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Sample records for previous geochemical analyses

  1. Paternity after vasectomy with two previous semen analyses without spermatozoa

    OpenAIRE

    Lucon, Marcos; Lucon, Antonio Marmo; Pasqualoto, Fabio Firmbach; Srougi, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: The risk of paternity after vasectomy is rare but still exists. Overall failure to achieve sterility after vasectomy occurs in 0.2 to 5.3% of patients due to technical failure or recanalization. The objective of this report was to describe a rare but notable case of proven paternity in which the semen analyses had not given evidence of spermatozoa. CASE REPORT: A 44-year-old vasectomized man whose semen analyses had shown azoospermia became a father four years after sterilization. Bl...

  2. Petrographic and Geochemical Analyses of Kirana Hills Shield Rocks around Sargodha and Economic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Waseem Khan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with geochemical and petrographic analysis of the Kirana Hill shield rocks of Punjab plains from Buland, Hachi, Shaheen Abad, Shaikh and Machh hills. On basis of the current studies certain modifications have been made in the classification and nomenclature of rocks exposed in the study areas. Chemical analyses have also been carried out in order to calculate Cross Iddings, Pirsson, and Washington (CIPW norms”, to strengthen nomenclature scheme and finally rocks are classified by using “MAGMA SOFTWARE”. Rhyolites predominate over the basalts/dolerites, andesites, and phyllite/ slate. Rhyolitic rocks are light grey, greenish grey and light brown in color, aphanitic in nature. The observed microscopic textures are aphyric, phyric or porphyritic and micropoikilitc. Moreover, some rhyolitic rocks also show flow texture. They are either cryptocrystalline to microcrystalline or microcrystalline to cryptocrystalline. No glassy material has been observed in any thin section. Mafic rocks are characterized by the presence of ferromagnesian minerals with plagioclase. Andesites exhibit mainly porphyritic texture, but aphyric texture has also been observed in few samples. Hydrothermal alterations are also very common in these rocks. Other rock assemblages identified during laboratory studies from Kirana area include: tuffs i.e. (Lithic Crystal Tuff and Lithic Tuff, basaltic andesite, rhyodacite/ dacite, slate/ phyllite, ankeritic rocks/ veins and quartzofeldspathic veins. Our studies also reveal that no evidence of quartzite has been found in the samples collected from above mentioned areas of Kirana, although it has been reported in previous literature. Iron (Fe has been observed in rhyolite as well as other volcanic rocks of Kirana hills, its presence suggests magma from deep mantle instead of crustal melting / anatexis. In the present analysis some primary and secondary copper minerals including chalcopyrite, atacamite and

  3. The Use of Univariate and Multivariate Analyses in the Geochemical Exploration, Ravanj Lead Mine, Delijan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Nejadhadad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A geochemical exploration program was applied to recognize the anomalous geochemical haloes at the Ravanj lead mine, Delijan, Iran. Sampling of unweathered rocks were undertaken across rock exposures on a 10 × 10 meter grid (n = 302 as well as the accessible parts of underground mine A (n = 42. First, the threshold values of all elements were determined using the cut-off values used in the exploratory data analysis (EDA method. Then, for further studies, elements with lognormal distributions (Pb, Zn, Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Sb, S, Sr, Th, Ba, Bi, Fe, Ni and Mn were selected. Robustness against outliers is achieved by application of central log ratio transformation to address the closure problems with compositional data prior to principle components analysis (PCA. Results of these analyses show that, in the Ravanj deposit, Pb mineralization is characterized by a Pb-Ba-Ag-Sb ± Zn ± Cd association. The supra-mineralization haloes are characterized by barite and tetrahedrite in a Ba- Th- Ag- Cu- Sb- As- Sr association and sub-mineralization haloes are comprised of pyrite and tetrahedrite, probably reflecting a Fe-Cu-As-Bi-Ni-Co-Mo-Mn association. Using univariate and multivariate geostatistical analyses (e.g., EDA and robust PCA, four anomalies were detected and mapped in Block A of the Ravanj deposit. Anomalies 1 and 2 are around the ancient orebodies. Anomaly 3 is located in a thin bedded limestone-shale intercalation unit that does not show significant mineralization. Drilling of the fourth anomaly suggested a low grade, non-economic Pb mineralization.

  4. Identification of magnetic particulates in road dust accumulated on roadside snow using magnetic, geochemical and micro-morphological analyses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bućko, M. S.; Magiera, T.; Johanson, B.; Petrovský, Eduard; Pesonen, L. J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 5 (2011), s. 1266-1276 ISSN 0269-7491 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : road dust * vehicle emissions * magnetic properties * snow * geochemical analyses Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 3.746, year: 2011

  5. Classification of geochemical data based on multivariate statistical analyses: Complementary roles of cluster, principal component, and independent component analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamori, Hikaru; Yoshida, Kenta; Nakamura, Hitomi; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Hamada, Morihisa; Haraguchi, Satoru; Ueki, Kenta

    2017-03-01

    Identifying the data structure including trends and groups/clusters in geochemical problems is essential to discuss the origin of sources and processes from the observed variability of data. An increasing number and high dimensionality of recent geochemical data require efficient and accurate multivariate statistical analysis methods. In this paper, we show the relationship and complementary roles of k-means cluster analysis (KCA), principal component analysis (PCA), and independent component analysis (ICA) to capture the true data structure. When the data are preprocessed by primary standardization (i.e., with the zero mean and normalized by the standard deviation), KCA and PCA provide essentially the same results, although the former returns the solution in a discretized space. When the data are preprocessed by whitening (i.e., normalized by eigenvalues along the principal components), KCA and ICA may identify a set of independent trends and groups, irrespective of the amplitude (power) of variance. As an example, basalt isotopic compositions have been analyzed with KCA on the whitened data, demonstrating clear rock type/tectonic occurrence/mantle end-member discrimination. Therefore, the combination of these methods, particularly KCA on whitened data, is useful to capture and discuss the data structure of various geochemical systems, for which an Excel program is provided.

  6. Exercise and sleep: a systematic review of previous meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, George A; Kelley, Kristi Sharpe

    2017-02-01

    Conduct a systematic review of previous meta-analyses on exercise and sleep outcomes in adults and a meta-analysis of studies nested within these meta-analyses. Meta-analyses of randomized controlled exercise interventions were included by searching nine electronic databases and cross-referencing. Dual-selection and data abstraction were conducted. Methodological quality of meta-analyses was assessed using AMSTAR and quality of evidence using GRADE. Random-effects models were used to pool results from the individual studies included in each meta-analysis. Three meta-analyses representing 950 adults were included. Methodological quality ranged from 36% to 64% while quality of evidence was very low to low. Statistically significant improvements (P ≤ 0.05) were observed for the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), overall sleep quality, global score, subjective sleep, and sleep latency. The number-needed-to-treat (NNT) and percentile improvements ranged from 4 to 7 and from 18.1 to 26.5, respectively. When overall sleep quality results from individual studies nested within different meta-analyses were pooled, statistically significant standardized mean difference (SMD) improvements were observed (-0.50, 95% CI -0.72 to -0.28). The NNT and percentile improvement were 7 and 19, respectively. Exercise improves selected sleep outcomes in adults. To increase public health reach, a large, well-designed, and more inclusive meta-analysis is needed. © 2016 Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Instrumental neutron and photon activation analyses of selected geochemical reference materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 1 (2010), s. 157-163 ISSN 0236-5731 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : neutron activation analysis * photon activation analysis * geochemical reference materials Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  8. Instrumental neutron and photon activation analyses of selected geochemical reference materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 284, č. 1 (2010), s. 157-163 ISSN 0236-5731 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300130706 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : neutron activation analysis * photon activation analysis * geochemical reference materials Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.777, year: 2010

  9. Constraining Lateral Evolution of Magmatic Behavior in North Tanzania from Geophysical and Geochemical Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, S.; Tiberi, C.; Parat, F.; Baudouin, C.

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of CRAFTI and CoLiBrEA experiments in 2013, we proceeded to both seismic and geochemical studies along an EW profile through the North Tanzania Divergence. The data were collected along a line starting at the Ngorongoro volcanic area, ending at Kitumbeine edifice and crossing the rift valley. Recent seismological studies show lateral and depth variations for both velocity and Vp/Vs ratio within this area, particularly a change of Moho depth between the western and central parts of the rift. These two zones also exhibit diverse geochemical signatures that involve different magma storage (depth of reservoir, magma volume) and ascent as well as higher partial melts content for the western part. We take advantage of the recent and precise 3D lithospheric velocity models and receiver functions in this area to compare the structure and nature of Ngorongoro area and rift valley. We first compute ray path and establish regional coherency maps between piercing points, Vp/Vs ratio and tomographic images. Second, those results are compared with the composition of magma at depth obtained from a petrophysical and geochemical analysis of lava samples. We will discuss those results in terms of magmatic processes, and how they interact with the rifting in a cratonic lithosphere.

  10. Geochemical distinctions between igneous carbonate, calcite cements, and limestone xenoliths (Polino carbonatite, Italy): spatially resolved LAICPMS analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosatelli, G.; Wall, F.; Stoppa, F.; Brilli, M.

    2010-11-01

    Petrography-controlled laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LAICPMS) analyses of carbonate in fresh shallow level sub-volcanic Polino monticellite calcio-carbonatite tuffisite have been performed to assess the geochemical differences between fresh igneous, epigenetic carbonates and sedimentary accidental fragments. Igneous calcite has consistently high LREE/HREE ratios (La/Yb N , 15-130) due to high LREE (ΣLREE, 425-1,269 ppm). Secondary calcite cements are characterized by progressively lower and more variable trace element contents, with lower LREE/HREE ratios. A distinguishing geochemical feature is progressively increasing negative Ce anomalies observed through coarse secondary calcite that can be related to the surface environment processes. The limestone accidental fragments in the tuffisite have trace element contents almost two orders of magnitude lower than igneous carbonate and low LREE (ΣLREE < 9.5 ppm) with low LREE/HREE fractionation (La/Yb N ratios < 18). The stable isotope composition of different carbonate types is consistent with their formation in different environments. The tuffisitization processes during diatreme formation under high CO2-OH fugacity conditions may account for the differences noted in the igneous carbonates.

  11. Identification of magnetic particulates in road dust accumulated on roadside snow using magnetic, geochemical and micro-morphological analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucko, Michal S.; Magiera, Tadeusz; Johanson, Bo; Petrovsky, Eduard; Pesonen, Lauri J.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to test the applicability of snow surveying in the collection and detailed characterization of vehicle-derived magnetic particles. Road dust extracted from snow, collected near a busy urban highway and a low traffic road in a rural environment (southern Finland), was studied using magnetic, geochemical and micro-morphological analyses. Significant differences in horizontal distribution of mass specific magnetic susceptibility (χ) were noticed for both roads. Multi-domain (MD) magnetite was identified as the primary magnetic mineral. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of road dust from both roads revealed: (1) angular-shaped particles (diameter ∼1-300 μm) mostly composed of Fe, Cr and Ni, derived from circulation of motor vehicles and (2) iron-rich spherules (d ∼ 2-70 μm). Tungsten-rich particles (d < 2 μm), derived from tyre stud abrasion were also identified. Additionally, a decreasing trend in χ and selected trace elements was observed with increasing distance from the road edge. - Highlights: → Snow surveying is an effective method in studies of vehicle-derived particles. → Multi-domain (MD) magnetite was identified as the primary magnetic mineral. → Particles mostly composed of Fe, Cr and Ni were identified in the roadside snow. → Snow located near the road is contaminated by heavy metals. - Snow surveying is an effective method in detailed studies of vehicle-derived magnetic particles.

  12. Application of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR for assessing biogenic silica sample purity in geochemical analyses and palaeoenvironmental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. A. Swann

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of a rapid and non-destructive method to assess purity levels in samples of biogenic silica prior to geochemical/isotope analysis remains a key objective in improving both the quality and use of such data in environmental and palaeoclimatic research. Here a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR mass-balance method is demonstrated for calculating levels of contamination in cleaned sediment core diatom samples from Lake Baikal, Russia. Following the selection of end-members representative of diatoms and contaminants in the analysed samples, a mass-balance model is generated to simulate the expected FTIR spectra for a given level of contamination. By fitting the sample FTIR spectra to the modelled FTIR spectra and calculating the residual spectra, the optimum best-fit model and level of contamination is obtained. When compared to X-ray Fluorescence (XRF the FTIR method portrays the main changes in sample contamination through the core sequence, permitting its use in instances where other, destructive, techniques are not appropriate. The ability to analyse samples of <1 mg enables, for the first time, routine analyses of small sized samples. Discrepancies between FTIR and XRF measurements can be attributed to FTIR end-members not fully representing all contaminants and problems in using XRF to detect organic matter external to the diatom frustule. By analysing samples with both FTIR and XRF, these limitations can be eliminated to accurately identify contaminated samples. Future, routine use of these techniques in palaeoenvironmental research will therefore significantly reduce the number of erroneous measurements and so improve the accuracy of biogenic silica/diatom based climate reconstructions.

  13. Geochemical analyses reveal the importance of environmental history for blue carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleway, J. J.; Saintilan, N.; Macreadie, P. I.; Baldock, J. A.; Heijnis, H.; Zawadzki, A.; Gadd, P.; Jacobsen, G.; Ralph, P. J.

    2017-07-01

    Coastal habitats including saltmarshes and mangrove forests can accumulate and store significant blue carbon stocks, which may persist for millennia. Despite this implied stability, the distribution and structure of intertidal-supratidal wetlands are known to respond to changes imposed by geomorphic evolution, climatic, sea level, and anthropogenic influences. In this study, we reconstruct environmental histories and biogeochemical conditions in four wetlands of similar contemporary vegetation in SE Australia. The objective is to assess the importance of historic factors to contemporary organic carbon (C) stocks and accumulation rates. Results from the four cores—two collected from marine-influenced saltmarshes (Wapengo marine site (WAP-M) and Port Stephens marine site (POR-M)) and two from fluvial influenced saltmarshes (Wapengo fluvial site (WAP-F) and Port Stephens fluvial site (POR-F))—highlight different environmental histories and preservation conditions. High C stocks are associated with the presence of a mangrove phase below the contemporary saltmarsh sediments in the POR-M and POR-F cores. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance analyses show this historic mangrove root C to be remarkably stable in its molecular composition despite its age, consistent with its position in deep sediments. WAP-M and WAP-F cores did not contain mangrove root C; however, significant preservation of char C (up to 46% of C in some depths) in WAP-F reveals the importance of historic catchment processes to this site. Together, these results highlight the importance of integrating historic ecosystem and catchment factors into attempts to upscale C accounting to broader spatial scales.

  14. Analyse géochimique des hydrocarbures légers par thermovaporisation Geochemical Analysis of Light Hydrocarbons by Thermovaporization

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    Jonathan D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le procédé de thermovaporisation est utilisé pour l'extraction et l'analyse des hydrocarbures à point d'ébullition situé à l'intérieur de l'intervalle correspondant aux alcanes C6 à C15; il s'applique également aux roches et aux huiles. La mise en ceuvre est simple et rapide, ce qui rend cette technique utilisable dans certains laboratoires de chantiers d'exploration. Les chromatogrammes de vapeurs montrent une succession de pics, chaque pic correspondant théoriquement à un composant défini, alcane, cyclane ou aromatique; la portion située entre les alcanes n-C, et n-C8 est très typée, mais le reste du chromatogramme apporte également des informations importantes ; l'ensemble donne une définition chimique très fine des hydrocarbures légers présents dans l'échantillon. L'exploitation de ces informations en interprétation géochimique est multiple (pouvoir pétroligène de sédiments, état de maturation, etc.. La faible masse de la prise d'essai nécessaire constitue un intérêt essentiel de la méthode. The method called thermovaporization is used to extract and analyse low boiling point hydrocarbons in the range corresponding to C6-C15; alcanes. Sediments and oils ore examined in the same way. This method is simple and fast to utilize, and for this reason it can be applied in some field exploration laboratories. Chromatograms show a sertes of peaks, each of them theoretically corresponding to a particular composant : alkane, cyclone, arcmatics. The part of the chromatogram between n-C7 n-C8 is very characteristic, but other parts also provide a great deal of information. The total chromatogram gives a very fine chemical definition of the light hydrocarbons in the sample. This information can be used for many geochemical interpretations (hydrocarbon yield potential, state of maturation, etc.. Moreover, the tiny amount of sample thot is necessary is of major interest.

  15. Geologic field notes and geochemical analyses of outcrop and drill core from Mesoproterozoic rocks and iron-oxide deposits and prospects of southeast Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Warren C.; Granitto, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Natural Resources/Missouri Geological Survey, undertook a study from 1988 to 1994 on the iron-oxide deposits and their host Mesoproterozoic igneous rocks in southeastern Missouri. The project resulted in an improvement of our understanding of the geologic setting, mode of formation, and the composition of many of the known deposits and prospects and the associated rocks of the St. Francois terrane in Missouri. The goal for this earlier work was to allow the comparison of Missouri iron-oxide deposits in context with other iron oxide-copper ± uranium (IOCG) types of mineral deposits observed globally. The raw geochemical analyses were released originally through the USGS National Geochemical Database (NGDB, http://mrdata.usgs.gov). The data presented herein offers all of the field notes, locations, rock descriptions, and geochemical analyses in a coherent package to facilitate new research efforts in IOCG deposit types. The data are provided in both Microsoft Excel (Version Office 2010) spreadsheet format (*.xlsx) and MS-DOS text formats (*.txt) for ease of use by numerous computer programs.

  16. Hydrogeochemical Processes of Groundwater Using Multivariate Statistical Analyses and Inverse Geochemical Modeling in Samrak Park of Nakdong River Basin, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang Yong

    2015-04-01

    Multivariate statistical methods and inverse geochemical modelling were used to assess the hydrogeochemical processes of groundwater in Nakdong River basin. The study area is located in a part of Nakdong River basin, the Busan Metropolitan City, Kora. Quaternary deposits forms Samrak Park region and are underlain by intrusive rocks of Bulkuksa group and sedimentary rocks of Yucheon group in the Cretaceous Period. The Samrak park region is acting as two aquifer systems of unconfined aquifer and confined aquifer. The unconfined aquifer consists of upper sand, and confined aquifer is comprised of clay, lower sand, gravel, weathered rock. Porosity and hydraulic conductivity of the area is 37 to 59% and 1.7 to 200m/day, respectively. Depth of the wells ranges from 9 to 77m. Piper's trilinear diagram, CaCl2 type was useful for unconfined aquifer and NaCl type was dominant for confined aquifer. By hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), Group 1 and Group 2 are fully composed of unconfined aquifer and confined aquifer, respectively. In factor analysis (FA), Factor 1 is described by the strong loadings of EC, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Cl, HCO3, SO4 and Si, and Factor 2 represents the strong loadings of pH and Al. Base on the Gibbs diagram, the unconfined and confined aquifer samples are scattered discretely in the rock and evaporation areas. The principal hydrogeochemical processes occurring in the confined and unconfined aquifers are the ion exchange due to the phenomena of freshening under natural recharge and water-rock interactions followed by evaporation and dissolution. The saturation index of minerals such as Ca-montmorillonite, dolomite and calcite represents oversaturated, and the albite, gypsum and halite show undersaturated. Inverse geochemical modeling using PHREEQC code demonstrated that relatively few phases were required to derive the differences in groundwater chemistry along the flow path in the area. It also suggested that dissolution of carbonate and ion exchange

  17. Exploration of gold occurrences in alteration zones at Dungash district, Southeastern Desert of Egypt using ASTER data and geochemical analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, S. M.; El Sharkawi, M.; El-Alfy, Z.; Soliman, N. M.; Ahmed, S. E.

    2016-05-01

    The present study aims at exploration of new gold occurrences in the alteration zones at Dungash district. Processed ASTER images band ratios 7/6 × 4/6 and (7 + 9/8), field geology and mineralogical and geochemical data help characterize three types of alterations in three areas 1 to 3 that may be targeted for Au exploration. Area1 confined to the metavolcanics located in the SE of Dungash gold mine and revealed silicified and sericitized type alterations, composed of quartz, epidote, chlorite, biotite and opaque minerals mainly pyrite and chalcopyrite. Area2 occurs in the gabbro-diorite rocks at Abu Meraiwa area NE of Dungash gold mine, which are rich in kaolinite, illite, sericite, pyrite, arsenopyrite and chalcopyrite that record kaolinitized alteration. Area3 is hosted in carbonaceous listwaenized serpentinite thus indicating the role of listwaenitization type alteration in ore genesis. It is composed of calcite, chromite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite and Ni-bearing sulphides. Au contents in area 1 range between 0.12 and 14.91 ppm, and between 6.1 and 16.3 ppm in area 2, while gold values in area 3 vary from types.

  18. 3D Textural and Geochemical Analyses on Carbonado Diamond: Insights from Pores and the Minerals within Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckley, S. A.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonado is an enigmatic variety of polycrystalline diamond found only in placer deposits and Proterozoic metaconglomerates in Brazil and the Central African Republic with unknown primary origin. These highly porous black nodules possess a narrow range of isotopically light carbon (δ13C -31 to -24 ‰), a primarily crustal inclusion suite unusually enriched in REEs and actinides filling the pore spaces, a crystallization age from 2.6 to 3.8 Ga, and other atypical features which have led to a variety of formation theories from extra-solar to deep mantle. We have completed the first multi-sample 3D textural analysis on nine carbonados using high resolution X-ray CT (XCT), with follow-up geochemical work. We have documented a variety of textures in both pore structure and mineralogy within pores. All pore textures feature a preferred orientation. Spatial coherence in pore fillings in some specimens suggest that secondary minerals formed by in-situ breakdown of primary inclusion phases. This, combined with the presence of pseudomorphs, support the hypothesis that elements comprising the secondary minerals within the pore spaces are actually primary. SEM-EDS analysis of one carbonado's exterior revealed the presence of zircon; XCT analysis of the complete volume indicates zircon is present only on the exterior of that specimen, but may be interior to others. Anticipated follow-up work will include LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating and REE analysis of the zircon, and step-leaching and ICP analysis of some specimens. Periodic XCT imaging will allow us to trace leaching progress and effectiveness. To provide further context for our observed pore fabrics, we also analyzed a framesite, a less porous polycrystalline diamond found in kimberlites thought to crystallize shortly before eruption. Both diamond varieties have bladed/elongated pores forming a foliation with a moderate lineation. The similarity in fabrics suggests a similar process could have formed both carbonados and

  19. Paleoenvironmental conditions and strontium isotope stratigraphy in the Paleogene Gafsa Basin (Tunisia) deduced from geochemical analyses of phosphatic fossils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, László; Ounis, Anouar; Chaabani, Fredj; Salah, Neili Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Fossil shark teeth and coprolites from three major phosphorite occurrences in the Gafsa Basin (southwestern Tunisia) were investigated for their geochemical compositions to improve local stratigraphy and to better assess paleoenvironmental conditions. 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios of shark teeth from the Early Maastrichtian El Haria Formation and from the Early Eocene Métlaoui s.s. Formation yielded Sr isotope ages of 68 ± 1 and 47.9 ± 1.3 Ma, respectively, which accord with the expected stratigraphic positions of these sediments. Conversely, shark teeth from the Paleocene-Eocene Chouabine Formation have large variation in Sr isotope ratios even within individual layers. After statistical treatment and then elimination of certain outlier samples, three age-models are proposed and discussed. The most reasonable solution includes three subsequent Sr ages of 61.8 ± 2.2 Ma, 57.2 ± 1.8 and 54.6 ± 1.6 for layer IX, layers VIII-V and layers IV-0, respectively. Three scenarios are discussed for explanation of the presence of the outliers: (1) diagenesis, (2) re-working and (3) locally controlled seawater Sr isotope ratio. The most plausible account for the higher 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to the global ocean in some fossils is enhanced intrabasinal re-working due to low sea level. Conversely, the sample with lower 87Sr/86Sr than the global seawater may link to diagenesis or to seawater influenced by weathering of Late Cretaceous marine carbonates, which latter is supported by model calculation as well. The ɛNd values of these fossils are very similar to those reported for Paleogene and Late Cretaceous Tethyan seawater and are compatible with the above interpretations. The relatively low oxygen isotope values in shark teeth from the topmost phosphate bed of the Chouabine Formation, together with the Sr isotope results, point toward recovering better connections with the open sea. These δ18O data reflect elevated ambient temperature, which may link to the Early Eocene

  20. Analytical methods used by the geochemical section: water; Methodes d'analyses utilisees par la section de geochimie: les eaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthollet, P.; Cavalier, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1971-07-01

    The authors describe the analytical methods used by the C.E.A. Geochemical Section to determine the chemical composition of natural waters encountered during the prospecting of uraniferous deposits or in the course of mining operations. Because of the diversity of the samples and the different items of information requested, methods were selected and adapted to answer to the demands peculiar to mining research. Methods and know-how concerning the quantitative analysis of natural water to find out the concentration of the following chemicals are reviewed: carbonates and bicarbonates, calcium, magnesium, chlorides, sodium and potassium, sulfates, nitrates, silica, phosphates, iron, manganese, aluminium, fluorides, dissolved oxygen, CO{sub 2}, SH{sub 2} and sulphur, and uranium. (authors) [French] Les auteurs decrivent les methodes d'analyses utilisees par la Section de Geochimie du C.E.A., pour la determination de la composition chimique des eaux naturelles rencontrees au cours de prospections de gites uraniferes ou de travaux miniers. La diversite des echantillons et les differents renseignements demandes a l'analyse les ont conduit a selectionner et a adapter des methodes afin qu'elles repondent aux exigences particulieres de la recherche miniere. Les methodes concernant le dosage dans les eaux superficielles et eaux souterraines des elements qui suivent sont presentees : carbonates and bicarbonates, calcium, magnesium, chlorures, sodium et potassium, sulfates, nitrates, silice, phosphates, fer ferreus et ferrique, manganese, aluminium, fluorures, oxygene dissous, CO{sub 2} libre, SH{sub 2} et soufre total, et uranium. (auteurs)

  1. Characterization of the Geochemical Reference Material BRP-1 from Brazil: New Data from High Precision LA-ICPMS Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzweiler, J.; Jochum, K. P.

    2007-05-01

    To get a well-characterized Brazilian basaltic reference material Cotta et al. (2007) prepared BRP-1, which was collected from the Cretaceous Parana Province. About 150 kg of the raw material was crushed and pulverized at the USGS in Denver, USA. Finally, the powder was split into 1920 glass bottles containing about 55 g of material. Homogeneity tests using XRF and microbeam-SRXRF showed that the material is homogeneous for most of the investigated elements. Representative minimum masses were 1 mg for major and 1 - 15 mg for trace elements. To get high-precision trace element data and to further test the homogeneity of BRP-1, we have applied a recently developed LA-ICPMS technique using an automated Ir-strip-heater (Stoll et al., 2007). About 40 mg of the rock powder was placed on an iridium strip. The melting of the sample took place in a closed box under an argon atmosphere to suppress oxidation and to limit volatilization of elements with low boiling points (e.g., Cs, Pb). In order to get reproducible conditions an automatic computer control served for 1650 ° C temperature using a pyrometer and heat up of 20 s, melting of 10 s and subside of 2 s. Fast cooling occurred by an Ar flow underneath. Using these conditions homogeneous glasses with no significant loss of volatile elements were obtained. Contamination from the high-purity iridium strip (99.955 %) was not detected with the exception of Ir whose concentration was about 20 ppm. Mass spectrometric analyses were performed with the double focusing Finnigan Element2 ICPMS and a new New Wave 193 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation system (Jochum et al., 2007). Matrix matched calibration was done with the reference glasses KL-2G and BCR-2G. BCR-2 was used as quality control material. We obtained a precision (1 RSD) of about 1 - 3 % for most trace elements. Our results obtained from two different bottles of BRP-1 agree within uncertainty limits confirming the homogeneity of BRP-1 in the mg range.

  2. Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, mineral, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Labay, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Geochemical Database (AGDB) was created and designed to compile and integrate geochemical data from Alaska in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessments, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessments, and studies in medical geology. This Microsoft Access database serves as a data archive in support of present and future Alaskan geologic and geochemical projects, and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses. The analytical results were determined by 85 laboratory and field analytical methods on 264,095 rock, sediment, soil, mineral and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed in USGS laboratories or, under contracts, in commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects from 1962 to 2009. In addition, mineralogical data from 18,138 nonmagnetic heavy mineral concentrate samples are included in this database. The AGDB includes historical geochemical data originally archived in the USGS Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database, used from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s and the USGS PLUTO database used from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s. All of these data are currently maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB were used to generate most of the AGDB data set. These data were checked for accuracy regarding sample location, sample media type, and analytical methods used. This arduous process of reviewing, verifying and, where necessary, editing all USGS geochemical data resulted in a significantly improved Alaska geochemical dataset. USGS data that were not previously in the NGDB because the data predate the earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  3. Evolutionary relationships of the Critically Endangered frog Ericabatrachus baleensis Largen, 1991 with notes on incorporating previously unsampled taxa into large-scale phylogenetic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The phylogenetic relationships of many taxa remain poorly known because of a lack of appropriate data and/or analyses. Despite substantial recent advances, amphibian phylogeny remains poorly resolved in many instances. The phylogenetic relationships of the Ethiopian endemic monotypic genus Ericabatrachus has been addressed thus far only with phenotypic data and remains contentious. Results We obtained fresh samples of the now rare and Critically Endangered Ericabatrachus baleensis and generated DNA sequences for two mitochondrial and four nuclear genes. Analyses of these new data using de novo and constrained-tree phylogenetic reconstructions strongly support a close relationship between Ericabatrachus and Petropedetes, and allow us to reject previously proposed alternative hypotheses of a close relationship with cacosternines or Phrynobatrachus. Conclusions We discuss the implications of our results for the taxonomy, biogeography and conservation of E. baleensis, and suggest a two-tiered approach to the inclusion and analyses of new data in order to assess the phylogenetic relationships of previously unsampled taxa. Such approaches will be important in the future given the increasing availability of relevant mega-alignments and potential framework phylogenies. PMID:24612655

  4. Pairing Coral Geochemical Analyses with an Ecosystem Services Model to Assess Drivers and Impacts of Sediment Delivery within Micronesia's Largest Estuary, Ngeremeduu Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S.; Dunbar, R. B.; Mucciarone, D.; Barkdull, M.

    2017-12-01

    Scientific tools assessing impacts to watershed and coastal ecosystem services, like those from land-use land conversion (LULC), are critical for sustainable land management strategies. Small island nations are particularly vulnerable to LULC threats, especially sediment delivery, given their small spatial size and reliance on natural resources. In the Republic of Palau, a small Pacific island country, three major land-use activities—construction, fires, and agriculture— have increased sediment delivery to important estuarine and coastal habitats (i.e., rivers, mangroves, coral reefs) over the past 30 years. This project examines the predictive capacity of an ecosystem services model, Natural Capital Project's InVEST, for sediment delivery using historic land-use and coral geochemical analysis. These refined model projections are used to assess ecosystem services tradeoffs under different future land development and management scenarios. Coral cores (20-41cm in length) were sampled along a high-to-low sedimentation gradient (i.e., near major rivers (high-impact) and ocean (low-impact)) in Micronesia's largest estuary, Ngeremeduu Bay. Isotopic indicators of seasonality (δ18O and δ13C values (% VPDB)) were used to construct the age model for each core. Barium, Manganese, and Yttrium were used as trace metal proxies for sedimentation and measured in each core using a laser ablation ICP-MS. Finally, the Natural Capital Project's InVEST sediment delivery model was paired with Geospatial data to examine the drivers of sediment delivery (i.e., construction, farms and fires) within these two watersheds. A thirty-year record of trace metal to calcium ratios in coral skeletons show a peak in sedimentation during 2006 and 2007, and in 2012. These results suggest historic peaks in sediment delivery correlating to large-scale road construction and support previous findings that Ngeremeduu Bay has reached a tipping point of retaining sediment. Natural Capital's project In

  5. State Guidelines for Mental Retardation and Intellectual Disabilities: A Re-visitation of Previous Analyses in Light of Changes in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polloway, Edward A.; Patton, James R.; Smith, J. David; Lubin, Jacqueline; Antoine, Karian

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR) (Luckasson et al., 2002) revised their manual on mental retardation. It also extended the changes that had been made in the previous (1992) manual to further promote an alternative approach to definition and classification in the field. The study reported here sought to determine the…

  6. Destructive versus non-destructive methods for geochemical analyses of ceramic artifacts: comparison of portable XRF and ICP-MS data on Bronze Age ceramics from Failaka Island (Kuwait) and Bahrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremtan, Ciprian; Ashkanani, Hasan; Tykot, Robert H.

    2013-04-01

    The study of bi-phase (i.e. matrix and clasts) geochemical composition of ceramic artifacts is a very powerful tool in fingerprinting the raw materials used by ancient manufacturers (clay sources, tempering materials, coloring agents, etc.), as well as in understanding the physical parameters of the manufacturing techniques. Reliable datasets often require the deployment of destructive techniques that will irremediably damage the artifact. Recent advances in portable X-ray fluorescence instrumentation (pXRF) allow for quick measurements of a range of chemical elements that not too long ago were available only through complicated and often destructive means of analytical chemistry (instrumental neutron activation analysis - INAA, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry - ICP-MS, direct coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy - DCP-OES etc.). In this contribution we present a comparison of datasets acquired by means of pXRF, DCP-OES, and ICP-MS on Bronze Age ceramics from Failaka Island (Kuwait) and Bahrain. The samples chosen for this study are fine grained, with very well sorted mineral components, and lack any visible organic material fragments. The sample preparation for ICP-MS and DCP-OES analyses was carried out on powdered samples, by using LiBO2 flux fusion and Ge (for the DCP-OES) and In (for ICP-MS) were used as internal standards. The measurements were calibrated against certified reference materials ranging from shales to rhyolites (SGR-1, SDo-1, JA-2, and JR-1) and performed at Univerity of South Florida's Center for Geochemical Analyses. The analytical errors for major elements was smaller than 5 %, while for selected trace elements the error was usually smaller than 3 %. The same set of elements was measured on the same samples at University of South Florida's Anthropology Department using a pXRF device equipped with obsidian filter. Each sample was measured three times and the values were averaged. Two certified reference materials (NIST-612

  7. Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP)-Geochemical data for rock, sediment, soil, and concentrate sample media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; DeWitt, Ed H.; Klein, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This database was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical data from central Colorado in order to facilitate geologic mapping, petrologic studies, mineral resource assessment, definition of geochemical baseline values and statistics, environmental impact assessment, and medical geology. The Microsoft Access database serves as a geochemical data warehouse in support of the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) and contains data tables describing historical and new quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 70 analytical laboratory and field methods for 47,478 rock, sediment, soil, and heavy-mineral concentrate samples. Most samples were collected by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel and analyzed either in the analytical laboratories of the USGS or by contract with commercial analytical laboratories. These data represent analyses of samples collected as part of various USGS programs and projects. In addition, geochemical data from 7,470 sediment and soil samples collected and analyzed under the Atomic Energy Commission National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (henceforth called NURE) have been included in this database. In addition to data from 2,377 samples collected and analyzed under CCAP, this dataset includes archived geochemical data originally entered into the in-house Rock Analysis Storage System (RASS) database (used by the USGS from the mid-1960s through the late 1980s) and the in-house PLUTO database (used by the USGS from the mid-1970s through the mid-1990s). All of these data are maintained in the Oracle-based National Geochemical Database (NGDB). Retrievals from the NGDB and from the NURE database were used to generate most of this dataset. In addition, USGS data that have been excluded previously from the NGDB because the data predate earliest USGS geochemical databases, or were once excluded for programmatic reasons

  8. Reconstructing late Quaternary palaeosol development and landscape connectivity from combined soil magnetic, geochemical and micromorphological analyses: insights from the Wilgerbosch River, Great Karoo, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldknow, Chris; Hooke, Janet; Oldfield, Frank

    2017-04-01

    water table and wetlands on the valley floors. Inset clay coatings and calcite hypocoatings attest to fluctuating groundwater levels. The calcrete acted to blanket T1 and T2 reducing extent of connectivity in subsequent phases of terrace development. Sediment in inset fills (T3-4) exhibited diminished primary mineral concentrations and ferrimagnetism (XLF = 20-60) due to recycling of earlier deposits (T1/T2), disconnectivity with 1st order tributaries and episodic gleying and dissolution of organic matter due to fluctuating groundwater level. The terrace palaeosols in the Wilgerbosch catchment are therefore polygenetic reflecting both changing sources of sediment (slope or channel) and multiple phases of soil development under varied palaeohydrological conditions. Caution is therefore urged attempting to relate conventional magnetic (XLF, XARM, XFD) and geochemical (CIA, CIW) metrics of pedogenesis in morphologically similar catchments to palaeoclimatic records. The approach taken in this study is presently useful for reconstructing extent of connectivity between landscape components.

  9. Molecular and mathematical modeling analyses of inter-island transmission of rabies into a previously rabies-free island in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohma, Kentaro; Saito, Mariko; Demetria, Catalino S; Manalo, Daria L; Quiambao, Beatriz P; Kamigaki, Taro; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    Rabies is endemic in the Philippines and dog bites are a major cause of rabies cases in humans. The rabies control program has not been successful in eliminating rabies because of low vaccination coverage among dogs. Therefore, more effective and feasible strategies for rabies control are urgently required in the country. To control rabies, it is very important to know if inter-island transmission can occur because rabies can become endemic once the virus is introduced in areas that previously had no reported cases. Our molecular epidemiological study suggests that inter-island transmission events can occur; therefore, we further investigated these inter-island transmission using phylogenetic and modeling approaches. We investigate inter-island transmission between Luzon and Tablas Islands in the Philippines. Phylogenetic analysis and mathematical modeling demonstrate that there was a time lag of several months to a year from rabies introduction to initial case detection, indicating the difficulties in recognizing the initial rabies introductory event. There had been no rabies cases reported in Tablas Island; however, transmission chain was sustained on this island after the introduction of rabies virus because of low vaccination coverage among dogs. Across the islands, a rabies control program should include control of inter-island dog transportation and rabies vaccination to avoid viral introduction from the outside and to break transmission chains after viral introduction. However, this program has not yet been completely implemented and transmission chains following inter-island virus transmission are still observed. Local government units try to control dog transport; however, it should be more strictly controlled, and a continuous rabies control program should be implemented to prevent rabies spread even in rabies-free areas. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relation between the sedimentary organic record and the climatic oscilations in the Holocene attested by palynofacies and organic geochemical analyses from a pond of altitude in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GABRIELLI T. GADENS-MARCON

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the quantitative and qualitative results obtained from palynofacies and geochemistry analyses carried out on a core covering approximately 8000 years of sedimentation of a pond of altitude located at the mining district of Ametista do Sul, southernmost Brazil. The main objective of this paper is to consider the paleoclimatic and paleoenvironmental significance of these analyses. The hydrological isolation renders this pond climatically sensitive to variations in pluviometric regime and this enabled infer rainfall events during the early Holocene, which was responsible for the beginning of the processes of water accumulation in the gossan and the sedimentation of the pond. Changes in the pattern of moisture over the time become the drier environment, resulting in the intermittent pattern of water depth that currently exists at the site. The fluctuations in water depth are inferred from the frequency of Botryococcus and other algae, which tend to decrease progressively toward the top where the autochthonous elements are replaced by parautochthonous and allochthonous elements. Pseudoschizaea, in turn, appears to act as a biological marker of these transitional intervals. The present results are of great importance for understanding the extent of climate change and its environmental impacts at regional and global levels.

  11. Fault mechanics at the base of the continental seismogenic zone: Insights from geochemical and mechanical analyses of a crustal-scale transpressional fault from the Argentera crystalline massif, French-Italian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclère, Henri; Lacroix, Brice; Fabbri, Olivier

    2014-09-01

    Faulting mechanics is examined by combining geochemical and mechanical analyses from a key exposure of a major fault zone crossing the Argentera crystalline massif (French-Italian Alps). The analyses are carried out on co-genetic and syn-tectonic quartz and chlorite extension veins and shear veins associated with late stage deformation in the fault zone. Paleothermometry based on chlorite compositions gives formation temperatures of 300 °C ± 20 °C, that is near the base of the seismogenic zone. δ18O values of quartz and δD and δ18O values of chlorite indicate that veins crystallized from a metamorphic fluid. In parallel, a mechanical analysis based on the Mohr-Coulomb theory shows that the pore fluid factor λv required to simultaneously reactivate the studied fault and to open the extension veins was close to a lithostatic value (λv ˜ 1). Comparisons with the 2003-2004 Ubaye seismic swarm, having occurred in the continuity of the studied fault zone, suggest that the base of the seismogenic zone may act as a limit separating an upper permeable reservoir saturated with meteoric waters under hydrostatic to supra-hydrostatic pressures from a lower low-permeability reservoir containing metamorphic waters under lithostatic pressure. This study suggests that overpressured fluids can be released upwards in the brittle crust by shear-enhanced permeability and can trigger earthquakes.

  12. Conceptual aspects: analyses law, ethical, human, technical, social factors of development ICT, e-learning and intercultural development in different countries setting out the previous new theoretical model and preliminary findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Smyrnova-Trybulska, Eugenia; Morze, Natalia; Issa, Tomayess; Issa, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    This paper, prepared by an international team of authors focuses on the conceptual aspects: analyses law, ethical, human, technical, social factors of ICT development, e-learning and intercultural development in different countries, setting out the previous and new theoretical model and preliminary

  13. GEOBASI: The geochemical Database of Tuscany Region (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Raco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the new Regional Geochemical Database (RGDB, called GEOBASI, is presented and illustrated in the framework of a joint collaboration among the three Tuscan universities (Florence, Pisa and Siena, CNR-IGG (Institute of Geosciences and Earth Resources of Pisa, ARPAT (Regional Agency for the Environmental Protection, LAMMA (Environmental Modelling and Monitoring Laboratory for Sustainable Development Consortium and S.I.R.A. (Territorial and Environmental Informative System of Tuscany. The database has permitted the construction of a repository where the geochemical information (compositional and isotopic has been stored in a structured way so that it can be available for different groups of users (e.g. institutional, public and private companies. The information contained in the database can in fact be downloaded freely and queried to correlate geochemistry to other non compositional variables. The first phase of the project was aimed at promoting the use of the geochemical data already available from previous investigations through a powerful Web-GIS interface to implement the exploratory statistics graphical-numerical tools used to: 1 analyse the spatial variability of the investigated context, 2 highlight the geographic location of data pertaining to classes of values or single cases, 3 compare the results of different analytical methodologies applied to the determination of the same element and/or chemical species, 4 extract the geochemical data related to specific monitoring plans and/or geographical areas, and finally 5 recover information about data below the detection limit to understand their impact on the behaviour of the investigated variable. Developments of this project will be focused on the definition of rules and standardized methods in a way that external users could also interactively pursue the RGDB. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of the Scarlino-Follonica plain will permit the improvement and test of

  14. The National Geochemical Survey; database and documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2004-01-01

    The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce a body of geochemical data for the United States based primarily on stream sediments, analyzed using a consistent set of methods. These data will compose a complete, national-scale geochemical coverage of the US, and will enable construction of geochemical maps, refine estimates of baseline concentrations of chemical elements in the sampled media, and provide context for a wide variety of studies in the geological and environmental sciences. The goal of the NGS is to analyze at least one stream-sediment sample in every 289 km2 area by a single set of analytical methods across the entire nation, with other solid sample media substituted where necessary. The NGS incorporates geochemical data from a variety of sources, including existing analyses in USGS databases, reanalyses of samples in USGS archives, and analyses of newly collected samples. At the present time, the NGS includes data covering ~71% of the land area of the US, including samples in all 50 states. This version of the online report provides complete access to NGS data, describes the history of the project, the methodology used, and presents preliminary geochemical maps for all analyzed elements. Future editions of this and other related reports will include the results of analysis of variance studies, as well as interpretive products related to the NGS data.

  15. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This Technical Report is designed mainly to introduce the methods and techniques of uranium geochemical exploration to exploration geologists who may not have had experience with geochemical exploration methods in their uranium programmes. The methods presented have been widely used in the uranium exploration industry for more than two decades. The intention has not been to produce an exhaustive, detailed manual, although detailed instructions are given for a field and laboratory data recording scheme and a satisfactory analytical method for the geochemical determination of uranium. Rather, the intention has been to introduce the concepts and methods of uranium exploration geochemistry in sufficient detail to guide the user in their effective use. Readers are advised to consult general references on geochemical exploration to increase their understanding of geochemical techniques for uranium

  16. Methods for geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedecker, Philip A.

    1987-01-01

    The laboratories for analytical chemistry within the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey are administered by the Office of Mineral Resources. The laboratory analysts provide analytical support to those programs of the Geologic Division that require chemical information and conduct basic research in analytical and geochemical areas vital to the furtherance of Division program goals. Laboratories for research and geochemical analysis are maintained at the three major centers in Reston, Virginia, Denver, Colorado, and Menlo Park, California. The Division has an expertise in a broad spectrum of analytical techniques, and the analytical research is designed to advance the state of the art of existing techniques and to develop new methods of analysis in response to special problems in geochemical analysis. The geochemical research and analytical results are applied to the solution of fundamental geochemical problems relating to the origin of mineral deposits and fossil fuels, as well as to studies relating to the distribution of elements in varied geologic systems, the mechanisms by which they are transported, and their impact on the environment.

  17. Methodological approaches in estimating anomalous geochemical field structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, R; Rudmin, M

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical statistic methods were applied to analyze the core samples from vertical expendable wells in Chertovo Koryto gold ore field. The following methods were used to analyse gold in samples: assay tests and atomic absorption method (AAS), while emission spectrum semiquantative method was applied to identify traces. The analysis of geochemical association distribution in one central profile demonstrated that bulk metasomatic aureoles are characteristic of concentric zonal structure. The distribution of geochemical associations is correlated to the hydrothermal stages of mineral formation identified in this deposit. It was proved that the processed geochemical data by factor and cluster analyses provided additional information on the anomalous geochemical field structure in gold- bearing black-shale strata. Such methods are effective tools in interpretating specific features of geochemical field structures in analogous potential ore-bearing areas

  18. Geochemical Investigations of Groundwater Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The report describes geochemical parameters and methods that provide information about the hydrodynamic stability of groundwaters in low permeability fractured rocks that are potential hosts for radioactive waste repositories. Hydrodynamic stability describes the propensity for changes in groundwater flows over long timescales, in terms of flow rates and flow directions. Hydrodynamic changes may also cause changes in water compositions, but the related issue of geochemical stability of a potential repository host rock system is outside the scope of this report. The main approaches to assessing groundwater stability are numerical modelling, measurement and interpretation of geochemical indicators in groundwater compositions, and analyses and interpretations of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in these minerals. This report covers the latter two topics, with emphasis on geochemical indicators. The extent to which palaeohydrogeology and geochemical stability indicators have been used in past safety cases is reviewed. It has been very variable, both in terms of the scenarios considered, the stability indicators considered and the extent to which the information was explicitly or implicitly used in assessing FEPs and scenarios in the safety cases. Geochemical indicators of hydrodynamic stability provide various categories of information that are of hydrogeological relevance. Information about groundwater mixing, flows and water sources is potentially provided by the total salinity of groundwaters, their contents of specific non-reactive solutes (principally chloride) and possibly of other solutes, the stable isotopic ratio of water, and certain characteristics of secondary minerals and fluid inclusions. Information pertaining directly to groundwater ages and the timing of water and solute movements is provided by isotopic systems including tritium, carbon-14, chlorine-36, stable oxygen and hydrogen isotopes, uranium isotopes and dissolved mobile gases in

  19. The geochemical atlas of Alaska, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Granitto, Matthew; Denning, Paul; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.

    2016-06-21

    A rich legacy of geochemical data produced since the early 1960s covers the great expanse of Alaska; careful treatment of such data may provide significant and revealing geochemical maps that may be used for landscape geochemistry, mineral resource exploration, and geoenvironmental investigations over large areas. To maximize the spatial density and extent of data coverage for statewide mapping of element distributions, we compiled and integrated analyses of more than 175,000 sediment and soil samples from three major, separate sources: the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys geochemical databases. Various types of heterogeneity and deficiencies in these data presented major challenges to our development of coherently integrated datasets for modeling and mapping of element distributions. Researchers from many different organizations and disparate scientific studies collected samples that were analyzed using highly variable methods throughout a time period of more than 50 years, during which many changes in analytical techniques were developed and applied. Despite these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new systematically integrated compilation of sediment and soil geochemical data with an average sample site density of approximately 1 locality per 10 square kilometers (km2) for the entire State of Alaska, although density varies considerably among different areas. From that compilation, we have modeled and mapped the distributions of 68 elements, thus creating an updated geochemical atlas for the State.

  20. Geochemical regionalism of biržai area topsoil and technogenous ground

    OpenAIRE

    Stankevičius, Tadas

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: to perform Biržai region soil geochemical regionalism in accordance with geological-geophormalogical evidence, to establish geochemical field differences, evaluate resistance to polution technogenous chemical elements. Goals: 1. Summarize experience gained in previously accomplished geochemical regionalism in Lithuania. 2. Familiarize with geochemical mapping of Biržai region . 3. To explore geological (quaternary), geomorphologic and anthropocentric pollution conditions in Biržai...

  1. Geochemical prospecting in Guiana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, R.

    1957-01-01

    During the last few years geochemical prospecting techniques have become common usage in the field of mineral deposit prospecting. The real scope of these methods lies in their use in the prospecting of large areas. The most promising use of the geochemistry and hydro-geochemistry of uranium is in heavily forested tropical territories, with few outcrops, where radiometry is strongly handicapped. (author) [fr

  2. Reconnaissance Geochemical Study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical exploration of Orle district within the Igarra schist belt in southwestern Nigeria was carried out using reconnaissance ... The occurrence of pathfinder elements such as As and W; and of rock units, such as amphibolites and pegmatites, within the schist belt that ...... house for national prosperity. Inaugural.

  3. Temporal and geochemical evolution of Miocene volcanism in the Andean back-arc between 36°S and 38°S and U-series analyses of young volcanic centers in the arc and back-arc, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup

    . Geochemical characteristics indicate a back-arc mantle devoid of arc-like components and with a strong OIB-like signature. They erupted at a time of extension along the Andean margin. After 20 Ma, basaltic – trachyandesitic lavas with a more depleted isotopic and incompatible trace element signature...... the fluid-enriched nature of arc-related rocks (U-excess are found in most rocks) and the more OIB-like nature of the Payún Matrú complex (Th-exsess is observed in all rocks). The fluid addition to the mantle source is modeled revealing timescales of 10 – 100 ka for the fluid enrichment. For the back...

  4. Post hoc analyses of the impact of previous medication on the efficacy of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a randomized, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghill DR

    2014-10-01

    =317; LDX, -18.6 [-21.5, -15.7]; OROS- MPH, -13.0 [-15.9, -10.2] and treatment-naïve individuals (n=147; LDX, -15.1 [-19.4, -10.9]; OROS-MPH, -12.7 [-16.8, -8.5] or patients previously treated with any ADHD medication (n=170; LDX, -21.5 [-25.5, -17.6]; OROS-MPH, -14.2 [-18.1, -10.3]. In addition, similar proportions of patients receiving active treatment were categorized as improved based on CGI-I score (CGI-I of 1 or 2 in the overall study population and among treatment-naïve individuals or patients previously treated with any ADHD medication. Conclusion: In these post hoc analyses, the response to LDX treatment, and to the reference treatment OROS-MPH, was similar to that observed for the overall study population in subgroups of patients categorized according to whether or not they had previously received ADHD medication. Keywords: attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, methylphenidate, central nervous system stimulants

  5. Geochemical modeling: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenne, E.A.

    1981-06-01

    Two general families of geochemical models presently exist. The ion speciation-solubility group of geochemical models contain submodels to first calculate a distribution of aqueous species and to secondly test the hypothesis that the water is near equilibrium with particular solid phases. These models may or may not calculate the adsorption of dissolved constituents and simulate the dissolution and precipitation (mass transfer) of solid phases. Another family of geochemical models, the reaction path models, simulates the stepwise precipitation of solid phases as a result of reacting specified amounts of water and rock. Reaction path models first perform an aqueous speciation of the dissolved constituents of the water, test solubility hypotheses, then perform the reaction path modeling. Certain improvements in the present versions of these models would enhance their value and usefulness to applications in nuclear-waste isolation, etc. Mass-transfer calculations of limited extent are certainly within the capabilities of state-of-the-art models. However, the reaction path models require an expansion of their thermodynamic data bases and systematic validation before they are generally accepted

  6. Temporal and geochemical evolution of Miocene volcanism in the Andean back-arc between 36°S and 38°S and U-series analyses of young volcanic centers in the arc and back-arc, Argentina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhr, Charlotte Thorup

    New 40Ar/39Ar, major and trace element, and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic data for the c. 24-7 Ma volcanic rocks from the Andean back-arc (35°S – 38°S) in the Mendoza and Neuquén (Argentina) regions shed light on the Miocene evolution of the back-arc of the Southern Volcanic Zone. Incipient shallowing....... Geochemical characteristics indicate a back-arc mantle devoid of arc-like components and with a strong OIB-like signature. They erupted at a time of extension along the Andean margin. After 20 Ma, basaltic – trachyandesitic lavas with a more depleted isotopic and incompatible trace element signature...... and showing evidence of a weak, but temporally increasing, arc component in the mantle source were erupted in a contractional regime. The increasing arc-influence in lavas erupted up to 500 km east of the trench indicates a shallowing of the subducting zone. A long period of volcanic quiescence followed...

  7. Geochemical prospecting in Morrinhos area - Ceara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, V.A. de; Campos, M. de; Braga, A. de P.G.

    1982-01-01

    Morrinhos ring-shaped structure has been considered by several authors as reflecting a non-rising pluton, related to the regional uranium mineralization. NUCLEBRAS carried out a geochemical prospecting in the area, (through soil and stream samples), to better understand the relationship between the structure and the ore bodies. The 229 samples were all analysed for 33 trace-elements, using optical spectrography and X-ray fluorescence methods. (Author) [pt

  8. Geochemical baseline studies of soil in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlaja, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    The soil element concentrations regionally vary a lot in Finland. Mostly this is caused by the different bedrock types, which are reflected in the soil qualities. Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) is carrying out geochemical baseline studies in Finland. In the previous phase, the research is focusing on urban areas and mine environments. The information can, for example, be used to determine the need for soil remediation, to assess environmental impacts or to measure the natural state of soil in industrial areas or mine districts. The field work is done by taking soil samples, typically at depth between 0-10 cm. Sampling sites are chosen to represent the most vulnerable areas when thinking of human impacts by possible toxic soil element contents: playgrounds, day-care centers, schools, parks and residential areas. In the mine districts the samples are taken from the areas locating outside the airborne dust effected areas. Element contents of the soil samples are then analyzed with ICP-AES and ICP-MS, Hg with CV-AAS. The results of the geochemical baseline studies are published in the Finnish national geochemical baseline database (TAPIR). The geochemical baseline map service is free for all users via internet browser. Through this map service it is possible to calculate regional soil baseline values using geochemical data stored in the map service database. Baseline data for 17 elements in total is provided in the map service and it can be viewed on the GTK's web pages (http://gtkdata.gtk.fi/Tapir/indexEN.html).

