio 2·0-3·0). The median duration of follow-up was 1·8 years (IQR 1·4-2·3). The primary efficacy outcome was stroke or systemic embolism, analysed by intention to treat. The primary safety outcome was major bleeding in the on-treatment population. All participants, investigators, and sponsors were masked to treatment assignments. In this subgroup analysis, we estimated event rates and used Cox models to compare outcomes in patients with and without previous stroke or TIA. The ARISTOTLE trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NTC00412984. Of the trial population, 3436 (19%) had a previous stroke or TIA. In the subgroup of patients with previous stroke or TIA, the rate of stroke or systemic embolism was 2·46 per 100 patient-years of follow-up in the apixaban group and 3·24 in the warfarin group (hazard ratio [HR] 0·76, 95% CI 0·56 to 1·03); in the subgroup of patients without previous stroke or TIA, the rate of stroke or systemic embolism was 1·01 per 100 patient-years of follow-up with apixaban and 1·23 with warfarin (HR 0·82, 95% CI 0·65 to 1·03; p for interaction=0·71). The absolute reduction in the rate of stroke and systemic embolism with apixaban versus warfarin was 0·77 per 100 patient-years of follow-up (95% CI -0·08 to 1·63) in patients with

  2. Are urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons associated with adult hypertension, heart attack, and cancer? USA NHANES, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-11-01

    Links between environmental chemicals and human health have emerged over the last few decades, but the effects from polyaromatic hydrocarbons were less studied, compared to other commonly known environmental chemicals such as heavy metals, phthalates, arsenic, phenols and pesticides. Therefore, it was aimed to study the relationships of urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons and adult cardiovascular disease and cancer using human sample in a national and population-based study in recent years. Data was retrieved from US National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2011-2012, including demographics, self-reported health conditions and urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Statistical analyses included chi-square test, t test, survey-weighted logistic regression modeling and population attributable risk (PAR) estimation. Of 5560 American adults aged 20-80 and included in the statistical analysis, urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons (representatively in one-third sample) were observed to be higher in people with cardiovascular disease and total cancer. In particular, urinary 4-hydroxyphenanthrene was associated with hypertension (odds ratio (OR) 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.00-1.76, P = 0.048, PAR 5.1%), urinary 1-hydroxypyrene was significantly associated with heart attack (OR 1.47, 95%CI 1.05-2.06, P = 0.027, PAR 1.7%), and urinary 2-hydroxynapthalene (2-naphthol) was associated with cancer (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.12-1.90, P = 0.008, PAR 3.9%). Urinary polyaromatic hydrocarbons were associated with adult hypertension, heart attack and cancer, although the causality cannot be established. From the research perspective, future studies with a longitudinal or experimental approach would be suggested. From the law and public health perspectives, regulation on minimizing exposure to polyaromatic hydrocarbons might need to be considered in future health and environmental policies and intervention programs.

  3. Electrocardiographic measures of left ventricular hypertrophy in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael E; Davis, Barry R; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Prineas, Ronald J; Okin, Peter M; Ghosh, Alokananda; Cushman, William C; Einhorn, Paula T; Oparil, Suzanne; Grimm, Richard H

    2016-12-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) predicts cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. We analyzed baseline/follow-up electrocardiographies in 26,376 Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial participants randomized to amlodipine (A), lisinopril (L), or chlorthalidone (C). Prevalent/incident LVH was examined using continuous and categorical classifications of Cornell voltage. At 2 and 4 years, prevalence of LVH in the C group (5.57%; 6.14%) was not statistically different from A group (2 years: 5.47%; P = .806, 4 years: 6.54%; P = .857) or L group (2 years: 5.64%; P = .857, 4 years: 6.50%; P = .430). Incident LVH followed similarly, with no difference at 2 years for C (2.99%) compared to A (2.57%; P = .173) or L (3.16%; P = .605) and at 4 years (C = 3.52%, A = 3.29%, L = 3.71%; P = .521 C vs. A, P = .618 C vs. L). Mean Cornell voltage decreased comparably across treatment groups (Δ baseline, 2 years = +3 to -27 μV, analysis of variance P = .8612; 4 years = +10 to -17 μV, analysis of variance P = .9692). We conclude that risk reductions associated with C treatment in secondary end points of the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial cannot be attributed to differential improvements in electrocardiography LVH. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. All rights reserved.

  4. Efficacy and Safety of Vorapaxar With and Without a Thienopyridine for Secondary Prevention in Patients With Previous Myocardial Infarction and No History of Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack: Results from TRA 2°P-TIMI 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohula, Erin A; Aylward, Philip E; Bonaca, Marc P; Corbalan, Ramon L; Kiss, Robert G; Murphy, Sabina A; Scirica, Benjamin M; White, Harvey; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2015-11-17

    Vorapaxar antagonizes protease-activated receptor 1, the primary receptor for thrombin on human platelets, and reduces recurrent thrombotic events in stable patients with a previous myocardial infarction (MI). We wished to determine whether the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapy with vorapaxar was modified by concurrent thienopyridine use. The Thrombin Receptor Antagonist in Secondary Prevention of Atherothrombotic Ischemic Events-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA 2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in 26,449 patients with previous atherothrombosis. This prespecified analysis included 16,897 patients who qualified with a MI in the preceding 2 weeks to 12 months and was restricted to patients without a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack given its contraindication in that population. Randomization was stratified on the basis of planned thienopyridine use. Thienopyridine was planned at randomization in 12,410 (73%). Vorapaxar significantly reduced the composite of cardiovascular death, MI, and stroke in comparison with placebo regardless of planned thienopyridine therapy (planned thienopyridine, hazard ratio, 0.80, 0.70-0.91, PGlobal Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries (GUSTO) moderate or severe bleeding risk was increased with vorapaxar and was not significantly altered by planned thienopyridine (planned, hazard ratio, 1.50; 1.18-1.89, Phistory of previous MI, whether treated concomitantly with a thienopyridine or not. The relative risk of moderate or severe bleeding was similarly increased irrespective of thienopyridine use. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00526474. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Heart Lesion After the First Attack of the Rheumatic Fever 22 Years Experience in Single Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Bejiqi, Ramush A.; Retkoceri, Ragip; Zeka, Naim; Bejiqi, Hana; Retkoceri, Arber

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute rheumatic fever and its sequels, rheumatic heart diseases, remain major unsolved preventable health problems in Kosovo population, particularly among the disadvantages indigenous Albanian and Egyptians people. In Kosovo, despite of performing secondary prophylaxis with benzathine penicillin, acute rheumatic fever hospitalization rates have remained essentially unchanged for the last 20 years. The role of echocardiography in the diagnosis of acute rheumatic carditis was estab...

  6. Rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack: a subgroup analysis of ROCKET AF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Patel, Manesh R; Stevens, Susanna R; Becker, Richard C; Breithardt, Günter; Carolei, Antonio; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Halperin, Jonathan L; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Mas, Jean-Louis; Massaro, Ayrton; Norrving, Bo; Nessel, Christopher C; Paolini, John F; Roine, Risto O; Singer, Daniel E; Wong, Lawrence; Califf, Robert M; Fox, Keith A A; Hacke, Werner

    2012-04-01

    In ROCKET AF, rivaroxaban was non-inferior to adjusted-dose warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to investigate whether the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin is consistent among the subgroups of patients with and without previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA). In ROCKET AF, patients with AF who were at increased risk of stroke were randomly assigned (1:1) in a double-blind manner to rivaroxaban 20 mg daily or adjusted dose warfarin (international normalised ratio 2·0-3·0). Patients and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. Between Dec 18, 2006, and June 17, 2009, 14 264 patients from 1178 centres in 45 countries were randomly assigned. The primary endpoint was the composite of stroke or non-CNS systemic embolism. In this substudy we assessed the interaction of the treatment effects of rivaroxaban and warfarin among patients with and without previous stroke or TIA. Efficacy analyses were by intention to treat and safety analyses were done in the on-treatment population. ROCKET AF is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00403767. 7468 (52%) patients had a previous stroke (n=4907) or TIA (n=2561) and 6796 (48%) had no previous stroke or TIA. The number of events per 100 person-years for the primary endpoint in patients treated with rivaroxaban compared with warfarin was consistent among patients with previous stroke or TIA (2·79% rivaroxaban vs 2·96% warfarin; hazard ratio [HR] 0·94, 95% CI 0·77-1·16) and those without (1·44%vs 1·88%; 0·77, 0·58-1·01; interaction p=0·23). The number of major and non-major clinically relevant bleeding events per 100 person-years in patients treated with rivaroxaban compared with warfarin was consistent among patients with previous stroke or TIA (13·31% rivaroxaban vs 13·87% warfarin; HR 0·96, 95% CI 0·87-1·07) and those without (16·69%vs 15·19%; 1·10, 0·99-1·21; interaction p=0·08

  7. The polypill and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes by Caroline Telfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, David S

    2013-07-01

    David S Wald speaks to Caroline Telfer, Assistant Commissioning Editor. David S Wald is a Consultant Cardiologist and Reader in Preventive Cardiology. He trained at Oxford University (UK) and Imperial College of Science and Technology, London (UK). His work combines interventional and preventive approaches to cardiovascular disease. He is currently leading a multicenter randomized trial assessing the value of preventive angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and a UK trial of a polypill for people over the age of 50 years for the prevention of ischemic heart disease and stroke.

  8. Heterogeneity in Early Responses in ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhruva, Sanket S; Huang, Chenxi; Spatz, Erica S; Coppi, Andreas C; Warner, Frederick; Li, Shu-Xia; Lin, Haiqun; Xu, Xiao; Furberg, Curt D; Davis, Barry R; Pressel, Sara L; Coifman, Ronald R; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2017-07-01

    Randomized trials of hypertension have seldom examined heterogeneity in response to treatments over time and the implications for cardiovascular outcomes. Understanding this heterogeneity, however, is a necessary step toward personalizing antihypertensive therapy. We applied trajectory-based modeling to data on 39 763 study participants of the ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) to identify distinct patterns of systolic blood pressure (SBP) response to randomized medications during the first 6 months of the trial. Two trajectory patterns were identified: immediate responders (85.5%), on average, had a decreasing SBP, whereas nonimmediate responders (14.5%), on average, had an initially increasing SBP followed by a decrease. Compared with those randomized to chlorthalidone, participants randomized to amlodipine (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10-1.31), lisinopril (odds ratio, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.73-2.03), and doxazosin (odds ratio, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.52-1.78) had higher adjusted odds ratios associated with being a nonimmediate responder (versus immediate responder). After multivariable adjustment, nonimmediate responders had a higher hazard ratio of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.21-1.84), combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.11-1.31), and heart failure (hazard ratio, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.24-1.78) during follow-up between 6 months and 2 years. The SBP response trajectories provided superior discrimination for predicting downstream adverse cardiovascular events than classification based on difference in SBP between the first 2 measurements, SBP at 6 months, and average SBP during the first 6 months. Our findings demonstrate heterogeneity in response to antihypertensive therapies and show that chlorthalidone is associated with more favorable initial response than the other medications. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. When and why do heart attacks occur? Cardiovascular triggers and their potential role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Bryan G; Mayeda, Guy S; Burstein, Steven; Economides, Christina; Kloner, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease affects 7.6% of the population in the United States, where > 900,000 myocardial infarctions (MIs) occur annually. Approximately half of all MIs have an identifiable clinical trigger. Myocardial ischemia, MI, sudden cardiac death, and thrombotic stroke each occur with circadian variation and peak after waking in the morning. In addition, physical exertion and mental stress are common precipitants of MI. Waking in the morning, physical exertion, and mental stress influence a number of physiologic parameters, including blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine levels, coronary blood flow, platelet aggregability, and endothelial function. Upregulation of sympathetic output and catecholamines increase myocardial oxygen demand and can decrease myocardial oxygen supply and promote thrombosis. Ischemia ensues when myocardial oxygen demand exceeds supply. Increases in blood pressure and ventricular contractility increase intravascular shear stress and may cause vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques to rupture, forming a nidus for thrombosis that can precipitate MI. Numerous clinical triggers of MI have been identified, including blizzards, the Christmas and New Year's holidays, experiencing an earthquake, the threat of violence, job strain, Mondays for the working population, sexual activity, overeating, smoking cigarettes, smoking marijuana, using cocaine, and particulate air pollution. Avoiding clinical triggers or participating in therapies that prevent clinical triggers from precipitating cardiac events could potentially postpone clinical events by several years and improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Direct or indirect evidence suggests that the risk of triggered MIs is reduced with β-blockers, aspirin, statins, stress management, and transcendental meditation.

  10. Serious as a heart attack: health-related content of late-night comedy television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Josh

    2006-01-01

    Although the medical community hoped that Vice President Dick Cheney's public experiences with heart problems and subsequent treatments would serve to raise awareness, educate the public about heart disease and treatment options, and showcase advances in cardiac care, late-night comedians saw Cheney's health problems as joke fodder. Comedians like Jay Leno, David Letterman, and Conan O'Brien ridiculed Cheney in their monologues, suggesting the vice president was frail, weak, and near death-certainly not a "poster boy" for contemporary cardiac care. This investigation presents a textual analysis of late-night comedy monologue jokes from July 25, 2000, to October 7, 2003. The themes that emerge in the jokes include Cheney's infirmity, his questionable fitness for office, and ridicule for his state-of-the-art defibrillator. Implications of health-related content in late-night comedy programs are offered, including the potential impacts on health knowledge and attitudes toward illness. This study takes an important step toward understanding health messages in an unconventional yet powerful media venue.

  11. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  12. Elevated troponin in patients with acute stroke - Is it a true heart attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dous, George V; Grigos, Angela C; Grodman, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Although the prognostic value of a positive troponin in an acute stroke patient is still uncertain, it is a commonly encountered clinical situation given that Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) frequently co-exist in the same patient and share similar risk factors. Our objectives in this review are to (1) identify the biologic relationship between acute cerebrovascular stroke and elevated troponin levels, (2) determine the pathophysiologic differences between positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke versus acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and (3) examine whether positive troponin in the setting of acute stroke has prognostic significance. We also will provide an insight analysis of some of the available studies and will provide guidance for a management approach based on the available data according to the current guidelines.

  13. Socioeconomic and air pollution correlates of adult asthma, heart attack, and stroke risks in the United States, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2017-05-01

    Asthma in the United States has become an important public health issue, with many physicians, regulators, and scientists elsewhere expressing concern that criterion air pollutants have contributed to a rising tide of asthma cases and symptoms. This paper studies recent associations (from 2008 to 2012) between self-reported asthma experiences and potential predictors, including age, sex, income, education, smoking, and county-level average annual ambient concentrations of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels recorded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, for adults 50 years old or older for whom survey data are available from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We also examine associations between these variables and self-reported heart attack and stroke experience; all three health outcomes are positively associated with each other. Young divorced women with low incomes are at greatest risk of asthma, especially if they are ever-smokers. Income is an important confounder of other relations. For example, in logistic regression modeling, PM2.5 is positively associated (pheart attack risk when these are regressed only against PM2.5, sex, age, and ever-smoking status, but not when they are regressed against these variables and income. In this data set, PM2.5 is significantly negatively associated with asthma risk in regression models, with a 10μg/m 3 decrease in PM2.5 corresponding to about a 6% increase in the probability of asthma, possibly because of confounding by smoking, which is negatively associated with PM2.5 and positively associated with asthma risk. A variety of non-parametric methods are used to quantify these associations and to explore potential causal interpretations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Long-Term Follow-up of Participants with Heart Failure in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Linda B.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Simpson, Lara M.; Cushman, William C.; Massie, Barry M.; Einhorn, Paula T.; Oparil, Suzanne; Ford, Charles E.; Graumlich, James F.; Dart, Richard A.; Parish, David C.; Retta, Tamrat M.; Cuyjet, Aloysius B.; Jafri, Syed Z.; Furberg, Curt D.; Saklayen, Mohammad G.; Thadani, Udho; Probstfield, Jeffrey L.; Davis, Barry R.

    2011-01-01

    Background In the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT), a randomized, double-blind, practice-based, active-control, comparative effectiveness trial in high-risk hypertensive participants, risk of new-onset heart failure (HF) was higher in the amlodipine (2.5-10 mg/day) and lisinopril (10-40 mg/day) arms compared with the chlorthalidone (12.5-25 mg/day) arm . Similar to other studies, mortality rates following new-onset HF were very high (≥50% at 5 years), and were similar across randomized treatment arms. After the randomized phase of the trial ended in 2002, outcomes were determined from administrative databases. Methods and Results Using national databases, post-trial follow-up mortality through 2006 was obtained on participants who developed new-onset HF during the randomized (in-trial) phase of ALLHAT. Mean follow-up for the entire period was 8.9 years. Of 1761 participants with incident HF in-trial, 1348 died. Post-HF all-cause mortality was similar across treatment groups with adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of 0.95 (0.81-1.12) and 1.05 (0.89-1.25), respectively, for amlodipine and lisinopril compared with chlorthalidone, and 10-year adjusted rates of 86%, 87%, and 83%, respectively. All-cause mortality rates were also similar among those with reduced ejection fractions (84%) and preserved ejection fractions (81%) with no significant differences by randomized treatment arm. Conclusions Once HF develops, risk of death is high and consistent across randomized treatment groups. Measures to prevent the development of HF, especially blood pressure control, must be a priority if mortality associated with development of HF is to be addressed. PMID:21969009

  15. Family history and body mass index predict perceived risks of diabetes and heart attack among community-dwelling Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans—DiLH Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Yoshimi; Choi, JiWon; Bender, Melinda S.; Gonzalez, Prisila; Arai, Shoshana

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the study was to explore the perceived risk for diabetes and heart attack and associated health status of Caucasian, Filipino, Korean, and Latino Americans without diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 904 urban adults (mean age 44.3 ± 16.1 years; 64.3% female) in English, Spanish or Korean between August and December 2013. Results Perceived risk for developing diabetes was indicated by 46.5% (n = 421), and 14.3% (n = 129) perceived themselves to be at risk for having a heart attack in their lifetime. Significant predictors of pessimistic diabetes risk perceptions: Filipino (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.04–2.86) and Korean (AOR = 2.4; 1.33–4.48) ethnicity, family history of diabetes (AOR = 1.4; 1.00–1.84), female gender (AOR = 1.4; 1.04–1.96), high cholesterol (AOR= 1.6; 1.09–2.37) and higher body mass index (BMI) (AOR = 1.1; 1.08–1.15). Predictors of pessimistic heart attack risk perceptions were family history of an early heart attack (AOR = 2.9; 1.69–5.02), high blood pressure (AOR = 2.4; 1.45–3.84), and higher BMI (AOR = 1.1; 1.04–1.12) after controlling for socio-demographic factors. Older age, physical inactivity, smoking, and low HDL levels were not associated with risk perceptions. Conclusion Multiple risk factors were predictive of greater perceived diabetes risk, whereas, only family history of heart attack, high blood pressure and increases in BMI significantly contributed to perceived risk of heart attack among ethnically diverse at risk middle-aged adults. It is important that healthcare providers address the discordance between an individual’s risk perceptions and the presence of actual risk factors. PMID:25931282

  16. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior heart attack: ticagrelor plus aspirin versus aspirin monotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amico, Frank; Schlesinger, Alex; Mazzoni, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Review of: Bonaca MP, Bhatt DL, Cohen M, et al. Long-term use of ticagrelor in patients with prior myocardial infarction. N Engl J Med. 2015;372:1791-1800. This Practice Pearl reviews the recent study Prevention of Cardiovascular Events in Patients with Prior Heart Attack Using Ticagrelor Compared With Placebo on a Background of Aspirin-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 54 (PEGASUS-TIMI 54). It challenges the current standard of care of 12 months of dual antiplatelet followed by aspirin indefinitely. The study demonstrated that patients who received ticagrelor, either the 60 mg or 90 mg twice daily plus aspirin, showed a decreased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, or stroke. The PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial also proved that the benefit of ticagrelor was seen early and continued to accrue over time, with a median of 33 months of follow-up, meaning that the benefit persists over time. It is important to note that both doses of the ticagrelor were associated with higher incidence of bleeding, but the rates of fatal bleeding did not show any difference between the ticagrelor or placebo.

  17. Pharmacologic Prevention of Incident Atrial Fibrillation: Long-Term Results From the ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewland, Thomas A; Soliman, Elsayed Z; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Davis, Barry R; Alonso, Alvaro; Albert, Christine M; Simpson, Lara M; Haywood, L Julian; Marcus, Gregory M

    2017-12-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF) guidelines indicate that pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin system may be considered for primary AF prevention in hypertensive patients, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. We sought to determine whether randomization to lisinopril reduces incident AF or atrial flutter (AFL) compared with chlorthalidone in a large clinical trial cohort with extended post-trial surveillance. We performed a secondary analysis of the ALLHAT (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial), a randomized, double-blind, active-controlled clinical trial that enrolled hypertensive individuals ≥55 years of age with at least one other cardiovascular risk factor. Participants were randomly assigned to receive amlodipine, lisinopril, or chlorthalidone. Individuals with elevated fasting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were also randomized to pravastatin versus usual care. The primary outcome was the development of either AF or AFL as diagnosed by serial study ECGs or by Medicare claims data. Among 14 837 participants without prevalent AF or AFL, 2514 developed AF/AFL during a mean 7.5±3.2 years of follow-up. Compared with chlorthalidone, randomization to either lisinopril (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% confidence interval, 0.94-1.15; P =0.46) or amlodipine (hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.03; P =0.16) was not associated with a significant reduction in incident AF/AFL. Compared with chlorthalidone, treatment with lisinopril is not associated with a meaningful reduction in incident AF or AFL among older adults with a history of hypertension. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000542. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Association between previously identified loci affecting telomere length and coronary heart disease (CHD in Han Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hui Ding,1 Fen Yan,1 Lin-Lin Zhou,2 Xiu-Hai Ji,3 Xin-Nan Gu,1 Zhi-Wei Tang,1 Ru-Hua Chen11Department of Pulmonary Medicine, The Affiliated Yixing People's Hospital, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu Province, 2Department of Cardiology, Affiliated Cixi Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, 3Department of Oncology, Affiliated Taicang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of ChinaPurpose: To replicate previously confirmed telomere-length loci in a Chinese Han population with coronary heart disease (CHD, and investigate these loci and the possibility of and age at onset of CHD.Patients and methods: 1514 CHD patients and 2470 normal controls were recruited. Medical data including age, sex, body mass index, lipid profiles, history of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia were collected from all the participants. Seven previously identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs related to leucocyte telomere length were genotyped, including rs10936599 in TERC, rs2736100 in TERT, rs7675998 in NAF1, rs9420907 in OBFC1, rs8105767 in ZNF208, rs755017 in RTEL1, and rs11125529 in ACYP2.Results: No significant difference in genotype frequencies from the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium test was noted for all tested SNPs both in the CHD patients and the normal controls. No polymorphism was observed for rs9420907, and AA genotype was noted in both the CHD patients and the controls. Neither the genotype nor the allele frequencies of rs2736100, rs8105767, rs11125529, and rs2967374 were significantly different between the CHD patients and the normal controls. For rs10936599 and rs755017, statistical difference was found for the allele frequency but not genotype. Distributions of genotype and allele were significantly different between the two groups for rs7675998. The odds ratio for carriers of CHD was 2.127 (95% confidence interval: 1.909–2.370 for the A allele of rs

  19. Treatment with B vitamins and incidence of cancer in patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack: results of a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W; Yi, Qilong; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of B vitamin treatment on the incidence of cancer among patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack. A total of 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with 1 tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B(6), 500 μg vitamin B(12)) and followed for a median of 3.4 years for any cancer as an adverse event. There was no significant difference in the incidence of any cancer among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (4.04% versus 4.59%; risk ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.07) and no difference in cancer mortality (2.35% versus 2.09%; risk ratio, 1.09; 0.81-1.46). Among 1899 patients with diabetes, the incidence of cancer was higher among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (5.35% versus 3.28%; adjusted risk ratio, 2.21; 1.31-3.73), whereas among 6168 patients without diabetes, the incidence of cancer was lower among participants assigned B vitamins compared with placebo (3.66% versus 5.03%; adjusted risk ratio, 0.67; 0.51-0.87; P for interaction=0.0001). Daily administration of folic acid, vitamin B(6), and vitamin B(12) to 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack for a median of 3.4 years had no significant effect, compared with placebo, on cancer incidence or mortality. However, a post hoc subgroup analysis raises the hypothesis that folic acid treatment may increase the incidence of cancer among diabetics and reduce the incidence of cancer among nondiabetics with a history of stroke or transient ischemic attack.

  20. 'I was in control of it from the start': A qualitative study of men's experiences of positive adjustment following a heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fran; Banwell, Elizabeth; Rakhit, Roby

    2017-09-01

    A qualitative design was used to explore the experience of positive adjustment following a heart attack. Ten men attending a cardiac rehabilitation programme completed in-depth semi-structured interviews. An overarching theme: 'I was in control of it from the start' emerged with six subthemes, relating to intrapersonal and interpersonal factors and processes. The subthemes reflected the importance of identifying controllable versus non-controllable factors and employing adaptive coping strategies.

  1. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  2. Spontaneous, late, in-the-bag intraocular lens subluxation in a patient with a previous acute angle-closure glaucoma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei-Wen; Chang, Shirley H L

    2004-08-01

    Cataract surgery was performed in a 49-year-old woman 16 months after an acute angle-closure glaucoma attack. Zonular dialysis was observed during surgery, but the intraocular lens (IOL) was implanted in the capsular bag uneventfully. At 4 1/2 months, 1 IOL loop wrapped in the bag herniated into the anterior chamber. The patient had no history of trauma. The IOL loop remained in the anterior chamber for 9 months, until the subluxated IOL spontaneously returned to its original position. Six months later, the IOL again dislocated into the anterior chamber.

  3. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid...... management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients....

  4. Heart Attack and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ... Carpal tunnel syndrome Depression Irritable bowel syndrome Migraine Thyroid disease Urinary tract infections All A-Z health topics ...

  5. [Mortality rate of acute heart attack in Zalaegerszeg micro-region. Results of the first Hungarian 24-hour acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction intervention care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupkovics, Géza; Motyovszki, Akos; Németh, Zoltán; Takács, István; Kenéz, András; Burkali, Bernadett; Menyhárt, Ildikó

    2010-04-04

    Morbidity and mortality rates of acute heart attack emphasize the significance of this patient group worldwide. The prompt and exact diagnosis and the timing of adequate therapy is crucial for this patients. Modern supply of acute heart attack includes invasive cardiology intervention, primer percutaneous coronary intervention. In year 1999, American and European recommendations suggested primer percutaneous coronary intervention only as an alternative possibility instead of thrombolysis, or in case of cardiogenic shock. 24 hour intervention unit for patients with acute heart attack was first organized in Hungary in Zala County Hospital's Cardiology Department, in year 1998. Our present study confirms, that since the intervention treatment has been introduced, average mortality rate has been reduced considerably in our area comparing to the national average. Mortality rates in West Transdanubian region and in Zalaegerszeg's micro-region were studied and compared for the period between 1997-2004, according to the data of National Public Health and Medical Officer Service. These data were then compared with the national average mortality data of Hungarian Central Statistical Office. With the help of our own computerized database we examined this period and compared the number of the completed invasive interventions to the mortality statistics. In the first full year, in 1998, we completed 82 primer and 283 elective PCIs; these number increased to 318 and 1265 by year 2005. At the same time, significant decrease of acute infarction related mortality was detectable among men of the Zalaegerszeg micro-region, comparing to the national average (pheart attack intervention care improved the area's mortality statistics significantly, comparing to the national average. The skilled work of the experienced team means an important advantage to the patients in Zalaegerszeg micro-region.

  6. Effects of human atrial natriuretic peptide on myocardial performance and energetics in heart failure due to previous myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Toru; Shinke, Toshiro; Shite, Junya; Takaoka, Hideyuki; Inoue, Nobutaka; Matsumoto, Hidenari; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Ryohei; Otake, Hiromasa; Matsumoto, Daisuke; Ogasawara, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2015-09-01

    Human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP) and spontaneous nitric oxide (NO) donor share cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) as a second messenger, but their effect on myocardium may differ. We compared the effect of hANP and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on left ventricular (LV) mechano-energetics in heart failure (HF). Ten patients with HF due to previous myocardial infarction (LV ejection fraction: 45±3%) were instrumented with conductance and coronary sinus thermodilution catheters. LV contractility (Ees: slope of end-systolic pressure-volume relation) and the ratio of LV stroke work (SW) to myocardial oxygen consumption (SW/MVO2=mechanical efficiency) were measured in response to intravenous infusion of ANP (0.05 μg/kg/min) or SNP (0.3 μg/kg/min) to lower blood pressure by at least 10 mmHg, and changes in plasma cGMP. SNP had no effect on Ees, SW, or MVO2, thus SW/MVO2 remained unchanged (40.54±5.84% to 36.59±5.72%, p=0.25). ANP increased Ees, and decreased MVO2 with preserved SW, resulting in improved SW/MVO2 (40.49±6.35% to 50.30±7.96%, p=0.0073). Infusion of ANP (10.42-34.95 pmol/ml, p=0.0003) increased cGMP levels, whereas infusion of SNP had no effect (10.42-12.23 pmol/ml, p=0.75). Compared to SNP, the ANP-dependent increase in cGMP may ameliorate myocardial inotropy and energetics in HF. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Atratividade de Atta sexdens rubropilosa por plantas de eucalipto atacadas previamente ou não por Thyrinteina arnobia Atta sexdens rubropilosa attractiveness to eucalyptus plants previously attacked or not by Thyrinteina arnobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Gomes de Oliveira

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available O sistema de defesa induzido das plantas é ativado após a ocorrência do dano provocado por um herbívoro. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar se plantas de eucalipto (Eucalyptus grandis atacadas previamente por lagartas de Thyrinteina arnobia tornam-se resistentes ao corte de operárias de Atta sexdens rubropilosa. Não houve diferença significativa no tempo gasto por operárias dessa formiga em iniciar o corte em plantas atacadas ou não. Porém, houve diferença significativa no tamanho de fragmentos cortados. Concluiu-se que plantas previamente atacadas tornam-se menos atrativas para A. sexdens rubropilosa devido à ativação do seu sistema de defesa induzido.The induced defense system of plants is activated after the occurrence of damage by a herbivore. The objective of this work was to evaluate whether plants of Eucalyptus grandis previously attacked by larvae of Thyrinteina arnobia become resistant to cutting by the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens rubropilosa. There was no significant difference in the lapse of time spent by the workers of this ant before they started cutting plants previously attacked or not. There was significant reduction in the size of leaf fragments cut by the ants. It was concluded that plants previously attacked were less attractive to the leaf cutter due to the activation of their induced defense system.

  8. Special Operations Soldier With Cardiac Family History: Use of CCTA and Protein Biomarker Testing to Detect Risk of Heart Attack From Noncalcified Plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Millee; Kroman, Anne; Singh, Juile; Tariq, Hassan; Amin, Shetal; Morales-Pablon, Cesar Alberto; Cahill, Kristina Vanessa; Harrison, Eric Edward

    2015-01-01

    We sought to characterize the risk of a heart attack in a 48-year-old asymptomatic US Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Soldier without known coronary artery disease (CAD). CAD continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among most age groups in the United States. Much research is dedicated to establishing new techniques to predict myocardial infarction (MI). Coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography, also known as CCTA, along with 7-protein serum biomarker risk assessment was performed for risk evaluation. A 48-year-old SOCOM Soldier with a family history of heart disease had skeletal chest pain from war injuries and a 5-fold higher risk of heart attack over the next 5 years on the basis of protein markers. A nonobstructive left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) plaque with a lipid-rich core and a thin fibrous cap (i.e., vulnerable plaque) was detected by CCTA. The patient was warned about his risk and prescribed four cardiac medications and scheduled for angioplasty even though he fell outside the guidelines by not having a severe obstructive blockage. Four days later, unfortunately, he had a heart attack before starting his medications and before angioplasty. CCTA with biomarker testing may have an important role in predicating acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in Special Operations Forces (SOF) Soldiers with at least one risk factor. Conventional stress testing and nuclear scanning would not detect non-flow-limiting vulnerable plaques in vulnerable patients. In order to collect more data, the PROTECT Registry has been started to evaluate asymptomatic Soldiers with at least one risk factor referred to the clinic by military physicians. 2015.

  9. Automated assessment of heart chamber volumes and function in patients with previous myocardial infarction using multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Andreas; Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Lønborg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV), and left atrial (LA) volumes and functions contain important prognostic information in ischemic heart disease. Because multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has high spatial resolution, this method may be optimal to obtain this information....