  9. Geochemical Survey of Pernambuco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, A.; Duarte, P.J.; Almeida, M.G. de; Medeiros, M.O.

    1988-01-01

    The area studied i this work is located in a triangle formed by the Sibiro and Boca da Mata Sugar-Mills and Serinhaem country. In the Cabo Formation the search determinated conglomerates, arcos and clays. Although the highest geochemical activity have been done in the decomposed crystalin, and the values from Cabo Formation don't be encourager, this formation has lithology compatible with uranium mineralization. The Cabo Formation's sediments presents lithologic variations very expressives, with conglomerates, arcoses and clay silts, which determinate the choise of the area. This area presented favorable to uranium prospecting and to others elements interesting to ragional geochemistry. The atomic absorption analysis, fluorimetry and spectrometry were done for the following elements: Zn, V, Ti, Ni, Pb, Mn, Ga, Cu, Co, Bi, Ag, B, Mo, and U. (C.D.G.) [pt

  10. Efficacy and tolerability of a single-pill combination of telmisartan 80 mg and hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg according to age, gender, race, hypertension severity, and previous antihypertensive use: planned analyses of a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu D

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dingliang Zhu,1 Harold Bays,2 Pingjin Gao,1 Michaela Mattheus,3 Birgit Voelker,3 Luis M Ruilope4 1Shanghai Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Louisville Metabolic and Atherosclerosis Research Center Inc, Louisville, KY, USA; 3Boehringer Ingelheim International GmbH, Ingelheim, Germany; 4Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain Background: The purpose of this work was to describe the efficacy and safety of a telmisartan 80 mg + hydrochlorothiazide 25 mg (T80/H25 single-pill combination therapy in patients with moderate-severe hypertension (mean seated trough cuff systolic blood pressure [BP] ≥ 160 mmHg and diastolic BP ≥ 100 mmHg in specific patient subpopulations. Methods: This was a planned analysis of a double-blind, multicenter, parallel-group trial that demonstrated the superiority of a single-pill combination of T80/H25 versus T80 monotherapy in terms of systolic BP change from baseline to week 7. Subpopulations included older (aged ≥ 65 years versus younger, gender, race, hypertension severity, and prior antihypertensive therapy. Endpoints were change from baseline in mean seated trough cuff systolic and diastolic BP, proportion of patients achieving their BP goal (systolic/diastolic BP 30 mmHg and >40 mmHg. Results: Across all subgroups, the T80/H25 single-pill combination provided consistently greater systolic and diastolic BP reductions than T80 and more patients had systolic BP reductions of >30 mmHg. In the T80 and T80/H25 groups, BP control was achieved in 34.1% and 48.8% of men, 35.5% and 62.7% of women, 34.5% and 56.6% of Asians, 22.6% and 38.6% of blacks, 36.7% and 57.8% of whites, 36.9% and 57.5% of patients < 65 years, 29.3% and 49.3% ≥65 years, 44.2% and 66.2% of those with grade 2 hypertension, 20.4% and 39.4% of those with grade 3 hypertension, 38.9% and 53.2% of previously untreated patients, 38.1% and 62.5% of patients previously treated with one antihypertensive, and 29.7% and 48.9% of patients

  11. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  12. Clinical significance of previously cryptic copy number alterations and loss of heterozygosity in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome determined using combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jin Ok; Seo, Eul Ju; Lee, Seong Wook; Suh, Jin Kyung; Im, Ho Joon; Seo, Jong Jin

    2014-07-01

    The combined array comparative genomic hybridization plus single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray (CGH+SNP microarray) platform can simultaneously detect copy number alterations (CNA) and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Eighteen children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n=15) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n=3) were studied using CGH+SNP microarray to evaluate the clinical significance of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations. CGH+SNP microarray revealed CNAs at 14 regions in 9 patients, while metaphase cytogenetic (MC) analysis detected CNAs in 11 regions in 8 patients. Using CGH+SNP microarray, LOHs>10 Mb involving terminal regions or the whole chromosome were detected in 3 of 18 patients (17%). CGH+SNP microarray revealed cryptic LOHs with or without CNAs in 3 of 5 patients with normal karyotypes. CGH+SNP microarray detected additional cryptic CNAs (n=2) and LOHs (n=5) in 6 of 13 patients with abnormal MC. In total, 9 patients demonstrated additional aberrations, including CNAs (n=3) and/or LOHs (n=8). Three of 15 patients with AML and terminal LOH>10 Mb demonstrated a significantly inferior relapse-free survival rate (P=0.041). This study demonstrates that CGH+SNP microarray can simultaneously detect previously cryptic CNAs and LOH, which may demonstrate prognostic implications.

  13. Statistical interpretation of geochemical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carambula, M.

    1990-01-01

    Statistical results have been obtained from a geochemical research from the following four aerial photographies Zapican, Carape, Las Canias, Alferez. They have been studied 3020 samples in total, to 22 chemical elements using plasma emission spectrometry methods.

  14. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, Matthew [Mill Valley, CA

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  15. Geochemical studies in watersheds expanded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, M. Robbins

    In the past, geochemical research in forested watersheds has focused on understanding the basic processes that occur in soils and rocks. Watershed geochemical processes, however, are greatly influenced by, and in turn, greatly influence, both organisms and biological process in soils, and hydrologic responses of catchments. To date, geochemical research has dealt principally with basic chemical processes in soils and rocks, and much less with questions concerning hydrologic routing through catchments and the effects such routing has on temporal variation in chemical composition of surface waters.Research on flow generation in catchments has focused on intensive field studies on plots, hillslope sections, and small catchments, with extension to larger scales necessarily involving the application of conceptual models that might (or might not) be valid. The acquisition of direct experimental evidence (for example, verifying flow generation mechanisms) on larger-scale watersheds has always been problematic. Although geochemists understand that the explanation of some geochemical observations requires that flow pathways be explicitly identified, and hydrologists understand that flow generation can be better elucidated if the geochemical history of waters is known, critical integrated communication between the disciplines is often lacking. In turn, biologists require physical and geochemical information to interpret biological effects in watersheds, and hydrologists and geochemists need to be aware of the effects of biological processes on hydrochemical response of catchments.

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical fingerprints to distinguish the exploited ferruginous mineralisations of Grotta della Monaca (Calabria, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimuccio, Luca Antonio; Rodrigues, Nelson; Larocca, Felice; Pratas, João; Amado, Ana Margarida; de Carvalho, Luís A. E. Batista

    2017-02-01

    This study examines the geochemical and mineralogical variations in the ferruginous mineralisations that crop out within Grotta della Monaca, which is considered to be the most striking and best known example of a prehistoric iron mine-cave from the southern Apennines (Calabria, Italy). Previous archaeological research identified three local and distinct ancient exploitation phases of these ferruginous mineralisations: (1) an Upper Palaeolithic phase; (2) a Late Neolithic phase; and (3) a post-Medieval phase. These materials, which have various forms of complex mineralogical admixtures and range in colour from yellow-orange to red and darker brown shades, mainly consist of iron oxides/hydroxides (essentially goethite and lepidocrocite), which are often mixed with subordinate and variable amounts of other matrix components (carbonates, sulphates, arsenates, silicates and organic matter). Such ferruginous mineralisations generally correspond to geochemically heterogeneous massive dyke/vein/mammillary/stratiform facies that are exposed within the local caves along open fractures and inclined bedding planes and that partially cover cave wall niches/notches/pockets and ceiling cupolas/holes. Selected samples/sub-samples are analysed through a multi-technique approach with a handheld portable X-ray Fluorescence, X-ray Diffraction, micro-Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscope (both conventional and attenuated total reflection), which is combined with subsequent multivariate statistical analysis of the elemental concentration data. The geochemical and mineralogical results are used to individualise similar compositional clusters. As expected, the identified groups, each of which has very specific geochemical-mineralogical ;fingerprints; and spatial distributions, enable us to identify the sampled ferruginous mineralisations. These specific mineral resources can be compared to similar raw materials that are found in other neighbouring archaeological sites, with

  17. Geochemical exploration for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The processes and types of dispersion that produce anomalies in stream water, stream sediment, and ground water, and the factors that must be considered in planning and interpreting geochemical surveys are reviewed. Examples of surveys near known deposits show the types of results to be expected. Background values depend mainly on the content of U in rocks of the drainage area. In igneous rocks, U tends to increase with potassium from ultramafic rocks (0.01 ppM) to granitic rocks (1 to 5 ppM). Some alkalic rocks have unusually high contents of U (15 to 100 ppM). Uranium-rich provinces marked by igneous rocks unusually rich in U are recognized in several areas and appear to have a deep crustal or mantle origin. In western U.S., many tertiary tuffaceous rocks have a high U content. Sandstones, limestones, and many shales approximate the crustal abundance at 0.5 to 4 ppM, but black shales, phosphates, and some organic materials are notably enriched in U. Uranium is very soluble in most oxidizing waters at the earth's surface, but is precipitated by reducing agents (organic matter, H 2 S) and adsorbed by organic material and some Fe oxides. In most surface and ground waters, U correlates approximately with the total dissolved solids, conductivity, and bicarbonate concentration of the water, and with the U content of rocks it comes into contact with. Most surveys of stream water near known districts show distinct anomalies extending a few km to tens of km downstream. A complication with water is the large variability with time, up to x 50, as a result of changes in the ratio of ground water to direct runoff, and changes in rate of oxidation and leaching. Collection and analysis of water samples also pose some difficulties

  18. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  19. Geochemical and isotopic signatures for the identification of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The objective of this study is to identify the extent of seawater intruded area by major geochemical and isotopic signatures. A total of 102 groundwater samples were collected and analysed for major and minor ions. Groundwater samples with electrical conductivity (EC) greater than 5000 S/cm and a river mouth sample ...

  20. Geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality in lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogeochemical study of groundwater was carried out in a part of the lower Palar river basin, southern. India to determine the geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality. Thirty-nine ground- water samples were collected from the study area and analysed for pH, Eh, EC, Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3,. CO3, Cl and ...

  1. Geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality in lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for few locations. The results of these analyses were used to identify the geochemical processes that are taking place in this region. Cation exchange and silicate ...... composition of groundwater from alluvial aquifers in the Wanaka and Wakatipu basins, central Otago, New. Zealand; Hydrogeol. J. 6 264–281. Rouxel M ...

  2. Geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality in lower ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogeochemical study of groundwater was carried out in a part of the lower Palar river basin, southern India to determine the geochemical processes controlling the groundwater quality. Thirty-nine groundwater samples were collected from the study area and analysed for pH, Eh, EC, Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, CO3, Cl and ...

  3. Geochemical computer codes. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this report a review of available codes is performed and some code intercomparisons are also discussed. The number of codes treating natural waters (groundwater, lake water, sea water) is large. Most geochemical computer codes treat equilibrium conditions, although some codes with kinetic capability are available. A geochemical equilibrium model consists of a computer code, solving a set of equations by some numerical method and a data base, consisting of thermodynamic data required for the calculations. There are some codes which treat coupled geochemical and transport modeling. Some of these codes solve the equilibrium and transport equations simultaneously while other solve the equations separately from each other. The coupled codes require a large computer capacity and have thus as yet limited use. Three code intercomparisons have been found in literature. It may be concluded that there are many codes available for geochemical calculations but most of them require a user that us quite familiar with the code. The user also has to know the geochemical system in order to judge the reliability of the results. A high quality data base is necessary to obtain a reliable result. The best results may be expected for the major species of natural waters. For more complicated problems, including trace elements, precipitation/dissolution, adsorption, etc., the results seem to be less reliable. (With 44 refs.) (author)

  4. Leveling data in geochemical mapping: scope of application, pros and cons of existing methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Benoît; Vandeuren, Aubry; Sonnet, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Geochemical mapping successfully met a range of needs from mineral exploration to environmental management. In Europe and around the world numerous geochemical datasets already exist. These datasets may originate from geochemical mapping projects or from the collection of sample analyses requested by environmental protection regulatory bodies. Combining datasets can be highly beneficial for establishing geochemical maps with increased resolution and/or coverage area. However this practice requires assessing the equivalence between datasets and, if needed, applying data leveling to remove possible biases between datasets. In the literature, several procedures for assessing dataset equivalence and leveling data are proposed. Daneshfar & Cameron (1998) proposed a method for the leveling of two adjacent datasets while Pereira et al. (2016) proposed two methods for the leveling of datasets that contain records located within the same geographical area. Each discussed method requires its own set of assumptions (underlying populations of data, spatial distribution of data, etc.). Here we propose to discuss the scope of application, pros, cons and practical recommendations for each method. This work is illustrated with several case studies in Wallonia (Southern Belgium) and in Europe involving trace element geochemical datasets. References: Daneshfar, B. & Cameron, E. (1998), Leveling geochemical data between map sheets, Journal of Geochemical Exploration 63(3), 189-201. Pereira, B.; Vandeuren, A.; Govaerts, B. B. & Sonnet, P. (2016), Assessing dataset equivalence and leveling data in geochemical mapping, Journal of Geochemical Exploration 168, 36-48.

  5. A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A geochemical atlas of North Carolina, U.S.A., was prepared using National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) stream-sediment data. Before termination of the NURE program, sampling of nearly the entire state (48,666 square miles of land area) was completed and geochemical analyses were obtained. The NURE data are applicable to mineral exploration, agriculture, waste disposal siting issues, health, and environmental studies. Applications in state government include resource surveys to assist mineral exploration by identifying geochemical anomalies and areas of mineralization. Agriculture seeks to identify areas with favorable (or unfavorable) conditions for plant growth, disease, and crop productivity. Trace elements such as cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, zinc, and molybdenum must be present within narrow ranges in soils for optimum growth and productivity. Trace elements as a contributing factor to disease are of concern to health professionals. Industry can use pH and conductivity data for water samples to site facilities which require specific water quality. The North Carolina NURE database consists of stream-sediment samples, groundwater samples, and stream-water analyses. The statewide database consists of 6,744 stream-sediment sites, 5,778 groundwater sample sites, and 295 stream-water sites. Neutron activation analyses were provided for U, Br, Cl, F, Mn, Na, Al, V, Dy in groundwater and stream water, and for U, Th, Hf, Ce, Fe, Mn, Na, Sc, Ti, V, Al, Dy, Eu, La, Sm, Yb, and Lu in stream sediments. Supplemental analyses by other techniques were reported on U (extractable), Ag, As, Ba, Be, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, K, Li, Mg, Mo, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Se, Sn, Sr, W, Y, and Zn for 4,619 stream-sediment samples. A small subset of 334 stream samples was analyzed for gold. The goal of the atlas was to make available the statewide NURE data with minimal interpretation to enable prospective users to modify and manipulate the data for their end use. The atlas provides only

  6. NOAA and MMS Marine Minerals Geochemical Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Minerals Geochemical Database was created by NGDC as a part of a project to construct a comprehensive computerized bibliography and geochemical database...

  7. Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed

  8. Geochemical anomaly in ancient subduction boundary fault: Trench-parallel heterogeneity in slip behavior caused by variation of mineral composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macente, A.; Vanorio, T.; Miller, K. J.; Fusseis, F.; Ogawa, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Kaneki, S.; Hirono, T.

    2017-12-01

    To understand slip behavior of large earthquakes along subduction zone, investigation of trench-parallel heterogeneity in slip parameters produced by variation of mineral compositions and physical properties is important. Here we targeted an ancient megasplay fault, developed in the Kii Peninsula, Japan, and studied the geological setting and mineralogical and geochemical characteristic by performing Raman spectroscopic analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, and geochemical analyses of major- and trace-element concentrations of the fault rocks and its surrounding rocks. The localized slip zone was composed of cataclasite and ultracataclasite, and showed granulation of mineral grains and intense shear foliation. On the basis of the results of paleo-temperature gap, estimated by Raman spectra, the burial depth of 3­­­­­-4 km and the cumulative displacement of ­­­­­ 4 km along the slip zone were estimated. Geochemical analyses revealed an anomaly of trace-element compositions in the slip zone. Although previous studies assumed fluid/rock mass ratio (R) of 7, we considered the repetition of slip events and assumed R = 0.1 referred from in situ porosity of the Nankai trough of 0.1­­­­­-0.2. Our numerical calculation of fluid­­­­­-rock interaction revealed that the ultracataclasite has experienced approximate 200 times seismic events accompanying with frictional heat of ≥350 °C. In contract, the western ancient megasplay fault, developed in the Shikoku Island, Japan, was reported to has experienced approximate 30 times seismic events together with high temperature of ≥350 °C. This inconsistency might cause from the mineral composition: our studied slip zone contained larger amount of plagioclase and lower amount of illite, probably leading to higher fault strength and subsequent higher frictional heat. Therefore, for assessment of slip distribution along the trench and of tsunamigenic potential, further study of mineral and geochemical

  9. Alternative geochemical barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    Previous investigations of the effects of neutralization and reduction on uranium mill tailings pore fluids by the Technical Support Contractor indicated that arsenic, selenium, and molybdenum continue to remain in solution in all but reducing conditions. These hazardous constituents are present in groundwaters as oxyanions and, therefore, are not expected to be removed by adsorption into clays and most other soil constituents. It was decided to investigate the attenuation capacity of two commonly available crystalline iron oxides, taconite and scoria, and a zeolite, a network aluminosilicate with a cage structure. Columns of the candidate materials were exposed to solutions of individual constituents, including arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and, uranium, and to the spiked tailings pore fluid from the Bodo Canyon disposal cell near Durango, Colorado. In addition to the single material columns, a homogeneous blend of the three materials and layers of the materials were exposed to spiked tailings pore fluids. The results of these experiments indicate that with the exception of molybdenum, the constituents of concern are attenuated by the taconite; however, they are not sufficiently attenuated to meet the groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project. Therefore, the candidate barrier materials did not prove to be useful to the UMTRA Project for the cleanup of groundwaters

  10. Effect of source integration on the geochemical fluxes from springs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisbee, Marty D.; Phillips, Fred M.; White, Art F.; Campbell, Andrew R.; Liu, Fengjing

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical fluxes from watersheds are typically defined using mass-balance methods that essentially lump all weathering processes operative in a watershed into a single flux of solute mass measured in streamflow at the watershed outlet. However, it is important that we understand how weathering processes in different hydrological zones of a watershed (i.e., surface, unsaturated, and saturated zones) contribute to the total geochemical flux from the watershed. This capability will improve understanding of how geochemical fluxes from these different zones may change in response to climate change. Here, the geochemical flux from weathering processes occurring solely in the saturated zone is investigated. This task, however, remains exceedingly difficult due to the sparsity of subsurface sampling points, especially in large, remote, and/or undeveloped watersheds. In such cases, springflow is often assumed to be a proxy for groundwater (defined as water residing in fully saturated geologic formations). However, springflow generation may integrate different sources of water including, but not limited to, groundwater. The authors’ hypothesis is that long-term estimates of geochemical fluxes from groundwater using springflow proxies will be too large due to the integrative nature of springflow generation. Two conceptual models of springflow generation are tested using endmember mixing analyses (EMMA) on observations of spring chemistries and stable isotopic compositions in a large alpine watershed in the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado. In the “total springflow” conceptual model, springflow is assumed to be 100% groundwater. In the “fractional springflow” conceptual model, springflow is assumed to be an integration of different sources of water (e.g., groundwater, unsaturated flow, preferential flow in the soil, etc.) and groundwater is only a fractional component. The results indicate that groundwater contributions in springflow range from 2% to 100

  11. Tracking riverborne sediment and contaminants in Commencement Bay, Washington, using geochemical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, Renee K.; Conn, Kathleen E.; Dinicola, Richard S.

    2017-09-29

    Large rivers carry terrestrial sediment, contaminants, and other materials to the coastal zone where they can affect marine biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems. This U.S. Geological Survey study combined river and marine sediment geochemistry and organic contaminant analyses to identify riverborne sediment and associated contaminants at shoreline sites in Commencement Bay, Puget Sound, Washington, that could be used by adult forage fish and other marine organisms. Geochemical signatures distinguished the fine fraction (column. The three Commencement Bay sites at which organic contaminants were measured in surface sediment did not have measurable 7Be activities in that layer, so their contaminant assemblages were attributed to sources from previous years. Concentrations of organic contaminants (the most common of which were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and fecal sterols) were higher in the <0.063-mm fraction compared to the <2-mm fraction, in winter compared to summer, in river suspended sediment compared to river bar and bank sediment, and in marine sediment compared to river sediment. The geochemical property barium/aluminum (Ba/Al) showed that the median percentage of Puyallup River derived fine surface sediment along the shoreline of Commencement Bay was 77 percent. This finding, in combination with higher concentrations of organic contaminants in marine rather than river sediment, indicates that riverborne sediment-bound contaminants are retained in shallow marine habitats of Commencement Bay. The retention of earlier inputs complicates efforts to identify recent inputs and sources. Understanding modern sources and fates of riverborne sediment and contaminants and their potential ecological impacts will therefore require a suite of targeted geochemical studies in such marine depositional environments.

  12. Field Analytical Techniques for Geochemical Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Lemière, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Obtaining geochemical results in the field has been a persistent dream for exploration geologists in the last century, and a few practical geochemical? tests were developed, but shipping samples to faraway labs and waiting weeks for results was the rule. This remained a dream until around 1990, when technology developments of portable instruments allowed on-site measurement of the first key metals in solids. This development progressed rapidly and by 2010, most geochem...

  13. Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

    1983-09-01

    As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite [UO 2 (OH) 2 . H 2 O], UO 2 (OH) 2 , and rutherfordine ((UO 2 CO 3 ) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions

  14. Geochemical prospecting for rare earth elements using termite mound materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Yu; Ohno, Tetsuji; Hoshino, Mihoko; Shin, Ki-Cheol; Murakami, Hiroyasu; Tsunematsu, Maiko; Watanabe, Yasushi

    2014-12-01

    The Blockspruit fluorite prospect, located in North West State of the Republic of South Africa, occurs within an actinolite rock zone that was emplaced into the Kenkelbos-type granite of Proterozoic age. There are a large number of termite mounds in the prospect. For geochemical prospecting for rare earth elements (REEs), in total, 200 samples of termite mound material were collected from actinolite rock and granite zones in the prospect. Geochemical analyses of these termite mound materials were conducted by two methods: portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Comparison of the two methods broadly indicates positive correlations of REEs (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Y), in particular Y and La having a strong correlation. As the result of modal abundance analyses, the actinolite rock at surface mainly consists of ferro-actinolite (89.89 wt%) and includes xenotime (0.26 wt%) and monazite (0.21 wt%) grains as REE minerals. Termite mound materials from actinolite rock also contain xenotime (0.27 wt%) and monazite (0.41 wt%) grains. In addition, termite mound materials from the actinolite rock zone have high hematite and Fe silicate contents compared to those from granite zone. These relationships suggest that REE minerals in termite mound materials originate form actinolite rock. Geochemical anomaly maps of Y, La, and Fe concentrations drawn based on the result of the portable XRF analyses show that high concentrations of these elements trend from SW to NE which broadly correspond to occurrences of actinolite body. These results indicate that termite mounds are an effective tool for REE geochemical prospection in the study area for both light REEs and Y, but a more detailed survey is required to establish the distribution of the actinolite rock body.

  15. Status report on geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, D.

    1991-12-01

    This report describes the findings of a review undertaken on behalf of the project management group of the programme 'Endlagersicherheit in der Nachbetriebsphase' based at GSF-IfT (Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit - Institut fuer Tieflagerung) to establish the current status of research into the simulation of geochemical processes relevant to radiological assessment. The review is intended to contribute to Stage 1 of a strategy formulated to enhance the use of geochemical models in Germany. Emphasis has been placed on processes deemed to be of greatest relevance to performance assessment for a HLW-repository in a salt dome principally, speciation-solubility in high salinity solutions, complexation by natural organics and generation-transport of colloids. For each of these and other topics covered, a summary is given of fundamental concepts, theoretical representations and their limitations, highlighting, where appropriate, the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches. The availability of data to quantify any given representation is addressed, taking into account the need for information at elevated temperatures and pressures. Mass transfer is considered in terms of aqueous, particulate and gas-mediated transport, respectively. (orig.) [de

  16. The geochemical signature of Neogene Eastern Mediterranean sediment: evidence for temporal and spatial variations in provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver, Martijn; Vroon, Pieter; Wijbrans, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Subducted sediment is one of the main geochemical components in arc magmas. Although an east-west gradient in Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS) sediment composition has been evoked to explain the along-arc geochemical variations in Aegean arc magmas [1], solid evidence for E-W changes in EMS sediment composition is lacking. The EMS sediment dataset is limited to Holocene samples, while the sediment currently underneath the volcanic arc has an age of at least 6 Ma. In order to characterise EMS sediment, we have used a combination of thermogravimetric and geochemical analyses of 45 Neogene DSDP and ODP drill core samples. Thermogravimetric dissociation curves provide a rapid way to determine carbonate-content and relative abundance of clay mineral groups in mixed sediment samples. Clear clay mineral distribution patterns are observed in the EMS: smectite is dominant in Nile sediment, aeolian dust consist mainly of kaolinite while illite is present in coarser (shelf) sediment. Four distinct provenance areas can be recognised on the basis of radiogenic isotope and trace element ratios of the EMS sediment samples. In line with previous studies [e.g. 2], we conclude that Sahara dust and Nile sediment are main constituents of EMS sediment. However, we recognize two additional source areas. Sediment derived from Cyprus and/or SW Turkey, characterised by high Ni/Nb ratios, is an important component in Quaternary EMS sediment. Sediment from the Aegean region has an arc signature (e.g. high La/Nb) and is distinguishable only in the Hellenic Trench. During the Neogene, an increase in aeolian dust input to the EMS is observed, which is consistent with the progressive aridification of the Sahara region. The geochemical characterisation of Neogene EMS sediment and the recognition of distinct provenance areas can be used to assess the contribution of subducted sediment to magmas in the Aeolian and Aegean volcanic arcs. In addition, it allows further high-resolution investigation of

  17. Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices

  18. Geochemical characterization of Parana Basin volcanic rocks: petrogenetic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the geochemical characteristics of Parana Basin volcanic rocks is presented. The results are based on the analyses of major and trace elements of 158 samples. Ninety three of these volcanic samples belong to 8 flow sequences from Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina States. The remaining sixty five samples are distributed over the entire basin. In order to study the influence of crustal contamination processes in changing chemical characteristics of the volcanic rocks, 47 samples representative of the crystalline basement of the southern and southeastern Parana Basin were also analysed. Several petrogenetic models were tested to explain the compocional variability of the volcanic rocks, in particular those of southern region. The results obtained sugest an assimilation-fractional crystallization process as viable to explain the differences of both the chemical characteristics and Sr isotope initial ratios observed in basic and intermediate rocks. A model involving melting processes of basic material, trapped at the base of the crust, with composition similar to low and high TiO 2 basalts appears to be a possibility to originate the Palmas and Chapeco acid melts, respectively. The study of ''uncontaminated'' or poorly contaminated low TiO 2 basic rocks from the southern, central and northern regions shows the existence of significant differences in the geochemical charactetistics according to their geographical occurrence. A similar geochemical diversity is also observed in high TiO 2 basalts and Chapeco volcanics. Differences in incompatible element ratios between low and high TiO 2 ''uncontaminated'' or poorly contaminated basalts suggest that they could have been produced by different degrees of melting in a garnet peridotite source. Geochemical and isotopic (Sr and Nd) data also support the view that basalts from northern and southern regions of Parana Basin originated from mantle source with different composition. (author) [pt

  19. Petrographic features, geochemical trends and mass balance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Petrographic features, geochemical trends and mass balance computation, in relation to the evolution of anatectic migmatites in the granulite facies terrain of the Manalur area, Tamil Nadu, south India.

  20. Proceedings of 2. Brazilian Geochemical Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Some works about geochemistry are presented, including themes about geochemical exploration, lithogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, analytical geochemistry, geochemistry of carbonatites and rare earth elements and organic geochemistry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  1. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, J [comp.

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  2. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    This report considers mass transport in the far-field of a radioactive waste repository, and detailed geochemical modelling of the ground-water in the near-field. A parallel approach to this problem of coupling transport and geochemical codes is the subject of another CEC report (ref. EUR 10226). Both studies were carried out in the framework of the CEC project MIRAGE. (Migration of radionuclides in the geosphere)

  3. Alaska Geochemical Database - Mineral Exploration Tool for the 21st Century - PDF of presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitto, Matthew; Schmidt, Jeanine M.; Labay, Keith A.; Shew, Nora B.; Gamble, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has created a geochemical database of geologic material samples collected in Alaska. This database is readily accessible to anyone with access to the Internet. Designed as a tool for mineral or environmental assessment, land management, or mineral exploration, the initial version of the Alaska Geochemical Database - U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 637 - contains geochemical, geologic, and geospatial data for 264,158 samples collected from 1962-2009: 108,909 rock samples; 92,701 sediment samples; 48,209 heavy-mineral-concentrate samples; 6,869 soil samples; and 7,470 mineral samples. In addition, the Alaska Geochemical Database contains mineralogic data for 18,138 nonmagnetic-fraction heavy mineral concentrates, making it the first U.S. Geological Survey database of this scope that contains both geochemical and mineralogic data. Examples from the Alaska Range will illustrate potential uses of the Alaska Geochemical Database in mineral exploration. Data from the Alaska Geochemical Database have been extensively checked for accuracy of sample media description, sample site location, and analytical method using U.S. Geological Survey sample-submittal archives and U.S. Geological Survey publications (plus field notebooks and sample site compilation base maps from the Alaska Technical Data Unit in Anchorage, Alaska). The database is also the repository for nearly all previously released U.S. Geological Survey Alaska geochemical datasets. Although the Alaska Geochemical Database is a fully relational database in Microsoft® Access 2003 and 2010 formats, these same data are also provided as a series of spreadsheet files in Microsoft® Excel 2003 and 2010 formats, and as ASCII text files. A DVD version of the Alaska Geochemical Database was released in October 2011, as U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 637, and data downloads are available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/637/. Also, all Alaska Geochemical Database data have been incorporated into

  4. Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-22

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) disposes of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and stabilizes high-level radioactive waste (HLW) tanks in the subsurface environment. Calculations used to establish the radiological limits of these facilities are referred to as Performance Assessments (PA), Special Analyses (SA), and Composite Analyses (CA). The objective of this document is to revise existing geochemical input values used for these calculations. This work builds on earlier compilations of geochemical data (2007, 2010), referred to a geochemical data packages. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program of the SRS PA programs that periodically updates calculations and data packages when new information becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, the approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., bias the recommended input values to reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). This document provides 1088 input parameters for geochemical parameters describing transport processes for 64 elements (>740 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight subsurface disposal or tank closure areas: Slit Trenches (ST), Engineered Trenches (ET), Low Activity Waste Vault (LAWV), Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDA), Components-in-Grout (CIG) Trenches, Saltstone Facility, and Closed Liquid Waste Tanks. The geochemical parameters described here are the distribution coefficient, Kd value, apparent solubility concentration, ks value, and the cementitious leachate impact factor.

  5. Geochemical evaluation of Niger Delta sedimentary organic rocks: a new insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlua, Akinsehinwa; Torto, Nelson

    2010-05-01

    A geochemical evaluation of Niger Delta organic matter was carried out using supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) sample preparation procedure. Comparison of geochemical significance of gas chromatographic data of rock extracts of SFE with those of Soxhlet extraction method from previous studies was made in order to establish the usefulness of SFE in geochemical exploration. The assessment of geochemical character of the rock samples from the comparison and interpretation of other geochemical parameters were used to give more insights into understanding the source rocks characteristics of onshore and shelf portions of the Niger Delta Basin. The results of the gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the rock extracts across the lithostratigraphic units show that Pr/Ph, Pr/nC17, Pr/nC18, CPI and odd/even preference ranged from 0.07 to 12.39, 0.04 to 6.66, 0.05 to 13.80, 0.12 to 8.4 and 0.06 to 8.12, respectively. The Rock-Eval pyrolysis data and geochemical ratios and parameters calculated from the GC data showed that most of the samples are mature and have strong terrestrial provenance while a few samples have strong marine provenance. The few marine source rocks are located in the deeper depth horizon. Pr/Ph and standard geochemical plots indicate that most of samples were derived from organic matter deposited in less reducing conditions, i.e. more of oxidizing conditions while a few samples have predominantly influence of reducing conditions. The results of trace metal analysis of older samples from Agbada Formation also indicate marine and mixed organic matter input deposited in less reducing conditions. The results obtained in this study are comparable with those obtained from previous studies when Soxhlet extraction method was used and also indicated the presence of more than one petroleum systems in the Niger Delta.

  6. Diversity and geochemical structuring of bacterial communities along a salinity gradient in a carbonate aquifer subject to seawater intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Héry, Marina; Volant, Aurélie; Garing, Charlotte; Luquot, Linda; Elbaz Poulichet, Françoise; Gouze, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    In aquifers subject to saline water intrusion, the mixing zone between freshwater and saltwater displays strong physico-chemical gradients. Although the microbial component of these specific environments has been largely disregarded, the contribution of micro-organisms to biogeochemical reactions impacting water geochemistry has previously been conjectured. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare bacterial community diversity and composition along a vertical saline gradient in a carbonate coastal aquifer using high throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. At different depths of the mixing zone, stable geochemical and hydrological conditions were associated with autochthonous bacterial communities harboring clearly distinct structures. Diversity pattern did not follow the salinity gradient, although multivariate analysis indicated that salinity was one of the major drivers of bacterial community composition, with organic carbon, pH and CO2 partial pressure. Correlation analyses between the relative abundance of bacterial taxa and geochemical parameters suggested that rare taxa may contribute to biogeochemical processes taking place at the interface between freshwater and saltwater. Bacterial respiration or alternative metabolisms such as sulfide oxidation or organic acids production may be responsible for the acidification and the resulting induced calcite dissolution observed at a specific depth of the mixing zone. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

    1980-06-30

    The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

  8. Geochemical Treasure Hunt for Primary School Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesmer, Maja; Frick, Daniel; Gerrits, Ruben; des GFZ-GeoWunderWerkstatt, Schülerlabor

    2017-04-01

    How can you inspire school children for geochemistry, and scientific exploratory urge? The key is to raise their curiosity and make learning new things a hands-on experience. The Fellows of the European Marie Curie Initial Training Network IsoNose designed and established a "Geochemical Treasure Hunt" to excite children for scientific investigations. This workshop explains primary school children the research and scientific methods of isotopic geochemistry, and their use to understand processes on the Earth's surface. From obtaining 'samples', performing various experiments, the school children gather clues leading them to the hidden treasure on the Telegrafenberg (campus of the GFZ Potsdam). The course was designed for school children to learn hands-on the meaning of elements, atoms and isotopes. In small groups the children conduct experiments of simplified methods being indispensable to any isotope geochemist. However, prior to working in any laboratory environment, a security briefing is necessary. For the course, two stages were implemented; firstly the use of harmful substances and dangerous equipment was minimised, and secondly children were equipped with size-matched personal protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, and safety googles). The purification of elements prior to isotopic analysis was visualised using colour chromatography. However, instead of using delicate mass spectrometers for the isotope ratio measurements, the pupils applied flame spectroscopy to analyse their dissolved and purified mineral solutions. Depending on the specific element present, a different colour was observed in the flame. The children plotted their colours of the flame spectroscopy onto a map and by interpreting the emerging colour patterns they localized the treasure on the map. In small teams they swarmed out on the Telegrafenberg to recover the hidden treasure. The project leading to this outreach activity has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie

  9. Uncertainty in reactive transport geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedegaard-Jensen, A.; Ekberg, C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Geochemical modelling is one way of predicting the transport of i.e. radionuclides in a rock formation. In a rock formation there will be fractures in which water and dissolved species can be transported. The composition of the water and the rock can either increase or decrease the mobility of the transported entities. When doing simulations on the mobility or transport of different species one has to know the exact water composition, the exact flow rates in the fracture and in the surrounding rock, the porosity and which minerals the rock is composed of. The problem with simulations on rocks is that the rock itself it not uniform i.e. larger fractures in some areas and smaller in other areas which can give different water flows. The rock composition can be different in different areas. In additions to this variance in the rock there are also problems with measuring the physical parameters used in a simulation. All measurements will perturb the rock and this perturbation will results in more or less correct values of the interesting parameters. The analytical methods used are also encumbered with uncertainties which in this case are added to the uncertainty from the perturbation of the analysed parameters. When doing simulation the effect of the uncertainties must be taken into account. As the computers are getting faster and faster the complexity of simulated systems are increased which also increase the uncertainty in the results from the simulations. In this paper we will show how the uncertainty in the different parameters will effect the solubility and mobility of different species. Small uncertainties in the input parameters can result in large uncertainties in the end. (authors)

  10. The alkali-silica reaction: mineralogical and geochemical aspects of some Dutch concretes and Norwegian mylonites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekmans, M.A.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    Maarten Broekmans has studied the alkali-silica reaction in two Dutch concretes by means of optical microscopy, geochemical analyses on bulk material and after selective digestion in acid, and with element mapping in polished thin sections. He furthermore characterized the nature of the

  11. Interaction of density flow and geochemical processes on islands in the Okavanga Delta, Botswana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Langer, T.; Prommer, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyses the interactions of density driven flow and geochemical reactions under evapo-concentration. A multi-species hydrodynamic flow and transport simulation model (SEAWAT) is coupled to a batch reaction model (PHREEQC) to analyze densitydriven flow on islands in the Okavango Delta,...

  12. Stream sediment geochemical survey of an area around Dass, N.E. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stream sediment geochemical survey was carried out in Dass area to determine possible dispersion train for Pb, Cu, Co, Ni and Zn. A total of 114 active stream sediment samples were collected over an area of 60km2. The samples were treated with hot HNO3 and analysed for Pb, Cu, Co, Ni, Zn, Mn, Mg, Ca, and Fe.

  13. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L.; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb2 +) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb2 + concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb2 + concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb2 + concentrations are the same for all three

  14. The effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on hydro-geochemical transport and effective reaction rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchley, Adam L; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K; Maxwell, Reed M

    2014-09-01

    The role of coupled physical and geochemical heterogeneities in hydro-geochemical transport is investigated by simulating three-dimensional transport in a heterogeneous system with kinetic mineral reactions. Ensembles of 100 physically heterogeneous realizations were simulated for three geochemical conditions: 1) spatially homogeneous reactive mineral surface area, 2) reactive surface area positively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity, and 3) reactive surface area negatively correlated to hydraulic heterogeneity. Groundwater chemistry and the corresponding effective reaction rates were calculated at three transverse planes to quantify differences in plume evolution due to heterogeneity in mineral reaction rates and solute residence time (τ). The model is based on a hypothetical CO2 intrusion into groundwater from a carbon capture utilization and storage (CCUS) operation where CO2 dissolution and formation of carbonic acid created geochemical dis-equilibrium between fluids and the mineral galena that resulted in increased aqueous lead (Pb(2+)) concentrations. Calcite dissolution buffered the pH change and created conditions of galena oversaturation, which then reduced lead concentrations along the flow path. Near the leak kinetic geochemical reactions control the release of solutes into the fluid, but further along the flow path mineral solubility controls solute concentrations. Simulation results demonstrate the impact of heterogeneous distribution of geochemical reactive surface area in coordination with physical heterogeneity on the effective reaction rate (Krxn,eff) and Pb(2+) concentrations within the plume. Dissimilarities between ensemble Pb(2+) concentration and Krxn,eff are attributed to how geochemical heterogeneity affects the time (τeq) and therefore advection distance (Leq) required for the system to re-establish geochemical equilibrium. Only after geochemical equilibrium is re-established, Krxn,eff and Pb(2+) concentrations are the same for all

  15. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz R, S. de la; Armienta, M.A.; Segovia A, N

    1992-05-15

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  16. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz R, S. de la; Armienta, M.A.; Segovia A, N.

    1992-05-01

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  17. A geochemical study of the winonaites: Evidence for limited partial melting and constraints on the precursor composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alison C.; Benedix, Gretchen K.; Hammond, Samantha J.; Bland, Philip A.; Rehkämper, Mark; Kreissig, Katharina; Strekopytov, Stanislav

    2017-02-01

    The winonaites are primitive achondrites which are associated with the IAB iron meteorites. Textural evidence implies heating to at least the Fe, Ni-FeS cotectic, but previous geochemical studies are ambiguous about the extent of silicate melting in these samples. Oxygen isotope evidence indicates that the precursor material may be related to the carbonaceous chondrites. Here we analysed a suite of winonaites for modal mineralogy and bulk major- and trace-element chemistry in order to assess the extent of thermal processing as well as constrain the precursor composition of the winonaite-IAB parent asteroid. Modal mineralogy and geochemical data are presented for eight winonaites. Textural analysis reveals that, for our sub-set of samples, all except the most primitive winonaite (Northwest Africa 1463) reached the Fe, Ni-FeS cotectic. However, only one (Tierra Blanca) shows geochemical evidence for silicate melting processes. Tierra Blanca is interpreted as a residue of small-degree silicate melting. Our sample of Winona shows geochemical evidence for extensive terrestrial weathering. All other winonaites studied here (Fortuna, Queen Alexander Range 94535, Hammadah al Hamra 193, Pontlyfni and NWA 1463) have chondritic major-element ratios and flat CI-normalised bulk rare-earth element patterns, suggesting that most of the winonaites did not reach the silicate melting temperature. The majority of winonaites were therefore heated to a narrow temperature range of between ∼1220 (the Fe, Ni-FeS cotectic temperature) and ∼1370 K (the basaltic partial melting temperature). Silicate inclusions in the IAB irons demonstrate partial melting did occur in some parts of the parent body (Ruzicka and Hutson, 2010), thereby implying heterogeneous heat distribution within this asteroid. Together, this indicates that melting was the result of internal heating by short-lived radionuclides. The brecciated nature of the winonaites suggests that the parent body was later disrupted by

  18. Robust statistics and geochemical data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Advantages of robust procedures over ordinary least-squares procedures in geochemical data analysis is demonstrated using NURE data from the Hot Springs Quadrangle, South Dakota, USA. Robust principal components analysis with 5% multivariate trimming successfully guarded the analysis against perturbations by outliers and increased the number of interpretable factors. Regression with SINE estimates significantly increased the goodness-of-fit of the regression and improved the correspondence of delineated anomalies with known uranium prospects. Because of the ubiquitous existence of outliers in geochemical data, robust statistical procedures are suggested as routine procedures to replace ordinary least-squares procedures

  19. Coupling of transport and geochemical models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noy, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    This contract stipulated separate pieces of work to consider mass transport in the far-field of a repository, and more detailed geochemical modelling of the groundwater in the near-field. It was envisaged that the far-field problem would be tackled by numerical solutions to the classical advection-diffusion equation obtained by the finite element method. For the near-field problem the feasibility of coupling existing geochemical equilibrium codes to the three dimensional groundwater flow codes was to be investigated. This report is divided into two sections with one part devoted to each aspect of this contract. (author)

  20. Stepwise magnetic-geochemical approach for efficient assessment of heavy metal polluted sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, E.; Rösler, W.; Ojha, G.

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that magnetometry can outline the distribution of fly ash deposition in the surroundings of coal-burning power plants and steel industries. Especially the easy-to-measure magnetic susceptibility (MS) is capable to act as a proxy for heavy metal (HM) pollution caused by such kind of point source pollution. Here we present a demonstration project around the coal-burning power plant complex "Schwarze Pumpe" in eastern Germany. Before reunification of West and East Germany huge amounts of HM pollutants were emitted from the "Schwarze Pumpe" into the environment by both fly ash emission and dumped clinker. The project has been conducted as part of the TASK Centre of Competence which aims at bringing new innovative techniques closer to the market. Our project combines in situ and laboratory MS measurements and HM analyses in order to demonstrate the efficiency of a stepwise approach for site assessment of HM pollution around point sources of fly-ash emission and deposition into soil. The following scenario is played through: We assume that the "true" spatial distribution of HM pollution (given by the pollution load index PLI comprising Fe, Zn, Pb, and Cu) is represented by our entire set of 85 measured samples (XRF analyses) from forest sites around the "Schwarze Pumpe". Surface MS data (collected with a Bartington MS2D) and in situ vertical MS sections (logged by an SM400 instrument) are used to determine a qualitative overview of potentially higher and lower polluted areas. A suite of spatial HM distribution maps obtained by random selections of 30 out of the 85 analysed sites is compared to the HM map obtained from a targeted 30-sites-selection based on pre-information from the MS results. The PLI distribution map obtained from the targeted 30-sites-selection shows all essential details of the "true" pollution map, while the different random 30-sites-selections miss important features. This comparison shows that, for the same cost

  1. The geochemical landscape of northwestern Wisconsin and adjacent parts of northern Michigan and Minnesota (geochemical data files)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.

    2003-01-01

    This data set consists of nine files of geochemical information on various types of surficial deposits in northwestern Wisconsin and immediately adjacent parts of Michigan and Minnesota. The files are presented in two formats: as dbase files in dbaseIV form and Microsoft Excel form. The data present multi-element chemical analyses of soils, stream sediments, and lake sediments. Latitude and longitude values are provided in each file so that the dbf files can be readily imported to GIS applications. Metadata files are provided in outline form, question and answer form and text form. The metadata includes information on procedures for sample collection, sample preparation, and chemical analyses including sensitivity and precision.

  2. A preliminary study on the geochemical environment for deep geological disposal of high level radioactive waste in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chun Soo; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Yong Kwon; Park, Byoung Yun

    2000-03-01

    Geochemical study on the groundwater from crystalline rocks (granite and gneiss) for the deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste was carried out in order to elucidate the hydrogeochemical and isotope characteristics and geochemical evolution of the groundwater. Study areas are Jungwon, Chojeong, Youngcheon and Yusung for granite region, Cheongyang for gneiss region, and Yeosu for volcanic region. Groundwaters of each study areas weree sampled and analysed systematically. Groundwaters can be grouped by their chemistry and host rock. Origin of the groundwater was proposed by isotope ({sup 18}O, {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, {sup 34}S, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 15}N) studies and the age of groundwater was inferred from their tritium contents. Based ont the geochemical and isotope characteristics, the geochemical evolutions of each types of groundwater were simulated using SOLVEQ/CHILLER and PHREEQC programs.

  3. An integrated geochemical and geoelectrical Investigation of an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ife Journal of Science ... Geochemical analysis of borehole soil samples for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH), geoelectrical imaging and geotechnical sieve analysis were used to assess the ... Keywords: Geochemical Analysis, Geoelectric Imaging, Borehole Sampling, TPH Concentrations, Oil Spill, Contamination ...

  4. Identification and characterization of tsunami deposits off southeast coast of India from the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami: Rock magnetic and geochemical approach.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.; Basavaiah, N.; Ramkumar, T.; Venkatramanan, S.; Deenadayalan, K.

    the relationships among the textural, mineral, geochemical and magnetic parameters, and suggests that most of the quartz-rich coarse sediments have been transported offshore by the tsunami wave. These results are well agreed with the previously published numerical...

  5. Appliance of geochemical engineering in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuang; Zhang Chengjiang; Ni Shijun; Li Kuanliang

    2008-01-01

    The basic foundation of applying geochemical engineering to control environment, common engineering models of disposal radioactive waste and the functions of the engineering barriers are introduced in this paper. The authors take the geochemical engineering barrier materiel research of a radioactive waste repository as an example to explain the appliance of geochemical engineering in the disposal of radioactive waste. And the results show that it can enhance the security of the nuclear waste repository if we use geochemical engineering barrier. (authors)

  6. Geochemical assessment of fluoride enrichment and nitrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    62

    minerals. By reducing the consumption of fertilizer and stress over groundwater, the water quality can be improved. Key Word- Hydro-geochemistry, Fluoride, ... source (industries effluent, fertilizer industry and fertilizer used in agriculture field) influences ...... groundwater of the Taiyuan basin, Northern China; J. Geochem.

  7. Geochemical modelling baseline compositions of groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Diederik Jan; Kjøller, Claus; Andersen, Martin Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    dissolution (East Midlands, Valreas and Aveiro). Reactive transport models, employing the code PHREEQC, which included these geochemical processes and one-dimensional solute transport were able to duplicate the observed patterns in water quality. These models may provide a quantitative understanding...

  8. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 125; Issue 7. Geochemical fingerprints and pebbles zircon geochronology: Implications for the provenance and tectonic setting of Lower Cretaceous sediments in the Zhucheng Basin (Jiaodong peninsula, North China). Jin-Long Ni Jun-Lai Liu Xiao-Ling Tang ...

  9. Kriging - a challenge in geochemical mapping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štojdl, J.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Popelka, J.; Váchová, T.; Hošek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, APR (2017) ISSN 1607-7962. [EGU General Assembly 2017. 23.04.2017-28.04.2017, Vienna] Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : kriging * geochemical mapping Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry http://meetingorganizer. copernicus .org/EGU2017/EGU2017-3615.pdf

  10. Discriminating four tectonic settings: Five new geochemical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 115; Issue 5. Discriminating four tectonic settings: Five new geochemical diagrams for basic and ultrabasic volcanic rocks based on log–ratio transformation of major-element data. Surendra P Verma Mirna Guevara Salil Agrawal. Volume 115 Issue 5 October 2006 ...

  11. Association between physical and geochemical characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as well as in waters relatively rich in uranium, rubidium, vanadium and manganese. It was clear that the occurrence of algae coincided with specific geological formations. These algae could act as indicator species of geology and heavy metals. Keywords: thermal springs, Limpopo Province, algae, diversity, geochemical ...

  12. Proceedings of 13. International Geochemical Exploration Symposium. 2. Brazilian Geochemical Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Some works about geochemistry are presented, including themes about geochemical exploration, lithogeochemistry and isotope geochemistry, environmental geochemistry, analyical geochemistry, geochemistry of carbonatites and rare earth elements and organic geochemistry. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Linking the climatic and geochemical controls on global soil carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doetterl, Sebastian; Stevens, Antoine; Six, Johan; Merckx, Roel; Van Oost, Kristof; Casanova Pinto, Manuel; Casanova-Katny, Angélica; Muñoz, Cristina; Boudin, Mathieu; Zagal Venegas, Erick; Boeckx, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    Climatic and geochemical parameters are regarded as the primary controls for soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnover. However, due to the difference in scale between climate and geochemical-related soil research, the interaction of these key factors for SOC dynamics have rarely been assessed. Across a large geochemical and climatic transect in similar biomes in Chile and the Antarctic Peninsula we show how abiotic geochemical soil features describing soil mineralogy and weathering pose a direct control on SOC stocks, concentration and turnover and are central to explaining soil C dynamics at larger scales. Precipitation and temperature had an only indirect control by regulating geochemistry. Soils with high SOC content have low specific potential CO2 respiration rates, but a large fraction of SOC that is stabilized via organo-mineral interactions. The opposite was observed for soils with low SOC content. The observed differences for topsoil SOC stocks along this transect of similar biomes but differing geo-climatic site conditions are of the same magnitude as differences observed for topsoil SOC stocks across all major global biomes. Using precipitation and a set of abiotic geochemical parameters describing soil mineralogy and weathering status led to predictions of high accuracy (R2 0.53-0.94) for different C response variables. Partial correlation analyses revealed that the strength of the correlation between climatic predictors and SOC response variables decreased by 51 - 83% when controlling for geochemical predictors. In contrast, controlling for climatic variables did not result in a strong decrease in the strength of the correlations of between most geochemical variables and SOC response variables. In summary, geochemical parameters describing soil mineralogy and weathering were found to be essential for accurate predictions of SOC stocks and potential CO2 respiration, while climatic factors were of minor importance as a direct control, but are

  14. Geochemical evolution of magmatism in Archean granite-greenstone terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonov, A. V.; Larionova, Yu. O.

    2006-05-01

    Evolution of Archean magmatism is one of the key problems concerning the early formation stages of the Earth crust and biosphere, because that evolution exactly controlled variable concentrations of chemical elements in the World Ocean, which are important for metabolism. Geochemical evolution of magmatism between 3.5 and 2.7 Ga is considered based on database characterizing volcanic and intrusive rock complexes of granite-greenstone terrains (GGT) studied most comprehensively in the Karelian (2.9-2.7 Ga) and Kaapvaal (3.5-2.9 Ga) cratons and in the Pilbara block (3.5-2.9 Ga). Trends of magmatic geochemical evolution in the mentioned GGTs were similar in general. At the early stage of their development, tholeiitic magmas were considerably enriched in chalcophile and siderophile elements Fe2O3, MgO, Cr, Ni, Co, V, Cu, and Zn. At the next stage, calc-alkaline volcanics of greenstone belts and syntectonic TTG granitoids were enriched in lithophile elements Rb, Cs, Ba, Th, U, Pb, Nb, La, Sr, Be and others. Elevated concentrations of both the “crustal” and “mantle-derived” elements represented a distinctive feature of predominantly intrusive rocks of granitoid composition, which were characteristic of the terminal stage of continental crust formation in the GGTs, because older silicic rocks and lithospheric mantle were jointly involved into processes of magma generation. On the other hand, the GGTs different in age reveal specific trends in geochemical evolution of rock associations close in composition and geological position. First, the geochemical cycle of GGT evolution was of a longer duration in the Paleoarchean than in the Meso-and Neoarchean. Second, the Paleoarche an tholeiitic associations had higher concentrations of LREE and HFSE (Zr, Ti, Th, Nb, Ta, Hf) than their Meso-and Neoarchean counterparts. Third, the Y and Yb concentrations in Paleoarchean calc-alkaline rock associations are systematically higher than in Neoarchean rocks of the same type

  15. The geochemical transformation of soils by agriculture and its dependence on soil erosion: An application of the geochemical mass balance approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Kyungsoo; Fisher, Beth; Ji, Junling; Aufdenkampe, Anthony; Klaminder, Jonatan

    2015-07-15

    Agricultural activities alter elemental budgets of soils and thus their long-term geochemical development and suitability for food production. This study examined the utility of a geochemical mass balance approach that has been frequently used for understanding geochemical aspect of soil formation, but has not previously been applied to agricultural settings. Protected forest served as a reference to quantify the cumulative fluxes of Ca, P, K, and Pb at a nearby tilled crop land. This comparison was made at two sites with contrasting erosional environments: relatively flat Coastal Plain in Delaware vs. hilly Piedmont in Pennsylvania. Mass balance calculations suggested that liming not only replenished the Ca lost prior to agricultural practice but also added substantial surplus at both sites. At the relatively slowly eroding Coastal Plain site, the agricultural soil exhibited enrichment of P and less depletion of K, while both elements were depleted in the forest soil. At the rapidly eroding Piedmont site, erosion inhibited P enrichment. In similar, agricultural Pb contamination appeared to have resulted in Pb enrichment in the relatively slowly eroding Coastal Plain agricultural soil, while not in the rapidly eroding Piedmont soils. We conclude that agricultural practices transform soils into a new geochemical state where current levels of Ca, P, and Pb exceed those provided by the local soil minerals, but such impacts are significantly offset by soil erosion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Geochemical characteristics and organic carbon sources within the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper uses C isotopic methods coupled with other geochemical parameters to investigate differences in the geochemical characteristics and sources of organic C within the Nanpan and Beipan rivers, two upstream tributaries to the Xi River. 2. Geographic, hydrologic, and geochemical setting. The Nanpan and Beipan ...