  10. Antiplatelet therapy and the effects of B vitamins in patients with previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack: a post-hoc subanalysis of VITATOPS, a randomised, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Eikelboom, John W; Yi, Qilong; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that any benefits of folic acid-based therapy to lower serum homocysteine in prevention of cardiovascular events might be offset by concomitant use of antiplatelet therapy. We aimed to establish whether there is an interaction between antiplatelet therapy and the effects of folic acid-based homocysteine-lowering therapy on major vascular events in patients with stroke or transient ischaemic attack enrolled in the vitamins to prevent stroke (VITATOPS) trial. In the VITATOPS trial, 8164 patients with recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with one tablet daily of placebo or B vitamins (2 mg folic acid, 25 mg vitamin B(6), and 500 μg vitamin B(12)) and followed up for a median 3·4 years (IQR 2·0-5·5) for the primary composite outcome of stroke, myocardial infarction, or death from vascular causes. In our post-hoc analysis of the interaction between antiplatelet therapy and the effects of treatment with B vitamins on the primary outcome, we used Cox proportional hazards regression before and after adjusting for imbalances in baseline prognostic factors in participants who were and were not taking antiplatelet drugs at baseline and in participants assigned to receive B vitamins or placebo. We also assessed the interaction in different subgroups of patients and different secondary outcomes. The VITATOPS trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00097669, and Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN74743444. At baseline, 6609 patients were taking antiplatelet therapy and 1463 were not. Patients not receiving antiplatelet therapy were more likely to be younger, east Asian, and disabled, to have a haemorrhagic stroke or cardioembolic ischaemic stroke, and to have a history of hypertension or atrial fibrillation. They were less likely to be smokers and to have a history of peripheral artery disease, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, ischaemic heart disease, and a

  11. DAILY CHANGES OF CENTRAL HEMODYNAMICS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE WITH NIGHT-TIME DYSPNOEA ATTACK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Dovgolis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study daily changes of central hemodynamics (CHD in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF and the effects of therapy. Materials and methods. 22 patients with ischemic heart disease and CHF of III-IV functional class (FC by NYHA, age 60,5±10,5 were observed. Patients were suffering from night-time dyspnoea attacks and had pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP 15-20 mm Hg. CHD was monitored invasively before the treatment and after 4 weeks of CHF treatment. Results. According to the cardiac index (CI at admission patients were split into two groups. 9 patients of group-I had CI ≤2,15 l\\min\\m2, and 13 patients of group-II had CI >2,15 l\\min\\m2. In patients of group-I CI increased in 4 weeks of treatment. The treatment caused considerable clinical improvement in all patients. The CHD indexes also improved. Initially evening-night-time peaks of PAOP (р≤0,002, systolic (SBP (р≤0,003, diastolic (DBP (р=0,002 and average (BPa (р=0,0007 blood pressure (BP as well as double multiplication (DM (р≤0,008 were registered in patients of group-I. At the end of treatment only evening-night increase in DBP (р=0,002 and BPa (р≤0,006 were noted. In patients of group-II after 4 weeks of treatment CI decreased or didn’t change. Towards 28-th day of treatment 10 patients had clinical improvements. Only one patient’s FC NYHA increased. At the end of treatment the normalization of CHD was registered totally in group. Initially evening-night-time peaks of PAOP (р≤0,002, SBP (р≤0, 0001, CI (р=0,057 and DM (р=0,084 were registered in patients of group-II. At the end of treatment evening-night-time peaks of PAOP (р≤0,015, SBP (р≤0,044, CI (р≤0,005 and DM (р≤0,044 still remained. Besides, evening-night-time peaks of cardiac output (р≤0,01 and systolic index (р≤0, 06 have added. Conclusion. In patients with CHF with initial CI ≤2,15 l\\min\\m2 treatment results in the normalization of CHD and its daily

  12. Not so close but still extremely loud: recollection of the World Trade Center terror attack and previous hurricanes moderates the association between exposure to hurricane Sandy and posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgi, Yuval; Shrira, Amit; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Palgi, Sharon; Goodwin, Robin; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2014-05-01

    The present study examined whether recollections of the World Trade Center (WTC) terror attack and previous hurricanes moderated the relationship between exposure to Hurricane Sandy and related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. An online sample of 1000 participants from affected areas completed self-report questionnaires a month after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast of the United States. Participants reported their exposure to Hurricane Sandy, their PTSD symptoms, and recollections of the WTC terror attack and previous hurricanes elicited due to Hurricane Sandy. Exposure to Hurricane Sandy was related to PTSD symptoms among those with high level of recollections of the WTC terror attack and past hurricanes, but not among those with low level of recollections. The aftermath of exposure to Hurricane Sandy is related not only to exposure, but also to its interaction with recollections of past traumas. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for practitioners and health policy makers in evaluating and interpreting the impact of past memories on future natural disasters. This may help in intervention plans of social and psychological services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  14. Do-not-resuscitate orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction: the Worcester Heart Attack Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Elizabeth A; Yarzebski, Jorge L; Goldberg, Robert J; Wheeler, Brownell; Gurwitz, Jerry H; Lessard, Darleen M; Bedell, Susanna E; Gore, Joel M

    2004-04-12

    Coronary heart disease is the leading cause of death in Americans. Despite increased interest in end-of-life care, data regarding the use of do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in acutely ill cardiac patients remain extremely limited. The objectives of this study were to describe use of DNR orders, treatment approaches, and hospital outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The study sample consisted of 4621 residents hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction at all metropolitan Worcester, Mass, area hospitals in five 1-year periods from 1991 to 1999. Significant increases in the use of DNR orders were observed during the study decade (from 16% in 1991 to 25% in 1999). The elderly, women, and patients with previous diabetes mellitus or stroke were more likely to have DNR orders. Patients with DNR orders were significantly less likely to be treated with effective cardiac medications, even if the DNR order occurred late in the hospital stay. Less than 1% of patients were noted to have DNR orders before hospital admission. Patients with DNR orders were significantly more likely to die during hospitalization than patients without DNR orders (44% vs 5%). The results of this community-wide study suggest increased use of DNR orders in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction during the past decade. Use of certain cardiac therapies and hospital outcomes are different between patients with and without DNR orders. Further efforts are needed to characterize the use of DNR orders in patients with acute coronary disease.

  15. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life--A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR). CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients' particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1) receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2) being supported to find new values in life, and (3) developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients' total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting programmes and

  16. Empowered to gain a new foothold in life—A study of the meaning of participating in cardiac rehabilitation to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte P. Simonÿ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate what it means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack to participate in cardiac rehabilitation (CR. CR is well-established internationally to support patients towards moving forward in satisfying, healthy, and well-functioning lives. Studies indicate that patients achieve improvement in quality of life when participating in CR. However, knowledge of how patients are supported during CR is sparse. Moreover, knowledge of what participating in CR means to patients afflicted by a minor heart attack is lacking. In-depth knowledge in this area is crucial in order to understand these patients’ particular gains and needs. In a phenomenological-hermeneutic frame field observations, focus group interviews, and individual interviews were conducted among 11 patients during and after their participation in CR. Field notes and transcribed interviews underwent three-phased interpretation. It was found that patients were supported to gain renewed balance in their lives during CR. Three themes were identified: (1 receiving a helpful but limited caring hand, (2 being supported to find new values in life, and (3 developing responsibility for the remaining time. The patients were carefully guided through a difficult time and supported to continue in healthy everyday lives. They were given hope which enabled them to find themselves a new foothold in life with respect to their own sense of well-being. This guidance and a sense of hopefulness were provided by heart specialists and more seasoned heart patients. In conclusion, patients were empowered to achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve their personal well-being during CR. However, structural barriers in the programme prevented adequate support regarding the patients’ total needs. Knowledge of the benefits of CR emphasizes the significance of the programme and highlights the importance of high inclusion. Efforts should be made to develop more flexible and longer lasting

  17. Survival of resuscitated cardiac arrest patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) conveyed directly to a Heart Attack Centre by ambulance clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fothergill, Rachael T; Watson, Lynne R; Virdi, Gurkamal K; Moore, Fionna P; Whitbread, Mark

    2014-01-01

    This study reports survival outcomes for patients resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) subsequent to ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), and who were conveyed directly by ambulance clinicians to a specialist Heart Attack Centre for expert cardiology assessment, angiography and possible percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This is a retrospective descriptive review of data sourced from the London Ambulance Service's OHCA registry over a one-year period. We observed excellent survival rates for our cohort of patients with 66% of patients surviving to be discharged from hospital, the majority of whom were still alive after one year. Those who survived tended to be younger, to have had a witnessed arrest in a public place with an initial cardiac rhythm of VF/VT, and to have been transported to the specialist centre more quickly than those who did not. A system allowing ambulance clinicians to autonomously convey OHCA STEMI patients who achieve a return of spontaneous circulation directly to a Heart Attack Centre is highly effective and yields excellent survival outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. It is not just a Minor Thing - A Phenomenological-Hermeneutic Study of Patients' Experiences when afflicted by a Minor Heart Attack and Participating in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonÿ, Charlotte P; Dreyer, Pia; Pedersen, Birthe D; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-06-01

    To improve cardiac care, especially cardiac rehabilitation, patients' perspectives should be better addressed. In Denmark, patients afflicted by a minor heart attack in terms of unstable angina pectoris or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction are treated in fast-track programmes with subacute treatment in hospital, early discharge and follow-up specialised outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. Knowledge of these patients' experiences of their life situation is essential to develop sufficient care protocols. To gain in-depth understanding of how patients afflicted by a minor heart attack experience their life situation when following cardiac rehabilitation. Focus group interviews and individual interviews were conducted with 11 patients enrolled in the cardiac rehabilitation programme. Data consisted of text in the form of transcribed interviews. A three-phased interpretation inspired by Paul Ricoeur's theory of interpretation was applied. As an overall concept, the patients experienced being forced into a demanding life shaking journey. Three themes emerged: Difficulty accepting the disease: facing the disease is a difficult challenge for the patients, leading to vulnerability and helplessness; Understanding that life has become frail: patients feel shaken as they realise that the disease is chronic and life-threatening; and An altered life: patients must adjust to new limitations in their everyday lives. Patients experience an overall demanding transition when they are afflicted by a minor heat attack, whereby their lives are sweepingly changed. Supporting patients' integrity, which becomes vulnerable during the various stages of transitions, is essential to ensure a healthy outcome. Being together with fellow patients during cardiac rehabilitation is a facilitating factor in the course of transition. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Coronary heart disease risk in patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known coronary heart disease: findings from the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarenco, Pierre; Goldstein, Larry B; Sillesen, Henrik; Benavente, Oscar; Zweifler, Richard M; Callahan, Alfred; Hennerici, Michael G; Zivin, Justin A; Welch, K Michael A

    2010-03-01

    Noncoronary forms of atherosclerosis (including transient ischemic attacks or stroke of carotid origin or >50% stenosis of the carotid artery) are associated with a 10-year vascular risk of >20% and are considered as a coronary heart disease (CHD) -risk equivalent from the standpoint of lipid management. The Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels (SPARCL) trial included patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack and no known CHD regardless of the presence of carotid atherosclerosis. We evaluated the risk of developing clinically recognized CHD in SPARCL patients. A total of 4731 patients (mean age, 63 years) was randomized to 80 mg/day atorvastatin placebo. The rates of major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure were evaluated. After 4.9 years of follow-up, the risks of a major coronary event and of any CHD end point in the placebo group were 5.1% and 8.6%, respectively. The rate of outcome of stroke decreased over time, whereas the major coronary event rate was stable. Relative to those having a large vessel-related stroke at baseline, those having a transient ischemic attack, hemorrhagic stroke, small vessel stroke, or a stroke of unknown cause had similar absolute rates for a first major coronary event and for any CHD event; transient ischemic attack, small vessel, and unknown cause groups had lower absolute revascularization procedure rates. Major coronary event, any CHD event, and any revascularization procedure rates were similarly reduced in all baseline stroke subtypes in the atorvastatin arm compared with placebo with no heterogeneity between groups. CHD risk can be substantially reduced by atorvastatin therapy in patients with recent stroke or transient ischemic attack regardless of stroke subtype.

  20. The association of a heart attack or stroke with depressive symptoms stratified by the presence of a close social contact: findings from the National Health and Aging Trends Study Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simning, Adam; Seplaki, Christopher L; Conwell, Yeates

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the study is to examine whether the risk of having clinically significant depressive symptoms following a heart attack or stroke varies by the presence of a close social contact. The National Health and Aging Trends Study is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of US Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 and older initiated in 2011. A total of 5643 older adults had information on social contacts at baseline and depressive symptoms at the 1-year follow-up interview. The two-item Patient Health Questionnaire identified clinically significant depressive symptoms. Interview questions examined social contacts and the presence of self-reported heart attack or stroke during the year of follow-up. A total of 297 older adults reported experiencing a heart attack and/or stroke between their baseline and follow-up interviews. In regression analyses accounting for sociodemographics, baseline depressive symptoms, medical comorbidity, and activities of daily living impairment, older adults with no close social contacts had increased odds of depressive symptoms at follow-up after experiencing a heart attack or stroke, while those with close social contacts had increased odds of depressive symptoms at follow-up after experiencing a stroke, but not a heart attack. Older adults have increased odds of having depressive symptoms following a self-reported stroke, but only those with no close social contacts had increased odds of depressive symptoms following a heart attack. Social networks may play a role in the mechanisms underlying depression among older adults experiencing certain acute health events. Future work exploring the potential causal relationships suggested here, if confirmed, could inform interventions to alleviate or prevent depression among at risk older adults. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Effect of B vitamins and lowering homocysteine on cognitive impairment in patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack: a prespecified secondary analysis of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Ford, Andrew H; Yi, Qilong; Eikelboom, John W; Lees, Kennedy R; Chen, Christopher; Xavier, Denis; Navarro, Jose C; Ranawaka, Udaya K; Uddin, Wasim; Ricci, Stefano; Gommans, John; Schmidt, Reinhold; Almeida, Osvaldo P; van Bockxmeer, Frank M

    2013-08-01

    High plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) has been associated with cognitive impairment but lowering tHcy with B-vitamins has produced equivocal results. We aimed to determine whether B-vitamin supplementation would reduce tHcy and the incidence of new cognitive impairment among individuals with stroke or transient ischemic attack≥6 months previously. A total of 8164 patients with stroke or transient ischemic attack were randomly allocated to double-blind treatment with one tablet daily of B-vitamins (folic acid, 2 mg; vitamin B6, 25 mg; vitamin B12, 500 μg) or placebo and followed up for 3.4 years (median) in the VITAmins TO Prevent Stroke (VITATOPS) trial. For this prespecified secondary analysis of VITATOPS, the primary outcome was a new diagnosis of cognitive impairment, defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score6 months after the qualifying stroke; 2608 participants were cognitively unimpaired (MMSE≥24), of whom 2214 participants (1110 B-vitamins versus 1104 placebo) had follow-up MMSEs during 2.8 years (median). At final follow-up, allocation to B-vitamins, compared with placebo, was associated with a reduction in mean tHcy (10.2 μmol/L versus 14.2 μmol/L; Pvitamin B6, and vitamin B12 to a self-selected clinical trial cohort of cognitively unimpaired patients with previous stroke or transient ischemic attack lowered mean tHcy but had no effect on the incidence of cognitive impairment or cognitive decline, as measured by the MMSE, during a median of 2.8 years. URL: http://www.controlled-trials.com. Unique identifier: ISRCTN74743444; URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00097669.

  2. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Chen, Xinguang; Li, Sijian

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP). Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention. Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China. A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients) or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients). KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke. Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome), blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome), and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome) were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention. Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p heart attack and stroke among senior patients who are on anti-hypertensive medication. Findings of this study provide solid data supporting a formal phase-III trial to establish the effectiveness of KM2H2 for use in community settings for prevention. ISRCTN Register ISRCTN12608966.

  3. Automated Discovery of Mimicry Attacks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giffin, Jonathon T; Jha, Somesh; Miller, Barton P

    2006-01-01

    .... These systems are useful only if they detect actual attacks. Previous research developed manually-constructed mimicry and evasion attacks that avoided detection by hiding a malicious series of system calls within a valid sequence allowed by the model...

  4. Social Engineering Attack Detection Model: SEADMv2

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available and is only able to cater for social engineering attacks that use bidirectional communication. Previous research discovered that social engineering attacks can be classified into three different categories, namely attacks that utilise bidirectional...

  5. Patients' understanding of their heart attack and the impact of exposure to a media campaign on pre-hospital time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummala, Shrikar R; Farshid, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) have a limited understanding of AMI symptoms and risk factors. This can lead to delays in the recognition of an AMI and hospital presentation. We aimed to assess patients' understanding of their AMI symptoms and risk factors and also assess the impact of exposure to a media campaign on their pre-hospital time. We surveyed 100 AMI patients admitted to the Canberra Hospital. We asked them about their AMI symptoms and risk factors and the impact of the National Heart Foundation (NHF) advertisements on their AMI experience. Only 26% of patients recognised that they were having an AMI. In 34% of cases, an ambulance was called. There was no significant difference in the median pre-hospital time between patients who encountered the NHF advertisements and those who had not (133 minutes vs. 137 minutes, p=0.809). Only 22% of patients could identify all of their personal AMI risk factors. Most AMI patients do not initially recognise their condition nor do they call for an ambulance. Exposure to the NHF advertisements had no significant influence on reducing pre-hospital time in this cohort. Most patients have a limited understanding of AMI risk factors and causes. Copyright © 2014 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Heart rate, salivary α-amylase activity, and cooperative behavior in previously naïve children receiving dental local anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhakis, Aristidis; Menexes, George; Coolidge, Trilby; Kalfas, Sotirios

    2012-01-01

    Psychosomatic indicators, such as heart rate (HR), salivary alpha amylase (sAA) activity, and behavior, can be used to determine stress. This study's aim was to assess the pattern of changes of salivary alpha amylase, heart rate, and cooperative behavior in previously naïve children receiving dental treatment under local anesthesia. Included were 30 children with no prior dental experience who needed 4 or more sessions of dental treatment involving local anesthesia. In each session, sAA, HR, and behavior were assessed before and during the application of local anesthesia and at the end of the treatment. The highest sAA value was always observed at the end of each session; overall, the value was lower in the fourth session. HR always increased during the local anesthesia, and did not vary across sessions. No significant relationship was found between child cooperation and either sAA or HR. In this sample, child cooperation may not be an accurate indicator of stress. Based on salivary alpha amylase activity changes, dental treatment involving local anesthesia in naïve children appeared to be less stressful after 3 sessions.

  7. Autonomic Nervous System and Stress to Predict Secondary Ischemic Events after Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Stroke: Possible Implications of Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Mazowita, Garey; Claydon, Victoria E

    2018-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke have high risks of recurrence and deterioration into severe ischemic strokes. Risk stratification of TIA and minor stroke is essential for early effective treatment. Traditional tools have only moderate predictive value, likely due to their inclusion of the limited number of stroke risk factors. Our review follows Hans Selye's fundamental work on stress theory and the progressive shift of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) from adaptation to disease when stress becomes chronic. We will first show that traditional risk factors and acute triggers of ischemic stroke are chronic and acute stress factors or "stressors," respectively. Our first review shows solid evidence of the relationship between chronic stress and stroke occurrence. The stress response is tightly regulated by the ANS whose function can be assessed with heart rate variability (HRV). Our second review demonstrates that stress-related risk factors of ischemic stroke are correlated with ANS dysfunction and impaired HRV. Our conclusions support the idea that HRV parameters may represent the combined effects of all body stressors that are risk factors for ischemic stroke and, thus, may be of important predictive value for the risk of subsequent ischemic events after TIA or minor stroke.

  8. Autonomic Nervous System and Stress to Predict Secondary Ischemic Events after Transient Ischemic Attack or Minor Stroke: Possible Implications of Heart Rate Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ling; Collet, Jean-Paul; Mazowita, Garey; Claydon, Victoria E.

    2018-01-01

    Transient ischemic attack (TIA) and minor stroke have high risks of recurrence and deterioration into severe ischemic strokes. Risk stratification of TIA and minor stroke is essential for early effective treatment. Traditional tools have only moderate predictive value, likely due to their inclusion of the limited number of stroke risk factors. Our review follows Hans Selye’s fundamental work on stress theory and the progressive shift of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) from adaptation to disease when stress becomes chronic. We will first show that traditional risk factors and acute triggers of ischemic stroke are chronic and acute stress factors or “stressors,” respectively. Our first review shows solid evidence of the relationship between chronic stress and stroke occurrence. The stress response is tightly regulated by the ANS whose function can be assessed with heart rate variability (HRV). Our second review demonstrates that stress-related risk factors of ischemic stroke are correlated with ANS dysfunction and impaired HRV. Our conclusions support the idea that HRV parameters may represent the combined effects of all body stressors that are risk factors for ischemic stroke and, thus, may be of important predictive value for the risk of subsequent ischemic events after TIA or minor stroke. PMID:29556209

  9. The Association Between Antihypertensive Medication Nonadherence and Visit-to-Visit Variability of Blood Pressure: Findings From the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronish, Ian M; Lynch, Amy I; Oparil, Suzanne; Whittle, Jeff; Davis, Barry R; Simpson, Lara M; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Cushman, William C; Chang, Tara I; Muntner, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Low adherence to antihypertensive medication has been hypothesized to increase visit-to-visit variability (VVV) of blood pressure (BP). We assessed the association between antihypertensive medication adherence and VVV of BP in the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT). VVV of BP was calculated using SD independent of mean, SD, and average real variability across study visits conducted 6 to 28 months after randomization. Participants who reported taking heart disease or nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or mortality risk. In conclusion, improving medication adherence may lower VVV of BP. However, VVV of BP is associated with cardiovascular outcomes independent of medication adherence. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Efficacy of a Community-Based Physical Activity Program KM2H2 for Stroke and Heart Attack Prevention among Senior Hypertensive Patients: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Phase-II Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Gong

    Full Text Available To evaluate the efficacy of the program Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2 in encouraging physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke among hypertensive patients enrolled in the Community-Based Hypertension Control Program (CBHCP.Cluster randomized controlled trial with three waves of longitudinal assessments at baseline, 3 and 6 months post intervention.Community-based and patient-centered self-care for behavioral intervention in urban settings of China.A total of 450 participants diagnosed with hypertension from 12 community health centers in Wuhan, China were recruited, and were randomly assigned by center to receive either KM2H2 plus standard CBHCP care (6 centers and 232 patients or the standard care only (6 centers and 218 patients.KM2H2 is a behavioral intervention guided by the Transtheoretical Model, the Model of Personalized Medicine and Social Capital Theory. It consists of six intervention sessions and two booster sessions engineered in a progressive manner. The purpose is to motivate and maintain physical activities for the prevention of heart attack and stroke.Heart attack and stroke (clinically diagnosed, primary outcome, blood pressure (measured, secondary outcome, and physical activity (self-report, tertiary outcome were assessed at the individual level during the baseline, 3- and 6-month post-intervention.Relative to the standard care, receiving KM2H2 was associated with significant reductions in the incidence of heart attack (3.60% vs. 7.03%, p < .05 and stroke (5.11% vs. 9.90%, p<0.05, and moderate reduction in blood pressure (-3.72 mmHg in DBP and -2.92 mmHg in DBP at 6-month post-intervention; and significant increases in physical activity at 3- (d = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.21, 0.85 and 6-month (d = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85 post-intervention, respectively.The program KM2H2 is efficacious to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke among senior patients who are on anti

  11. Attack surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruschka, Nils; Jensen, Meiko

    2010-01-01

    The new paradigm of cloud computing poses severe security risks to its adopters. In order to cope with these risks, appropriate taxonomies and classification criteria for attacks on cloud computing are required. In this work-in-progress paper we present one such taxonomy based on the notion...... of attack surfaces of the cloud computing scenario participants....

  12. Baseline Quality of Life and Risk of Stroke in the ALLHAT Study (Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Tanzila; Auchus, Alexander P; Oparil, Suzanne; Wright, Clinton B; Wright, Jackson; Furlan, Anthony J; Sila, Cathy A; Davis, Barry R; Pressel, Sara; Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Einhorn, Paula T; Lerner, Alan J

    2017-11-01

    The visual analogue scale is a self-reported, validated tool to measure quality of life (QoL). Our purpose was to determine whether baseline QoL predicted strokes in the ALLHAT study (Antihypertensive and Lipid Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial) and evaluate determinants of poststroke change in QoL. In the ALLHAT study, among the 33 357 patients randomized to treatment arms, 1525 experienced strokes; 1202 (79%) strokes were nonfatal. This study cohort includes 32 318 (97%) subjects who completed the baseline visual analogue scale QoL estimate. QoL was measured on a visual analogue scale and adjusted using a Torrance transformation (transformed QoL [TQoL]). Kaplan-Meier curves and adjusted proportional hazards analyses were used to estimate the effect of TQoL on the risk of stroke, on a continuous scale (0-1) and by quartiles (≤0.81, >0.81≤0.89, >0.89≤0.95, >0.95). We analyzed the change from baseline to first poststroke TQoL using adjusted linear regression. After adjusting for multiple stroke risk factors, the hazard ratio for stroke events for baseline TQoL was 0.93 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-0.98) per 0.1 U increase. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% increased stroke risk (hazard ratio=1.20 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.44]) compared with the reference highest quartile TQoL. Poststroke TQoL change was significant within all treatment groups ( P ≤0.001). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that baseline TQoL was the strongest predictor of poststroke TQoL with similar results for the untransformed QoL. The lowest baseline TQoL quartile had a 20% higher stroke risk than the highest quartile. Baseline TQoL was the only factor that predicted poststroke change in TQoL. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00000542. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  14. Clinical significance of incident hypokalemia and hyperkalemia in treated hypertensive patients in the antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment to prevent heart attack trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Michael H; Piller, Linda B; Ford, Charles E; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Oparil, Suzanne; Cushman, William C; Einhorn, Paula T; Franklin, Stanley S; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Ong, Stephen T; Eckfeldt, John H; Furberg, Curt D; Calhoun, David A; Davis, Barry R

    2012-05-01

    Concerns exist that diuretic-induced changes in serum potassium may have adverse effects in hypertensive patients. The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial, a large practice-based clinical trial, made it possible to examine consequences of observed changes in potassium during care in conventional practice settings. Normokalemic participants randomized to chlorthalidone (C) versus amlodipine or lisinopril as a first-step drug were stratified by year-1 potassium. Postyear-1 outcomes among hypokalemics (potassium, 5.4 mmol/L) were compared with normokalemics (potassium, 3.5-5.4 mmol/L). Year-1 hypokalemia incidence was 6.8%; incidence in C (12.9%) differed from amlodipine (2.1%; Pheart disease occurred in 8.1% with hypokalemia, 8.0% with normokalemia, and 11.1% with hyperkalemia. Overall, mortality was higher in hypokalemics than in normokalemics (Cox hazard ratio, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.02-1.44]) with statistically significant (interaction, P<0.01) disparity in hazard ratios for the 3 treatment arms (hazard ratios, C=1.21, amlodipine=1.60, lisinopril=3.82). Hyperkalemia was associated with increased risk of combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.58 [95% CI, 1.15-2.18]) without significant treatment interactions. In conventional practice settings, the uncommon appearance of hyperkalemia was associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Hypokalemia was associated with increased mortality; however, the statistically significant heterogeneity in hazard ratios across treatment groups strongly suggests that the observed increase in mortality is unrelated to the specific effects of C. Thus, for most patients, concerns about potassium levels should not influence the clinician's decision about initiating hypertension treatment with low-moderate doses of thiazide diuretics (12.5-25.0 mg of C).

  15. Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out these healthy cooking tips . You’ll learn smart substitutions, healthy snacking ideas and better prep methods. For example, with poultry, use the leaner light meat (breasts) instead of the fattier dark meat ( ...

  16. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  17. Healthy Heart Handbook for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who use high-dose birth control pills (oral contraceptives) are more likely to have a heart attack ... given to people who arrive at a hospital emergency department with a suspected heart attack or stroke. ...

  18. Cri du chat syndrome and congenital heart disease: a review of previously reported cases and presentation of an additional 21 cases from the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Christine; Moller, James H; Finkelstein, Marsha; Lohr, Jamie; Schimmenti, Lisa

    2006-05-01

    To analyze the cases submitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Care Consortium (PCCC) database from 1982 to 2002 to determine the frequency and distribution of congenital heart disease (CHD) found in this population, to review the literature for previously published accounts of CHD in this population, and to review current genotype-phenotype associations for cri du chat (CDC) syndrome with CHD. We performed a retrospective review of the 98422 CHD cases submitted to the PCCC between 1982 and 2002, to find patients who had a noncardiac diagnosis of CDC syndrome. A total of 21 patients (15 female and 6 male patients) were identified. Although some patients had multiple cardiac anomalies, they were categorized according to primary diagnoses on the basis of the most hemodynamically significant component. The patient groups were ventricular septal defect (n = 6), patent ductus arteriosus (n = 6), tetralogy of Fallot (n = 5), pulmonary valve atresia with ventricular septal defect (n = 2), pulmonary valve stenosis (n = 1), and double-outlet right ventricle (n = 1). Eighteen of the 21 patients underwent surgical repair of their defects. There was 1 late operative death. To determine whether the observed frequency of these cardiac defects among patients with CDC syndrome was comparable to that of the general population of patients with CHD, data for all cases submitted to the PCCC from 1982 to 2002 were used. Use of these numbers to determine expected frequencies for these defects showed significantly greater proportions of patients with these specific lesions among the patients with CDC syndrome. Currently there is no clear understanding of the genomic cause of the prevalence of these defects in the population with CDC syndrome, although CHD has been noted among patients with other deletion syndromes.

  19. Shark attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidera, K J; Ogden, J A; Highhouse, K; Pugh, L; Beatty, E

    1991-01-01

    Shark attacks are rare but devastating. This case had major injuries that included an open femoral fracture, massive hemorrhage, sciatic nerve laceration, and significant skin and muscle damage. The patient required 15 operative procedures, extensive physical therapy, and orthotic assistance. A review of the literature pertaining to shark bites is included.

  20. Previously known and newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation: a major risk indicator after a myocardial infarction complicated by heart failure or left ventricular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køber, Lars; Swedberg, Karl; McMurray, John J V

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To characterize the relationship between known and newly diagnosed atrial fibrillation (AF) and the risk of death and major cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated by heart failure (HF) and/or left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD). MET...

  1. Treatment-resistant hypertension and the incidence of cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease: results from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntner, Paul; Davis, Barry R; Cushman, William C; Bangalore, Sripal; Calhoun, David A; Pressel, Sara L; Black, Henry R; Kostis, John B; Probstfield, Jeffrey L; Whelton, Paul K; Rahman, Mahboob

    2014-11-01

    Apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) is defined as uncontrolled hypertension despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medication classes or controlled hypertension while treated with ≥4 antihypertensive medication classes. Although a high prevalence of aTRH has been reported, few data are available on its association with cardiovascular and renal outcomes. We analyzed data on 14 684 Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) participants to determine the association between aTRH (n=1870) with coronary heart disease, stroke, all-cause mortality, heart failure, peripheral artery disease, and end-stage renal disease. We defined aTRH as blood pressure not at goal (systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg) while taking ≥3 classes of antihypertensive medication or taking ≥4 classes of antihypertensive medication with blood pressure at goal during the year 2 ALLHAT study visit (1996-2000). Use of a diuretic was not required to meet the definition of aTRH. Follow-up occurred through 2002. The multivariable adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) comparing participants with versus without aTRH were as follows: coronary heart disease (1.44 [1.18-1.76]), stroke (1.57 [1.18-2.08]), all-cause mortality (1.30 [1.11-1.52]), heart failure (1.88 [1.52-2.34]), peripheral artery disease (1.23 [0.85-1.79]), and end-stage renal disease (1.95 [1.11-3.41]). aTRH was also associated with the pooled outcomes of combined coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-1.71) and combined cardiovascular disease (hazard ratio, 1.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-1.64). These results demonstrate that aTRH increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and end-stage renal disease. Studies are needed to identify approaches to prevent aTRH and reduce risk for adverse outcomes among individuals with aTRH. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Analysis of 24-h Rhythm in Ventricular Repolarization Identifies QT Diurnality As a Novel Clinical Parameter Associated with Previous Ventricular Arrhythmias in Heart Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan C. Du Pre

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiac repolarization abnormalities are among the major causes of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In humans, cardiac repolarization duration has a 24-h rhythm. Animal studies show that this rhythm is regulated by 24-h rhythms in ion channel function and that disruption of this rhythm leads to ventricular arrhythmias. We hypothesized that 24-h rhythms in QT duration can be used as a predictor for sudden cardiac death and are associated with ventricular arrhythmias. Secondly, we assessed a possible mechanistic explanation by studying the putative role of hERG channel dysfunction.Materials and Methods: In 2 retrospective studies, measures of the 24-h variation in the QT and QTc intervals (QT and QTc diurnality, QTd and QTcd, respectively have been derived from Holter analyses and compared between groups: 1 39 post-infarct patients with systolic heart failure (CHF: EF < 35%, of which 14 with, and 25 without a history of ventricular arrhythmias and 2 five patients with proven (LQTS2 and 16 with potential (Sotalol-induced hERG channel dysfunction vs. 22 controls.Results: QTd was two-fold higher in CHF patients with a history of ventricular arrhythmias (38 ± 15 ms compared to CHF patients without VT (16 ± 9 ms, p = 0.001. QTd was significantly increased in LQT2 patients (43 ± 24 ms or those treated with Sotalol (30 ± 10 ms compared to controls (21 ± 8 ms, p < 0.05 for both.Discussion: QT diurnality presents a novel clinical parameter of repolarization that can be derived from Holter registrations and may be useful for identification of patients at risk for ventricular arrhythmias.

  3. BIRD ATTACK OCULAR INJURIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Soleimani, Mohammad; Behrouz, Mahmoud Jabbarvand

    2017-03-29

    To report 30 patients with bird attack-related eye injuries. This study was performed among patients coming to Farabi Eye Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from 2010 to 2015 with a history of bird attack causing eye injury. The inclusion criteria were a history of bird attack by pecking causing eye injury and having treatment and follow-up record for at least 6 months after treatment. The primary eye examinations included a full ophthalmic examination including evaluation of uncorrected visual acuity and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), anterior segment slit lamp biomicroscopy, and photography. For all patients with penetrating injury, primary repair was undertaken. Thirty patients (10 females and 20 males) with a mean age of 23.3 ± 18.5 years entered the study. The most common zone of injury was zone 1 (P < 0.001), and lensectomy was not needed in majority of patients (P < 0.001). The most common bird causing the injury was mynah (P < 0.001). Those patients with baseline BCVA of less than 20/200 or those with endophthalmitis had statistically worse final BCVA after treatment. Patients attacked by mynah bird had significantly better pretreatment uncorrected visual acuity and BCVA. The most common bird causing the eye injury among the sample of patients from Iran was mynah, which differs with previous studies indicating the rooster attack as the most common cause of eye injury. The authors also found that the most common zone of injury was zone 1, and the presence of endophthalmitis and lower baseline BCVA were significant risk factors for worse visual outcomes.

  4. Persistent effect at 30-month post intervention of a community-based randomized trial of KM2H2 in reducing stroke and heart attack among senior hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jie; Xu, Yunan; Chen, Xinguang; Yang, Niannian; Li, Fang; Yan, Yaqiong

    2018-01-02

    The effect of the Keep Moving toward Healthy Heart and Healthy Brain (KM2H2) program at 6-month post intervention has been assessed.  The purpose of this study is to evaluate the KM2H 2 program at 30-month post intervention. A total of 450 senior hypertensive patients from 12 community health centers were randomized by center to either receive KM2H 2 plus standard care (6 centers, n = 232) or standard care only (6 centers, n = 218). Data for outcome measures at 30-month post intervention were analyzed. New cases of stroke and heart attack were verified with medical records; levels of physical activity were assessed using self-reported questionnaire. In addition to comparative analysis, adjusted incidence rate and program effects were determined using mixed effects modeling method. At the 30-month follow-up, the adjusted incidence rate [95% CI] of stroke was 11.81% [5.90, 17.72] for patients in the intervention group and 19.78% [14.07, 25.50] (p = 0.03) for the control group. The adjusted incidence rate of heart attack was 3.34% [1.91, 8.58] and 6.68% [1.64, 11.73] for the intervention and control groups (p = 0.16), respectively; the proportion and the duration of engaging in regular physical activity were significantly greater for the intervention group than the control group. The reductions in blood pressure between the intervention and the control was not statistically significant. The KM2H 2 program showed a persistent effect up to 30 months post intervention in enhancing physical activity and reducing the risk of cardio-cerebrovascular events, particularly stroke. These findings demonstrate the persistent effect of the KM2H 2 and suggest the need for a full-scale evaluation of the intervention program for practical use. ISRCTN Register ISRCTN12608966 . Registered 03 March 2015. Retrospectively registered.