  17. Geochemical Signature of Amazon Tropical Rainforest Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José João Lelis Leal de Souza

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Evaluating soil geochemical diversity in the Amazon Basin has been a challenge largely because most study sites have been at the edge of the basin and it is difficult to get samples in such a region. Here we show that even among the most weathered soils, physicochemical soil properties express lithology. Our results are based on topsoil samples collected from different locations in minimally disturbed areas in the state of Amazonas, Brazil. Soil properties were measured using methods which are suitable for highly developed soils. The Chemical Index Alteration and Weathering Index of Parker was calculated based on the content of metal(loids in soils determined by X-ray fluorescence. Descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA were performed on data. In general, Amazon rainforest soils are more deeply weathered than soils in other Brazilian biomes and tropical rainforests in Asia and Africa. The high coefficient of variation of metal(loid contents express pedogenesis and parent material diversity. Correlation analysis indicated that the tri-pentavalent elements are strongly associated with Al and Fe contents in the topsoil. In contrast, mono-divalent elements are correlated with sand and silt fractions. According to PCA, five soil groups with defined geochemical compositions and degrees of weathering could be identified: i acidic sandy podzolized soils; ii acidic loamy ferralitic soils with the highest content of tri-pentavalent ions; iii acidic clayey kaolinitic soils with low metal(loid contents; iv acidic loamy kaolinitic soils with low metal(loid contents; and v silty neutral 2:1 clay soils. This study is the first effort to analyze the geochemical diversity in Amazon rainforest soils. These data are extremely valuable in determining the geochemical background for these soil types and this region. Geochemical variability can be predicted to some extent by lithology and pedogenesis, which can be

  18. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical Data Bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.G.; Read, D.

    1992-01-01

    The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Northern Territory of Australia is being studied to evaluate the processes involved in the geochemical alteration of the ore body and the formation of the uranium dispersion fan. A broad range of research is being undertaken into the geochemistry and hydrology of the site with the aim of understanding the transport of radionuclides through the system. During the project a range of geochemical and hydrogeochemical models have been developed to account for measured data from the site and with which to predict site evolution. The majority of these models are based on the premise of thermodynamic chemical equilibrium and employ fundamental thermodynamic data to characterise the chemistry of the system. From the differences which exist between the thermodynamic data bases (Appendices I and II) it is possible to gain a view of the level of uncertainty associated with thermodynamic data in each set of calculations. This report gives a brief introduction to the geochemical processes underlying the models, and details the equations used to quantify the more common of these processes (e.g. aqueous speciation and mineral solubility). A description is given of the computer codes (EQ3/6, PHREEQE, MINTEQ) most commonly used during the project for geochemical modelling. Their key features are highlighted and comparisons made. It is concluded that the degree of uncertainty in geochemical modelling studies arising as a result of using one code rather than another is relatively insignificant when compared to that related to differences in the underlying data bases. 73 refs., 3 figs

  19. Geochemical modelling: what phenomena are missing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquier, P.

    1989-12-01

    In the framework of safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal, retention phenomena are usually taken into account by the Kd concept. It is well recognized that this concept is not enough for safety assessment models, because of the several and strong assumptions which are involved in this kind of representation. One way to have a better representation of the retention phenomena, is to substitute for this Kd concept an explicit description of geochemical phenomena and then couple transport codes with geochemical codes in a fully or a two-step procedure. We use currently such codes, but the scope of this paper is to display the limits today of the geochemical modelling in connection with sites analysis for deep disposal. In this paper, we intend to give an overview of phenomena which are missing in the geochemical models, or which are not completely introduced in the models. We can distinguish, on one hand phenomena for which modelling concepts exist such as adsorption/desorption and, on the other hand, phenomena for which modelling concepts do not exist for the moment such as colloids, and complexation by polyelectrolyte solutions (organics). Moreover we have to take care of very low concentrations of radionuclides, which can be expected from the leaching processes in the repository. Under those conditions, some reactions may not occur. After a critical review of the involved phenomena, we intend to stress the main directions of the wishful evolution of the geochemical modelling. This evolution should improve substantially the quality of the above-mentioned site assessments

  20. Multivariate analysis relating oil shale geochemical properties to NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Washburn, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry has been used to provide insight into shale composition by separating relaxation responses from the various hydrogen-bearing phases present in shales in a noninvasive way. Previous low-field NMR work using solid-echo methods provided qualitative information on organic constituents associated with raw and pyrolyzed oil shale samples, but uncertainty in the interpretation of longitudinal-transverse (T1–T2) relaxometry correlation results indicated further study was required. Qualitative confirmation of peaks attributed to kerogen in oil shale was achieved by comparing T1–T2 correlation measurements made on oil shale samples to measurements made on kerogen isolated from those shales. Quantitative relationships between T1–T2 correlation data and organic geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales were determined using partial least-squares regression (PLSR). Relaxometry results were also compared to infrared spectra, and the results not only provided further confidence in the organic matter peak interpretations but also confirmed attribution of T1–T2 peaks to clay hydroxyls. In addition, PLSR analysis was applied to correlate relaxometry data to trace element concentrations with good success. The results of this work show that NMR relaxometry measurements using the solid-echo approach produce T1–T2 peak distributions that correlate well with geochemical properties of raw and pyrolyzed oil shales.

  1. Archean cherts: field, petrographic and geochemical criteria to determine their origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledevin, Morgane; Arndt, Nicholas T.; Simionovici, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    contribute significantly to the trace-element composition, but acts as a diluent. Buck Reef cherts have extremely low contents of most trace elements due to low contents of detrital minerals and carbonates. S-cherts result from the silicification of preexisting rocks: under the action of circulating fluids, primary minerals are replaced by silica minerals and the porosity of the protolith is significantly reduced. Such process occurs even at the surface and persist downward the sedimentary units until after the rocks are indurated. F-cherts were observed in the Barite Valley, where chert dykes cross-cut surrounding units at high angle. The fractures often display jigsaw-puzzle textures, suggesting hydraulic fracturation, and their near-vertical orientation points to emplacement at shallow levels in the sediment pile. The dykes are filled with a black chert that contains variable amounts of host rock fragments that vary in shape (angular to rounded) and size (dm to µm). They control the whole-rock chemistry of cherts, and obscure the chemical composition of the primary, precipitating fluid. We believe that this fluid had a thixotropic behavior, i.e. it was fluid enough during the intrusion to fill very fine <1mm fractures but viscous enough when the velocity decreased to suspend decimetric host rock fragments. Based on our observations, we conclude that (1) field and petrological studies are more reliable than geochemical analyses for the recognition of various chert types; (2) the composition of cherts strongly depends on the type and amount of mineral phases other than silica, especially clays and carbonates; (3) C-cherts might be more abundant than previously thought and deposited as an amorphous, siliceous gel onto the seafloor before being rapidly indurated.

  2. Geochemical and Crystallographic Study of Turbo Torquatus (Mollusca: Gastropoda) From Southwestern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, L. M.; George, A. D.; Shaw, J.; Hart, R. D.; Roberts, M. P.; Becker, T.; Evans, N. J.; McDonald, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    Shells of the marine gastropod Turbo torquatus were sampled from three different locations along the Western Australian coastline, namely Marmion Lagoon (31°S), Rottnest Island (32°S), and Hamelin Bay (34°S). Marmion Lagoon and Rottnest Island have similar sea surface temperature ranges that are ˜1°C warmer than Hamelin Bay, with all sites influenced by the warm southward flowing Leeuwin Current. The shells were characterized using crystallographic, spectroscopic, and geochemical analyses. Shell mineral composition varies between the three sites suggesting the influence of sea surface temperature, oxygen consumption, and/or bedrock composition on shell mineralogy and preferential incorporation and/or elemental discrimination of Mg, P, and S. Furthermore, T. torquatus was found to exert control over the incorporation of most, if not all, the elements measured here, suggesting strong biological regulation. At all levels of testing, the concentrations of Li varied significantly, which indicates that this trace element may not be a suitable environmental proxy. Variation in Sr concentration between sites and between specimens reflects combined environmental and biological controls suggesting that Sr/Ca ratios in T. torquatus cannot be used to estimate sea surface temperature without experimentally accounting for metabolic and growth effects. The mineral composition and microstructure of T. torquatus shells may help identify sea surface temperature variations on geological time scales. These findings support the previously hypothesized involvement of an active selective pathway across the calcifying mantle of T. torquatus for most, if not all, the elements measured here.

  3. Geochemical characterization of mid-distal Nisyros tephra on Datça peninsula (southwestern Anatolia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençalioğlu-Kuşcu, Gonca; Uslular, Göksu

    2018-04-01

    We present new distal records of tephra deposits that overly the Kos ignimbrite in seven locations of Datça peninsula. Tephra in one of these locations were previously associated with Nisyros Kyra sub-unit based only on the field characteristics. We use different proxies such as field observations, petrography, mineral, glass, and whole-rock chemistry in order to characterize and correlate the previously and recently identified pumice fall deposits on Datça. The total thickness of the fall deposit reaches to 3.5 m. The size of the pumice clasts is generally within the range of lapilli, and they have vitrophyric texture consisting mainly of plagioclase (andesine to labradorite) with scarce clinopyroxene (diopside to augite), olivine (Fo48-50), amphibole (magnesio-hastingsite), and biotite crystals. Amphibole is a ubiquitous phenocryst in all Datça tephra units and used as a criterion for the correlation. Glass major element analyses by EMPA reveal two different groups with andesitic and dacitic compositions. Difference in silica content (up to ca. 4 wt%) detected in the same specimen also designates the heterogeneity in pumice glass. This heterogeneity in glass composition is also supported by the frequent occurrence of banded pumice clasts in Datça tephra. Whole-rock composition of the pumice is mainly andesitic with calc-alkaline affinity. Multi-element patterns on primitive-mantle normalized diagram display typical arc-magmatism signature (i.e. depletion in Nb, Ta, Ti, and P). In order to check and eliminate the potential alternatives, we compared the distal deposits on Datça not only with Kyra, but also with other Nisyros tephra units. Yet, Kyra is the only unit that has comparable depositional characteristics, calcic amphibole crystals, andesitic-dacitic glass and whole-rock chemistry, and distal tephra deposits on neighboring islands (Tilos and Chalki). Therefore, we associate Datça tephra deposits with some proximal Kyra subunits of intermediate

  4. Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-05-01

    The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

  5. Application of cluster analysis to geochemical compositional data for identifying ore-related geochemical anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuguang; Zhou, Kefa; Wang, Jinlin; Yang, Genfang; Wang, Shanshan

    2017-12-01

    Cluster analysis is a well-known technique that is used to analyze various types of data. In this study, cluster analysis is applied to geochemical data that describe 1444 stream sediment samples collected in northwestern Xinjiang with a sample spacing of approximately 2 km. Three algorithms (the hierarchical, k-means, and fuzzy c-means algorithms) and six data transformation methods (the z-score standardization, ZST; the logarithmic transformation, LT; the additive log-ratio transformation, ALT; the centered log-ratio transformation, CLT; the isometric log-ratio transformation, ILT; and no transformation, NT) are compared in terms of their effects on the cluster analysis of the geochemical compositional data. The study shows that, on the one hand, the ZST does not affect the results of column- or variable-based (R-type) cluster analysis, whereas the other methods, including the LT, the ALT, and the CLT, have substantial effects on the results. On the other hand, the results of the row- or observation-based (Q-type) cluster analysis obtained from the geochemical data after applying NT and the ZST are relatively poor. However, we derive some improved results from the geochemical data after applying the CLT, the ILT, the LT, and the ALT. Moreover, the k-means and fuzzy c-means clustering algorithms are more reliable than the hierarchical algorithm when they are used to cluster the geochemical data. We apply cluster analysis to the geochemical data to explore for Au deposits within the study area, and we obtain a good correlation between the results retrieved by combining the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms and the potential zones of Au mineralization. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of the CLT or the ILT with the k-means or fuzzy c-means algorithms is an effective tool to identify potential zones of mineralization from geochemical data.

  6. A Low-Li Geochemical Province in the NE Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, J. C.; Gwozdz, R.

    1978-01-01

    Lithium was analysed in 392 basalts and related igneous rocks from the North Atlantic Tertiary-Recent province using activation analysis and Čerenkov counting. Monotonous Li values of 5.5±2 ppm in NE Atlantic basalts define a low-Li geochemical province which has persisted for 60 million years......, over 20° of latitude and regardless of basalt type and chemistry. This low-Li province and the increasing Li contents of ocean-ridge tholeiites into the S Atlantic are believed to monitor Li heterogeneity in the underlying mantle. Li, like Na, increases gently during the differentiation of several...... basalt series. No whole-rock coherence is observed between Li and Mg, K, Rb or Ca. Mantle phlogopite is considered to play an insignificant rôle in controlling the Li levels of NE Atlantic basalts....

  7. Petrographic and geochemical characteristics of the Cypress Creek salt core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    Law Engineering Testing Company supervised the drilling of a corehole into the stock of Cypress Creek Dome, located in Perry County, Mississippi. A total of 170 ft of caprock and 501 ft of salt stock was recovered for physical examination and chemical analysis. This report describes the types of analyses performed and summarizes the data developed. The entire caprock and salt core were described and photographed prior to selection of samples for petrologic and geochemical analysis. Transmitted light techniques were used to determine gross structural and compositional variations in the core. The core lithologies are presented graphically, at a scale of 1 in. to 2 ft. In addition to the detailed field descriptions and photographs, petrologic studies performed on selected caprock and salt samples included: thin-section examination, scanning-electron microscope studies, energy-dispersion analysis, and x-ray-diffraction analysis. Geochemical analyses were performed to determine the average elemental composition of the salt core and amounts of methane and carbon dioxide gases contained within the salt grains. Except for two thin (3 and 6 ft thick) gypsum zones in the top 27 ft of the caprock, the core is predominantly anhydrite (generally 80%). Minor amounts of dolomite and calcite are also present. The salt core consists predominantly of crystalline halite, fine- to medium-grained (0.25 to 1 in.) with few megacrysts. Anhydrite occurs in the salt core as disseminated grains, ranging in length from <0.1 in. to 12 in. Discrete zones exist within the salt core, distinguished from one another primarily by the character of the anhydrite inclusions

  8. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  9. Summary report on geochemical barrier special study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    Long-term management of uranium mill tailings must provide assurance that soluble contaminants will not migrate beyond the Point of Compliance. Conventional management alternatives provide containment through the use of physical barriers which are designed to prevent migration of water through the tailings pile. An alternative is to geochemically modify the tailings to immobilize the contaminants. This investigation examined three potential geochemical modifiers to determine their ability to immobilize inorganic groundwater contaminants found in uranium mill tailings. These modifiers were hydrated lime (Ca(OH) 2 ), limestone (CaCO 3 ), and a sphaegnum peat moss. This investigation focused on both the geochemical interactions between the tailings and the modifiers, and the effects the modifiers had on the physical strength of the tailings. The geochemical investigations began with characterization of the tailings by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. This was followed by batch leaching experiments in which various concentrations of each modifier were added to tailings in shaker flasks and allowed to come to equilibrium. Finally, column experiments were conducted to simulate flow through a tailings pile. The results show that all of the modifiers were at least moderately effective at immobilizing most of the groundwater contaminants of concern at uranium mill tailings sites. Hydrated lime was able to achieve 90 percent concentration reduction of arsenic, cadmium, selenium, uranium, and sulfate when added at a two percent concentration. Limestone was somewhat less effective and peat removed greater than 90 percent of arsenic, lead, uranium, and sulfate at a one percent concentration. The column tests showed that kinetic and/or mass transfer limitations are important and that sufficient time must be allowed for the immobilization reactions to occur

  10. Synthesizing Earth's geochemical data for hydrogeochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S. L.; Kubicki, J.; Miller, D.; Richter, D.; Giles, L.; Mitra, P.

    2007-12-01

    For over 200 years, geochemical, microbiological, and chemical data have been collected to describe the evolution of the surface earth. Many of these measurements are data showing variations in time or in space. To forward predict hydrologic response to changing tectonic, climatic, or anthropogenic forcings requires synthesis of these data and utilization in hydrogeochemical models. Increasingly, scientists are attempting to synthesize such data in order to make predictions for new regions or for future time periods. However, to make such complex geochemical data accessible requires development of sophisticated cyberinfrastructures that both invite uploading as well as usage of data. Two such cyberinfrastructure (CI) initiatives are currently developing, one to invite and promote the use of environmental kinetics data (laboratory time course data) through ChemxSeer, and the other to invite and promote the use of spatially indexed geochemical data for the Earth's Critical Zone through CZEN.org. The vision of these CI initiatives is to provide cyber-enhanced portals that encourage domain scientists to upload their data before publication (in private cyberspace), and to make these data eventually publicly accessible (after an embargo period). If the CI can be made to provide services to the domain specialist - e.g. to provide data analysis services or data comparison services - we envision that scientists will upload data. In addition, the CI can promote the use and comparison of datasets across disciplines. For example, the CI can facilitate the use of spatially indexed geochemical data by scientists more accustomed to dealing with time-course data for hydrologic flow, and can provide user-friendly interfaces with CI established to facilitate the use of hydrologic data. Examples of the usage of synthesized data to predict soil development over the last 13ky and its effects on active hydrological flow boundaries in surficial systems will be discussed for i) a N

  11. Geochemical modelling of groundwater chemistry in the Tono area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.

    2003-03-01

    This report summarizes the research result about geochemical modelling of the groundwater during H14 financial year. JNC-TGC have built the geochemical conceptual models of groundwater by using the chemical data of the groundwater of the Mizunami group and Toki granite. Although this models are extremely useful as interpretive tools, they lack the quantitative basis necessary to evaluate coupled processes of fluid-flow and water-rock interaction driving the chemical evolution of groundwater systems. In this research, the following three items have been considered for the purpose of construction of the geochemical model which can express the chemical reaction in groundwater correctly. Evaluation of the quality of the previous analytical data in the Tono region. Grasp of the chemical character of groundwaters. Consideration about the influence between Eh, pH and CO 2 (g) parameter, and which the change has. Evaluation of the quality of the previous analytical data are important because deficiencies in sampling technique, sample-preservation procedures or analytical method may adversely affect the overall quality of groundwater chemical and isotopic analysis. In addition, the effects of borehole drilling and logging, hydraulic testing inappropriate sampling strategies or inadequate sampling tools may perturb groundwater compositions to such an extent that they are unrepresentative of in-situ conditions. The quality of water analysis is indicated by its charge balance. The charge balance of many of the analysis lies within the strictly acceptable range of 0±5%, but charge imbalances exceeding these limits are calculated for many other samples. These reasons are examined in the following. Analytical errors (e.q., of alkalinity). Errors arising from the use of IC values that are unrepresentative because CO 2 was gained by or lost from the sample during storage and (or) analysis. Errors arising from the invalid assumption that non-carbonate contributions to the

  12. Sharp fronts within geochemical transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grindrod, P.

    1995-01-01

    The authors consider some reactive geochemical transport problems in groundwater systems. When incoming fluid is in disequilibrium with the mineralogy sharp transition fronts may develop. They show that this is a generic property for a class of systems where the timescales associated with reaction and diffusion phenomena are much shorter than those associated with advective transport. Such multiple timescale problems are relevant to a variety of processes in natural systems: mathematically methods of singular perturbation theory reduce the dimension of the problems to be solved locally. Furthermore, they consider how spatial heterogeneous mineralogy can impact upon the propagation of sharp geochemical fronts. The authors developed an asymptotic approach in which they solve equations for the evolving geometry of the front and indicate how the non-smooth perturbations due to natural heterogeneity of the mineralogy on underlying ground water flow field are balanced against the smoothing effect of diffusion/dispersive processes. Fronts are curvature damped, and the results here indicate the generic nature of separate front propagation within both model (idealized) and natural (heterogeneous) geochemical systems

  13. Tools and data for the geochemical modeling. Thermodynamic data for sulfur species and background salts and tools for the uncertainty analysis; WEDA. Werkzeuge und Daten fuer die Geochemische Modellierung. Thermodynamische Daten fuer Schwefelspezies und Hintergrundsalze sowie Tools zur Unsicherheitsanalyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, Sven; Schoenwiese, Dagmar; Scharge, Tina

    2015-07-15

    The report on tools and data for the geochemical modeling covers the following issues: experimental methods and theoretical models, design of a thermodynamic model for reduced sulfur species, thermodynamic models for background salts, tools for the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of geochemical equilibrium modeling.

  14. Microbial iron cycling in acidic geothermal springs of Yellowstone National Park: Integrating molecular surveys, geochemical processes and isolation of novel Fe-active microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Kozubal

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical, molecular, and physiological analyses of microbial isolates were combined to study the geomicrobiology of acidic iron oxide mats in Yellowstone National Park (YNP. Nineteen sampling locations from 11 geothermal springs were studied ranging in temperature from 53 to 84 °C and pH 2.4 to 3.6. All iron-oxide mats exhibited high diversity of crenarchaeal sequences from the Sulfolobales, Thermoproteales, and Desulfurococcales. The predominant Sulfolobales sequences were highly similar to Metallosphaera yellowstonensis str. MK1, previously isolated from one of these sites. Other groups of archaea were consistently associated with different types of iron oxide mats, including undescribed members of the phyla Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Bacterial sequences were dominated by relatives of Hydrogenobaculum spp. above 65-70 °C, but increased in diversity below 60 °C. Cultivation of relevant iron-oxidizing and iron-reducing microbial isolates included Sulfolobus str. MK3, Sulfobacillus str. MK2, Acidicaldus str. MK6, and a new candidate genus in the Sulfolobales referred to as Sulfolobales str. MK5. Strains MK3 and MK5 are capable of oxidizing ferrous iron autotrophically, while strain MK2 oxidizes iron mixotrophically. Similar rates of iron oxidation were observed for M. yellowstonensis str. MK1 and Sulfolobales str. MK5 cultures, and these rates are close to those measured in situ. Biomineralized phases of ferric iron varied among cultures and field sites, and included ferric oxyhydroxides, K-jarosite, goethite, hematite, and scorodite depending on geochemical conditions. Strains MK5 and MK6 are capable of reducing ferric iron under anaerobic conditions with complex carbon sources. The combination of geochemical and molecular data as well as physiological observations of isolates suggests that the community structure of acidic Fe mats is linked with Fe cycling across temperatures ranging from 53 to 88 oC.

  15. Microbial Iron Cycling in Acidic Geothermal Springs of Yellowstone National Park: Integrating Molecular Surveys, Geochemical Processes, and Isolation of Novel Fe-Active Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozubal, Mark A.; Macur, Richard E.; Jay, Zackary J.; Beam, Jacob P.; Malfatti, Stephanie A.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Kocar, Benjamin D.; Borch, Thomas; Inskeep, William P.

    2012-01-01

    Geochemical, molecular, and physiological analyses of microbial isolates were combined to study the geomicrobiology of acidic iron oxide mats in Yellowstone National Park. Nineteen sampling locations from 11 geothermal springs were studied ranging in temperature from 53 to 88°C and pH 2.4 to 3.6. All iron oxide mats exhibited high diversity of crenarchaeal sequences from the Sulfolobales, Thermoproteales, and Desulfurococcales. The predominant Sulfolobales sequences were highly similar to Metallosphaera yellowstonensis str. MK1, previously isolated from one of these sites. Other groups of archaea were consistently associated with different types of iron oxide mats, including undescribed members of the phyla Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Bacterial sequences were dominated by relatives of Hydrogenobaculum spp. above 65–70°C, but increased in diversity below 60°C. Cultivation of relevant iron-oxidizing and iron-reducing microbial isolates included Sulfolobus str. MK3, Sulfobacillus str. MK2, Acidicaldus str. MK6, and a new candidate genus in the Sulfolobales referred to as Sulfolobales str. MK5. Strains MK3 and MK5 are capable of oxidizing ferrous iron autotrophically, while strain MK2 oxidizes iron mixotrophically. Similar rates of iron oxidation were measured for M. yellowstonensis str. MK1 and Sulfolobales str. MK5. Biomineralized phases of ferric iron varied among cultures and field sites, and included ferric oxyhydroxides, K-jarosite, goethite, hematite, and scorodite depending on geochemical conditions. Strains MK5 and MK6 are capable of reducing ferric iron under anaerobic conditions with complex carbon sources. The combination of geochemical and molecular data as well as physiological observations of isolates suggests that the community structure of acidic Fe mats is linked with Fe cycling across temperatures ranging from 53 to 88°C. PMID:22470372

  16. Geochemical modeling of the nuclear-waste repository system. A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, W.J.

    1980-12-01

    The primary objective of the geochemical modeling task is to develop an understanding of the waste-repository geochemical system and provide a valuable tool for estimating future states of that system. There currently exists a variety of computer codes which can be used in geochemical modeling studies. Some available codes contain the framework for simulating a natural chemical system and estimating, within limits, the response of that system to environmental changes. By data-base enhancement and code development, this modeling technique can be even more usefully applied to a nuclear-waste repository. In particular, thermodynamic data on elements not presently in the data base but identified as being of particular hazard in the waste-repository system, need to be incorporated into the code to estimate the near-field as well as the far-field reactions during a hypothetical breach. A reaction-path-simulation code, which estimates the products of specific rock/water reactions, has been tested using basalt and ground water. Results show that the mass-transfer capabilities of the code will be useful in chemical-evolution studies and scenario analyses. The purpose of this report is to explain the status of geochemical modeling as it currently applies to the chemical system of a hypothetical nuclear-waste repository in basalt and to present the plan proposed for further developmet and application

  17. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's Geochemical Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, W.; Seitz, M.; Fenster, D.; Lerman, A.; Brookins, D.; Tisue, M.

    1984-02-01

    Describe the management program for coordinating subcontractors and their work, and integrating research results. Appropriate flowcharts should be included. Provide more information on the overall scope of the program. For each subcontractor, provide specific workscopes that indicate whether analytical activities are developmental or routine, approximate number of analyses to be made, and something of the adequacy of the analyses to meet program goals. Indicate interfaces with other earth-science disciplines like hydrology and with other groups doing relevant geochemical research and engineering design. Address the priorities for each activity or group of activities. High priority should be given to early development of a geochemical statement of what constitutes suitable salt for a repository. Reference standard procedures for sampling, sample preservation, and sample analysis wherever appropriate or, if not appropriate, indicate that any deviations from standard procedures will be documented. Ensure that appropriate quality assurance procedures will be followed for the procedures listed above. Include specific procedures for the choice, verification, validation, and documentation of computer codes related to the geochemical aspects of repository performance assessment. Include activities addressing regional hydrochemistry and make clear that each principal hydrogeologic unit at each site will be studied geochemically. Indicate that proposed plans for obtaining hydrogeochemical data will be included in each site characterization plan. Describe how site geochemical stability will be handled, especially with respect to dissolution, postemplacement geochemistry, human influences, and climatic variations. Minor recommendations and suggested improvements in the text of the plan are given in Sec. 5

  18. Geochemical studies of the sediments of Barreiras group, Itaborai region-RJ, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.C.G.P.

    1983-01-01

    It is purpused to study the lead, copper, chromium, manganese, vanadium and zinc geochemical bahavior of the clays obtained from outcrop samples of Barreiras group and weathered Pre-Cambriam situated at Itaborai region, in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Field and laboratory description, grain size analyses, X-ray diffraction, emission spectrography, X-ray fluorescence, atomic absorption, transmission electronic microscopy and pH tests were applied to twenty-two samples selected. (Author) [pt

  19. A New Sample Transect through the Sierra Madre Occidental Silicic Large Igneous Province in Southern Chihuahua State, Mexico: First Stratigraphic, Petrologic, and Geochemical Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, G. D.; Davila Harris, P.; Brown, S. R.; Anderson, L.; Moreno, N.

    2014-12-01

    We completed a field sampling transect across the northern Sierra Madre Occidental silicic large igneous province (SMO) in December 2013. Here we present the first stratigraphic, petrological, and geochemical data from the transect between Hidalgo del Parral and Guadalupe y Calvo, Chihuahua, Mexico. This is the first new transect across the SMO in 25 years and the only one between existing NE - SW transects at Chihuahua - Hermosillo and Durango - Mazatlan. The 245 km-long transect along Mexican Highway 24 crosses the boundary between the extended (Basin and Range) and non-extended (Sierra Madre Occidental plateau) parts of the SMO, and allows sampling of previously undescribed Oligocene (?) - early Miocene (?) rhyolitic ignimbrites and lavas, and occasional post-rhyolite, Miocene (?) SCORBA basaltic andesite lavas. 54 samples of rhyolitic ignimbrites (40) and lavas (7), and basaltic andesite lavas (7) were sampled along the transect, including 8 canyon sections with more than one unit. The ignimbrites are overwhelming rhyodacitic (plagioclase and hornblende or biotite phyric) or rhyolitic (quartz (+/- sanidine) in additon to plagioclase and hornblende or biotite phyric) and sparsely to highly phyric. Preliminary petrographic (phenocryst abundances) and geochemical (major and trace element) will be presented and compared to existing data from elsewhere in the SMO. Future work will include U-Pb zircon dating and whole rock and in-zircon radiogenic isotopes analyses.

  20. Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in clays

    KAUST Repository

    Loch, J. P. Gustav

    2010-02-13

    Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in bentonite clay are studied in the laboratory, where a 6 mm thick bentonite layer is subjected to direct current. Acidification and alkalization near anode and cathode are expected, possibly causing mineral deterioration, ion mobilization and precipitation of new solids. Afterwards the clay is analysed by XRF and anolyte and catholyte are analysed by ICP-MS. In addition, as a preliminary experiment treated bentonite is analysed by high resolution μ-XRF. Electro-osmotic flow is observed. Due to its carbonate content the bentonite is pH-buffering. Alkalization in the catholyte is substantial. Ca, Na and Sr are significantly removed from the clay and accumulate in the catholyte. Recovery in the catholyte accounts for a small fraction of the element-loss from the clay. The rest will have precipitated in undetected solid phases. μ-XRF indicates the loss of Ca-content throughout the bentonite layer. © The Author(s) 2010.

  1. Groundwater sources and geochemical processes in a crystalline fault aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Clément; Aquilina, Luc; Bour, Olivier; Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Dewandel, Benoît; Pauwels, Hélène; Labasque, Thierry; Vergnaud-Ayraud, Virginie; Hochreutener, Rebecca

    2014-11-01

    The origin of water flowing in faults and fractures at great depth is poorly known in crystalline media. This paper describes a field study designed to characterize the geochemical compartmentalization of a deep aquifer system constituted by a graben structure where a permeable fault zone was identified. Analyses of the major chemical elements, trace elements, dissolved gases and stable water isotopes reveal the origin of dissolved components for each permeable domain and provide information on various water sources involved during different seasonal regimes. The geochemical response induced by performing a pumping test in the fault-zone is examined, in order to quantify mixing processes and contribution of different permeable domains to the flow. Reactive processes enhanced by the pumped fluxes are also identified and discussed. The fault zone presents different geochemical responses related to changes in hydraulic regime. They are interpreted as different water sources related to various permeable structures within the aquifer. During the low water regime, results suggest mixing of recent water with a clear contribution of older water of inter-glacial origin (recharge temperature around 7 °C), suggesting the involvement of water trapped in a local low-permeability matrix domain or the contribution of large scale circulation loops. During the high water level period, due to inversion of the hydraulic gradient between the major permeable fault zone and its surrounding domains, modern water predominantly flows down to the deep bedrock and ensures recharge at a local scale within the graben. Pumping in a permeable fault zone induces hydraulic connections with storage-reservoirs. The overlaid regolith domain ensures part of the flow rate for long term pumping (around 20% in the present case). During late-time pumping, orthogonal fluxes coming from the fractured domains surrounding the major fault zone are dominant. Storage in the connected fracture network within the

  2. A molecular organic geochemical study of black shales associated with diatomites from the Oligocene Meinilite Shale (Flysch Carpathians, SE Poland)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Koster, J.; Rospondek, M.; Zubrzycki, A.; Kolouba, M.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1995-01-01

    Black shales of the Menilite Formation, the source rock for oils in the Carpathian overthrust belt, display a large variability in their bulk and molecular geochemical parameters. Biomarker and stable carbon isotope analyses indicate a variable contribution from different algae (particularly

  3. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  4. Landscape-geochemical factors of deposit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batulin, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    Effect of landscape-geochemical factors on hydrogenic formation of uranium ores is considered. The primary attention is paid to finding reasons for hydrogeochemical background increase in the regions of arid climate. Problems of uranium distribution in alluvial landscapes, hydrogeochemical regime of ground waters, reflecting the effect of waters of the zone of aeration are revealed. Chemical composition of porous solutions in the zone of aeration, as well as historical geochemindstry of landscape a its role from the view point of uranium solution formation in the arid zone are considered [ru

  5. sedimentological and geochemical characteristics of outcrop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    0.17. 0.70. 1.13. 1.37. -. CIA (%). 73.00. 76.00. 74.00. 85.00. 99.00. 95.00. 98.00. 90.00. 96.00. 77.00. 99.00. 96.00. 94.00. -. CIW (%). 78.00. 87.00. 83.00. 97.00. 100.00. 99.00. 100. 99.00. 99.00. 86.00. 00. 99.00. 100.00. -. Nton and Adamolekun: Sedimentological and Geochemical Characteristics of Outcrop Sediments ...

  6. Kriging - a challenge in geochemical mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojdl, Jiri; Matys Grygar, Tomas; Elznicova, Jitka; Popelka, Jan; Vachova, Tatina; Hosek, Michal

    2017-04-01

    Geochemists can easily provide datasets for contamination mapping thanks to recent advances in geographical information systems (GIS) and portable chemical-analytical instrumentation. Kriging is commonly used to visualise the results of such mapping. It is understandable, as kriging is a well-established method of spatial interpolation. It was created in 1950's for geochemical data processing to estimate the most likely distribution of gold based on samples from a few boreholes. However, kriging is based on the assumption of continuous spatial distribution of numeric data that is not realistic in environmental geochemistry. The use of kriging is correct when the data density is sufficient with respect to heterogeneity of the spatial distribution of the geochemical parameters. However, if anomalous geochemical values are focused in hotspots of which boundaries are insufficiently densely sampled, kriging could provide misleading maps with the real contours of hotspots blurred by data smoothing and levelling out individual (isolated) but relevant anomalous values. The data smoothing can thus it results in underestimation of geochemical extremes, which may in fact be of the greatest importance in mapping projects. In our study we characterised hotspots of contamination by uranium and zinc in the floodplain of the Ploučnice River. The first objective of our study was to compare three methods of sampling: random (based on stochastic generation of sampling points), systematic (square grid) and judgemental sampling (based on judgement stemming from principles of fluvial deposition) as the basis for pollution maps. The first detected problem in production of the maps was the reduction of the smoothing effect of kriging using appropriate function of empirical semivariogram and setting the variation of at microscales smaller than the sampling distances to minimum (the "nugget" parameter of semivariogram). Exact interpolators such as Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) or Radial

  7. A Geochemical Reaction Model for Titration of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Parker, J. C.; Gu, B.; Luo, W.; Brooks, S. C.; Spalding, B. P.; Jardine, P. M.; Watson, D. B.

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates geochemical reactions during titration of contaminated soil and groundwater at the Oak Ridge Reservation in eastern Tennessee. The soils and groundwater exhibits low pH and high concentrations of aluminum, calcium, magnesium, manganese, various trace metals such as nickel and cobalt, and radionuclides such as uranium and technetium. The mobility of many of the contaminant species diminishes with increasing pH. However, base additions to increase pH are strongly buffered by various precipitation/dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions. The ability to predict acid-base behavior and associated geochemical effects is thus critical to evaluate remediation performance of pH manipulation strategies. This study was undertaken to develop a practical but generally applicable geochemical model to predict aqueous and solid-phase speciation during soil and groundwater titration. To model titration in the presence of aquifer solids, an approach proposed by Spalding and Spalding (2001) was utilized, which treats aquifer solids as a polyprotic acid. Previous studies have shown that Fe and Al-oxyhydroxides strongly sorb dissolved Ni, U and Tc species. In this study, since the total Fe concentration is much smaller than that of Al, only ion exchange reactions associated with Al hydroxides are considered. An equilibrium reaction model that includes aqueous complexation, precipitation, ion exchange, and soil buffering reactions was developed and implemented in the code HydroGeoChem 5.0 (HGC5). Comparison of model results with experimental titration curves for contaminated groundwater alone and for soil- water systems indicated close agreement. This study is expected to facilitate field-scale modeling of geochemical processes under conditions with highly variable pH to develop practical methods to control contaminant mobility at geochemically complex sites.

  8. A geostatistical method applied to the geochemical study of the Chichinautzin Volcanic Field in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, P.; Roberge, J.; Urbina Oviedo, C. A.

    2011-12-01

    order is more important than the first order tendency, which means a lot of change in the geochemistry at a local scale. Previous works have established the petrological and geochemical heterogeneity of CVF. Our work allows a special view of this heterogeneity, using geostatistical parameters, and interpolation technique of selected geochemical markers.

  9. Geochemical orientation for mineral exploration in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overstreet, W.C.; Grimes, D.J.; Seitz, J.F.

    1982-01-01

    This report is a supplement to previous accounts of geochemical exploration conducted in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan by the Natural Resources Authority of the Royal Government of Jordan and the U.S. Geological Survey. The field work on which this report is based was sponsored by the U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of State. Procedures used in collecting various kinds of rocks, ores, slags, eluvial and alluvial sediments, heavy-mineral concentrates, and organic materials for use as geochemical sample media are summarized, as are the laboratory procedures followed for the analysis of these sample materials by semiquantitative spectrographic, atomic absorption, fluorometric, and X-ray diffraction methods. Geochemical evaluations of the possibilities for economic mineral deposits in certain areas are presented. The results of these preliminary investigations open concepts for further use in geochemical exploration in the search for metallic mineral deposits in Jordan. Perhaps the most desirable new activity would be hydrogeochemical exploration for uranium and base metals, accompanied by interpretation of such remote-sensing data as results of airborne radiometric surveys and computer-enhanced LANDSAT imagery. For more conventional approaches to geochemical exploration, however, several fundamental problems regarding proper choice of geochemical sample media for different geologic and geographic parts of the Country must be solved before effective surveys can be made. The present results also show that such common geochemical exploration techniques as the determination of the trace-element contents of soils, plant ash, and slags have direct application also toward the resolution of several archaeological problems in Jordan. These include the relation of trace-elements chemistry of local soils to the composition of botanic remains, the trace-elements composition of slags to the technological development of the extractive metallurgy of

  10. Is formamide a geochemically plausible prebiotic solvent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bada, Jeffrey L; Chalmers, John H; Cleaves, H James

    2016-07-27

    From a geochemical perspective, significant amounts of pure formamide (HCONH2) would have likely been rare on the early Earth. There may have been mixed formamide-water solutions, but even in the presence of catalyst, solutions with >20 weight% water in formamide would not have produced significant amounts of prebiotic compounds. It might be feasible to produce relatively pure formamide by a rare occurrence of freezing formamide/water mixtures at temperatures lower than formamide's freezing point (2.55 °C) but greater than the freezing point of water. Because of the high density of formamide ice it would have sunk and accumulated at the bottom of the solution. If the remaining water froze on the surface of this ice, and was then removed by a sublimation-ablation process, a small amount of pure formamide ice might have been produced. In addition a recent report suggested that ∼85 weight% formamide could be prepared by a geochemical type of fractional distillation process, offering another possible route for prebiotic formamide production.

  11. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes

    2017-01-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as 228 Ac, 214 Bi and 214 Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  12. Forensic Analysis using Geological and Geochemical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewerff, J.

    2009-04-01

    Due to the globalisation of legal (and illegal) trade there is an increasing demand for techniques which can verify the geographical origin and transfer routes of many legal and illegal commodities and products. Although geological techniques have been used in forensic investigations since the emergence of forensics as a science in the late eighteen hundreds, the last decade has seen a marked increase in geo-scientists initiating concept studies using the latest analytical techniques, including studying natural abundance isotope variations, micro analysis with laser ablation ICPMS and geochemical mapping. Most of the concept studies have shown a good potential but uptake by the law enforcement and legal community has been limited due to concerns about the admissibility of the new methods. As an introduction to the UGU2009 session "Forensic Provenancing using Geological and Geochemical Techniques" I will give an overview of the state of the art of forensic geology and the issues that concern the admissibility of geological forensic evidence. I will use examples from the NITECRIME and FIRMS networks, the EU TRACE project and other projects and literature to illustrate the important issues at hand.

  13. Geochemical signature of radioactive waste: oil NORM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Gilberto T. de Paula; Costa-de-Moura, Jorge; Gomes, Carlos de Almeida; Sampaio, Emidio A. Lopes, E-mail: gilberto.costa@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jcmoura@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cgomes@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Controle de Rejeitos e Transporte de Materiais Radioativos

    2017-07-01

    The Brazilian Nuclear Agency (CNEN) rules all nuclear activity in Brazil as demanded by the Federal Constitution, articles 21, XXIII, and 177, V, and by the Federal Acts 4.118/62 and 10.308/2001. Therefore, the CNEN is responsible for any radioactive waste disposal in the country. Oil Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (Oil NORM) in this paper refers to waste coming from oil exploration. Oil NORM has called much attention during the last decades, mostly because it is not possible to determine its primary source due to the actual absence of regulatory control mechanism. There is no efficient regulatory tool which allows determining the origin of such NORM wastes even among those facilities under regulatory control. This fact may encourage non-authorized radioactive material transportation, smuggling and terrorism. The aim of this project is to provide a geochemical signature for each oil NORM waste using its naturally occurring isotopic composition to identify its origin. The here proposed method is a specific geochemical modeling of oil sludge NORM samples which are analyzed for radioisotopes normally present in oil pipes, such as {sup 228}Ac, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Pb. The activity ratios are plotted in scatter diagrams. This method was successfully tested with data of different sources obtained from analysis reports from the Campos Basin/Brazil and from literature. (author)

  14. Geochemical fractionation of 210Pb in oxic estuarine sediments of Coatzacoalcos River, Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontiveros-Cuadras, J.F.; Ruiz-Fernandez, A.C.; Perez-Bernal, L.H.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona; Wee-Kwong, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    210 Pb activities were analyzed in surface sediments from the Coatzacoalcos River (Gulf of Mexico) to evaluate its distribution according to sediment grain size and in different geochemical compartments by using sequential extraction techniques. The geochemical fractionation experiments provided compatible results: by using the Tessier's method more than 90% of the 210 Pb activity in the samples was found the residual fraction (primary and secondary minerals) and the remaining ( 210 Pb content was found in comparative amounts in the reactive, the silicate, and the pyrite fractions (accounting together for >80%), and the rest was found in the residual fraction. The grain size fractionation analyses showed that the 210 Pb activities were mostly retained in the clay fraction, accounting up to 60-70% of the 210 Pb total activity in the sediment sample and therefore, it is concluded that the separation of the clay fraction can be useful to improve the analysis of low 210 Pb content sediments for dating purposes. (author)

  15. mineralogical and geochemical trends in lateritic weathering profiles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three soil profiles on the basement rocks in Awa-Oru-Ijebu Igbo area of southwestern Nigeria were investigated for the ... Geochemical data further revealed significant enrichment of Al2O3 and Fe2O3 in the laterite profile compared with the parent rock, ...... Mineralogical, Geochemical and Economic. Appraisal of some clay ...

  16. Behaviour of nature and technogenic radioisotopes in buried geochemical barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.A.; Onoshko, M.P.; Generalova, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Behaviour of potassium 40, radium 226, thorium 232, strontium 90 and cesium 137 on geochemical barriers connected with buried soils and cut-off meander sediments of the Holocene age of the Sozh river valley are examined. Some sides of the barrier geochemical structure caused by syngeneic and epigenetic processes have been taken into consideration

  17. Lead Isotopes in Olivine-Phyric Shergottite Tissint: Implications for the Geochemical Evolution of the Shergottite Source Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriwaki, R.; Usui, T.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.; Yokoyama, T.

    2015-01-01

    Geochemically-depleted shergottites are basaltic rocks derived from a martian mantle source reservoir. Geochemical evolution of the martian mantle has been investigated mainly based on the Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and Lu-Hf isotope systematics of the shergottites [1]. Although potentially informative, U-Th- Pb isotope systematics have been limited because of difficulties in interpreting the analyses of depleted meteorite samples that are more susceptible to the effects of near-surface processes and terrestrial contamination. This study conducts a 5-step sequential acid leaching experiment of the first witnessed fall of the geochemically-depleted olivinephyric shergottite Tissint to minimize the effect of low temperature distrubence. Trace element analyses of the Tissint acid residue (mostly pyroxene) indicate that Pb isotope compositions of the residue do not contain either a martian surface or terrestrial component, but represent the Tissint magma source [2]. The residue has relatively unradiogenic initial Pb isotopic compositions (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb = 10.8136) that fall within the Pb isotope space of other geochemically-depleted shergottites. An initial µ-value (238U/204Pb = 1.5) of Tissint at the time of crystallization (472 Ma [3]) is similar to a time-integrated mu- value (1.72 at 472 Ma) of the Tissint source mantle calculated based on the two-stage mantle evolution model [1]. On the other hand, the other geochemically-depleted shergottites (e.g., QUE 94201 [4]) have initial µ-values of their parental magmas distinctly lower than those of their modeled source mantle. These results suggest that only Tissint potentially reflects the geochemical signature of the shergottite mantle source that originated from cumulates of the martian magma ocean

  18. Baseline Geochemical Data for Medical Researchers in Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W.

    2017-12-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, Kentucky has the highest cancer incidence and death rates in the country. New efforts by geochemists and medical researchers are examining ways to diagnose the origin and sources of carcinogenesis. In an effort to determine if naturally occurring geochemical or mineral elements contributes to the cancer causation, the Kentucky Geological Survey has established a Minerals and Geochemical Database that is available to medical researchers for examination of baseline geochemistry and determine if naturally occurring mineral or chemical elements contribute to the high rate of cancers in the state. Cancer causation is complex, so if natural sources can be accounted for, then researchers can focus on the true causation. Naturally occurring minerals, metals and elements occur in many parts of the state, and their presence is valuable for evaluating causation. For example, some data in the database contain maps showing (a) statewide elemental geochemistry, (b) areas of black shale oxidation occurrence, which releases metals in soil and surface waters, (c) some clay deposits in the state that can contain high content of rare earth elements, and (d) site-specific uranium occurrences. Knowing the locations of major ore deposits in the state can also provide information related to mineral and chemical anomalies, such as for base metals and mercury. Radionuclide data in soil and water analyses are limited, so future research may involve obtaining more analyses to determine radon potential. This database also contains information on faulting and geology in the state. Although the metals content of trees may not seem relevant, the ash and humus content of degraded trees affects soil, stream sediment and water geochemistry. Many rural homes heat with wood, releasing metals into the surrounding biosphere. Stressed vegetation techniques can be used to explore for ore deposits and look for high metal contents in soils and rocks. These

  19. Neutron activation analysis of rare earths and some other elements in material of geochemical interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunfelt, A.O.

    1975-01-01

    ngle-element methods for the determination by neutron activation analysis of antimony, chromium, phosphorus, selenium and silver in international geochemical standard rocks, and the determination of rare earth elements i in standard rocks and apatites are described and discussed in twelve previously published papers, and in an eighteen page summary. Chemical separationtechniques are also discussed and the results are compared with previously obtained results with the same standard rocks. The accuracy of neutron activation analysis is discussed in comparison with isotope dilution mass spectroscopy, atomic absorption, gas chromatography and spark source mass spectrometry. (JIW)

  20. Geochemical study of coral skeletons from the Puerto Morelos Reef, southeastern Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper-Zubillaga, Juan J.; Armstrong-Altrin, John S.; Rosales-Hoz, Leticia

    2014-12-01

    Geochemical analyses in coral skeletons have been used as a proxy of marine environmental conditions and to understand the mechanisms of adsorption of chemical elements into the coral skeletons and growth forms. However, little attention has been given to show the possible differences in the growth rates of corals based upon major, trace, rare earth element and microprobe analyses to examine the physical-chemical conditions influencing those differences. Our goal is to show how branch and fan corals incorporate elements into their skeletons comparing them with their coral growth rates. We determine the development of the skeletons of two branching (Acropora palmata, Acropora cervicornis) and one fan shaped (Gorgonia ventalina) colonies in the Puerto Morelos Reef, southeastern Mexico based upon geochemical data and the influence of terrigenous input into the species. Mg and Sr concentrations were the most statistically significant elements among the species studied suggesting that Mg concentration in Gorgonia ventalina is probably not linked to its growth rate. Mn content in the sea water is adsorbed by the three corals during past growth rates during high rainfall events. Sr concentration may be associated with the growth rate of Acropora palmata. Little differences in the growth rate in Acropora palmata may be associated with low rates of calcitization, negligible changes in the Sr concentration and little influence of temperature and water depth in its growth. Trace elements like Cr, Co, Ni and V adsorbed by the corals are influenced by natural concentration of these elements in the sea-water. Rare earth elements in the corals studied suggests abundant inorganic ions CO32- with variable pH in modern shallow well-oxygenated sea water. Lack of terrigenous input seawards is supported by geochemical, geomorphological and biological evidences. This study is an example of how geochemical data are useful to observe the differences in environmental conditions related to

  1. Composition of natural gas and crude oil produced from 10 wells in the Lower Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone, Trumbull County, Ohio: Chapter G.7 in Coal and petroleum resources in the Appalachian basin: distribution, geologic framework, and geochemical character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burruss, Robert A.; Ryder, Robert T.; Ruppert, Leslie F.; Ryder, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Natural gases and associated crude oils in the “Clinton” sandstone, Medina Group sandstones, and equivalent Tuscarora Sandstone in the northern Appalachian basin are part of a regional, continuous-type or basin-centered accumulation. The origin of the hydrocarbon charge to regional continuoustype accumulations is poorly understood. We have analyzed the molecular and stable isotopic composition of gases and oils produced from 10 wells in the “Clinton” sandstone in Trumbull County, Ohio, in an initial attempt to identify the characteristics of the accumulated fluids. The analyses show that the fluids have remarkably uniform compositions that are similar to previously published analyses of oils (Cole and others, 1987) and gases (Laughrey and Baldasarre, 1998) in Early Silurian reservoirs elsewhere in Ohio; however, geochemical parameters in the oils and gases suggest that the fluids have experienced higher levels of thermal stress than the present-day burial conditions of the reservoir rocks. The crude oils have an unusual geochemical characteristic: they do not contain detectable levels of sterane and triterpane biomarkers. The origin of these absences is unknown.

  2. Geochemical Arrays at Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeper, K.; Wilson, R. M.; Chanton, J.; Lapham, L.; Farr, N.; Camilli, R.; Martens, C. S.; Pontbriand, C.