  5. [Risk of fatal/non-fatal events in patients with previous coronary heart disease/acute myocardial infarction and treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Olmo, L; Juan Armas, J; Gomariz García, J J

    2017-09-04

    Primary Care is the fundamental axis of our health system and obliges us to be consistent with our prescriptions. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with increased cardiovascular risk and increased risk of all causes of death, as well as acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in patients with a previous myocardial infarction. Pain and cardiac patient management are 2 basic pillars in our daily activity, and we must know the limitations of NSAIDs in patients with established cardiovascular risk. We present a review of the scientific literature with primary interest in the role of NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk. The objective is to determine the relationship between the consumption of different NSAIDs and the fatal and non-fatal events among patients with known coronary disease. This is a review of the scientific literature with primary interest in the role of NSAIDs and cardiovascular risk. The literature review was conducted in PubMed search engines like Tripdatabase and with certain keywords. Of the 15 original papers found, 9 did not correspond completely to the central focus, so the approach was decided from 6 original articles from the past 5 years, which address the central focus of increased cardiovascular risk found (fatal and non-fatal events) in patients with prior cardiovascular disease or AMI being prescribed NSAIDs for any reason. The risk of fatal/non-fatal events in each of the studies is expressed by the odds ratio (OR)/hazard ratio (HR), defined as the probability of an event occurring. A moderate risk was observed for ibuprofen. It increases the risk of acute coronary syndrome after 5 years of cardiovascular event, especially in the 2nd year (OR 1.63; 95% CI 1.42-1.87). It also increases the risk of stroke (HR 1.23; 95% IC 1.10-1.38). Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors were the third risk group, after nabumetone and diclofenac. Celecoxib increases risk from the 14th day of treatment (HR 2.3; 95% CI 1.79-3.02), having an OR

  6. MI: Not a Heart Attack but a Gut Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rosemary K; Cabrera, Ana M

    2018-02-01

    Mesenteric ischemia and infarction are infrequent but often deadly conditions in acute and critically ill patients. Mesenteric ischemia may be a primary admission diagnosis or may develop secondary to another diagnosis. Having a high index of suspicion for patients at risk of mesenteric ischemia and mesenteric infarction can alter a poor outcome. This article reviews the pathophysiology, risk factors, assessment, medical and nursing diagnoses, as well as collaborative management for mesenteric ischemia. Early identification of patients at risk and the appropriate diagnostic testing are stressed. Nurses armed with the knowledge of this condition are better able to provide safe care to their patients. ©2018 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  7. CDC Vital Signs: Heart Age - Is Your Heart Older Than You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age. About 3 in 4 heart attacks and strokes are due to risk factors that increase heart age. Problem US adults have ... and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. Doctors, nurses, and other ... the effect of risk factors on their heart health. Help patients choose a ...

  8. Low level of knowledge of heart attack symptoms and inappropriate anticipated treatment-seeking behaviour among older Chinese: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Pui Hing; Moe, Gordon; Lee, Siu Yin; Woo, Jean; Leung, Angela Y M; Chow, Chi-Ming; Kong, Cecilia; Lo, Wing Tung; Yuen, Ming Hay; Zerwic, Julie

    2018-03-26

    Prehospital delay of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is common globally, and Hong Kong-home of a rapidly ageing Chinese population-is not an exception. Seeking emergency medical care promptly is important for patients. Treatment-seeking behaviours have been shown to be associated with knowledge of AMI symptoms and specific cultural beliefs. This study aimed to assess the level of knowledge of AMI symptoms and expected treatment-seeking behaviour among older Chinese in Hong Kong. A cross-sectional population-based survey was conducted at the Elderly Health Centres in Hong Kong from March to September 2016. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with a structured questionnaire based on previous studies and local adaptations. Among 1804 people aged 65 years and above who completed the questionnaire, chest pain (80.2%), palpitations (75.8%) and fainting (71.9%) were the major symptoms recognised as AMI related. Meanwhile, stomach ache (46.9%), coughing (45.4%) and neck pain (40.8%) were recognised as not AMI related. The mean expected discomfort intensity during AMI onset was 7.7 out of 10 (SD=2.1). Regarding the expected treatment-seeking behaviour, seeking non-emergent medical care was the most popular action when AMI symptoms emerged during the day, without chest pain or with lower discomfort intensity, whereas calling an ambulance was the most common option when AMI symptoms emerged at night or with high discomfort intensity. To minimise delays in seeking treatment, future health education should focus on increasing the public knowledge of AMI symptoms and the need to call an ambulance during an emergency. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Social engineering attack framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available link. A social engineering attack targets this weakness by; using various manipulation techniques in order to elicit sensitive; information. The field of social engineering is still in its infancy; stages with regards to formal definitions and attack...

  10. Terrorists and Suicide Attacks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cronin, Audrey K

    2003-01-01

    Suicide attacks by terrorist organizations have become more prevalent globally, and assessing the threat of suicide attacks against the United States and its interests at home and abroad has therefore...

  11. Solidarity under Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meret, Susi; Goffredo, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/susi-meret-sergio-goffredo/solidarity-under-attack......https://www.opendemocracy.net/can-europe-make-it/susi-meret-sergio-goffredo/solidarity-under-attack...

  12. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ischemic Attack TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery for a short time. The only difference between a stroke ...

  13. Composite Dos Attack Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ramanauskaitė

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for potential threats is one of the most important phases ensuring system security. It allows evaluating possible losses, changes in the attack process, the effectiveness of used countermeasures, optimal system settings, etc. In cyber-attack cases, executing real experiments can be difficult for many reasons. However, mathematical or programming models can be used instead of conducting experiments in a real environment. This work proposes a composite denial of service attack model that combines bandwidth exhaustion, filtering and memory depletion models for a more real representation of similar cyber-attacks. On the basis of the introduced model, different experiments were done. They showed the main dependencies of the influence of attacker and victim’s properties on the success probability of denial of service attack. In the future, this model can be used for the denial of service attack or countermeasure optimization.

  14. Is the incidence of heart attack still decreasing in Australia? Developing reliable methods for monitoring trends in myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease (AUS-MOCHA): a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedkoff, Lee; Knuiman, Matthew; Hobbs, Michael S T; Hung, Joseph; Mathur, Sushma; Beilby, John; Reynolds, Anna; Briffa, Tom G; Lopez, Derrick; Sanfilippo, Frank M

    2016-08-24

    Accurate monitoring of acute coronary heart disease (CHD) is essential for understanding the effects of primary and secondary prevention and for planning of healthcare services. The ability to reliably monitor acute CHD has been affected by new diagnostic tests for myocardial infarction (MI) and changing clinical classifications and management of CHD. Our study will develop new and reliable methods for monitoring population trends in incidence, outcomes and health service usage for acute CHD and chest pain. The study cohort of all CHD will be identified from the Western Australian Data Linkage System using state-wide data sets for emergency department presentation, hospitalisations and mortality data for 2002-2014. This core linked data set will be supplemented with data from hospital medical record reviews, pathology data and hospital pharmacy dispensing databases. The consistency over time of the coding of the different subgroups of CHD/chest pain (ST-elevation MI, non-ST elevation MI, unstable angina, stable angina, other CHD, non-CHD chest pain) in linked data will be assessed using these data sources, and an algorithm developed detailing groups in which temporal trends can be reliably measured. This algorithm will be used for measurement of trends in incidence and outcomes of acute CHD, and to develop further methods for monitoring acute CHD using unlinked and linked data with varying availability of hospitalisation history. Ethics approval has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committees of the WA Department of Health (#2016/23) and The University of Western Australia (RA/4/1/7230). Findings will be disseminated via publication in peer-reviewed journals, and presentation at national and international conferences. There will also be a strong platform for dissemination of new monitoring methods via collaboration with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare which will assist with promotion of these methods at state and national levels

  15. Detecting Pulsing Denial-of-Service Attacks with Nondeterministic Attack Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiapu Luo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the important problem of detecting pulsing denial of service (PDoS attacks which send a sequence of attack pulses to reduce TCP throughput. Unlike previous works which focused on a restricted form of attacks, we consider a very broad class of attacks. In particular, our attack model admits any attack interval between two adjacent pulses, whether deterministic or not. It also includes the traditional flooding-based attacks as a limiting case (i.e., zero attack interval. Our main contribution is Vanguard, a new anomaly-based detection scheme for this class of PDoS attacks. The Vanguard detection is based on three traffic anomalies induced by the attacks, and it detects them using a CUSUM algorithm. We have prototyped Vanguard and evaluated it on a testbed. The experiment results show that Vanguard is more effective than the previous methods that are based on other traffic anomalies (after a transformation using wavelet transform, Fourier transform, and autocorrelation and detection algorithms (e.g., dynamic time warping.

  16. Detecting Pulsing Denial-of-Service Attacks with Nondeterministic Attack Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiapu; Chan, Edmond W. W.; Chang, Rocky K. C.

    2009-12-01

    This paper addresses the important problem of detecting pulsing denial of service (PDoS) attacks which send a sequence of attack pulses to reduce TCP throughput. Unlike previous works which focused on a restricted form of attacks, we consider a very broad class of attacks. In particular, our attack model admits any attack interval between two adjacent pulses, whether deterministic or not. It also includes the traditional flooding-based attacks as a limiting case (i.e., zero attack interval). Our main contribution is Vanguard, a new anomaly-based detection scheme for this class of PDoS attacks. The Vanguard detection is based on three traffic anomalies induced by the attacks, and it detects them using a CUSUM algorithm. We have prototyped Vanguard and evaluated it on a testbed. The experiment results show that Vanguard is more effective than the previous methods that are based on other traffic anomalies (after a transformation using wavelet transform, Fourier transform, and autocorrelation) and detection algorithms (e.g., dynamic time warping).

  17. Recurrent spontaneous attacks of dizziness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    This article describes the common causes of recurrent vertigo and dizziness that can be diagnosed largely on the basis of history. Ninety percent of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness can be explained by six disorders: (1) Ménière disease is characterized by vertigo attacks, lasting 20 minutes to several hours, with concomitant hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Aural symptoms become permanent during the course of the disease. (2) Attacks of vestibular migraine may last anywhere from minutes to days. Most patients have a previous history of migraine headaches, and many experience migraine symptoms during the attack. (3) Vertebrobasilar TIAs affect older adults with vascular risk factors. Most attacks last less than 1 hour and are accompanied by other symptoms from the posterior circulation territory. (4) Vestibular paroxysmia is caused by vascular compression of the eighth cranial nerve. It manifests itself with brief attacks of vertigo that recur many times per day, sometimes with concomitant cochlear symptoms. (5) Orthostatic hypotension causes brief episodes of dizziness lasting seconds to a few minutes after standing up and is relieved by sitting or lying down. In older adults, it may be accompanied by supine hypertension. (6) Panic attacks usually last minutes, occur in specific situations, and are accompanied by choking, palpitations, tremor, heat, and anxiety. Less common causes of spontaneous recurrent vertigo and dizziness include perilymph fistula, superior canal dehiscence, autoimmune inner ear disease, otosclerosis, cardiac arrhythmia, and medication side effects. Neurologists need to venture into otolaryngology, internal medicine, and psychiatry to master the differential diagnosis of recurrent dizziness.

  18. Kleptographic Attacks on ECDSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda Anatolievna Chepick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents secretly trapdoor with universal protection (SETUP attacks on the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm ECDSA. It allows a malicious manufacturer of black-box cryptosystems to implement these attacks to get access to user’s private key. The attacker can obtain user’s private key. The way ECDSA can be used for encryption and key exchange is also described.

  19. Seven deadliest USB attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting USB technology? Then you need Seven Deadliest USB Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to USB, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks detailed in this book include: USB Hacksaw USB Switchblade USB Based Virus/Malicous Code Launch USB Device Overflow RAMdum

  20. Acute Limb Ischemia and Outcomes With Vorapaxar in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease: Results From the Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA2°P-TIMI 50).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaca, Marc P; Gutierrez, J Antonio; Creager, Mark A; Scirica, Benjamin M; Olin, Jeffrey; Murphy, Sabina A; Braunwald, Eugene; Morrow, David A

    2016-03-08

    Patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) are at heightened risk of acute limb ischemia (ALI), a morbid event that may result in limb loss. We investigated the causes, sequelae, and predictors of ALI in a contemporary population with symptomatic PAD and whether protease-activated receptor 1 antagonism with vorapaxar reduced ALI overall and by type. The Trial to Assess the Effects of Vorapaxar in Preventing Heart Attack and Stroke in Patients With Atherosclerosis-Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction 50 (TRA2°P-TIMI 50) was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of vorapaxar in stable patients, including 3787 with symptomatic PAD. ALI was a prespecified adjudicated end point using a formal definition. A total of 150 ALI events occurred in 108 patients during follow-up (placebo 3-year rate, 3.9%; 1.3% annualized). For patients with symptomatic PAD, previous peripheral revascularization, smoking, and the ankle-brachial index were predictive of ALI. The majority of ALI events occurred as a result of surgical graft thrombosis (56%), followed by native vessel in situ thrombosis (27%). Stent thrombosis and thromboembolism caused ALI in 13% and 5%, respectively. Amputation occurred in 17.6% presenting with ALI. Vorapaxar reduced first ALI events by 41% (hazard ratio, 0.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.86; P=0.006) and total ALI events by 41% (94 versus 56 events; risk ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.93; P=0.022). The efficacy of vorapaxar was consistent across types of ALI. In selected patients with symptomatic PAD and without atrial fibrillation, ALI occurs at a rate of 1.3%/y, is most frequently caused by acute bypass graft thrombosis or in situ thrombosis of a diseased vessel, and often results in limb loss. Vorapaxar reduces ALI in patients with symptomatic PAD with consistency across type, including PAD resulting from surgical graft thrombosis and in-situ thrombosis. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00526474

  1. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  2. Plants under dual attack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponzio, C.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Though immobile, plants are members of complex environments, and are under constant threat from a wide range of attackers, which includes organisms such as insect herbivores or plant pathogens. Plants have developed sophisticated defenses against these attackers, and include chemical responses such

  3. Nocturnal panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Fabiana L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sleep disorders and the search for specific treatment.

  4. Transient Ischemic Attack

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TIA , or transient ischemic attack, is a "mini stroke" that occurs when a blood clot blocks an ... a short time. The only difference between a stroke and TIA is that with TIA the blockage ...

  5. Triple outlet right ventricle: a previously unknown cardiac malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingo, Jennifer E; Carroll, Sheila J; Crystal, Matthew A

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of an infant with three distinct outflow tracts from the right ventricle. Three outlets from the heart have been previously named the "Tritruncal Heart". We review the two previously reported cases of tritruncal hearts and describe the anatomy, diagnosis, surgical management, and outcome of our case. Embryologic implications are also discussed.

  6. Facial Dog Attack Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wei; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2013-01-01

    The exposed position of the face makes it vulnerable to dog bite injuries. This fact combined with the short stature of children makes them a high-risk group for such attacks. In contrast to wounds inflicted by assaults and accidents, dog bite wounds are deep puncture type wounds compounded by the presence of pathologic bacteria from the saliva of the attacking dog. This, combined with the presence of crushed, devitalized tissue makes these wounds highly susceptible to infection. Key to succe...

  7. Cyber Attacks, Information Attacks, and Postmodern Warfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valuch Jozef

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to evaluate and differentiate between the phenomena of cyberwarfare and information warfare, as manifestations of what we perceive as postmodern warfare. We describe and analyse the current examples of the use the postmodern warfare and the reactions of states and international bodies to these phenomena. The subject matter of this paper is the relationship between new types of postmodern conflicts and the law of armed conflicts (law of war. Based on ICJ case law, it is clear that under current legal rules of international law of war, cyber attacks as well as information attacks (often performed in the cyberspace as well can only be perceived as “war” if executed in addition to classical kinetic warfare, which is often not the case. In most cases perceived “only” as a non-linear warfare (postmodern conflict, this practice nevertheless must be condemned as conduct contrary to the principles of international law and (possibly a crime under national laws, unless this type of conduct will be recognized by the international community as a “war” proper, in its new, postmodern sense.

  8. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  9. Seven Deadliest Wireless Technologies Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Haines, Brad

    2010-01-01

    How can an information security professional keep up with all of the hacks, attacks, and exploits? One way to find out what the worst of the worst are is to read the seven books in our Seven Deadliest Attacks Series. Not only do we let you in on the anatomy of these attacks but we also tell you how to get rid of them and how to defend against them in the future. Countermeasures are detailed so that you can fight against similar attacks as they evolve. Attacks featured in this book include:Bluetooth AttacksCredit Card, Access Card, and Passport AttacksBad Encryption

  10. Shark attack in Natal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J A

    1975-02-01

    The injuries in 5 cases of shark attack in Natal during 1973-74 are reviewed. Experience in shark attacks in South Africa during this period is discussed (1965-73), and the value of protecting heavily utilized beaches in Natal with nets is assessed. The surgical applications of elasmobranch research at the Oceanographic Research Institute (Durban) and at the Headquarters of the Natal Anti-Shark Measures Board (Umhlanga Rocks) are described. Modern trends in the training of surf life-guards, the provision of basic equipment for primary resuscitation of casualties on the beaches, and the policy of general and local care of these patients in Natal are discussed.

  11. Transient ischemic attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society. Circulation . 2014;130(23):2071-2104. PMID: 24682348 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24682348 . Keman WN, Ovbiagele B, Black HR, et al. Guidelines for the prevention of ...

  12. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  13. Temporal Cyber Attack Detection.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, Joey Burton [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Draelos, Timothy J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Galiardi, Meghan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Doak, Justin E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Rigorous characterization of the performance and generalization ability of cyber defense systems is extremely difficult, making it hard to gauge uncertainty, and thus, confidence. This difficulty largely stems from a lack of labeled attack data that fully explores the potential adversarial space. Currently, performance of cyber defense systems is typically evaluated in a qualitative manner by manually inspecting the results of the system on live data and adjusting as needed. Additionally, machine learning has shown promise in deriving models that automatically learn indicators of compromise that are more robust than analyst-derived detectors. However, to generate these models, most algorithms require large amounts of labeled data (i.e., examples of attacks). Algorithms that do not require annotated data to derive models are similarly at a disadvantage, because labeled data is still necessary when evaluating performance. In this work, we explore the use of temporal generative models to learn cyber attack graph representations and automatically generate data for experimentation and evaluation. Training and evaluating cyber systems and machine learning models requires significant, annotated data, which is typically collected and labeled by hand for one-off experiments. Automatically generating such data helps derive/evaluate detection models and ensures reproducibility of results. Experimentally, we demonstrate the efficacy of generative sequence analysis techniques on learning the structure of attack graphs, based on a realistic example. These derived models can then be used to generate more data. Additionally, we provide a roadmap for future research efforts in this area.

  14. Fatal crocodile attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Shee, Biplab; Sukul, Biswajit

    2013-11-01

    Attacks on human beings by various animals leading to varied types of injuries and even death in some cases are not uncommon. Crocodile attacks on humans have been reported from a number of countries across the globe. Deaths in such attacks are mostly due to mechanical injuries or drowning. Bites by the crocodiles often cause the limbs to be separated from the body. The present case refers to an incident of a fatal attack by a crocodile on a 35 years old female where only the mutilated head of the female was recovered. Multiple lacerated wounds over the face and scalp along with fracture of the cranial bones was detected on autopsy. Two distinct bite marks in the form of punched in holes were noted over the parietal and frontal bones. Injuries on the head with its traumatic amputation from the body were sufficient to cause death. However, the presence of other fatal injuries on the unrecovered body parts could not be ruled out. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  15. Preliminary data from γ-cardiography during the abatement of an asthmatic attack (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georges, R.; Vernejoul, P. de; Raynaud, C.; Blanchon, P.; Kellershohn, C.; Turiaf, J.

    1961-01-01

    The authors used gamma cardiology during the abatement of 16 cases of asthma with a view to detecting heart attacks not otherwise visible with routine methods of examination: clinical, radiological and electro-cardio-graphical. In gamma cardiology, a radioactive indicator is used and its path followed in the cavities of the heart. The method makes it possible to study the circulation in the right heart, the pulmonary crossing, and the left heart, as well as evaluation of the heart-flow. As a result of their investigations the authors, after having discussed the significance of the data obtained with the method, suggest that it is possible by the use of gamma cardiography during the abatement of an asthma attack: 1- To confirm attacks of the right heart which have already been detected by ordinary methods. 2- To confirm the presence of modifications in the recorded curves which suggest, in the case of the left heart, possible attack; such on attack is also indicated, in a small number of cases, by electrocardiography curves. Some considerations are put forward by the authors concerning the physiopathology of attacks on the left heart. (authors) [fr

  16. Blocking of Brute Force Attack

    OpenAIRE

    M.Venkata Krishna Reddy

    2012-01-01

    A common threat Web developers face is a password-guessing attack known as a brute-force attack. A brute-force attack is an attempt to discover a password by systematically trying every possible combination of letters, numbers, and symbols until you discover the one correct combination that works. If your Web site requires user authentication, you are a good target for a brute-force attack. An attacker can always discover a password through a brute-force attack, but the downside is that it co...

  17. Bluetooth security attacks comparative analysis, attacks, and countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Haataja, Keijo; Pasanen, Sanna; Toivanen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    This overview of Bluetooth security examines network vulnerabilities and offers a comparative analysis of recent security attacks. It also examines related countermeasures and proposes a novel attack that works against all existing Bluetooth versions.

  18. Cyber-physical attacks: A growing invisible threat

    OpenAIRE

    Loukas, George

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Attacks: A Growing Invisible Threat presents the growing list of harmful uses of computers and their ability to disable cameras, turn off a building’s lights, make a car veer off the road, or a drone land in enemy hands. In essence, it details the ways cyber-physical attacks are replacing physical attacks in crime, warfare, and terrorism. The book explores how attacks using computers affect the physical world in ways that were previously only possible through physical means. Pe...

  19. Cyber-physical attacks a growing invisible threat

    CERN Document Server

    Loukas, George

    2015-01-01

    Cyber-Physical Attacks: A Growing Invisible Threat presents the growing list of harmful uses of computers and their ability to disable cameras, turn off a building's lights, make a car veer off the road,  or a drone land in enemy hands. In essence, it details the ways cyber-physical attacks are replacing physical attacks in crime, warfare, and terrorism. The book explores how attacks using computers affect the physical world in ways that were previously only possible through physical means. Perpetrators can now cause damage without the same risk, and without the political, social, or moral

  20. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regular exercise when you have heart disease is important. Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may ... exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you would like to do is safe for you. This is especially important if: You recently had a heart attack. You ...

  1. Healthy Heart Collaboration and Developed Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impact: EPA is raising awareness of heart disease and its link to air pollution and other environmental factors as a partner in Million Hearts, a national initiative to prevent heart attacks and strokes. The talk will provide an up to date review of the evidence linking air poll...

  2. Spreading of localized attacks in spatial multiplex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaknin, Dana; Danziger, Michael M.; Havlin, Shlomo

    2017-07-01

    Many real-world multilayer systems such as critical infrastructure are interdependent and embedded in space with links of a characteristic length. They are also vulnerable to localized attacks or failures, such as terrorist attacks or natural catastrophes, which affect all nodes within a given radius. Here we study the effects of localized attacks on spatial multiplex networks of two layers. We find a metastable region where a localized attack larger than a critical size induces a nucleation transition as a cascade of failures spreads throughout the system, leading to its collapse. We develop a theory to predict the critical attack size and find that it exhibits novel scaling behavior. We further find that localized attacks in these multiplex systems can induce a previously unobserved combination of random and spatial cascades. Our results demonstrate important vulnerabilities in real-world interdependent networks and show new theoretical features of spatial networks.

  3. Further attacks on Yeung-Mintzer fragile watermarking scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridrich, Jessica; Goljan, Miroslav; Memon, Nasir D.

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, we describe new and improved attacks on the authentication scheme previously proposed by Yeung and Mintzer. Previous attacks assumed that the binary watermark logo inserted in an image for the purposes of authentication was known. Here we remove that assumption and show how the scheme is still vulnerable, even if the binary logo is not known but the attacker has access to multiple images that have been watermarked with the same secret key and contain the same (but unknown) logo. We present two attacks. The first attack infers the secret watermark insertion function and the binary logo, given multiple images authenticated with the same key and containing the same logo. We show that a very good approximation to the logo and watermark insertion function can be constructed using as few as two images. With color images, one needs many more images, nevertheless the attack is still feasible. The second attack we present, which we call the 'collage-attack' is a variation of the Holliman-Memon counterfeiting attack. The proposed variation does not require knowledge of the watermark logo and produces counterfeits of superior quality by means of a suitable dithering process that we develop.

  4. Your Guide to Living Well with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trouble walking, dizziness, or loss of balance or coordination. ● A sudden, severe headache with no known cause. ... lifestyle changes and medications, still offer the best protection against heart attack and other complications of heart ...

  5. No discrimination against previous mates in a sexually cannibalistic spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhage, Lutz; Schneider, Jutta M.

    2005-09-01

    In several animal species, females discriminate against previous mates in subsequent mating decisions, increasing the potential for multiple paternity. In spiders, female choice may take the form of selective sexual cannibalism, which has been shown to bias paternity in favor of particular males. If cannibalistic attacks function to restrict a male's paternity, females may have little interest to remate with males having survived such an attack. We therefore studied the possibility of female discrimination against previous mates in sexually cannibalistic Argiope bruennichi, where females almost always attack their mate at the onset of copulation. We compared mating latency and copulation duration of males having experienced a previous copulation either with the same or with a different female, but found no evidence for discrimination against previous mates. However, males copulated significantly shorter when inserting into a used, compared to a previously unused, genital pore of the female.

  6. Attack Trees with Sequential Conjunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jhawar, Ravi; Kordy, Barbara; Mauw, Sjouke; Radomirović, Sasa; Trujillo-Rasua, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    We provide the first formal foundation of SAND attack trees which are a popular extension of the well-known attack trees. The SAND at- tack tree formalism increases the expressivity of attack trees by intro- ducing the sequential conjunctive operator SAND. This operator enables the modeling of

  7. Simulation of Attacks for Security in Wireless Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Alvaro; Sanchez, Pablo

    2016-11-18

    The increasing complexity and low-power constraints of current Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) require efficient methodologies for network simulation and embedded software performance analysis of nodes. In addition, security is also a very important feature that has to be addressed in most WSNs, since they may work with sensitive data and operate in hostile unattended environments. In this paper, a methodology for security analysis of Wireless Sensor Networks is presented. The methodology allows designing attack-aware embedded software/firmware or attack countermeasures to provide security in WSNs. The proposed methodology includes attacker modeling and attack simulation with performance analysis (node's software execution time and power consumption estimation). After an analysis of different WSN attack types, an attacker model is proposed. This model defines three different types of attackers that can emulate most WSN attacks. In addition, this paper presents a virtual platform that is able to model the node hardware, embedded software and basic wireless channel features. This virtual simulation analyzes the embedded software behavior and node power consumption while it takes into account the network deployment and topology. Additionally, this simulator integrates the previously mentioned attacker model. Thus, the impact of attacks on power consumption and software behavior/execution-time can be analyzed. This provides developers with essential information about the effects that one or multiple attacks could have on the network, helping them to develop more secure WSN systems. This WSN attack simulator is an essential element of the attack-aware embedded software development methodology that is also introduced in this work.

  8. Structural Learning of Attack Vectors for Generating Mutated XSS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hsun Wang

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Web applications suffer from cross-site scripting (XSS attacks that resulting from incomplete or incorrect input sanitization. Learning the structure of attack vectors could enrich the variety of manifestations in generated XSS attacks. In this study, we focus on generating more threatening XSS attacks for the state-of-the-art detection approaches that can find potential XSS vulnerabilities in Web applications, and propose a mechanism for structural learning of attack vectors with the aim of generating mutated XSS attacks in a fully automatic way. Mutated XSS attack generation depends on the analysis of attack vectors and the structural learning mechanism. For the kernel of the learning mechanism, we use a Hidden Markov model (HMM as the structure of the attack vector model to capture the implicit manner of the attack vector, and this manner is benefited from the syntax meanings that are labeled by the proposed tokenizing mechanism. Bayes theorem is used to determine the number of hidden states in the model for generalizing the structure model. The paper has the contributions as following: (1 automatically learn the structure of attack vectors from practical data analysis to modeling a structure model of attack vectors, (2 mimic the manners and the elements of attack vectors to extend the ability of testing tool for identifying XSS vulnerabilities, (3 be helpful to verify the flaws of blacklist sanitization procedures of Web applications. We evaluated the proposed mechanism by Burp Intruder with a dataset collected from public XSS archives. The results show that mutated XSS attack generation can identify potential vulnerabilities.

  9. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  10. Seven Deadliest Unified Communications Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    York, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting Unified Communications technology? Then you need Seven Deadliest Unified Communication Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to Unified Communications, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks featured in this book include: UC Ecosystem Attacks Insecure Endpo

  11. Adversarial Feature Selection Against Evasion Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Chan, Patrick P K; Biggio, Battista; Yeung, Daniel S; Roli, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition and machine learning techniques have been increasingly adopted in adversarial settings such as spam, intrusion, and malware detection, although their security against well-crafted attacks that aim to evade detection by manipulating data at test time has not yet been thoroughly assessed. While previous work has been mainly focused on devising adversary-aware classification algorithms to counter evasion attempts, only few authors have considered the impact of using reduced feature sets on classifier security against the same attacks. An interesting, preliminary result is that classifier security to evasion may be even worsened by the application of feature selection. In this paper, we provide a more detailed investigation of this aspect, shedding some light on the security properties of feature selection against evasion attacks. Inspired by previous work on adversary-aware classifiers, we propose a novel adversary-aware feature selection model that can improve classifier security against evasion attacks, by incorporating specific assumptions on the adversary's data manipulation strategy. We focus on an efficient, wrapper-based implementation of our approach, and experimentally validate its soundness on different application examples, including spam and malware detection.

  12. Improving Attack Graph Visualization through Data Reduction and Attack Grouping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Homer; Ashok Varikuti; Xinming Ou; Miles A. McQueen

    2008-09-01

    Various tools exist to analyze enterprise network systems and to produce attack graphs detailing how attackers might penetrate into the system. These attack graphs, however, are often complex and difficult to comprehend fully, and a human user may find it problematic to reach appropriate configuration decisions. This paper presents methodologies that can 1) automatically identify portions of an attack graph that do not help a user to understand the core security problems and so can be trimmed, and 2) automatically group similar attack steps as virtual nodes in a model of the network topology, to immediately increase the understandability of the data. We believe both methods are important steps toward improving visualization of attack graphs to make them more useful in configuration management for large enterprise networks. We implemented our methods using one of the existing attack-graph toolkits. Initial experimentation shows that the proposed approaches can 1) significantly reduce the complexity of attack graphs by trimming a large portion of the graph that is not needed for a user to understand the security problem, and 2) significantly increase the accessibility and understandability of the data presented in the attack graph by clearly showing, within a generated visualization of the network topology, the number and type of potential attacks to which each host is exposed.

  13. Attacks on computer systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan V. Vuletić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer systems are a critical component of the human society in the 21st century. Economic sector, defense, security, energy, telecommunications, industrial production, finance and other vital infrastructure depend on computer systems that operate at local, national or global scales. A particular problem is that, due to the rapid development of ICT and the unstoppable growth of its application in all spheres of the human society, their vulnerability and exposure to very serious potential dangers increase. This paper analyzes some typical attacks on computer systems.

  14. Pulse pressure as a haemodynamic variable in systolic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrie, Colin James

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to satisfy the requirements of the body. Explanations for this include heart muscle damage after a heart attack. This could be very recently, or in the past, sometimes dating back many years. In other cases the explanation for

  15. Recent "phishing" attacks

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2009-01-01

    Over the last few weeks there has been a marked increase in the number of attacks on CERN made by cybercriminals. Typical attacks arrive in the form of e-mail messages purporting to come from the CERN Help Desk, Mail Service, or some similarly official-sounding entity and suggest that there is a problem with your account, such as it being over-quota. They then ask you to click on a link or to reply and give your password. Please don’t! Be cautious of any unexpected messages containing web links even if they appear to come from known contacts. If you happen to click on such a link and if your permission is requested to run or install software, always decline it. NEVER provide your password or other details if these are requested. These messages try to trick you into clicking on Web links which will help them to install malicious software on your computer, and anti-virus software cannot be relied on to detect all cases. In case of questions on this topic, you may contact mailto:helpdesk@cern.ch. CERN Comput...

  16. [Group therapy. Rehabilitation of heart and hemiplegic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, A

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, ideas and methods for working in group psychoterapy with hemiplegics and post-heart-attack patients in a general hospital in Mexico City are outlined. With hemiplegics support therapy is used and with heart-attack-patients, learning therapy. Both groups meet once a week.

  17. Rehab for the Heart (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-08-24

    Each year, nearly 790,000 adults in the U.S. suffer a heart attack. This podcast discusses the importance of getting cardiac rehab after a heart attack.  Created: 8/24/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 8/24/2017.

  18. Flu and Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease includes but is not limited to coronary artery disease [heart attack or myocardial infarction, acute coronary ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  19. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  20. Myocardial adaption to HI(RT in previously untrained men with a randomized, longitudinal cardiac MR imaging study (Physical adaptions in Untrained on Strength and Heart trial, PUSH-trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Scharf

    Full Text Available Although musculoskeletal effects in resistance training are well described, little is known about structural and functional cardiac adaption in formerly untrained subjects. We prospectively evaluated whether short term high intensity (resistance training (HI(RT induces detectable morphologic cardiac changes in previously untrained men in a randomized controlled magnetic resonance imaging (MRI study.80 untrained middle-aged men were randomly assigned to a HI(RT-group (n = 40; 43.5±5.9 years or an inactive control group (n = 40; 42.0±6.3 years. HI(RT comprised 22 weeks of training focusing on a single-set to failure protocol in 2-3 sessions/week, each with 10-13 exercises addressing main muscle groups. Repetitions were decreased from 8-10 to 3-5 during study period. Before and after HI(RT all subjects underwent physiologic examination and cardiac MRI (cine imaging, tagging.Indexed left (LV and right ventricular (RV volume (LV: 76.8±15.6 to 78.7±14.8 ml/m2; RV: 77.0±15.5 to 78.7±15.1 ml/m2 and mass (LV: 55.5±9.7 to 57.0±8.8 g/m2; RV: 14.6±3.0 to 15.0±2.9 g/m2 significantly increased with HI(RT (all p<0.001. Mean LV and RV remodeling indices of HI(RT-group did not alter with training (0.73g/mL and 0.19g/mL, respectively [p = 0.96 and p = 0.87], indicating balanced cardiac adaption. Indexed LV (48.4±11.1 to 50.8±11.0 ml/m2 and RV (48.5±11.0 to 50.6±10.7 ml/m2 stroke volume significantly increased with HI(RT (p<0.001. Myocardial strain and strain rates did not change following resistance exercise. Left atrial volume at end systole slightly increased after HI(RT (36.2±7.9 to 37.0±8.4 ml/m2, p = 0.411, the ratio to end-diastolic LV volume at baseline and post-training was unchanged (0.47 vs. 0.47, p = 0.79.22 weeks of HI(RT lead to measurable, physiological changes in cardiac atrial and ventricular morphologic characteristics and function in previously untrained men.The PUSH-trial is registered at the US National Institutes of Health

  1. Cyber Attacks and Combat Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carataș Maria Alina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyber terrorism is an intangible danger, a real over the corner threat in the life of individuals,organizations, and governments and is getting harder to deal with its damages. The motivations forthe cyber-attacks are different, depending on the terrorist group, from cybercrime to hacktivism,attacks over the authorities’ servers. Organizations constantly need to find new ways ofstrengthening protection against cyber-attacks, assess their cyber readiness, expand the resiliencecapacity and adopts international security regulations.

  2. Attacks on RFID Identification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Mikhaylov

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is about attacks on RFID systems. Currently antivirus developers are not developing systems that protect from viruses that could exist on RFID tags. Such viruses are considered as not existing because the RFID tag memory is very small. Unfortunately such viruses exist. This article is concerned to such viruses and attacks that hackers could do using such viruses. Based on this article methods to prevent RFID-viruses attacks could be developed.

  3. DDoS Attack Detection Algorithms Based on Entropy Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liying; Zhou, Jianying; Xiao, Ning

    Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack poses a severe threat to the Internet. It is difficult to find the exact signature of attacking. Moreover, it is hard to distinguish the difference of an unusual high volume of traffic which is caused by the attack or occurs when a huge number of users occasionally access the target machine at the same time. The entropy detection method is an effective method to detect the DDoS attack. It is mainly used to calculate the distribution randomness of some attributes in the network packets' headers. In this paper, we focus on the detection technology of DDoS attack. We improve the previous entropy detection algorithm, and propose two enhanced detection methods based on cumulative entropy and time, respectively. Experiment results show that these methods could lead to more accurate and effective DDoS detection.

  4. Pre-attack signs and symptoms in cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Agneta; Lund, Nunu; Beske, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to the premonitory phase of migraine, little is known about the pre-attack (prodromal) phase of a cluster headache. We aimed to describe the nature, prevalence, and duration of pre-attack symptoms in cluster headache. Methods Eighty patients with episodic cluster headache...... or chronic cluster headache, according to ICHD-3 beta criteria, were invited to participate. In this observational study, patients underwent a semi-structured interview where they were asked about the presence of 31 symptoms/signs in relation to a typical cluster headache attack. Symptoms included previously...... reported cluster headache pre-attack symptoms, premonitory migraine symptoms and accompanying symptoms of migraine and cluster headache. Results Pre-attack symptoms were reported by 83.3% of patients, with an average of 4.25 (SD 3.9) per patient. Local and painful symptoms, occurring with a median of 10...

  5. Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Timm, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting social networks? Then you need Seven Deadliest Social Network Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to social networks like Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. Attacks detailed in this book include: Social Networking Infrastruct

  6. Seven Deadliest Web Application Attacks

    CERN Document Server

    Shema, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Do you need to keep up with the latest hacks, attacks, and exploits effecting web applications? Then you need Seven Deadliest Web Application Attacks. This book pinpoints the most dangerous hacks and exploits specific to web applications, laying out the anatomy of these attacks including how to make your system more secure. You will discover the best ways to defend against these vicious hacks with step-by-step instruction and learn techniques to make your computer and network impenetrable. .. .. Attacks detailed in this book include: ..: ..; Cross-Site Scripting (XSS) ..; Cross-Site Request Fo

  7. The Timing of Terrorist Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    I use a simple optimal stopping model to derive policy relevant insights on the timing of one-shot attacks by small autonomous terrorist units or “lone wolf” individuals. A main insight is that an increase in proactive counterterrorism measures can lead to a short term increase in the number...... of attempted terrorist attacks because it makes it more risky for existing terrorist units to pursue further development of capabilities. This is consistent with the events in London in 2005 where a terrorist attack on 7 July was followed by a similar but unsuccessful attack two weeks later....

  8. Global Mapping of Cyber Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Identifying factors behind countries weakness to cyber - attacks is an important step towards addressing these weaknesses at the root level. For...the lowest rates of cyber - attacks . This is surprising given the bad cyber reputation of some African countries such as Nigeria. Our research has many policy implications.

  9. Superposition Attacks on Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Funder, Jakob Løvstad; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2011-01-01

    string model. While our protocol is classical, it is sound against a cheating unbounded quantum prover and computational zero-knowledge even if the verifier is allowed a superposition attack. Finally, we consider multiparty computation and show that for the most general type of attack, simulation based...

  10. Multiculturalism & The Charlie Hebdo Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2016-01-01

    The attack on Charlie Hebdo has by many been linked to multiculturalism. But it is unclear exactly how the connection between multiculturalism and the attack should be understood and whether there indeed is such a connection. The article discusses this by distinguishing between different senses o...

  11. Automated Generation of Attack Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2014-01-01

    -prone and impracticable for large systems. Nonetheless, the automated generation of attack trees has only been explored in connection to computer networks and levering rich models, whose analysis typically leads to an exponential blow-up of the state space. We propose a static analysis approach where attack trees...

  12. CHA2DS2-VASc Score (Congestive Heart Failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 [Doubled], Diabetes Mellitus, Prior Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack [Doubled], Vascular Disease, Age 65-74, Female) for Stroke in Asian Patients With Atrial Fibrillation: A Korean Nationwide Sample Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Hoon; Yang, Pil-Sung; Uhm, Jae-Sun; Kim, Jong-Youn; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Joung, Boyoung; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-06-01

    The CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc stroke score (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age ≥75 (doubled), diabetes mellitus, prior stroke or transient ischemic attack (doubled), vascular disease, age 65-74, female) is used in most guidelines for risk stratification in atrial fibrillation (AF), but most data for this score have been derived in Western populations. Ethnic differences in stroke risk may be present. Our objective was to investigate risk factors for stroke in AF and application of the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score in an Asian AF population from Korea. A total of 5855 oral anticoagulant-naive nonvalvular AF patients aged ≥20 years were enrolled from Korea National Health Insurance Service Sample cohort from 2002 to 2008 and were followed up until December 2013. The incidence rates (per 100 person-years) of ischemic stroke were 3.32 in the total population, being 0.23 in low-risk (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score 0 [male] or 1 [female]) and 4.59 in high-risk patients (CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc ≥2). Incidence rates of ischemic stroke or the composite thromboembolism end point showed a clear increase with increasing CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc score. On multivariable analysis, significant associations between CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc risk factors and ischemic stroke were observed; however, the significance of vascular disease or diabetes mellitus was attenuated after multivariate adjustment, and female sex (hazard ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.84) had a lower risk of ischemic stroke than males. Patients who were categorized as low risk consistently had an event rate Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Exploring Windows Domain-Level Defenses Against Authentication Attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Jeff A. {Cyber Sciences} [ORNL; Curtis, Laura [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the security resilience of the current Windows Active Directory (AD) environments to Pass-the-Hash and Pass- the-Ticket credential theft attacks. While doing this, we discovered a way to trigger the removal of all previously issued authentication credentials for a client, thus preventing their use by attackers. After triggered, the user is forced to contact the domain administrators and to authenticate to the AD to continue. This could become the basis for a response that arrests the spread of a detected attack. Operating in a virtualized XenServer environment, we were able to carefully determine and recreate the conditions necessary to cause this response.

  14. WILD PIG ATTACKS ON HUMANS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J.

    2013-04-12

    Attacks on humans by wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been documented since ancient times. However, studies characterizing these incidents are lacking. In an effort to better understand this phenomenon, information was collected from 412 wild pig attacks on humans. Similar to studies of large predator attacks on humans, data came from a variety of sources. The various attacks compiled occurred in seven zoogeographic realms. Most attacks occurred within the species native range, and specifically in rural areas. The occurrence was highest during the winter months and daylight hours. Most happened under non-hunting circumstances and appeared to be unprovoked. Wounded animals were the chief cause of these attacks in hunting situations. The animals involved were typically solitary, male and large in size. The fate of the wild pigs involved in these attacks varied depending upon the circumstances, however, most escaped uninjured. Most human victims were adult males traveling on foot and alone. The most frequent outcome for these victims was physical contact/mauling. The severity of resulting injuries ranged from minor to fatal. Most of the mauled victims had injuries to only one part of their bodies, with legs/feet being the most frequent body part injured. Injuries were primarily in the form of lacerations and punctures. Fatalities were typically due to blood loss. In some cases, serious infections or toxemia resulted from the injuries. Other species (i.e., pets and livestock) were also accompanying some of the humans during these attacks. The fates of these animals varied from escaping uninjured to being killed. Frequency data on both non-hunting and hunting incidents of wild pig attacks on humans at the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, showed quantitatively that such incidents are rare.

  15. Shark Attack Project - Marine Attack at Towed Hydrophone Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalmijn, Adrianus J

    2005-01-01

    The original objective of the SIO Marine Attack project was to identify the electric and magnetic fields causing sharks to inflict serious damage upon the towed hydrophone arrays of US Navy submarines...

  16. The Cyber-Physical Attacker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    the security properties of CPSs, as a system cannot be secured without defining the threats it is subject to. In this work an attacker scenario is presented which addresses the peculiarities of a cyber-physical adversary, and we discuss how this scenario relates to other attacker models popular in the security......The world of Cyber-Physical Systems ranges from industrial to national interest applications. Even though these systems are pervading our everyday life, we are still far from fully understanding their security properties. Devising a suitable attacker model is a crucial element when studying...

  17. Gas in Attack and Gas in Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fries, Amos A

    1919-01-01

    Carrying out a gas attack is the most technical and dangerous of war's attacks, not only to those on board the airplane that is initiating the attack, but also to those friendly troops on the ground for miles around...

  18. Neuroradiological study of transient ischemic attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takusagawa, Yoshihiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Ichiki, Ken; Suga, Takeshi; Nishigaki, Shinichi

    1986-01-01

    Fifty-two patients with carotid TIAs and thirteen patients with vertebrobasilar TIAs were investigated by angiography and computed tomography. TIA was diagnosed by clinical symptoms in accordance with the criteria for TIA of the Joint Committee for Stroke Facilities in the U.S.A. (1974). The 65 patients with TIAs included 49 males and 16 females with average age of 63.5 years old at the initial episode of TIA. As for the diseases associated with TIA, hypertension (51 %), diabetes mellitus (15 %) and ischemic heart diseases (11 %) were the major disorders. Atrial fibrillation was observed in 2 cases. Intervals from last TIA attack to angiography were less than 7 days in 22 cases, 8 ∼ 30 days in 19 cases, 1 ∼ 4 monthes in 14 cases and more than 4 monthes in 10 cases, respectively. The cases in which angiography was done earlier after attacks displayed more abnormal findings. In 52 patients with caroted TIAs the artherosclerotic change of extracranial portion of the internal carotid artery was found in 14 cases (27 %), that of intracranial portion of the artery in 11 cases (21 %) and both lesions in 2 cases (4 %). On the other hand, in 13 patients with vertebrobasilar TIAs, this change was observed in 4 cases at the extracranival potion and in 1 case at the intracranial potion (siphon) of the internal carotid artery. Abnormal CT findings were found in 29 of 65 patients, namely 9 had ventricular dilatation and brain atrophy, 6 had cerebral infarction which was not associated with associated with symptoms of TIA. In carotid TIAs, Cerebral infarction was associated with symptoms of TIAs in 15 cases, namely 10 had a small low density area in the basal ganglia near the internal capsule and 5 had a low density area in the cortical or subcortical region. All of these 5 cases had cerebral embolism, which recanalized after attacks. (J.P.N.)

  19. Forensics Investigation of Web Application Security Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Amor Lazzez; Thabet Slimani

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, web applications are popular targets for security attackers. Using specific security mechanisms, we can prevent or detect a security attack on a web application, but we cannot find out the criminal who has carried out the security attack. Being unable to trace back an attack, encourages hackers to launch new attacks on the same system. Web application forensics aims to trace back and attribute a web application security attack to its originator. This may significantly reduce the sec...

  20. Genetic attack on neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-03-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size.

  1. Genetic attack on neural cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Naeh, Rivka; Kanter, Ido

    2006-01-01

    Different scaling properties for the complexity of bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning are essential for the security of neural cryptography. Incrementing the synaptic depth of the networks increases the synchronization time only polynomially, but the success of the geometric attack is reduced exponentially and it clearly fails in the limit of infinite synaptic depth. This method is improved by adding a genetic algorithm, which selects the fittest neural networks. The probability of a successful genetic attack is calculated for different model parameters using numerical simulations. The results show that scaling laws observed in the case of other attacks hold for the improved algorithm, too. The number of networks needed for an effective attack grows exponentially with increasing synaptic depth. In addition, finite-size effects caused by Hebbian and anti-Hebbian learning are analyzed. These learning rules converge to the random walk rule if the synaptic depth is small compared to the square root of the system size

  2. Panic Attacks and Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in panic attacks. For example, if a grizzly bear came after you, your body would react instinctively. ... panic disorder Major life stress, such as the death or serious illness of a loved one A ...

  3. Quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yao; Gao, Ming; Li, Mo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    With the advent of physical unclonable functions (PUFs), PUF-based quantum authentication systems have been proposed for security purposes, and recently, proof-of-principle experiment has been demonstrated. As a further step toward completing the security analysis, we investigate quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems and prove that quantum cloning attacks outperform the so-called challenge-estimation attacks. We present the analytical expression of the false-accept probability by use of the corresponding optimal quantum cloning machines and extend the previous results in the literature. In light of these findings, an explicit comparison is made between PUF-based quantum authentication systems and quantum key distribution protocols in the context of cloning attacks. Moreover, from an experimental perspective, a trade-off between the average photon number and the detection efficiency is discussed in detail.

  4. Understanding the Heart's Electrical System and EKG Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that attack and damage the body's tissues or cells. In pregnant women, antibodies can cross the placenta. (The placenta is the organ that attaches the umbilical cord to the mother's womb.) These proteins can damage the baby's heart and lead to congenital heart block. Congenital heart ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs-Heart Age

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This podcast is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  6. Development and Validation of a Model to Predict Absolute Vascular Risk Reduction by Moderate-Intensity Statin Therapy in Individual Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial, Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial, and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaasenbrood, Lotte; Poulter, Neil R; Sever, Peter S; Colhoun, Helen M; Livingstone, Shona J; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Pressel, Sara L; Davis, Barry R; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Visseren, Frank L J

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to translate the average relative effect of statin therapy from trial data to the individual patient with type 2 diabetes mellitus by developing and validating a model to predict individualized absolute risk reductions (ARR) of cardiovascular events. Data of 2725 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Lipid Lowering Arm of the Anglo Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT-LLA) study (atorvastatin 10 mg versus placebo) were used for model derivation. The model was based on 8 clinical predictors including treatment allocation (statin/placebo). Ten-year individualized ARR on major cardiovascular events by statin therapy were calculated for each patient by subtracting the estimated on-treatment risk from the estimated off-treatment risk. Predicted 10-year ARR by statin therapy was 4% (median ARR, 3.2%; interquartile range, 2.5%-4.3%; 95% confidence interval for 3.2% ARR, -1.4% to 6.8%). Addition of treatment interactions did not improve model performance. Therefore, the wide distribution in ARR was a consequence of the underlying distribution in cardiovascular risk enrolled in these trials. External validation of the model was performed in data from the Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT-LLT; pravastatin 40 mg versus usual care) and Collaborative Atorvastatin Diabetes Study (CARDS; atorvastatin 10 mg versus placebo) of 3878 and 2838 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, respectively. Model calibration was adequate in both external data sets, discrimination was moderate (ALLHAT-LLT: c-statistics, 0.64 [95% confidence interval, 0.61-0.67] and CARDS: 0.68 [95% confidence interval, 0.64-0.72]). ARRs of major cardiovascular events by statin therapy can be accurately estimated for individual patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus using a model based on routinely available patient characteristics. There is a wide distribution in ARR that may complement informed decision making. URL: http

  7. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  8. Analytical Characterization of Internet Security Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellke, Sarah H.

    2010-01-01

    Internet security attacks have drawn significant attention due to their enormously adverse impact. These attacks includes Malware (Viruses, Worms, Trojan Horse), Denial of Service, Packet Sniffer, and Password Attacks. There is an increasing need to provide adequate defense mechanisms against these attacks. My thesis proposal deals with analytical…

  9. Rivaroxaban compared with warfarin in patients with atrial fibrillation and previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hankey, Graeme J; Patel, Manesh R; Stevens, Susanna R

    2012-01-01

    In ROCKET AF, rivaroxaban was non-inferior to adjusted-dose warfarin in preventing stroke or systemic embolism among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to investigate whether the efficacy and safety of rivaroxaban compared with warfarin is consistent among the subgroups of patients ...

  10. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kilometers), which is far enough to circle the earth more than twice! See also on other sites: ... For the Public Heart Information Center Project Heart Women’s Heart Health Clinical Trials 6770 Bertner Avenue Houston, ...

  11. [A heart attack: was the patient lucky or unlucky?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Hartman, T.C.; van Ravesteijn, H.; Lucassen, P.L.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    CIRCUMSTANCES WERE FAVOURABLE BUT OUTCOME ILL-FATED: The assessment of signs and symptoms in primary care is an important but difficult task for general practitioners (GPs) who have to decide whether symptoms require immediate action or rather a watchful waiting approach. However, the GP may

  12. Heartburn or Chest Pain: When Is It Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness The most ...

  13. When You Visit Your Doctor After a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... today's hectic lifestyles, most of us end up eating out at least once a week. Get the latest news on health and wellness delivered to your inbox ! Men's Health Inside Men's Health: Erectile Dysfunction Exercise & Fitness Healthy Eating Men's Sexual Health Prostate Cancer Prostate Health & Disease ...

  14. Drug-Eluting Stents: Do They Increase Heart Attack Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intervention, or PCI). Drug-eluting stents have a polymer coating over mesh that emits a drug over ... Advisory Panel meeting on the Absorb Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System. JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. 2016;9:1757. FDA ...

  15. Predicting asymptomatic coronary artery disease in patients with ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack: the PRECORIS score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, David; Song, Dongbeom; Yoo, Joonsang; Turc, Guillaume; Sablayrolles, Jean-Louis; Choi, Byoung Wook; Heo, Ji Hoe; Mas, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Identifying occult coronary artery stenosis may improve secondary prevention of stroke patients. The aim of this study was to derive and validate a simple score to predict severe occult coronary artery stenosis in stroke patients. We derived a score from a French hospital-based cohort of consecutive patients (n=300) who had an ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack and no previous history of coronary heart disease (Predicting Asymptomatic Coronary Artery Disease in Patients With Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack [PRECORIS] score) and validated the score in a similar Korean cohort (n=1602). In both cohorts, severe coronary artery stenosis was defined by the presence of at least 1≥50% coronary artery stenosis as detected by 64-section CT coronary angiography. A 5-point score (Framingham Risk Score-predicted 10-year coronary heart disease risk [≥20%=3; 10-19%=1; disease or 3-vessel disease were considered (C-statistic=0.83 [0.74-0.92] and 0.70 [0.66-0.74] in derivation and validation cohorts, respectively). The prevalence of occult≥50% coronary artery stenosis and ≥50% left main trunk or 3-vessel disease increased gradually with the PRECORIS score, reaching 44.2% and 13.5% in derivation cohort and 49.8% and 12.8% in validation cohort in patients with a PRECORIS score≥4. The PRECORIS score can identify a population of stroke or transient ischemic attack patients with a high prevalence of occult severe coronary artery stenosis.

  16. [Functional heart pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabhorn, Ralph; Jordan, Jochen

    2004-09-01

    Functional heart symptoms, especially chest pain, are very widespread and, according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), are described as "somatoform autonomous functional disorders of the cardiovascular system". Although they are very often accompanied by considerable anxiety about having a heart attack, for example, they are initially not recognizable as such and have to be distinguished from somatic complaints. The most prevalent of these symptoms (Table 2) are chest pains, followed by feelings of weakness, a tendency to become easily fatigued and breathing difficulties. The perception of changes in cardiac activity, such as tachycardia, heart palpitations, irregular heartbeat or arrhythmias, is also extremely unsettling and thus anxiety-provoking. Therefore, although a responsible cardiac diagnosis is the basis for every further step taken, it is advisable to carry out a brief anamnesis immediately, if possible, to determine the prior history (Table 1). For example, previously conducted clarification of somatic causes, consultations with more than one physician in parallel or repeated medical emergency calls can be helpful for orientation. Moreover, in the interview during the diagnostic measures, the possibility of functional causes should always be pointed out in order to counteract a somatic fixation early on. The health-care policy role that lies in early diagnosis of functional cardiac complaints has to be regarded as highly relevant. Following exclusionary diagnosis, the patients should not be discharged as "healthy" from the cardiological practice without a more in-depth anamnesis of their complaints, because differentiated questioning of the patient not only about typical physical and psychic symptoms, but also about behavior patterns (Table 3) that can accompany functional cardiac complaints, works in favor of a doctor-patient relationship that is based on trust. Since, in addition to anxiety disorders, above all depressive states

  17. Detection of complex cyber attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorio-de Souza, Ian; Berk, Vincent H.; Giani, Annarita; Bakos, George; Bates, Marion; Cybenko, George; Madory, Doug

    2006-05-01

    One significant drawback to currently available security products is their inabilty to correlate diverse sensor input. For instance, by only using network intrusion detection data, a root kit installed through a weak username-password combination may go unnoticed. Similarly, an administrator may never make the link between deteriorating response times from the database server and an attacker exfiltrating trusted data, if these facts aren't presented together. Current Security Information Management Systems (SIMS) can collect and represent diverse data but lack sufficient correlation algorithms. By using a Process Query System, we were able to quickly bring together data flowing from many sources, including NIDS, HIDS, server logs, CPU load and memory usage, etc. We constructed PQS models that describe dynamic behavior of complicated attacks and failures, allowing us to detect and differentiate simultaneous sophisticated attacks on a target network. In this paper, we discuss the benefits of implementing such a multistage cyber attack detection system using PQS. We focus on how data from multiple sources can be combined and used to detect and track comprehensive network security events that go unnoticed using conventional tools.

  18. Mitigating Higher Ed Cyber Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Gary; Ashford, Tina

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation we will discuss the many and varied cyber attacks that have recently occurred in the higher ed community. We will discuss the perpetrators, the victims, the impact and how these institutions have evolved to meet this threat. Mitigation techniques and defense strategies will be covered as will a discussion of effective security…

  19. From control system security indices to attack identifiability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herdeiro Teixeira, A.M.; Sandberg, H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate detectability and identifiability of attacks on linear dynamical systems that are subjected to external disturbances. We generalize a concept for a security index, which was previously introduced for static systems. The index exactly quantifies the resources

  20. [The hospital care of victims of terrorist attacks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhaddou, Assena; Nion, Nathalie; Riou, Bruno; Blandeau, Fanny; Moreau, Pilar; Guemache, Sofia

    2017-04-01

    The treatment of victims of terrorist attacks in a trauma centre requires the putting in place of plans, training and simulation exercises. Previous experiences have highlighted the areas which require improvement. As exceptional health situations are unpredictable, it is essential to always be vigilant and prepared for an unforeseen event. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Terrorist attacks escalate in frequency and fatalities preceding highly lethal attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Andy; Sainudiin, Raazesh; Sibley, Chris G; Schimel, Jeff; Webber, David

    2014-01-01

    Highly lethal terrorist attacks, which we define as those killing 21 or more people, account for 50% of the total number of people killed in all terrorist attacks combined, yet comprise only 3.5% of terrorist attacks. Given the disproportionate influence of these incidents, uncovering systematic patterns in attacks that precede and anticipate these highly lethal attacks may be of value for understanding attacks that exact a heavy toll on life. Here we examined whether the activity of terrorist groups escalates--both in the number of people killed per attack and in the frequency of attacks--leading up to highly lethal attacks. Analyses of terrorist attacks drawn from a state-of-the-art international terrorism database (The Global Terrorism Database) showed evidence for both types of escalation leading up to highly lethal attacks, though complexities to the patterns emerged as well. These patterns of escalation do not emerge among terrorist groups that never commit a highly lethal attack.

  2. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  3. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  4. Rehab for the Heart (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-08-24

    Each year, nearly 790,000 adults in the U.S. suffer a heart attack. For a third of these, it’s not their first. Cardiac rehabilitation could have prevented many of these. In this podcast, Dr. Fleetwood Loustalot discusses the importance of getting cardiac rehab after a heart attack.  Created: 8/24/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 8/24/2017.

  5. A computer network attack taxonomy and ontology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, RP

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available taxonomy and ontology RP van Heerden1,2, B Irwin2, ID Burke1, L Leenen1 1CSIR, Pretoria, South Africa 2Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa Keywords/ Key Phrases: Network Attack, Network Attack Classification, Taxonomy, Ontology, Attack... Scenario rvheerden@csir.co.za b.irwin@ru.ac.za iburke@csir.co.za lleenen@csir.co.za Abstract: Computer network attacks differ in the motivation of the entity behind the attack, the execution and the end result. The diversity of attacks has a...

  6. Transient complete atrioventricular block with Morgagni—Adams—Stokes attacks in a child after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Sabirova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of life-threatening arrhythmias after surgical correction of congenital heart diseases is one the urgent problems in pediatrlc cardiology. The paper describes the clinical picture, diagnosis, and therapy in a patent with transient complete atrioventricular block after open heart surgery. A protracted Morgagni—Adams—Stokes attack is one of the causes of sudden cardiac death. The occurrence of even single syncopes in patients after surgery for congenital heart disease requires that the arrhythmogenic nature of the attack should be ruled out for the timely and adequate therapy including the implantation of antiarrhythmic devices.

  7. Shilling Attacks Detection in Recommender Systems Based on Target Item Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wen, Junhao; Koh, Yun Sing; Xiong, Qingyu; Gao, Min; Dobbie, Gillian; Alam, Shafiq

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are highly vulnerable to shilling attacks, both by individuals and groups. Attackers who introduce biased ratings in order to affect recommendations, have been shown to negatively affect collaborative filtering (CF) algorithms. Previous research focuses only on the differences between genuine profiles and attack profiles, ignoring the group characteristics in attack profiles. In this paper, we study the use of statistical metrics to detect rating patterns of attackers and group characteristics in attack profiles. Another question is that most existing detecting methods are model specific. Two metrics, Rating Deviation from Mean Agreement (RDMA) and Degree of Similarity with Top Neighbors (DegSim), are used for analyzing rating patterns between malicious profiles and genuine profiles in attack models. Building upon this, we also propose and evaluate a detection structure called RD-TIA for detecting shilling attacks in recommender systems using a statistical approach. In order to detect more complicated attack models, we propose a novel metric called DegSim' based on DegSim. The experimental results show that our detection model based on target item analysis is an effective approach for detecting shilling attacks.

  8. Shilling Attacks Detection in Recommender Systems Based on Target Item Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wen, Junhao; Koh, Yun Sing; Xiong, Qingyu; Gao, Min; Dobbie, Gillian; Alam, Shafiq

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are highly vulnerable to shilling attacks, both by individuals and groups. Attackers who introduce biased ratings in order to affect recommendations, have been shown to negatively affect collaborative filtering (CF) algorithms. Previous research focuses only on the differences between genuine profiles and attack profiles, ignoring the group characteristics in attack profiles. In this paper, we study the use of statistical metrics to detect rating patterns of attackers and group characteristics in attack profiles. Another question is that most existing detecting methods are model specific. Two metrics, Rating Deviation from Mean Agreement (RDMA) and Degree of Similarity with Top Neighbors (DegSim), are used for analyzing rating patterns between malicious profiles and genuine profiles in attack models. Building upon this, we also propose and evaluate a detection structure called RD-TIA for detecting shilling attacks in recommender systems using a statistical approach. In order to detect more complicated attack models, we propose a novel metric called DegSim’ based on DegSim. The experimental results show that our detection model based on target item analysis is an effective approach for detecting shilling attacks. PMID:26222882

  9. Protecting Cryptographic Memory against Tampering Attack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukherjee, Pratyay

    . In practice such attacks can be executed easily, e.g. by heating the device, as substantiated by numerous works in the past decade. Tampering attacks are a class of such physical attacks where the attacker can change the memory/computation, gains additional (non-black-box) knowledge by interacting...... with the faulty device and then tries to break the security. Prior works show that generically approaching such problem is notoriously difficult. So, in this dissertation we attempt to solve an easier question, known as memory-tampering, where the attacker is allowed tamper only with the memory of the device......In this dissertation we investigate the question of protecting cryptographic devices from tampering attacks. Traditional theoretical analysis of cryptographic devices is based on black-box models which do not take into account the attacks on the implementations, known as physical attacks...

  10. Using an ontology for network attack planning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The modern complexity of network attacks and their counter-measures (cyber operations) requires detailed planning. This paper presents a Network Attack Planning ontology which is aimed at providing support for planning such network operations within...

  11. Social engineering attack examples, templates and scenarios

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mouton, Francois

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available link. A social engineering attack targets this weakness by using various manipulation techniques to elicit sensitive information. The field of social engineering is still in its early stages with regard to formal definitions, attack frameworks...

  12. Peacetime Use of Computer Network Attack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Busby, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    .... PDD-63 alerts the nation to prepare for impending cyber attacks. This paper examines the nature, scale, and likelihood of cyber attacks posited in PDD-63 and finds that the country does not face an imminent "electronic Pearl Harbor...

  13. Quantifying Shannon's work function for cryptanalytic attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Son, R.J.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Attacks on cryptographic systems are limited by the available computational resources. A theoretical understanding of these resource limitations is needed to evaluate the security of cryptographic primitives and procedures. This study uses an Attacker versus Environment game formalism based on

  14. Stochastic Model of TCP SYN Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ramanauskaitė

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A great proportion of essential services are moving into internet space making the threat of DoS attacks even more actual. To estimate the real risk of some kind of denial of service (DoS attack in real world is difficult, but mathematical and software models make this task easier. In this paper we overview the ways of implementing DoS attack models and offer a stochastic model of SYN flooding attack. It allows evaluating the potential threat of SYN flooding attacks, taking into account both the legitimate system flow as well as the possible attack power. At the same time we can assess the effect of such parameters as buffer capacity, open connection storage in the buffer or filte­ring efficiency on the success of different SYN flooding attacks. This model can be used for other type of memory depletion denial of service attacks.Article in Lithuanian

  15. Network Attack Reference Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    fingerprinting tools include QueSO [10] (literally translates to “what OS”) and nmap [11], however there are a number of additional tools available for...Network Attack Reference Data Set J. McKenna and J. Treurniet Defence R&D Canada √ Ottawa TECHNICAL...collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources

  16. Biometrics Evaluation under Spoofing Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Chingovska, Ivana; Anjos, André; Marcel, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    While more accurate and reliable than ever, the trustworthiness of biometric verification systems is compromised by the emergence of spoofing attacks. Responding to this threat, numerous research publications address isolated spoofing detection, resulting in efficient counter-measures for many biometric modes. However, an important, but often overlooked issue regards their engagement into a verification task and how to measure their impact on the verification systems themselves. A novel evalu...

  17. Survey of Sybil Attacks in Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Gunturu, Rupesh

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the Sybil attack in social networks, which has the potential to compromise the whole distributed network. In the Sybil attack, the malicious user claims multiple identities to compromise the network. Sybil attacks can be used to change the overall ranking in voting applications, bad-mouth an opinion, access resources or to break the trust mechanism behind a P2P network. In this paper, different defense mechanisms used to mitigate Sybil attacks are also reviewed.

  18. Are the rules for the right to self-defense outdated to address current conflicts like attacks from non-state actors and cyber-attacks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo J. Arias

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The latest US-led coalition’s attacks against ISIS in Syria raised the question whether states can use defensive force against non-state actors. Two critical incidents had previously triggered the discussion on the importance and consequences of cyber-attacks as a new form armed attacks. The first one occurred in Estonia in 2007, when the country experienced extensive computer hacking attacks that lasted several weeks. The second incident happened in 2008, during the Georgia–Russia conflict over South Ossetia, when Georgia experienced cyber-attacks similar to those suffered by Estonia in the previous year. Furthermore, on June 21, 2016, the central banks of Indonesia and South Korea were hit by cyber-attacks on their public websites since activist hacking group Anonymous pledged last month to target banks across the world. The previous incidents have created, once again, public questioning if the rules on the use of force and the right of self-defense established in the United Nations Charter are sufficient and efficient to address these new forms of attacks.

  19. Cyberprints: Identifying Cyber Attackers by Feature Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of attributing cyber attacks is one of increasing importance. Without a solid method of demonstrating the origin of a cyber attack, any attempts to deter would-be cyber attackers are wasted. Existing methods of attribution make unfounded assumptions about the environment in which they will operate: omniscience (the ability to gather,…

  20. Attacks and countermeasures on AES and ECC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tange, Henrik; Andersen, Birger

    2013-01-01

    is foreseeable while the rounds are performed. ECC (Elliptic Curve Cryptography) is used as a public key crypto system with the key purpose of creating a private shared between two participants in a communication network. Attacks on ECC include the Pohlig-Hellman attack and the Pollard's rho attack. Furthermore...

  1. Attacks and countermeasures on AES and ECC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tange, Henrik; Andersen, Birger

    2013-01-01

    AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is widely used in LTE and Wi-Fi communication systems. AES has recently been exposed to new attacks which have questioned the overall security of AES. The newest attack is a so called biclique attack, which is using the fact that the content of the state array...

  2. The Value of Attack-Defence Diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, H.; Krämer, Julia; Krčál, Jan; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Piessens, Frank; Viganò, Luca

    Success or failure of attacks on high-security systems, such as hacker attacks on sensitive data, depend on various situational conditions, including the timing and success chances of single attack steps, and concurrent countermeasures of the defender. With the existing state-of-the-art modelling

  3. Automated classification of computer network attacks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Heerden, R

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate how an automated reasoner, HermiT, is used to classify instances of computer network based attacks in conjunction with a network attack ontology. The ontology describes different types of network attacks through classes...