    2011-12-01

    A suite of geochemical monitoring arrays has been developed for the Woolsey Mound Seafloor Observatory in the northern Gulf of Mexico to evaluate the oceanographic and tectonic forcing factors on the formation and stability of gas hydrates. These arrays are designed to collect sustained, time-series data of chemical concentrations, gradients and fluxes from the subsurface to the seafloor and into the near bottom water column. A Pore Fluid Array provides time-series measurements of methane, sulfate and salinity in subsurface pore waters to evaluate microbial activity, hydrate formation and/or hydrate dissociation. A Chimney Sampler Array collects in situ chemical and physical readings at the benthic boundary. The array is designed around a vertical cylinder with a known volume and washout rate for measuring chemical gradients and flux at the seafloor. The Benthic Boundary Layer Array extends into the water column with a package of sensors in a node close to the seafloor and a similar node 20 m above the seafloor to evaluate upward, downward and transversely advecting fluids. The three arrays can be used in concert to evaluate a release of methane by the dissociation of gas hydrates: the Pore Fluid Array identifies the breakdown of gas hydrates in the subsurface, the Chimney Array determines the rate of flux at the seafloor and the Benthic Boundary Layer Array evaluates the fate of the release in the water column. Combining the data from the geochemical arrays with output from the geophysical arrays provides key information to evaluate the specific and relative importance of tectonic and oceanographic triggers for hydrate dissociation. New probes and deployment platforms have been developed for the installation and maintenance of the arrays and new systems are in place and under development for the recovery of the data. Generally, the complete array or its components have to be recovered to download the data. However, this summer 2011, a new optic modem system was

  3. Subgroup analyses of maraviroc in previously treated R5 HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Nelson, Mark; Lazzarin, Adriano; Konourina, Irina; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Lampiris, Harry; Hirschel, Bernard; Tebas, Pablo; Raffi, François; Trottier, Benoit; Bellos, Nicholaos; Saag, Michael; Cooper, David A.; Westby, Mike; Tawadrous, Margaret; Sullivan, John F.; Ridgway, Caroline; Dunne, Michael W.; Felstead, Steve; Mayer, Howard; van der Ryst, Elna; Angel, Jonathan; Conway, Brian; Gough, Kevin A.; Lalonde, Richard G.; Laplante, Francois; Leblanc, Roger P.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rachlis, Anita R.; Romanowski, Barbara; Rosser, Stuart J.; Rubinstein, Ethan; Shafran, Stephen David; Smaill, Fiona; Tremblay, Cecile; Trottier, Sylvie; Tsoukas, Christos; Walmsley, Sharon Lynn; Voskanian, Alen; Akil, Bisher; Arduino, Roberto Claudio; Asmuth, David; Beatty, George William; Becker, Stephen Lawrence; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Blue, Sky Robert; Bolan, Robert Key; Brand, John D.; Burnazian, George Ghazaros; Burnside, Alfred F.; Campbell, Thomas B.; Campo, Rafael E.; Casey, Kathleen King; Cimoch, Paul Joseph; Cohen, Calvin J.; Coodley, Gregg Oscar; Corales, Roberto B.; DeJesus, Edwin; Diaz, Leslie E.; Drusano, George L.; Ernst, Jerome A.; Feinberg, Judith E.; Feldman, Lawrence Edward; Fine, Steven M.; Flamm, Jason Andrew; Follansbee, Stephen Eliot; Fralich, Todd Allen; Gallant, Emanuel; Godofsky, Eliot Warren; Green, Gary; Greiger-Zanlungo, Paula Rosa; Gripshover, Barbara Marie; Groger, Richard K.; Gulick, Roy; Hardy, William David; Hassler, Shawn K.; Haubrich, Richard Harold; Hauptman, Stephen P.; Henry, David Holden; Henry, William Keith; Hernandez, Jose Norberto; Hicks, Charles Byron; Horberg, Michael Alan; Jemsek, Joseph G.; Kelly, Allan Rowan; Kinder, Clifford A.; Klein, Daniel Benjamin; Kogelman, Laura; Lalezari, Jacob Paul; LaMarca, Anthony; Lampiris, Harry William; Leibowitz, Matthew; Leider, Jason Mark; Lennox, Jeffrey Lloyd; Liporace, Ralph; Martin, Harold Luther; Martinez-Bejar, Lucia M.; Martorell, Claudia; McGowan, Joseph P.; Mildvan, Donna; Miles, Steven; Mitsuyasu, Ronald Takeshi; Morales-Ramirez, Javier Osvaldo; Morris, Anne B.; Mounzer, Karam Chucri; Myers, Robert Anderson; Nadler, Jeffrey P.; Pearce, Daniel; Pierone, Gerald; Rashbaum, Bruce Stephen; Ravishankar, Jayashree; Redfield, Robert Ray; Reichman, Richard Craig; Robbins, William Jay; Roberts, Stockton Edward; Rodriguez, Jorge E.; Sathasivam, Kunthavi; Sax, Paul Edward; Schwartz, Lawrence E.; Segal-Maurer, Sorana; Sension, Michael Grant; Sepulveda-Arzola, Gladys E.; Skolnik, Paul Richard; Sloan, Louis Marshall; Smith, Robert P.; Sosman, James Michael; Stapleton, Jack Thomas; Steigbigel, Roy; Steinhart, Corklin R.; Sweet, Donna Elaine; Swindells, Susan; Thompson, Melanie Ann; Sisneros, Silver; Towner, William James; Gordon, Peter; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Wheeler, David Allen; Williams, Sally; Wilcox, Dean; Williams, Steven; Wills, Todd Stephen; Wohlfeiler, Michael Bruce; Wright, David; Xavier, Angela; Yangco, Bienvenido Gamulo; Zingman, Barry Stephen; Zorrilla, Carmen D.; Allworth, Anthony M.; Bloch, Mark T.; Bodsworth, Neil J.; Chuah, John; Cooper, David; Doong, Nicholas; Dwyer, Dominic; Gold, Julian; Hoy, Jennifer Frances; Moore, Richard J.; Roth, Norman J.; Workman, Cassy; Clumeck, Nathan; Dellot, Patricia; Goffard, Jean Christophe; Moutschen, Michel; Vandercam, Bernard C.; Vogelaers, Dirk; Bentata, Michele; Cotte, Laurent; Delfraissy, Jean-Francois; Durant, Jacques; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Landman, Roland; Lafeuillade, Alain; Martin, Isabelle Poizot; Molina, Jean-Michel; Pialoux, Gilles; Piketty, Christophe; Raffi, Francois; Reynes, Jacques; Verdon, Renaud; Arasteh, Keikawus; Bogner, Johannes Richard; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Esser, Stefan; Goebel, Frank-Detlef; Harrer, Thomas; Kern, Peter; Knechten, Heribert; van Lunzen, Jan; Mueller, Markus; Mutz, Antonius; Oette, Mark; Plettenberg, Andreas; Rockstroh, Juergen; Rump, Jorg-Andres; Schmidt, Reinhold E.; Schneider, Lothar; Schuster, Dieter; Staszewski, Schlomo; Stellbrink, Hans-Juergen; Trein, Andreas; Weitner, Lutwinus; Aiuti, Fernando; Bassetti, Dante; Di Biagio, Antonio; Caramello, Pietro; Carosi, Giampiero; Esposito, Roberto; Leoncini, Francesco; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Mazzotta, Francesco; Montella, Francesco; Raise, Enzo; Vullo, Vicenzo; Hoepelman, Ilja Mohandas; Perenboom, Rosalinde Maria; Prins, J. M.; Richter, Clemens; van der Ende, Marchina Elisabeth; Beniowski, Marek; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Flisiak, Robert; Halota, Waldemar; Horban, Andrzej; Mach, Tomasz; Smiatacz, Tomasz; Lozano de Leon, Fernando; Viciana Fernandez, Pompeyo; Rubio Garcia, Rafael; Gatell Artigas, Jose Josep; Gonzalez Garcia, Juan Julian; Gutierrez, Felix; Gonzalez Lahoz, Juan; Iribarren Loyarte, Jose; Moreno, Santiago; Pulido Ortega, Federico; Domingo Pedrol, Pere; Rivero, Antonio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Sarria, Cristina; Gisslen, Magnus; Flamholc, Leo; Karlsson, Anders; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Cavassini, Matthias; Drechsler, Henning; Opravil, Milos; Vernazza, Pietro; Easterbrook, Philippa Jane; Fisher, Martin; Hay, Philip; Johnson, Margaret A.; Leen, Clifford L.; Nelson, Mark R.; Ong, Edmund; Weber, Jonathan N.; White, David J.; Wilkins, Edmund; Wiselka, Martin; Alvarez-Jacinto, Ana Maria; Antoniskis, Diana; Atkinson, Barbara A.; Berger, Daniel S.; Blick, Gary; Brenna, Robert Owen; Burack, Jeffrey Howard; Church, L. W. Preston; Clay, Patrick G.; Cook, Paul Peniston; Creticos, Catherine Maria; Daly, Patrick William; Feleke, Getachew; File, Thomas Mc Donald; Galpin, Jeffrey Eliot; Green, Stephen Lloyd; Haas, Frances Fae; Hanna, Barbara J.; Hsiao, Chiu-Bin; Hsu, Ricky K.; Jones, Robert S.; Kadlecik, Peter; Kalayjian, Robert Charles; Keller, Robert H.; Kerkar, Shubha; Koirala, Janak; Lai, Leon Liang-Yu; Lalla-Reddy, Sujata; Macarthur, Rodger David; Malanoski, Gregory John; Markowitz, Norman Peter; McLeroth, Patrick L.; McMeeking, Alexander A.; Miljkovic, Goran; Montana, John Buscemi; Nixon, Daniel Edward; Norris, Dorece G.; Penico, Jesse Pullen; Perez-Limonte, Leonel; Posorske, Lynette H.; Prelutsky, David James; Riddell, James; Rodwick, Barry Michael; Ruane, Peter Jerome; Sampson, James; Santiago, Steven; Seinfeld, Amy; Sharp, Victoria Lee; Shebib, Zaher; Tanner, Mark Leslie; Timpone, Joseph G.; Wade, Barbara H.; Wallach, Frances; Weinberg, Winkler; Zurawski, Christine

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted subanalyses of the combined results of the Maraviroc versus Optimized Therapy in Viremic Antiretroviral Treatment-Experienced Patients (MOTIVATE) 1 and MOTIVATE 2 studies to better characterize the efficacy and safety of maraviroc in key subgroups of patients. METHODS: We

  4. GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Rosemary

    2008-01-01

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

  5. History and evaluation of national-scale geochemical data sets for the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Smith

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Six national-scale, or near national-scale, geochemical data sets for soils or stream sediments exist for the United States. The earliest of these, here termed the ‘Shacklette’ data set, was generated by a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS project conducted from 1961 to 1975. This project used soil collected from a depth of about 20 cm as the sampling medium at 1323 sites throughout the conterminous U.S. The National Uranium Resource Evaluation Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (NURE-HSSR Program of the U.S. Department of Energy was conducted from 1975 to 1984 and collected either stream sediments, lake sediments, or soils at more than 378,000 sites in both the conterminous U.S. and Alaska. The sampled area represented about 65% of the nation. The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS, from 1978 to 1982, collected samples from multiple soil horizons at sites within the major crop-growing regions of the conterminous U.S. This data set contains analyses of more than 3000 samples. The National Geochemical Survey, a USGS project conducted from 1997 to 2009, used a subset of the NURE-HSSR archival samples as its starting point and then collected primarily stream sediments, with occasional soils, in the parts of the U.S. not covered by the NURE-HSSR Program. This data set contains chemical analyses for more than 70,000 samples. The USGS, in collaboration with the Mexican Geological Survey and the Geological Survey of Canada, initiated soil sampling for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project in 2007. Sampling of three horizons or depths at more than 4800 sites in the U.S. was completed in 2010, and chemical analyses are currently ongoing. The NRCS initiated a project in the 1990s to analyze the various soil horizons from selected pedons throughout the U.S. This data set currently contains data from more than 1400 sites. This paper (1 discusses each data set in terms of its purpose, sample collection protocols

  6. Geochemical Investigation of Clay Minerals in Marte, Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. D. Adams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay deposit collected from various locations in Marte (Northern Borno, were studied to determine their physical and chemical characteristics in order to evaluate their suitability for industrial uses. Major and trace element analyses were carried out on clay samples using Inductively Couple Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES and X- Ray Fluorescence (XRF. The result of the chemical analysis of the ten (10 samples collected showed significant amounts of SiO2 and Al2O3. Silica content ranges from 51.48 to 62.44 % while alumina varies from 12.49 to 19.00 %. The calcium oxide ranges from 1.17 to 3.39 %, Na2O ranges from 1.1 to 8.61 %, K2O from 1.54 to 3.66 %, MgO varies from 0.04 to0.14 %, Fe2O3 varies from 0.3 to 2.7 % and MnO ranges from 0.01 to 1.03 %. The result showed that the clays are mainly smectite with quartz and felspar as the main non-clay minerals. Generally, the geochemical results of the samples do not meet the standard for industrial utilization when compared to the Industrial specifications. However, for industrial utilization, some of the clay samples may be used after necessary beneficiations.

  7. Geochemical and isotopic characterization of groundwater origins in a Mediterranean karst system (southern France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, J. L.; Ladouche, B.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.

    2013-12-01

    Geochemical and isotopic ratio (11B/10B and 87Sr/86Sr) results are reported for better determining the groundwater origins in the Lez Karst system (southern France). The Lez spring is the main perennial outlet of the system and supplies with drinking water the metropolitan area of Montpellier. According to the hydrodynamic conditions, five water-types discharge at the Lez spring with important mineralization fluctuations (Caetano Bicalho et al., 2012). This geochemical response suggests that hydrodynamics targets groundwater circulation, resulting from different water end-member solicitation and mixing. Previous studies using conventional natural tracers do not succeed to identify all the water compartments supporting the flow during the hydrologic cycle (Marjolet & Salado, 1977; Joseph et al., 1988) and to explain the mineralization variation of the Lez spring. The present study combines a basic geochemical survey data with boron and strontium isotope ratio data for a better characterization of the Lez spring geochemical functioning. Groundwater samples were collected at the Lez spring and surrounding springs and wells under different hydrologic conditions from 2009 to 2011. Major, trace and rare earth elements were determined at AETE analytical platform (OREME, Univ. Montpellier 2) by ionic chromatography and Q-ICP-MS respectively. d11B and 87Sr/86Sr were determined at BRGM/MMA Orleans by TIMS. The geochemical survey has been extended at a larger scale by sampling the main geochemical end- members already identified to replace the Lez spring waters in the regional geochemical context. From this geochemical study, valuable informations have been provided on the reservoir types and water origins flowing in high and low stage periods. For the highly mineralized waters occurring in the fall first rainy events or severe low stages, a deep contribution is highlighted but B and Sr isotopic data do not ascertain the two Triassic end-members (halite or gypsum) as possible

  8. A multi-proxy geochemical investigation of late-Quaternary paleoenvironmental change from Burial Lake, Noatak National Preserve, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenbinder, M. S.; Abbott, M.; Stoner, J. S.; Dorfman, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Here we present a new multi-proxy geochemical analysis of paleoenvironmental change inferred from sediment cores recovered from Burial Lake (68.434° N, 159.174° W; 430 m ASL) in northwest Alaska. Previous work on cores from 7.9 m water depth sampled at comparatively low resolution revealed basal sediments date to ~ 40,000 cal yr BP and an unconformity during a period of aridity around the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). We therefore collected multiple overlapping Livingston cores from the lake depocenter (21.5 m water depth) in the summer of 2010 in an effort to develop a temporally continuous, high resolution record spanning prior to the LGM to the present. We focus our interpretations on a 6.51 m core developed through wiggle matching proxy data from core sites A10 and C10. We use traditional laboratory methods and investigate new approaches to assess changes in sedimentation and productivity. We are measuring dry bulk density, organic matter via Loss-on-ignition at 550° C, biogenic silica, magnetic susceptibility, grain size via laser diffractometry, and elemental abundances via scanning x-ray fluorescence (XRF). Future research seeks to test the reliability of two commonly used XRF proxies, for organic matter (incoherence/coherence ratios) and aquatic productivity (Si/Ti ratios). Age control is provided by 12 Accelerator Mass Spectrometry radiocarbon dates of discrete terrestrial macrofossils. Results from these analyses indicate that the depocenter core is continuous and the sediment record spans the last ~ 38,000 cal yr BP and most importantly contains sediments spanning the LGM. Preliminary geochemical results demonstrate substantial cyclicity in organic matter and aquatic productivity beginning in the late-glacial. We seek to analyze the periodicity of these proxies through spectral analysis, although initial observations suggest multi-century to millennial scale variability. In addition, we note the presence of two abrupt, non-linear transitions in organic

  9. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  10. The evolution of crop cultivation and paleoenvironment in the Longji Terraces, southern China: Organic geochemical evidence from paleosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongjian; Li, Shijie; Chen, Wei; Cai, Desuo; Liu, Yan

    2017-11-01

    The Longji ancient agricultural terraces in the Longji Mountain area (Guilin, southern China), which still remain in use, are famous for their magnificent terraced landscape with a mix of ecosystem and human inhabitation. Previous research has revealed the genesis and preliminary paleoenvironmental record of the agricultural terraces, but little is known about variations in crop cultivation over time. In this study, organic geochemical analyses and radiocarbon dating of an aggradational cultivated soil from a terrace profile were used to explore crop type variation and relevant paleoenvironmental change during the period of cultivation on the Longji Terraces. Hydroponic farming with rice (C 3 ) planting has been the dominant cultivation mode since the initial construction of the terraces. Warm-dry climate contributed to the growth of drought-tolerant crop (C 4 ) cultivation in the late 15th century. Temperature deterioration during the Little Ice Age had a negative impact on dry and hydroponic farming activities from the late 15th century to the late 19th century, while climate warming after the Little Ice Age promoted the redevelopment of hydroponic farming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fracture Sealing in Shales: Geological and Geochemical Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathelineau, Michel

    2001-01-01

    The so-called self-sealing processes can be re-examined at the light of geological and geochemical consideration about the past history of the rocks. The concept of 'self sealing' needs to consider the formation and the sealing of fractures, especially three main stages: (i) the initiation of the fracture (development of micro-cracks initiated from previous heterogeneities up to fracturing), ii) the fracturing processes which occur generally at depth in presence of a fluid phase, iii) the healing or sealing of the fractures which corresponds basically to two main processes: a restoration of the initial permeability of the rock block by reducing the transmissivity of the discontinuity down to values equivalent to that of the homogeneous medium before fracturing, or the sealing of the open discontinuity by precipitation of newly formed minerals. In the latter case, the evolution of the open fracture is driven by re-arrangement of particles or precipitation of newly formed material, either by dissolution/crystallisation processes or by crystallisation from the percolating fluids (advective processes). Such processes are governed by chemical processes, especially the rate of precipitation of minerals which depends of the degree of saturation with respect to the mineral, and the kinetics of precipitation. (author)

  12. Neutron and photon activation analyses in geochemical characterization of Libyan Desert Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Z.; Krausová, I.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 311, č. 2 (2017), s. 1465-1471 ISSN 0236-5731. [International Conference on Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry (RANC) /1./. Budapest, 10.04.2016-15.04.2016] Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Libyan Desert Glass * INAA * IPAA * impact origin * Nubian sandstone * volatilization Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Geology Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  13. Neutron and photon activation analyses in geochemical characterization of Libyan Desert Glass

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk; Krausová, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 311, č. 2 (2017), s. 1465-1471 ISSN 0236-5731. [1st International Conference on Radioanalytical and Nuclear chemistry (RANC). Budapest, 10.04.2016-15.04.2016] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-22351S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Libyan Desert Glass * INAA * IPAA * Impact origin * Nubian sandstone * Volatilization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Analytical chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  14. Geochemical reconnaissance for uranium in the Palmyrides region of central Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jubeli, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    An account is given of the application of multielement reconnaissance rock chemistry, coupled with ground scintillation γ-ray measurements, to the investigation of the dispersion patterns of uranium and other major and trace elements in the rocks of the arid Palmyrides region of central Syria. The region is underlain by 10 km of sediments that accumulated in an interplatform depression during the Mesozoic and Caenozoic. Uranium and associated elements were syngenetically incorporated into the Upper Cretaceous and Lower Palaeogene sediments - especially phosphorites, which are well represented in the region. The oxidizing environment of the region has facilitated the subsequent geochemical redistribution of uranium. In the investigation more than 400 lithogeochemical samples collected from an area of approximately 9000 km 2 were analysed for over 30 elements. The resulting data were interpreted with the aid of univariate and multivariate statistical methods and the areal distribution of uranium, its associated elements, multivariate geochemical functions and factor scores were mapped with the use of computer graphics. Anomalies of U are accompanied by concentrations of As, Se, V, Mo, Zn, Cd, Cu, Ni and P in various combinations. The highest U concentrations are found in the Upper Cretaceous, which contains a high proportion of phosphatic rocks; younger sediments contain progressively less U. Uranium anomalies close to faults, which have provided conduits for wider U migration, are superimposed on this pattern. Lithogeochemical methods thus define geochemical dispersion patterns with good contrast and delineate areas for further investigation. (author)

  15. Geochemical and mineralogical maps for soils of the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Cannon, William F.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Solano, Federico; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey began sampling in 2007 for a low-density (1 site per 1,600 square kilometers, 4,857 sites) geochemical and mineralogical survey of soils in the conterminous United States as part of the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project. The sampling protocol for the national-scale survey included, at each site, a sample from a depth of 0 to 5 centimeters, a composite of the soil A horizon, and a deeper sample from the soil C horizon or, if the top of the C horizon was at a depth greater than 1 meter, a sample from a depth of approximately 80–100 centimeters. The soil A and C horizons were determined by a quantitative X-ray diffraction method using Rietveld refinement. Sampling in the conterminous United States was completed in 2010, with chemical and mineralogical analyses completed in May 2013. The resulting data set provides an estimate of the abundance and spatial distribution of chemical elements and minerals in soils of the conterminous United States and represents a baseline for soil geochemistry and mineralogy against which future changes may be recognized and quantified. This report releases geochemical and mineralogical maps along with a histogram, boxplot, and empirical cumulative distribution function plot for each element or mineral.

  16. Modelling the closure-related geochemical evolution of groundwater at a former uranium mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, J G; Mayer, K U; Blowes, D W; Frind, E O; Molson, J W; Kahnt, R; Jenk, U

    2001-11-01

    A newly developed reactive transport model was used to evaluate the potential effects of mine closure on the geochemical evolution in the aquifer downgradient from a mine site. The simulations were conducted for the Königstein uranium mine located in Saxony, Germany. During decades of operation, uranium at the former mine site had been extracted by in situ acid leaching of the ore underground, while the mine was maintained in a dewatered condition. One option for decommissioning is to allow the groundwater level to rise to its natural level, flooding the mine workings. As a result, pore water containing high concentrations of dissolved metals, radionuclides, and sulfate may be released. Additional contamination may arise due to the dissolution of minerals contained in the aquifer downgradient of the mine. On the other hand, dissolved metals may be attenuated by reactions within the aquifer. The geochemical processes and interactions involved are highly non-linear and their impact on the quality of the groundwater and surface water downstream of the mine is not always intuitive. The multicomponent reactive transport model MIN3P, which can describe mineral dissolution-precipitation reactions, aqueous complexation, and oxidation-reduction reactions, is shown to be a powerful tool for investigating these processes. The predictive capabilities of the model are, however, limited by the availability of key geochemical parameters such as the presence and quantities of primary and secondary mineral phases. Under these conditions, the model can provide valuable insight by means of sensitivity analyses.

  17. Geochemical study of groundwater at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) and its contractor, Rust Geotech, support the Kirtland Area Office by assisting Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (Sandia/NM) with remedial action, remedial design, and technical support of its Environmental Restoration Program. To aid in determining groundwater origins and flow paths, the GJPO was tasked to provide interpretation of groundwater geochemical data. The purpose of this investigation was to describe and analyze the groundwater geochemistry of the Sandia/NM Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). Interpretations of groundwater origins are made by using these data and the results of {open_quotes}mass balance{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}reaction path{close_quote} modeling. Additional maps and plots were compiled to more fully comprehend the geochemical distributions. A more complete set of these data representations are provided in the appendices. Previous interpretations of groundwater-flow paths that were based on well-head, geologic, and geochemical data are presented in various reports and were used as the basis for developing the models presented in this investigation.

  18. Bacterial communities associated with subsurface geochemical processes in continental serpentinite springs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, William J; Morrill, Penny L; Szponar, Natalie; Schrenk, Matthew O

    2013-07-01

    Reactions associated with the geochemical process of serpentinization can generate copious quantities of hydrogen and low-molecular-weight organic carbon compounds, which may provide energy and nutrients to sustain subsurface microbial communities independently of the photosynthetically supported surface biosphere. Previous microbial ecology studies have tested this hypothesis in deep sea hydrothermal vents, such as the Lost City hydrothermal field. This study applied similar methods, including molecular fingerprinting and tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, to ultrabasic continental springs emanating from serpentinizing ultramafic rocks. These molecular surveys were linked with geochemical measurements of the fluids in an interdisciplinary approach designed to distinguish potential subsurface organisms from those derived from surface habitats. The betaproteobacterial genus Hydrogenophaga was identified as a likely inhabitant of transition zones where hydrogen-enriched subsurface fluids mix with oxygenated surface water. The Firmicutes genus Erysipelothrix was most strongly correlated with geochemical factors indicative of subsurface fluids and was identified as the most likely inhabitant of a serpentinization-powered subsurface biosphere. Both of these taxa have been identified in multiple hydrogen-enriched subsurface habitats worldwide, and the results of this study contribute to an emerging biogeographic pattern in which Betaproteobacteria occur in near-surface mixing zones and Firmicutes are present in deeper, anoxic subsurface habitats.

  19. Petrological mineralogical and geochemical characterization of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in Ratones Mines (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buil Gutierrez, B.

    2002-01-01

    The petrological, mineralogical and geochemical characterisation of the granitoids and fracture fillings developed in the Ratones Mine (Caceres, Spain) has been done in order to understand rock-water interaction processes which control water geochemical parameters. Special interest has been devoted to the analysis and interpretation of REE patterns in the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) because they constitute geochemical tracers in water-rock interaction process. Moreover, REE are considered as actinide analogues. In order to characterise the solid phase (granitoids and fracture fillings) several investigation scales (system, outcrop, whole rock, mineral and geochemical components) have been considered and different types of samples have been analysed. These factors control the methodological approach used in this investigation. The analytical methods we have used in this investigation are microscope, qualitative and semi-quantitative methods (XRD, SEM,EDAX) and quantitative methods (ICP-MS, XRF, EM, LAM-IC-MS). The bulk of the granitoids located around the Ratones Mine Belongs to the alkaline feldspar granite-sienogranite lihotype and they show a peraluminous and subalkaline pattern. From the mineralogical point of view, they are composed by quartz, K-feldspar (Or>90%), showing sericitation, moscovitization and turmolinization altherations, alkaline plagioclase (An-=-3%), usually altered to sericite, saussirite and less frequently affected by moscovitization processes, Fe-Al biotite, frequently affected by chloritization processes and sometimes replaced by muscovite, and finally muscovite (>2% celadonite and <4% paragonite) both of primary and secondary origin. The differences observed between the different lithotypes are related with the modal proportion of the principal minerals,with the presence or absence of certain accessory minerals ( turmaline, cordierite), with specific textural patterns, grain size and also with the richness in specific

  20. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  1. GEOCHEM-EZ: a chemical speciation program with greater power and flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    GEOCHEM –EZ is a multi-functional chemical speciation program, which was designed to replace the existing GEOCHEM-PC, a program that can only be used on DOS consoles. Chemical speciation programs, such as GEOCHEM (Sposito and Mattigod, 1980) and GEOCHEM-PC (Parker et al., 1995), have been excellent ...

  2. Uruguay mining Inventory: Geochemical prospecting results of Valentines mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangenberg, J.; Filippini, J.

    1985-01-01

    This work is about geochemical prospecting carried out into the Uruguay mining inventory framework. In this case the survey was in Valentines mapping. Florida, Durazno and Treinta y Tres provinces of Uruguay .

  3. Chlorine isotopes potential as geo-chemical tracers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shirodkar, P.V.; Pradhan, U.K.; Banerjee, R.

    The potential of chlorine isotopes as tracers of geo-chemical processes of earth and the oceans is highlighted based on systematic studies carried out in understanding the chlorine isotope fractionation mechanism, its constancy in seawater and its...

  4. Geochemical methodology for gold prospect ion in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangenber, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work is about the history of gold prospection in Uruguay. In this study there are considered the geochemical aspects, the gold performance, the applicability to mining prospection and the gold prospection aluvionar

  5. Geochemical prospect ion results of Mariscala aerial photo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippini, J.

    1989-01-01

    This report shows the geochemical prospect ion results carried out within the framework of the metalical mining prospect ion in Mariscala aerial photo. Lavalleja district belong to the Mining inventory programme of Uruguay.

  6. The geochemical chararateristics of the marble deposits east of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ), marbles were investigated with the view to establishing marble occurrences and their geochemical characteristics. Crystalline rocks of the Nigerian Basement Complex (migmatite – gneiss complex) underlie the area. Ten marble bodies were ...

  7. National Geochemical Survey Locations and Results for Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The United States Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with other state and federal agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting a National Geochemical...

  8. Geochemical behavior of disposed radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barney, G.S.; Navratil, J.D.; Schulz, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    The papers in this book are organized to cover the chemical aspects that are important to understanding the behavior of disposed radioactive wastes. These aspects include radionuclide sorption and desorption, solubility of radionuclide compounds, chemical species of radionuclides in natural waters, hydrothermal geochemical reactions, measurements of radionuclide migration, solid state chemistry of wastes, and waste-form leaching behavior. The information in each of the papers is necessary to predict the transport of radionuclides from wastes via natural waters and thus to predict the safety of the disposed waste. Radionuclide transport in natural waters is strongly dependent on sorption, desorption, dissolution, and precipitation processes. The first two papers discuss laboratory investigations of these processes. Descriptions of sorption and desorption behavior of important radionuclides under a wide range of environmental conditions are presented in the first section. Among the sorbents studied are basalt interbed solids, granites, clays, sediments, hydrous oxides, and pure minerals. Effects of redox conditions, groundwater composition and pH on sorption reactions are described

  9. LASL approach to uranium geochemical reconnaissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The US ERDA, as part of the NURE program, has initiated a nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The aims of the NURE program are to provide data on which to base more accurate estimates of US uranium reserves for long-range planning and to aid in meeting the nation's projected uranium demands into the next century. The HSSR objective is to complete, by 1980, a reconnaissance of the nation's surface waters, ground waters, and stream and lake sediments, to aid in assessment of uranium reserves and identification of areas of interest for exploration. Patterned after extensive uranium reconnaissance done in many other countries, the LASL project is comprised of the following five components: (1) organization and planning, which includes management, design, and execution; (2) field sampling, which includes orientation studies, generation of specifications, and contracting and inspection of field work; (3) sample receiving and analysis, which includes development of methods and hardware, quality assurance, and archival storage; (4) data handling and presentation, including verification, storage, output, and plotting; and (5) data evaluation and publication, which incorporates geochemical, geological, statistical, and empirical evaluation and report writing. The LASL approach to each component and the current status in each state are described.

  10. LASL approach to uranium geochemical reconnaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, R.R. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The US ERDA, as part of the NURE program, has initiated a nationwide Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR). The aims of the NURE program are to provide data on which to base more accurate estimates of US uranium reserves for long-range planning and to aid in meeting the nation's projected uranium demands into the next century. The HSSR objective is to complete, by 1980, a reconnaissance of the nation's surface waters, ground waters, and stream and lake sediments, to aid in assessment of uranium reserves and identification of areas of interest for exploration. Patterned after extensive uranium reconnaissance done in many other countries, the LASL project is comprised of the following five components: (1) organization and planning, which includes management, design, and execution; (2) field sampling, which includes orientation studies, generation of specifications, and contracting and inspection of field work; (3) sample receiving and analysis, which includes development of methods and hardware, quality assurance, and archival storage; (4) data handling and presentation, including verification, storage, output, and plotting; and (5) data evaluation and publication, which incorporates geochemical, geological, statistical, and empirical evaluation and report writing. The LASL approach to each component and the current status in each state are described

  11. Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D

    2006-02-28

    The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling

  12. Coupling R and PHREEQC: Efficient Programming of Geochemical Models

    OpenAIRE

    De Lucia, Marco; Kühn, Michael

    2013-01-01

    We present a new interface between the geochemical simulator PHREEQC and the open source language R. It represents a tool to flexibly and efficiently program and automate every aspect of geochemical modelling. The interface helps particularly to setup and run large numbers of simulations and visualise the results. Also profiting of numberless high-quality R extension packages, performing sensitivity analysis or Monte Carlo simulations becomes straightforward. Further, an algorithm to speedup ...

  13. Geochemical and Physical Characteristics of Iraqi Dust and Soil Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-08

    Report: Geochemical and Physical Characteristics of Iraqi Dust and Soil Samples iv ABBREVIATIONS LIST Acronyms ASTM American Society for Testing...gallons of Militec-1 gun lubricant were donated to DRI by 9 Militec, Inc. (11828 Pika Drive, Waldorf, Maryland). All three lubricants also serve as...Report: Geochemical and Physical Characteristics of Iraqi Dust and Soil Samples 37 REFERENCES ASTM ( American Society for Testing and Materials). 2000

  14. Geochemical, hydrological, and biological cycling of energy residual. Research plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wobber, F.J.

    1983-03-01

    Proposed research goals and specific research areas designed to provide a base of fundamental scientific information so that the geochemical, hydrological, and biophysical mechanisms that contribute to the transport and long term fate of energy residuals in natural systems can be understood are described. Energy development and production have resulted in a need for advanced scientific information on the geochemical transformations, transport rates, and potential for bioaccumulation of contaminants in subsurface environments

  15. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution using chemical equilibrium codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Pirhonen, V.

    1991-01-01

    Geochemical equilibrium codes are a modern tool in studying interaction between groundwater and solid phases. The most common used programs and application subjects are shortly presented in this article. The main emphasis is laid on the approach method of using calculated results in evaluating groundwater evolution in hydrogeological system. At present in geochemical equilibrium modelling also kinetic as well as hydrologic constrains along a flow path are taken into consideration

  16. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  17. Geothermal resources in Martinique (Lesser Antilles): new insight of geochemical isotopic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadalia, A.; Rad, S.; Braibant, G.; Brach, M.; Millot, R.; Traineau, H.

    2012-12-01

    Geothermal exploration of Martinique Island started in 1967 but was interrupted successively at 3 times. Additional geothermal exploration program was conducted by BRGM, in 2001-2003 and recently in areas known for their geothermal interest: Mount Pelée volcano and Diamant. A complementary exploration is now proceed with new sites of interest such as "Pitons du Carbet" massif after recent dating (Germa et al., 2011). A conceptual model of reservoir was established for Mount Pelée volcano and on the Piton du Carbet massif, but the extension of these greenfield remains unknown. We propose new approach through geochemistry by the integration to the prospection of chemical compositions of river waters adding to hot springs and well waters. Rivers catchment in Lesser Antilles and their hydrothermal impact have been studied in order to quantify and identify the magmatic contribution into the river (Rad et al., 2011). Chemical analyses and new isotopic tools such as Lithium isotopes 7Li/6Li (expressed as δ7Li) are measured in river waters. Among these multi chemical parameters, isotopic in particular (H, Li, C, O, Sr…) the Li isotopic signature appear to be conservative and allows to identify new target with high temperature water-rock interactions or in case of high fractionation, reflecting low temperature water-rock interactions, to avoid an extended zone. These new technique was applied to the Mount Pelée and confirm the pre-existent model established in previous exploration campaign. For Pitons du Carbet massif all the river catchment of the massif have been sampled, first results show a potential western extension of the reservoir, confirm by an important gas leak of hydrothermal origin. For tropical volcanic environment with sharp relief, dense vegetation, and high precipitation, chemical and isotopic analyses, particularly lithium isotopes, in river waters, allow to identify zone of interest. To conclude, river catchment studies dedicate to geothermal

  18. Groundwater quality assessment using geoelectrical and geochemical approaches: case study of Abi area, southeastern Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebong, Ebong D.; Akpan, Anthony E.; Emeka, Chimezie N.; Urang, Job G.

    2017-09-01

    The electrical resistivity technique which involved the Schlumberger depth sounding method and geochemical analyses of water samples collected from boreholes was used to investigate the suitability of groundwater aquifers in Abi for drinking and irrigation purposes. Fifty randomly located electrical resistivity data were collected, modeled, and interpreted after calibration with lithologic logs. Ten borehole water samples were collected and analysed to determine anion, cation concentrations and some physical and chemical parameters, such as water colour, temperature, total dissolved solids, and electrical conductivity. The results show that the lithostratigraphy of the study area is composed of sands, sandstones (fractured, consolidated and loosed), siltstones, shales (compacted and fractured) of the Asu River Group, Eze-Aku Formation which comprises the aquifer units, and the Nkporo Shale Formation. The aquifer conduits are known to be rich in silicate minerals, and the groundwater samples in some locations show a significant amount of Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+. These cations balanced the consumption of H+ during the hydrolytic alteration of silicate minerals. The geochemical analysis of groundwater samples revealed dominant calcium-magnesium-carbonate-bicarbonate water facies. Irrigation water quality parameters, such as sodium absorption ratio, percentage of sodium, and permeability index, were calculated based on the physico-chemical analyses. The groundwater quality was observed to be influenced by the interaction of some geologic processes but was classified to be good to excellent, indicating its suitability for domestic and irrigation purposes.

  19. Concerning evaluation of eco-geochemical background in remediation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    The geochemical concept of biosphere developed by V.I. Vernadsky states the geological role of the living organisms in the course of their active chemical interaction with the inert matter (Vernadsky, 1926, 1960). Basing on this theory it is reasonable to suggest that coevolution of living organisms and their environment led to development of the dynamically stable biogeocenoses precisely adequate to their geochemical environment. Soil cover was treated by V.I. Vernadsky as a balanced bio-inert matter resulting from this interaction. Appearance of human mind and then a civilization led to global expansion of human beings, first able to survive in unfavorable geochemical conditions and then starting chemical transformation of the environment to satisfy the growing demands of mankind in food and energy. The residence in unfavorable environment and local contamination was followed by appearance of endemic diseases of plants, animals and man. Therefore zonal, regional and local chemical composition of the soil cover formed in natural conditions may be used for estimation of the optimum geochemical background, most adequate for the corresponding zonal biogeocenoses and species. Moreover, the natural geochemical background and technogenic fields have unequal spatial structure and this facilitates their identification that may be relatively easy realized in remediation strategy. On the assumption of the foregoing, the adequate methodical approach to remediation of technogenically affected areas should account of the interaction of the existing natural and the newly formed technogenic geochemical fields and include the following steps: 1) the study and mapping of geochemical structure of the natural geochemical background basing on soil maps; 2) the study of contaminants and mapping spatial distribution of technogenic releases; 3) construction of risk maps for the target risk groups with due regard to natural ecological threshold concentration in context of risk degree for

  20. Investigating the temporal fluctuations in geoelectrical and geochemical signals Jointly measured in a seismic area of Southern Apennine chain (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Piscitelli

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse geoelectrical and geochemical time series jointly measured by means of a multiparametric automatic station close to an anomalous fluid emission in Val d'Agri (Basilicata, Southern Italy. In the investigated are some destructive seismic events occurred in past and recent years. We analysed the temporal fluctuations of the signals by spectral tools. We detected scaling behaviours in the power spectra of the time series recorded, that are typical fingerprints of fractional Brownian motions. The estimated values of the spectral indices reveal the presence of antipersistent behaviour in the time dynamics of all geoelectrical and geochemical data recorded. This work intends to improve our knowledge of the inner time dynamics of geophysical non-seismometric parameters.

  1. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  2. Development of thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, L.L.C., Denver, Colorado (United States); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Neyama, Atsushi [Computer Software Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Two thermodynamic databases for geochemical calculations supporting research and development on geological disposal concepts for high level radioactive waste are described in this report. One, SPRONS.JNC, is compatible with thermodynamic relations comprising the SUPCRT model and software, which permits calculation of the standard molal and partial molal thermodynamic properties of minerals, gases, aqueous species and reactions from 1 to 5000 bars and 0 to 1000degC. This database includes standard molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard molal entropies and volumes, and Maier-Kelly heat capacity coefficients at the reference pressure (1 bar) and temperature (25degC) for 195 minerals and 16 gases. It also includes standard partial molal Gibbs free energies and enthalpies of formation, standard partial molal entropies, and Helgeson, Kirkham and Flowers (HKF) equation-of-state coefficients at the reference pressure and temperature for 1147 inorganic and organic aqueous ions and complexes. SPRONS.JNC extends similar databases described elsewhere by incorporating new and revised data published in the peer-reviewed literature since 1991. The other database, PHREEQE.JNC, is compatible with the PHREEQE series of geochemical modeling codes. It includes equilibrium constants at 25degC and l bar for mineral-dissolution, gas-solubility, aqueous-association and oxidation-reduction reactions. Reaction enthalpies, or coefficients in an empirical log K(T) function, are also included in this database, which permits calculation of equilibrium constants between 0 and 100degC at 1 bar. All equilibrium constants, reaction enthalpies, and log K(T) coefficients in PHREEQE.JNC are calculated using SUPCRT and SPRONS.JNC, which ensures that these two databases are mutually consistent. They are also internally consistent insofar as all the data are compatible with basic thermodynamic definitions and functional relations in the SUPCRT model, and because primary

  3. Compilation of kinetic data for geochemical calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.; Savage, D.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic data, including rate constants, reaction orders and activation energies, are compiled for 34 hydrolysis reactions involving feldspars, sheet silicates, zeolites, oxides, pyroxenes and amphiboles, and for similar reactions involving calcite and pyrite. The data are compatible with a rate law consistent with surface reaction control and transition-state theory, which is incorporated in the geochemical software package EQ3/6 and GWB. Kinetic data for the reactions noted above are strictly compatible with the transition-state rate law only under far-from-equilibrium conditions. It is possible that the data are conceptually consistent with this rate law under both far-from-equilibrium and near-to-equilibrium conditions, but this should be confirmed whenever possible through analysis of original experimental results. Due to limitations in the availability of kinetic data for mine-water reactions, and in order to simplify evaluations of geochemical models of groundwater evolution, it is convenient to assume local-equilibrium in such models whenever possible. To assess whether this assumption is reasonable, a modeling approach accounting for couple fluid flow and water-rock interaction is described that can be use to estimate spatial and temporal scale of local equilibrium. The approach is demonstrated for conditions involving groundwater flow in fractures at JNC's Kamaishi in-situ tests site, and is also used to estimate the travel time necessary for oxidizing surface waters to migrate to the level of a HLW repository in crystalline rock. The question of whether local equilibrium is a reasonable assumption must be addressed using an appropriate modeling approach. To be appropriate for conditions at the Kamaishi site using the modeling approach noted above, the fracture fill must closely approximate a porous mine, groundwater flow must be purely advective and diffusion of solutes across the fracture-host rock boundary must not occur. Moreover, the mineralogical and

  4. Compilation of kinetic data for geochemical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, LLC., Denver, Colorado (United States); Savage, D. [Quintessa, Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom); Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic data, including rate constants, reaction orders and activation energies, are compiled for 34 hydrolysis reactions involving feldspars, sheet silicates, zeolites, oxides, pyroxenes and amphiboles, and for similar reactions involving calcite and pyrite. The data are compatible with a rate law consistent with surface reaction control and transition-state theory, which is incorporated in the geochemical software package EQ3/6 and GWB. Kinetic data for the reactions noted above are strictly compatible with the transition-state rate law only under far-from-equilibrium conditions. It is possible that the data are conceptually consistent with this rate law under both far-from-equilibrium and near-to-equilibrium conditions, but this should be confirmed whenever possible through analysis of original experimental results. Due to limitations in the availability of kinetic data for mine-water reactions, and in order to simplify evaluations of geochemical models of groundwater evolution, it is convenient to assume local-equilibrium in such models whenever possible. To assess whether this assumption is reasonable, a modeling approach accounting for couple fluid flow and water-rock interaction is described that can be use to estimate spatial and temporal scale of local equilibrium. The approach is demonstrated for conditions involving groundwater flow in fractures at JNC's Kamaishi in-situ tests site, and is also used to estimate the travel time necessary for oxidizing surface waters to migrate to the level of a HLW repository in crystalline rock. The question of whether local equilibrium is a reasonable assumption must be addressed using an appropriate modeling approach. To be appropriate for conditions at the Kamaishi site using the modeling approach noted above, the fracture fill must closely approximate a porous mine, groundwater flow must be purely advective and diffusion of solutes across the fracture-host rock boundary must not occur. Moreover, the

  5. Coal weathering and the geochemical carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soobum; Berner, Robert A.

    1999-10-01

    The weathering rate of sedimentary organic matter in the continental surficial environment is poorly constrained despite its importance to the geochemical carbon cycle. During this weathering, complete oxidation to carbon dioxide is normally assumed, but there is little proof that this actually occurs. Knowledge of the rate and mechanisms of sedimentary organic matter weathering is important because it is one of the major controls on atmospheric oxygen level through geologic time. We have determined the aqueous oxidation rates of pyrite-free bituminous coal at 24° and 50°C by using a dual-cell flow-through method. Coal was used as an example of sedimentary organic matter because of the difficulty in obtaining pyrite-free kerogen for laboratory study. The aqueous oxidation rate obtained in the present study for air-saturated water (270 μM O2) was found to be on the order of 2 × 10-12 mol O2/m2/s at 25°C, which is fast compared to other geologic processes such as tectonic uplift and exposure through erosion. The reaction order with respect to oxygen level is 0.5 on a several thousand hour time scale for both 24° and 50°C experiments. Activation energies, determined under 24° and 50°C conditions, were ≈40 kJ/mol O2 indicating that the oxidation reaction is surface reaction controlled. The oxygen consumption rate obtained in this study is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that for pyrite oxidation in water, but still rapid on a geologic time scale. Aqueous coal oxidation results in the formation of dissolved CO2, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and solid oxidation products, which are all quantitatively significant reaction products.

  6. Geochemical factors influencing vault design and layout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gascoyne, M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Sargent, F.P.

    1995-01-01

    The design and construction of a vault for used nuclear fuel in crystalline rock may be influenced by a number of geochemical factors. During the siting stage, information is needed regarding the rock type, heterogeneities in its composition and the mineralogy of permeable zones because these will cause variations in thermal conductivity, strength and radionuclide sorptive properties of the rock. These factors may affect decisions regarding depth of vault construction, tunnel dimensions and spacing of panels and waste containers. The decision on whether groundwaters are allowed to flow freely into a planned excavation may depend on measurements of their chemical compositions, microbiological contents and presence of hazardous or corrosive constituents. During site characterization, borehole drilling from the surface and subsequent hydraulic testing will introduce both chemical and microbiological contaminants that may further influence this decision. During vault construction, the geochemistry of the rock may cause changes to the characterization, design and construction of the vault. For example, high salinity fluids in micropores in the rock could prevent the use of radar surveys to detect fractures in the surrounding rock. High rock salinity may also cause unacceptably high total dissolved solids loadings in water discharged from the facility. Again, the presence of toxic, corrosive or radioactive constituents in inflowing groundwater may require grouting or, if inflow is needed for service operations, development of treatment facilities both above and below ground. In addition, the use of explosives will cause high organic and nitrate loadings in service water as well as the possible impregnation of these chemicals in the damaged wall-rock surrounding an excavation. These chemicals may remain despite cleaning efforts and act as nutrients to promote microbial activity in the post-closure phase. In the operational phase, further design and construction, changes

  7. Predictive geophysics: geochemical simulations to geophysical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, R. G.; Cleverley, J.

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing focus on deep exploration for covered targets, new methods are required to target mineral systems under cover. Geophysical responses are driven by physical property contrasts; for example, density contrasts provide a gravity signal, acoustic impedance contrasts provide a seismic reflection signal. In turn, the physical properties for basement, crystalline rocks which host the vast majority of mineral systems are determined almost wholly by the mineralogy of the rocks in question. Mineral systems, through the transport of heat and reactive fluids, will serve to modify the physical properties of country rock as they chemically alter the hosting strata. To understand these changes, we have performed 2D reactive transport modelling that simulates the formation of Archean gold deposits of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. From this, we derive a model of mineralogy that we can use to predict the density, magnetic susceptibility and seismic reflection changes associated with ore formation. It is then possible to predict the gravity, magnetic and seismic reflection responses associated with these deposits. Scenario mapping, such as testing the ability to resolve buried ore bodies or the geophysical survey spacing required to resolve the mineral system, can be performed to produce geophysical targets from these geochemical simulations. We find that there is a gravity response of around 9% of the unaltered response for deposits even buried by 1km of cover, and there is a magnetic spike associated with proximal alteration of the ore system. Finally, seismic reflection response is mostly characterised by additional reflections along faults that plumb the alteration system.

  8. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  9. Tectonic origin of serpentinites on Syros, Greece: Geochemical signatures of abyssal origin preserved in a HP/LT subduction complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperdock, Emily H. G.; Raia, Natalie H.; Barnes, Jaime D.; Stockli, Daniel F.; Schwarzenbach, Esther M.

    2018-01-01

    This study combines whole rock trace and major element geochemistry, and stable isotope (δD and δ18O) analyses with petrographic observations to deduce the origin and tectonic setting of serpentinization of ultramafic blocks from the exhumed HP/LT Aegean subduction complex on Syros, Greece. Samples are completely serpentinized and are characterized by mineral assemblages that consist of variable amounts of serpentine, talc, chlorite, and magnetite. δD and δ18O values of bulk rock serpentinite powders and chips (δD = - 64 to - 33‰ and δ18O = + 5.2 to + 9.0‰) reflect hydration by seawater at temperatures < 250 °C in an oceanic setting pre-subduction, or by fluids derived from dehydrating altered oceanic crust during subduction. Fluid-mobile elements corroborate the possibility of initial serpentinization by seawater, followed by secondary fluid-rock interactions with a sedimentary source pre- or syn-subduction. Whole rock major element, trace element, and REE analyses record limited melt extraction, exhibit flat REE patterns, and do not show pronounced Eu anomalies. The geochemical signatures preserved in these serpentinites argue against a mantle wedge source, as has been previously speculated for ultramafic rocks on Syros. Rather, the data are consistent with derivation from abyssal peridotites in a hyper-extended margin setting or mid-ocean ridge and fracture zone environment. In either case, the data suggest an extensional and/or oceanic origin associated with the Cretaceous opening of the Pindos Ocean and not a subduction-related derivation from the mantle wedge.

  10. Geochemical analysis of core from a geothermal anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverslew, B.; Tammemagi, H.Y.

    1985-04-01

    A mild geothermal area in western Montana, USA, has been studied, as a natural analog, to learn about the effects that long-term heat generated by a repository containing spent nuclear fuel might have on the surrounding rock mass. The results of previous geological, geophysical and hydrogeological studies are briefly summarized. Extensive petrological studies have been undertaken on core samples obtained from a 2 km deep borehole drilled into the Empire Creek Stock. These include a detailed petrographic study, x-ray diffraction analyses, scanning electron microscope and electron microprobe analyses, porosity and permeability measurements, oxygen isotope analyses, uranium disequilibrium analyses and K-Ar age determinations. The implications to deep burial of nuclear wastes are discussed. 40 refs

  11. Geochemical stratigraphy and correlation within large igneous provinces: The final preserved stages of the Faroe Islands Basalt Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, J. M.; Hole, M. J.; Jolley, D. W.; Passey, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    The Faroe Islands Basalt Group (FIBG) comprises a gross stratigraphic thickness of over 6.5 km of dominantly extrusive basaltic facies erupted during the Late Palaeocene to Early Eocene. In this study we present 140 major and trace element analyses from flow by flow field and borehole sample profiles, through the Enni Formation, which comprises the final phase of volcanism preserved on the Faroe Islands. The sample profiles target geographically spaced and overlapping stratigraphic sequences tied relative to a 3D ArcGIS surface for the regionally extensive volcaniclastic Argir Beds marker unit. From these profiles five geochemical groups including one low TiO2 (Low-Ti 1.5 wt%) groups differentiated by Nb, Zr, Y and V variations are identified in conjunction with previous studies. The spatial and stratigraphic distribution of these groups is mapped across the islands and demonstrates a complex inter-digitated flow field evolution. Within the finer scale variations, broad spatial and temporal development trends are identified demonstrating the potential for correlation within the volcanic succession at the local, tens of kilometers scale. Low-Ti lavas formed in association with lithospheric thinning and developed extensive flow fields between the Faroe Islands and East Greenland contemporaneous to the eruption of High-Ti smaller melt fraction lava flows in both locations. The progression of High-Ti lava groups preserved on either side of the developing rift zone is very similar, but is not, however, chronostratigraphic due to multiple inter-digitations of the chemical types. We tentatively suggest that a previously proposed rift-oblique transfer zone between the Faroe Islands and East Greenland enabled non-uniform lithospheric thinning and the preservation of a near-continuous High-Ti melting region between these areas beyond the onset of Low-Ti eruptions which were initially fed from the west. This study highlights the complex nature of late stage flood basalt

  12. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Kenneth M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ΔfG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than

  13. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration - Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO 2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO 2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO 2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO 2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO 2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO 2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO 2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO 2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO 2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO 2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO 2 and CH 4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of Δ f G 298 o and/or log K r,298 o are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log K r,T o or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist

  14. Mesozoic rift magmatism in the North Sea region: 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of Scanian basalts and geochemical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergelin, Ingemar; Obst, Karsten; Söderlund, Ulf; Larsson, Kent; Johansson, Leif

    2011-06-01

    More than 100 volcanic necks composed of basanites and melanephelinites occur in Scania, southern Sweden, at the junction of two major tectonic lineaments, the Phanerozoic Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone (STZ) and the Proterozoic Protogine Zone. New 40Ar/39Ar isotope analyses of whole rock fragments of nine selected basalt necks suggest that the Mesozoic alkaline volcanism in the Scanian province commenced earlier than previously reported and comprised three separate volcanic episodes that span a total period of ca. 80 Myr: a first Jurassic (191-178 Ma), a second at the Jurassic/Cretaceous boundary (ca. 145 Ma), and a final middle Cretaceous episode (ca. 110 Ma). The new results allow for precise time correlations between eruption events in the Scanian and those in the North Sea volcanic provinces. The older, early Jurassic event in Scania is largely synchronous with that in the Egersund Basin and the Forties field whereas the event at ca. 145 Ma is correlated with activity in the Central Graben. These volcanic episodes also correlate in age with Kimmerian tectonic activity. Volcanic activity in the middle Cretaceous period has also been dated in the triple junction in the North Sea and offshore in the Netherland Sector. The correlation of basalt volcanism in Scania with the Egersund nephelinites strongly suggest that volcanism was triggered by repeated tectonic activity along the STZ. Geochemical data of alkaline mafic rocks in the Scanian and the North Sea volcanic provinces imply that different provinces have largely unique geochemical signatures in favour of a heterogeneous mantle in the North Sea volcanic region. However, basalts of different generations in one and the same province cannot be readily separated on the basis of geochemistry, suggesting that the same lithospheric mantle was the source of repeated volcanism over time in each province. The data suggest a low degree of melting of a volatile-bearing mantle lherzolite enriched in incompatible elements with

  15. Tephra from andesitic Shiveluch volcano, Kamchatka, NW Pacific: chronology of explosive eruptions and geochemical fingerprinting of volcanic glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomareva, Vera; Portnyagin, Maxim; Pevzner, Maria; Blaauw, Maarten; Kyle, Philip; Derkachev, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    The ~16-ka-long record of explosive eruptions from Shiveluch volcano (Kamchatka, NW Pacific) is refined using geochemical fingerprinting of tephra and radiocarbon ages. Volcanic glass from 77 prominent Holocene tephras and four Late Glacial tephra packages was analyzed by electron microprobe. Eruption ages were estimated using 113 radiocarbon dates for proximal tephra sequence. These radiocarbon dates were combined with 76 dates for regional Kamchatka marker tephra layers into a single Bayesian framework taking into account the stratigraphic ordering within and between the sites. As a result, we report ~1,700 high-quality glass analyses from Late Glacial-Holocene Shiveluch eruptions of known ages. These define the magmatic evolution of the volcano and provide a reference for correlations with distal fall deposits. Shiveluch tephras represent two major types of magmas, which have been feeding the volcano during the Late Glacial-Holocene time: Baidarny basaltic andesites and Young Shiveluch andesites. Baidarny tephras erupted mostly during the Late Glacial time (~16-12.8 ka BP) but persisted into the Holocene as subordinate admixture to the prevailing Young Shiveluch andesitic tephras (~12.7 ka BP-present). Baidarny basaltic andesite tephras have trachyandesite and trachydacite (SiO2 SiO2 > 71.5 wt%). Strongly calc-alkaline medium-K characteristics of Shiveluch volcanic glasses along with moderate Cl, CaO and low P2O5 contents permit reliable discrimination of Shiveluch tephras from the majority of other large Holocene tephras of Kamchatka. The Young Shiveluch glasses exhibit wave-like variations in SiO2 contents through time that may reflect alternating periods of high and low frequency/volume of magma supply to deep magma reservoirs beneath the volcano. The compositional variability of Shiveluch glass allows geochemical fingerprinting of individual Shiveluch tephra layers which along with age estimates facilitates their use as a dating tool in paleovolcanological

  16. Predictive Analysis of Geochemical Controls in an Alpine Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, A. P.; Sherson, L. R.; Crossey, L. J.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Alpine watersheds are increasingly relied upon for use in the American West, necessitating a more complete understanding of annual hydrologic patterns and geologic influences on water chemistry. The Jemez River is a fifth order stream in central New Mexico that flows from its source in the Jemez Mountains to its confluence with the Rio Grande north of the town of Bernalillo. Designated uses of the Jemez River include domestic water supply, recreation, and agriculture. Geothermal uses are currently being considered as well. The river recharges shallow aquifer waters used by several communities, including tribal lands of the Jemez Pueblo. The hydrogeology of the Jemez system is characterized by geothermal inputs from the Baca hydrothermal system associated with the 1.2Ma Valles caldera, as well as groundwater and surface water interactions. Freshwater input from the Rio Guadalupe and several ephemeral tributaries also influences the water chemistry of the Jemez system. Fifteen sites along a 35 km reach of the river were sampled between 2006 and 2010. Discharge of the Jemez River ranged from 10-876 cfs over the study period. The annual hydrograph is affected by annual snowmelt in the Jemez Mountains as well as surges due to monsoonal rains in July and August. Geochemical data collected over this period include temperature, conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen (D.O.), major ions, trace elements, and stable isotopes. Continuous records of temperature, conductivity, pH, D.O. and turbidity data were collected from a water quality sonde installed in March 2010. Geochemical modeling and time series analysis were performed using PHREEQC, Geochemist’s Workbench, and MATLAB. Empirical data collected during this study gave rise to several models describing the hydrology and geochemistry of the Jemez system. Our data suggest that springs are the primary contributors to dissolved load, and that solute loading from geothermal inputs is intensified by low flows observed on

  17. Basic principles of forward and inverse geochemical modelization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gimeno, M.J.; Pena, J.