  4. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  5. Blind Cartography for Side Channel Attacks: Cross-Correlation Cartography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Sauvage

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Side channel and fault injection attacks are major threats to cryptographic applications of embedded systems. Best performances for these attacks are achieved by focusing sensors or injectors on the sensible parts of the application, by means of dedicated methods to localise them. Few methods have been proposed in the past, and all of them aim at pinpointing the cryptoprocessor. However it could be interesting to exploit the activity of other parts of the application, in order to increase the attack's efficiency or to bypass its countermeasures. In this paper, we present a localisation method based on cross-correlation, which issues a list of areas of interest within the attacked device. It realizes an exhaustive analysis, since it may localise any module of the device, and not only those which perform cryptographic operations. Moreover, it also does not require a preliminary knowledge about the implementation, whereas some previous cartography methods require that the attacker could choose the cryptoprocessor inputs, which is not always possible. The method is experimentally validated using observations of the electromagnetic near field distribution over a Xilinx Virtex 5 FPGA. The matching between areas of interest and the application layout in the FPGA floorplan is confirmed by correlation analysis.

  6. Calculating Adversarial Risk from Attack Trees: Control Strength and Probabilistic Attackers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter; Davarynejad, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Attack trees are a well-known formalism for quantitative analysis of cyber attacks consisting of multiple steps and alternative paths. It is possible to derive properties of the overall attacks from properties of individual steps, such as cost for the attacker and probability of success. However, in

  7. Whispering through DDoS attack

    OpenAIRE

    Miralem Mehic; Jiri Slachta; Miroslav Voznak

    2016-01-01

    Denial of service (DoS) attack is an attempt of the attacker to disable victim's machine by depleting network or computing resources. If this attack is performed with more than one machine, it is called distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. Covert channels are those channels which are used for information transmission even though they are neither designed nor intended to transfer information at all. In this article, we investigated the possibility of using of DDoS attack for purposes o...

  8. Script-viruses Attacks on UNIX OS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Mikhaylov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article attacks on UNIX OS are considered. Currently antivirus developers are concentrated on protecting systems from viruses that are most common and attack popular operating systems. If the system or its components are not often attacked then the antivirus products are not protecting these components as it is not profitable. The same situation is with script-viruses for UNIX OS as most experts consider that it is impossible for such viruses to get enough rights to attack. Nevertheless the main conclusion of this article is the fact that such viruses can be very powerful and can attack systems and get enough rights.

  9. Stochastic Model of TCP SYN Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Simona Ramanauskaitė; Antanas Čenys

    2011-01-01

    A great proportion of essential services are moving into internet space making the threat of DoS attacks even more actual. To estimate the real risk of some kind of denial of service (DoS) attack in real world is difficult, but mathematical and software models make this task easier. In this paper we overview the ways of implementing DoS attack models and offer a stochastic model of SYN flooding attack. It allows evaluating the potential threat of SYN flooding attacks, taking into account both...

  10. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  11. NETWORK SECURITY ATTACKS. ARP POISONING CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminiţa DEFTA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Arp poisoning is one of the most common attacks in a switched network. A switch is a network device that limits the ability of attackers that use a packet sniffer to gain access to information from internal network traffic. However, using ARP poisoning the traffic between two computers can be intercepted even in a network that uses switches. This method is known as man in the middle attack. With this type of attack the affected stations from a network will have invalid entries in the ARP table. Thus, it will contain only the correspondence between the IP addresses of the stations from the same network and a single MAC address (the station that initiated the attack. In this paper we present step by step the initiation of such an attack in a network with three computers. We will intercept the traffic between two stations using the third one (the attacker.

  12. Whispering through DDoS attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miralem Mehic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Denial of service (DoS attack is an attempt of the attacker to disable victim's machine by depleting network or computing resources. If this attack is performed with more than one machine, it is called distributed denial of service (DDoS attack. Covert channels are those channels which are used for information transmission even though they are neither designed nor intended to transfer information at all. In this article, we investigated the possibility of using of DDoS attack for purposes of hiding data or concealing the existing covert channel. In addition, in this paper we analyzed the possibility of detection of such covert communication with the well-known statistical method. Also, we proposed the coordination mechanisms of the attack which may be used. A lot of research has been done in order to describe and prevent DDoS attacks, yet research on steganography on this field is still scarce.

  13. Attack Tree Generation by Policy Invalidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2015-01-01

    Attacks on systems and organisations increasingly exploit human actors, for example through social engineering, complicating their formal treatment and automatic identification. Formalisation of human behaviour is difficult at best, and attacks on socio-technical systems are still mostly identified...... through brainstorming of experts. In this work we formalize attack tree generation including human factors; based on recent advances in system models we develop a technique to identify possible attacks analytically, including technical and human factors. Our systematic attack generation is based...... on invalidating policies in the system model by identifying possible sequences of actions that lead to an attack. The generated attacks are precise enough to illustrate the threat, and they are general enough to hide the details of individual steps....

  14. Network Protection Against DDoS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dzurenda

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with possibilities of the network protection against Distributed Denial of Service attacks (DDoS. The basic types of DDoS attacks and their impact on the protected network are presented here. Furthermore, we present basic detection and defense techniques thanks to which it is possible to increase resistance of the protected network or device against DDoS attacks. Moreover, we tested the ability of current commercial Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS, especially Radware DefensePro 6.10.00 product against the most common types of DDoS attacks. We create five scenarios that are varied in type and strength of the DDoS attacks. The attacks intensity was much greater than the normal intensity of the current DDoS attacks.

  15. SQL Injection Attacks and Defense

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, Justin

    2012-01-01

    SQL Injection Attacks and Defense, First Edition: Winner of the Best Book Bejtlich Read Award "SQL injection is probably the number one problem for any server-side application, and this book unequaled in its coverage." -Richard Bejtlich, Tao Security blog SQL injection represents one of the most dangerous and well-known, yet misunderstood, security vulnerabilities on the Internet, largely because there is no central repository of information available for penetration testers, IT security consultants and practitioners, and web/software developers to turn to for help. SQL Injection Att

  16. Residue Age and Attack Pressure Influence Efficacy of Insecticide Treatments Against Ambrosia Beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Michael E; Ranger, Christopher M

    2018-02-09

    Management of ambrosia beetles in ornamental nurseries relies, in part, on insecticide treatments to prevent beetles from boring into trees. However, data on residual efficacy of commonly used pyrethroid insecticides is needed to gauge the duration that trees are protected during spring when peak beetle pressure occurs. Residual efficacy of bifenthrin and permethrin trunk sprays was examined in field trials which used trees injected with 10% ethanol to ensure host attack pressure. Permethrin consistently reduced attacks by Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and other ambrosia beetles for at least 4 wk, while efficacy of bifenthrin was inconsistent and lasted only about 10 d. Since previous studies demonstrated attacks are positively correlated with host ethanol emissions, we injected trees with 2.5, 5, and 10% ethanol to determine if residual efficacy was affected by attack pressure. Preventive treatments with bifenthrin reduced ambrosia beetle attacks at all concentrations of injected ethanol compared to non-sprayed controls. There was no interaction between attack pressure and insecticide treatment with respect to total attacks or attacks by X. germanus. However, increasing attack pressure did increase the probability of attacks on insecticide treated trees by X. germanus and other Scolytinae. Results from our current study will improve the ability of growers to make decisions on frequency of protective sprays, but residual efficacy of insecticide treatments may decline as attack pressure increases. Cultural practices should therefore maximize host vigor and minimize attack pressure associated with stress-induced ethanol emissions. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  17. Sudden unexpected death in children with a previously diagnosed cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, Florens N.; Cohen, Joeri; Blom, Nico A.; Delhaas, Tammo; Helbing, Wim A.; Lam, Jan; Sobotka-Plojhar, Marta A.; Temmerman, Arno M.; Sreeram, Narayanswani

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is known that children with previously diagnosed heart defects die suddenly. The causes of death are often unknown. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify all infants and children within the Netherlands with previously diagnosed heart disease who had a sudden unexpected death

  18. Sudden unexpected death in children with a previously diagnosed cardiovascular disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, F.N.; Cohen, Joeri; Blom, N.A.; Delhaas, T.; Helbing, W.A.; Lam, J.; Sobotka-Plojhar, M.A.; Temmerman, Arno M.; Sreeram, N.

    2004-01-01

    Background: It is known that children with previously diagnosed heart defects die suddenly. The causes of death are often unknown. Objective: The aim of the study was to identify all infants and children within the Netherlands with previously diagnosed heart disease who had a sudden unexpected death

  19. Mending broken hearts : Cardiac regeneration in zebrafish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruse, F.K.

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading global cause of death, accounting for more than 30% of all deaths. It claims more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Bearing these facts in mind, research in this field is direly needed. A heart attack, also known as myocardial infarction (MI), happens

  20. Somatic panic-attack equivalents in a community sample of Rwandan widows who survived the 1994 genocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagengimana, Athanase; Hinton, Devon; Bird, Bruce; Pollack, Mark; Pitman, Roger K.

    2009-01-01

    The present study is the first to attempt to determine rates of panic attacks, especially ‘somatically focused’ panic attacks, panic disorder, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression levels in a population of Rwandans traumatized by the 1994 genocide. The following measures were utilized: the Rwandan Panic-Disorder Survey (RPDS); the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI); the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ); and the PTSD Checklist (PCL). Forty of 100 Rwandan widows suffered somatically focused panic attacks during the previous 4 weeks. Thirty-five (87%) of those having panic attacks suffered panic disorder, making the rate of panic disorder for the entire sample 35%. Rwandan widows with panic attacks had greater psychopathology on all measures. Somatically focused panic-attack subtypes seem to constitute a key response to trauma in the Rwandan population. Future studies of traumatized non-Western populations should carefully assess not only somatoform disorder but also somatically focused panic attacks. PMID:12581815

  1. Efficacy of nebulized fluticasone propionate in adult patients admitted to the emergency department due to bronchial asthma attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starobin, Daniel; Bolotinsky, Ludmila; Or, Jack; Fink, Gershon; Shtoeger, Zev

    2008-01-01

    Locally delivered steroids by inhalers or nebulizers have been shown in small trials to be effective in acute asthma attack, but evidence-based data are insufficient to establish their place as routine management of adult asthma attacks. To determine the efficacy of nebulized compared to systemic steroids in adult asthmatics admitted to the emergency department following an acute attack. Adult asthmatics admitted to the ED were assigned in random consecutive case fashion to one of three protocol groups: group 1--nebulized steroid fluticasone (Flixotide Nebules), group 2--intravenous methylprednisolone, group 3--combined treatment by both routes. Objective and subjective parameters, such as peak expiratory flow, oxygen saturation, heart rate and dyspnea score, were registered before and 2 hours after ED treatment was initiated. Steroids were continued for 1 week following the ED visit according to the protocol arm. Data on hospital admission/discharge rate, ED readmissions in the week after enrollment and other major events related to asthma were registered. Altogether, 73 adult asthmatics were assigned to receive treatment: 24 patients in group 1, 23 in group 2 and 26 in group 3. Mean age was 44.4 +/- 16.8 years (range 17-75 years). Peak expiratory flow and dyspnea score significantly improved in group 1 patients compared with patients in the other groups after 2 hours of ED treatment (P = 0.021 and 0.009, respectively). The discharge rate after ED treatment was significantly higher in groups 1 and 3 than in group 2 (P = 0.05). All 73 patients were alive a week after enrollment. Five patients (20.8%) in the Flixotide treatment arm were hospitalized and required additional systemic steroids. Multivariate analysis of factors affecting hospitalization rate demonstrated that severity of asthma (odds ratio 8.11) and group 2 (OD 4.17) had a negative effect, whereas adherence to chronic anti-asthma therapy (OD 0.49) reduced the hospitalization rate. Our study cohort

  2. Resilience of LTE networks against smart jamming attacks: Wideband model

    KAUST Repository

    Aziz, Farhan M.

    2015-12-03

    LTE/LTE-A networks have been successfully providing advanced broadband services to millions of users worldwide. Lately, it has been suggested to use LTE networks for mission-critical applications like public safety, smart grid and military communications. We have previously shown that LTE networks are vulnerable to Denial-of-Service (DOS) and loss of service attacks from smart jammers. In this paper, we extend our previous work on resilience of LTE networks to wideband multipath fading channel, SINR estimation in frequency domain and computation of utilities based on observable parameters under the framework of single-shot and repeated games with asymmetric information. In a single-shot game formulation, network utility is severely compromised at its solutions, i.e. at the Nash Equilibria (NE). We propose evolved repeated-game strategy algorithms to combat smart jamming attacks that can be implemented in existing deployments using current technology. © 2015 IEEE.

  3. Higher Order Differential Attack on 6-Round MISTY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoo, Yukiyasu; Saito, Teruo; Nakashima, Hiroki; Shigeri, Maki

    MISTY1 is a 64-bit block cipher that has provable security against differential and linear cryptanalysis. MISTY1 is one of the algorithms selected in the European NESSIE project, and it has been recommended for Japanese e-Government ciphers by the CRYPTREC project. This paper reports a previously unknown higher order differential characteristic of 4-round MISTY1 with the FL functions. It also shows that a higher order differential attack that utilizes this newly discovered characteristic is successful against 6-round MISTY1 with the FL functions. This attack can recover a partial subkey with a data complexity of 253.7 and a computational complexity of 264.4, which is better than any previous cryptanalysis of MISTY1.

  4. Model checking exact cost for attack scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanyan, Zaruhi; Nielson, Flemming

    2017-01-01

    . However, current model checking does not encompass the exact cost analysis of an attack, which is standard for attack trees. Our first contribution is the logic erPCTL with cost-related operators. The extended logic allows to analyse the probability of an event satisfying given cost bounds and to compute......Attack trees constitute a powerful tool for modelling security threats. Many security analyses of attack trees can be seamlessly expressed as model checking of Markov Decision Processes obtained from the attack trees, thus reaping the benefits of a coherent framework and a mature tool support...... the exact cost of an event. Our second contribution is the model checking algorithm for erPCTL. Finally, we apply our framework to the analysis of attack trees....

  5. Securing internet by eliminating DDOS attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranchana, R.; Gayathri Devi, N.; Santhi, H.; Gayathri, P.

    2017-11-01

    The major threat caused to the authorised usage of Internet is Distributed Denial of Service attack. The mechanisms used to prevent the DDoS attacks are said to overcome the attack’s ability in spoofing the IP packets source addresses. By utilising Internet Protocol spoofing, the attackers cause a consequential load over the networks destination for policing attack packets. To overcome the IP Spoofing level on the Internet, We propose an Inter domain Packet Filter (IPF) architecture. The proposed scheme is not based on global routing information. The packets with reliable source addresses are not rejected, the IPF frame work works in such a manner. The spoofing capability of attackers is confined by IPF, and also the filter identifies the source of an attack packet by minimal number of candidate network.

  6. DDOS ATTACK DETECTION SIMULATION AND HANDLING MECHANISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Sanmorino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we discuss how to handle DDoS attack that coming from the attacker by using detection method and handling mechanism. Detection perform by comparing number of packets and number of flow. Whereas handling mechanism perform by limiting or drop the packets that detected as a DDoS attack. The study begins with simulation on real network, which aims to get the real traffic data. Then, dump traffic data obtained from the simulation used for detection method on our prototype system called DASHM (DDoS Attack Simulation and Handling Mechanism. From the result of experiment that has been conducted, the proposed method successfully detect DDoS attack and handle the incoming packet sent by attacker.

  7. Transient ischemic attack: diagnostic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messé, Steven R; Jauch, Edward C

    2008-08-01

    A transient ischemic attack portends significant risk of a stroke. Consequently, the diagnostic evaluation in the emergency department is focused on identifying high-risk causes so that preventive strategies can be implemented. The evaluation consists of a facilitated evaluation of the patient's metabolic, cardiac, and neurovascular systems. At a minimum, the following tests are recommended: fingerstick glucose level, electrolyte levels, CBC count, urinalysis, and coagulation studies; noncontrast computed tomography (CT) of the head; electrocardiography; and continuous telemetry monitoring. Vascular imaging studies, such as carotid ultrasonography, CT angiography, or magnetic resonance angiography, should be performed on an urgent basis and prioritized according to the patient's risk stratification for disease. Consideration should be given for echocardiography if no large vessel abnormality is identified.

  8. Where can an Insider attack?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof; Nielson, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    By definition, an insider has better access, is more trusted, and has better information about internal procedures, high-value targets, and potential weak spots in the security, than an outsider. Consequently, an insider attack has the potential to cause significant, even catastrophic, damage...... to the targeted organisation. While the problem is well recognised in the security community as well as in law-enforcement and intelligence communities, the main resort still is to audit log files \\$\\backslash\\$emph{after the fact}. There has been little research into developing models, automated tools...... of the modelled systems. Our analysis of processes identifies which actions may be performed by whom, at which locations, accessing which data. This allows to compute a superset of audit results---before an incident occurs....

  9. Increased intrinsic brain connectivity between pons and somatosensory cortex during attacks of migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2017-01-01

    The neurological disturbances of migraine aura are caused by transient cortical dysfunction due to waves of spreading depolarization that disrupt neuronal signaling. The effects of these cortical events on intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine aura have not previously been...... investigated. Studies of spontaneous migraine attacks are notoriously challenging due to their unpredictable nature and patient discomfort. We investigated 16 migraine patients with visual aura during attacks and in the attack-free state using resting state fMRI. We applied a hypothesis-driven seed......-based approach focusing on cortical visual areas and areas involved in migraine pain, and a data-driven independent component analysis approach to detect changes in intrinsic brain signaling during attacks. In addition, we performed the analyses after mirroring the MRI data according to the side of perceived...

  10. Security under Uncertainty: Adaptive Attackers Are More Challenging to Human Defenders than Random Attackers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Moisan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Game Theory is a common approach used to understand attacker and defender motives, strategies, and allocation of limited security resources. For example, many defense algorithms are based on game-theoretic solutions that conclude that randomization of defense actions assures unpredictability, creating difficulties for a human attacker. However, many game-theoretic solutions often rely on idealized assumptions of decision making that underplay the role of human cognition and information uncertainty. The consequence is that we know little about how effective these algorithms are against human players. Using a simplified security game, we study the type of attack strategy and the uncertainty about an attacker's strategy in a laboratory experiment where participants play the role of defenders against a simulated attacker. Our goal is to compare a human defender's behavior in three levels of uncertainty (Information Level: Certain, Risky, Uncertain and three types of attacker's strategy (Attacker's strategy: Minimax, Random, Adaptive in a between-subjects experimental design. Best defense performance is achieved when defenders play against a minimax and a random attack strategy compared to an adaptive strategy. Furthermore, when payoffs are certain, defenders are as efficient against random attack strategy as they are against an adaptive strategy, but when payoffs are uncertain, defenders have most difficulties defending against an adaptive attacker compared to a random attacker. We conclude that given conditions of uncertainty in many security problems, defense algorithms would be more efficient if they are adaptive to the attacker actions, taking advantage of the attacker's human inefficiencies.

  11. Cache timing attacks on recent microarchitectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreou, Alexandres; Bogdanov, Andrey; Tischhauser, Elmar Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Cache timing attacks have been known for a long time, however since the rise of cloud computing and shared hardware resources, such attacks found new potentially devastating applications. One prominent example is S$A (presented by Irazoqui et al at S&P 2015) which is a cache timing attack against...... engineered as part of this work. This is the first time CSSAs for the Skylake architecture are reported. Our attacks demonstrate that cryptographic applications in cloud computing environments using key-dependent tables for acceleration are still vulnerable even on recent architectures, including Skylake...

  12. Religion and support for suicide attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginges, Jeremy; Hansen, Ian; Norenzayan, Ara

    2009-02-01

    In four studies carried out across different cultural, religious, and political contexts, we investigated the association between religion and popular support for suicide attacks. In two surveys of Palestinians and one cognitive priming experiment with Israeli settlers, prayer to God, an index of religious devotion, was unrelated to support for suicide attacks. Instead, attendance at religious services, thought to enhance coalitional commitment, positively predicted support for suicide attacks. In a survey of six religions in six nations, regular attendance at religious services positively predicted a combination of willing martyrdom and out-group hostility, but regular prayer did not. Implications for understanding the role of religion in suicide attacks are discussed.

  13. Integrating cyber attacks within fault trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nai Fovino, Igor; Masera, Marcelo; De Cian, Alessio

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for quantitative security risk assessment of complex systems is presented, combining fault-tree analysis, traditionally used in reliability analysis, with the recently introduced Attack-tree analysis, proposed for the study of malicious attack patterns. The combined use of fault trees and attack trees helps the analyst to effectively face the security challenges posed by the introduction of modern ICT technologies in the control systems of critical infrastructures. The proposed approach allows considering the interaction of malicious deliberate acts with random failures. Formal definitions of fault tree and attack tree are provided and a mathematical model for the calculation of system fault probabilities is presented.

  14. Visualizing Risks: Icons for Information Attack Scenarios

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosmer, Hilary

    2000-01-01

    .... Visual attack scenarios help defenders see system ambiguities, imprecision, vulnerabilities and omissions, thus speeding up risk analysis, requirements gathering, safeguard selection, cryptographic...

  15. Validation Method of a Telecommunications Blackout Attack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amado, Joao; Nunes, Paulo

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation method of telecommunications infrastructure vulnerabilities, allowing the identification of components that can be attacked in order to achieve a communications blackout...

  16. CARDIAC EMERGENCY: LIFT UP YOUR HEARTS

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    50 000 deaths every year in France following heart problems. You or someone close to you, a friend, a relative, a colleague at work. You all probably know someone who has had a heart attack. Noting that 80% of all deaths occur outside hospital, the Fédération Française de Cardiologie, working in collaboration with first aid groups (rescue associations, etc.), are launching a nationwide campaign to train as many people as possible in what to do for cardiac first aid. According to specialists, more than half of all heart attack victims could have survived if someone nearby had been quick at doing what was needed. The CERN Fire Brigade is helping in this campaign by offering two free training sessions, each lasting three hours and mainly based on recognizing a heart attack, the proper way of calling for help, and practice in mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and heart massage. The courses will be held on 20 November and 6 December from4 to 7 p.m. at Building 65. So don’t wait, stop b...

  17. Heart rate is a prognostic risk factor for myocardial infarction: a post hoc analysis in the PERFORM (Prevention of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular Events of ischemic origin with teRutroban in patients with a history oF ischemic strOke or tRansient ischeMic attack) study population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kim; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Amarenco, Pierre; Chamorro, Angel; Fisher, Marc; Ford, Ian; Hennerici, Michael G; Mattle, Heinrich P; Rothwell, Peter M

    2013-10-09

    Elevated resting heart rate is known to be detrimental to morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular disease, though its effect in patients with ischemic stroke is unclear. We analyzed the effect of baseline resting heart rate on myocardial infarction (MI) in patients with a recent noncardioembolic cerebral ischemic event participating in PERFORM. We compared fatal or nonfatal MI using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models for PERFORM patients with baseline heart rate heart rate was analyzed as a continuous variable. Other cerebrovascular and cardiovascular outcomes were also explored. Heart rate ≥70 bpm was associated with increased relative risk for fatal or nonfatal MI (HR 1.32, 95% CI 1.03-1.69, P=0.029). For every 5-bpm increase in heart rate, there was an increase in relative risk for fatal and nonfatal MI (11.3%, P=0.0002). Heart rate ≥70 bpm was also associated with increased relative risk for a composite of fatal or nonfatal ischemic stroke, fatal or nonfatal MI, or other vascular death (excluding hemorrhagic death) (Pheart rate, there were increases in relative risk for fatal or nonfatal ischemic stroke, fatal or nonfatal MI, or other vascular death (4.7%, Pheart rate ≥70 bpm places patients with a noncardioembolic cerebral ischemic event at increased risk for MI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cued Panic Attacks in Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Katharine A.; Menard, William; Bjornsson, Andri S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a common and often severe disorder. Clinical observations suggest that panic attacks triggered by BDD symptoms may be common. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined such panic attacks in BDD. We investigated the prevalence, clinical features, and correlates of BDD-triggered panic attacks in individuals with this disorder. Methods Panic attacks and other variables were assessed using reliable and valid measures in 76 individuals with lifetime DSM-IV BDD. Results 28.9% (95% CI, 18.5%–39.4%) of participants reported lifetime panic attacks triggered by BDD symptoms. The most common triggers of such attacks were feeling that others were looking at or scrutinizing the perceived appearance defects (61.9%), looking in the mirror at perceived defects (38.1%), and being in bright light where perceived defects would be more visible (23.8%). The most common panic attack symptoms were palpitations (86.4%), sweating (66.7%), shortness of breath (63.6%), trembling or shaking (63.6%), and fear of losing control or going crazy (63.6%). Compared to participants without such panic attacks, those with BDD-triggered panic attacks had more severe lifetime BDD, social anxiety, and depressive symptoms, as well as poorer functioning and quality of life on a number of measures. They were also less likely to be employed and more likely to have been psychiatrically hospitalized and to have had suicidal ideation due to BDD. Conclusions Panic attacks triggered by BDD-related situations appear common in individuals with this disorder. BDD-triggered panic attacks were associated with greater symptom severity and morbidity. PMID:23653076

  19. Practical security and privacy attacks against biometric hashing using sparse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topcu, Berkay; Karabat, Cagatay; Azadmanesh, Matin; Erdogan, Hakan

    2016-12-01

    Biometric hashing is a cancelable biometric verification method that has received research interest recently. This method can be considered as a two-factor authentication method which combines a personal password (or secret key) with a biometric to obtain a secure binary template which is used for authentication. We present novel practical security and privacy attacks against biometric hashing when the attacker is assumed to know the user's password in order to quantify the additional protection due to biometrics when the password is compromised. We present four methods that can reconstruct a biometric feature and/or the image from a hash and one method which can find the closest biometric data (i.e., face image) from a database. Two of the reconstruction methods are based on 1-bit compressed sensing signal reconstruction for which the data acquisition scenario is very similar to biometric hashing. Previous literature introduced simple attack methods, but we show that we can achieve higher level of security threats using compressed sensing recovery techniques. In addition, we present privacy attacks which reconstruct a biometric image which resembles the original image. We quantify the performance of the attacks using detection error tradeoff curves and equal error rates under advanced attack scenarios. We show that conventional biometric hashing methods suffer from high security and privacy leaks under practical attacks, and we believe more advanced hash generation methods are necessary to avoid these attacks.

  20. Attack Trees for Practical Security Assessment: Ranking of Attack Scenarios with ADTool 2.0

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadyatskaya, Olga; Jhawar, Ravi; Kordy, P.T.; Lounis, Karim; Mauw, Sjouke; Trujillo-Rasua, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    In this tool demonstration paper we present the ADTool2.0: an open-source software tool for design, manipulation and analysis of attack trees. The tool supports ranking of attack scenarios based on quantitative attributes entered by the user; it is scriptable; and it incorporates attack trees with

  1. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital for 7 to 21 days after a heart transplant. The first 24 to 48 hours will likely be in ... follow your self-care instructions. Biopsies of the heart muscle are ... after transplant, and then less often after that. This helps ...

  2. HEART Aerothermodynamic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Alireza

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the aerothermodynamic environment around an 8.3 meter High Energy Atmospheric Reentry Test (HEART) vehicle. This study generated twelve nose shape configurations and compared their responses at the peak heating trajectory point against the baseline nose shape. The heat flux sensitivity to the angle of attack variations are also discussed. The possibility of a two-piece Thermal Protection System (TPS) design at the nose is also considered, as are the surface catalytic affects of the aeroheating environment of such configuration. Based on these analyses, an optimum nose shape is proposed to minimize the surface heating. A recommendation is also made for a two-piece TPS design, for which the surface catalytic uncertainty associated with the jump in heating at the nose-IAD juncture is reduced by a minimum of 93%. In this paper, the aeroshell is assumed to be rigid and the inflatable fluid interaction effect is left for future investigations.

  3. The Weight of Cognitions in Panic: The Link between Misinterpretations and Panic Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cort, Klara; Hermans, Dirk; Noortman, Daphne; Arends, Wiesje; Griez, Eric J. L.; Schruers, Koen R. J.

    2013-01-01

    In cognitive theory it is hypothesized that panic attacks are provoked by catastrophic misinterpretations of bodily sensations. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of associated word pairs referring to catastrophic thinking (e.g. palpitations-heart attack) in producing panic attacks. Patients with PD (n = 20), patients with mixed anxiety disorders (n = 20), and a healthy control group (n = 30) participated in the present study. To enhance ecological validity we first conducted a stimulus validation experiment. Subsequently, nine suitable panic and neutral word pairs were presented in block to the participants. Anxiety levels were assessed before and after the presentation. PD patients were more anxious when reading these word pairs, compared to neutral word pairs. However, none of the participants experienced a panic attack upon reading the word pairs. From the present results it seems that catastrophic thinking is rather related to the anticipatory anxiety for panic attacks, but not necessarily with the occurrence of the panic attacks themselves. PMID:23940559

  4. Evaluation of Crosstalk Attacks in Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Christoph; Eiselt, Michael; Grobe, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    WDM-PON systems regained interest as low-cost solution for metro and access networks. We present a comparative analysis of resilience of wavelength-selective and wavelength-routed architectures against crosstalk attackers. We compare the vulnerability of these architectures against attacks...

  5. Rotational Rebound Attacks on Reduced Skein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khovratovich, Dmitry; Nikolic, Ivica; Rechberger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we combine a recent rotational cryptanalysis with the rebound attack, which results in the best cryptanalysis of Skein, a candidate for the SHA-3 competition. The rebound attack approach was so far only applied to AES-like constructions. For the first time, we show that this approach...

  6. Attack Tree Generation by Policy Invalidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof; Kammüller, Florian; Naeem Akram, R.; Jajodia, S.

    2015-01-01

    Attacks on systems and organisations increasingly exploit human actors, for example through social engineering, complicating their formal treatment and automatic identi﬿cation. Formalisation of human behaviour is difficult at best, and attacks on socio-technical systems are still mostly identi﬿ed

  7. Perievent panic attacks and panic disorder after mass trauma: a 12-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Cristina M; Salguero, José M; Cano-Vindel, Antonio; Galea, Sandro

    2013-06-01

    Panic attacks frequently lead to psychopathological disorders, including panic disorder. Even though panic disorder is a highly comorbid and disabling mental health problem associated with stressful life or traumatic events, perievent panic attacks and their association with panic disorder have hardly been investigated as a central topic after mass trauma. Using data from a longitudinal population-based assessment of Madrid residents after the March 11, 2004 train bombings (N = 1,589), with assessments conducted 1, 6, and 12 months after the attacks, the rate of perievent panic attacks was 10.9%. Level of exposure, previous life stressors, and negative emotionality were associated with perievent panic attacks (β = .12, .15, and .10, respectively), which in turn mediated the relationship between exposure to the terrorist event and panic disorder in the following year. Previous life stressors (β = .15) and low social support (β = -.14) were directly associated with panic disorder during the subsequent year. The most vulnerable individuals who experienced perievent panic attacks were 3.7 times, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [2.1, 6.4], more likely to suffer from panic disorder in the following year. Results suggest that early identification of perievent panic attacks following mass trauma may be helpful for reducing panic disorder. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  8. Cyber attack analysis on cyber-physical systems: Detectability, severity, and attenuation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Cheolhyeon

    computational cost. The proposed algorithm is validated through a linearized longitudinal motion of a UAV example. Finally, we propose an attack attenuation strategy via the controller design for CPSs that are robust to various types of cyber attacks. While the previous studies have investigated a secure control by assuming a specific attack strategy, in this research we propose a hybrid robust control scheme that contains multiple sub-controllers, each matched to a specific type of cyber attacks. Then the system can be adapted to various cyber attacks (including those that are not assumed for sub-controller design) by switching its sub-controllers to achieve the best performance. Then, a method for designing a secure switching logic to counter all possible cyber attacks is proposed and it verifies mathematically the system's performance and stability as well. The performance of the proposed control scheme is demonstrated by an example with the hybrid H2 - H-infinity controller applied to a UAV example.

  9. Burdens on emergency responders after a terrorist attack in Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, U; Zimmermann, P; Mahnke, M; Butler, O; Polk, S; Willmund, G

    2018-02-16

    Terrorist attacks induce various responses in emergency responders. Addressing this range of responses in individual workers is of central interest. To assess the gender- and occupation-specific effects of a terrorist attack, particularly in emergency responders. This was a pilot study. Emergency responders present during the 2016 terrorist attack at Breitscheidplatz in Berlin were asked to participate. Measures for crisis management had been previously implemented. Stress (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ]), quality of life (The World Health Organization Quality of Life [WHOQOL-BREF]), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 [PCL-5]) and current psychological symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory [BSI]) were assessed. Thirty-seven subjects were included, 11 female and 26 male. The occupational groups included 16 firefighters, six police officers, five psychosocial health care personnel and nine members of aid organizations. Three months after the attack, female workers showed higher scores in stress and paranoid ideation, police officers showed higher scores in hostility and firefighters scored lower quality of life in environment and physical health. The mental health burden identified in this study plays an important role for emergency responders after terrorist attacks. Differences between occupational groups may be attributable to differences in tasks that responders perform during acute incidents. The presence of these differences 3 months after the incident suggests that these are at least medium-term conditions. This study may inform the development of treatments and policies and it thus recommended to develop a multi-level assessment and treatment programme that is gender- and occupation-specific. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Rotational Rebound Attacks on Reduced Skein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khovratovich, Dmitry; Nikolić, Ivica; Rechberger, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we combine two powerful methods of symmetric cryptanalysis: rotational cryptanalysis and the rebound attack. Rotational cryptanalysis was designed for the analysis of bit-oriented designs like ARX (Addition-Rotation-XOR) schemes. It has been applied to several hash functions and block...... ciphers, including the new standard SHA-3 (Keccak). The rebound attack is a start-from-the-middle approach for finding differential paths and conforming pairs in byte-oriented designs like Substitution-Permutation networks and AES. We apply our new compositional attack to the reduced version of the hash...... function Skein, a finalist of the SHA-3 competition. Our attack penetrates more than two thirds of the Skein core—the cipher Threefish, and made the designers to change the submission in order to prevent it. The rebound part of our attack has been significantly enhanced to deliver results on the largest...

  11. Use of Attack Graphs in Security Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Shandilya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Attack graphs have been used to model the vulnerabilities of the systems and their potential exploits. The successful exploits leading to the partial/total failure of the systems are subject of keen security interest. Considerable effort has been expended in exhaustive modeling, analyses, detection, and mitigation of attacks. One prominent methodology involves constructing attack graphs of the pertinent system for analysis and response strategies. This not only gives the simplified representation of the system, but also allows prioritizing the security properties whose violations are of greater concern, for both detection and repair. We present a survey and critical study of state-of-the-art technologies in attack graph generation and use in security system. Based on our research, we identify the potential, challenges, and direction of the current research in using attack graphs.

  12. Automatic Classification of Attacks on IP Telephony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Safarik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an algorithm for automatic analysis of attack data in IP telephony network with a neural network. Data for the analysis is gathered from variable monitoring application running in the network. These monitoring systems are a typical part of nowadays network. Information from them is usually used after attack. It is possible to use an automatic classification of IP telephony attacks for nearly real-time classification and counter attack or mitigation of potential attacks. The classification use proposed neural network, and the article covers design of a neural network and its practical implementation. It contains also methods for neural network learning and data gathering functions from honeypot application.

  13. Two Improved Multiple-Differential Collision Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In CHES 2008, Bogdanov proposed multiple-differential collision attacks which could be applied to the power analysis attacks on practical cryptographic systems. However, due to the effect of countermeasures on FPGA, there are some difficulties during the collision detection, such as local high noise and the lack of sampling points. In this paper, keypoints voting test is proposed for solving these problems, which can increase the success ratio from 35% to 95% on the example of one implementation. Furthermore, we improve the ternary voting test of Bogdanov, which can improve the experiment efficiency markedly. Our experiments show that the number of power traces required in our attack is only a quarter of the requirement of traditional attack. Finally, some alternative countermeasures against our attacks are discussed.

  14. Music and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A shark attack treated in a tertiary care centre: Case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Mélissa; Plant, Mathew A; Snell, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Although uncommon, shark attacks can lead to devastating outcomes for victims. Surgeons also face unique challenges during operative management such as exsanguination, shock, specific injury patterns and infections. This case report presents the management of a 39-year-old previously healthy female attacked by a shark while on vacation in Mexico. The patient sustained severe injuries to her left arm and her left thigh. She was transferred to a Canadian institution after ambiguous operative ma...

  16. Regional movements of the tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, off northeastern Brazil: inferences regarding shark attack hazard

    OpenAIRE

    HAZIN,FABIO H.V.; AFONSO,ANDRE S.; CASTILHO,PEDRO C. DE; FERREIRA,LUCIANA C.; ROCHA,BRUNO C.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    An abnormally high shark attack rate verified off Recife could be related to migratory behavior of tiger sharks. This situation started after the construction of the Suape port to the south of Recife. A previous study suggested that attacking sharks could be following northward currents and that they were being attracted shoreward by approaching vessels. In this scenario, such northward movement pattern could imply a higher probability of sharks accessing the littoral area of Recife after lea...

  17. Hill-Climbing Attacks and Robust Online Signature Verification Algorithm against Hill-Climbing Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Daigo

    Attacks using hill-climbing methods have been reported as a vulnerability of biometric authentication systems. In this paper, we propose a robust online signature verification algorithm against such attacks. Specifically, the attack considered in this paper is a hill-climbing forged data attack. Artificial forgeries are generated offline by using the hill-climbing method, and the forgeries are input to a target system to be attacked. In this paper, we analyze the menace of hill-climbing forged data attacks using six types of hill-climbing forged data and propose a robust algorithm by incorporating the hill-climbing method into an online signature verification algorithm. Experiments to evaluate the proposed system were performed using a public online signature database. The proposed algorithm showed improved performance against this kind of attack.

  18. A taxonomy and discussion of software attack technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2005-03-01

    Software is a complex thing. It is not an engineering artifact that springs forth from a design by simply following software coding rules; creativity and the human element are at the heart of the process. Software development is part science, part art, and part craft. Design, architecture, and coding are equally important activities and in each of these activities, errors may be introduced that lead to security vulnerabilities. Therefore, inevitably, errors enter into the code. Some of these errors are discovered during testing; however, some are not. The best way to find security errors, whether they are introduced as part of the architecture development effort or coding effort, is to automate the security testing process to the maximum extent possible and add this class of tools to the tools available, which aids in the compilation process, testing, test analysis, and software distribution. Recent technological advances, improvements in computer-generated forces (CGFs), and results in research in information assurance and software protection indicate that we can build a semi-intelligent software security testing tool. However, before we can undertake the security testing automation effort, we must understand the scope of the required testing, the security failures that need to be uncovered during testing, and the characteristics of the failures. Therefore, we undertook the research reported in the paper, which is the development of a taxonomy and a discussion of software attacks generated from the point of view of the security tester with the goal of using the taxonomy to guide the development of the knowledge base for the automated security testing tool. The representation for attacks and threat cases yielded by this research captures the strategies, tactics, and other considerations that come into play during the planning and execution of attacks upon application software. The paper is organized as follows. Section one contains an introduction to our research

  19. Impact of a general practitioners' strike and of terrorist attacks on a call centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Paul-Georges; Orsini, Charlotte; Grave, Mélanie; Linval, Frédéric; Akodad, Hayatte; Goix, Laurent; Adnet, Frédéric; Lapostolle, Frédéric

    2016-11-30

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of the same-day GPs' strike and terrorist attacks on a call centre's activity. We compared the number of calls received, the number of patient's medical files (PMFs) created and the number of mobile ICU (MICU) dispatched per hour on Friday, 13 November, to the repository established on the five previous Fridays. As previously published, the variation criterion was set to an activity variation above 20% for more than 2 h. On Friday, 13 November, 1745 calls were received compared with 1455 calls, on average, for the five previous Fridays. The number of calls received increased after the terrorist attacks (≤90%) and remained above the threshold for 3 h. The number of PMFs exceeded the threshold from 10:00 a.m. to 05:00 p.m., but was not affected by the attacks. The number of MICUs dispatched exceeded the threshold (>500%) in the first hour after the attacks. The GPs' strike and the terrorist attacks did not impact our call centre's activity in the same manner. The strike increased the number of PMFs without increasing the number of calls received. The attacks increased the number of calls received and MICU dispatched without increasing the number of PMFs. Many markers are at the disposal of call centres to evaluate the impact of healthcare events.

  20. Protecting complex infrastructures against multiple strategic attackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausken, Kjell

    2011-01-01

    Infrastructures are analysed subject to defence by a strategic defender and attack by multiple strategic attackers. A framework is developed where each agent determines how much to invest in defending versus attacking each of multiple targets. A target can have economic, human and symbolic values, which generally vary across agents. Investment expenditure functions for each agent can be linear in the investment effort, concave, convex, logistic, can increase incrementally, or can be subject to budget constraints. Contest success functions (e.g., ratio and difference forms) determine the probability of a successful attack on each target, dependent on the relative investments of the defender and attackers on each target, and on characteristics of the contest. Targets can be in parallel, in series, interlinked, interdependent or independent. The defender minimises the expected damage plus the defence expenditures. Each attacker maximises the expected damage minus the attack expenditures. The number of free choice variables equals the number of agents times the number of targets, or lower if there are budget constraints. Each agent is interested in how his investments vary across the targets, and the impact on his utilities. Alternative optimisation programmes are discussed, together with repeated games, dynamic games and incomplete information. An example is provided for illustration.

  1. Radiological attacks and accidents. Medical consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuta, Hidenari

    2007-01-01

    Probability of the occurrence of radiological attacks appears to be elevated after the terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11 in 2001. There are a lot of scenarios of radiological attack: simple radiological device, radiological disperse device (RDD or dirty bomb), attacks against nuclear reactor, improvised nuclear device, and nuclear weapons. Of these, RDD attack is the most probable scenario, because it can be easily made and can generate enormous psychological and economic damages. Radiological incidents are occurring to and fro in the world, including several cases of theft to nuclear facilities and unsuccessful terrorist attacks against them. Recently, a former Russian spy has allegedly been killed using polonium-210. In addition, serious radiological accidents have occurred in Chernobyl, Goiania, and Tokai-mura. Planning, preparation, education, and training exercise appear to be essential factors to cope with radiological attacks and accidents effectively without feeling much anxiety. Triage and psychological first aid are prerequisite to manage and provide effective medial care for mass casualties without inducing panic. (author)

  2. Rotational Rebound Attacks on Reduced Skein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khovratovich, Dmitry; Nikolic, Ivica; Rechberger, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we combine a recent rotational cryptanalysis with the rebound attack, which results in the best cryptanalysis of Skein, a candidate for the SHA-3 competition. The rebound attack approach was so far only applied to AES-like constructions. For the first time, we show that this approac...... inside-out computations and neutral bits in the inbound phase of the rebound attack, and give well-defined rotational distinguishers as certificates of weaknesses for the compression functions and block ciphers.......In this paper we combine a recent rotational cryptanalysis with the rebound attack, which results in the best cryptanalysis of Skein, a candidate for the SHA-3 competition. The rebound attack approach was so far only applied to AES-like constructions. For the first time, we show that this approach...... and the Threefish cipher. The new techniques include an analytical search for optimal input values in the rotational cryptanalysis, which allows to extend the outbound phase of the attack with a precomputation phase, an approach never used in any rebound-style attack before. Further we show how to combine multiple...

  3. Smart Grid Integrity Attacks: Characterizations and Countermeasures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annarita Giani; Eilyan Bitar; Miles McQueen; Pramod Khargonekar; Kameshwar Poolla

    2011-10-01

    Real power injections at loads and generators, and real power flows on selected lines in a transmission network are monitored, transmitted over a SCADA network to the system operator, and used in state estimation algorithms to make dispatch, re-balance and other energy management system [EMS] decisions. Coordinated cyber attacks of power meter readings can be arranged to be undetectable by any bad data detection algorithm. These unobservable attacks present a serious threat to grid operations. Of particular interest are sparse attacks that involve the compromise of a modest number of meter readings. An efficient algorithm to find all unobservable attacks [under standard DC load flow approximations] involving the compromise of exactly two power injection meters and an arbitrary number of power meters on lines is presented. This requires O(n2m) flops for a power system with n buses and m line meters. If all lines are metered, there exist canonical forms that characterize all 3, 4, and 5-sparse unobservable attacks. These can be quickly detected in power systems using standard graph algorithms. Known secure phase measurement units [PMUs] can be used as countermeasures against an arbitrary collection of cyber attacks. Finding the minimum number of necessary PMUs is NP-hard. It is shown that p + 1 PMUs at carefully chosen buses are sufficient to neutralize a collection of p cyber attacks.

  4. Situational awareness of a coordinated cyber attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudit, Moises; Stotz, Adam; Holender, Michael

    2005-03-01

    As technology continues to advance, services and capabilities become computerized, and an ever increasing amount of business is conducted electronically the threat of cyber attacks gets compounded by the complexity of such attacks and the criticality of the information which must be secured. A new age of virtual warfare has dawned in which seconds can differentiate between the protection of vital information and/or services and a malicious attacker attaining their goal. In this paper we present a novel approach in the real-time detection of multistage coordinated cyber attacks and the promising initial testing results we have obtained. We introduce INFERD (INformation Fusion Engine for Real-time Decision-making), an adaptable information fusion engine which performs fusion at levels zero, one, and two to provide real-time situational assessment and its application to the cyber domain in the ECCARS (Event Correlation for Cyber Attack Recognition System) system. The advantages to our approach are fourfold: (1) The complexity of the attacks which we consider, (2) the level of abstraction in which the analyst interacts with the attack scenarios, (3) the speed at which the information fusion is presented and performed, and (4) our disregard for ad-hoc rules or a priori parameters.

  5. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not be able to receive contrast) Recently placed artificial joints Certain types of vascular stents Worked with ...

  6. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... graph show each step of an electrical signal's journey through the heart. EKG The image shows the ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  7. Heart Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stories that unite us in a shared journey toward better heart health. Hear from our new ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  8. Disorders of cardiac hemodynamic in attack period of bronchial asthma in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratiev V.А.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available By dopplerechocardiography method there was studied functional state of cardiac ventricles and character of hemodynamic disorders in 48 patients aged 5-17 years in attack period of moderately-severe and severe bronchial asthma. Group of comparison included 40 healthy peers. Disorders of central and peripheral hemodynamic in attack period of bronchial asthma in children were accompanied both by systolic and diastolic dysfunction of the left and right heart ventricles, herewith right ventricle was functioning in the mode of hyperdynamic, and left one – in the mode of hypodynamic. Combined systolic-diastolic variant of dysfunction both of right and left ventricles was developing in 58,3% of patients with moderately-severe and in 91,6% of patients with severe bronchial asthma. In the attack period of bronchial asthma in children equal directionality of systolic and diastolic dysfunction of heart ventricles was developing; this was characterized by synchronization of their function. Assessment of functional interaction of the ventricles under conditions of severe asthma attack showed direct and high (r=0,67 correlative interaction between finding of Tei index of the left and right ventricles, which characterize their systolic function; this, under conditions of increased hemodynamic pre-loading testified to compensatory increase of systolic interaction of ventricles. Direct and high (r=0,69 correlative interaction between time indices of isovolumic relaxation of the left and right ventricles, characterizing their diastolic function, testified to compensatory increase of diastolic interaction of ventricles under conditions of increase of hemodynamic post-loading. Imbalance of central and peripheral link of hemodynamic in attack period of bronchial asthma in children testified to development of cardiac insufficiency, which was compensated predominantly at the expense of increase of heart contractions rate.

  9. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:May 8,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  10. Should heart age calculators be used alongside absolute cardiovascular disease risk assessment?

    OpenAIRE

    Bonner, Carissa; Bell, Katy; Jansen, Jesse; Glasziou, Paul; Irwig, Les; Doust, Jenny; McCaffery, Kirsten

    2018-01-01

    Background National estimates of ‘heart age’ by government health organisations in the US, UK and China show most people have an older heart age than current age. While most heart age calculators are promoted as a communication tool for lifestyle change, they may also be used to justify medication when clinical guidelines advocate their use alongside absolute risk assessment. However, only those at high absolute risk of a heart attack or stroke are likely to benefit from medication, and it is...

  11. Risk factors of transient ischemic attack: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Khare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient ischemic attack (TIA is a transient episode of neurologic dysfunction caused due to loss of blood flow to the brain or spinal cord without acute infarction. Depending on the area of the brain involved, symptoms of TIA vary widely from patient to patient. Since the blockage period in TIA is very short-lived, there is no permanent damage. Risk factors for TIA include family history of stroke or TIA, age above 55 years or older, higher risk of TIA in males than females, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and tobacco smoking. Genetics, race, and imbalance in lipid profile are other risk factors of TIA. TIA is usually diagnosed after taking a thorough history and a physical examination. Several radiological tests such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the evaluation of patients who have had a TIA. Ultrasound of the neck and an echocardiogram of the heart are other tests useful in the diagnosis and evaluation of the attack. The treatment following acute recovery from a TIA depends on the underlying cause. Patients who have more than 70% stenosis of the carotid artery, removal of atherosclerotic plaque is usually done by carotid endarterectomy surgery. One-third of the people with TIA can later have recurrent TIAs and one-third can have a stroke because of permanent nerve cell loss. Having a TIA is a risk factor for eventually having a stroke. Educating the patients and inculcating lifestyle modifications in them are initial steps to minimize the prevalence of transient ischemic attack.

  12. Catastrophizing, rumination, and reappraisal prospectively predict adolescent PTSD symptom onset following a terrorist attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, Jessica L; Jager-Hyman, Shari; Heleniak, Charlotte; Beck, Aaron T; Sheridan, Margaret A; McLaughlin, Katie A

    2016-08-24

    Disruptions in emotion regulation are a transdiagnostic risk factor for psychopathology. However, scant research has examined whether emotion regulation strategies are related to the onset of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among youths exposed to trauma. We investigated whether pretrauma emotion regulation strategies prospectively predicted PTSD symptom onset after the 2013 Boston Marathon terrorist attack among adolescents and whether these associations were moderated by the degree of exposure to media coverage of the attack. A sample of 78 Boston-area adolescents (mean age = 16.72 years, 65% female) who previously participated in studies assessing emotion regulation and psychopathology were recruited following the terrorist attack. Within 4 weeks of the attack, we assessed self-reported PTSD symptoms and attack-related media exposure via an online survey. We examined the association of pretrauma emotion regulation strategies with PTSD symptom onset after adjustment for pretrauma internalizing symptoms and violence exposure. Greater pretrauma engagement in rumination predicted onset of PTSD symptoms following the attack. Adolescents who engaged in catastrophizing also had greater PTSD symptoms postattack, but only when exposed to high levels of media coverage of the attacks; the same pattern was observed for adolescents who engaged in low levels of cognitive reappraisal. Engagement in specific emotion regulation strategies prior to a traumatic event predicts the onset of PTSD symptoms among youths exposed to trauma, extending transdiagnostic models of emotion regulation to encompass trauma-related psychopathology in children and adolescents. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Cyber-Attacks on Smart Meters in Household Nanogrid: Modeling, Simulation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Tellbach

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The subject of cyber-security and therefore cyber-attacks on smart grid (SG has become subject of many publications in the last years, emphasizing its importance in research, as well as in practice. One especially vulnerable part of SG are smart meters (SMs. The major contribution of simulating a variety of cyber-attacks on SMs that have not been done in previous studies is the identification and quantification of the possible impacts on the security of SG. In this study, a simulation model of a nanogrid, including a complete household with an SM, was developed. Different cyber-attacks were injected into the SM to simulate their effects on household nanogrid. The analysis of the impacts of different cyber-attacks showed that the effects of cyber-attacks can be sorted into various categories. Integrity and confidentiality attacks cause monetary effects on the grid. While, availability attacks have monetary effects on the grid as well, they are mainly aimed at compromising the SM communication by either delaying or stopping it completely.

  14. Implementation of Positive Operator-Valued Measure in Passive Faraday Mirror Attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei-Long; Gao Ming; Ma Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Passive Faraday-mirror (PFM) attack is based on imperfect Faraday mirrors in practical quantum cryptography systems and a set of three-dimensional Positive Operator-Valued Measure (POVM) operators plays an important role in this attack. In this paper, we propose a simple scheme to implement the POVM in PFM attack on an Faraday–Michelson quantum cryptography system. Since the POVM can not be implemented directly with previous methods, in this scheme it needs to expand the states sent by Alice and the POVM operators in the attack into four-dimensional Hilbert space first, without changing the attacking effect by calculation. Based on the methods proposed by Ahnert and Payne, the linear-optical setup for implementing the POVM operators is derived. At last, the complete setup for realizing the PFM attack is presented with all parameters. Furthermore, our scheme can also be applied to realize PFM attack on a plug-and-play system by changing the parameters in the setup. (paper)

  15. Catastrophizing, rumination, and reappraisal prospectively predict adolescent PTSD symptom onset following a terrorist attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, Jessica L.; Jager-Hyman, Shari; Heleniak, Charlotte; Beck, Aaron T.; Sheridan, Margaret A.; McLaughlin, Katie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Disruptions in emotion regulation are a transdiagnostic risk factor for psychopathology. However, scant research has examined whether emotion regulation strategies are related to the onset of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among youths exposed to trauma. We investigated whether pretrauma emotion regulation strategies prospectively predicted PTSD symptom onset after the 2013 Boston Marathon terrorist attack among adolescents and whether these associations were moderated by the degree of exposure to media coverage of the attack. Methods A sample of 78 Boston-area adolescents (mean age =16.72 years, 65% female) who previously participated in studies assessing emotion regulation and psychopathology were recruited following the terrorist attack. Within 4 weeks of the attack, we assessed self-reported PTSD symptoms and attack-related media exposure via an online survey. We examined the association of pretrauma emotion regulation strategies with PTSD symptom onset after adjustment for pretrauma internalizing symptoms and violence exposure. Results Greater pretrauma engagement in rumination predicted onset of PTSD symptoms following the attack. Adolescents who engaged in catastrophizing also had greater PTSD symptoms postattack, but only when exposed to high levels of media coverage of the attacks; the same pattern was observed for adolescents who engaged in low levels of cognitive reappraisal. Conclusions Engagement in specific emotion regulation strategies prior to a traumatic event predicts the onset of PTSD symptoms among youths exposed to trauma, extending transdiagnostic models of emotion regulation to encompass trauma-related psychopathology in children and adolescents. PMID:27557454

  16. The role of sleep in migraine attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Inamorato

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Migraine attacks may be precipitated by sleep deprivation or excessive sleep and sleep is also associated with relief of migraine attacks. In view of this variable relationship we studied the records of 159 consecutive outpatients of our Headache Unit. In 121 records there was reference to sleep involvement, in 55% by a single form and in 45% by more than one form. When only one form was related, relief was most common (70%. 30% of that group of patients had the migraine attack precipitated by sleep, 24% by deprivation and 6% by sleep excess. When the effects of sleep were multiple, these effects were as expected logically in 65%: «in accordance» group (e.g attack precipitated by sleep deprivation and relieved by sleep onset. In a second group, («conflicting» where the involvement was not logical, there were three different combinations of sleep involvement, possibly due to more than one pathophysiological mechanism.

  17. On localization attacks against cloud infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Sistani, Mohammad Ali

    2013-05-01

    One of the key characteristics of cloud computing is the device and location independence that enables the user to access systems regardless of their location. Because cloud computing is heavily based on sharing resource, it is vulnerable to cyber attacks. In this paper, we investigate a localization attack that enables the adversary to leverage central processing unit (CPU) resources to localize the physical location of server used by victims. By increasing and reducing CPU usage through the malicious virtual machine (VM), the response time from the victim VM will increase and decrease correspondingly. In this way, by embedding the probing signal into the CPU usage and correlating the same pattern in the response time from the victim VM, the adversary can find the location of victim VM. To determine attack accuracy, we investigate features in both the time and frequency domains. We conduct both theoretical and experimental study to demonstrate the effectiveness of such an attack.

  18. Marine Attack on Towed Hydrophone Arrays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalmijn, Ad

    2002-01-01

    The original objective of the SIO Marine Attack project was to identify the electric and magnetic fields causing sharks to inflict serious damage upon the towed hydrophone arrays of US Navy submarines...

  19. Heuristic attacks against graphical password generators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Peach, S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors explore heuristic attacks against graphical password generators. A new trend is emerging to use user clickable pictures to generate passwords. This technique of authentication can be successfully used for - for example...

  20. Twisted Polynomials and Forgery Attacks on GCM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdelraheem, Mohamed Ahmed A. M. A.; Beelen, Peter; Bogdanov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    nonce misuse resistance, such as POET. The algebraic structure of polynomial hashing has given rise to security concerns: At CRYPTO 2008, Handschuh and Preneel describe key recovery attacks, and at FSE 2013, Procter and Cid provide a comprehensive framework for forgery attacks. Both approaches rely...... heavily on the ability to construct forgery polynomials having disjoint sets of roots, with many roots (“weak keys”) each. Constructing such polynomials beyond naïve approaches is crucial for these attacks, but still an open problem. In this paper, we comprehensively address this issue. We propose to use...... in an improved key recovery algorithm. As cryptanalytic applications of our twisted polynomials, we develop the first universal forgery attacks on GCM in the weak-key model that do not require nonce reuse. Moreover, we present universal weak-key forgeries for the nonce-misuse resistant AE scheme POET, which...

  1. Using agility to combat cyber attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kerry

    2017-06-01

    Some incident response practitioners feel that they have been locked in a battle with cyber criminals since the popular adoption of the internet. Initially, organisations made great inroads in preventing and containing cyber attacks. In the last few years, however, cyber criminals have become adept at eluding defence security technologies and rapidly modifying their exploit strategies for financial or political gains. Similar to changes in military combat tactics, cyber criminals utilise distributed attack cells, real-time communications, and rapidly mutating exploits to minimise the potential for detection. Cyber criminals have changed their attack paradigm. This paper describes a new incident response paradigm aimed at combating the new model of cyber attacks with an emphasis on agility to increase the organisation's ability to respond rapidly to these new challenges.

  2. Joint Warfighting: Attacking Time-Critical Targets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    .... While DOD has developed and fielded considerable capability to detect, assess, and attack most fixed enemy targets, experiences in the Persian Gulf and more recently in Kosovo revealed that DOD...

  3. ATTACK WARNING: Costs to Modernize NORAD's Computer System Significantly Understated

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cross, F

    1991-01-01

    ...) Integrated Tactical Warning and Attack Assessment (ITW/AA) system. These subsystems provide critical strategic surveillance and attack warning and assessment information to United States and Canadian leaders...

  4. Consciousness in Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Reuber, M.; Kurthen, M.

    2011-01-01

    Non-epileptic attack disorder (NEAD) is one of the most important differential diagnoses of epilepsy. Impairment of\\ud consciousness is the key feature of non-epileptic attacks (NEAs). The first half of this review summarises the clinical research\\ud literature featuring observations relating to consciousness in NEAD. The second half places this evidence in the wider context\\ud of the recent discourse on consciousness in neuroscience and the philosophy of mind. We argue that studies of consci...

  5. Semantic Identification Attacks on Web Browsing

    OpenAIRE

    Guha, Neel

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a Semantic Identification Attack, in which an adversary uses semantic signals about the pages visited in one browsing session to identify other browsing sessions launched by the same user. This attack allows an adver- sary to determine if two browsing sessions originate from the same user regardless of any measures taken by the user to disguise their browser or network. We use the MSNBC Anonymous Browsing data set, which contains a large set of user visits (labeled by category) t...

  6. Panic Attack History and Smoking Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Samantha G.; Brown, Lily A.; Goodwin, Renee D.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about panic attacks and puffing topography, a behavioral index of the value of smoking reinforcement. This study examined smoking style during the course of smoking of a single cigarette among adult daily smokers with and without a history of panic attacks. Method Participants (n = 124, Mage = 43.9, SD = 9.7; 44.4% female) were non-treatment seeking daily smokers. Lifetime panic attack history was assessed via diagnostic assessment; 28.2% (n = 35) of the sample had a panic attack history. Participants smoked one cigarette during an ad libitum smoking trial. Puff volume, duration, and inter-puff interval were measured using the Clinical Research Support System (CReSS) pocket device. Results Regression analyses revealed that panic attack status was not associated with significant differences in average puff volume, duration, or inter-puff interval. Multi-level modeling was used to examine puffing trajectories. Puff-level data revealed that there was a significant quadratic time x panic effect for puff volume and duration. Those with a panic attack history demonstrated relatively sustained levels of both puff volume and duration over time, whereas those without a history of panic attacks demonstrated an increase followed by a decrease in volume and duration over time. These effects were not accounted for by the presence of general psychopathology. Discussion Smokers with a panic attack history demonstrate more persistent efforts to self-regulate the delivery of nicotine, and thus may be at risk for continued smoking and dependence. Tailored treatment may be needed to address unique vulnerabilities among this group. PMID:28033542

  7. Attack by Pyemotes johnmoseri (Acari: Pyemotidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin Askit; Ibrahim Cakmak; John Moser

    2007-01-01

    The Aegean Region of Turkey is one of the largest dried fig producers in the world. A Turkish cultivar sarilop (Ficus carica cv. Calimyrna L.) possesses good qualities for drying process, and has been grown extensively for many years in Turkey. Hypoborus ficus is the most common xylophagous insect attacking fig trees in Aydin (Aks¸it et al. 2003). This pest attacks...

  8. Cyber Security Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Dale

    2012-05-31

    This goal of this project was to develop cyber security audit and attack detection tools for industrial control systems (ICS). Digital Bond developed and released a tool named Bandolier that audits ICS components commonly used in the energy sector against an optimal security configuration. The Portaledge Project developed a capability for the PI Historian, the most widely used Historian in the energy sector, to aggregate security events and detect cyber attacks.

  9. Combined Heuristic Attack Strategy on Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Šimon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the existence of a complex network is considered an advantage feature and efforts are made to increase its robustness against an attack. However, there exist also harmful and/or malicious networks, from social ones like spreading hoax, corruption, phishing, extremist ideology, and terrorist support up to computer networks spreading computer viruses or DDoS attack software or even biological networks of carriers or transport centers spreading disease among the population. New attack strategy can be therefore used against malicious networks, as well as in a worst-case scenario test for robustness of a useful network. A common measure of robustness of networks is their disintegration level after removal of a fraction of nodes. This robustness can be calculated as a ratio of the number of nodes of the greatest remaining network component against the number of nodes in the original network. Our paper presents a combination of heuristics optimized for an attack on a complex network to achieve its greatest disintegration. Nodes are deleted sequentially based on a heuristic criterion. Efficiency of classical attack approaches is compared to the proposed approach on Barabási-Albert, scale-free with tunable power-law exponent, and Erdős-Rényi models of complex networks and on real-world networks. Our attack strategy results in a faster disintegration, which is counterbalanced by its slightly increased computational demands.

  10. On the anatomy of social engineering attacks: A literature-based dissection of successful attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Bullée, Jan Willem Hendrik; Montoya, Lorena; Pieters, W.; Junger, M.; Hartel, P.H.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the extent to which persuasion principles are used in successful social engineering attacks. Seventy-four scenarios were extracted from 4 books on social engineering (written by social engineers) and analysed. Each scenario was split into attack steps, containing single interactions between offender and target. For each attack step, persuasion principles were identified. The main findings are that (a) persuasion principles are often used in social engineer...

  11. Investigation of the pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine attacks induced by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Hougaard, Anders; Schytz, Henrik W

    2014-01-01

    samples (plasma PACAP38 and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and serum tryptase), and vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory frequency, and end-tidal pressure of CO2) was recorded before and up to 5 h after infusion. Twenty-two patients [mean age 24 years (range 19-36)] completed the study...... on both days. Sixteen patients (73%) reported migraine-like attacks after PACAP38 and four after vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (18%) infusion (P = 0.002). Three of four patients, who reported migraine-like attacks after vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, also reported attacks after PACAP38. Both...... the start of PACAP38 infusion only in those patients who later reported migraine attacks. Blood levels of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and tryptase were unchanged after PACAP38 infusion. In conclusion, PACAP38-induced migraine was associated with sustained dilatation of extracranial arteries...

  12. Intrusion detection in cloud computing based attack patterns and risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Charhi Youssef

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of work originally presented in SYSCO CONF.We extend our previous work by presenting the initial results of the implementation of intrusion detection based on risk assessment on cloud computing. The idea focuses on a novel approach for detecting cyber-attacks on the cloud environment by analyzing attacks pattern using risk assessment methodologies. The aim of our solution is to combine evidences obtained from Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS deployed in a cloud with risk assessment related to each attack pattern. Our approach presents a new qualitative solution for analyzing each symptom, indicator and vulnerability analyzing impact and likelihood of distributed and multi-steps attacks directed to cloud environments. The implementation of this approach will reduce the number of false alerts and will improve the performance of the IDS.

  13. Transcranial Doppler and cardiovascular responses during cardiovascular autonomic tests in migraineurs during and outside attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, L L; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Boesen, F

    1995-01-01

    The transcranial Doppler (TCD) and cardiovascular responses to established tests of autonomic function were studied in 50 migraineurs (23 of whom experienced aura and 27 who did not) and 30 healthy control subjects. In addition to the measurements outside attacks, 10 migraineurs were also tested...... to a head-up tilt test, a cold-pressor test and a Valsalva manoeuvre. The cardiovascular reflexes in response to the Valsalva manoeuvre suggested a mild parasympathetic hypofunction in migraineurs, both those with and those without aura. On the basis of the present results and previous findings by others...... during unilateral attacks of migraine without aura. Transcranial Doppler examinations of middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood velocity showed no differences between migraineurs and healthy subjects and no difference between migraineurs experiencing an attack and outside an attack when examined in response...

  14. Exploiting Hardware Vulnerabilities to Attack Embedded System Devices: a Survey of Potent Microarchitectural Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos P. Fournaris

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-Physical system devices nowadays constitute a mixture of Information Technology (IT and Operational Technology (OT systems that are meant to operate harmonically under a security critical framework. As security IT countermeasures are gradually been installed in many embedded system nodes, thus securing them from many well-know cyber attacks there is a lurking danger that is still overlooked. Apart from the software vulnerabilities that typical malicious programs use, there are some very interesting hardware vulnerabilities that can be exploited in order to mount devastating software or hardware attacks (typically undetected by software countermeasures capable of fully compromising any embedded system device. Real-time microarchitecture attacks such as the cache side-channel attacks are such case but also the newly discovered Rowhammer fault injection attack that can be mounted even remotely to gain full access to a device DRAM (Dynamic Random Access Memory. Under the light of the above dangers that are focused on the device hardware structure, in this paper, an overview of this attack field is provided including attacks, threat directives and countermeasures. The goal of this paper is not to exhaustively overview attacks and countermeasures but rather to survey the various, possible, existing attack directions and highlight the security risks that they can pose to security critical embedded systems as well as indicate their strength on compromising the Quality of Service (QoS such systems are designed to provide.

  15. Predicting Factors of Zone 4 Attack in Volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo C; Castro, Henrique O; Evangelista, Breno F; Malheiros, Laura M; Greco, Pablo J; Ugrinowitsch, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    This study examined 142 volleyball games of the Men's Super League 2014/2015 seasons in Brazil from which we analyzed 24-26 games of each participating team, identifying 5,267 Zone 4 attacks for further analysis. Within these Zone 4 attacks, we analyzed the association between the effect of the attack carried out and the separate effects of serve reception, tempo and type of attack. We found that the reception, tempo of attack, second tempo of attack, and power of diagonal attack were predictors of the attack effect in Zone 4. Moreover, placed attacks showed a tendency to not yield a score. In conclusion, winning points in high-level men's volleyball requires excellent receptions, a fast attack tempo and powerfully executed of attacks.

  16. Classification of HTTP Attacks: A Study on the ECML/PKDD 2007 Discovery Challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eliassi-Rad, Tina [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2009-07-08

    As the world becomes more reliant on Web applications for commercial, financial, and medical transactions, cyber attacks on the World Wide Web are increasing in frequency and severity. Web applications provide an attractive alternative to traditional desktop applications due to their accessibility and ease of deployment. However, the accessibility of Web applications also makes them extremely vulnerable to attack. This inherent vulnerability is intensified by the distributed nature ofWeb applications and the complexity of configuring application servers. These factors have led to a proliferation of Web-based attacks, in which attackers surreptitiously inject code into HTTP requests, allowing them to execute arbitrary commands on remote systems and perform malicious activities such as reading, altering, or destroying sensitive data. One approach for dealing with HTTP-based attacks is to identify malicious code in incoming HTTP requests and eliminate bad requests before they are processed. Using machine learning techniques, we can build a classifier to automatically label requests as “Valid” or “Attack.” For this study, we develop a simple, but effective HTTP attack classifier, based on the vector space model used commonly for Information Retrieval. Our classifier not only separates attacks from valid requests, but can also identify specific attack types (e.g., “SQL Injection” or “Path Traversal”). We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach through experiments on the ECML/PKDD 2007 Discovery Challenge data set. Specifically, we show that our approach achieves higher precision and recall than previous methods. In addition, our approach has a number of desirable characteristics, including robustness to missing contextual information, interpretability of models, and scalability.