    1994-01-01

    Geochemical modeling consists in the application of thermodynamic and physicochemical principles in the hydrogeochemical systems interpretation. It has been developed following two different approaches: a) inverse modeling (or mass balance calculations), which uses observed chemical and isotopic data from waters and rocks to identify geochemical reactions responsible of them, in a quantitative way; and b) forward modeling, which attempts to predict water compositions and mass transfer that can result from hypothesized reactions, from observed initial conditions on water-rock system compositions. Both of them have intrinsic uses and limitations which drive to their use in specific problems. For systems with adequate chemical, isotopic, and mineralogic data, the inverse modeling approach of speciation and mass-balance modeling provides the most direct means of determining quantitative geochemical reaction models. In contrast, for systems with missing or inadequate data, reaction-path modeling provides an a priori method of predicting geochemical reactions. In some cases it is useful to combine forward modeling with the results from inverse models. The mass-balance results determine the net mass transfer along the flow path, but these results are only partially constrained by thermodynamics. The forward modeling can be used both, to prove thermodynamic consistency for them, and to predict water quality at points where there are no enough data. Recent advances in geochemical modeling are focused on finding the most efficient numerical procedures for coupling geochemical reactions (both equilibrium and kinetic) with the hydrodynamic transport equations in compositionally-complex systems, on uncertainty analysis, and on model validation for actual geochemical systems

  18. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  19. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  20. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  1. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  2. Geochemical assessment of sediment in Cape Town harbour, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. K. Okoro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical assessment of marine sediments collected from Cape Town harbour was carried out using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, Fourier-Transform-infrared and X-ray diffractrometry techniques. The clay mineral phase consists of biotites, kaolinites and halites. The ranges of concentrations (mg/kg of trace metals were: Cd (1.69±0.075 – 0.080±0.002, Si (0.37±0.11 – 0.023±0.012, Fe (30.01±2.04 – 2.23±0.12, Cu (1462±39 – 1.51±0.11, Al (19.92±2.24 – 1.25±0.13, Sn (63.98±4.97 – 1.15±0.38, Pb (252±29 – 8.73±1.06, Hg (1.002±0.168 – 0.049±0.005 and Zn (1.26±0.07 – 0.022±0.004 mg kg-1. The enrichment factors of Sn, Pb, Zn, Fe, Cd, Al and Hg revealed anthropogenic inputs of these metals into the marine environment. The enrichment factor of Cu was less than 1 and this suggests that its presence was largely due to natural changes. The results are indications of the contributions of trace metals contained in the runoffs from the domestic and urban drains, as well as the inflow storm water. Ship repair activities appeared to constitute a major factor responsible for the higher metal contamination in the dockyard areas. The geomineral analyses revealed the presence of quartz, pyrite, and calcite and carrolite minerals as the main constituents of the marine sediments. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v28i1.3

  3. Barnacles - recorders of environmental conditions with unique geochemical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens; Gale, Andy; Korte, Christoph; Frei, Robert; Huggett, Jenny; Wray, Dave

    2017-04-01

    Barnacles are calcite-forming arthropods that occur in a wide range of habitats in modern times and are found in sedimentary successions reaching back to the Paleozoic. Despite potential use of their mostly low-Mg calcite hard parts for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions, their geochemical composition has been little studied. Here, we present the first comprehensive overview of barnacle geochemistry, with C and O isotope, as well as Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca data for multiple samples of 42 species covering the orders Sessilia, Scalpelliformes, and Lepadiformes. XRD analyses confirm calcite as the only significant carbonate mineral of the studied barnacle shell material. Apart from one species, median Mg/Ca ratios fall below 50 mmol/mol, the approximate limit for low-Mg-calcite. In the order Sessilia, the scuta and terga are on average enriched in Mg by 36 % over the unmoveable plates. Amongst the calcite-forming marine animals, barnacles have very high Sr/Ca ratios of 2.6 to 5.9 mmol/mol, amongst the highest known for calcite secreting animals. Mn/Ca and Fe/Ca ratios are commonly low and compatible with other modern shell calcite, but can be strongly enriched to > 1 mmol/mol in proximal habitats, particularly close to areas strongly affected by human activity. Carbon and oxygen isotope data indicate formation of the calcite in or near isotopic equilibrium with ambient water conditions. Apart from species showing δ18O values below 0 ‰ V-PDB, a negative correlation of oxygen isotope ratios with Sr/Ca ratios is observed, which may be related to metabolic activity. Compositional patterns in barnacle shell material, particularly high Sr concentrations and Mg distribution in shell plates of the Sessilia, point to a great potential of barnacles for high fidelity reconstruction of past seawater chemistry and environmental conditions complementary to other archives.

  4. Geochemical analysis of brine samples for exploration of Borate deposits in the South of Sabzevar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Bemani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Mohammad-abad Oryan is the only potential source of borate in the North-east of Iran located in 50 km South of Sabzevar. The area is located in tuff marl, tuffaceous marl, volcanic braccia and tuff braccia structures. Remote sensing techniques, geological studies and integration of this data in GIS were applied in an area of about 600 square kilometers to locate the promising areas of borate mineralization for detailed studies (Bemani, 2012. The aim of this detailed geochemical study is to confine the anomaly areas for exploratory drilling and trenching. Materials and methods Field studies were carried out in 9 geological traverses, mainly in Tonakar and Borje Kharkan area and 126 brine samples were taken from hydrothermal springs and 13 rock samples were taken from trenches. All the samples were analyzed for four elements, including B, K, Li and Mg. In order to determine the threshold quantities of the samples and isolation of anomaly, the data were analyzed using statistical methods including classical statistics, fractal geometry and EDA methods (Bemani, 2012. Result Initial data analysis showed that there were no censored data. Also, by applying statistical hypothesis testing, no significant relation was observed between the elements in the two areas (except for Li. Therefore, all the statistical analyses were carried out separately. After outlier correction, based on the amount of skewedness and histograms and probability plots of different elements, it became clear that none of the elements in the raw data distribution were normal and required to be transformed to be close to normal. In this study, logarithmic and three-parameter logarithm transformation were used in order to normalize the data . Based on the mean values, standard deviation of the normalized data, and background value and threshold, probable and possible anomalies were obtained and geochemical anomaly maps were drawn to identify the promising areas. With the

  5. Hydrologic Regulation of Global Geochemical Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, K.

    2015-12-01

    understand the processes controlling marine isotopic weathering processes, the need to integrate solute and solid transport into Earth system models, and the need to understand the role of extreme physical and temporal heterogeneities in moderating geochemical fluxes.

  6. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  7. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  8. Geochemical evolution of Ngorongoro Caldera, Northern Tanzania: Implications for crust magma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollel, Godwin F.; Swisher, Carl C.; Feigenson, Mark D.; Carr, Michael J.

    2008-07-01

    Ngorongoro Caldera is the largest and best-preserved of nine Plio-Pleistocene volcanoes that make-up the Ngorongoro Volcanic Highlands (NVH) complex situated at the southern bifurcation of Gregory Rift, part of the East African Rift system of northern Tanzania. We report here, major and trace element abundances, Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses and 40Ar/ 39Ar laser incremental-heating and total fusion ages on lava and tephra sampled from stratigraphic sections exposed within the Ngorongoro Caldera. Major and trace elements measured on samples collected from the Ngorongoro Caldera wall indicate a stratified magma chamber whose silicic top and basaltic bottom was inverted by sequential eruptions. Samples from the lower part of the exposed Ngorongoro Caldera wall are high in silica, alkalis and HFSE (High Field Strength Elements). The Zr, Nb and Hf concentrations are highly correlated with each other and decrease up-section, indicative of the extent of magma evolution. Modeling of major, trace as well as Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data suggests that assimilation fractional crystallization processes were essential in producing the observed geochemical variations. The Sr and Nd isotope ratios from the Ngorongoro samples are widely dispersed ( 87Sr/ 86Sr = 0.70405 to 0.70801, 143Nd/ 144Nd = 0.512205 to 0.512623) and Pb isotope ratios are consistent with previous studies: 206Pb/ 204Pb = 18.73 to 19.37, 207Pb/ 204Pb = 15.64 to 15.69, 208Pb/ 204Pb = 39.52 to 39.55. Although Sr isotopic ratios are similar to Oceanic Island Basalt (OIB), the more radiogenic samples ( 87Sr/ 86Sr > 0.705) from the lower part of the section suggest crust-magma interaction; this is supported by Ce/Pb ratios (Ngorongoro Caldera wall section yield 40Ar/ 39Ar ages of 2.25 ± 0.02 Ma to 2.01 ± 0.02 Ma, constraining a duration of volcanism of the order of ~ 240 kyr. These ages suggest correlation of a normal to reverse geomagnetic polarity transition measured in the Ngorongoro Caldera wall section with the ~ 2

  9. Petrological and Geochemical characterization of central Chihuahua basalts: a possible local sign of rifting activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Garcia-Rascon, M.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.; Morton-Bermea, O.

    2012-12-01

    The central part of the mexican state, Chihuahua, is the oriental border of the Sierra Madre Occidental (silicic large igneous province), which consist of series of ignimbrites divided into two volcanic groups of andesites and rhyolites. In the central region of Chihuahua, the volcanic rocks are now part of the Basin and Range, allowing the presence of mafic rocks in the lower areas. The study area is located approximately 200 km to the NW of Chihuahua city near to La Guajolota town, in the Namiquipa County. There are at least 5 outcrops of basalts to the west of the road, named Puerto de Lopez, Malpaises, El Tascate, Quebrada Honda, and Carrizalio, respectively. These outcrops have only been previously described by the Mexican Geologic Survey (SGM) as thin basaltic flows, with vesicles filled with quartz, and phenocrystals of labradorite, andesine, oligoclase and olivine. Petrologically, the basalts present different textures, from small phenocrysts of plagioclase in a very fine matrix to large, zoned and sometimes broken phenocrysts of plagioclase in a coarser matrix. All samples have olivine in an advanced state of alteration, iddingsite. The geochemical analyses report that these basaltic flows contain characteristics of rift basalts. The rocks have a normative olivine values from 5.78 to 27.26 and nepheline values from 0 to 2.34. In the TAS diagram the samples straddle the join between basalt and trachy-basalt, reflecting a high K2O content. The Mg# average is 0.297, a value that suggests that the basalts do not come from a primitive magma. The basalts have high values of Ba (945-1334 ppm), Cu (54-147 ppm), and Zn (123-615 ppm). The contents of Rb (23-57 ppm), Sr (659-810 ppm), Y (26-33 ppm), Zr (148-217 ppm) and Cr (79-98 ppm) are characteristics of rift basalts. Using discrimination diagrams, the basalts plot in the field of within plate, supporting the rifting origin. Outcrops of other basalts, at about 80 to 100 km to the east of the study area, Lomas El

  10. Statistical Analysis Of Reconnaissance Geochemical Data From ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Co, Mo, Hg, Sb, Tl, Sc, Cr, Ni, La, W, V, U, Th, Bi, Sr and Ga in 56 stream sediment samples collected from Orle drainage system were subjected to univariate and multivariate statistical analyses. The univariate methods used include ...

  11. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network

  12. Isotope-geochemical methods for investigating ores and enclosing rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezovskij, F.I.; Gnatenko, O.V.; Zhukov, F.I.

    1985-01-01

    Isotope-geochemical methods for investigating ores and enclosing rocks as applied to uranium deposits are considered. Attention is paid to precision mass-spectrometric isotope analysis mass-spectrometric isotope analysis of light elements and to sample preparation for the analysis. Interpretation of the results of sulfur, carbon, oxygen and lead isotope investigations in uranium deposits of different genetic types allows to find definite regularities in isotope variations depending on phisico-chemical ore forming conditions. It is shown that the combination of isotope-geochemical investigations permits to make a reliable conclusion on the source of ore substance means of its transportation and deposition in the process of metamorphism

  13. Geochemical characterization of oceanic basalts using artificial neural network

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.; Iyer, S.D.

    discrete geochemical traits of the OFB by using certain characteristic elemental concentration of these basalts. In order to classify the OFB we considered one major oxide (K 2 O),seventrace(Sc,Rb,Sr,Y,Zr,Nband Ba,),sixrareearthelements(REE)(La...,Ce,Nd,Sm,Eu, and Yb) and seven elemental ratios (Zr/Nb, Y/Nb, Ba/ Nb, Zr/Y, Sm/Nd, La/Yb and Ce/Y). A reason for utilizing the above mentioned elements and their ratios is because these carry the geochemical signatures of the individual OFB type i.e., N-MORB, E...

  14. Geochemical variability of copper and iron in Oman margin sediments

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Alagarsamy, R.

    .D.Thesis, University of Liverpool, 1984. [19] R.E. Sturgeon, C.L. Chakrabarti, Recent advances in electrothermal atomisation in a graphite furnace atomic adsorption spectrophotometer, Progr. Anal. Atom. Spectroscopy 1 (1978) 5-9. [20] C.R. Smith, L.A. Levin, D... in immature sediments along the continental margins of Peru and Oman. Part I: Results of petrographical and bulk geochemical data, Org. Geochem. 24 (1996) 437-451. [36] R. Raiswell, D.E. Canfield, Sources of iron for pyrite formation in marine sediments...

  15. Using multifractal modeling as a standard tool in geochemical exploration for predicting mineralized areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Mario A.

    2015-04-01

    It has been 20 years since the pioneering work of Cheng et al (1994) first proposed a quantitative relationship for the areas enclosing concentration values of an element above given thresholds and their distribution in the field, known as concentration-area (CA) method, which is based in multifractal theory. The method allows the definition of geochemical anomalies in wide set of geological backgrounds but it took nearly 15 years before it became a widely used methodology for mineral exploration. The method was also extended to 1D and 3D data sets. It is worth noting the variety of methods that spanned from the theory of fractals. Building on previous models, including multiplicative cascades and size-grade relationships, increasing evidence points to the powerful tools of fractal theory to describe and model ore deposit distribution and formation. However, while much of these approaches become complex and not easy to use, the CA method is remarkable for its utter simplicity and disarming results obtained when confronted with the geological reality in the field. This is most valued by companies and professionals undertaking geochemical exploration surveys for the characterization or refining of potential ore targets or known mineralized areas. Several approaches have combined the CA method with geostatistic modeling and simulation and other established statistical techniques in order to enhance anomalous threshold identification. Examples are not restricted to geochemical exploration alone, other applications being studies on environmental change. Some of these examples will be addressed as they have been applied to different regions in the world, but particular emphasis will be put on geochemical exploration surveys in different geotectonic units of the Variscan basement in the Iberian Peninsula. These include quartz-vein gold mineralization in Northern Portugal and several surveys for base metals over two wide areas, which served to re-evaluate much of the

  16. Hydro-geochemical appraisal of groundwater quality from weathered basement aquifers in Northern Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanda, Elijah; Monjerezi, Maurice; Mwatseteza, Jonas F.; Kazembe, Lawrence N.

    The obligation to ensure adequate potable water supply to everyone, has necessitated the development of groundwater resources for reliable rural water supply in most developing countries. An understanding of spatial variation and processes affecting water quality is essential in sustaining usable water supplies under changing climate and local environmental pressures. In this study, an assessment of quality and dominant hydro-geochemical processes affecting the quality of groundwater from weathered basement aquifers in Mzimba district, Northern Malawi, has been conducted. Groundwater samples were collected from 172 hand-pumped boreholes, drilled for domestic rural water supply and analysed for major and minor ions, pH and total dissolved solids (TDS). In general, groundwater is of low mineralisation (TDS range: 29-1896 mg L -1 for the dry season), with hydro-geochemical facies dominated by Ca-HCO 3, which evolves to Ca-Cl water type. Multivariate statistical analysis (HCA and PCA) and geochemical interpretation showed that the Ca-HCO 3 groundwater type result from hydrolysis of silicate minerals, which causes the solution to reach equilibrium with kaolinite. The processes of cation exchange of Na + and K + in the groundwater for Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ on clay minerals, carbonate precipitation and evaporation, are shown to modify the chemical composition from Ca-HCO 3 types to Ca-Cl types. Groundwater is generally of good quality in both rainy and dry seasons, with little seasonal changes. The United States Salinity Laboratory Staff and Wilcox diagrams showed that most samples were also suitable for irrigation except for 4% (eight samples) of the groundwater samples (with EC > 2000 μS cm -1). These are located in alluviums and colluviums localised near river banks and in inter hill valleys.

  17. Biodiversity of benthic microbial communities in bioturbated coastal sediments is controlled by geochemical microniches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertics, Victoria J; Ziebis, Wiebke

    2009-11-01

    We used a combination of field and laboratory approaches to address how the bioturbation activity of two crustaceans, the ghost shrimp Neotrypaea californiensis and the fiddler crab Uca crenulata, affects the microbial diversity in the seabed of a coastal lagoon (Catalina Harbor, Santa Catalina Island, CA, USA). Detailed geochemical analyses, including oxygen microsensor measurements, were performed to characterize environmental parameters. We used a whole-assemblage fingerprinting approach (ARISA: amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis) to compare bacterial diversity along geochemical gradients and in relation to subsurface microniches. The two crustaceans have different burrowing behaviors. The ghost shrimp maintains complex, deep-reaching burrows and permanently lives subterranean, supplying its burrow with oxygen-rich water. In contrast, the fiddler crab constructs simpler, J-shaped burrows, which it does not inhabit permanently and does not actively ventilate. Our goal was to address how varying environmental parameters affect benthic microbial communities. An important question in benthic microbial ecology has been whether burrows support similar or unique communities compared with the sediment surface. Our results showed that sediment surface microbial communities are distinct from subsurface assemblages and that different burrow types support diverse bacterial taxa. Statistical comparisons by canonical correspondence analysis indicated that the availability of oxidants (oxygen, nitrate, ferric iron) play a key role in determining the presence and abundance of different taxa. When geochemical parameters were alike, microbial communities associated with burrows showed significant similarity to sediment surface communities. Our study provides implications on the community structure of microbial communities in marine sediments and the factors controlling their distribution.

  18. Gamma Spectrometric Determination of U, Th, K and Some Geochemical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodona, A.; Tashko, A.

    2001-01-01

    The application of 'in situ' gamma-spectrometric method (''infinite'' environment), made possible the simultanious determination of U, Th and K. 4 channel gamma-spectrometric analyser with NaI(TI) scintilation counter crystal detector (103 cm 3 φ=50x50mm) was used to determin U, Th(more than 1-2 ppm) and K (more than 1%) in laboratory conditions. The detector was inserted into a lead camera and calibrated for measurement geometry with vessel of ''Marineli'' type of a 17o cm 3 volume. The study of main factors, which influence in the gamma spectrometric measurements, (the technical, physical, geometrical and time parameters) has been carried out. International standards of U, Th, K and internal monitoring standard samples are used for the calibration. External analytical control has been realized by other radiometric and chemical methods. The detection limits ( 1 ppm Th, 2ppm U and 1% K) and the relative errors (17-20% for 1-10 ppm U, Th and 10-15% for more than 10 ppm U, Th and more than 1% K) guarantee a quantitative analysis that may be used successfully in the geochemical studies. Some geochemical applications, based on the content of Th, U and Th/U ratio in rocks samples that we have we have analyzed with this method, are shown in this paper. U, Th and their ratio are used as trace elements to indicate the differences between the acidic magmatic rocks of Albania (Th/U ratio=2-6 and>10). The bimodal character of Th/U scattering in ignimbrides and monzonites (Korabi zone) shows that in addition to the ''normal'' rocks, there are also some ones enriched with Th, So, the differential analysis of Th, U, and K may be used as geochemical exploration criteria for the radioactive and non-radioactive mineralization, such as REE (Rare Earth Elements), phospghorites, bauxites, placers etc. (authors)

  19. Evaluation and prediction of oil biodegradation: a novel approach integrating geochemical and basin modeling techniques in offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudino, Roger [YPF S.A. (Argentina); Santos, Glauce Figueiredo dos; Losilla, Carlos; Cabrera, Ricardo; Loncarich, Ariel; Gavarrino, Alejandro [RepsolYPF do Brasil, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Oil fields accounting for a large portion of the world reserves are severely affected by biological degradation. In Brazil, giant fields of the Campos Basin are producing biodegraded oils with widely variable fluid characteristics (10 to 40 deg API) and no apparent logical distribution nor predictability. Modern geochemical techniques allow defining the level of biodegradation. When original (non-degraded) oil samples and other with varying degradation level are available it might be possible to define a distribution trend and to relate it to present day geological factors such as temperature and reservoir geometry. However, other critical factors must be taken into account. But most of all, it is fundamental to have a vision in time of their evolution. This can only be achieved through 3D Basin Models coupled with modern visualization tools. The multi-disciplinary work-flow described here integrates three-dimensional numerical simulations with modern geochemical analyses. (author)

  20. Study of the coupling of geochemical models based on thermodynamic equilibrium with models of component transfer as solutions in porous media or fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coudrain-Ribstein, A.

    1985-01-01

    This study is a contribution of analyses possibilities of modelling the transfer of components in the underground taking into account complexes geochemical phenomena. In the first part, the aim and the methodology of existing codes are presented. The transfer codes describe with a great precision the physical phenomena of transport but they are based on a very simple conceptualisation of the geochemical phenomena of retention by the rock. The geochemical models are interested by a stable unity of volume. They allow to compute the equilibrium distribution of the components between the chemical species of the solution, and the solid and gaseous phases. They use important thermodynamic data bases corresponding to each possible reaction. To sum up the situation about the geochemical codes in Europe and United States, a list of about thirty codes describe their method and potentialities. The mathematical analysis of the different methods used in both types of codes is presented. Then, the principles of a modelisation associating the potentialities of the transport codes and the geochemical codes are discussed. It is not possible to think of a simple coupling. A general code must be established on the bases of the existing codes but also on new concepts and under new constraints. In such studies one must always deal with the problem of the reactions kinetics. When the velocity of the reactions is big enough versus the velocity of transport processes, the assumption of local geochemical equilibrium can be retained. A general code would be very cumbersome, expensive and difficult to use. The results would be difficult to analyse and exploit. On the other hand, for each case study, a detailed analysis can point out many computing simplifications without simplifying the concepts [fr

  1. The identification of provenance-controlled facies by geochemical methods on a portion of the Vaal Reef, Klerksdorp Goldfield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henckel, J.; Schweitzer, J.K.; Horsch, H.

    1990-01-01

    The use of geochemical methods for identifying provenance controlled facies in Witwatersrand reefs is considered. Three methods - whole rock geochemistry, zircon analysis, and chromite analysis - have been evaluated in order to establish the feasibility of using these geochemical techniques. An area of Vaal Reef where two sedimentological facies with distinct gold distributions had previously been identified was investigated. The studies reported here gave evidence of differences in the source areas for these two facies. Accordingly, it is concluded that the application of geochemistry to identify provenance-controlled facies is a useful technique which can help geologists arrive at a better interpretation of depositional systems within Witwatersrand reefs and thereby assist in the understanding of gold distribution patterns. 26 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Geothermal investigations with isotope and geochemical techniques in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    The IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) for Latin America on the Use of Isotope and Geochemical Techniques in Geothermal Exploration started in 1984. The first activity carried out was a Seminar on isotope and geochemical techniques in geothermal exploration, which took place in June 1984 in Morelia, Mexico. During the seminar, which was attended by representatives of the institutions which later took part in the programme, the objectives, main research lines, and geothermal fields to be studied during the CRP were discussed. The first research contracts were awarded towards the end of 1984. The field work started in 1985 and continued through 1990. During the implementation of the CRP a considerable number of geothermal fields were studied in the nine participating countries. The investigations carried out were geochemically quite comprehensive in most cases, but in some others they were still in a reconnaissance stage when the CRP ended: the latter studies are not reported in these proceedings, but the data obtained are in principle available from the relevant national institutions. While investigations with conventional geochemical techniques had already started in several fields before 1985, isotope methods were applied for the first time in all cases during this CRP. Due to the remoteness and high elevation of many of the fields studied and the adverse meteorological conditions during long periods of the year, the investigations could not proceed rapidly: this is the main reason for the unusually long duration of the CRP, which could be concluded only after more than five years after its inception

  3. Mining inventory of Uruguay. Polanco fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H; Artignan, D; Vairon, P

    1982-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Polanco fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory . In this work were covered 660 km2 obtaining 685 samples for study which were analyzed by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories

  4. Geochemical assessment of light gaseous hydrocarbons in near ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Light hydrocarbons in soil have been used as direct indicators in geochemical hydrocarbon exploration, which remains an unconventional path in the petroleum industry. The occurrence of adsorbed soil ... Kalpana1 D J Patil1 A M Dayal1. National Geophysical Research Institute, Uppal Road, Hyderabad 500606, India.

  5. Statistical Evaluation of Geochemical Au Sample Quality | Affam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ANOVA and the t–Tests revealed no significant analytical error. However, the other tests indicated multimodality of the populations as well as batch effect which culminates into significant procedural error. The investigation concludes that these systematic procedural errors if unchecked could mask true geochemical ...

  6. geochemical characterization the waters of foggaras the continental

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. Benaricha, A. Khaldi, A. Elouissi, S. Mouassa, M. Zaagane

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0. International License. Libraries Resource Directory. We are listed under Research Associations category. GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION THE WATERS OF FOGGARAS THE.

  7. Numerical modeling of geochemical variations caused by crustal relamination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Katharina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370618947; Castro, Antonio; Gerya, Taras

    2013-01-01

    Geochemical consequences of composite diapirs formed in subduction zones have been studied using a thermomechanical numerical model of an ocean-continent subduction zone. This model includes dehydration of subducted crust, aqueous fluid transport, partial melting, and melt emplacement. Subduction of

  8. Geochemical trends in the weathered profiles above granite gneiss ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical trends in the weathered profiles above granite gneiss and schist of Abeokuta area, southwestern Nigeria. Anthony T Bolarinwa, Anthony A Elueze. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology 2005, Vol. 41(1): 19-31. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  9. Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies of phosphorite nodules in the Dange Formation Sokoto Basin, Northwestern Niveria. OA Adekeye, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Mining and Geology Vol.40(2) 2004: 101-106. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  10. Comparison of thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratillake, M.R.; Newton, G.W.A.; Robinson, V.J.

    1988-05-01

    Four thermodynamic databases used by European groups for geochemical modelling have been compared. Thermodynamic data for both aqueous species and solid species have been listed. When the values are directly comparable any differences between them have been highlighted at two levels of significance. (author)

  11. Geochemical behaviour of vanadium in iron—titanium oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuiling, R.D.; Feenstra, A.

    The following geochemical rules-of-thumb seem to hold for vanadium: 1. (1) Magnetites as a group have higher V contents than either hematites or ilmenites. 2. (2) In magnetite—hematite pairs, however, the hematite has the higher V content. 3. (3) In magnetite—ilmenite pairs, the magnetite

  12. Geochemical reactivity of rocks of the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chuman, T.; Gürtlerová, P.; Hruška, Jakub; Adamová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2014), s. 341-349 ISSN 1744-5647 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : geochemical reactivity * Czech Republic * susceptibility to weathering Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.193, year: 2014

  13. Geological and geochemical variations in Mid-Tertiary Ethiopian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mekelle University. Geological and geochemical variations in Mid-Tertiary Ethiopian Flood Basalt. Province, Maychew, Tigray Region, Ethiopia. Kurkura Kabeto*. Department of Earth Science, College of Natural and Computational Sciences, P.O. Box 231,. Mekelle University, Ethiopia (*kurkura57@yahoo.com). ABSTRACT.

  14. Uruguay Mining inventory. Las Animas fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Spangenberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Las Animas fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory. In this work were covered 660 km2 obtaining 738 samples for study which were analyzed by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories.

  15. Geochemical and hydrodynamic phosphorus retention mechanisms in lowland catchments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Grift, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/373433484

    2017-01-01

    The release of phosphorus (P) to surface water from heavily fertilised agricultural fields is of major importance for surface water quality. The research reported in this thesis examined the role of geochemical and hydrodynamic processes controlling P speciation and transport in lowland catchments

  16. Uruguay Mining inventory. Florida fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Artignan, D.; Vairon, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Florida fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory. In this work were covered 660 km2 obtaining 752 samples for study which were analyzed by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories

  17. Geochemical features of rare metal pegmatites in Nassarawa area ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical features of rare metal pegmatites in Nassarawa area, central Nigeria. JID Adekeye, OF Akintola. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology Vol. 43 (1) 2007: pp. 15-21. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  18. Geochemical and petrogenetic trends of syenite and charnockitic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical and petrogenetic trends of syenite and charnockitic rock of Ike Iho and Osuntedo areas, soutweastern Nigeria. AA Elueze, OO Kehinde-Phillips, OA Okunlola. Abstract. No Abstract. Journal of Mining and Geology Vol. 44 (1) 2008: pp. 21-36. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  19. Uruguay Mining inventory. Minas fotoplano geochemical prospecting results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeegers, H.; Artignan, D.; Vairon, P.

    1982-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out in Minas fotoplano within the framework of Uruguay Mining inventory. In this work were covered 380 km2 obtaining with 433 samples for study which were analized by Plasma Emission Spectrometry in Orleans BRGM laboratories

  20. The geochemical behavior of protactinium 231 and its chosen geochemical analogue thorium in the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg-Wickman, M.

    1983-03-01

    To be able to judge whether protactinium 231 might represent a major contribution to the human radiation risk from high level radioactive waste a literature study of the geochemical behavior of protactinium has been made. The interest in protactinium determinations has, as far, been in the field of marine geochemistry and geochronology. These investigations show that thorium may be used as a chemical analogue. The content of protactinium 231 is determined by the 235 U content and consequently the occurrence of protactinium in nature is directly associated to the geochemistry of uranium. The pronounced hydrolytic tendency of protactinium and its great sorption and coprecipitation capacity ought to prevent or at least appreciably delay its transport from a back-filled nuclear waste vault to the uppermost surface of the earth. It also has a tendency to form colloids or particulates which may be strongly fixed on a rock surface. In adsorption and desorption processes kinetics must play an important role. Our knowledge in this field is quite limited. Under the physico-chemical conditions in the sea, protactinium is rapidly scavenged from the water column by particulates. It accumulates in the sediments. (author)

  1. Geochemical simulation of fluid rock interactions to predict flowback water compostions during hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Michael; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Black shales are a heterogeneous mixture of minerals, organic matter and formation water and little is actually known about the fluid-rock interactions during hydraulic fracturing and their effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Geochemical simulations have been performed based on the analyses of "real" flowback water samples and artificial stimulation fluids from lab experiments with the aim to set up a chemical process model for shale gas reservoirs. Prediction of flowback water compositions for potential or already chosen sites requires validated and parameterized geochemical models. For the software "Geochemist's Workbench" (GWB) data bases are adapted and amended based on a literature review. Evaluation of the system has been performed in comparison with the results from laboratory experiments. Parameterization was done in regard to field data provided. Finally, reaction path models are applied for quantitative information about the mobility of compounds in specific settings. Our work leads to quantitative estimates of reservoir compounds in the flowback based on calibrations by laboratory experiments. Such information is crucial for the assessment of environmental impacts as well as to estimate human- and ecotoxicological effects of the flowback waters from a variety of natural gas shales. With a comprehensive knowledge about potential composition and mobility of flowback water, selection of water treatment techniques will become easier.

  2. LA-ICP-MS trace element mapping and its application to geochemical transport in garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Tom; Wade, Ben; Payne, Justin; Hand, Martin; Clark, Chris; Anczkiewicz, Robert; Reid, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Existing instrumentation used to interrogate trace element distributions in geological samples includes EPMA, TEM, SEM, SIMS and synchrotron XRF/XRD analysis. Each technique has its inherent strengths and limitations, whether they relate to detection limits, analytical volumes, sample preparation, and/or instrumentation cost and accessibility. Traditionally, LA-ICP-MS has been used to quantify trace element (wt%-ppb) content in a wide variety of materials via spot analysis. However, its utility as an imaging tool has recently emerged to allow 2D mapping with excellent detection limits (ppb) over a wide isotopic range (7Li to 238U), with minimal sample preparation required. This is achieved by rastering of the focused laser beam in linear transects, which are then stitched together by post-acquisition processing to form a quantified or semi-quantified image of the trace element distribution. Large suites of isotopes are able to be collected simultaneously, allowing access to substantially increased geochemical information from analysed samples. We demonstrate the use of the LA-ICP-MS imaging technique to reveal complex trace element zonation patterns in a variety of garnets affected by fluid-rock interaction, including those from metasomatised mid-crustal shear zones and a calcsilicate skarn deposit. Such detailed geochemical records shed light on trace element behaviour during metasomatic processes, including their impact on Sm-Nd and Lu-Hf garnet geochronology. Ultimately, this allows for the construction of coupled P -T -t-fluid histories from individual samples.

  3. The role of geochemical prospecting in phased uranium exploration. A case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.Y.; Armour-Brown, A.; Olsen, H.; Lundberg, B.; Niesen, P.L.

    1976-01-01

    The commencement of a UNDP/IAEA uranium exploration project in Northern Greece in 1971 offered the opportunity to test and apply an exploration strategy based on a phased use of geochemical exploration methods. The paper reviews the exploration task, the strategy selected, and some results obtained. The project area (22000 km 2 ) was explored by car-borne survey, covering 15000 km of road and track. Concurrently, a stream sediment geochemical survey was begun which aimed at a nominal sample density of one sample per square kilometre. Samples were analysed for copper, lead, zinc, silver, cobalt, nickel, molybdenum, mercury and manganese, in addition to uranium. At each site, a general reading of radioactivity was made, and treated like another element analysis. The reconnaissance programme succeeded in delineating a number of important target areas, varying in size from a few to several hundred square kilometres with significant uranium potential. Follow-up and detailed surveys have been carried out over a number of these, including a sedimentary basin of continental deposits which have been found to contain occurrences of secondary uranium minerals, and two areas in which granitic bodies have been found to have fracture systems and secondary uranium mineralization of economic interest. In no case has sufficient work been yet done to prove economic deposits of uranium. The phased strategy used has, however, already been demonstrated to be effective in the environment of northern Greece. (author)

  4. Geochemical Anomalies in the Sediments of Lake Druksiai

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinas, A.

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the impact of Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on natural processes in Lake Druksiai and accumulation of pollutants, in 19931997, carrying on the state scientific program, the Marine Geochemistry Division of the Institute of Geography performed lithological geochemical mapping of lake bottom sediments on a scale of 1 .50 000. The results obtained enabled to distinguish zones of higher anthropogenous geochemical load, where geochemical anomalies of pollutants, including oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals, had been taken into account. Applying concentration coefficients for oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and their natural background, the attempt was made to differentiate natural and technogenous components in the geochemical anomalies As expected, the finer sediments -aleurite-pelite mud - showed amounts of oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals being 12.1 times higher than in fine sand - the most coarse of the sediments studied Sediments with organic mater exceeding 20% contained 11.7 times more pollutants than those with organic matter below 1 .5%. Calculations of concentration coefficients (CC) showed no elements in no stations exceeded 10 - the sediments did not reach the category of high pollution However, in many sites, the coefficients exceeded values of 1-2, thus, showing sediments attributable to the categories of weakly polluted or just polluted. Mapping model done by GIS methods (by superimposing schemes of pollutant CCs distribution in the lake and summing them) for geochemical anomalies two derivative map-schemes were obtained for oil hydrocarbons and heavy metals. They showed that clean sediments cover just 24.75% (according to the pollutant background for soil types) and 12.35% (according to the organic matter background for its amount intervals) lake bottom area. Zones slightly polluted by an element at least cover 69.7 and 80.29% of lake area, correspondingly; whereas zones slightly polluted by all

  5. A hydro-geochemical study of Nahr-Ibrahim catchment area: Fluvial metal transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korfali, Samira

    2004-01-01

    Author.Metals enter water bodies geological weathering, soil erosion, industrial and domestic waste discharges, as well as atmospheric deposition. The metal content in sediments is a reflection of the nature of their background whether of geologic and/or anthropogenic origin. The depositional process of metals in sediment are controlled by river discharge, turbulence of river, morphology and river geometry, as well as the geochemical phases of sediment and soils. Thus a study of metal content in river and /or metal transport with a water body should include a hydrological study of the river, types of minerals in sediment and soil, sediment and soil textures, and metal speciation in the different geochemical phases of sediment, bank and soils. A contaminated flood plain is a temporary storage system for pollutants and an understanding of soil-sediment-interactions is important prerequisite for modeling fluvial pollutant transport. The determination of metal speciation in sediment and soil chemical fraction can provide information on the way in which these metals are bound to sediment and soil, their mobilization potential, bioavailability and possible mechanism of fluvial pollutant transport. Sequential extraction techniques yielding operationally defined chemical pools have been used by many workers to examine the partitioning of metals among the various geochemical phases of sediment or soil. The sequential extraction method specifies metals in sediment fractions as: exchangeable, specifically sorbed, easily reducible, moderately reducible, organic, residual. Previously, I have conducted a study on speciation of metals (Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd) in the dry season bed-load sediments only at five sites 13 km stretch upstream from the mouth of Nahr Ibrahim. The reported data revealed that the specifically sorbed sediment fraction was the prime fraction for deposition of Mn, Z, CU, Pb and Cd metals in sediments. X-ray diffraction analysis of bed sediments showed

  6. Geochemical characteristics of an urban river: Geochemical contamination and urban stream syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAvoy, S. E.; Connor, N.; Sarraino, S.; Frantz, D.; Bushaw-Newton, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. is among the 10 most contaminated rivers in the USA, containing sewage, metals, PAHs, and PCBs. The biogeochemical characteristics of urban rivers, including the Anacostia, remain largely unstudied. Here we examine the base-flow geochemistry of the tidal freshwater Anacostia over a two-year period (April 2010- April 2012), concentrating on water chemistry (pH, hardness, SAR, alkalinity, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe, Mn, Zn, Al, Ba, Ni, P, S, Sr, NO3, NH4, PO4) at 3 locations in the stream. Mean NO3was generally between 1.1 and 1.3 mg/L, although occasionally concentrations increased to 3-4 mg/L at all sites. NH4 was very low generally (0.0 to 0.3 mg/L) with occasional peaks of 1.5-3.9 mg/L downstream. A Principle Components Analysis of stream chemistry showed that the upstream site had two components that explained 34.2 and 29.2% of the data variance; PC1 was most strongly negatively correlated with Ca (-.896), Mg (-.585) and hardness (-.823), and was positively correlated with Ba (which is sometimes associated with disturbance), B, NO3, P, PO4, Sr and Al. PC2 was strongly correlated with Mg, K, S, Ni and NH4. Na was positively and significantly correlated with both components, but more so with PC1. At the middle and downstream sites, two components explained 41 to 44% (PC1) and 22 to 28% (PC2) of the data set variance respectively. The components were essentially the same as the upstream site, with the dominance switched. PC1 was positively and highly correlated with ions associated with bedrock components (Ca, Mg, K, Na, and pH but also S and NH4). PC2 was not positively correlated with any of the dominant geochemical variables, but was negatively correlated with Ca and K and positively correlated with NO3, Ba and Mn. The principle components analysis suggests that there is a strong geochemical component and weaker anion/nitrate component contributing to the ion distribution, and their relative dominance changes moving downstream

  7. Investigation of the Geochemical Preservation of ca. 3.0 Ga Permineralized and Encapsulated Microfossils by Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Frédéric; Robert, François; Sugitani, Kenichiro; Tartèse, Romain; Duhamel, Rémi; Derenne, Sylvie

    2017-12-01

    Observations of Archean organic-walled microfossils suggest that their fossilization took place through both encapsulation and permineralization. In this study, we investigated microfossils from the ca. 3.0 Ga Farrel Quartzite (Pilbara, Western Australia) using transmitted light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microspectrometry, and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) ion microprobe analyses. In contrast to previous studies, we demonstrated that permineralized microfossils were not characterized by the micrometric spatial relationships between Si and C-N as observed in thin sections. Permineralized microfossils are composed of carbonaceous globules that did not survive the acid treatment, whereas encapsulated microfossils were characterized due to their resistance to the acid maceration procedure. We also investigated the microscale relationship between the 12 C 14 N - and 12 C 2 - ion emission as a proxy of the N/C atomic ratio in both permineralized and encapsulated microfossils. After considering any potential matrix and microtopography effects, we demonstrate that the encapsulated microfossils exhibit the highest level of geochemical preservation. This finding shows that the chemical heterogeneity of the microfossils, observed at a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of micrometers, can be related to fossilization processes. Key Words: Carbonaceous matter-Farrel Quartzite-Fossilization-NanoSIMS-Nitrogen-Permineralization. Astrobiology 17, 1192-1202.

  8. A geochemical record of the link between chemical weathering and the East Asian summer monsoon during the late Holocene preserved in lacustrine sediments from Poyang Lake, central China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Wei, Gangjian; Li, Wuxian; Liu, Ying

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents relatively high-resolution geochemical records spanning the past 4000 cal yr BP obtained from the lacustrine sediments of Poyang Lake in central China. The variations in the intensity of the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) are traced using the K/Na, Ti/Na, Al/K, kaolinite/illite and clay/feldspar ratios, together with the chemical index of alteration (CIA), as indicators of chemical weathering. During the last 4000 years, the proxy records of chemical weathering from Poyang Lake exhibit an overall enhanced trend, consistent with regional hydrological changes in previous independent records. Further comparisons and analyses demonstrate that regional moisture variations in central China is inversely correlated with the EASM intensity, with weak EASM generating high precipitation in central China. Our data reveal three intervals of dramatically dry climatic conditions (i.e., ca. 4000-3200 cal yr BP, ca. 2800-2400 cal yr BP, and ca. 500-200 cal yr BP). A period of weak chemical weathering, related to cold and dry climatic conditions, occurred during the Little Ice Age (LIA), whereas more intense chemical weathering, reflecting warm and humid climatic conditions, was recorded during the Medieval Warm Period (MWP). Besides, an intensification of chemical weathering in Poyang Lake during the late Holocene agrees well with strong ENSO activity, suggesting that moisture variations in central China may be predominantly driven by ENSO variability.

  9. Investigation of the Geochemical Preservation of ca. 3.0 Ga Permineralized and Encapsulated Microfossils by Nanoscale Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Frédéric; Robert, François; Sugitani, Kenichiro; Tartèse, Romain; Duhamel, Rémi; Derenne, Sylvie

    2017-12-01

    Observations of Archean organic-walled microfossils suggest that their fossilization took place through both encapsulation and permineralization. In this study, we investigated microfossils from the ca. 3.0 Ga Farrel Quartzite (Pilbara, Western Australia) using transmitted light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman microspectrometry, and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) ion microprobe analyses. In contrast to previous studies, we demonstrated that permineralized microfossils were not characterized by the micrometric spatial relationships between Si and C-N as observed in thin sections. Permineralized microfossils are composed of carbonaceous globules that did not survive the acid treatment, whereas encapsulated microfossils were characterized due to their resistance to the acid maceration procedure. We also investigated the microscale relationship between the 12C14N- and 12C2- ion emission as a proxy of the N/C atomic ratio in both permineralized and encapsulated microfossils. After considering any potential matrix and microtopography effects, we demonstrate that the encapsulated microfossils exhibit the highest level of geochemical preservation. This finding shows that the chemical heterogeneity of the microfossils, observed at a spatial resolution of a few hundreds of micrometers, can be related to fossilization processes.

  10. Interaction between shallow and deep aquifers in the Tivoli Plain (Central Italy) enhanced by groundwater extraction: A multi-isotope approach and geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carucci, Valentina; Petitta, Marco; Aravena, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    In the Tivoli Plain (Rome, Central Italy) the interaction between shallow and deep groundwater flow systems enhanced by groundwater extraction has been investigated using isotopic and chemical tracers. A conceptual model of the groundwater flowpaths has been developed and verified by geochemical modeling. A combined hydrogeochemical and isotopic investigation using ion relationships such as DIC/Cl − , Ca/(Ca + Mg)/SO 4 /(SO 4 + HCO 3 ), and environmental isotopes (δ 18 O, δ 2 H, 87 Sr/ 86 Sr, δ 34 S and δ 13 C) was carried out in order to determine the sources of recharge of the aquifer, the origin of solutes and the mixing processes in groundwater of Tivoli Plain. Multivariate statistical methods such as principal component analysis and Cluster analyses have confirmed the existence of different geochemical facies and the role of mixing in the chemical composition of the groundwater. Results indicate that the hydrochemistry of groundwater is characterized by mixing between end-members coming directly from carbonate recharge areas and to groundwater circulating in a deeply buried Meso-Cenozoic carbonate sequence. The travertine aquifer is fed by both flow systems, but a local contribution by direct input in the Plain has also been recognized. The stable isotope data ( 18 O, 2 H, 13 C and 34 S) supports the flow system conceptual model inferred from the geochemical data and represents key data to quantify the geochemical mixing in the different groundwaters of the Plain. The results of numerical modeling (PHREEQC) are consistent with the flowpaths derived from the hydrogeochemical conceptual model. The inverse models performed generated the main geochemical processes occurring in the groundwater flow system, which also included mixing. Geochemical and isotope modeling demonstrate an increasing influence of groundwater from the deeply buried aquifer in the travertine aquifer, enhanced by lowering of the travertine aquifer water table due to quarry pumping.

  11. Geochemical studies, magmatic evolution, microstructures and replacement mechanisms in Jebale-Barez granitoid Complex (East and Southeast Jiroft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Rasouli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Jebale-Barez Plutonic Complex (JBPC is composed of many intrusive bodies and is located in the southeastern province of Kerman on the longitude of the 57◦ 45 ' east to 58◦ 00' and Northern latitudes 28◦ 30' to 29◦ 00'. The petrologic composition is composed of granodiorite, quartzdiorite, granite, alkali-granite, and trace amounts of tonalite with dominant granodiorite composition. Previously, the JBPC was separated into three plutonic phases by Ghorbani (2014. The first plutonic phase is the main body of the complex with composition of quartz-diorite to granodiorite. After differentiation of magma in the magmatic chamber, the porphyritic and not fully consolidated magmas have intruded into the main body. Their compositions were dominantly granodiorite and granite that are defined as the second plutonic phase. Finally, the last phase was started by an intrusion of the holo- leucogranite into the previous bodies. This plutonic activity was pursued by the minor Quaternary basaltic volcanism that shows metamorphic haloes in the contacts. They are dominantly porphyric leucogranites. However, some bodies show dendritic texture that may imply the existence of silicic fluids in the latest crystallization stages. Materials and methods In this article different analysis methods were used. For example, we used a total of two hundred samples of the various granitoids that were selected for common thin section study. Forty four representative samples from the different granitic rocks were selected for whole rock chemical analyses. The analyses of both major and trace elements were performed at the Department of Earth Sciences, the University of Perugia, Italy. The analysis for all major elements was carried out by an X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF using a tube completed with a Rn and W anode under conditions with acceleration voltage of 40-45 kV and electric current ranging from I=30-35 mA. After calcination of powdered

  12. Geochemical Parameters Required from the SKB Site Characterisation Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bath, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    SKB has described its approach to site characterisation in a number of Technical Reports. One of the scientific topics in which specific information requirements and priorities are set out is geochemistry. This report for SKI examines critically whether the geochemical parameters identified in the SKB programme documents will be adequate for safety and regulatory requirements. It also examines some of the details of parameter requirements and interpretation tools that will be necessary to convert site investigation data into knowledge about chemical conditions and groundwater movements. The SKB strategy for geochemical data focuses on a small number of 'suitability indicators', primarily dissolved oxygen, pH and salinity. Their parameter requirements aim to assess those primary characteristics, as well as to acquire a wider range of data that will support those assessments and provide a broader understanding of candidate areas. An initial observation in this review that, though it is a primary suitability indicator, dissolved oxygen apparently will not be measured and instead will be inferred from other redox indicators. This raises a number of issues about sampling and monitoring measures, analytical data reliability and sensitivity, and the degree of confidence in geochemical understanding. A geochemical programme involves reconnaissance by desk study and acquisition of new data at levels of details that are appropriate to the stage of site investigations. As early as possible, a conceptual model of a candidate area should help to define the objectives of geochemical measurements on both rock and groundwater samples. It is recommended that parameters requirements should be defined and considered not only in terms of isolated measurements but more in terms of addressing broader objectives that relate to safety and also to geoscientific understanding. The safety priorities remain (e.g. dissolved oxygen) but will then be supported by an understanding of processes

  13. Geochemical Parameters Required from the SKB Site Characterisation Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bath, Adrian [Intellisci Ltd., Loughborough (United Kingdom)

    2002-01-01

    SKB has described its approach to site characterisation in a number of Technical Reports. One of the scientific topics in which specific information requirements and priorities are set out is geochemistry. This report for SKI examines critically whether the geochemical parameters identified in the SKB programme documents will be adequate for safety and regulatory requirements. It also examines some of the details of parameter requirements and interpretation tools that will be necessary to convert site investigation data into knowledge about chemical conditions and groundwater movements. The SKB strategy for geochemical data focuses on a small number of 'suitability indicators', primarily dissolved oxygen, pH and salinity. Their parameter requirements aim to assess those primary characteristics, as well as to acquire a wider range of data that will support those assessments and provide a broader understanding of candidate areas. An initial observation in this review that, though it is a primary suitability indicator, dissolved oxygen apparently will not be measured and instead will be inferred from other redox indicators. This raises a number of issues about sampling and monitoring measures, analytical data reliability and sensitivity, and the degree of confidence in geochemical understanding. A geochemical programme involves reconnaissance by desk study and acquisition of new data at levels of details that are appropriate to the stage of site investigations. As early as possible, a conceptual model of a candidate area should help to define the objectives of geochemical measurements on both rock and groundwater samples. It is recommended that parameters requirements should be defined and considered not only in terms of isolated measurements but more in terms of addressing broader objectives that relate to safety and also to geoscientific understanding. The safety priorities remain (e.g. dissolved oxygen) but will then be supported by an understanding of

  14. Organic geochemical study of domanik deposits, Tatarstan Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosova, F. F.; Pronin, N. V.

    2010-05-01

    High-bituminous argillo-siliceous carbonate deposits of domanik formation (DF) occurring within pale depressions and down warps in the east of the Russian platform are treated by many investigators as a main source of oil and gas in the Volga-Ural province. In this study a special attention was turned to organic-rich rocks DF witch outcrop in the central part (Uratminskaya area 792, 806 boreholes) and in the west part (Sviyagskaya, 423) of the Tatarstan Republic. The aim of the present paper is to characterize the organic matter: origin, depositional environments, thermal maturity and biodegradation-weathering effects. Nowadays the most informative geochemical parameters are some biomarkers which qualitatively and are quantitatively defined from distributions of n-alkanes and branched alkanes. Biomarkers - it's original fingerprints of biomass of organic matter, that reflect molecular hydrocarbonic structure. The bulk, molecular composition of oil is initially a function of the type and maturity of the source rock from which it has been expelled, while the source rock type reflects both the nature of precursor organisms and the conditions of its deposition. Methodology used in this study included sampling, bitumen extraction, liquid-column chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses. The bitumen was fractionated by column chromatography on silica gel. Non-aromatic or alifatics, aromatics and polar compounds were obtained. Alifatic were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry Percin Elmer. The hydrocarbons present in the sediments of DF and have a carbon numbers ranging from 12 through 38. The samples contain variably inputs from both terrigenous and non-terrigenous (probably marine algal) organic matter as evident in bimodal GC fingerprints of some samples. Pristane and phytane, also, occur in very high concentration in sample extracts. The relatively low Pr/Ph ratios, CPI and OEPbiomarkers distribution of the domanic samples generally

  15. Geologic reconnaissance and geochemical analysis of ferromanganese crusts of the Ratak Chain, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, W.C.; Davis, A.S.; Haggerty, J.A.; Ling, T.H.; Commeau, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey R/V S.P. LEE (cruise L9-84-CP) left Majuro, Ratak chain of the Marshall Islands, on July 28, 1984 and reached Hawaii on August 15, 1984. The main objective of this cruise was to study the distribution and composition of ferromanganese-oxide crusts in the Marshall Islands area (Fig. 1). A total of 5410 km of 12-kHz and 3.5-kHz seismic-reflection data, and 730 km of 80-in3 to 148-in3 airgun seismic-reflection data were collected. A description of these data and the ship-tracklines are presented in Schwab and Bailey (1984). This open-file report describes the types of samples collected and tabulates the results of our preliminary geochemical analyses of the ferromanganese-oxide crusts.

  16. Geochemical evaluation of marginal basins in the south of Bahia state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaglianone, P.C.; Trindade, L.A.F.; Nascimento, M.M. do

    1987-01-01

    Geochemical analyses were performed on more than 700 rock samples and 4 oil samples, from Mucuri, Cumuruxatiba and Jequitinhonha basins, offshore Bahia state, Brazil. The methods employed in this study includes the evaluation of organic carbon contents, Rock-Eval pyrolysis, vitrinite reflectance, carbon isotopes, assessment of oils and extrats by liquid and gas chromatography and gas chromatography - spectrometry. Three main source rock systems have been identified in offshore Bahia: the Mucuri shales from Rio da Serra and Aratu Stages lower Neocomian related to a lacustrine fresh water environment; the Jiquia shales (Upper Neocomian) deposited in a lacustrine saline water environment, and the Alagoas Shales related to an evaporitic environment of Aptian age. (author) [pt

  17. Geological and geochemical data for seamounts and associated ferromanganese crusts in the Ratak Chain, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, W.C.; Hein, J.R.; Davis, A.S.; Morgenson, L.A.; Daniel, C.L.; Haggerty, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    In 1984, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a reconnaissance cruise L9-84-CP aboard the R/V S.P. LEE along the northern Ratak Ridge, Marshall Islands (Fig. 1). Preliminary geochemical results from the cruise show that ferromanganese crusts (Mn crusts) on the submarine slopes of seamounts, and islands may have potential for commercial exploitation (Schwab and others, 1985). In this report we present shipboard data and laboratory analyses for rock samples collected on cruise L9-84-CP. This report should supplement the reports of Schwab and Bailey (1985) and Schwab and others (1985). A total of 5410 km of 12-kHz and 3.5-kHz seismic-reflection data, and q O 730 km of 80-in3 and 148-in3 airgun seismic-reflection data were collected on cruise L9-84-CP (Schwab and Bailey, 1985). Eighteen sample stations were occupied; 13 dredge hauls and 3 box cores were collected (Table 1). These samples are available at the USGS Branch of Pacific Marine Geology offices in Menlo Park, California. Data presented in this report should encourage a more extensive field investigation and serious economic and technical evaluation of Mn crusts within the Marshall Islands area. Ferromanganese-oxide precipitates that encrust hard substrate on the submarine flanks of seamounts, guyots, atolls, islands, and linear volcanic ridges, have been known for several decades (Cronan, 1977; Frazer and Fisk, 1980) but were not studied in a systematic way until the West German MIDPAC expedition of 1981 (Halbach and others, 1982). Unlike abyssal ferromanganese nodules, Mn crusts contain higher concentrations of the economically attractive metals, cobalt and platinum (Toth, 1980; Craig and others, 1982; Halbach and others, 1984; Hein and others, 1985). Mn crusts are predominantly hydrogenous in origin, in contrast to abyssal ferromanganese nodules which also have a substantial diagenetic input (Halbach and others, 1981). In order for a Mn crust deposit to be economically attractive, it must be of high

  18. Rates of induced abortion in Denmark according to age, previous births and previous abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise H. Hansen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whereas the effects of various socio-demographic determinants on a woman's risk of having an abortion are relatively well-documented, less attention has been given to the effect of previous abortions and births. Objective: To study the effect of previous abortions and births on Danish women's risk of an abortion, in addition to a number of demographic and personal characteristics. Data and methods: From the Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset we obtained data on the number of live births and induced abortions by year (1981-2001, age (16-39, county of residence and marital status. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of the explanatory variables on the probability of having an abortion in a relevant year. Main findings and conclusion: A woman's risk of having an abortion increases with the number of previous births and previous abortions. Some interactions were was found in the way a woman's risk of abortion varies with calendar year, age and parity. The risk of an abortion for women with no children decreases while the risk of an abortion for women with children increases over time. Furthermore, the risk of an abortion decreases with age, but relatively more so for women with children compared to childless women. Trends for teenagers are discussed in a separate section.

  19. Gemas: Geochemical mapping of the agricultural and grasing land soils of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Clemens; Fabian, Karl; Birke, Manfred; Demetriades, Alecos; Matschullat, Jörg; Gemas Project Team

    2017-04-01

    Geochemical Mapping of Agricultural and grazing land Soil (GEMAS) is a cooperative project between the Geochemistry Expert Group of EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometaux. During 2008 and until early 2009, a total of 2108 samples of agricultural (ploughed land, 0-20 cm, Ap-samples) and 2023 samples of grazing land (0-10 cm, Gr samples)) soil were collected at a density of 1 site/2500 km2 each from 33 European countries, covering an area of 5,600,000 km2. All samples were analysed for 52 chemical elements following an aqua regia extraction, 42 elements by XRF (total), and soil properties, like CEC, TOC, pH (CaCl2), following tight external quality control procedures. In addition, the Ap soil samples were analysed for 57 elements in a mobile metal ion (MMI®) extraction, Pb isotopes, magnetic susceptibility and total C, N and S. The results demonstrate that robust geochemical maps of Europe can be constructed based on low density sampling, the two independent sample materials, Ap and Gr, show very comparable distribution patterns across Europe. At the European scale, element distribution patterns are governed by natural processes, most often a combination of geology and climate. The geochemical maps reflect most of the known metal mining districts in Europe. In addition, a number of new anomalies emerge that may indicate mineral potential. The size of some anomalies is such that they can only be detected when mapping at the continental scale. For some elements completely new geological settings are detected. An anthropogenic impact at a much more local scale is discernible in the immediate vicinity of some major European cities (e.g., London, Paris) and some metal smelters. The impact of agriculture is visible for Cu (vineyard soils) and for some further elements only in the mobile metal ion (MMI) extraction. For several trace elements deficiency issues are a larger threat to plant, animal and finally human health at the European scale than toxicity. Taking the famous step

  20. Status report on geochemical field results from Atlantic study sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, T.R.S.; Thomson, J.; Hydes, D.J.; Colley, S.

    1983-01-01

    This report summarises the results of preliminary geochemical investigations at three North Atlantic study areas. The two eastern sites, on the Cape Verde abyssal plain (CV2) and east of Great Meteor Seamount (GME) were visited during 1982. The results presented are preliminary. Studies in the western Atlantic, close to the Nares Abyssal Plain study site are more detailed and are presented in a separate paper. The report shows for the first time the relative redox status of the three sites. The differences are unexpectedly large, the most reduced cores being recovered at GME and the most oxidised at CV2. The sporadic nature of Recent sediment accumulation at these sites is also emphasised. In order to place these preliminary results in context their relevance to the production of mathematical system models is discussed in a closing section. The necessity for such models to rest on sound foundations of geochemical understanding is noted. Suggestions on future research priorities are offered for discussion. (author)

  1. Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

    1992-09-01

    The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

  2. Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

    1992-09-01

    The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

  3. Metals and trace elements in feathers: A geochemical approach to avoid misinterpretation of analytical responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghesi, Fabrizio; Migani, Francesca; Andreotti, Alessandro; Baccetti, Nicola; Bianchi, Nicola; Birke, Manfred; Dinelli, Enrico

    2016-02-15

    Assessing trace metal pollution using feathers has long attracted the attention of ecotoxicologists as a cost-effective and non-invasive biomonitoring method. In order to interpret the concentrations in feathers considering the external contamination due to lithic residue particles, we adopted a novel geochemical approach. We analysed 58 element concentrations in feathers of wild Eurasian Greater Flamingo Phoenicopterus roseus fledglings, from 4 colonies in Western Europe (Spain, France, Sardinia, and North-eastern Italy) and one group of adults from zoo. In addition, 53 elements were assessed in soil collected close to the nesting islets. This enabled to compare a wide selection of metals among the colonies, highlighting environmental anomalies and tackling possible causes of misinterpretation of feather results. Most trace elements in feathers (Al, Ce, Co, Cs, Fe, Ga, Li, Mn, Nb, Pb, Rb, Ti, V, Zr, and REEs) were of external origin. Some elements could be constitutive (Cu, Zn) or significantly bioaccumulated (Hg, Se) in flamingos. For As, Cr, and to a lesser extent Pb, it seems that bioaccumulation potentially could be revealed by highly exposed birds, provided feathers are well cleaned. This comprehensive study provides a new dataset and confirms that Hg has been accumulated in feathers in all sites to some extent, with particular concern for the Sardinian colony, which should be studied further including Cr. The Spanish colony appears critical for As pollution and should be urgently investigated in depth. Feathers collected from North-eastern Italy were the hardest to clean, but our methods allowed biological interpretation of Cr and Pb. Our study highlights the importance of external contamination when analysing trace elements in feathers and advances methodological recommendations in order to reduce the presence of residual particles carrying elements of external origin. Geochemical data, when available, can represent a valuable tool for a correct

  4. Induction of a geochemical barrier for As, Fe and S immobilization in a sulfide substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Rodrigues de Assis

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD is an environmental concern due to the risk of element mobilization, including toxic elements, and inclusion in the food chain. In this study, three cover layers were tested to minimize As, Fe and S mobilization from a substrate from former gold mining, containing pyrite and arsenopyrite. For this purpose, different layers (capillary break, sealant and cover layer above the substrate and the induction of a geochemical barrier (GB were used to provide suitable conditions for adsorption and co-precipitation of the mobilized As. Thirteen treatments were established to evaluate the leaching of As, Fe and S from a substrate in lysimeters. The pH, As, Fe, S, Na, and K concentrations and total volume of the leachates were determined. Mineralogical analyses were realized in the substrate at the end of the experimental period. Lowest amounts of As, Fe and S (average values of 5.47, 48.59 and 132.89 g/lysimeter were leached in the treatments that received Na and K to induce GB formation. Mineralogical analyses indicated jarosite formation in the control treatment and in treatments that received Na and K salts. However, the jarosite amounts in these treatments were higher than in the control, suggesting that these salts accelerated the GB formation. High amounts of As, Fe and S (average values of 11.7, 103.94 and 201.13 g/lysimeter were observed in the leachate from treatments without capillary break layer. The formation of geochemical barrier and the use of different layers over the sulfide substrate proved to be efficient techniques to decrease As, Fe and S mobilization and mitigate the impact of acid mine drainage.

  5. Geochemical normalization of magnetic susceptibility for investigation of floodplain sediments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Faměra, Martin; Matys Grygar, Tomáš; Elznicová, J.; Grison, Hana

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2018), č. článku 189. ISSN 1866-6280 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-00340S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:67985530 Keywords : Background functions * Geochemical normalization * Mass-specific magnetic susceptibility * Post-depositional processes * Provenance Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Geology (GFU-E) Impact factor: 1.569, year: 2016

  6. Content analysis of ecosystems and geochemical cycles in portuguese textbooks

    OpenAIRE

    Tracana, Rosa Branca; Ferreira, Maria Eduarda; Carvalho, Graça Simões de

    2014-01-01

    There are many studies in recent times, on the theme Ecosystems and geochemical cycles. All authors expressed consensus in terms of the need to work content with our children and youth, to foster the development of skills that promote sustainable development. Our study is based on the teaching of science and also in the area of social pedagogy in the context of social representations. Thus, we intend to analyze the didactic transposition of the topic Ecosystems and Cycles, in terms of textboo...

  7. Geochemical signatures of tephras from Quaternary Antarctic Peninsula volcanoes

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus,Stefan; Kurbatov,Andrei; Yates,Martin

    2013-01-01

    In the northern Antarctic Peninsula area, at least 12 Late Plelstocene-Holocene volcanic centers could be potential sources of tephra layers in the region. We present unique geochemical fingerprints for ten of these volcanoes using major, trace, rare earth element, and isotope data from 95 samples of tephra and other eruption products. The volcanoes have predominantly basaltic and basaltic andesitic compositions. The Nb/Y ratio proves useful to distinguish between volcanic centers located on ...

  8. Geochemical analysis of soils and sediments, Coeur d'Alene drainage basin, Idaho: sampling, analytical methods, and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Stephen E.; Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Ikramuddin, Mohammed; Lindsay, James

    2001-01-01

    This report presents the locations, descriptions, analytical procedures used, and an inter-lab comparison of over 1100 geochemical analyses of samples of soil and sediment in and downstream of a major lead-zinc-silver mining district in the Coeur d'Alene (CdA) drainage basin of northern Idaho. The samples fall in 3 broad categories: (1) samples from vertical profiles of floodplain soils in the valley of the main stem of the CdA River (767 samples) and of the South Fork of the CdA River (38 samples), (2) size fractionated surficial samples of sediment bedload within the channel of the South Fork of the CdA River (68 samples), and (3) samples from vertical profiles of sediment bedload within the channel of the main stem of the CdA River (260 samples). Five different laboratories contributed geochemical data for this report. Four of the five laboratories employed analytical methods that require sample dissolution prior to analysis; one laboratory (US Geological Survey) used analytical instrumentation (energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence [EDXRF]) that is applied to pulverized samples. Some dissolution procedures use four acids (hydrochloric, nitric, perchloric, and hydrofluoric; Eastern Washington University [EWU] Geochemical Laboratory and XRAL Laboratories, Inc.), others use two acids (nitric acid and aqua regia; CHEMEX Labs, Inc.), and some use only concentrated nitric acid (ACZ Laboratories, Inc.). Most analyses of dissolved samples were done by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) or by ICP - MS (Mass Spectroscopy). Some analyses for Ag and K were done by Flame Atomic Absorption (FAA). Inter-laboratory comparisons are made for 6 elements: lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), iron

  9. The role of atomic absorption spectrometry in geochemical exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viets, J.G.; O'Leary, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper we briefly describe the principles of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and the basic hardware components necessary to make measurements of analyte concentrations. Then we discuss a variety of methods that have been developed for the introduction of analyte atoms into the light path of the spectrophotometer. This section deals with sample digestion, elimination of interferences, and optimum production of ground-state atoms, all critical considerations when choosing an AAS method. Other critical considerations are cost, speed, simplicity, precision, and applicability of the method to the wide range of materials sampled in geochemical exploration. We cannot attempt to review all of the AAS methods developed for geological materials but instead will restrict our discussion to some of those appropriate for geochemical exploration. Our background and familiarity are reflected in the methods we discuss, and we have no doubt overlooked many good methods. Our discussion should therefore be considered a starting point in finding the right method for the problem, rather than the end of the search. Finally, we discuss the future of AAS relative to other instrumental techniques and the promising new directions for AAS in geochemical exploration. ?? 1992.

  10. Study on long-term stability of geochemical environments at deep underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Takashi; Iwatsuki, Teruki

    2005-01-01

    Observation and fluid inclusion analysis of fracture filling calcites in granite at the Tono area were conducted to assess long-term stability of geochemical environment at deep underground. The result of observation using SEM and luminoscope shows that precipitation processes of calcite can be divided into four phases (1 to 4) based on their occurrence. (1) Phase 1: indistinct morphology and includes the wall rock fragments. (2) Phase 2: rhombohedral and hexagonal form. (3) Phase 3: elongate rhombohedral form, growth over the layer of phase 2 calcite. (4) Phase 4: small rhombohedral form crystals growth from surface of phase 3 calcite. On Phase 1 calcite, it seems to be hydrothermal origin related to fracture activation. Previous study shows the correlation between the salinity of fluid from which calcite precipitated and morphology of calcite. According to previous studies, the groundwater from which phase 3 calcite precipitated would be the highest salinity such as seawater. Phase 2 and 4 calcite may be precipitated from groundwater with low salinity. On the other hand, fluid inclusions were recognized in phase 2 and 3 calcite. All inclusions indicated mono-phase (liquid phase). These suggest that phase 2 and 3 calcites were precipitated in low-temperature condition. Result of salinity analysis indicates that two groundwaters having different chemical properties had existed during phase 2 and 3 calcite precipitation. Based on these results, geochemical environment had changed by input of high salinity groundwater during Phase 2 and 3 calcite precipitation. It is required to identify the origin of each groundwater in consideration of historical geology for further understanding of long-term hydrochemical condition. (author)

  11. Reproducibility of geochemical and climatic signals in the Atlantic coral Montastraea faveolata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph M.; Quinn, T.M.; Helmle, K.P.; Halley, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Monthly resolved, 41-year-long stable isotopic and elemental ratio time series were generated from two separate heads of Montastraea faveolata from Looe Key, Florida, to assess the fidelity of using geochemical variations in Montastraea, the dominant reef-building coral of the Atlantic, to reconstruct sea surface environmental conditions at this site. The stable isotope time series of the two corals replicate well; mean values of ??18O and ??13C are indistinguishable between cores (compare 0.70??? versus 0.68??? for ??13C and -3.90??? versus - 3.94??? for ??18O). Mean values from the Sr/Ca time series differ by 0.037 mmol/mol, which is outside of analytical error and indicates that nonenvironmental factors are influencing the coral Sr/ Ca records at Looe Key. We have generated significant ?? 18O-sea surface temperature (SST) (R = -0.84) and Sr/ Ca-SST (R = -0.86) calibration equations at Looe Key; however, these equations are different from previously published equations for Montastraea. Variations in growth parameters or kinetic effects are not sufficient to explain either the observed differences in the mean offset between Sr/Ca time series or the disagreement between previous calibrations and our calculated ??18O-SST and Sr/Ca-SST relationships. Calibration differences are most likely due to variations in seawater chemistry in the continentally influenced waters at Looe Key. Additional geochemical replication studies of Montastraea are needed and should include multiple coral heads from open ocean localities complemented whenever possible by seawater chemistry determinations. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Towards a consistent geochemical model for prediction of uranium(VI) removal from groundwater by ferrihydrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Daessman, Ellinor; Baeckstroem, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Uranium(VI), which is often elevated in granitoidic groundwaters, is known to adsorb strongly to Fe (hydr)oxides under certain conditions. This process can be used in water treatment to remove U(VI). To develop a consistent geochemical model for U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite, batch experiments were performed and previous data sets reviewed to optimize a set of surface complexation constants using the 3-plane CD-MUSIC model. To consider the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on U(VI) speciation, new parameters for the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) were optimized using previously published data. The model, which was constrained from available X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy evidence, fitted the data well when the surface sites were divided into low- and high-affinity binding sites. Application of the model concept to other published data sets revealed differences in the reactivity of different ferrihydrites towards U(VI). Use of the optimized SHM parameters for U(VI)-DOM complexation showed that this process is important for U(VI) speciation at low pH. However in neutral to alkaline waters with substantial carbonate present, Ca-U-CO 3 complexes predominate. The calibrated geochemical model was used to simulate U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite for a hypothetical groundwater in the presence of several competitive ions. The results showed that U(VI) adsorption was strong between pH 5 and 8. Also near the calcite saturation limit, where U(VI) adsorption was weakest according to the model, the adsorption percentage was predicted to be >80%. Hence U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite-containing sorbents may be used as a method to bring down U(VI) concentrations to acceptable levels in groundwater

  13. Recalibration of the Mars Science Laboratory ChemCam instrument with an expanded geochemical database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Samuel M.; Wiens, Roger C.; Anderson, Ryan; Forni, Olivier; Frydenvang, Jens; Lasue, Jeremie; Cousin, Agnes; Payre, Valerie; Boucher, Tommy; Dyar, M. Darby; McLennan, Scott M.; Morris, Richard V.; Graff, Trevor G.; Mertzman, Stanley A; Ehlmann, Bethany L.; Belgacem, Ines; Newsom, Horton E.; Clark, Ben C.; Melikechi, Noureddine; Mezzacappa, Alissa; McInroy, Rhonda E.; Martinez, Ronald; Gasda, Patrick J.; Gasnault, Olivier; Maurice, Sylvestre

    2017-01-01

    The ChemCam Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) instrument onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity has obtained > 300,000 spectra of rock and soil analysis targets since landing at Gale Crater in 2012, and the spectra represent perhaps the largest publicly-available LIBS datasets. The compositions of the major elements, reported as oxides (SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, FeOT, MgO, CaO, Na2O, K2O), have been re-calibrated using a laboratory LIBS instrument, Mars-like atmospheric conditions, and a much larger set of standards (408) that span a wider compositional range than previously employed. The new calibration uses a combination of partial least squares (PLS1) and Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithms, together with a calibration transfer matrix to minimize differences between the conditions under which the standards were analyzed in the laboratory and the conditions on Mars. While the previous model provided good results in the compositional range near the average Mars surface composition, the new model fits the extreme compositions far better. Examples are given for plagioclase feldspars, where silicon was significantly over-estimated by the previous model, and for calcium-sulfate veins, where silicon compositions near zero were inaccurate. The uncertainties of major element abundances are described as a function of the abundances, and are overall significantly lower than the previous model, enabling important new geochemical interpretations of the data.

  14. Congruency sequence effects are driven by previous-trial congruency, not previous-trial response conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Weissman, Daniel H.; Carp, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Congruency effects in distracter interference tasks are often smaller after incongruent trials than after congruent trials. However, the sources of such congruency sequence effects (CSEs) are controversial. The conflict monitoring model of cognitive control links CSEs to the detection and resolution of response conflict. In contrast, competing theories attribute CSEs to attentional or affective processes that vary with previous-trial congruency (incongruent vs. congruent). The present study s...

  15. Geophysical, geochemical, mineralogical, and enivronmental data for rock samples collected in a mineralized volcanic environment, upper Animas River watershed, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCafferty, A.E.; Horton, R.J.; Stanton, M.R.; McDougal, R.R.; Fey, D.L.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides analyses of 90 rock samples collected in the upper Animas River watershed near Silverton, Colo., from 2001 to 2007. The samples are analyzed for geophysical, geochemical, mineralogical, and environmental rock properties of acid neutralizing capacity and net acid production. The database is derived from both published (n=68) and unpublished (n=32) data. New for all samples are geophysical measurements of electrical resistivity, density, and porosity. Rock samples were acquired from 12 geologic units that include key Tertiary volcanic and plutonic lithologies, all with varying degrees of alteration.

  16. INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

    2003-09-01

    This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched

  17. Initial geochemical characteristics of fluid fine tailings in an oil sands end pit lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dompierre, Kathryn A. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada S7N 5A9 (Canada); Lindsay, Matthew B.J., E-mail: matt.lindsay@usask.ca [Department of Geological Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada); Cruz-Hernández, Pablo [Department of Geology, University of Huelva, Campus ‘El Carmen’, E-21071 Huelva (Spain); Halferdahl, Geoffrey M. [Environmental Research and Development, Syncrude Canada Limited, Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1H4 (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Geochemical characteristics of fluid fine tailings (FFT) were examined in Base Mine Lake (BML), which is the first full-scale demonstration oil sands end pit lake (EPL) in northern Alberta, Canada. Approximately 186 Mm{sup 3} of FFT was deposited between 1994 and 2012, before BML was established on December 31, 2012. Bulk FFT samples (n = 588) were collected in July and August 2013 at various depths at 15 sampling sites. Temperature, solid content, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, Eh and alkalinity were measured for all samples. Detailed geochemical analyses were performed on a subset of samples (n = 284). Pore-water pH decreased with depth by approximately 0.5 within the upper 10 m of the FFT. Major pore-water constituents included Na (880 ± 96 mg L{sup −1}) and Cl (560 ± 95 mg L{sup −1}); Ca (19 ± 4.1 mg L{sup −1}), Mg (11 ± 2.0 mg L{sup −1}), K (16 ± 2.3 mg L{sup −1}) and NH{sub 3} (9.9 ± 4.7 mg L{sup −1}) were consistently observed. Iron and Mn concentrations were low within FFT pore water, whereas SO{sub 4} concentrations decreased sharply across the FFT–water interface. Geochemical modeling indicated that FeS{sub (s)} precipitation was favoured under SO{sub 4}-reducing conditions. Pore water was also under-saturated with respect to gypsum [CaSO{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O], and near saturation with respect to calcite [CaCO{sub 3}], dolomite [CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}] and siderite [FeCO{sub 3}]. X-ray diffraction (XRD) suggested that carbonate-mineral dissolution largely depleted calcite and dolomite. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy revealed the presence of FeS{sub (s)}, pyrite [FeS{sub 2}], and siderite. Carbonate-mineral dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation have likely contributed to FFT dewatering and settlement. However, the long-term importance of these processes within EPLs remains unknown. These results provide a reference for assessing the long-term geochemical evolution of oil sands EPLs, and offer

  18. Adaptive Multiscale Modeling of Geochemical Impacts on Fracture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Deng, H.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding fracture evolution is essential for many subsurface energy applications, including subsurface storage, shale gas production, fracking, CO2 sequestration, and geothermal energy extraction. Geochemical processes in particular play a significant role in the evolution of fractures through dissolution-driven widening, fines migration, and/or fracture sealing due to precipitation. One obstacle to understanding and exploiting geochemical fracture evolution is that it is a multiscale process. However, current geochemical modeling of fractures cannot capture this multi-scale nature of geochemical and mechanical impacts on fracture evolution, and is limited to either a continuum or pore-scale representation. Conventional continuum-scale models treat fractures as preferential flow paths, with their permeability evolving as a function (often, a cubic law) of the fracture aperture. This approach has the limitation that it oversimplifies flow within the fracture in its omission of pore scale effects while also assuming well-mixed conditions. More recently, pore-scale models along with advanced characterization techniques have allowed for accurate simulations of flow and reactive transport within the pore space (Molins et al., 2014, 2015). However, these models, even with high performance computing, are currently limited in their ability to treat tractable domain sizes (Steefel et al., 2013). Thus, there is a critical need to develop an adaptive modeling capability that can account for separate properties and processes, emergent and otherwise, in the fracture and the rock matrix at different spatial scales. Here we present an adaptive modeling capability that treats geochemical impacts on fracture evolution within a single multiscale framework. Model development makes use of the high performance simulation capability, Chombo-Crunch, leveraged by high resolution characterization and experiments. The modeling framework is based on the adaptive capability in Chombo

  19. Advantage of Chernobyl radionuclides at modelling of geochemical landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonenka, I.P.

    2002-01-01

    Any human activity causes a chemical alteration of environment. It occurs as a result of both the immediate emission of pollutants, and of violation of the ecosystems homeostasis. Under technogenic effect a geochemical field becomes still more variegated. This phenomenon is formed by subjective processes. In this case the unconditional application of statistical methods is not correct. Efficiently a contamination patchiness is scrutinised by method of a radioactive label, as some pollutants are allocated on a surface similarly artificial radionuclides. During 10 years the radioecological investigation like this was carried out in the moderate contamination area of Chernobyl zone. Nuclide 137Cs predominant on this terrain was used as a tracer. It turned out that the pollution field heterogeneity is depended on structure of landscape most intimately. The modelling of 137Cs allocation allowed to establish the attitude of background and anomalous zone. Principal premise of beginnings of an anomaly is the interplay of migration streams with geochemical barriers. Combination of these factors determines the radiological and geochemical parameters. The behaviour of other pollutants (Sr, Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni, Cr, Co) in discrete segments of elementary landscape also rather differs. Within test area six types of positive going local geochemical anomalies are being discovered. The detailed analysis of them has resulted in creation of new technique of account of pollutants total inventory. This parameter is computed with the use of correction for a natural patchiness. For example the stoichiometric relationship show that an average of 0.73 % of the total 137Cs inventory was involved in the processes of secondary redistribution. More than on third of this value (0.26 %) was fixed at local geochemical barriers within eluvial landscapes and formed radiogeochemical anomalies at the intra facies level. The other portion of 137Cs inventory (0.47 %) was removed outside the boundaries of

  20. The Importance of Accurate Dating and Multiproxy Analyses in Paleoenvironmental Reconstructions: A Case Study from Cocha Cashu, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salenbien, W.; Jackson, L. J.; Baker, P. A.; Rigsby, C. A.; Wheatley, A.; Fritz, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Using a multiproxy approach and LA-ICP-MS dating of detrital zircons, we propose a revised age and depositional setting for the well-known Cocha Cashu outcrop situated along the Manu River, approximately 2 kilometers downstream from the Cocha Cashu Biological Station, located in Manu National Park, southeastern Peruvian Amazonia. This outcrop stretches for 650 meters alongside the river with an average height of 10 meters. The depositional setting is reconstructed by the combined use of detailed sedimentological logging and analyses as well as geochemical analyses of podogenic carbonate (δ13C, δ18O) and the soil organic fraction (δ15N, δ13C, %S, %C, %N), which shows fluctuations in the source of organic material. We use palynological analyses to further improve the paleoenvironmental reconstruction by studying a series of samples evenly spaced throughout the whole outcrop. Radiometric dating on detrital zircon crystals in the coarse sedimentary fractions by LA-ICP-MS in conjunction with palynological data provide a much younger age for this outcrop than previously reported in the literature ( 0.1 Ma vs. 9 Ma). These dates are some of the youngest detrital zircons to be dated using LA-ICP-MS. The updated age, alongside with the sedimentological analyses, palynological and geochemical evidence, can be best explained by a fully continental, fluvial setting, with the outcrop having been deposited as a repeated series of crevasse splays, suggesting that the Amazonian forelands experienced a similar sedimentary regime during Middle to Late Quaternary. This has major implications for a series of paleogeographic reconstructions that utilized previous interpretations of the Cocha Cashu Outcrop for Miocene marine incursions and questions the validity of certain proxy types that have been frequently used in other studies, such as trace fossil assemblages and application of sedimentary statistics. Overall, this case study shows that in order to accurately reconstruct the

  1. A Spatially Constrained Multi-autoencoder Approach for Multivariate Geochemical Anomaly Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirong, C.; Qingfeng, G.; Renguang, Z.; Yihui, X.

    2017-12-01

    Separating and recognizing geochemical anomalies from the geochemical background is one of the key tasks in geochemical exploration. Many methods have been developed, such as calculating the mean ±2 standard deviation, and fractal/multifractal models. In recent years, deep autoencoder, a deep learning approach, have been used for multivariate geochemical anomaly recognition. While being able to deal with the non-normal distributions of geochemical concentrations and the non-linear relationships among them, this self-supervised learning method does not take into account the spatial heterogeneity of geochemical background and the uncertainty induced by the randomly initialized weights of neurons, leading to ineffective recognition of weak anomalies. In this paper, we introduce a spatially constrained multi-autoencoder (SCMA) approach for multivariate geochemical anomaly recognition, which includes two steps: spatial partitioning and anomaly score computation. The first step divides the study area into multiple sub-regions to segregate the geochemical background, by grouping the geochemical samples through K-means clustering, spatial filtering, and spatial constraining rules. In the second step, for each sub-region, a group of autoencoder neural networks are constructed with an identical structure but different initial weights on neurons. Each autoencoder is trained using the geochemical samples within the corresponding sub-region to learn the sub-regional geochemical background. The best autoencoder of a group is chosen as the final model for the corresponding sub-region. The anomaly score at each location can then be calculated as the euclidean distance between the observed concentrations and reconstructed concentrations of geochemical elements.The experiments using the geochemical data and Fe deposits in the southwestern Fujian province of China showed that our SCMA approach greatly improved the recognition of weak anomalies, achieving the AUC of 0.89, compared

  2. Crustal contamination and crystal entrapment during polybaric magma evolution at Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano, Italy: Geochemical and Sr isotope evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochi, M.; Ayuso, R.A.; de Vivo, B.; Somma, R.

    2006-01-01

    New major and trace element analyses and Sr-isotope determinations of rocks from Mt. Somma-Vesuvius volcano produced from 25 ky BP to 1944 AD are part of an extensive database documenting the geochemical evolution of this classic region. Volcanic rocks include silica undersaturated, potassic and ultrapotassic lavas and tephras characterized by variable mineralogy and different crystal abundance, as well as by wide ranges of trace element contents and a wide span of initial Sr-isotopic compositions. Both the degree of undersaturation in silica and the crystal content increase through time, being higher in rocks produced after the eruption at 472 AD (Pollena eruption). Compositional variations have been generally thought to reflect contributions from diverse types of mantle and crust. Magma mixing is commonly invoked as a fundamental process affecting the magmas, in addition to crystal fractionation. Our assessment of geochemical and Sr-isotopic data indicates that compositional variability also reflects the influence of crustal contamination during magma evolution during upward migration to shallow crustal levels and/or by entrapment of crystal mush generated during previous magma storage in the crust. Using a variant of the assimilation fractional crystallization model (Energy Conservation-Assimilation Fractional Crystallization; [Spera and Bohrson, 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes I: General model and energy-constrained assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) formulation. J. Petrol. 999-1018]; [Bohrson, W.A. and Spera, F.J., 2001. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic process II: application of energy-constrained assimilation-fractional crystallization (EC-AFC) model to magmatic systems. J. Petrol. 1019-1041]) we estimated the contributions from the crust and suggest that contamination by carbonate rocks that underlie the volcano (2 km down to 9-10 km) is a fundamental process controlling magma compositions at Mt. Somma

  3. Organic-geochemical investigations on soil layers affected by theTohoku-oki tsunami (March 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reicherter, Klaus; Schwarzbauer, Jan; Jaffe, Bruce; Szczucinski, Witold

    2014-05-01

    Geochemical investigations on tsunami deposits, in particular palaeotsunamites, have mainly focused on inorganic indicators that have been used to distinguish between terrestrial and marine matter in sedimentary archives. Observable tsunami deposits may also be characterised by organic-geochemical parameters reflecting the mixture and unexpected transport of marine and terrestrial matter. The application of organic substances with indicative properties has so far not been used, although the approach of using specific indicators to determine prehistoric, historic and recent processes and impacts (so-called biomarker and anthropogenic marker approach) already exists. In particular, for recent tsunami deposit the analysis of anthropogenic or even xenobiotic compounds as indicators for assessing the impact of tsunamis has been neglected so far. The Tohoku-oki tsunami in March 2011 showed the huge threat that tsunamis, and subsequent flooding of coastal lowlands, pose to society. The mainly sandy deposits of this mega-tsunami reach more than 4.5 km inland as there were run-up heights of ca. 10 m (wave height). The destruction of infrastructure by wave action and flooding is accompanied by the release of environmental pollutants (e.g. fuels, fats, tarmac, plastics, heavy metals, etc.) contaminating the coastal areas and ocean. To characterize this event in the sedimentary deposits, we analyzed several soil archives from the Bay of Sendai area. Soil layers representing the tsunami deposits have been contrasted with unaffected pre-tsunami samples by means of organic-geochemical analyses based on GC/MS. Natural compounds and their diagenetic transformation products have been tested as marker compounds for monitoring this recent tsunami. The relative composition of fatty acids, n-alkanes, sesquiterpenes and further substances pointed to significant variations before and after the tsunami event. Additionally, anthropogenic marker compounds (such as soil derived pesticides

  4. Reconstruction of paleostorm history using geochemical proxies in sediment cores from Eastern Lake, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, O.; Wang, Y.; Donoghue, J. F.; Coor, J. L.; Kish, S.; Elsner, J.; Hu, X. B.; Niedoroda, A. W.; Ye, M.; Xu, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Analysis of geochemical proxies of coastal lake sediments provides a useful tool for reconstructing paleostorm history. Such paleostorm records can help constrain models that are used to predict future storm events. In this study, we collected two sediment cores (60 and 103 cm long, respectively) from the center of Eastern Lake located on the Gulf coast of NW Florida. These cores, which are mainly composed of organic-rich mud and organic-poor sand, were sub-sampled at 2-3mm intervals for analyses of their organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations as well as δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures. Selected samples were submitted for radiocarbon dating in order to establish a chronological framework for the interpretation of the geochemical data. There are significant variations in δ13C, δ15N, C%, N% and C/N with depth. The δ13C and δ15N values vary from -21.8‰ to -26.7‰ and 2.6‰ to 5‰, respectively. The stable isotopic signatures of carbon and nitrogen indicate that the sources of organic matter in sediments include terrestrial C3 type vegetation, marine input from Gulf of Mexico and biological productivity within the lake, such as phytoplankton and zooplankton growing in the lacustrine environment. The δ13C and δ15N values exhibit significant negative excursions by 2‰ in a 30 cm thick sand layer, bounded by a rapid return to the base value. A positive shift in the δ15N record observed in the upper part of the cores likely reflects increased anthropogenic input of N such as sewage or septic tank effluents associated with recent development of areas around the lake for human habitation. Similarly, organic C% and N% range from 5.8 to 0.4 and 0.4 to 0.1, respectively. A prominent negative shift by 2σ relative to the baseline in C% and N% has been observed at approx. 55 to 58 cm depth, consisting of an organic-poor sand layer. This shift in C% and N% can be correlated with the negative shift in the δ13C and δ15N values, indicating a major storm event

  5. Geochemical and hydrological processes controlling groundwater quality in Assiut Governorate, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, R. G.; Tempel, R.; Gomaa, M.; Korany, E.

    2011-12-01

    Groundwater in Assiut area, Egypt, is an important source of fresh water for human consumption, agriculture, and domestic and industrial purposes. Due to a growing population and expansion of agricultural reclamation projects in the desert fringes of the Nile Valley, there is an increasing water demand in this arid region. This study has investigated the geochemical and hydrological processes that control groundwater quality within the Pleistocene, Plio-Pleistocene, and Eocene aquifers in Assiut, in addition to the hydraulic relationships between surface and groundwater systems and the relations among the defined groundwater aquifers. A total of 28 surface and 160 groundwater samples were collected for geochemical analysis (major and minor element chemistry, and stable isotope analyses). Total dissolved solids = 182 to 5657 mg/L, water-delta 18O = -7.5 to +6.5%, and water-delta D = -55 to +32%. Geochemical and stable isotope data indicate that the principal source of recharge to the Pleistocene and Plio-Pleistocene aquifers is the surface water system (irrigation canals), while the prevalence of Na-Cl type waters in the Eocene aquifer indicates recharge by upward leakage from the underlying Nubian sandstone aquifer which contains the same Na-Cl water type. Evaporation prior to infiltration, mixing, and mineral equilibria (dissolution and precipitation) are the main factors that affect water quality. Ion exchange plays a secondary role in controlling the water chemistry of the Pleistocene aquifer, but is more effective in controlling water quality within the Plio-Pleistocene and Eocene aquifers due to the prevalence of clay minerals within the matrices. The fresh water exploited from the Eocene aquifer may be of great importance for land reclamation projects not only at the western desert fringes, but also at the eastern desert fringes of Assiut and similar settings around the River Nile south of Assiut Governorate. Results of this study will be helpful for

  6. The granitic complex of Brame/Saint-Sylvestre/Saint-Goussaud (French Massif Central), geochemical mapping applied to uranium prospecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valois, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    Obtained geochemic data from the granitic complex of Brame/Saint-Sylvestre/Saint-Goussaud (French Massif Central), which is known as uranium ore bearing. Friedrich's data were reinterpreted using a different statistical method (principal component analysis with oblic rotation of the factors). The resulting trace element associations are interpreted according to the several mineral paragenesis previously described in this complex. These associations can be related to the successive stages of granitic cristallisation, and their mapping is in agreement with previous mapping obtained from quite different data (structural petrology for example). New results concern an U, Zn, Y, R.E association which is attributed to the uraninite paragenesis, previously described on this granitic complex. Mapping this last association contributes to emphasize the central part of the complex as a favourable zone for prospecting [fr

  7. Semi-detailed uranium geochemical survey in Northwestern Samar (27 March 1979 - 4 July 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G. Jr.; Ogena, M.; Tauli, G.

    1980-04-01

    A uranium geochemical survey was conducted to delineate in detail the uranium prospective area(s) in northwestern Samar. A total of 805 stream sediments and 1.115 water samples were obtained from the target areas from uranium analysis. Geochemical anomalies were indicated in San Isidro and Mauo. Geochemical correlations between uranium and trace elements (Pb, Ag, Ni, Cu, Co, Zn and Mn) were generally poor. (ELC)

  8. Postcards from Mars: Insights into Martian Geochemical Processes from the Curiosity Rover

    OpenAIRE

    Leshin, L. A.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Blake, D. F.; Gellert, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Wiens, R. C.; Maurice, S.

    2013-01-01

    With the successful landing of the Mars Curiosity Rover in August 2012, we now have the most capable geochemical laboratory ever to travel to another planet roving Mars’ Gale crater. The geochemical instrument suite includes the Chemistry Camera (ChemCam), which uses a laser to vaporize geologic targets and performs atomic emission spectroscopy on the vapor from distances of up to 7m. This provides a geochemical surveying capability that enables rapid identification of...

  9. A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material, Sediment Tracking, and Sediment Budget Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-26

    ER D C TR -1 7- 3 Dredging Operations and Environmental Research Program A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material ...June 2017 A Guide for Using Geochemical Methods in Dredged Material , Sediment Tracking, and Sediment Budget Studies Heidi M. Wadman Coastal and...and Development Center Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 Under Project 449021, “Geochemical and Other Tracers for Dredged Material Fate” ERDC TR-17-3 ii

  10. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P Inskeep

    Full Text Available The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensive array of unique high-temperature environments that host a variety of deeply-rooted and understudied Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The combination of extreme temperature and chemical conditions encountered in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial habitats and offers a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of indigenous microbial communities and for establishing linkages between putative metabolisms and element cycling. Metagenome sequence (14-15,000 Sanger reads per site was obtained for five high-temperature (>65 degrees C chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools in Yellowstone National Park (YNP that exhibit a wide range in geochemistry including pH, dissolved sulfide, dissolved oxygen and ferrous iron. Metagenome data revealed significant differences in the predominant phyla associated with each of these geochemical environments. Novel members of the Sulfolobales are dominant in low pH environments, while other Crenarchaeota including distantly-related Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales populations dominate in suboxic sulfidic sediments. Several novel archaeal groups are well represented in an acidic (pH 3 Fe-oxyhydroxide mat, where a higher O2 influx is accompanied with an increase in archaeal diversity. The presence or absence of genes and pathways important in S oxidation-reduction, H2-oxidation, and aerobic respiration (terminal oxidation provide insight regarding the metabolic strategies of indigenous organisms present in geothermal systems. Multiple-pathway and protein-specific functional analysis of metagenome sequence data corroborated results from phylogenetic analyses and clearly demonstrate major differences in metabolic potential across sites. The distribution of functional genes involved in

  11. Alligator Rivers Analogue project. Geochemical modelling of present-day groundwaters. Final Report - Volume 12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sverjensky, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The main purpose of this report is to summarize geochemical modeling studies of the present-day Koongarra groundwaters. Information on the present-day geochemistry and geochemical processes at Koongarra forms a basis for a present-day analogue for nuclear waste migration. The present-day analogue is built on studies of the mineralogy and petrology of the Koongarra deposit, and chemical analyses of present-day groundwaters from the deposit. The overall approach taken in the present study has been to carry out a series of aqueous speciation and state of saturation calculations, including chemical mass transfer calculations, to address the possible control over the chemistry of the present-day for the groundwaters at Koongarra. The most important implication of the present study for the migration of radionuclides is the strong role played by the water-rock interactions, both above and below the water table, influencing the overall chemical evolution of the groundwaters. Thus, the results show that the chemical evolution of waters is strongly controlled by the initial availability of CO 2 and the mineral assemblage encountered, which together determine the major element evolution of the waters by controlling the pH. The relative rates of evolution of the pH and the oxidation state of the groundwaters are also critical to the mobility of uranium. The shallow Koongarra waters are sufficiently oxidising that they can dissolve and transport uranium even under acidic conditions. Under the more reducing condition of the deep groundwaters, is the pH level that permits uranium transport as carbonate complexes. However, if the oxidation state decreases to much lower levels, it would be expected that uranium become immobile. All the speciation and state of saturation calculations carried out in the present study are available from the author, on request

  12. Geochemical imprints of genotypic variants of Globigerina bulloides in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadekov, Aleksey Yu.; Darling, Kate F.; Ishimura, Toyoho; Wade, Christopher M.; Kimoto, Katsunori; Singh, Arun Deo; Anand, Pallavi; Kroon, Dick; Jung, Simon; Ganssen, Gerald; Ganeshram, Raja; Tsunogai, Urumu; Elderfield, Henry

    2016-10-01

    Planktonic foraminifera record oceanic conditions in their shell geochemistry. Many palaeoenvironmental studies have used fossil planktonic foraminifera to constrain past seawater properties by defining species based on their shell morphology. Recent genetic studies, however, have identified ecologically distinct genotypes within traditionally recognized morphospecies, signaling potential repercussions for palaeoclimate reconstructions. Here we demonstrate how the presence of Globigerina bulloides cryptic genotypes in the Arabian Sea may influence geochemical signals of living and fossil assemblages of these morphospecies. We have identified two distinct genotypes of G. bulloides with either cool water (type-II) or warm water (type-I) temperature preferences in the Western Arabian Sea. We accompany these genetic studies with analyses of Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) compositions of individual G. bulloides shells. Both Mg/Ca and δ18O values display bimodal distribution patterns. The distribution of Mg/Ca values cannot be simply explained by seawater parameters, and we attribute it to genotype-specific biological controls on the shell geochemistry. The wide range of δ18O values in the fossil assemblage also suggests that similar controls likely influence this proxy in addition to environmental parameters. However, the magnitude of this effect on the δ18O signals is not clear from our data set, and further work is needed to clarify this. We also discuss current evidence of potential genotype-specific geochemical signals in published data on G. bulloides geochemistry and other planktonic foraminiferal species. We conclude that significant caution should be taken when utilizing G. bulloides geochemistry for paleoclimate reconstruction in the regions with upwelling activity or oceanographic fronts.

  13. Geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Durango, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

    1983-09-01

    This report is the result of a geochemical investigation of the former uranium mill and tailings site at Durango, Colorado. This is one in a series of site specific geochemical investigations performed on the inactive uranium mill tailings included in the UMTRA Project. The objectives of the investigation are to characterize the geochemistry, to determine the contaminant distribution resulting from the former milling activities and tailings, and to infer chemical pathways and transport mechanisms from the contaminant distribution. The results will be used to model contaminant migration and to develop criteria for long-term containment media such as a cover system which is impermeable to contaminant migration. This report assumes a familiarity with the hydrologic conditions of the site and the geochemical concepts underlying the investigation. The results reported are based on a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. The solid samples are water extracted remove easily soluble salts and acids extracted to remove cabonates and hydroxides. The water extracts and solid samples were analyzed for the major and trace elements. A limited number of samples were analyzed for radiological components. The report includes the methods of sampling, sample processing, analysis, and data interpretation. Three major conclusions are: (1) carbonate salts and low TDS characterize the tailings; (2) the adjacent area and raffinate ponds contain contaminants deposited by a single event of fluid permeation of the soils; and (3) the Animas River adjacent to the site has elevated gross alpha activity attributed to 226 Ra in the sediments derived from the tailings or milling activities

  14. Geochemical Characterization of Late Pleistocene and Holocene Tephra Layers from the Basin of Mexico, Central Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Beatriz; Newton, Anthony J.

    1998-07-01

    In order to aid palaeoenvironmental research of Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits of central Mexico, tephra layers collected from the sediments of the Texcoco and Chalco sub-basins, in the southern part of the Basin of Mexico, are geochemically characterized and used as stratigraphic markers. The tephra layers range in composition from basaltic andesites to rhyolites and are calc-alkaline. The tephras range in age from >34,000 to ca. 2600 14C yr B.P. New names are used informally to designate correlated tephras. The Tlahuac tephra is present in Chalco, at a depth of 18 m; in the southeastern part of Texcoco, at a depth of around 10 m; and at the Tlapacoya archaeological site, where it had been mistakenly described as basaltic. This basalt-andesite tephra is dated to at least 34,000 14C yr B.P. The Tlapacoya 1 tephra is dated to between 15,020 ± 450 and 14,430 ± 190 yr B.P. and is present in all Chalco sections. The Tlapacoya 2 tephra corresponds to the previously described "pomez gruesa con fragmentos de andesita" (ca. 14,400 yr B.P.) and is present in all Chalco and Texcoco sections. The likely source of these three tephras is the volcano Popocatepetl. Tephra II at Chalco dates to 12,520 ± 135 yr B.P. and correlates with the Upper Toluca Pumice from Nevado de Toluca volcano. These represent the first geochemical glass-shard analysis of tephras from the Basin of Mexico, and so further research is necessary before a reliable tephrochronology can be established.

  15. Geochemical association of plutonium in marine sediments from Palomares (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, M.P.; Gasco, C.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A.; Pujol, L.

    1994-01-01

    The geochemical association of plutonium in sediments from the marine ecosystem of Palomares has been studied. A sequential leaching technique using selective extractants has been employed to determine the percentages of Pu in the following forms: (a) readily available, (b) exchangeable and adsorbed to specific sites, (c) associated with organic matter, (d) sesquioxides, (e) residual. Plutonium was found to be associated mainly with phases (c), (d) and (e), and therefore, appears to be relatively immobile and not readily available to bottom feeding biota. The effect of different source terms on Pu distribution is also discussed. (orig.)

  16. Experimental insights into geochemical changes in hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcon, Virginia; Joseph, Craig; Carter, Kimberly E.; Hedges, Sheila W.; Lopano, Christina L.; Guthrie, George D.; Hakala, J. Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing applied to organic-rich shales has significantly increased the recoverable volume of methane available for U.S. energy consumption. Fluid-shale reactions in the reservoir may affect long-term reservoir productivity and waste management needs through changes to fracture mineral composition and produced fluid chemical composition. We performed laboratory experiments with Marcellus Shale and lab-generated hydraulic fracturing fluid at elevated pressures and temperatures to evaluate mineral reactions and the release of trace elements into solution. Results from the experiment containing fracturing chemicals show evidence for clay and carbonate dissolution, secondary clay and anhydrite precipitation, and early-stage (24–48 h) fluid enrichment of certain elements followed by depletion in later stages (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Sc, Zn). Other elements such as As, Fe, Mn, Sr, and Y increased in concentration and remained elevated throughout the duration of the experiment with fracturing fluid. Geochemical modeling of experimental fluid data indicates primary clay dissolution, and secondary formation of smectites and barite, after reaction with fracturing fluid. Changes in aqueous organic composition were observed, indicating organic additives may be chemically transformed or sequestered by the formation after hydraulic fracturing. The NaCl concentrations in our fluids are similar to measured concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters, showing that these experiments are representative of reservoir fluid chemistries and can provide insight on geochemical reactions that occur in the field. These results can be applied towards evaluating the evolution of hydraulically-fractured reservoirs, and towards understanding geochemical processes that control the composition of produced water from unconventional shales. - Highlights: • Metal concentrations could be at their peak in produced waters recovered 24–48 after fracturing. • Carbonate

  17. Preliminary study of volcano monitoring using geochemical composition of lichen

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUAN, S.

    2012-12-01

    Taipei City, the capital of Taiwan, is bounded with Tatun Volcano Group (TVG), which is not active since 200 ka. However, some evidences indicate that the latest explosion of volcanic ash was dated to 5-6 ka as well as TVG is so close to metropolis. The monitoring on TVG is crucial for crisis management. For monitoring TVG, changes of geochemical signal in some volcanic gases and hot springs are currently assessed by monthly sampling. The geochemistry of volcanic gas and hot spring represents a short-term condition on sampling time and is highly controlled by temperature and precipitation on the surface. A long-term average geochemistry will be very helpful to be compared with the results of volcanic gas and hot spring. A bioindicator not only has the ability to store geochemical compositions in their tissues but also has a wide geographical distribution. It is very suitable in this kind of study and lichen is one of the best bioindicators mainly because lichens grow slowly and have a large-scale dependence upon the environment for their nutrition, In TVG, the high SO2 content in the atmosphere results in the absence of fruticose lichen. On the contrary, crustos lichen is the most common species in the study area. For the preliminary analysis, one fruticose, four foliose and four crustos lichens were collected around the major emission centers of volcanic gas. According to the results of ICP-MS analysis, the abundances of heavy metals are generally in the order of Zn, Fe, Mn, Cu, Cr, Pb, Cd, Ni, V, Co and U. Factor analysis (FA) demonstrates that most of the metals show very high loadings in the first factor. This means that the fractionation of metals among different lichen species is minor and the geochemical compositions of lichen are possibly controlled by the same source (atmosphere). The second factor of FA includes Mn, Sr and Ba, which share the same oxidation state of +2 in acidic environment. This factor can describe the variation of Mn, Sr and Ba in the

  18. Overview of geochemical modeling needs for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isherwood, D.; Wolery, T.

    1984-01-01

    Research needs include, but are not limited to: measurement of basic thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures for species identified by modelers as potentially important; evaluation of substances which control or limit precipitation and/or nucleation kinetics; sorption studies specifically designed to provide data needed for modeling. This includes the rate of sorption, desorption, and the characterization of the solid and aqueous phases; site-mixing models and thermodynamic data for secondary minerals that form solid solutions; the development of standard techniques for measuring rate laws for precipitation and dissolution kinetics; and measurement of rate laws describing redox kinetics, dissolution, and precipitation involving aqueous species and solid phases of interest to geochemical modelers

  19. (Hydrological and geochemical response and recovery in disturbed arctic ecosystems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett, K.R.

    1990-08-31

    Ionic concentration of snow prior to meltoff in 1990 as in previous years ranged widely from point to point within the basin. Overland flow began on May 12 and was monitored at closely-spaced time intervals for discharge volume and ionic concentrations to better define this relationship in non-channelized flow. Ionic concentration in both watertrack flow and in Imnavait Creek were closely monitored during meltoff. During the post melt period daily sampling was maintained in watertrack 7 and Imnavait Creek. Rainfall collection and analysis on an eight day schedule was maintained as in previous years. Soil solution composition was monitored on an event basis in conjunction with a similar schedule of precipitation sampling to determine relationships between precipitation and near surface and overland flow. Composition of deeper soil solution was also monitored and sampled for {sup 18}O analyses to determine the age structure of water contributed by the active layer to stream and watertracks. A pilot experiment employing salt tracers was conducted across landscape units to determine rates and pathways of soil solution movement in response to individual rain events. Nutrient addition in rime and fog were also recorded to add detail to the input side of the balance equation.

  20. Organic geochemical investigation and coal-bed methane characteristics of the Guasare coals (Paso Diablo mine, western Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, K.; Martinez, M.; Hackley, P.; Marquez, G.; Garban, G.; Esteves, I.; Escobar, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to carry out a geochemical study of channel samples collected from six coal beds in the Marcelina Formation (Zulia State, western Venezuela) and to determine experimentally the gas content of the coals from the Paso Diablo mine. Organic geochemical analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and isotopic analyses on-line in coalbed gas samples were performed. The results suggest that the Guasare coals were deposited in a continental environment under highly dysoxic and low salinity conditions. The non-detection of 18??(H)-oleanane does not preclude that the organic facies that gave rise to the coals were dominated by angiosperms. In addition, the presence of the sesquiterpenoid cadalene may indicate the subordinate contribution of gymnosperms (conifers) in the Paleocene Guasare mire. The average coalbed gas content obtained was 0.6 cm3/g. ??13C and D values indicate that thermogenic gas is prevalent in the studied coals. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  1. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  2. Application of Ground Penetrating Radar Supported by Mineralogical-Geochemical Methods for Mapping Unroofed Cave Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teja Čeru

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ground penetrating radar (GPR using a special unshielded 50 MHz Rough Terrain Antenna (RTA in combination with a shielded 250 MHz antenna was used to study the capability of this geophysical method for detecting cave sediments. Allochthonous cave sediments found in the study area of Lanski vrh (W Slovenia are now exposed on the karst surface in the so-called “unroofed caves” due to a general lowering of the surface (denudation of carbonate rocks and can provide valuable evidence of the karst development. In the first phase, GPR profiles were measured at three test locations, where cave sediments are clearly evident on the surface and appear with flowstone. It turned out that cave sediments are clearly visible on GPR radargrams as areas of strong signal attenuation. Based on this finding, GPR profiling was used in several other places where direct indicators of unroofed caves or other indicators for speleogenesis are not present due to strong surface reshaping. The influence of various field conditions, especially water content, on GPR measurements was also analysed by comparing radargrams measured in various field conditions. Further mineralogical-geochemical analyses were conducted to better understand the factors that influence the attenuation in the area of cave sediments. Samples of cave sediments and soils on carbonate rocks (rendzina were taken for X-ray diffraction (XRD and X-ray fluorescence (XRF analyses to compare the mineral and geochemical compositions of both sediments. Results show that cave sediments contain higher amounts of clay minerals and iron/aluminium oxides/hydroxides which, in addition to the thickness of cave sediments, can play an important role in the depth of penetration. Differences in the mineral composition also lead to water retention in cave sediments even through dry periods which additionally contribute to increased attenuation with respect to surrounding soils. The GPR method has proven to be reliable for

  3. Geochemical Atlas of the San Jose and Golfito quadrangles, Costa Rica. Atlas Geoquimico de los cuadrangulos de San Jose y Golfito, Costa Rica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    The Geochemical Atlas of the San Jose and Golfito 1:200,000-scale quadrangles, Costa Rica, was produced to help stimulate the growth of the Costa Rican mining industry and, thus, to benefit the economy of the country. As a result of the geochemical data presented in the Atlas, future exploration for metallic minerals in Costa Rica can be focused on specific areas that have the highest potential for mineralization. Stream-sediment samples were collected from drainage basins within the two quadrangles. These samples were analyzed for 50 elements and the results were displayed as computer-generated color maps. Each map shows the variation in abundance of a single element within the quadrangle. Basic statistics, geological and cultural data are included as insets in each map to assist in interpretation. In the Golfito quadrangle, the geochemical data do not clearly indicate undiscovered gold mineralization. The areas known to contain placer (alluvial) gold are heavily affected by mining activity. Statistical treatment of the geochemical data is necessary before it will be possible to determine the gold potential of this quadrangle. In San Jose quadrangle, gold and the pathfinder elements, arsenic and antimony, are indicators of the gold mineralization characteristic of the Costa Rican gold district located in the Tilaran-Montes del Aguacate Range. This work shows that high concentrations of these elements occur in samples collected downstream from active gold mines. More importantly, the high concentrations of gold, arsenic, and antimony in sediment samples from an area southeast of the known gold district suggest a previously unknown extension of the district. This postulated extension underlain by Tertiary volcanic rocks which host the gold deposits within the gold district. The geochemical data, displayed herein, also indicate that drainage basins north of Ciudad Quesada on the flanks of Volcan Platanar have high gold potential.