  17. Interaction of Insecticide and Media Moisture on Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Attacks on Selected Ornamental Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven D; Anderson, Amanda L; Ranger, Christopher M

    2017-12-08

    Exotic ambrosia beetles, particularly Xylosandrus crassiusculus (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) and Xylosandrus germanus (Blandford) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), are among the most damaging pests of ornamental trees in nurseries. Growers have had few tactics besides insecticide applications to reduce ambrosia beetle attacks but recent research has shown that attacks may be reduced by maintaining media moisture below a 50% threshold thereby reducing flood stress. We compared the efficacy of managing media moisture and insecticide applications for reducing ambrosia beetle attacks on three ornamental tree species in North Carolina. During trials in spring 2013 and 2015, flooded Cornus florida and Cornus kousa were heavily attacked despite sprays with permethrin, but nonflooded C. kousa or C. florida were not attacked. In spring 2015 trials, both nonflooded and flooded Styrax japonicus were heavily attacked regardless of permethrin applications. Although ethanol emissions were not measured, the apparently healthy nonflooded S. japonicus trees may have been exposed to an unknown physiological stress, such as low temperature injury, the previous winter, which predisposed them to beetle attack. However, ethanol levels within host tissues were not measured as part of the current study. X. crassiusculus (75%), Xyloborinus saxesenii Ratzburg (13%), and X. germanus (9%) were the most abundant species collected in ethanol baited traps deployed in 2015, while X. crassiusculus (63%) and X. germanus (36%) were the predominant species reared from attacked trees. Results indicate that managing media moisture levels at or below 50%, and maximizing tree health overall, may provide significant protection against Xylosandrus spp. attacks in flood intolerant tree species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Pathologic features of fatal shark attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, R W; Gilbert, J D; Brown, K

    2000-09-01

    To examine the pattern of injuries in cases of fatal shark attack in South Australian waters, the authors examined the files of their institution for all cases of shark attack in which full autopsies had been performed over the past 25 years, from 1974 to 1998. Of the seven deaths attributed to shark attack during this period, full autopsies were performed in only two cases. In the remaining five cases, bodies either had not been found or were incomplete. Case 1 was a 27-year-old male surfer who had been attacked by a shark. At autopsy, the main areas of injury involved the right thigh, which displayed characteristic teeth marks, extensive soft tissue damage, and incision of the femoral artery. There were also incised wounds of the right wrist. Bony injury was minimal, and no shark teeth were recovered. Case 2 was a 26-year-old male diver who had been attacked by a shark. At autopsy, the main areas of injury involved the left thigh and lower leg, which displayed characteristic teeth marks, extensive soft tissue damage, and incised wounds of the femoral artery and vein. There was also soft tissue trauma to the left wrist, with transection of the radial artery and vein. Bony injury was minimal, and no shark teeth were recovered. In both cases, death resulted from exsanguination following a similar pattern of soft tissue and vascular damage to a leg and arm. This type of injury is in keeping with predator attack from underneath or behind, with the most severe injuries involving one leg. Less severe injuries to the arms may have occurred during the ensuing struggle. Reconstruction of the damaged limb in case 2 by sewing together skin, soft tissue, and muscle bundles not only revealed that no soft tissue was missing but also gave a clearer picture of the pattern of teeth marks, direction of the attack, and species of predator.

  19. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  20. A Hop-Count Analysis Scheme for Avoiding Wormhole Attacks in MANET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Shang-Ming; Laih, Chi-Sung; Kuo, Wen-Chung

    2009-01-01

    MANET, due to the nature of wireless transmission, has more security issues compared to wired environments. A specific type of attack, the Wormhole attack does not require exploiting any nodes in the network and can interfere with the route establishment process. Instead of detecting wormholes from the role of administrators as in previous methods, we implement a new protocol, MHA, using a hop-count analysis from the viewpoint of users without any special environment assumptions. We also discuss previous works which require the role of administrator and their reliance on impractical assumptions, thus showing the advantages of MHA.

  1. A Hop-Count Analysis Scheme for Avoiding Wormhole Attacks in MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Sung Laih

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available MANET, due to the nature of wireless transmission, has more security issues compared to wired environments. A specific type of attack, the Wormhole attack does not require exploiting any nodes in the network and can interfere with the route establishment process. Instead of detecting wormholes from the role of administrators as in previous methods, we implement a new protocol, MHA, using a hop-count analysis from the viewpoint of users without any special environment assumptions. We also discuss previous works which require the role of administrator and their reliance on impractical assumptions, thus showing the advantages of MHA.

  2. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth ...

  3. Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may need to have a pacemaker. Rarely, the tricuspid valve can become damaged by the endomyocardial biopsy procedure; if that happens it will need to be repaired or replaced. Patients with congenital heart disease who have had a coarctation repair or problems ...

  4. 12 CFR 263.17 - Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding... Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding. If an interlocutory appeal or collateral attack is brought in... shall be excused based on the pendency before any court of any interlocutory appeal or collateral attack. ...

  5. 12 CFR 509.17 - Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding....17 Collateral attacks on adjudicatory proceeding. If an interlocutory appeal or collateral attack is... shall be excused based on the pendency before any court of any interlocutory appeal or collateral attack. ...

  6. A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Attack Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Liu

    2005-11-28

    The area investigated by this project is cyber attack prediction. With a focus on correlation-based prediction, current attack prediction methodologies overlook the strategic nature of cyber attack-defense scenarios. As a result, current cyber attack prediction methodologies are very limited in predicting strategic behaviors of attackers in enforcing nontrivial cyber attacks such as DDoS attacks, and may result in low accuracy in correlation-based predictions. This project develops a game theoretic framework for cyber attack prediction, where an automatic game-theory-based attack prediction method is proposed. Being able to quantitatively predict the likelihood of (sequences of) attack actions, our attack prediction methodology can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers and may greatly improve the accuracy of correlation-based prediction. To our best knowledge, this project develops the first comprehensive framework for incentive-based modeling and inference of attack intent, objectives, and strategies; and this project develops the first method that can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers. The significance of this research and the benefit to the public can be demonstrated to certain extent by (a) the severe threat of cyber attacks to the critical infrastructures of the nation, including many infrastructures overseen by the Department of Energy, (b) the importance of cyber security to critical infrastructure protection, and (c) the importance of cyber attack prediction to achieving cyber security.

  7. Trace Attack against Biometric Mobile Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa Ghouzali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With the exponential increase in the dependence on mobile devices in everyday life, there is a growing concern related to privacy and security issues in the Gulf countries; therefore, it is imperative that security threats should be analyzed in detail. Mobile devices store enormous amounts of personal and financial information, unfortunately without any security. In order to secure mobile devices against different threats, biometrics has been applied and shown to be effective. However, biometric mobile applications are also vulnerable to several types of attacks that can decrease their security. Biometric information itself is considered sensitive data; for example, fingerprints can leave traces in touched objects and facial images can be captured everywhere or accessed by the attacker if the facial image is stored in the mobile device (lost or stolen. Hence, an attacker can easily forge the identity of a legitimate user and access data on a device. In this paper, the effects of a trace attack on the sensitivity of biometric mobile applications are investigated in terms of security and user privacy. Experimental results carried out on facial and fingerprint mobile authentication applications using different databases have shown that these mobile applications are vulnerable to the proposed attack, which poses a serious threat to the overall system security and user privacy.

  8. Panic Attack during Elective Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalampos Mitsonis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD and colonoscopy (CS can evoke anxiety, embarrassment, and discomfort. These concerns can culminate in panic attacks, which may traumatize patients and significantly decrease their compliance to the procedure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between preendoscopic anxiety and the possibility of a panic attack during an elective gastrointestinal endoscopy (EGE. Methods. The study population comprised of 79 Greek outpatients. The examination was carried out without the use of conscious sedation. Patients' anxiety levels were assessed before the procedure using the Greek version of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-Y. Results. Seventy-nine patients were enrolled: 45 EGD and 34 CS. Females had higher state and trait anxiety levels than males (48.14 ± 7.94 versus 44.17 ± 7.43, <0.05; and 43.68 ± 6.95 versus 39.86 ± 7.46, <0.05. Patients who experienced panic attack had significantly higher levels of both trait and state anxiety, compared to those who were panic-free. There was no significant relationship between panic attacks and sex or type of procedure. Conclusions. Patients who experience panic attacks during endoscopic procedures appear to have significantly higher anxiety levels before the procedure. Administering the STAI questionnaire prior to the endoscopy seems to be a useful screening method for vulnerable patients.

  9. On the anatomy of social engineering attacks : A literature-based dissection of successful attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullée, Jan Willem Hendrik; Montoya, Lorena; Pieters, W.; Junger, M.; Hartel, P.H.

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the extent to which persuasion principles are used in successful social engineering attacks. Seventy-four scenarios were extracted from 4 books on social engineering (written by social engineers) and analysed. Each scenario was split into attack steps,

  10. On the anatomy of social engineering attacks : A literature-based dissection of successful attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bullee, Jan-Willem; Montoya, L.; Pieters, Wolter; Junger, Marianne; Hartel, Pieter H.

    The aim of this studywas to explore the extent towhich persuasion principles are used in successful social engineering attacks. Seventy-four scenarioswere extracted from 4 books on social engineering (written by social engineers) and analysed. Each scenariowas split into attack steps, containing

  11. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) and Allison ...

  12. Overview of DOS attacks on wireless sensor networks and experimental results for simulation of interference attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Gavrić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless sensor networks are now used in various fields. The information transmitted in the wireless sensor networks is very sensitive, so the security issue is very important. DOS (denial of service attacks are a fundamental threat to the functioning of wireless sensor networks. This paper describes some of the most common DOS attacks and potential methods of protection against them. The case study shows one of the most frequent attacks on wireless sensor networks – the interference attack. In the introduction of this paper authors assume that the attack interference can cause significant obstruction of wireless sensor networks. This assumption has been proved in the case study through simulation scenario and simulation results.

  13. Attack-tolerant networked control system: an approach for detection the controller stealthy hijacking attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta Yaseen, Amer; Bayart, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a new approach will be introduced as a development for the attack-tolerant scheme in the Networked Control System (NCS). The objective is to be able to detect an attack such as the Stuxnet case where the controller is reprogrammed and hijacked. Besides the ability to detect the stealthy controller hijacking attack, the advantage of this approach is that there is no need for a priori mathematical model of the controller. In order to implement the proposed scheme, a specific detector for the controller hijacking attack is designed. The performance of this scheme is evaluated be connected the detector to NCS with basic security elements such as Data Encryption Standard (DES), Message Digest (MD5), and timestamp. The detector is tested along with networked PI controller under stealthy hijacking attack. The test results of the proposed method show that the hijacked controller can be significantly detected and recovered.

  14. A Traceability Attack against e-Passports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chothia, Tom; Smirnov, Vitaliy

    Since 2004, many nations have started issuing "e-passports" containing an RFID tag that, when powered, broadcasts information. It is claimed that these passports are more secure and that our data will be protected from any possible unauthorised attempts to read it. In this paper we show that there is a flaw in one of the passport's protocols that makes it possible to trace the movements of a particular passport, without having to break the passport's cryptographic key. All an attacker has to do is to record one session between the passport and a legitimate reader, then by replaying a particular message, the attacker can distinguish that passport from any other. We have implemented our attack and tested it successfully against passports issued by a range of nations.

  15. Liability for damage caused by terrorist attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2004-01-01

    After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, one of the questions raised was about the potential liability of the operator of a nuclear power plant for damage sustained by a third party as a result of a comparable terrorist attack on a nuclear power plant. Internationally, this situation is regulated by the Convention on Third-Party Liability in Nuclear Power, the so-called Paris Liability Convention, of 1960, 1964, 1982. Among other things, that Convention excludes liability in cases directly resulting form 'actions of armed conflict..'. The problem arises, among other things, from the absence of an internationally acknowledged definition of terrorism or terrorist attack, and from the idea that, according to the Paris Convention, the legal entities assumed to be involved in such actions are states and weapons. National and international agreements and laws about the liability of the operator of nuclear facility for damage to third parties as a result of terrorist actions are analyzed and discussed. (orig.)

  16. Key Recovery Attacks on Recent Authenticated Ciphers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogdanov, Andrey; Dobraunig, Christoph; Eichlseder, Maria

    2014-01-01

    and wireless networks. All these schemes use well-established and secure components such as the AES, Grain-like NFSRs, ChaCha and SipHash as their building blocks. However, we discover key recovery attacks for all three designs, featuring square-root complexities. Using a key collision technique, we can...... recover the secret key of AVALANCHE in 2n/2, where n 2∈ {28; 192; 256} is the key length. This technique also applies to the authentication part of Calico whose 128-bit key can be recovered in 264 time. For RBS, we can recover its full 132-bit key in 265 time with a guess-and-determine attack. All attacks...

  17. What Is Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which could relieve angina. Heart Valve Repair or Replacement For the heart to work well, blood must ... have blood flowing through it. Heart-Lung Bypass Machine The image shows how a heart-lung bypass ...

  18. Getting a New Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a procedure that opens clogged arteries. Repair the heart valve . This procedure can often make your heart function ... heart muscle. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) . These are mechanical pumps that surgeons insert to help the heart ...

  19. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  20. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  1. Blood Pressure and Risk of Vascular Dementia: Evidence From a Primary Care Registry and a Cohort Study of Transient Ischemic Attack and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emdin, Connor A; Rothwell, Peter M; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Kiran, Amit; Conrad, Nathalie; Callender, Thomas; Mehta, Ziyah; Pendlebury, Sarah T; Anderson, Simon G; Mohseni, Hamid; Woodward, Mark; Rahimi, Kazem

    2016-06-01

    Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia but reliable evidence on age-specific associations between blood pressure (BP) and risk of vascular dementia is limited and some studies have reported negative associations at older ages. In a cohort of 4.28 million individuals, free of known vascular disease and dementia and identified from linked electronic primary care health records in the United Kingdom (Clinical Practice Research Datalink), we related BP to time to physician-diagnosed vascular dementia. We further determined associations between BP and dementia in a prospective population-based cohort of incident transient ischemic attack and stroke (Oxford Vascular Study). For a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 11 114 initial presentations of vascular dementia were observed in the primary care cohort after exclusion of the first 4 years of follow-up. The association between usual systolic BP and risk of vascular dementia decreased with age (hazard ratio per 20 mm Hg higher systolic BP, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.35 at 30-50 years; 1.26, 1.18-1.35 at 51-70 years; 0.97, 0.92-1.03 at 71-90 years; P trend=0.006). Usual systolic BP remained predictive of vascular dementia after accounting for effect mediation by stroke and transient ischemic attack. In the population-based cohort, prior systolic BP was predictive of 5-year risk of dementia with no evidence of negative association at older ages. BP is positively associated with risk of vascular dementia, irrespective of preceding transient ischemic attack or stroke. Previous reports of inverse associations in old age could not be confirmed. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Discovering Collaborative Cyber Attack Patterns Using Social Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Haitao; Yang, Shanchieh Jay

    This paper investigates collaborative cyber attacks based on social network analysis. An Attack Social Graph (ASG) is defined to represent cyber attacks on the Internet. Features are extracted from ASGs to analyze collaborative patterns. We use principle component analysis to reduce the feature space, and hierarchical clustering to group attack sources that exhibit similar behavior. Experiments with real world data illustrate that our framework can effectively reduce from large dataset to clusters of attack sources exhibiting critical collaborative patterns.

  3. PKI Layer Cake: New Collision Attacks against the Global X.509 Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Dan; Patterson, Meredith L.; Sassaman, Len

    Research unveiled in December of 2008 [15] showed how MD5's long-known flaws could be actively exploited to attack the real-worldCertification Authority infrastructure. In this paper, we demonstrate two new classes of collision, which will be somewhat trickier to address than previous attacks against X.509: the applicability of MD2 preimage attacks against the primary root certificate for Verisign, and the difficulty of validating X.509 Names contained within PKCS#10 Certificate Requests.We also draw particular attention to two possibly unrecognized vectors for implementation flaws that have been problematic in the past: the ASN.1 BER decoder required to parsePKCS#10, and the potential for SQL injection fromtext contained within its requests. Finally, we explore why the implications of these attacks are broader than some have realized - first, because Client Authentication is sometimes tied to X.509, and second, because Extended Validation certificates were only intended to stop phishing attacks from names similar to trusted brands. As per the work of Adam Barth and Collin Jackson [4], EV does not prevent an attacker who can synthesize or acquire a "low assurance" certificate for a given name from acquiring the "green bar" EV experience.

  4. Information-governing dynamics of attacker-defender interactions in youth rugby union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Pedro; Araújo, Duarte; Davids, Keith; Gouveia, Luis; Milho, João; Serpa, Sidónio

    2008-11-01

    Previous work on dynamics of interpersonal interactions in 1 vs. 1 sub-phases of basketball has identified changes in interpersonal distance between an attacker and defender as a potential control parameter for influencing organizational states of attacker-defender dyads. Other studies have reported the constraining effect of relative velocity between an attacker and defender in 1 vs. 1 dyads. To evaluate the relationship between these candidate control parameters, we compared the impact of both interpersonal distance and relative velocity on the pattern-forming dynamics of attacker-defender dyads in the sport of rugby union. Results revealed that when interpersonal distance achieved a critical value of less than 4 m, and relative velocity values increased or were maintained above 1 m x s(-1), a successful outcome (i.e. clean attempt) for an attacker was predicted. Alternatively, when values of relative velocity suddenly decreased below this threshold, at the same critical value of interpersonal distance, a successful outcome for the defender was predicted. Data demonstrated how the coupling of these two potential, nested control parameters moved the dyadic system to phase transitions, characterized as a try or a tackle. Observations suggested that relative velocity increased its influence on the organization of attacker-defender dyads in rugby union over time as spatial proximity to the try line increased.

  5. Detecting Unknown Attacks in Wireless Sensor Networks That Contain Mobile Nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorana Banković

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As wireless sensor networks are usually deployed in unattended areas, security policies cannot be updated in a timely fashion upon identification of new attacks. This gives enough time for attackers to cause significant damage. Thus, it is of great importance to provide protection from unknown attacks. However, existing solutions are mostly concentrated on known attacks. On the other hand, mobility can make the sensor network more resilient to failures, reactive to events, and able to support disparate missions with a common set of sensors, yet the problem of security becomes more complicated. In order to address the issue of security in networks with mobile nodes, we propose a machine learning solution for anomaly detection along with the feature extraction process that tries to detect temporal and spatial inconsistencies in the sequences of sensed values and the routing paths used to forward these values to the base station. We also propose a special way to treat mobile nodes, which is the main novelty of this work. The data produced in the presence of an attacker are treated as outliers, and detected using clustering techniques. These techniques are further coupled with a reputation system, in this way isolating compromised nodes in timely fashion. The proposal exhibits good performances at detecting and confining previously unseen attacks, including the cases when mobile nodes are compromised.

  6. Enhancing collaborative intrusion detection networks against insider attacks using supervised intrusion sensitivity-based trust management model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Wenjuan; Meng, Weizhi; Kwok, Lam-For

    2017-01-01

    To defend against complex attacks, collaborative intrusion detection networks (CIDNs) have been developed to enhance the detection accuracy, which enable an IDS to collect information and learn experience from others. However, this kind of networks is vulnerable to malicious nodes which...... are utilized by insider attacks (e.g., betrayal attacks). In our previous research, we developed a notion of intrusion sensitivity and identified that it can help improve the detection of insider attacks, whereas it is still a challenge for these nodes to automatically assign the values. In this article, we...... of intrusion sensitivity based on expert knowledge. In the evaluation, we compare the performance of three different supervised classifiers in assigning sensitivity values and investigate our trust model under different attack scenarios and in a real wireless sensor network. Experimental results indicate...

  7. Playing Attack and Defense with Trusted Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Javier; Bonnet, Philippe; Bouganim, Luc

    2014-01-01

    It is often convenient to assume in a data management platform that one or several computing devices are trusted, specially when the goal is to provide privacy guarantees over personal data. But what does it take for a computing device to be trusted? More specifically, how can a personal device...... provide trusted storage? This is the question we tackle in this demonstration. We describe how secure devices, equipped with a trusted execution environment, differ from general purpose devices. We illustrate with our demonstration scenario, that it is much more difficult to attack a storage service...... running on a secure device, than to attack the same service running on a general purpose device....

  8. Attacks and infections in percolation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Hans-Karl; Stenull, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    We discuss attacks and infections at propagating fronts of percolation processes based on the extended general epidemic process. The scaling behavior of the number of the attacked and infected sites in the long time limit at the ordinary and tricritical percolation transitions is governed by specific composite operators of the field-theoretic representation of this process. We calculate corresponding critical exponents for tricritical percolation in mean-field theory and for ordinary percolation to 1-loop order. Our results agree well with the available numerical data. (paper)

  9. A novel proposed network security management approach for cyber attacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Nazir, B.; Zafar, M.F.; Anwar, M.M.; Azam, K.; Asar, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    Network security is a discipline that focuses on securing networks from unauthorized access. Given the Escalating threats of malicious cyber attacks, modern enterprises employ multiple lines of defense. A comprehensive defense strategy against such attacks should include (I) an attack detection component that deter- mines the fact that a program is compromised, (2) an attack identification and prevention component that identifies attack packets so that one can block such packets in the future and prevents the attack from further propagation. Over the last decade, a significant amount of research has been vested in the systems that can detect cyber attacks either statically at compile time or dynamically at run time, However, not much effort is spent on automated attack packet identification or attack prevention. In this paper we present a unified solution to the problems mentioned above. We implemented this solution after the forward engineering of Open Source Security Information Management (OSSIM) system called Preventive Information Security management (PrISM) system that correlates input from different sensors so that the resulting product can automatically detect any cyber attack against it and prevents by identifying the actual attack packet(s). The PrISM was always able to detect the attacks, identify the attack packets and most often prevent by blocking the attacker's IP address to continue normal execution. There is no additional run-time performance overhead for attack prevention. (author)

  10. 75 FR 70273 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and... Institute Special Emphasis Panel, The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering to Prevent Heart Attack Trial... Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  11. Increased intrinsic brain connectivity between pons and somatosensory cortex during attacks of migraine with aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik B W; Rostrup, Egill; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-05-01

    The neurological disturbances of migraine aura are caused by transient cortical dysfunction due to waves of spreading depolarization that disrupt neuronal signaling. The effects of these cortical events on intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine aura have not previously been investigated. Studies of spontaneous migraine attacks are notoriously challenging due to their unpredictable nature and patient discomfort. We investigated 16 migraine patients with visual aura during attacks and in the attack-free state using resting state fMRI. We applied a hypothesis-driven seed-based approach focusing on cortical visual areas and areas involved in migraine pain, and a data-driven independent component analysis approach to detect changes in intrinsic brain signaling during attacks. In addition, we performed the analyses after mirroring the MRI data according to the side of perceived aura symptoms. We found a marked increase in connectivity during attacks between the left pons and the left primary somatosensory cortex including the head and face somatotopic areas (peak voxel: P = 0.0096, (x, y, z) = (-54, -32, 32), corresponding well with the majority of patients reporting right-sided pain. For aura-side normalized data, we found increased connectivity during attacks between visual area V5 and the lower middle frontal gyrus in the symptomatic hemisphere (peak voxel: P = 0.0194, (x, y, z) = (40, 40, 12). The present study provides evidence of altered intrinsic brain connectivity during attacks of migraine with aura, which may reflect consequences of cortical spreading depression, suggesting a link between aura and headache mechanisms. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2635-2642, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Caffeine challenge test in panic disorder and depression with panic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Antonio E; Lopes, Fabiana L; Valença, Alexandre M; Freire, Rafael C; Veras, André B; de-Melo-Neto, Valfrido L; Nascimento, Isabella; King, Anna Lucia; Mezzasalma, Marco A; Soares-Filho, Gastão L; Zin, Walter A

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to observe if patients with panic disorder (PD) and patients with major depression with panic attacks (MDP) (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria) respond in a similar way to the induction of panic attacks by an oral caffeine challenge test. We randomly selected 29 patients with PD, 27 with MDP, 25 with major depression without panic attacks (MD), and 28 healthy volunteers. The patients had no psychotropic drug for at least a 4-week period. In a randomized double-blind experiment performed in 2 occasions 7 days apart, 480 mg caffeine and a caffeine-free (placebo) solution were administered in a coffee form and anxiety scales were applied before and after each test. A total of 58.6% (n = 17) of patients with PD, 44.4% (n = 12) of patients with MDP, 12.0% (n = 3) of patients with MD, and 7.1% (n= 2) of control subjects had a panic attack after the 480-mg caffeine challenge test (chi(2)(3) = 16.22, P = .001). The patients with PD and MDP were more sensitive to caffeine than were patients with MD and healthy volunteers. No panic attack was observed after the caffeine-free solution intake. The patients with MD had a lower heart rate response to the test than all the other groups (2-way analysis of variance, group by time interaction with Greenhouse-Geisser correction: F(3,762) = 2.85, P = .026). Our data suggest that there is an association between panic attacks, no matter if associated with PD or MDP, and hyperreactivity to an oral caffeine challenge test.

  13. New Trends in Heart Regeneration: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kochegarov A

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we focus on new approaches that could lead to the regeneration of heart muscle and the restoration of cardiac muscle function derived from newly-formed cardiomyocytes. Various strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, adult bone marrow stem cells and cardiac spheres from human heart biopsies are described. Pathological conditions which lead to atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease often are followed by myocardial infarction causing myocardial cell death. After cell death, there is very little self-regeneration of the cardiac muscle tissue, which is replaced by non-contractile connective tissue, thus weakening the ability of the heart muscle to contract fully and leading to heart failure. A number of experimental research approaches to stimulate heart muscle regeneration with the hope of regaining normal or near normal heart function in the damaged heart muscle have been attempted. Some of these very interesting studies have used a variety of stem cell types in combination with potential cardiogenic differentiation factors in an attempt to promote differentiation of new cardiac muscle for possible future use in the clinical treatment of patients who have suffered heart muscle damage from acute myocardial infarctions or related cardiovascular diseases. Although progress has been made in recent years relative to promoting the differentiation of cardiac muscle tissue from non-muscle cells, much work remains to be done for this technology to be used routinely in translational clinical medicine to treat patients with damaged heart muscle tissue and return such individuals to pre-heart-attack activity levels.

  14. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs......, IR was an independent predictor of sMAC in the CHF group beta = 0.37 (p complement system and thus...

  15. Investigating the Possibility to Individualize Asthma Attack Therapy Based on Attack Severity and Patient Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sárkány Zoltán

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to investigate with the help of a computerized simulation model whether the treatment of an acute asthma attack can be individualized based on the severity of the attack and the characteristics of the patient. Material and Method: A stochastic lung model was used to simulate the deposition of 1 nm - 10 μm particles during a mild and a moderate asthma attack. Breathing parameters were varied to maximize deposition, and simulation results were compared with those obtained in the case of a severe asthma attack. In order to investigate the effect of height on the deposition of inhaled particles, another series of simulations was carried out with identical breathing parameters, comparing patient heights of 155 cm, 175 cm and 195 cm. Results: The optimization process yielded an increase in the maximum deposition values of around 6-7% for each type of investigated asthma attack, and the difference between attacks of different degree of severity was around 5% for both the initial and the optimized values, a higher degree of obstruction increasing the amount of deposited particles. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the individualization of asthma attack treatment cannot be based on particles of different size, as the highest deposited fraction in all three types of attacks can be obtained using 0.01 μm particles. The use of a specific set of breathing parameters yields a difference between a mild and a moderate, as well as a moderate and a severe asthma attack of around 5%.

  16. Terminal attack trajectories of peregrine falcons are described by the proportional navigation guidance law of missiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighton, Caroline H; Thomas, Adrian L R; Taylor, Graham K

    2017-12-19

    The ability to intercept uncooperative targets is key to many diverse flight behaviors, from courtship to predation. Previous research has looked for simple geometric rules describing the attack trajectories of animals, but the underlying feedback laws have remained obscure. Here, we use GPS loggers and onboard video cameras to study peregrine falcons, Falco peregrinus , attacking stationary targets, maneuvering targets, and live prey. We show that the terminal attack trajectories of peregrines are not described by any simple geometric rule as previously claimed, and instead use system identification techniques to fit a phenomenological model of the dynamical system generating the observed trajectories. We find that these trajectories are best-and exceedingly well-modeled by the proportional navigation (PN) guidance law used by most guided missiles. Under this guidance law, turning is commanded at a rate proportional to the angular rate of the line-of-sight between the attacker and its target, with a constant of proportionality (i.e., feedback gain) called the navigation constant ( N ). Whereas most guided missiles use navigation constants falling on the interval 3 ≤ N ≤ 5, peregrine attack trajectories are best fitted by lower navigation constants (median N law could find use in small visually guided drones designed to remove other drones from protected airspace. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  17. A Novel Protective Framework for Defeating HTTP-Based Denial of Service and Distributed Denial of Service Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed A; Abdul Manaf, Azizah

    2015-01-01

    The growth of web technology has brought convenience to our life, since it has become the most important communication channel. However, now this merit is threatened by complicated network-based attacks, such as denial of service (DoS) and distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. Despite many researchers' efforts, no optimal solution that addresses all sorts of HTTP DoS/DDoS attacks is on offer. Therefore, this research aims to fix this gap by designing an alternative solution called a flexible, collaborative, multilayer, DDoS prevention framework (FCMDPF). The innovative design of the FCMDPF framework handles all aspects of HTTP-based DoS/DDoS attacks through the following three subsequent framework's schemes (layers). Firstly, an outer blocking (OB) scheme blocks attacking IP source if it is listed on the black list table. Secondly, the service traceback oriented architecture (STBOA) scheme is to validate whether the incoming request is launched by a human or by an automated tool. Then, it traces back the true attacking IP source. Thirdly, the flexible advanced entropy based (FAEB) scheme is to eliminate high rate DDoS (HR-DDoS) and flash crowd (FC) attacks. Compared to the previous researches, our framework's design provides an efficient protection for web applications against all sorts of DoS/DDoS attacks.

  18. A Novel Protective Framework for Defeating HTTP-Based Denial of Service and Distributed Denial of Service Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Saleh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of web technology has brought convenience to our life, since it has become the most important communication channel. However, now this merit is threatened by complicated network-based attacks, such as denial of service (DoS and distributed denial of service (DDoS attacks. Despite many researchers’ efforts, no optimal solution that addresses all sorts of HTTP DoS/DDoS attacks is on offer. Therefore, this research aims to fix this gap by designing an alternative solution called a flexible, collaborative, multilayer, DDoS prevention framework (FCMDPF. The innovative design of the FCMDPF framework handles all aspects of HTTP-based DoS/DDoS attacks through the following three subsequent framework’s schemes (layers. Firstly, an outer blocking (OB scheme blocks attacking IP source if it is listed on the black list table. Secondly, the service traceback oriented architecture (STBOA scheme is to validate whether the incoming request is launched by a human or by an automated tool. Then, it traces back the true attacking IP source. Thirdly, the flexible advanced entropy based (FAEB scheme is to eliminate high rate DDoS (HR-DDoS and flash crowd (FC attacks. Compared to the previous researches, our framework’s design provides an efficient protection for web applications against all sorts of DoS/DDoS attacks.

  19. Afghanistan: Green-on-Blue Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-02

    killing infidels in their land. In order to mitigate attacks within the ANSF embedded Afghan intelligence agents to watch for any ANA soldier or ANP...said, “Americans use the word f--k all the time.” 37 Many Afghan troops take the meaning sexually , not as a meaningless expletive, the understanding

  20. Rising Trend: Complex and sophisticated attack methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Increased frequency and intensity of DoS/DDoS. Few Gbps is now normal; Anonymous VPNs being used; Botnets being used as a vehicle for launching DDoS attacks. Large scale booking of domain names. Hundred thousands of domains registered in short duration via few registrars; Single registrant; Most of the domains ...

  1. Rising Trend: Complex and sophisticated attack methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stux, DuQu, Nitro, Luckycat, Exploit Kits, FLAME. ADSL/SoHo Router Compromise. Botnets of compromised ADSL/SoHo Routers; User Redirection via malicious DNS entry. Web Application attacks. SQL Injection, RFI etc. More and more Webshells. More utility to hackers; Increasing complexity and evading mechanisms.

  2. Attack Classification Schema for Smart City WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Garcia-Font

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas around the world are populating their streets with wireless sensor networks (WSNs in order to feed incipient smart city IT systems with metropolitan data. In the future smart cities, WSN technology will have a massive presence in the streets, and the operation of municipal services will be based to a great extent on data gathered with this technology. However, from an information security point of view, WSNs can have failures and can be the target of many different types of attacks. Therefore, this raises concerns about the reliability of this technology in a smart city context. Traditionally, security measures in WSNs have been proposed to protect specific protocols in an environment with total control of a single network. This approach is not valid for smart cities, as multiple external providers deploy a plethora of WSNs with different security requirements. Hence, a new security perspective needs to be adopted to protect WSNs in smart cities. Considering security issues related to the deployment of WSNs as a main data source in smart cities, in this article, we propose an intrusion detection framework and an attack classification schema to assist smart city administrators to delimit the most plausible attacks and to point out the components and providers affected by incidents. We demonstrate the use of the classification schema providing a proof of concept based on a simulated selective forwarding attack affecting a parking and a sound WSN.

  3. Attack Classification Schema for Smart City WSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Font, Victor; Garrigues, Carles; Rifà-Pous, Helena

    2017-04-05

    Urban areas around the world are populating their streets with wireless sensor networks (WSNs) in order to feed incipient smart city IT systems with metropolitan data. In the future smart cities, WSN technology will have a massive presence in the streets, and the operation of municipal services will be based to a great extent on data gathered with this technology. However, from an information security point of view, WSNs can have failures and can be the target of many different types of attacks. Therefore, this raises concerns about the reliability of this technology in a smart city context. Traditionally, security measures in WSNs have been proposed to protect specific protocols in an environment with total control of a single network. This approach is not valid for smart cities, as multiple external providers deploy a plethora of WSNs with different security requirements. Hence, a new security perspective needs to be adopted to protect WSNs in smart cities. Considering security issues related to the deployment of WSNs as a main data source in smart cities, in this article, we propose an intrusion detection framework and an attack classification schema to assist smart city administrators to delimit the most plausible attacks and to point out the components and providers affected by incidents. We demonstrate the use of the classification schema providing a proof of concept based on a simulated selective forwarding attack affecting a parking and a sound WSN.