  4. Geochemical databases. Part 1. Pmatch: a program to manage thermochemical data. Part 2. The experimental validation of geochemical computer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, F.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D.; Nilsson, K.; Skytte Jensen, B.

    1993-01-01

    This work is carried out under cost-sharing contract with European Atomic Energy Community in the framework of its programme on Management and Storage of Radioactive Wastes. Part 1: PMATCH, A Program to Manage Thermochemical Data, describes the development and use of a computer program, by means of which new thermodynamic data from literature may be referenced to a common frame and thereby become internally consistent with an existing database. The report presents the relevant thermodynamic expressions and their use in the program is discussed. When there is not sufficient thermodynamic data available to describe a species behaviour under all conceivable conditions, the problems arising are thoroughly discussed and the available data is handled by approximating expressions. Part II: The Experimental Validation of Geochemical Computer models are the results of experimental investigations of the equilibria established in aqueous suspensions of mixtures of carbonate minerals (Calcium, magnesium, manganese and europium carbonates) compared with theoretical calculations made by means of the geochemical JENSEN program. The study revealed that the geochemical computer program worked well, and that its database was of sufficient validity. However, it was observed that experimental difficulties could hardly be avoided, when as here a gaseous component took part in the equilibria. Whereas the magnesium and calcium carbonates did not demonstrate mutual solid solubility, this produced abnormal effects when manganese and calcium carbonates were mixed resulting in a diminished solubility of both manganese and calcium. With tracer amounts of europium added to a suspension of calcite in sodium carbonate solutions long term experiments revealed a transition after 1-2 months, whereby the tracer became more strongly adsorbed onto calcite. The transition is interpreted as the nucleation and formation of a surface phase incorporating the 'species' NaEu(Co 3 ) 2

  5. Hydro-geochemical modeling of subalpine urbanized area: geochemical characterization of the shallow and deep aquifers of the urban district of Como (first results).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrana, Silvia; Brunamonte, Fabio; Frascoli, Francesca; Ferrario, Maria Francesca; Michetti, Alessandro Maria; Pozzi, Andrea; Gambillara, Roberto; Binda, Gilberto

    2016-04-01

    characterization of both aquifers and the comprehension of the interaction between the shallow one and deep one. The first results of geochemical and hydrological analyses in nine piezometer, seven in the shallow aquifer and two in the deep one, permit to identify a general characterization of groundwater: the waters of both the aquifers are calcium bicarbonate, with discontinuous enrichment in sulphate and silicate. The conductibility values are higher in the shallow aquifer then in the deep aquifer, this is an indication of the high flow rate of the deep one and of the higher level of vulnerability of the shallow water respect the urban pollutant. Particular is also the relatively high temperature for the deep water (15.5°C to 16.1°C). The next steps of work are an increase of geochemical analysis, with trace element, and the correlation with hydro-chemical surface water.

  6. Geochemical factors in borehole-shaft plug longevity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Geochemical investigations that address factors controlling the longevity of repository sealing materials in a geochemical environment are discussed. Studies are being made of cement-based materials as major candidates for seals for borehole plugging, and shaft and tunnel sealing in certain potential repository environments. Factors controlling the extent of attainment of equilibrium of the plug components with time and the rate of approach to a state of stable equilibrium of the plug component chemical subsystem within the total system are discussed. The effect of these factors on changes in physical, mechanical and thermal properties of a seal system, and the consequent effectiveness of the seal in preventing transport of radioactive waste species are the dominant features to be determined. Laboratory experiments on the effects of anticipated temperature, pressure, and environmental factors (including chemical composition and specific rock type) are described. Thermodynamic studies are used to determine the potentially stable reaction products under conditions similar to those anticipated for the repository boreholes, shafts, and tunnels during and after the operating stage. Multitemperature reaction series are studied, and reaction kinetics are investigated for the purpose of predicting the course of likely reactions. Detailed studies of permeability, diffusion, and interfacial properties and chemical and microphase characterization of the products of experiments are carried out. Characterization studies of old and ancient cements, mortars, and concretes and prototype man-made seal materials are performed to further assess the factors associated with longevity

  7. Geochemical dispersion of uranium near prospects in Pennsylvania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, A.W.; Schmiermund, R.L.; Mahar, D.L.

    1977-06-01

    The geochemical dispersion of U was investigated near sedimentary uranium prospects in eastern and north-central Pennsylvania. Near Jim Thorpe, known uranium occurrences in the Catskill Fm. are limited to the base of the Duncannon member. At Penn Haven Junction, roll-type U deposits with appreciable Pb and Se are localized adjacent to an oxidized tongue of channel-filling conglomeratic sandstone. The channel and encircling U occurrences furnish a large target for geochemical exploration. Selective extractions show that the organic, Fe-oxide, sand and silt fractions of stream sediments are the major hosts for U in stream sediments. Fe-oxides have a greater affinity for U than organic matter but are less abundant. The U content of organic matter is about 10 5 times the U content of stream water. Stream sediments furnish a representative sample of the average content of U, Zn, Cu, and major elements in soils of a drainage basin in north-central Pennsylvania, so a semiquantitative appraisal of weathering uranium occurrences can be made from stream sediments in climates and topography like Pennsylvania. The flux of uranium leaving the basin in solution is about equal to that leaving as sediment. Uranium is considerably less mobile than Ca and Na. A new method of extracting uranium from water samples, using a liquid ion exchanger (Amberlite LA-1), shows promise for simple field application

  8. Microstructural and geochemical evolution of sliding surfaces in landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaebitz, M.; Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    The formation of basal sliding surfaces in mass movements is known to be associated with chemical and physical alteration of rock and regolith. To evaluate its microstructural and geochemical evolution we collected samples from the host rock to the sliding surface and adjacent deposits within landslides in Kirgizstan and central China. The sample locations represent different morphological and geological conditions to evaluate if the weakness of the sliding surface derives from general factors such as (micro)structural or mineralogical changes within the landslide body. Based on qualitative and quantitative geochemical analysis we could not find neither indication for notable weathering of the parent bedrock nor accumulation of clay minerals along the sliding surface to explain its reduced shear strength in the investigated near-surface landslides. The cataclasites are mainly composed of quartz, illite, calcite, kaolinite and feldspar with grain sizes between 5 μm down to contents towards the sliding surface, pointing to alteration processes. Transmission electron microscopy and focused ion beam technique for TEM sample preparation were used to compare the microstructures. It clearly revealed a severe reduction of grain size, and increase of pore space due to grain comminution by creeping and moving processes, indicating that elevated pore pressures are the main reason for the weakness of the sliding surfaces in shallow landslides. The comminution process within sliding surface formation seems to be comparable to fault gauge formation.

  9. Evolution of geochemical conditions in SFL 3-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Fred; Lindgren, M.; Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M.; Engkvist, I.

    1999-12-01

    The evolution of geochemical conditions in the repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5, and in the vicinity of the repository are important when predicting the retention of radionuclides and the long-term stability of engineered barriers. In this study the initial conditions at different repository sites at 300 - 400 m depth, the influence of repository construction and operation, the expected conditions after repository closure and saturation, and the evolution in a long-term perspective are discussed. Groundwaters that are found at these depths have near-neutral pH and are reducing in character, but the composition can vary from saline to non-saline water. The water chemistry in the near-field will mainly be influenced by the composition of the groundwater and by the large amounts of cementitious material that can be found in the repository. Disturbances caused during construction and operation are not expected to be permanent. Studies of old concrete indicate that leaching of concrete is a slow process. The geochemical conditions in the repository are therefore expected to be stable and prevail for hundreds of thousand years. However, the evolution of the surrounding environment may influence the conditions in long-term perspective

  10. The Nasca and Palpa geoglyphs: geophysical and geochemical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsch, Kerstin; Weller, Andreas; Rosas, Silvia; Reppchen, Gunter

    2009-10-01

    The Nasca geoglyphs in the stone desert in southern Peru are part of our world cultural heritage. These remarkable drawings have roused the interest of scientists from different disciplines. Here we report the results of integrated geophysical, petrophysical, mineralogical, and geochemical investigations of the geoglyphs at six test sites in the stone desert around Nasca and Palpa. The geomagnetic measurements revealed clear indications of subsurface structures that differ from the visible surface geoglyphs. The high-resolution geoelectrical images show unexpected resistivity anomalies underneath the geoglyphs down to a depth of about 2 m. Remarkable structures were revealed in both vertical and lateral directions. No evidence was found of geochemical or mineralogical alterations of the natural geogenic materials (desert pavement environment versus geoglyphs). Neither salts nor other mineral materials were used by the Nasca people to alter or prepare the surfaces of geoglyphs. This supports the hypothesis that the Nasca people simply removed stone material down to the natural hard pan horizon to create the geoglyphs.

  11. Evolution of geochemical conditions in SFL 3-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Fred [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Lindgren, M.; Skagius, K.; Wiborgh, M. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Engkvist, I. [Barsebaeck Kraft AB (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The evolution of geochemical conditions in the repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5, and in the vicinity of the repository are important when predicting the retention of radionuclides and the long-term stability of engineered barriers. In this study the initial conditions at different repository sites at 300 - 400 m depth, the influence of repository construction and operation, the expected conditions after repository closure and saturation, and the evolution in a long-term perspective are discussed. Groundwaters that are found at these depths have near-neutral pH and are reducing in character, but the composition can vary from saline to non-saline water. The water chemistry in the near-field will mainly be influenced by the composition of the groundwater and by the large amounts of cementitious material that can be found in the repository. Disturbances caused during construction and operation are not expected to be permanent. Studies of old concrete indicate that leaching of concrete is a slow process. The geochemical conditions in the repository are therefore expected to be stable and prevail for hundreds of thousand years. However, the evolution of the surrounding environment may influence the conditions in long-term perspective.

  12. Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

    1993-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield

  13. Periodic safety analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouffon, A.; Zermizoglou, R.

    1990-12-01

    The IAEA Safety Guide 50-SG-S8 devoted to 'Safety Aspects of Foundations of Nuclear Power Plants' indicates that operator of a NPP should establish a program for inspection of safe operation during construction, start-up and service life of the plant for obtaining data needed for estimating the life time of structures and components. At the same time the program should ensure that the safety margins are appropriate. Periodic safety analysis are an important part of the safety inspection program. Periodic safety reports is a method for testing the whole system or a part of the safety system following the precise criteria. Periodic safety analyses are not meant for qualification of the plant components. Separate analyses are devoted to: start-up, qualification of components and materials, and aging. All these analyses are described in this presentation. The last chapter describes the experience obtained for PWR-900 and PWR-1300 units from 1986-1989

  14. Laser Beam Focus Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Carøe; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    2007-01-01

    the obtainable features in direct laser machining as well as heat affected zones in welding processes. This paper describes the development of a measuring unit capable of analysing beam shape and diameter of lasers to be used in manufacturing processes. The analyser is based on the principle of a rotating...... mechanical wire being swept through the laser beam at varying Z-heights. The reflected signal is analysed and the resulting beam profile determined. The development comprised the design of a flexible fixture capable of providing both rotation and Z-axis movement, control software including data capture...... and finally data analysis based on the ISO approach. The device was calibrated and tested on commercially available laser systems. It showed good reproducibility. It was the target to be able to measure CW lasers with a power up to 200 W, focused down to spot diameters in the range of 10µm. In order...

  15. Uranium-bearing and associated minerals in their geochemical and sedimentological context, Elliot Lake, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theis, N.J.

    1979-01-01

    The depositional energy environment of the Rio Algom-Denison ore reef was investigated on a regional scale using several parameters including pebble size. Regional trends of decreasing pebble size coincide with the regional direction of sediment transport. Pebble size was also used to characterize the depositional energy environment at the sample level. Quartz-pebble size and pyrite-grain size as determined from the same samples have a correlation coefficient of 0.93 which indicates that the coarse granular pyrite is detrital. Bulk chemical analyses of selected elements (U, Th, Pb, Ti, Ce, La, Y and Zr) which were chosen to reflect specific minerals (uraninite, brannerite, monazite and zircon), showed strong correlation with quartz-pebble size of the respective samples. Electron microprobe analyses of uraninite and brannerite are reported. The uraninites have typical pegmatitic compositions. Several types of brannerite are described; the conclusion reached is that although some brannerite may be detrital, most of it formed by adsorption of uranium onto titania collectors. Redistribution of some of the uranium has not changed the placer nature of the ore reef. Genesis of individual minerals (pyrite, uraninite, brannerite, zircon and monazite) is discussed. It is concluded that the mineralogy and its geochemical expression have been controlled by processes of fluvial deposition. As a result of the regional patterns in depositional environment, the ore reef shows a broad mineralogical zoning. Fluctuations in depositional energy have also produced lithologically related mineral zoning on a smaller scale. (author)

  16. Holocene geochemical footprint from Semi-arid alpine wetlands in southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alix, Antonio; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo; Toney, Jaime L.; Ramos-Román, María J.; Camuera, Jon; Anderson, R. Scott; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio; Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca; Queralt, Ignasi

    2018-02-01

    Here we provide the geochemical dataset that our research group has collected after 10 years of investigation in the Sierra Nevada National Park in southern Spain. These data come from Holocene sedimentary records from four alpine sites (ranging from ∼2500 to ∼3000 masl): two peatlands and two shallow lakes. Different kinds of organic and inorganic analyses have been conducted. The organic matter in the bulk sediment was characterised using elemental measurements and isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA-IRMS). Leaf waxes in the sediment were investigated by means of chromatography with flame-ionization detection and mass spectrometry (GC-FID, GC-MS). Major, minor and trace elements of the sediments were analysed with atomic absorption (AAS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), as well as X-ray scanning fluorescence. These data can be reused by environmental researchers and soil and land managers of the Sierra Nevada National Park and similar regions to identify the effect of natural climate change, overprinted by human impact, as well as to project new management policies in similar protected areas.

  17. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Haestholmen site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino- Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the geological final disposal of radioactive waste. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on the geochemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions that control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors that control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Haestholmen has been created and the significance of geochemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flow paths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (64 altogether) obtained from precipitation, the Baltic Sea, the soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and 14 deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Haestholmen to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used to evaluate evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 34}S) and mixing of palaeo-water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Haestholmen suggest that changes in external conditions, such as glaciation

  18. A multiscale hydro-geochemical-mechanical approach to analyze faulted CO 2 reservoirs: Original Research Article: A multiscale hydro-geochemical-mechanical approach to analyze faulted CO 2 reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Hou, Zhangshuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; White, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA

    2016-08-01

    This paper applies a multiscale hydro-geochemical-mechanical approach to analyze faulted CO2 reservoirs using the STOMP-CO2-R code that is coupled to the ABAQUS® finite element package. STOMP-CO2-R models the reactive transport of CO2 causing mineral volume fraction changes that are captured by an Eshelby-Mori-Tanka model implemented in ABAQUS®. A three-dimensional (3D) STOMP-CO2-R model for a reservoir containing an inclined fault was built to analyze a formation containing a reaction network with 5 minerals: albite, anorthite, calcite, kaolinite and quartz. A 3D finite element mesh that exactly maps the STOMP-CO2-R grid is developed for coupled hydro-geochemical-mechanical analyses. The model contains alternating sandstone and shale layers. The impact of reactive transport of CO2 on the geomechanical properties of reservoir rocks and seals are studied in terms of mineral composition changes that affect their geomechanical responses. Simulations assuming extensional and compressional stress regimes with and without coupled geochemistry are performed to study the stress regime effect on the risk of hydraulic fracture. The tendency for the fault to slip is examined in terms of stress regime, geomechanical and geochemical-mechanical effects as well as fault inclination. The results show that mineralogical changes due to long-term injection of CO2 reduce the permeability and elastic modulus of the reservoir, leading to increased risk of hydraulic fracture in the injection location and at the caprock seal immediately above the injection zone. Fault slip is not predicted to occur. However, fault inclination and stress regime have an important impact on the slip tendency factor.

  19. Contesting Citizenship: Comparative Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siim, Birte; Squires, Judith

    2007-01-01

    importance of particularized experiences and multiple ineequality agendas). These developments shape the way citizenship is both practiced and analysed. Mapping neat citizenship modles onto distinct nation-states and evaluating these in relation to formal equality is no longer an adequate approach....... Comparative citizenship analyses need to be considered in relation to multipleinequalities and their intersections and to multiple governance and trans-national organisinf. This, in turn, suggests that comparative citizenship analysis needs to consider new spaces in which struggles for equal citizenship occur...

  20. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David

    2010-12-01

    /condensation process /Karnland et al. 2009/. Once bentonite is water saturated, the transport of solutes is driven by diffusion. Although Donnan equilibrium /Birgersson and Karnland 2009/ and anion exclusion /Muurinen et al. 2004/ are able to influence the mobility of chloride in the bentonite buffer, under the high temperature LOT A2 test conditions, measured data seem to indicate a relatively low influence of these processes on the transport of chloride. For this reason, the transport of chloride has been modelled taking into account advective, dispersive and diffusive fluxes that are believed to have occurred in the LOT A2 test. Numerical results were conducted at fixed thermal gradients for both heated and non-heated bentonite based on the temperatures recorded during the experiment for both heated and non-heated bentonite. The computed evolution of the bentonite saturation indicates that, within approximately one year, the bentonite blocks located at the depth of the heater are completely water saturated which agrees with measured data. The simulated transport of chloride is also in good agreement with data measured at the end of the LOT A2 test for the two cases considered, reflecting the reliability of the conceptual model defined for the LOT A2 test. Based on the geochemical data obtained at end of the LOT A2 test, and on previous modelling exercises /Arcos et al. 2006/, the main geochemical processes that are believed to have developed during the LOT A2 test are: (i) precipitation/dissolution of carbonate, sulphate and silica minerals and, (ii) cation exchange in the montmorillonite interlayer. Numerical results predict the dissolution - precipitation of anhydrite, calcite and silica in the heated bentonite in agreement with data measured at the end of the LOT A2 test

  1. Geochemical characterization of groundwater discharging from springs north of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, 2009–2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Kimberly R.; Tillman, Fred D.; Anderson, Jessica R.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Bills, Donald J.

    2017-08-01

    A geochemical study was conducted on 37 springs discharging from the Toroweap Formation, Coconino Sandstone, Hermit Formation, Supai Group, and Redwall Limestone north of the Grand Canyon near areas of breccia-pipe uranium mining. Baseline concentrations were established for the elements As, B, Li, Se, SiO2, Sr, Tl, U, and V. Three springs exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards: Fence Spring for arsenic, Pigeon Spring for selenium and uranium, and Willow (Hack) Spring for selenium. The majority of the spring sites had uranium values of less than 10 micrograms per liter (μg/L), but six springs discharging from all of the geologic units studied that are located stratigraphically above the Redwall Limestone had uranium values greater than 10 μg/L (Cottonwood [Tuckup], Grama, Pigeon, Rock, and Willow [Hack and Snake Gulch] Springs). The geochemical characteristics of these six springs with elevated uranium include Ca-Mg-SO4 water type, circumneutral pH, high specific conductance, correlation and multivariate associations between U, Mo, Sr, Se, Li, and Zn, low 87Sr/86Sr, low 234U/238U activity ratios (1.34–2.31), detectable tritium, and carbon isotopic interpretation indicating they may be a mixture of modern and pre-modern waters. Similar geochemical compositions of spring waters having elevated uranium concentrations are observed at sites located both near and away from sites of uranium-mining activities in the present study. Therefore, mining does not appear to explain the presence of elevated uranium concentrations in groundwater at the six springs noted above. The elevated uranium at the six previously mentioned springs may be influenced by iron mineralization associated with mineralized breccia pipe deposits. Six springs discharging from the Coconino Sandstone (Upper Jumpup, Little, Horse, and Slide Springs) and Redwall Limestone (Kanab and Side Canyon Springs) contained water with corrected radiocarbon ages as much as 9

  2. Thermo-hydro-geochemical modelling of the bentonite buffer. LOT A2 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, Clara; Salas, Joaquin; Arcos, David (Amphos 21 Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2010-12-15

    /condensation process /Karnland et al. 2009/. Once bentonite is water saturated, the transport of solutes is driven by diffusion. Although Donnan equilibrium /Birgersson and Karnland 2009/ and anion exclusion /Muurinen et al. 2004/ are able to influence the mobility of chloride in the bentonite buffer, under the high temperature LOT A2 test conditions, measured data seem to indicate a relatively low influence of these processes on the transport of chloride. For this reason, the transport of chloride has been modelled taking into account advective, dispersive and diffusive fluxes that are believed to have occurred in the LOT A2 test. Numerical results were conducted at fixed thermal gradients for both heated and non-heated bentonite based on the temperatures recorded during the experiment for both heated and non-heated bentonite. The computed evolution of the bentonite saturation indicates that, within approximately one year, the bentonite blocks located at the depth of the heater are completely water saturated which agrees with measured data. The simulated transport of chloride is also in good agreement with data measured at the end of the LOT A2 test for the two cases considered, reflecting the reliability of the conceptual model defined for the LOT A2 test. Based on the geochemical data obtained at end of the LOT A2 test, and on previous modelling exercises /Arcos et al. 2006/, the main geochemical processes that are believed to have developed during the LOT A2 test are: (i) precipitation/dissolution of carbonate, sulphate and silica minerals and, (ii) cation exchange in the montmorillonite interlayer. Numerical results predict the dissolution - precipitation of anhydrite, calcite and silica in the heated bentonite in agreement with data measured at the end of the LOT A2 test

  3. Identifying the role of historical anthropogenic activities on urban soils: geochemical impact and city scale mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guern, Cecile; Baudouin, Vivien; Conil, Pierre

    2017-04-01

    Recently, European cities have faced several changes including deindustrialization and population increase. To limit urban sprawl, urban densification is preferred. It conducts to (re)develop available areas such as brownfields. Although these areas can be attractive for housing due to their location (in proximity to the city centre or to a riverside), their soils and subsoils are often contaminated. They are therefore potentially harmful for human health and the environment, and potentially costly to remediate. Currently, in case of contamination suspicion, depth geochemical characterization of urban soil and subsoil are carried out at site scale. Nevertheless, large redevelopment project occur at quarter to city scale. It appears therefore useful to acquire the preliminary knowledge on the structure and quality of soil and subsoils, as well as on the potential sources of contamination at quarter to city scale. In the frame of the Ile de Nantes (France) redevelopment project, we considered more particularly anthropogenic deposits and former industrial activities as main sources of contamination linked to human activities. To face the low traceability of the use of anthropogenic deposits and the lack of synthesis of former industrial activities, we carried out a historical study, synthetizing the information spread in numerous archive documents to spatialize the extent of the deposits and of the former activities. In addition we developed a typology of made grounds according to their contamination potential to build a 3D geological model with a geochemical coherence. In this frame, we valorized existing borehole descriptions coming mainly from pollution diagnosis and geotechnical studies. We also developed a methodology to define urban baseline compatibility levels using the existing analytical data at depth from pollution diagnosis. These data were previously gathered in a local geodatabase towards with borehole descriptions (more than 2000 borehole descriptions

  4. GEOCHEMICAL AND ISOTOPIC CONSTRAINTS ON GROUND-WATER FLOW DIRECTIONS, MIXING AND RECHARGE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. Meijer; E. Kwicklis

    2000-01-01

    This analysis is governed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Analysis and Modeling Report Development Plan entitled ''Geochemical and Isotopic Constraints on Groundwater Flow Directions, Mixing and Recharge at Yucca Mountain'' (CRWMS M and O 1999a). As stated in this Development Plan, the purpose of the work is to provide an analysis of groundwater recharge rates, flow directions and velocities, and mixing proportions of water from different source areas based on groundwater geochemical and isotopic data. The analysis of hydrochemical and isotopic data is intended to provide a basis for evaluating the hydrologic system at Yucca Mountain independently of analyses based purely on hydraulic arguments. Where more than one conceptual model for flow is possible, based on existing hydraulic data, hydrochemical and isotopic data may be useful in eliminating some of these conceptual models. This report documents the use of geochemical and isotopic data to constrain rates and directions of groundwater flow near Yucca Mountain and the timing and magnitude of recharge in the Yucca Mountain vicinity. The geochemical and isotopic data are also examined with regard to the possible dilution of groundwater recharge from Yucca Mountain by mixing with groundwater downgradient from the potential repository site. Specifically, the primary tasks of this report, as listed in the AMR Development Plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a), consist of the following: (1) Compare geochemical and isotopic data for perched and pore water in the unsaturated zone with similar data from the saturated zone to determine if local recharge is present in the regional groundwater system; (2) Determine the timing of the recharge from stable isotopes such as deuterium ( 2 H) and oxygen-18 ( 18 O), which are known to vary over time as a function of climate, and from radioisotopes such as carbon-14 ( 14 C) and chlorine-36 ( 36 Cl); (3) Determine the magnitude of recharge from relatively

  5. Management of Reclaimed Produced Water in the Rocky Mountain States Enhanced with the Expanded U.S. Geological Survey Produced Waters Geochemical Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, K. D.; Blondes, M. S.; Reidy, M. E.; Conaway, C. H.; Thordsen, J. J.; Rowan, E. L.; Kharaka, Y. K.; Engle, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Rocky Mountain states; Wyoming, Colorado, Montana, New Mexico and Utah produce annually approximately 470,000 acre-feet (3.66 billion barrels) of produced water - water that coexists with oil and gas and is brought to the surface with the pumping of oil and gas wells. Concerns about severe drought, groundwater depletion, and contamination have prompted petroleum operators and water districts to examine the recycling of produced water. Knowledge of the geochemistry of produced waters is valuable in determining the feasibility of produced water reuse. Water with low salinity can be reclaimed for use inside and outside of the petroleum industry. Since a great proportion of petroleum wells in the Rocky Mountain states, especially coal-bed methane wells, have produced water with relatively low salinity (generally hydraulic fracturing or enhanced oil recovery, and even for municipal uses, such as drinking water. The USGS Produced Waters Geochemical Database, available at http://eerscmap.usgs.gov/pwapp, has 60,000 data points in this region (this includes 35,000 new data points added to the 2002 database) and will facilitate studies on the management of produced water for reclamation in the Rocky Mountain region. Expanding on the USGS 2002 database, which contains geochemical analyses of major ions and total dissolved solids, the new data also include geochemical analyses of minor ions and stable isotopes. We have added an interactive web map application which allows the user to filter data on chosen fields (e.g. TDS Rocky Mountains.

  6. A Study of the Microbial Spatial Heterogeneity of Bahamian Thrombolites Using Molecular, Biochemical, and Stable Isotope Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louyakis, Artemis S.; Mobberley, Jennifer M.; Vitek, Brooke E.; Visscher, Pieter T.; Hagan, Paul D.; Reid, R. Pamela; Kozdon, Reinhard; Orland, Ian J.; Valley, John W.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Casaburi, Giorgio; Foster, Jamie S.

    2017-05-01

    Thrombolites are buildups of carbonate that exhibit a clotted internal structure formed through the interactions of microbial mats and their environment. Despite recent advances, we are only beginning to understand the microbial and molecular processes associated with their formation. In this study, a spatial profile of the microbial and metabolic diversity of thrombolite-forming mats of Highborne Cay, The Bahamas, was generated by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and predictive metagenomic analyses. These molecular-based approaches were complemented with microelectrode profiling and in situ stable isotope analysis to examine the dominant taxa and metabolic activities within the thrombolite-forming communities. Analyses revealed three distinctive zones within the thrombolite-forming mats that exhibited stratified populations of bacteria and archaea. Predictive metagenomics also revealed vertical profiles of metabolic capabilities, such as photosynthesis and carboxylic and fatty acid synthesis within the mats that had not been previously observed. The carbonate precipitates within the thrombolite-forming mats exhibited isotopic geochemical signatures suggesting that the precipitation within the Bahamian thrombolites is photosynthetically induced. Together, this study provides the first look at the spatial organization of the microbial populations within Bahamian thrombolites and enables the distribution of microbes to be correlated with their activities within modern thrombolite systems.

  7. Dialogisk kommunikationsteoretisk analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Louise Jane

    2018-01-01

    analysemetode, der er blevet udviklet inden for dialogisk kommunikationsforskning - The Integrated Framework for Analysing Dialogic Knowledge Production and Communication (IFADIA). IFADIA-metoden bygger på en kombination af Bakhtins dialogteori og Foucaults teori om magt/viden og diskurs. Metoden er beregnet...

  8. Probabilistic safety analyses (PSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The guide shows how the probabilistic safety analyses (PSA) are used in the design, construction and operation of light water reactor plants in order for their part to ensure that the safety of the plant is good enough in all plant operational states

  9. Meta-analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Maria A.; Luyten, Johannes W.; Scheerens, Jaap; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Scheerens, J

    2014-01-01

    In this chapter results of a research synthesis and quantitative meta-analyses of three facets of time effects in education are presented, namely time at school during regular lesson hours, homework, and extended learning time. The number of studies for these three facets of time that could be used

  10. Analysing Access Control Specifications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Hansen, René Rydhof

    2009-01-01

    . Recent events have revealed intimate knowledge of surveillance and control systems on the side of the attacker, making it often impossible to deduce the identity of an inside attacker from logged data. In this work we present an approach that analyses the access control configuration to identify the set...

  11. Wavelet Analyses and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeianu, Cristian C.; Landau, Rubin H.; Paez, Manuel J.

    2009-01-01

    It is shown how a modern extension of Fourier analysis known as wavelet analysis is applied to signals containing multiscale information. First, a continuous wavelet transform is used to analyse the spectrum of a nonstationary signal (one whose form changes in time). The spectral analysis of such a signal gives the strength of the signal in each…

  12. Filmstil - teori og analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    Filmstil påvirker på afgørende vis vores oplevelse af film. Men filmstil, måden, de levende billeder organiserer fortællingen på fylder noget mindre end filmens handling, når vi taler om film. Filmstil - teori og analyse er en rigt eksemplificeret præsentation, kritik og videreudvikling af...

  13. Risico-analyse brandstofpontons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijt de Haag P; Post J; LSO

    2001-01-01

    Voor het bepalen van de risico's van brandstofpontons in een jachthaven is een generieke risico-analyse uitgevoerd. Er is een referentiesysteem gedefinieerd, bestaande uit een betonnen brandstofponton met een relatief grote inhoud en doorzet. Aangenomen is dat de ponton gelegen is in een

  14. Neutron and photon activation analyses in geochemical characterization of sediment profiles at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mizera, Jiří; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 282, č. 1 (2009), s. 53-57 ISSN 0236-5731. [MARC VIII (8th International Conference on Methods and Applications of Radionalytical Chemistry). Kailua-Kona, Hawai, 05.04.2009-10.04.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary * Brodno section * Neutron activation analysis Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.631, year: 2009

  15. Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

    2009-12-31

    Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the aforementioned anomalies at depth. Moreover, high CO{sub 2} concentrations associated with coals in the vadose zone suggest a strong affinity for adsorbing CO{sub 2}. Overall, the low permeability of reclaimed mine lands and coals and CO2 adsorption by the latter is likely to reduce the ability of surface geochemistry tools to detect a microseepage signal.

  16. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments from the Skagerrak (Denmark): I. Geochemical and microbiological analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knab, Nina J.; Cragg, Barry A.; Borowski, Christian

    2008-01-01

    as a methane barrier for this upward diffusing methane. To investigate the regulation of AOM and sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and the controls on the efficiency of methane consumption, pore water concentrations, and microbial rates of AOM, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis were determined in three gravity...

  17. Accounting for geochemical alterations of caprock fracture permeability in basin-scale models of leakage from geologic CO2 reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B.; Fitts, J. P.; Dobossy, M.; Bielicki, J. M.; Peters, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Climate mitigation, public acceptance and energy, markets demand that the potential CO2 leakage rates from geologic storage reservoirs are predicted to be low and are known to a high level of certainty. Current approaches to predict CO2 leakage rates assume constant permeability of leakage pathways (e.g., wellbores, faults, fractures). A reactive transport model was developed to account for geochemical alterations that result in permeability evolution of leakage pathways. The one-dimensional reactive transport model was coupled with the basin-scale Estimating Leakage Semi-Analytical (ELSA) model to simulate CO2 and brine leakage through vertical caprock pathways for different CO2 storage reservoir sites and injection scenarios within the Mt. Simon and St. Peter sandstone formations of the Michigan basin. Mineral dissolution in the numerical reactive transport model expands leakage pathways and increases permeability as a result of calcite dissolution by reactions driven by CO2-acidified brine. A geochemical model compared kinetic and equilibrium treatments of calcite dissolution within each grid block for each time step. For a single fracture, we investigated the effect of the reactions on leakage by performing sensitivity analyses of fracture geometry, CO2 concentration, calcite abundance, initial permeability, and pressure gradient. Assuming that calcite dissolution reaches equilibrium at each time step produces unrealistic scenarios of buffering and permeability evolution within fractures. Therefore, the reactive transport model with a kinetic treatment of calcite dissolution was coupled to the ELSA model and used to compare brine and CO2 leakage rates at a variety of potential geologic storage sites within the Michigan basin. The results are used to construct maps based on the susceptibility to geochemically driven increases in leakage rates. These maps should provide useful and easily communicated inputs into decision-making processes for siting geologic CO2

  18. Geochemical processes controlling water salinization in an irrigated basin in Spain: Identification of natural and anthropogenic influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchán, D., E-mail: d.merchan@igme.es [Geological Survey of Spain — IGME, C/Manuel Lasala 44 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain); Auqué, L.F.; Acero, P.; Gimeno, M.J. [University of Zaragoza — Department of Earth Sciences (Geochemical Modelling Group), C/Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Causapé, J. [Geological Survey of Spain — IGME, C/Manuel Lasala 44 9B, 50006 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2015-01-01

    Salinization of water bodies represents a significant risk in water systems. The salinization of waters in a small irrigated hydrological basin is studied herein through an integrated hydrogeochemical study including multivariate statistical analyses and geochemical modeling. The study zone has two well differentiated geologic materials: (i) Quaternary sediments of low salinity and high permeability and (ii) Tertiary sediments of high salinity and very low permeability. In this work, soil samples were collected and leaching experiments conducted on them in the laboratory. In addition, water samples were collected from precipitation, irrigation, groundwater, spring and surface waters. The waters show an increase in salinity from precipitation and irrigation water to ground- and, finally, surface water. The enrichment in salinity is related to the dissolution of soluble mineral present mainly in the Tertiary materials. Cation exchange, precipitation of calcite and, probably, incongruent dissolution of dolomite, have been inferred from the hydrochemical data set. Multivariate statistical analysis provided information about the structure of the data, differentiating the group of surface waters from the groundwaters and the salinization from the nitrate pollution processes. The available information was included in geochemical models in which hypothesis of consistency and thermodynamic feasibility were checked. The assessment of the collected information pointed to a natural control on salinization processes in the Lerma Basin with minimal influence of anthropogenic factors. - Highlights: • Salinization in Lerma Basin was controlled by the dissolution of soluble salts. • Water salinization and nitrate pollution were found to be independent processes. • High NO{sub 3}, fresh groundwater evolved to lower NO{sub 3}, higher salinity surface water. • Inverse and direct geochemical modeling confirmed the hypotheses. • Salinization was a natural ongoing process

  19. Geochemical variability and sequence stratigraphic interpretation of the mudstone- dominated Lower Cretaceous succession in the eastern Lower Saxony Basin, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöle, Hauke; Heimhofer, Ulrich; Erbacher, Jochen; Bornemann, André; Luppold, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary rocks predominantly composed of silts and clays (mudstones) are currently a popular topic within industry and academia. Of particular interest is to better constrain the pervasive facies variability present within these rocks. Despite their apparent homogeneity at core and outcrop scale, mudstones can actually be highly heterogeneous when examined in detail. We used geochemical and palynofacies analyses to delineate the facies variability present within the mudstone-dominated Lower Cretaceous succession in the eastern Lower Saxony Basin (LSB). In addition, the data-set is used to establish a sequence stratigraphic framework based on X-ray fluorescence (XRF) chemostratigraphy and palynofacies within apparently homogeneous mudstone successions. Our study is based on three scientific drill cores (Scharnhorst 3, Scharrel 10 and Frielingen 9) which were drilled during 2012-2014. Because of their close geographical location and similar palaeoenvironmental setting, these cored sections can be considered as one complete, 510-m-thick composite section covering the late Berriasian to earliest Aptian interval. All cores have been analysed for major and minor elements (Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe) by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) core scanning analysis at 1 cm resolution. The resulting trends for each element were analysed in terms of facies variability and to capture relative shifts in shoreline trajectories. For example, elemental ratios indicative of coarser clastic input (e.g., Si/Al) are used to decipher proximal to distal trends within the studied sediments. In order to better understand the nature of geochemical variations, XRF core scanning analyses are compared with palynofacies results.

  20. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

    2003-01-08

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

  1. Geochemical Distribution of Lead and Chromium in River Getsi-Kano

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geochemical forms of lead (Pb) and Chromium (Cr) from the sediment of River Getsi Kano-Nigeria were determined using Atomic Absorption spectrometer for eighteen months. Apart from determination of the metals in water, geochemical forms of the metals were also evaluated into five fractions. Exchangeable, bound to ...

  2. Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.M.; Benedict, F.C. Jr.; Rose, T.P.; Hershey, R.L.; Paces, J.B.; Peterman, Z.E.; Farnham, I.M.; Johannesson, K.H.; Singh, A.K.; Stetzenbach, K.J.; Hudson, G.B.; Kenneally, J.M.; Eaton, G.F.; Smith, D.K.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units

  3. Geochemical evaluation of CO2 injection and containment in a depleted gas field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tambach, T.J.; Koenen, M.; Wasch, L.J.; Bergen, F. van

    2015-01-01

    The short- and long-term geochemical impact of CO2 injection into a depleted gas reservoir (DGR) is investigated using reservoir/geochemical modeling with TOUGH2/TOUGHREACT and 1D kinetic diffusion modeling with PHREEQC (caprock/well-cement). Simulations of CO2 injection into the reservoir predict

  4. Development of geophysical and geochemical data processing software based on component GIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Dan; Yu Xiang; Wu Qubo; Han Shaoyang; Li Xi

    2013-01-01

    Based on component GIS and mixed programming techniques, a software which combines the basic GIS functions, conventional and unconventional data process methods for the regional geophysical and geochemical data together, is designed and developed. The software has many advantages, such as friendly interface, easy to use and utility functions and provides a useful platform for regional geophysical and geochemical data processing. (authors)

  5. Analysis of the potential impact of capillarity on long-term geochemical processes in sulphidic waste-rock dumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedretti, Daniele; Lassin, Arnault; Beckie, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Capillarity may affect geochemical reactions generating acid-rock drainage. • We studied its impact in a simplified, synthetic WRD. • Capillarity mainly affects the formation of secondary minerals. • It can strongly control long-term formation of gypsum and in turn sulfate release. • Capillarity can be also important for the analysis of calcite passivation. - Abstract: Assessing long-term production of acid rock drainage (ARD) from waste-rock dumps (WRDs) requires a careful analysis of the processes controlling acid-generating geochemical reactions under unsaturated conditions. In this work, we focus on the potential control of capillarity on these reactions, as previous studies showed that capillarity affects the activity of water and solutes in the unsaturated zone through the pore water pressure. We used capillarity-corrected thermodynamic databases and compared calculated speciation and solubility results with those from databases that do not account for capillarity. We developed a simple dynamic model with reduced geochemical components to analyze in detail the effect of capillarity. Results indicate that under low pH conditions simulations with capillarity-controlled reactions generate relatively larger dissolved sulfate concentrations from the WRDs over longer time scales, when compared against simulations without capillarity control. This occurs because capillarity strongly controls the formation of secondary sulfate-bearing minerals such as gypsum. When sufficient oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures are maintained within WRDs (such as in well-ventilated systems) and calcite content is insufficient to buffer acidity, the amount of secondary gypsum was calculated to be much larger in capillarity-corrected models. No appreciable effects of capillarity were observed under conditions where gypsum was not generated. Model results are also insensitive to temperature changes in typical climatic ranges. These results indicate some of

  6. Burning of coal waste piles from Douro Coalfield (Portugal): Petrological, geochemical and mineralogical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, J.; Flores, D. [Departamento and Centro de Geologia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); da Silva, E. Ferreira [GeoBioTec, GeoBiosciences, Geotechnologies and Geoenginering Research Center, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2010-04-01

    In the Douro Coalfield anthracites were exploited for decades (1795-1994). Besides many small mines Douro Coalfield had two principal mining areas (S. Pedro da Cova and Pejao). Coal mining activities cause several impacts on the environment, one of which is the amount of discard or waste which was disposed of all over Douro Coalfield resulting in one of the most significant and severe impacts on the environment. Over 20 waste piles exist in the old mining areas, geographically dispersed, and three of them are presently burning. Their ignition was caused by forest fires during the summer of 2005. Samples from the burning and unburned zones of the waste piles were studied as were the gas from vents and the minerals resulting after combustion. Geochemical processes and mineralogical transformations in the burning coal waste pile were investigated. Microscopic analyses of the samples identified some particular aspects related with combustion: oxidation of pyrite, the presence of iron oxides, organic particles with cracks and rims with lowered (suppressed) Rr, devolatilization vacuoles and some char structures. The occurrence of vitreous (glassy) material as well as Fe-Al spinels in the burning coal waste provide evidences that the combustion temperature could have reached values above 1000 C. Due to combustion, and as expected, the samples studied reported high ash yields. Samples taken from the burning zones reported an increase of As, Cr, Li, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr and LREE concentrations and a decrease in Zr and HREE concentrations. Enrichment in Cs, Li and Rb was noted when comparing with the geochemical composition of black shales and world coals composition that is related with the contribution of granitic rocks in the sediments that originated the main lithologies of the Douro Coalfield (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenites). Cluster analyses (R-type and Q-type) were performed to understand the trend between the unburned and burning samples and it seems that some

  7. Geochemical and mineralogical characterization of a neutral, low-sulfide/high-carbonate tailings impoundment, Markušovce, eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Edgar; Petrák, Marián; Tóth, Roman; Lalinská-Voleková, Bronislava; Jurkovič, L'ubomír; Kučerová, Gabriela; Radková, Anežka; Sottník, Peter; Vozár, Jaroslav

    2013-11-01

    Tailings deposits generated from mining activities represent a potential risk for the aquatic environment through the release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids occurring in a variety of minerals present in the tailings. Physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings such as total concentrations of chemical elements, pH, ratio of acid-producing to acid-neutralizing minerals, and primary and secondary mineral phases are very important factors that control the actual release of potentially toxic metals and metalloids from the tailings to the environment. The aims of this study are the determination of geochemical and mineralogical characteristics of tailings deposited in voluminous impoundment situated near the village of Markušovce (eastern Slovakia) and identification of the processes controlling the mobility of selected toxic metals (Cu, Hg) and metalloids (As, Sb). The studied tailings have unique features in comparison with the other tailings investigated previously because of the specific mineral assemblage primarily consisting of barite, siderite, quartz, and minor sulfides. To meet the aims, samples of the tailings were collected from 3 boreholes and 15 excavated pits and subjected to bulk geochemical analyses (i.e., determination of chemical composition, pH, Eh, acid generation, and neutralization potentials) combined with detailed mineralogical characterization using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), and micro-X-ray diffraction (μ-XRD). Additionally, the geochemical and mineralogical factors controlling the transfer of potentially toxic elements from tailings to waters were also determined using short-term batch test (European norm EN 12457), sampling of drainage waters and speciation-equilibrium calculations performed with PHREEQC. The tailings mineral assemblage consists of siderite, barite, quartz, and dolomite. Sulfide minerals constitute only a minor proportion of the tailings

  8. Controls on the geochemical evolution of Prairie Pothole Region lakes and wetlands over decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher T.; Mushet, David M.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Rover, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    One hundred sixty-seven Prairie Pothole lakes, ponds and wetlands (largely lakes) previously analyzed chemically during the late 1960’s and early to mid-1970’s were resampled and reanalyzed in 2011–2012. The two sampling periods differed climatically. The earlier sampling took place during normal to slightly dry conditions, whereas the latter occurred during and immediately following exceptionally wet conditions. As reported previously in Mushet et al. (2015), the dominant effect was expansion of the area of these lakes and dilution of their major ions. However, within that context, there were significant differences in the evolutionary pathways of major ions. To establish these pathways, we employed the inverse modeling computer code NetpathXL. This code takes the initial and final lake composition and, using mass balance constrained by the composition of diluting waters, and input and output of phases, calculates plausible geochemical evolution pathways. Despite the fact that in most cases major ions decreased, a subset of the lakes had an increase in SO42−. This distinction is significant because SO42− is the dominant anion in a majority of Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and lakes. For lakes with decreasing SO42−, the proportion of original lake water required for mass balance was subordinate to rainwater and/or overland flow. In contrast, lakes with increasing SO42− between the two sampling episodes tended to be dominated by original lake water. This suite of lakes tended to be smaller and have lower initial SO42−concentrations such that inputs of sulfur from dissolution of the minerals gypsum or pyrite had a significant impact on the final sulfur concentration given the lower dilution factors. Thus, our study provides context for how Prairie Pothole Region water bodies evolve geochemically as climate changes. Because wetland geochemistry in turn controls the ecology of these water bodies, this research contributes to the prediction of the

  9. Biomass feedstock analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilen, C.; Moilanen, A.; Kurkela, E. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1996-12-31

    The overall objectives of the project `Feasibility of electricity production from biomass by pressurized gasification systems` within the EC Research Programme JOULE II were to evaluate the potential of advanced power production systems based on biomass gasification and to study the technical and economic feasibility of these new processes with different type of biomass feed stocks. This report was prepared as part of this R and D project. The objectives of this task were to perform fuel analyses of potential woody and herbaceous biomasses with specific regard to the gasification properties of the selected feed stocks. The analyses of 15 Scandinavian and European biomass feed stock included density, proximate and ultimate analyses, trace compounds, ash composition and fusion behaviour in oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The wood-derived fuels, such as whole-tree chips, forest residues, bark and to some extent willow, can be expected to have good gasification properties. Difficulties caused by ash fusion and sintering in straw combustion and gasification are generally known. The ash and alkali metal contents of the European biomasses harvested in Italy resembled those of the Nordic straws, and it is expected that they behave to a great extent as straw in gasification. Any direct relation between the ash fusion behavior (determined according to the standard method) and, for instance, the alkali metal content was not found in the laboratory determinations. A more profound characterisation of the fuels would require gasification experiments in a thermobalance and a PDU (Process development Unit) rig. (orig.) (10 refs.)

  10. Possible future HERA analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiser, Achim

    2015-12-01

    A variety of possible future analyses of HERA data in the context of the HERA data preservation programme is collected, motivated, and commented. The focus is placed on possible future analyses of the existing ep collider data and their physics scope. Comparisons to the original scope of the HERA pro- gramme are made, and cross references to topics also covered by other participants of the workshop are given. This includes topics on QCD, proton structure, diffraction, jets, hadronic final states, heavy flavours, electroweak physics, and the application of related theory and phenomenology topics like NNLO QCD calculations, low-x related models, nonperturbative QCD aspects, and electroweak radiative corrections. Synergies with other collider programmes are also addressed. In summary, the range of physics topics which can still be uniquely covered using the existing data is very broad and of considerable physics interest, often matching the interest of results from colliders currently in operation. Due to well-established data and MC sets, calibrations, and analysis procedures the manpower and expertise needed for a particular analysis is often very much smaller than that needed for an ongoing experiment. Since centrally funded manpower to carry out such analyses is not available any longer, this contribution not only targets experienced self-funded experimentalists, but also theorists and master-level students who might wish to carry out such an analysis.

  11. Repeat immigration: A previously unobserved source of heterogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradhya, Siddartha; Scott, Kirk; Smith, Christopher D

    2017-07-01

    Register data allow for nuanced analyses of heterogeneities between sub-groups which are not observable in other data sources. One heterogeneity for which register data is particularly useful is in identifying unique migration histories of immigrant populations, a group of interest across disciplines. Years since migration is a commonly used measure of integration in studies seeking to understand the outcomes of immigrants. This study constructs detailed migration histories to test whether misclassified migrations may mask important heterogeneities. In doing so, we identify a previously understudied group of migrants called repeat immigrants, and show that they differ systematically from permanent immigrants. In addition, we quantify the degree to which migration information is misreported in the registers. The analysis is carried out in two steps. First, we estimate income trajectories for repeat immigrants and permanent immigrants to understand the degree to which they differ. Second, we test data validity by cross-referencing migration information with changes in income to determine whether there are inconsistencies indicating misreporting. From the first part of the analysis, the results indicate that repeat immigrants systematically differ from permanent immigrants in terms of income trajectories. Furthermore, income trajectories differ based on the way in which years since migration is calculated. The second part of the analysis suggests that misreported migration events, while present, are negligible. Repeat immigrants differ in terms of income trajectories, and may differ in terms of other outcomes as well. Furthermore, this study underlines that Swedish registers provide a reliable data source to analyze groups which are unidentifiable in other data sources.

  12. The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

    1989-01-01

    As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Geochemical exploration for phosphate in the State of Acre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.L. da; Melo Costa, W.A. de; Santos, A.J.M. dos

    1989-01-01

    The geochemical prospecting conducted for phosphates in Acre which could explain the good fertility of the region was charged to discover this material. The phosphates are strictly built of all the bone structures and coprolites of the several fragments of vertebrate fossils, which are widespread in the region. The phosphatic fossils are bedded in the Solimoes Formation, especially its basal to intermediary conglomeratic bed. The fossils are constituted of low crystallinity apatite, and their matrix sediments include quartz, feldspars, smectite, halloysite and calcite. The P 2 O 5 content reaches up to 5% in the sediments and up to 32% in the fragments. The fossils are enriched in U 3 O 8 and rare earth elements. There is no perspect of classic or mineral deposits but the geological knowlwdge will permit the improvement of the use of the soils in Acre. (author) [pt

  14. Geochemical characterisation of Elbe river high flood sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, F. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Falkenberg (Germany). Sektion Boden-/Gewaesserforschung]|[UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany). Sektion Gewaesserforschung; Rupp, H.; Meissner, R. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Falkenberg (Germany). Sektion Boden-/Gewaesserforschung; Lohse, M.; Buettner, O.; Friese, K. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany). Sektion Gewaesserforschung; Miehlich, G. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Bodenkunde

    2001-07-01

    Quality aims for land usage in flood plains have to be worked out in the Russian-German research project 'Effects of floods on the pollution of agricultural used flood plain soils of the Oka River and the Elbe River'. It is financed by the Germany Ministry of Education and Research (FKZ 02 WT 9617/0). Beside the characterisation of the present pollution of soils for the middle Elbe, it is necessary to prognosticate the current pollutant input. At the examination site nearby Wittenberge, Elbe River kilometers 435 and 440, natural deposited flood sediments were sampled by artificial lawn mats. By the geochemical characterisation it is possible to record the metal input into the flood plain and to win knowledge about the sedimentation process. The results of sediment investigation of the high flood in spring 1997 are presented. (orig.)

  15. Nuclear probes in physical and geochemical studies of natural diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, J.P.F.

    In this review the emphasis is directed to the use of nuclear particles for the analysis of impurities in diamond from an interest in both the observed physical properties and genesis of diamond and the inter-relation between these two aspects. However (nuclear) radiation can be used more specifically: from the inter-relation of elemental impurities chemical and geochemical information can be deduced, from energy variation depth distributions of selected impurities can be determined, the prospect of lattice location of impurities exists from the use of extremely finely collimated beams of nuclear particles, which are used also for probing the inter-atomic fields, and finally all nuclear probes excite luminescence in diamonds

  16. Hydrogeological and geochemical studies in the Perch Lake basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.J.

    1979-08-01

    The Perch Lake basin is a small drainage system along the Ottawa River about 200 km west of Ottawa on the Canadian Shield. Since 1975, groups of scientists from several Canadian universities and government departments have been studying the hydrological, geological and geochemical properties of the basin. The object of these studies is to develop and test simulation models used to describe the time-dependent mass flow rates of water and dissolved and suspended substances through the basin. To review progress, a symposium/workshop was held at Chalk Rier in 1978 April. This report contains 24 extended summaries of the material presented verbally at the workshop. Subject matters include atmospheric sources and sinks, mass flows through the surface and subsurface regimes in the drainage basins and interactions occurring in the lake. (author)

  17. Geochemical isotope compartment model of the nitrogen cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, G.; Wetzel, K.; Stiehl, G.

    1981-01-01

    A model of the global cycle of nitrogen and its isotopes is described. It takes into account geochemical reservoirs (nitrogen in magmatic metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks and in the atmosphere) and the nitrogen exchange between magmatic rocks and the outer mantle, the transition of nitrogen exchange between sedimentary rocks and the atmosphere. With the aid of the mathematical formalisms of the compartment theory and on the basis of all available delta 11 N values assumptions regarding the isotope effects in forming these nitrogen fluxes data have been obtained on the degree of the nitrogen exchange between the earth crust and the outer mantle and on other nitrogen fluxes characterizing the global nitrogen cycle. (author)

  18. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis of gold in geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilliacus, R.

    1983-01-01

    A fast method for the radiochemical neutron activation analysis of gold in geochemical samples is described. The method is intended for samples having background concentrations of gold. The method is based on the dissolution of samples with hydrofluoric acid and aqua regia followed by the dissolution of the fluorides with boric acid and hydrochloric acid. Gold is then adsorbed on activated carbon by filtrating the solution through a thin carbon layer. The activity measurements are carried out using a Ge(Li)-detector and a multichannel analyzer. The chemical yields of the separation determined by reirradiation vary between 60 and 90%. The detection limit of the method is 0.2 ng/g gold in rock samples. USGS standard rocks and exploration reference materials are analyzed and the results are presented and compared with literature data. (author)

  19. The Earth's heterogeneous mantle a geophysical, geodynamical, and geochemical perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Amir

    2015-01-01

    This book highlights and discusses recent developments that have contributed to an improved understanding of observed mantle heterogeneities and their relation to the thermo-chemical state of Earth's mantle, which ultimately holds the key to unlocking the secrets of the evolution of our planet. This series of topical reviews and original contributions address 4 themes. Theme 1 covers topics in geophysics, including global and regional seismic tomography, electrical conductivity and seismic imaging of mantle discontinuities and heterogeneities in the upper mantle, transition zone and lower mantle. Theme 2 addresses geochemical views of the mantle including lithospheric evolution from analysis of mantle xenoliths, composition of the deep Earth and the effect of water on subduction-zone processes. Theme 3 discusses geodynamical perspectives on the global thermo-chemical structure of the deep mantle. Theme 4 covers application of mineral physics data and phase equilibrium computations to infer the regional-scale ...