  4. Sequential and Parallel Attack Tree Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, Florian; Guck, Dennis; Kumar, Rajesh; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette; Koornneef, Floor; van Gulijk, Coen

    The intricacy of socio-technical systems requires a careful planning and utilisation of security resources to ensure uninterrupted, secure and reliable services. Even though many studies have been conducted to understand and model the behaviour of a potential attacker, the detection of crucial

  5. Wrap-Attack Pack: Product Packaging Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Hoffman, K. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Although many marketing courses discuss traditional concepts pertaining to product strategy, concepts specifically relating to packaging are often glossed over. This exercise, "Wrap-Attack Pack," teaches students about the utilitarian and hedonic design elements of packaging. More specifically, the primary objective is to creatively…

  6. Shark attack: review of 86 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolgar, J D; Cliff, G; Nair, R; Hafez, H; Robbs, J V

    2001-05-01

    On average there are approximately 50 confirmed shark attacks worldwide annually. Despite their rarity, such incidents often generate much public and media attention. The injuries of 86 consecutive victims of shark attack were reviewed from 1980 to 1999. Clinical data retrieved from the South African Shark Attack Files, maintained by the Natal Sharks Board, were retrospectively analyzed to determine the nature, treatment, and outcome of injuries. The majority of victims (n = 68 [81%]) had relatively minor injuries that required simple primary suture. Those patients (n = 16 [19%]) with more extensive limb lacerations longer than 20 cm or with soft-tissue loss of more than one myofascial compartment were associated with higher morbidity and limb loss. In 8 of the 10 fatalities, death occurred as a result of exsanguinating hemorrhage from a limb vascular injury. Victims of shark attack usually sustain only minor injuries. In more serious cases, particularly if associated with a major vascular injury, hemorrhage control and early resuscitation are of utmost importance during the initial management if these patients are to survive.

  7. Shark Attack! Sinking Your Teeth into Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Herbert

    2002-01-01

    Presents a real life shark attack story and studies arm reattachment surgery to teach human anatomy. Discusses how knowledge of anatomy can be put to use in the real world and how the arm functions. Includes teaching notes and suggestions for classroom management. (YDS)

  8. Algebraic Side-Channel Attack on Twofish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chujiao Ma

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available While algebraic side-channel attack (ASCA has been successful in breaking simple cryptographic algorithms, it has never been done on larger or more complex algorithms such as Twofish. Compared to other algorithms that ASCA has been used on, Twofish is more difficult to attack due to the key-dependent S-boxes as well as the complex key scheduling. In this paper, we propose the first algebraic side-channel attack on Twofish, and examine the importance of side-channel information in getting past the key-dependent S-boxes and the complex key scheduling. The cryptographic algorithm and side-channel information are both expressed as boolean equations and a SAT solver is used to recover the key. While algebraic attack by itself is not sufficient to break the algorithm, with the help of side-channel information such as Hamming weights, we are able to correctly solve for 96 bits of the 128 bits key in under 2 hours with known plaintext/ciphertext.

  9. Association between Terror Attacks and Suicide Attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, Tal; Yagil, Yaron; Schreiber, Shaul

    2009-01-01

    Based on Durkheim's "Control theory," we explored the association between frequency of terror attacks in Israel and the frequency of suicide attempts admitted to the Emergency Room of a major general hospital in Tel-Aviv (1999-2004). Analysis of the six-year study period as a whole revealed no significant correlation between the…

  10. Fighting Through a Logistics Cyber Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-19

    Infiltrating GATES ............................................................................................................ 19 SCADA Vulnerability...not adequately protected; there isn’t sufficient guidance, or funding allocated to the security of our Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition ( SCADA ...attack against a vital system such as GATES, and instead focus her efforts on a less secure more conspicuous system 6 such as the SCADA systems

  11. Strengthening Crypto-1 Cipher Against Algebraic Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Afianti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, several studies addressed the problem of data security in Mifare Classic. One of its weaknesses is the low random number quality. This causes SAT solver attacks to have lower complexity. In order to strengthen Crypto-1 against SAT solver attacks, a modification of the feedback function with better cryptographic properties is proposed. It applies a primitive polynomial companion matrix. SAT solvers cannot directly attack the feedback shift register that uses the modified Boolean feedback function, the register has to be split into smaller groups. Experimental testing showed that the amount of memory and CPU time needed were highest when attacking the modified Crypto-1 using the modified feedback function and the original filter function. In addition, another modified Crypto-1, using the modified feedback function and a modified filter function, had the lowest percentage of revealed variables. It can be concluded that the security strength and performance of the modified Crypto-1 using the modified feedback function and the modified filter function are better than those of the original Crypto-1.

  12. Intrusion-Tolerant Replication under Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Much of our critical infrastructure is controlled by large software systems whose participants are distributed across the Internet. As our dependence on these critical systems continues to grow, it becomes increasingly important that they meet strict availability and performance requirements, even in the face of malicious attacks, including those…

  13. Rhode Island School Terrorist Attack Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Michael W. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the state of safety and terrorist attack preparedness in Rhode Island Schools as determined by Rhode Island school leader perceptions. The study is descriptive in nature as it gathers data to describe a particular event or situation. Using a researcher generated survey based on terrorist preparedness guidelines and suggestions…

  14. Modeling of Aggregate Attacks on Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Galindo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An order factor in combinations of random and targeted attacks on modern scale free network model has been explored. Protection concepts based on timely restructuring of topologies have been discussed. Vulnerability parameter defined by investment value has been introduced, and protection financing strategies depending on node connectivity has been analyzed.

  15. Rising Trend: Complex and sophisticated attack methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Few Gbps is now normal; Anonymous VPNs being used; Botnets being used as a vehicle for launching DDoS attacks ... Single registrant; Most of the domains kept unresolved; Mostly being used for spamming and malware distribution; Many domains are listed as malicious; Poor process control by Domain Registrars.

  16. Quantitative Verification and Synthesis of Attack-Defence Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aslanyan, Zaruhi; Nielson, Flemming; Parker, David

    2016-01-01

    Attack-defence trees are a powerful technique for formally evaluating attack-defence scenarios. They represent in an intuitive, graphical way the interaction between an attacker and a defender who compete in order to achieve conflicting objectives. We propose a novel framework for the formal...... analysis of quantitative properties of complex attack-defence scenarios, using an extension of attack-defence trees which models temporal ordering of actions and allows explicit dependencies in the strategies adopted by attackers and defenders. We adopt a game-theoretic approach, translating attack......-defence trees to two-player stochastic games, and then employ probabilistic model checking techniques to formally analyse these models. This provides a means to both verify formally specified security properties of the attack-defence scenarios and, dually, to synthesise strategies for attackers or defenders...

  17. Transforming Graphical System Models to Graphical Attack Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2016-01-01

    Manually identifying possible attacks on an organisation is a complex undertaking; many different factors must be considered, and the resulting attack scenarios can be complex and hard to maintain as the organisation changes. System models provide a systematic representation of organisations...... that helps in structuring attack identification and can integrate physical, virtual, and social components. These models form a solid basis for guiding the manual identification of attack scenarios. Their main benefit, however, is in the analytic generation of attacks. In this work we present a systematic...... approach to transforming graphical system models to graphical attack models in the form of attack trees. Based on an asset in the model, our transformations result in an attack tree that represents attacks by all possible actors in the model, after which the actor in question has obtained the asset....

  18. An Adaptive Approach for Defending against DDoS Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhai Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In various network attacks, the Distributed Denial-of-Service (DDoS attack is a severe threat. In order to deal with this kind of attack in time, it is necessary to establish a special type of defense system to change strategy dynamically against attacks. In this paper, we introduce an adaptive approach, which is used for defending against DDoS attacks, based on normal traffic analysis. The approach can check DDoS attacks and adaptively adjust its configurations according to the network condition and attack severity. In order to insure the common users to visit the victim server that is being attacked, we provide a nonlinear traffic control formula for the system. Our simulation test indicates that the nonlinear control approach can prevent the malicious attack packets effectively while making legitimate traffic flows arrive at the victim.

  19. Psychosocial Predictors of Adverse Events in Heart Failure: The Utility of Multiple Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    Heart Failure Hospitalization in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Without Previously Diagnosed Heart Failure: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort...psychiatry 33:636-41 82. Tennant CC, Langeluddecke PM, Fulcher G, Wilby J. 1988. Acute and chronic life event stress in coronary atherosclerosis...underlying causes of heart failure include coronary heart disease, hypertension, valvular 15 heart disease, chronic pulmonary disease

  20. Blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular and ischemic heart disease, and longevity in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity.......Because elastase in alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency may attack elastin in the arterial wall, we tested whether alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency is associated with reduced blood pressure, risk of ischemic cerebrovascular (ICVD) and ischemic heart disease (IHD), and longevity....

  1. Error and attack vulnerability of temporal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajanovski, S.; Scellato, S.; Leontiadis, I.

    2012-06-01

    The study of real-world communication systems via complex network models has greatly expanded our understanding on how information flows, even in completely decentralized architectures such as mobile wireless networks. Nonetheless, static network models cannot capture the time-varying aspects and, therefore, various temporal metrics have been introduced. In this paper, we investigate the robustness of time-varying networks under various failures and intelligent attacks. We adopt a methodology to evaluate the impact of such events on the network connectivity by employing temporal metrics in order to select and remove nodes based on how critical they are considered for the network. We also define the temporal robustness range, a new metric that quantifies the disruption caused by an attack strategy to a given temporal network. Our results show that in real-world networks, where some nodes are more dominant than others, temporal connectivity is significantly more affected by intelligent attacks than by random failures. Moreover, different intelligent attack strategies have a similar effect on the robustness: even small subsets of highly connected nodes act as a bottleneck in the temporal information flow, becoming critical weak points of the entire system. Additionally, the same nodes are the most important across a range of different importance metrics, expressing the correlation between highly connected nodes and those that trigger most of the changes in the optimal information spreading. Contrarily, we show that in randomly generated networks, where all the nodes have similar properties, random errors and intelligent attacks exhibit similar behavior. These conclusions may help us in design of more robust systems and fault-tolerant network architectures.

  2. Recovery of human remains after shark attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byard, Roger W; James, Ross A; Heath, Karen J

    2006-09-01

    Two cases of fatal shark attack are reported where the only tissues recovered were fragments of lung. Case 1: An 18-year-old male who was in the sea behind a boat was observed by friends to be taken by a great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). The shark dragged him under the water and then, with a second shark, dismembered the body. Witnesses noted a large amount of blood and unrecognizable body parts coming to the surface. The only tissues recovered despite an intensive beach and sea search were 2 fragments of lung. Case 2: A 19-year-old male was attacked by a great white shark while diving. A witness saw the shark swim away with the victim's body in its mouth. Again, despite intensive beach and sea searches, the only tissue recovered was a single piece of lung, along with pieces of wetsuit and diving equipment. These cases indicate that the only tissue to escape being consumed or lost in fatal shark attacks, where there is a significant attack with dismemberment and disruption of the integrity of the body, may be lung. The buoyancy of aerated pulmonary tissue ensures that it rises quickly to the surface, where it may be recovered by searchers soon after the attack. Aeration of the lung would be in keeping with death from trauma rather than from drowning and may be a useful marker in unwitnessed deaths to separate ante- from postmortem injury, using only relatively small amounts of tissues. Early organ recovery enhances the identification of human tissues as the extent of morphologic alterations by putrefactive processes and sea scavengers will have been minimized. DNA testing is also possible on such recovered fragments, enabling confirmation of the identity of the victim.

  3. Alloys influence in ferritic steels with hydrogen attack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L; Rey Saravia, D; Lombardich, J; Saggio, M; Juan, A; Blanco, J

    2003-01-01

    Materials exposed to a corrosive environment and high temperatures, are associated with a decrease of their mechanical properties and embitterment.At room temperatures atomic hydrogen diffuses easily through metals structure, it accumulates in lattice defects forming molecular hydrogen and generating cracking due to internal stresses.Under high temperatures the phenomenon is more complex.The steels in these conditions present different structures of precipitates, that the change under creep conditions period.In this work it is determined the influence of Cr and V alloys, the changes of ferritic steel resistance in a corrosive environment and high temperatures.1.25 Cr 1 Mo 0.25 V and 2.25Cr 1 Mo under different loads and temperatures previously attacked by hydrogen environment.The hydrogen is induced by the electrolytic technique, optimizing the choice of temperatures, current density, electrolyte, etc. In order to control an adequate cathode charge, a follow up procedure is carried out by electronic barrier microscopy.After the attack, the material is settled at room temperatures for certain period of time, to allow the hydrogen to leave and evaluate the residual damage.Creep by torsion assays, under constant load and temperature is used as an experimental technique.With the outcome data curves are drawn in order to study the secondary creep rate, with the applied load and temperature, determining the value of stress exponent n and the activation energy Q.Comparing to equal assays to the same ferritic steels but non attacked by hydrogen, these values allows the prediction of microstructure changes present during these tests

  4. Modelling Social-Technical Attacks with Timed Automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    David, Nicolas; David, Alexandre; Hansen, Rene Rydhof

    2015-01-01

    Attacks on a system often exploit vulnerabilities that arise from human behaviour or other human activity. Attacks of this type, so-called socio-technical attacks, cover everything from social engineering to insider attacks, and they can have a devastating impact on an unprepared organisation....... In this paper we develop an approach towards modelling socio-technical systems in general and socio-technical attacks in particular, using timed automata and illustrate its application by a complex case study. Thanks to automated model checking and automata theory, we can automatically generate possible attacks...

  5. Optimal counterterrorism and the recruitment effect of large terrorist attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    makes it more likely that terrorist cells plan small rather than large attacks and therefore may increase the probability of a successful attack. Analyzing optimal counterterrorism we see that the recruitment effect makes authorities increase the level of counterterrorism after large attacks. Therefore......, in periods following large attacks a new attack is more likely to be small compared to other periods. Finally, we analyze the long-run consequences of the recruitment effect. We show that it leads to more counterterrorism, more small attacks, and a higher sum of terrorism damage and counterterrorism costs...

  6. Piranha attacks in dammed streams used for human recreation in the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Vidal; Sazima, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, attacks by piranhas have become a common problem in dammed portions of rivers and streams in the State of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. In two outbreaks recorded in two neighboring counties in the Northwest region of the state, 74 bathers were bitten. Only one bite per person was recorded during a short period of the year. The bites were related to parental care and/or defense of spawning territory, which confirms previous studies and demystify the attacks by these legendary fish, as they are perceived by most people. Placement of fine mesh nets and removal of aquatic vegetation stopped the attacks.

  7. Why are heart operations postponed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos Dimitrios

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To investigate the reasons that lead to postponement of cardiac operations, in order to elucidate the problem and help patients through modes of prevention. Methods-Design We retrospectively included in the study all patients submitted to elective adult heart surgery in our department during the 4-year period 2007-2010 and noted all cases of postponement after official inclusion in the operating schedule. Results 94 out of a total of 575 patients (16.34% scheduled for elective cardiac operation had their procedure postponed. The reasons were mainly organisatory (in 49 cases, 52.12%, which in order of significance were: unavailability in operating rooms, shortage in matching erythrocyte units and shortage in anaesthetic/nursing staff. The rest of the cases (45, 47.88% were postponed due to medical reasons, which in order of significance were: febrile situations, including infections of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary system, problems with the regulation of antiplatelet and antithrombotic drugs, neurological manifestations such as stroke and transient ischaemic attacks, exacerbation of asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arrhythmias, renal problems and allergic reactions to drugs. Patients with advanced age and increased Euroscore values were most possible to have their heart operation postponed. Conclusions Heart operations are postponed due to organisatory as well as medical reasons, the latter mainly affecting older, morbid patients who therefore require advanced preoperative care.

  8. Open-Heart surgery and cerebrovascular accident: retrospective study at King Khalid University Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Satli, R.A.; Takrouri, Mohammad S.M.; Al-Daif, A.; Fouda, Mohamed N.; Maher, S.; Al-Khwsky, F.

    2000-01-01

    Stroke after coronary by-pass grafting (CABG) is often disabling. The incidence of ischemic stroke may approach 3% to 5%. Several risk factors have been identified including previous history of stroke, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass time, and postoperative atrial fibrillation. Objective was to determine the incidence and risk factors of neurological deficit after open heart surgery. Retrospective study was done during the period 1992-1995 at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. There were 350 patients who were subjected to (CABG), 10 patients (2.8%) found to suffer from cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) following open-heart surgery. In 8 patients, the complaint lasted more than 24 hours (stroke), while 2 patients developed transient ischemic attacks (TIA). Five factors were found to be associated with increased risk of post cardiac surgery CVA. These factors are postoperative atrial fibrillation, carotid bruit, past history of heart failure, past history of CVA and smoking. The authors concluded that it is necessary to start a prospective study to verify the area of improvement with regards to technique, selection of patients and mode of perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) Arabia. (author)

  9. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  10. Carbachol induces headache, but not migraine-like attacks, in patients with migraine without aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, H W; Wienecke, T; Olesen, J

    2009-01-01

    Schytz HW, Wienecke T, Olesen J & Ashina M. Carbachol induces headache, but not migraine-like attacks, in patients with migraine without aura. Cephalalgia 2009. London. ISSN 0333-1024Carbachol induces headache in healthy subjects, but the migraine eliciting effect of carbachol has not previously...... been studied. We hypothesized that the cholinomimetic agonist carbachol would induce headache and migraine-like attacks in migraineurs. Carbachol (3 microg/kg) or placebo was randomly infused into 18 patients with migraine without aura in a double-blind crossover study. Headache was scored on a verbal...

  11. Watch-Nodes-Based Wormhole Attacks Detection in Wireless Mesh Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-yu Luan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Wormhole attacks, as a devastating type of threats in wireless mesh networks, have received much attention in recent years. This paper proposes a type of wormhole attack model and its corresponding detection scheme. In this scheme, the combination of a number of techniques, such as distributed voting, watch-nodes-based detection and identity-based cryptosystem are used. The simulation results and qualitative analysis demonstrate the performance and cost of the proposed scheme are more advantageous over the some of the previous schemes.

  12. Cyber-Attacks on Smart Meters in Household Nanogrid: Modeling, Simulation and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Tellbach; Yan-Fu Li

    2018-01-01

    The subject of cyber-security and therefore cyber-attacks on smart grid (SG) has become subject of many publications in the last years, emphasizing its importance in research, as well as in practice. One especially vulnerable part of SG are smart meters (SMs). The major contribution of simulating a variety of cyber-attacks on SMs that have not been done in previous studies is the identification and quantification of the possible impacts on the security of SG. In this study, a simulation model...

  13. Improving the security of arbitrated quantum signature against the forgery attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke-Jia; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Li, Dan

    2013-08-01

    As a feasible model for signing quantum messages, some cryptanalysis and improvement of arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) have received a great deal of attentions in recent years. However, in this paper we find the previous improvement is not suitable implemented in some typical AQS protocols in the sense that the receiver, Bob, can forge a valid signature under known message attack. We describe the forgery strategy and present some corresponding improved strategies to stand against the forgery attack by modifying the encryption algorithm, an important part of AQS. These works preserve the merits of AQS and lead some potential improvements of the security in quantum signature or other cryptography problems.

  14. Attacks on Heartbeat-Based Security Using Remote Photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepers, Robert Mark; Wang, Wenjin; de Haan, Gerard; Sourdis, Ioannis; Strydis, Christos

    2018-05-01

    The time interval between consecutive heartbeats (interpulse interval, IPI) has previously been suggested for securing mobile-health solutions. This time interval is known to contain a degree of randomness, permitting the generation of a time- and person-specific identifier. It is commonly assumed that only devices trusted by a person can make physical contact with him/her, and that this physical contact allows each device to generate a similar identifier based on its own cardiac recordings. Under these conditions, the identifiers generated by different trusted devices can facilitate secure authentication. Recently, a wide range of techniques have been proposed for measuring heartbeats remotely, a prominent example of which is remote photoplethysmography (rPPG). These techniques may pose a significant threat to heartbeat-based security, as an adversary may pretend to be a trusted device by generating a similar identifier without physical contact, thus bypassing one of the core security conditions. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of such remote attacks using state-of-the-art rPPG methods. Our evaluation shows that rPPG has similar accuracy as contact PPG and, thus, forms a substantial threat to heartbeat-based-security systems that permit trusted devices to obtain their identifiers from contact PPG recordings. Conversely, rPPG cannot obtain an accurate representation of an identifier generated from electrical cardiac signals, making the latter invulnerable to state-of-the-art remote attacks.

  15. Cyber-Attacks and the Risks for CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Computer Security Team

    2013-01-01

    In the previous Bulletin, we discussed the cyber-risks for the accelerator complex. However, looking at the broader picture, the cyber-risks for CERN are much more diverse.   Attacks can not only harm the operation of accelerators or experiments, but also impact negatively on the operation of the Organization as a whole and/or its reputation. This would not only hamper and impede our work while making us looking plain stupid, but might also make funding agencies reconsider whether their money is well invested in CERN… Examples? Sure, let’s be imaginative! What would be the consequences, if: a laptop holding sensitive CERN documents is lost or stolen, and ends up on eBay? your password is compromised and your mail account misused to send nasty messages to thousands of external mail addresses? an attacker manages to add photos of naked women/men onto a prominent CERN website, and boasts about this on Twitter? confidential documents like job application forms or passwo...

  16. Anticollusion Attack Noninteractive Security Hierarchical Key Agreement Scheme in WHMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kefei Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Health Monitoring Systems (WHMS have potential to change the way of health care and bring numbers of benefits to patients, physicians, hospitals, and society. However, there are crucial barriers not only to transmit the biometric information but also to protect the privacy and security of the patients’ information. The key agreement between two entities is an essential cryptography operation to clear the barriers. In particular, the noninteractive hierarchical key agreement scheme becomes an attractive direction in WHMS because each sensor node or gateway has limited resources and power. Recently, a noninteractive hierarchical key agreement scheme has been proposed by Kim for WHMS. However, we show that Kim’s cryptographic scheme is vulnerable to the collusion attack if the physicians can be corrupted. Obviously, it is a more practical security condition. Therefore, we proposed an improved key agreement scheme against the attack. Security proof, security analysis, and experimental results demonstrate that our proposed scheme gains enhanced security and more efficiency than Kim’s previous scheme while inheriting its qualities of one-round communication and security properties.

  17. Bush animal attacks: management of complex injuries in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Katrina B

    2011-12-01

    important to understand the management of these attacks in resource-limited health care environment. Further, the growing population and human encroachment on previously wild habitats such as the northwestern Tanzania bush argues for increased community awareness to assist in prevention of human injuries by animals.

  18. Ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation in refractory short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sarah; Akram, Harith; Lagrata, Susie; Hariz, Marwan; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Matharu, Manjit

    2016-10-01

    SEE LEONE AND PROIETTI CECCHINI DOI101093/AWW233 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks are primary headache disorders characterized by short-lasting attacks of unilateral pain accompanied by autonomic features. A small minority are refractory to medical treatment. Neuroimaging studies have suggested a role of the posterior hypothalamic region in their pathogenesis. Previous case reports on deep brain stimulation of this region, now understood to be the ventral tegmental area, for this disorder are limited to a total of three patients. We present a case series of 11 new patients treated with ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation in an uncontrolled, open-label prospective observational study. Eleven patients with refractory short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks underwent ipsilateral ventral tegmental area deep brain stimulation in a specialist unit. All patients had failed, or been denied access to, occipital nerve stimulation within the UK's National Health Service. Primary endpoint was change in mean daily attack frequency at final follow-up. Secondary outcomes included attack severity, attack duration, headache load (a composite score of attack frequency, severity and duration), quality of life measures, disability and affective scores. Information was also collected on adverse events. Eleven patients (six male) with a median age of 50 years (range 26-67) were implanted between 2009 and 2014. Median follow-up was 29 months (range 7-63). At final follow-up the median improvement in daily attack frequency was 78% (interquartile range 33%). Response rate (defined as at least a 50% improvement in daily attack frequency) was 82% and four patients were rendered pain-free for prolonged periods of time. Headache load improved by 99% (interquartile range 52%). Improvements were observed in a number of quality of life, disability and affect measures. Adverse events included mild incision

  19. Diverticulitis Diet: Can Certain Foods Trigger an Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... there trigger foods I should avoid to prevent diverticulitis attacks? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Actually, no specific foods are known to trigger diverticulitis attacks. And no special diet has been proved ...

  20. Cyber Attacks During the War on Terrorism: A Predictive Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vatis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ... responsible for the attack. This paper examines case studies of political conflicts that have led to attacks on cyber systems, such as the recent clashes between India and Pakistan, Israel and the Palestinians, and NATO...

  1. Information Warfare: Defining the Legal Response to An Attack

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pottorff, James

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the difficulty in determining whether an information warfare attack, such as a computer virus, can be treated as an "armed attack" for purposes of national defense under the United Nations charter. As the U.S...

  2. Denial of Service Attack Techniques: Analysis, Implementation and Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Elleithy

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available A denial of service attack (DOS is any type of attack on a networking structure to disable a server from servicing its clients. Attacks range from sending millions of requests to a server in an attempt to slow it down, flooding a server with large packets of invalid data, to sending requests with an invalid or spoofed IP address. In this paper we show the implementation and analysis of three main types of attack: Ping of Death, TCP SYN Flood, and Distributed DOS. The Ping of Death attack will be simulated against a Microsoft Windows 95 computer. The TCP SYN Flood attack will be simulated against a Microsoft Windows 2000 IIS FTP Server. Distributed DOS will be demonstrated by simulating a distribution zombie program that will carry the Ping of Death attack. This paper will demonstrate the potential damage from DOS attacks and analyze the ramifications of the damage.

  3. Cyber Attacks During the War on Terrorism: A Predictive Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vatis, Michael

    2001-01-01

    .... Just as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 defied what many thought possible, cyber attacks could escalate in response to United States and allied retaliatory measures against the terrorists...

  4. Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilland, D. [Kirkland AFB, NM (United States). Air Force Research Lab.; Phipps, G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Optics & Technologies Dept.; Jingle, C.; Newton, G. [Schafer Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The Air Force Research Laboratory`s Satellite Threat Warning and Attack Reporting (STW/AR) program will provide technologies for advanced threat warning and reporting of radio frequency (RF) and laser threats. The STW/AR program objectives are: (a) develop cost- effective technologies to detect, identify, locate, characterize, and report attacks or interference against U.S. and Allied satellites. (b) demonstrate innovative, light-weight, low-power, laser and RF sensors. The program focuses on the demonstration of RF and laser sensors. The RF sensor effort includes the investigation of interferometric antenna arrays, multi-arm spiral and butler matrix antennas, wideband receivers, adaptive processors, and improved processing algorithms. The laser sensor effort includes the investigation of alternative detectors, broadband grating and optical designs, active pixel sensing, and improved processing algorithms.

  5. Quantum Communication Attacks on Classical Cryptographic Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgård, Ivan Bjerre

    , one can show that the protocol remains secure even under such an attack. However, there are also cases where the honest players are quantum as well, even if the protocol uses classical communication. For instance, this is the case when classical multiparty computation is used as a “subroutine......” in quantum multiparty computation. Furthermore, in the future, players in a protocol may employ quantum computing simply to improve efficiency of their local computation, even if the communication is supposed to be classical. In such cases, it no longer seems clear that a quantum adversary must be limited......In the literature on cryptographic protocols, it has been studied several times what happens if a classical protocol is attacked by a quantum adversary. Usually, this is taken to mean that the adversary runs a quantum algorithm, but communicates classically with the honest players. In several cases...

  6. Research About Attacks Over Cloud Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is expected to continue expanding in the next few years and people will start to see some of the following benefits in their real lives. Security of cloud computing environments is the set of control-based technologies and policies absolute to adhere regulatory compliance rules and protect information data applications and infrastructure related with cloud use. In this paper we suggest a model to estimating the cloud computing security and test the services provided to users. The simulator NG-Cloud Next Generation Secure Cloud Storage is used and modified to administer the proposed model. This implementation achieved security functions potential attacks as defined in the proposed model. Finally we also solve some attacks over cloud computing to provide the security and safety of the cloud.

  7. Two fatal tiger attacks in zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantius, Britta; Wittschieber, Daniel; Schmidt, Sven; Rothschild, Markus A; Banaschak, Sibylle

    2016-01-01

    Two captive tiger attacks are presented that took place in Cologne and Münster zoos. Both attacks occurred when the handlers, intent on cleaning the enclosures, entered whilst the tigers accidently retained access to the location, and thus defended their territory against the perceived intruders. Both victims suffered fatal neck injuries from the bites. At Münster, colleagues managed to lure the tiger away from its victim to enable treatment, whilst the Cologne zoo tiger had to be shot in order to allow access to be gained. Whilst it was judged that human error led to the deaths of the experienced zookeepers, the investigation in Münster was closed as no third party was found to be at fault, whereas the Cologne zoo director was initially charged with being negligent. These charges were subsequently dismissed as safety regulations were found to be up to date.

  8. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  9. Presentation attack detection in voice biometrics

    OpenAIRE

    Korshunov, Pavel; Marcel, Sébastien; Vielhauer, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Recent years have shown an increase in both the accuracy of biometric systems and their practical use. The application of biometrics is becoming widespread with fingerprint sensors in smartphones, automatic face recognition in social networks and video-based applications, and speaker recognition in phone banking and other phone-based services. The popularization of the biometric systems, however, exposed their major flaw --- high vulnerability to spoofing attacks. A fingerprint sensor can be ...

  10. A Study of Gaps in Attack Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-12

    necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Defense. © 2016 MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Delivered to the U.S. Government with...and identify cyber attacks reflects the “arms race” na- ture of the cyber domain. While defenders develop new and improved techniques to detect known...Trost. Digging into ShellShock Exploitation attempts using ShockPot Data. https://www.threatstream.com/ blog /shockpot-exploitation-analysis, September

  11. Collision attack against Tav-128 hash function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariyanto, Fajar; Hayat Susanti, Bety

    2017-10-01

    Tav-128 is a hash function which is designed for Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) authentication protocol. Tav-128 is expected to be a cryptographically secure hash function which meets collision resistance properties. In this research, a collision attack is done to prove whether Tav-128 is a collision resistant hash function. The results show that collisions can be obtained in Tav-128 hash function which means in other word, Tav-128 is not a collision resistant hash function.

  12. Modeling inter-signal arrival times for accurate detection of CAN bus signal injection attacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Michael Roy [ORNL; Bridges, Robert A [ORNL; Combs, Frank L [ORNL; Starr, Michael S [ORNL; Prowell, Stacy J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Modern vehicles rely on hundreds of on-board electronic control units (ECUs) communicating over in-vehicle networks. As external interfaces to the car control networks (such as the on-board diagnostic (OBD) port, auxiliary media ports, etc.) become common, and vehicle-to-vehicle / vehicle-to-infrastructure technology is in the near future, the attack surface for vehicles grows, exposing control networks to potentially life-critical attacks. This paper addresses the need for securing the CAN bus by detecting anomalous traffic patterns via unusual refresh rates of certain commands. While previous works have identified signal frequency as an important feature for CAN bus intrusion detection, this paper provides the first such algorithm with experiments on five attack scenarios. Our data-driven anomaly detection algorithm requires only five seconds of training time (on normal data) and achieves true positive / false discovery rates of 0.9998/0.00298, respectively (micro-averaged across the five experimental tests).

  13. Attacking Paper-Based E2E Voting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, John; Regenscheid, Andrew; Moran, Tal; Chaum, David

    In this paper, we develop methods for constructing vote-buying/coercion attacks on end-to-end voting systems, and describe vote-buying/coercion attacks on three proposed end-to-end voting systems: Punchscan, Prêt-à-voter, and ThreeBallot. We also demonstrate a different attack on Punchscan, which could permit corrupt election officials to change votes without detection in some cases. Additionally, we consider some generic attacks on end-to-end voting systems.

  14. Your heart might give away your emotions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laundav, David Kristian; Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk; Bækgaard, Per

    2014-01-01

    Estimating emotional responses to pictures based on heart rate measurements: Variations in Heart Rate serves as an important clinical health indicator, but potentially also as a window into cognitive reactions to presented stimuli, as a function of both stimuli, context and previous cognitive state....... This study looks at single-trial time domain mean Heart Rate (HR) and frequency domain Heart Rate Variability (HRV) measured while subjects were passively viewing emotionally engaging images, comparing short random presentations with grouped sequences of either neutral, highly arousing pleasant or highly...

  15. Iraqi violence, Saudi attack and further bombings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2006-03-15

    Iraq moved closer to all-out civil war following an attack on the Imam Ali al-Hadi mosque in Samarra, one of Shi'i Islam's holiest shrines, on 22nd February. In the days that followed, several hundred Iraqis died in inter-communal violence. Attacks on installations close to the Basrah Oil Terminal were reported. Earlier in the month, the main oil storage facility in Kirkuk was bombed, forcing the Northern Oil Company to shut-in the 0.3 mn bpd field. Oil and electricity supplies in southern Iraq were cut by attacks on installations some 40 miles south of Baghdad. Turkey agreed to resume product exports to Iraq after a deal was agreed on repaying Iraqi debts of $1 bn to Turkish suppliers. An official Australian inquiry into illegal payments made under the UN's oil-for-food programme is to investigate allegations involving two Australian-controlled oil firms. (author)

  16. Smoking behaviour under intense terrorist attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keinan-Boker, Lital; Kohn, Robert; Billig, Miriam; Levav, Itzhak

    2011-06-01

    Smoking is one of the varied psychological reactions to stress. This study examined the rate and changes in cigarette smoking among former Gaza and current West Bank Jewish settlers subjected to direct and indirect terrorist attacks during the Al-Aksa Intifada. The relationship with degree of religious observance and emotional distress was explored as well. In this cross-sectional study, the respondents were settlers randomly selected and interviewed by telephone (N = 706). The interview schedule included socio-demographic items, information on direct exposure to terrorist attacks (e.g. threat to life or physical integrity, personal losses, property damage) and on steady and changes in smoking habits, and a scale to measure emotional distress. In contrast with the country population, a larger percentage of settlers who smoked increased the number of cigarettes consumed with exposure to terrorism (10 and 27%, respectively). Respondents who were injured or had their home damaged reported a higher rate of smoking during the preceding year (30 and 20%, respectively). Emotional distress was related to cigarette smoking, but not in the controlled analysis. Religious observance had no effect. Direct or indirect exposure to terrorist attacks had an impact on smoking prevalence rates and on changes in smoking habits. Studies investigating reactions to traumatic events should include a detailed section on smoking while mental health interventions should address the needs of smokers.

  17. Cardiovascular Reactivity and Heart Rate Variability in Panic Disorder

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santiago, Helen T

    1999-01-01

    .... Because previous studies of cardiovascular reactivity and heart rate variability have been inconclusive, these factors were re-examined in panickers and controls during physiological challenge...

  18. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  19. Link-layer jamming attacks on S-MAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Y.W.; Hartel, Pieter H.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    We argue that among denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, link-layer jamming is a more attractive option to attackers than radio jamming is. By exploiting the semantics of the link-layer protocol (aka MAC protocol), an attacker can achieve better efficiency than blindly jamming the radio signals alone.

  20. Link-layer Jamming Attacks on S-MAC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, Y.W.; Hartel, Pieter H.; den Hartog, Jeremy; Havinga, Paul J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We argue that among denial-of-service (DoS) attacks, link-layer jamming is a more attractive option to attackers than radio jamming is. By exploiting the semantics of the link-layer protocol (aka MAC protocol), an attacker can achieve better efficiency than blindly jamming the radio signals alone.