  20. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of Shuixigou group in Yili basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinping; Min Maozhong

    2003-01-01

    The Shuixigou Group, Lower-Middle Jurassic is the uranium-hosting formation of in-situ leachable sandstone-type uranium deposits in Yili basin. Rocks of the Shuixigou Group were extensively corroded during the diagenesis by the CO 2 -and organic acid-rich water derived from the organic matter existing in the strata. As a result, sandstones became loose and porous. Data of geochemical background such as uranium, organic carbon and major element contents in this paper are the achievement of authors. The results indicate that the distribution of uranium, organic matter and major elements is closely associated with the formation of epigenetic interlayer oxidation zone sandstone-type uranium deposits, and with the discrimination of ore-hosting and barren interlayer oxidation zones

  1. The 'glass earth' - geochemical frontiers in exploration through cover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, G.; Denton, G.; Giblin, A.; Korsch, M.; Andrew, A.; Whitford, D.

    1999-01-01

    'Glass Earth' represents a number of current and planned projects within CSIRO aimed at making 'transparent' the top 1000 m of the Earth's crust It builds upon current technologies developed within a number of CSIRO divisions as well as the Australian Mineral Exploration Technologies CRC (AMET CRC), the Australian Geodynamics CRC (AG CRC) and the CRC for Landscape Evolution and Mineral Exploration (CRC LEME). New geophysical and geochemical technologies will be developed to complement these, together with new capabilities in modelling, data integration and visualisation, including hydrogeochemistry, hydrogeology, surface geochemistry and isotope geochemistry, modelling of chemical, fluid and heat flows in rock and regolith, advanced visualisation and data fusion. This paper describes some recent work in the field of isotope geochemistry, with the principal aim of 'seeing through' cover to understand basement geology and detect hidden ore systems

  2. HGCal Simulation Analyses for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Sarah Marie

    2015-01-01

    This summer, I approached the topic of fast-timing detection of photons from Higgs decays via simulation analyses, working under the supervision of Dr. Adolf Bornheim of the California Institute of Technology. My specific project focused on simulating the high granularity calorimeter for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. CMS detects particles using calorimeters. The Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECal) is arranged cylindrically to form a barrel section and two “endcaps.” Previously, both the barrel and endcap have employed lead tungstate crystal detectors, known as the “shashlik” design. The crystal detectors, however, rapidly degrade from exposure to radiation. This effect is most pronounced in the endcaps. To avoid the high expense of frequently replacing degraded detectors, it was recently decided to eliminate the endcap crystals in favor of an arrangement of silicon detectors known as the “High Granularity Calorimeter” (HGCal), while leaving the barrel detector technology unchanged. T...

  3. Geochemical processes during managed aquifer recharge with desalinated seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganot, Y.; Holtzman, R.; Weisbrod, N.; Russak, A.; Katz, Y.; Kurtzman, D.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we study the geochemical processes along the variably-saturated zone during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) with reverse-osmosis desalinated seawater (DSW) to an infiltration pond at the Menashe site, located above the Israeli coastal aquifer. The DSW is post-treated by calcite dissolution (remineralization) in order to meet the Israeli desalinated water quality criteria. Suction cups and monitoring wells inside the pond were used to monitor water quality during two MAR events on 2015 and 2016. Results show that cation exchange is dominant, driven by the high Ca2+ concentration in the post-treated DSW. Stable isotope analysis shows that the composition of the shallow groundwater is similar to the recharged DSW, but with enrichment of Mg2+, Na+, Ca2+ and HCO3-. A calibrated variably-saturated reactive transport model was used to predict the geochemical evolution during 50 years of MAR with two water quality scenarios: post-treated DSW and soft DSW (without post-treatment). The latter scenario was aimed to test soil-aquifer-treatment as an alternative post-treatment technique. In terms of water quality, the results of the two scenarios were found within the range of the desalinated water criteria. Mg2+ enrichment was stable ( 2.5 mg L-1), higher than the zero concentration found in the Israeli DSW. Calcite content reduction was low (<1%) along the variably-saturated profile, after 50 years of MAR. This suggests that using soil-aquifer-treatment as a remineralization technique for DSW is potentially a sustainable practice, which is limited only by the current hydraulic capacity of the Menashe MAR site.

  4. Geochemical Constraints on Archaeal Diversity in the Vulcano Hydrothermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, K. L.; Amend, J. P.

    2006-12-01

    The shallow marine hydrothermal system of Vulcano, Italy hosts a wide diversity of cultured thermophilic Archaea, including Palaeococcus helgesonii, Archaeoglobus fulgidus, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to name a few. However, recent studies have revealed a plethora of uncultured archaeal lineages in the Vulcano system. For example, a 16S rRNA gene survey of an onshore geothermal well identified a diverse archaeal community including deeply-branching uncultured Crenarchaeota, Korarchaeota, and Euryarchaeota. Additionally, culture-independent hybridization techniques suggested that Archaea account for nearly half of the microbial community in the Vulcano system. Furthermore, geochemical characterization of fluids revealed numerous lithotrophic and heterotrophic exergonic reactions that could support as yet uncultured organisms. Archaeal diversity throughout the Vulcano hydrothermal system was investigated using 16S rRNA gene surveys at five submarine vents and an onshore sediment seep. Overall, archaeal diversity was higher (10 groups) at submarine vents with moderate temperatures (59°C) compared with higher temperature (94°C) vents (4 groups). Archaeal communities at the moderately thermal vents were dominated by Thermococcales and also contained Archaeoglobales, Thermoproteales, and uncultured archaea among the Korarchaeota, Marine Group I, and the Deep-sea Hydrothermal Vent Euryarchaeota (DHVE). Fluid composition also affects the microbial community structure. At two high-temperature sites variations in archaeal diversity can be attributed to differences in iron and hydrogen concentrations, and pH. Comparing sites with similar temperature and pH conditions suggests that the presence of Desulfurococcales is limited to sites at which metabolic energy yields exceed 10 kJ per mole of electrons transferred. The Vulcano hydrothermal system hosts diverse archaeal communities, containing both cultured and uncultured species, whose distribution appears to be constrained by

  5. Gas quality and geochemical studies in gas-stimulation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Gas produced following the Gasbuggy and Rulison gas-stimulation nuclear explosions had a different composition than the natural gas produced in the same areas before nuclear stimulation. The principal difference was the presence of substantial amounts of CO 2 , CO, H 2 , and H 2 O in the post-explosion gas. There also were changes in ratios of hydrocarbons. Because CO 2 reduces the heating value of the gas, and steam presents a troublesome disposal problem due to the trace of tritium it carries, an understanding of the geochemical effects produced by these types of nuclear explosions is needed. Samples of gas-bearing shales were heated under a variety of conditions evolving CO 2 at temperatures as low as 500 0 C, even under a CO 2 pressure of 50 atm, due to reactions between fine-grained carbonates and silicates. In other experimental studies evidence was obtained that regions of high temperature (approximately 400 0 C), rather than radiation, caused the changes in gas composition observed in the Gasbuggy chimney during the 6-mo ''shut-in'' period. In looking ahead to the geochemical effects that occur when multiple explosions are used to form interconnecting chimneys, it is concluded that less CO 2 will be produced per unit yield than for a single explosion in the same rock. This is because the intensely heated rock is cooled rapidly by convecting gas before it can heat the adjacent rubble, which results in less rubble being heated hot enough to release CO 2 . Steam production, however, will be greater in the case of multiple explosions than for single explosions because a higher fraction of the total yield is deposited as heat in the chimney, thus increasing the average chimney temperature. The average chimney temperature, and thus the steam pressure, increases as the distance between multiple explosions is decreased. The steam pressure will also increase as the depth of nuclear explosions is increased

  6. Arsenic: geochemical distribution and health risk in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuzolo, Daniela; Cicchella, Domenico; Albanese, Stefano; Catani, Vittorio; Dinelli, Enrico; Lima, Annamaria; Valera, Paolo; De Vivo, Benedetto

    2017-04-01

    Characterization of risks to human health is determinant for risk management and population surveillance. This study represent the first work at national scale for Italy about arsenic occurrence, distribution and health impact. We analyzed the As geochemical distribution in different environmental matrices on the whole Italian territory, and assessed both carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks for different exposure routes and age groups. The results demonstrate that, in Italy, arsenic is present in significant concentrations both in water (up to 27.2 µg/L) and soils (up to 70 mg/kg). Its presence is mainly controlled by geological processes and locally reflects the industrial history of the Country. The population of the Central Italy, where high content of arsenic in the analyzed samples is due to the presence of alkaline volcanics, are the most exposed to the health risk. Based on the results of our work, it is clear that the consumption of tap water for potable use is the most impactful route for As daily exposure and play an important role in governing potential cancer and non-cancer risks for the considered population. It is interesting to observe that the Incremental Life Cancer Risk through water ingestion show that almost 80% of data falls above the internationally accepted benchmark value of 1 x 10-5. Moreover it was demonstrated that childhood is the most susceptible age stage to As exposure. Geochemical mapping provided a useful tool to spatially analyze and represent data and to highlight the most critic areas and the most exposed population to arsenic at national scale. In conclusion, this study improve knowledge about As occurrence for an entire Country, recognizing an health emerging problem. It might be a good starting point to support the urgently needed policy actions, in order to prevent and reduce the health risk. Moreover, the performed method in this case study research is potentially generalizable and applicable in other countries.

  7. Integrated Geochemical-Petrographic Insights on Neoproterozoic Ocean Oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, A.; Planavsky, N.; Wallace, M. W.; Wang, X.; Gueguen, B.

    2015-12-01

    Novel isotope systems have the potential to provide new insights into biogeochemical cycling in Earth's evolving oceans. However, much recent paleo-redox work has been done without extensive consideration of sample preservation or paleoenvironmental setting. Neoproterozoic reef complexes from South Australia provide a perfect setting to test geochemical redox proxies (e.g. uranium isotopes and trace metal chemistry) within a well-defined sedimentological and petrographic context. These reefs developed significant frameworks over ~1km of steep platform relief from the seafloor, and contain a variety of carbonate components including primary dolomite marine cements. Analysis of a variety of components within these reefs reveals significant variation in uranium isotope composition and trace metal chemistry between components, even within a single sample. Marine cements, which precipitated directly from seawater, have much lower contamination element concentrations (e.g. Al, Zr, Th) than depositional micrites, and appear to represent the best archive of ancient ocean conditions. These cements have high levels of Fe, Mn in shallow and deep reef facies (e.g. 2-3wt% Fe), but only Fe-oxide inclusions in peritidal settings. This distribution suggests ferruginous conditions under a surficial chemocline in this Neoproterozoic seawater. Uranium isotopes from pristine marine cements have relatively heavy values compared to modern seawater (median = -0.22 δ238U). These values are essentially unfractionated from riverine inputs, which we interpret as tracking extensive near quantitative low-T reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by abundant soluble iron in seawater. Depositional components and late stage cements have a much lighter and more variable U isotope compositions (-0.71 to -0.08 δ238U). This work highlights the need for fundamental petrographic constraints on the preservation of depositional geochemical signatures in the future use and development of sedimentary redox proxies.

  8. Baseline and premining geochemical characterization of mined sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2015-01-01

    A rational goal for environmental restoration of new, active, or inactive mine sites would be ‘natural background’ or the environmental conditions that existed before any mining activities or other related anthropogenic activities. In a strictly technical sense, there is no such thing as natural background (or entirely non-anthropogenic) existing today because there is no part of the planet earth that has not had at least some chemical disturbance from anthropogenic activities. Hence, the terms ‘baseline’ and ‘pre-mining’ are preferred to describe these conditions. Baseline conditions are those that existed at the time of the characterization which could be pre-mining, during mining, or post-mining. Protocols for geochemically characterizing pre-mining conditions are not well-documented for sites already mined but there are two approaches that seem most direct and least ambiguous. One is characterization of analog sites along with judicious application of geochemical modeling. The other is reactive-transport modeling (based on careful synoptic sampling with tracer-injection) and subtracting inputs from known mining and mineral processing. Several examples of acidic drainage are described from around the world documenting the range of water compositions produced from pyrite oxidation in the absence of mining. These analog sites provide insight to the processes forming mineralized waters in areas untouched by mining. Natural analog water-chemistry data is compared with the higher metal concentrations, metal fluxes, and weathering rates found in mined areas in the few places where comparisons are possible. The differences are generally 1–3 orders of magnitude higher for acid mine drainage.

  9. Geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

    1983-09-01

    This report is the result of a geochemical investigation of the former uranium mill and tailings site at Grand Junction, Colorado. The objectives of the investigation are to characterize the geochemistry, to determine the contaminant distribution resulting from the former milling activities and tailings, and to infer chemical pathways and transport mechanisms from the contaminant distribution. The results should be used to model contaminant migration and to develop criteria for long-term containment media, such as a cover system which is impermeable to contaminant migration. This report assumes a familiarity with the hydrologic conditions of the site and the geochemical concepts underlying the investigation. The results reported are based on a sampling of waters in two seasons and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. The solid samples were water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The water extracts and solid samples were analyzed for the major and trace elements. A limited number of samples were analyzed for radiological components. The report includes the methods of sampling, sample processing, analysis, and data interpretation. Four major conclusions are: (1) trace element concentrations in shallow subsurface waters adjacent to the tailings temporally vary up to an order of magnitude; (2) the riverbank soils and borehole waters are contaminated with uranium, radium, and trace elements from discharge of tailings solids and solutions during the active time of the mill; however, the movement of contaminants toward the Colorado River does not appear to be significant; (3) the Colorado River adjacent to the tailings is not contaminated; and (4) trace metals have accumulated at both the tailings/cover and tailings/soil interface because of precipitation reactions caused by chemical differences between the two materials

  10. WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

    1982-09-01

    Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ΔG 0 /sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs

  11. Hydrological and geochemical consequences of river regulation - hyporheic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siergieiev, Dmytro; Lundberg, Angela; Widerlund, Anders

    2014-05-01

    River-aquifer interfaces, essential for ecosystem functioning in terms of nutrient exchange and biological habitat, appear greatly threatened worldwide. Although river regulation is a vast pressure on river-aquifer interaction, influencing entire watersheds, knowledge about hyporheic exchange in regulated rivers is rather limited. In this study, we combine two decades of research on hydrological and geochemical impacts of hydropower regulation on river water and hyporheic zone in two large boreal rivers, unregulated Kalix River and regulated Lule River. Altered river discharge, with reduced spring peaks, daily summer fluctuations and elevated winter base flow severely modified Lule River water geochemistry and thus the transport of solutes to the Bothnian Bay (Baltic Sea). Further, these river modifications changed the river-aquifer exchange on both daily and seasonal scale, which resulted in deteriorated hyporheic conditions with reduced riverbed hydraulic conductivity (formation of a clogging layer) reflected in a declined hyporheic flux. Altered hydrological regime of the hyporheic zone created quasi-stagnant conditions beneath the river-aquifer interface and promoted the formation of geochemically suboxic environment. Taken that hyporheic water is a mixture of river water and groundwater, mixing models for the regulated site demonstrate a considerable addition of Fe, Mn, Al, NH4 and removal of dissolved oxygen and nitrate, which suggests the hyporheic zone in the Lule River to be a source of solutes. This contradicts the observations from the hyporheic zone in the unregulated river, with opposite behaviour functioning as a barrier. These results suggest that the hyporheic zone function is dependent on the river discharge and the state of the river-aquifer connectivity. Improved knowledge about the latter on a watershed scale will substantially increase our understanding about the status and potential pressures of riverine ecosystems and assist management and

  12. Geophysical and geochemical signatures of Gulf of Mexico seafloor brines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Joye

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical, temperature, and discrete depth-stratified geochemical data illustrate differences between an actively venting mud volcano and a relatively quiescent brine pool in the Gulf of Mexico along the continental slope. Geophysical data, including laser-line scan mosaics and sub-bottom profiles, document the dynamic nature of both environments. Temperature profiles, obtained by lowering a CTD into the brine fluid, show that the venting brine was at least 10°C warmer than the bottom water. At the brine pool, thermal stratification was observed and only small differences in stratification were documented between three sampling times (1991, 1997 and 1998. In contrast, at the mud volcano, substantial temperature variability was observed, with the core brine temperature being slightly higher than bottom water (by 2°C in 1997 but substantially higher than bottom water (by 19°C in 1998. Detailed geochemical samples were obtained in 2002 using a device called the 'brine trapper' and concentrations of dissolved gases, major ions and nutrients were determined. Both brines contained about four times as much salt as seawater and steep concentration gradients of dissolved ions and nutrients versus brine depth were apparent. Differences in the concentrations of calcium, magnesium and potassium between the two brine fluids suggest that the fluids are derived from different sources, have different dilution/mixing histories, or that brine-sediment reactions are more important at the mud volcano. Substantial concentrations of methane, ammonium, and silicate were observed in both brines, suggesting that fluids expelled from deep ocean brines are important sources of these constituents to the surrounding environment.

  13. 22 CFR 40.91 - Certain aliens previously removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens previously removed. 40.91... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Aliens Previously Removed § 40.91 Certain aliens previously removed. (a) 5-year bar. An alien who has been found inadmissible, whether as a result...

  14. Spatial distribution and leaching behavior of pollutants from phosphogypsum stocked in a gypstack: Geochemical characterization and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisone, Sara; Gautier, Mathieu; Chatain, Vincent; Blanc, Denise

    2017-05-15

    Phosphogypsum (PPG) is the byproduct of the production of phosphoric acid and phosphate fertilizers from phosphate rocks (PR) by acid digestion. Despite the technical feasibility, the impurities present in this waste make its reuse critical and large amounts of PPG are stockpiled, resulting in the production of polluted acid leachates. The aim of the present study was to characterize the spatial variability and evolution in time of a 20-year-old gypstack and to study the geochemical behavior of the waste in order to assess the best management options. Chemical and mineralogical analyses were performed on core samples taken from 4 different depths of the stack down to 13.5 m. Despite the high homogeneity shown by chemical and mineral characterization, leaching tests revealed a different chemical behavior with depth. pH-dependent leaching tests were also performed to measure the acid neutralization capacity of the studied matrices and to determine the leachability of the elements or pollutants of concern as a function of pH. The study was focused on Ca, Fe Na, Si, Cd and Sr and on F - , PO 4 3- and SO 4 2- anions. The geochemical modeling of these tests with PHREEQC enabled the identification of the minor phases controlling the solubilization of the elements analyzed. Validation of the model by the simulation of a column leaching test suggested that the model could be used as a predictive tool to assess different management scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Utilization of Neutron Activation Analysis for geochemical study of major and trace elements in Bouregreg river basin (Morocco)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounouira, H.; Bounakhla, M.; Embarch, K.; Choukri, A.; Cherkaoui, R.; Gaudry, A.; Treuil, M.; Chakiri, S.

    2010-01-01

    The Bouregreg river basin is located in the moroccan central massif which consists mainly of palaeozoic formations that were subject to the Hercynian orogeny. This study documents the backround geochemistry and hydrochemistry of the Bouregreg river basin, focusing on the distribution of major and trace elements, Rock samples were collected at 9 locations along the bouregreg river and its tributaries in the winter of 2005. Major (Al, fe, Mn, Na, K and Ti) and trace (Rb, Cs, Sr, Sc, Ba, Cr, V, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Sb, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Dy, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Mo, Th and U) elements were anlysed using instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA). Data show that most of the geochemistry and hydrochemistry are related to regional and local geology. the geochemical heritage of geological environment in the Bouregreg river basin is very important, that results from the more compatible behaviour and the inertia of some elements during the weathering (3d transition elements (Co, Ni, Cr,...), interne transition elements f (lanthanides, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta,...)). The geochemical homogeneity of the basin shows also heritage during the crustal accretion (magmatism-metamorphism-sedimention) and the typology of this continental area is the same that the Upper Continental Crust (UCC). Some anomalously high heavy metal analyses, particulary for As and Sb, may be related to anthropogenic activities

  16. Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.

    1995-08-01

    Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

  17. Preliminary delineation of natural geochemical reactions, Snake River Plain aquifer system, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and vicinity, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.; Orr, B.R.

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting a study to determine the natural geochemistry of the Snake River Plain aquifer system at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho. As part of this study, a group of geochemical reactions that partially control the natural chemistry of ground water at the INEL were identified. Mineralogy of the aquifer matrix was determined using X-ray diffraction and thin-section analysis and theoretical stabilities of the minerals were used to identify potential solid-phase reactants and products of the reactions. The reactants and products that have an important contribution to the natural geochemistry include labradorite, olivine, pyroxene, smectite, calcite, ferric oxyhydroxide, and several silica phases. To further identify the reactions, analyses of 22 representative water samples from sites tapping the Snake River Plain aquifer system were used to determine the thermodynamic condition of the ground water relative to the minerals in the framework of the aquifer system. Principal reactions modifying the natural geochemical system include congruent dissolution of olivine, diopside, amorphous silica, and anhydrite; incongruent dissolution of labradorite with calcium montmorillonite as a residual product; precipitation of calcite and ferric oxyhydroxide; and oxidation of ferrous iron to ferric iron. Cation exchange reactions retard the downward movement of heavy, multivalent waste constituents where infiltration ponds are used for waste disposal

  18. Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

    2005-03-10

    Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

  19. Modelling of leaching and geochemical processes in an aged MSWIBA subbase layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendz, David; Suer, Pascal; Sloot, Hans van der; Kosson, David; Flyhammar, Peter

    2009-07-15

    In a previous project, the accumulated effects of leaching and aging in a subbase layer of bottom ash in a test road were investigated. The test road were constructed in 1987 in Linkoeping, Sweden, and was in use until the start of the Vaendoera Q4-241 study in September 2003. The overall objective of the present study is to bring the evaluation of the previous project (Q4-241) further by taking advantage of the existing data, perform complementary laboratory experiments on four composite samples reflecting different degree of exposure to atmosphere and leaching. The specific objectives were to investigate: (i) what processes and mineral phases that govern leaching of macro- and trace elements and DOC in the bottom ash after 16 years (1987- 2003) of aging under field conditions. (ii) how the hydrologic conditions, infiltration of water and leachate production has evolved with time. The following tests were performed on the composite samples: pH-stat test, column test, Fe/Al oxide extraction and TOC fractioning. Geochemical and hydrological modelling where performed with LeachXS/Orchestra and Hydrus 2-D. Daily precipitation data from the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI) from the Malmslaett (Linkoeping) measurement station was used in the hydrological modelling of January 1988 to the 1st of september 2003. The hydraulic modeling results show that the bottom ash subbase layer endure seasonal wet and dry cycles. The results confirm that, depending on the boundary conditions along the shoulders the capillary potential may drive moisture either in or out of the road body. The water retention parameters for bottom ash were crucial in the hydraulic modeling and the capillary forces in bottom ash were found to be significant with a water retention curve close to silt. This explains the observed depletion of easily soluble salts in the test road. The results showed that the accumulated LS ratio for the bottom ash subbase layer reached about LS:10 in

  20. A conceptual geochemical model of the geothermal system at Surprise Valley, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Ferguson, Colin; Cantwell, Carolyn A.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; McClain, James; Spycher, Nicolas; Dobson, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    Characterizing the geothermal system at Surprise Valley (SV), northeastern California, is important for determining the sustainability of the energy resource, and mitigating hazards associated with hydrothermal eruptions that last occurred in 1951. Previous geochemical studies of the area attempted to reconcile different hot spring compositions on the western and eastern sides of the valley using scenarios of dilution, equilibration at low temperatures, surface evaporation, and differences in rock type along flow paths. These models were primarily supported using classical geothermometry methods, and generally assumed that fluids in the Lake City mud volcano area on the western side of the valley best reflect the composition of a deep geothermal fluid. In this contribution, we address controls on hot spring compositions using a different suite of geochemical tools, including optimized multicomponent geochemistry (GeoT) models, hot spring fluid major and trace element measurements, mineralogical observations, and stable isotope measurements of hot spring fluids and precipitated carbonates. We synthesize the results into a conceptual geochemical model of the Surprise Valley geothermal system, and show that high-temperature (quartz, Na/K, Na/K/Ca) classical geothermometers fail to predict maximum subsurface temperatures because fluids re-equilibrated at progressively lower temperatures during outflow, including in the Lake City area. We propose a model where hot spring fluids originate as a mixture between a deep thermal brine and modern meteoric fluids, with a seasonally variable mixing ratio. The deep brine has deuterium values at least 3 to 4‰ lighter than any known groundwater or high-elevation snow previously measured in and adjacent to SV, suggesting it was recharged during the Pleistocene when meteoric fluids had lower deuterium values. The deuterium values and compositional characteristics of the deep brine have only been identified in thermal springs and

  1. AMS analyses at ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    The major use of ANTARES is Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) with 14 C being the most commonly analysed radioisotope - presently about 35 % of the available beam time on ANTARES is used for 14 C measurements. The accelerator measurements are supported by, and dependent on, a strong sample preparation section. The ANTARES AMS facility supports a wide range of investigations into fields such as global climate change, ice cores, oceanography, dendrochronology, anthropology, and classical and Australian archaeology. Described here are some examples of the ways in which AMS has been applied to support research into the archaeology, prehistory and culture of this continent's indigenous Aboriginal peoples. (author)

  2. Coupled process analyses for salt repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Monti, A.M.; Raines, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Salt sites are being investigated as potential candidates for a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To assess the performance of a repository in salt it is necessary to estimate the potential for naturally occurring and/or intrusive fluids to contact the radioactive waste and transport it to the accessible environment. The long-term performance assessment of a salt repository consists of multidisciplinary studies of the coupled physical and chemical interactions in geologic systems involving heat transfer, ground-water hydrology, geomechanics, geochemistry, and radionuclide transport. The coupled process analyses performed or planned to be conducted include coupled thermal, stress, and pressure-induced brine migration; flow, thermal, mechanical, and geomechanical (corrosion and leach rate) analyses for waste package and waste form performance; flow, thermal, and mechanical analyses for shaft seals and near-field performance; flow, thermal, dissolution, and salt creep analyses for borehole scenarios; flow, energy, and solute transport analyses of the groundwater system in the vicinity of site; and coupled analyses of hydrologic, mechanical, geochemical, and radionuclide transport

  3. Coupled process analyses for salt repository performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.K.; Bloom, S.G.; Monti, A.M.; Baines, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Salt sites are investigated as potential candidates for a deep geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To assess the performance of a repository in salt it is necessary to estimate the potential for naturally occurring and/or intrusive fluids to contact the radioactive waste and transport it to the accessible environment. The long-term performance assessment of a salt repository consists of multidisciplinary studies of the coupled physical and chemical interactions in geologic systems involving heat transfer, groundwater hydrology, geomechanics, geochemistry, and radionuclide transport. The coupled process analyses performed or planned to be conducted include coupled thermal, stress, and pressure-induced brine migration; flow, thermal, mechanical, and geomechanical (corrosion and leach rate) analyses for waste package and waste form performance; flow, thermal, and mechanical analyses for shaft seals and near-field performance; flow, thermal, dissolution, and salt creep analyses for borehole scenarios; flow, energy, and solute transport analyses of the groundwater system in the vicinity of the site; and coupled analyses of hydrologic, mechanical, geochemical, and radionuclide transport

  4. Determining root correspondence between previously and newly detected objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglieroni, David W.; Beer, N Reginald

    2014-06-17

    A system that applies attribute and topology based change detection to networks of objects that were detected on previous scans of a structure, roadway, or area of interest. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The topology of the network of previously detected objects is maintained in a constellation database that stores attributes of previously detected objects and implicitly captures the geometrical structure of the network. A change detection system detects change by comparing the attributes and topology of new objects detected on the latest scan to the constellation database of previously detected objects.

  5. Geochemical characterization of organic ligands for copper(II) in different molecular size fractions in Lake Biwa, Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fengchang Wu [Chinese Academy of Science, Guiyang (China). Inst. of Geochemistry; Eiichiro Tanoue [Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan). Graduate School of Environmental Studies

    2001-07-01

    In a previous study, we reported the isolation of organic ligands for copper(II), their mass distribution and fluorescence properties in different molecular size fractions of the waters in Lake Biwa by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and three dimensional excitation/emission matrix spectroscopy (3DEEM) (Wu, F., Tanoue, E., 2001. Molecular mass distributions and fluorescence characteristics of organic ligands for copper (II) in Lake Biwa, Japan. Org. Geochem. 32, 11-20). In this continuous study, geochemical properties of these isolated ligand fractions were characterized in terms of binding complexation, functional groups and amino acid composition. The results show that two ligand classes (L{sub 1} and L{sub 2}) were recovered from all molecular size ligand fractions, L{sub 1} with a conditional stability constant (LogK'{sub CuL}) of 7.82-9.56, and L{sub 2} with a LogK'{sub CuL} value of 7.05-8.78. The stronger ligands with protein-like fluorescence were of recent biogenic origin, and the weaker ligands with humic-like fluorescence were related to refractory humic substances. Functional groups responsible for the fluorescence in the ligand fractions are also discussed. The results presented here would have significance for understanding the nature of natural organic ligands and their biogeochemical role in aquatic systems. (author)

  6. Proteins analysed as virtual knots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Keith; Taylor, Alexander J.; Dennis, Mark R.

    2017-02-01

    Long, flexible physical filaments are naturally tangled and knotted, from macroscopic string down to long-chain molecules. The existence of knotting in a filament naturally affects its configuration and properties, and may be very stable or disappear rapidly under manipulation and interaction. Knotting has been previously identified in protein backbone chains, for which these mechanical constraints are of fundamental importance to their molecular functionality, despite their being open curves in which the knots are not mathematically well defined; knotting can only be identified by closing the termini of the chain somehow. We introduce a new method for resolving knotting in open curves using virtual knots, which are a wider class of topological objects that do not require a classical closure and so naturally capture the topological ambiguity inherent in open curves. We describe the results of analysing proteins in the Protein Data Bank by this new scheme, recovering and extending previous knotting results, and identifying topological interest in some new cases. The statistics of virtual knots in protein chains are compared with those of open random walks and Hamiltonian subchains on cubic lattices, identifying a regime of open curves in which the virtual knotting description is likely to be important.

  7. Uncertainty Analyses and Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevin Coppersmith

    2001-01-01

    The DOE identified a variety of uncertainties, arising from different sources, during its assessment of the performance of a potential geologic repository at the Yucca Mountain site. In general, the number and detail of process models developed for the Yucca Mountain site, and the complex coupling among those models, make the direct incorporation of all uncertainties difficult. The DOE has addressed these issues in a number of ways using an approach to uncertainties that is focused on producing a defensible evaluation of the performance of a potential repository. The treatment of uncertainties oriented toward defensible assessments has led to analyses and models with so-called ''conservative'' assumptions and parameter bounds, where conservative implies lower performance than might be demonstrated with a more realistic representation. The varying maturity of the analyses and models, and uneven level of data availability, result in total system level analyses with a mix of realistic and conservative estimates (for both probabilistic representations and single values). That is, some inputs have realistically represented uncertainties, and others are conservatively estimated or bounded. However, this approach is consistent with the ''reasonable assurance'' approach to compliance demonstration, which was called for in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) proposed 10 CFR Part 63 regulation (64 FR 8640 [DIRS 101680]). A risk analysis that includes conservatism in the inputs will result in conservative risk estimates. Therefore, the approach taken for the Total System Performance Assessment for the Site Recommendation (TSPA-SR) provides a reasonable representation of processes and conservatism for purposes of site recommendation. However, mixing unknown degrees of conservatism in models and parameter representations reduces the transparency of the analysis and makes the development of coherent and consistent probability statements about projected repository

  8. Geochemical site-selection criteria for HLW repositories in Europe and North America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Arthur, Randolph C.; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

    2000-01-01

    Geochemical as well as socio-economic issues associated with the selection of potential sites to host a high-level nuclear waste repository have received considerable attention in repository programs in Europe (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the U.K.) and North America (Canada and the United States). The objective of the present study is to summarize this international experience with particular emphasis on geochemical properties that factor into the adopted site-selection strategies. Results indicate that the geochemical properties of a site play a subordinate role, at best, to other geotechnical properties in the international site-selection approaches. In countries where geochemical properties are acknowledged in the site-selection approach, requirements are stated qualitatively and tend to focus on associated impacts on the stability of the engineered barrier system and on radionuclide transport. Site geochemical properties that are likely to control the long-term stability of geochemical conditions and radionuclide migration behavior are unspecified, however. This non-prescriptive approach may be reasonable for purposes of screening among potential sites, but a better understanding of site properties that are most important in controlling the long-term geochemical evolution of the site over a range of possible scenarios would enable the potential sites to be ranked in terms of their suitability to host a repository. (author)

  9. A novel two-dimensional model for colloid transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, N; Elimelech, M; Sun, N Z; Ryan, J N

    2001-06-01

    A two-dimensional model for colloid transport in geochemically and physically heterogeneous porous media is presented. The model considers patchwise geochemical heterogeneity, which is suitable to describe the chemical variability of many surficial aquifers with ferric oxyhydroxide-coated porous matrix, as well as spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, which results in heterogeneous flow field. The model is comprised of a transient fluid flow equation, a transient colloid transport equation, and an equation for the dynamics of colloid deposition and release. Numerical simulations were carried out with the model to investigate the colloid transport behavior in layered and randomly heterogeneous porous media. Results demonstrate that physical and geochemical heterogeneities markedly affect the colloid transport behavior. Layered physical or geochemical heterogeneity can result in distinct preferential flow paths of colloidal particles. Furthermore, the combined effect of layered physical and geochemical heterogeneity may result in enhanced or reduced preferential flow of colloids. Random distribution of physical heterogeneity (hydraulic conductivity) results in a random flow field and an irregularly distributed colloid concentration profile in the porous medium. Contrary to random physical heterogeneity, the effect of random patchwise geochemical heterogeneity on colloid transport behavior is not significant. It is mostly the mean value of geochemical heterogeneity rather than its distribution that governs the colloid transport behavior.

  10. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tao; Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding; Sun, Liguang; Yin, Xijie

    2016-01-01

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ 15 N and δ 13 C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540–2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540–1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition. - Highlights: • Emperor penguin colonized at Amanda Bay, East Antarctic as early as AD 1540. • Populations of emperor penguin at Amanda Bay increase during the little ice age. • Depleted N isotope ratios of Emperor penguins during the LIA were observed.

  11. Scientific drilling reveals geochemical heterogeneity within the Ko'olau shield, Hawai'i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Eric H.; Garcia, Michael O.

    The Ko'olau Scientific Drilling Project (KSDP) was initiated to determine if the distinctive geochemistry of Ko'olau lavas is a near-surface feature. This project successfully deepened a recent, 351 m deep, tri-cone rotary-drilled water well by coring another 328 m. Three Ar-Ar plateau ages of 2.8 to 2.9 Ma from the drill core section of 103 flows confirm stratigraphic interpretations that core drilling recovered the deepest and oldest subaerially erupted lavas yet sampled from this volcano. The petrography and geochemistry of the core, and cuttings from this and another new Ko'olau water well ( 433 m deep) were determined. These analyses revealed that the geochemically distinct lavas of Ko'olau form a veneer only 175-250 m thick at the drill sites, covering flows with more typical Hawaiian tholeiite compositions. The compositional change occurred near the end of shield volcanism and is not abrupt. Thus, it is probably not related to a catastrophic event such as the collapse of the northeast flank of this volcano. The distinct geochemistry of surface Ko'olau lavas cannot be explained by melting pyroxenitic or combined pyroxenitic and peridotitic sources. Additional recycled oceanic crustal components, such as plagioclase-rich cumulates and sediment, were probably involved. As the Ko'olau volcano drifted off the Hawaiian hotspot and the overall degree of melting decreased, the proportion of melts from recycled oceanic crustal material increased relative to those from mantle peridotite.

  12. Mineralogical and geochemical aspects of nickeliferous laterite of Vermelho region, Serra dos Carajas (State of Para)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Correa, S.L. de.

    1982-01-01

    Mineralogical and geochemical studies were carried out on the nickeliferous laterite of Vermelho region (Serra of Carajas, state of Para). A total of 64 samples were analysed by X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption, spectrophotometry, including bed-rock specimens. The laterite is derived from ultramafic rocks (serpentinites) and there horizons were recognized towards the top: saprolitic horizon with a thickness of more than 4 meters, clay horizon 6,1 meters thick and limonitic horizon with a thickness of 8,3 meters. The process of weathering affected both major and trace elements which were bleached, transported and reprecipitated. This caused variations in the concentration of the elements with depth, except for magnesium which was extensively bleached. Nickel concentrations in the clay horizon probably was a result of ion exchange between smectite and Ni-bearing solutions, the source of this Ni being goethite. Cobalt and zinc were also strongly enriched during the process of laterization, although maximum concentrations of these elements are found in different horizons. (author)

  13. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding; Sun, Liguang; Yin, Xijie

    2016-09-15

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ(15)N and δ(13)C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540-2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540-1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Geochemical information and isotopic ratios in pinpointing the rates of contamination processes generated at mine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turunen, Kaisa; Kittilä, Anniina; Backnäs, Soile; Pasanen, Antti; Hendriksson, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The isotopic composition of water is an important fingerprinting method for tracing recharge sources, distribution processes and possible hydraulic connections of mine waters. However, since, the isotopes alone do not indicate the contamination derived from mining activities; also a set of geochemical analysis of harmful substance in water is acquired. This complex approach will allow a detailed insight in migration of potentially harmful substances, their reactions, mixing and dilution in ground and surface waters. The data can be applied also when comparing geogenic and anthropogenic emissions. Isotopic methods are rather new approach to estimate mining related emissions in Finland and thus, a novel approach of isotopic methods for investigation and monitoring of migration of harmful substances from mine sites are tested in two mine sites in Finland. The aim of this study is to assess the emission sources, flow paths and interaction between mine waters, groundwater and surface waters. A set of isotopic data, including S, Li, Mg, U, Sr, Pb, O, and H, will be combined with chemical information and physical parameters of water in order to assess the source and extent of possible contamination as well as the rates of processes that generate or at best attenuate the contamination. The results obtained from water analyses and field measurements will be used in hydrogeochemical modelling for the prediction of chemical transformation and long-term impacts of mining at study site and its surroundings.

  15. Geochemical investigations of potentially toxic trace elements in urban sediments of Idrija

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Špela Bavec

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban areas and associated human activities (industry, traffi, processes of mining and ore extracting, etc. have induced anthropogenic emissions of potentially toxic trace elements (PTTE, which can present risk to living organisms and ecosystems in case of enriched levels. An example of such area in Slovenia is the Idrija town, the central part of the second largest Hg mining district in the world, which is heavily contaminated with Hg in all environmental compartments. The knowledge about levels and distribution of other PTTE in Idrija is very limited due to the outstanding Hg related problems. In this study the geochemical investigation of PTTE (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb and Zn was performed in urban stream and road sediments of Idrija town for the fist time. In addition, solid phases of PTTE were observed using SEM/EDS and their potential sources were assessed. The results show that the levels of PTTE in urban stream and road sediments are mostly below international guidelines, except for Cu some high values were measured in road sediments. The highest Cu level was determined in the vicinity of a commutator production industry. The associations of Cu with other elements in solid phases are very diverse, which is why the analyses could not reveal the specifi source of high Cu levels.

  16. Hydrothermal system of the Papandayan Volcano from temperature, self-potential (SP) and geochemical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Revil, André; Gunawan, Hendra; Saing, Ugan B.; Grandis, Hendra

    2017-07-01

    Papandayan volcano in West Java, Indonesia, is characterized by intense hydrothermal activities manifested by numerous fumaroles at three craters or kawah, i.e. Mas, Manuk and Baru. The latter was created after November 2002 phreatic eruption. Since 2011, numerous volcano-tectonic B events are encountered and the volcano was set on alert status on several occasions. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the structure of the summital hydrothermal system from Self-Potential (SP), soil temperature and gas concentrations in the soil (CO2, SO2 and H2S) data. This combination of geophysical and geochemical methods allows identification of the weak permeable zones serving as preferential pathways for hydrothermal circulation and potential candidates to future landslides or flank collapses. This study is an on-going collaborative research project and we plan to conduct electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and also Induced-Polarization (IP) surveys. Additional data would allow the 3D imaging of the studied area. The IP parameters will be used to characterise and to quantify the degree of alteration of the volcanic rocks as has been shown very recently in the laboratory studies. There are also rocks and soil samples that will undergo laboratory analyses at ISTerre for IP and complex resistivity parameters at the sample scale that will help to interpret the survey results.

  17. Geochemical processes and compacted bentonite FEBEX with a thermohydraulic gradient with a thermohydraulic gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguey Jimenez, S.; Cuevas Rodriguez, J.; Martin Barca, M.; Vigil de la Villa Mencia, R.; Ramirez Martin, S.; Garcia Gimenez, R.

    2002-01-01

    At present, the main source of High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) is the electrical energy production during all sep of developing. In almost all the countries with nuclear programs, the option for the final management of HLW is the Deep Geological Repository (DGR), based on the concept of multi barrier. According to this concept, the wastes is isolated from biosphere by the interposition of confinement barrier. In the context of an investigation of the near field for a repository of HLW, the FEBEX Project, a set of laboratory test has been designed to give a better understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical and geochemical behaviour of the compacted bentonite as a confinement barrier. The object of these work is to analyse the properties of the bentonite and its behaviour under conditions that will be found in a repository. The precipitation of mineral phases, due to local changes in the chemical equilibrium and the hydration itself, can produce changes in the salinity of the interstitial water and in the microstructural organisation of the clay particles. the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the bentonite can be modified by the special conditions of the barrier. (Author)

  18. Geochemical record of high emperor penguin populations during the Little Ice Age at Amanda Bay, Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Tao, E-mail: huangt@ahu.edu.cn [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei 230601 (China); School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yang, Lianjiao; Chu, Zhuding [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Sun, Liguang, E-mail: slg@ustc.edu.cn [School of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Yin, Xijie [Third Institute of Oceanography, State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) are sensitive to the Antarctic climate change because they breed on the fast sea ice. Studies of paleohistory for the emperor penguin are rare, due to the lack of archives on land. In this study, we obtained an emperor penguin ornithogenic sediment profile (PI) and performed geochronological, geochemical and stable isotope analyses on the sediments and feather remains. Two radiocarbon dates of penguin feathers in PI indicate that emperor penguins colonized Amanda Bay as early as CE 1540. By using the bio-elements (P, Se, Hg, Zn and Cd) in sediments and stable isotope values (δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 13}C) in feathers, we inferred relative population size and dietary change of emperor penguins during the period of CE 1540–2008, respectively. An increase in population size with depleted N isotope ratios for emperor penguins on N island at Amanda Bay during the Little Ice Age (CE 1540–1866) was observed, suggesting that cold climate affected the penguin's breeding habitat, prey availability and thus their population and dietary composition. - Highlights: • Emperor penguin colonized at Amanda Bay, East Antarctic as early as AD 1540. • Populations of emperor penguin at Amanda Bay increase during the little ice age. • Depleted N isotope ratios of Emperor penguins during the LIA were observed.

  19. EEG analyses with SOBI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glickman, Matthew R.; Tang, Akaysha (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-02-01

    The motivating vision behind Sandia's MENTOR/PAL LDRD project has been that of systems which use real-time psychophysiological data to support and enhance human performance, both individually and of groups. Relevant and significant psychophysiological data being a necessary prerequisite to such systems, this LDRD has focused on identifying and refining such signals. The project has focused in particular on EEG (electroencephalogram) data as a promising candidate signal because it (potentially) provides a broad window on brain activity with relatively low cost and logistical constraints. We report here on two analyses performed on EEG data collected in this project using the SOBI (Second Order Blind Identification) algorithm to identify two independent sources of brain activity: one in the frontal lobe and one in the occipital. The first study looks at directional influences between the two components, while the second study looks at inferring gender based upon the frontal component.

  20. A simple beam analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarchand, G.

    1977-01-01

    (ee'p) experiments allow to measure the missing energy distribution as well as the momentum distribution of the extracted proton in the nucleus versus the missing energy. Such experiments are presently conducted on SACLAY's A.L.S. 300 Linac. Electrons and protons are respectively analysed by two spectrometers and detected in their focal planes. Counting rates are usually low and include time coincidences and accidentals. Signal-to-noise ratio is dependent on the physics of the experiment and the resolution of the coincidence, therefore it is mandatory to get a beam current distribution as flat as possible. Using new technologies has allowed to monitor in real time the behavior of the beam pulse and determine when the duty cycle can be considered as being good with respect to a numerical basis

  1. Analyse af elbilers forbrug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Torp, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Denne rapport undersøger GPS og CAN bus datagrundlaget opsamlet ved kørsel med elbiler og analysere på elbilers forbrug. Analyserne er baseret på godt 133 millioner GPS og CAN bus målinger opsamlet fra 164 elbiler (Citroen C-Zero, Mitsubishi iMiev og Peugeot Ion) i kalenderåret 2012....... For datagrundlaget kan det konstateres, at der er behov for væsentlige, men simple opstramninger for fremadrettet at gøre det nemmere at anvende GPS/CAN bus data fra elbiler i andre analyser. Brugen af elbiler er sammenlignet med brændstofbiler og konklusionen er, at elbiler generelt kører 10-15 km/t langsommere på...

  2. Analyse de "La banlieue"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Morais

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available 1. Préambule - Conditions de réalisation de la présente analyse Un groupe d'étudiants de master 1 de FLE de l'université Paris 3 (donc des étudiants en didactique des langues se destinant à l'enseignement du FLE a observé le produit au cours d'un module sur les TIC (Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication et la didactique des langues. Une discussion s'est ensuite engagée sur le forum d'une plate-forme de formation à distance à partir de quelques questions posées par l'enseigna...

  3. Geochemical constraints on depth of origin of oceanic carbonatites: The Cape Verde case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucelance, Régis; Hammouda, Tahar; Moreira, Manuel; Martins, João C.

    2010-12-01

    We present new Sr-Nd isotope compositions together with major- and trace element concentrations measured for whole rocks and mineral separate phases (apatite, biotite and calcite) from fifteen Cape Verde oceanic carbonatites (Atlantic Ocean). Trace element patterns of calcio- and magnesio-carbonatites present a strong depletion in K, Hf, Zr and Ti and an overall enrichment in Sr and REE relative to Cape Verde basalts, arguing for distinct source components between carbonatites and basalts. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios show small, but significant variations defining a binary mixing between a depleted end-member with unradiogenic Sr and radiogenic Nd values and a ''enriched'' end-member compatible with old marine carbonates. We interpret the depleted end-member as the Cape Verde oceanic lithosphere by comparison with previous studies on Cape Verde basalts. We thus propose that oceanic carbonatites are resulting from the interaction of a deep rooted mantle plume carrying a lower 4He/ 3He signature from the lower mantle and a carbonated metasomatized lithosphere, which by low degree melting produced carbonatite magmas. Sr-Nd compositions and trace element patterns of carbonatites argue in favor of a metasomatic agent originating from partial melting of recycled, carbonated oceanic crust. We have successfully reproduced the main geochemical features of this model using a Monte-Carlo-type simulation.

  4. Network class superposition analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl A B Pearson

    Full Text Available Networks are often used to understand a whole system by modeling the interactions among its pieces. Examples include biomolecules in a cell interacting to provide some primary function, or species in an environment forming a stable community. However, these interactions are often unknown; instead, the pieces' dynamic states are known, and network structure must be inferred. Because observed function may be explained by many different networks (e.g., ≈ 10(30 for the yeast cell cycle process, considering dynamics beyond this primary function means picking a single network or suitable sample: measuring over all networks exhibiting the primary function is computationally infeasible. We circumvent that obstacle by calculating the network class ensemble. We represent the ensemble by a stochastic matrix T, which is a transition-by-transition superposition of the system dynamics for each member of the class. We present concrete results for T derived from boolean time series dynamics on networks obeying the Strong Inhibition rule, by applying T to several traditional questions about network dynamics. We show that the distribution of the number of point attractors can be accurately estimated with T. We show how to generate Derrida plots based on T. We show that T-based Shannon entropy outperforms other methods at selecting experiments to further narrow the network structure. We also outline an experimental test of predictions based on T. We motivate all of these results in terms of a popular molecular biology boolean network model for the yeast cell cycle, but the methods and analyses we introduce are general. We conclude with open questions for T, for example, application to other models, computational considerations when scaling up to larger systems, and other potential analyses.

  5. Statistical analysis of soil geochemical data to identify pathfinders associated with mineral deposits: An example from the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Denise M.; Zipper, Carl E.; Donovan, Patricia; Schreiber, Madeline E.; Seal, Robert; Engle, Mark A.; Chermak, John A.; Bodnar, Robert J.; Johnson, Daniel K.; Aylor, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Soil geochemical anomalies can be used to identify pathfinders in exploration for ore deposits. In this study, compositional data analysis is used with multivariate statistical methods to analyse soil geochemical data collected from the Coles Hill uranium deposit, Virginia, USA, to identify pathfinders associated with this deposit. Elemental compositions and relationships were compared between the collected Coles Hill soil and reference soil samples extracted from a regional subset of a national-scale geochemical survey. Results show that pathfinders for the Coles Hill deposit include light rare earth elements (La and Ce), which, when normalised by their Al content, are correlated with U/Al, and elevated Th/Al values, which are not correlated with U/Al, supporting decoupling of U from Th during soil generation. These results can be used in genetic and weathering models of the Coles Hill deposit, and can also be applied to future prospecting for similar U deposits in the eastern United States, and in regions with similar geological/climatic conditions.

  6. Geophysical and geochemical constraints on the geodynamic origin of the Vrancea Seismogenic Zone Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillerup, Melvin A.

    The Vrancea Seismogenic Zone (VSZ) of Romania is a steeply NW-dipping volume (30 x 70 x 200 km) of intermediate-depth seismicity in the upper mantle beneath the bend zone of the Eastern Carpathians. The majority of tectonic models lean heavily on subduction processes to explain the Vrancea mantle seismicity and the presence of a Miocene age calc-alkaline volcanic arc in the East Carpathian hinterland. However, recent deep seismic reflection data collected over the Eastern Carpathian bend zone image an orogen lacking (1) a crustal root and (2) dipping crustal-scale fabrics routinely imaged in modern and ancient subduction zones. The DRACULA I and DACIA-PLAN deep seismic reflection profiles show that the East Carpathian orogen is supported by crust only 30-33 km thick while the Focsani basin (foreland) and Transylvanian basin (hinterland) crust is 42 km and 46 km thick respectively. Here the VSZ is interpreted as the former Eastern Carpathian orogenic root which was removed as a result of continental lithospheric delamination and is seismically foundering beneath the East Carpathian bend zone. Because large volumes of calc-alkaline volcanism are typically associated with subduction settings existing geochemical analyses from the Calimani, Gurghiu, and Harghita Mountains (CGH) have been reinterpreted in light of the seismic data which does not advocate the subduction of oceanic lithosphere. CGH rocks exhibit a compositional range from basalt to rhyolite, many with high-Mg# (Mg/Mg+Fe > 0.60), high-Sr (>1000 ppm), and elevated delta-O18 values (6-8.7 /) typical of arc lavas, and are consistent with mixing of mantle-derived melts with a crustal component. The 143Nd/144Nd (0.5123-0.5129) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.7040-0.7103) ratios similarly suggest mixing of mantle and crustal end members to obtain the observed isotopic compositions. A new geochemical model is presented whereby delamination initiates a geodynamic process like subduction but with the distinct absence of subducted

  7. Understanding sediment sources in a peri-urban Mediterranean catchment using geochemical tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carla; Walsh, Rory; Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Blake, Will

    2016-04-01

    One of the main physical environmental impacts of urbanization is an increase in suspended sediment concentrations and loads, particularly in the constructional phase. Impacts in peri-urban catchments characterized by a mosaic of urban and non-urban landscape elements with varying roles in acting as sources and sinks of overland flow and slope wash have received little attention, particularly in Mediterranean environments. The present study uses a sediment 'fingerprinting' approach to determine the main sediment sources in the peri-urban Ribeira dos Covões catchment (6.2km2) in Portugal and how they change during storm events following contrasting antecedent weather. The catchment, rural until 1972, underwent discontinuous urbanization in 1973-1993, followed by an urban consolidation phase. Currently, its land-use is a complex mosaic of woodland (56%), urban (40%) and agricultural (4%) land parcels. Distinct urban patterns include some well-defined urban residential centres, but also areas of discontinuous urban sprawl. Since 2010, a major road was built and an enterprise park has been under construction, covering 1% and 5% of the catchment, respectively. The catchment has a Mediterranean climate. The geology comprises sandstone (56%), limestone (41%) and alluvial deposits (3%). Soils are generally deep (>3.0m), but shallow (road surface immediately it entered the stream network. The elemental composition (40 elements) of each size fraction was assessed using a Niton X-ray fluorescence elemental analyser. Results show that rock type has a profound influence on the geochemical properties of bed-sediments. Catchment outlet sediment collected after the summer and a storm of high rainfall intensity following dry weather displayed geochemical properties closer to those of sediment from sandstone sub-catchments, and in particularly sediment from the enterprise park under construction. After the storm that followed very wet weather, however, limestone areas became of

  8. Geochemical characteristics of naturally acid and alkaline saline lakes in southern Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, Brenda Beitler; Benison, Kathleen C.

    2009-01-01

    Abundant shallow saline lakes on the Archean Yilgarn Craton in southern Western Australia exhibit a rare spectrum of geochemical conditions. Here the field geochemistry over three seasons (pH, salinity, and temperature), as well as major ions, trace elements, and H, O, and S stable isotopes of surface waters and shallow groundwaters from 59 ephemeral lakes in southern Western Australia (WA) are reported. Approximately 40% of the lakes and 84% of the measured groundwaters in WA are extremely acidic (pH 28%. The fluids are typically Na-Cl to Na-Mg-Cl-SO 4 brines with variable yet locally high amounts of Ca, K, Al, Fe, Si, and Br. The acid brine fluid compositions are unusual. For example, in some fluids the amount of Al>>Ca, the amount of Br > K, and comparison of total S to SO 4 2- values suggest the presence of other uncommon S-bearing species. Trends in δ 18 O and δ 2 H illustrate the separation between surface lake water and shallow groundwaters, and indicate the contribution of meteoric waters to the lakes. The chemical and isotopic compositions of these fluids indicate a spatially and temporally dynamic, yet regionally consistent, history of brine evolution that is fundamentally different from most other terrestrial closed basin brines. The WA lake brines do not evolve from surface evaporation of dilute inflow waters, but rather are fed by highly evolved regionally acid saline groundwaters. The lake waters then diversify with locally varying surface and near-surface processes such as meteoric dilution by flooding, evapoconcentration, mineral precipitation and dissolution, and fluid mixing. The WA lake waters and groundwaters are somewhat similar to those in an entirely different geologic setting in northeastern Victoria, illustrating the potential for different geochemical pathways to lead to the formation of similar lacustrine acid brines. Although these types of environments are rare in modern settings, ancient ephemeral acid saline lake deposits have been

  9. Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

    2010-12-17

    Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and

  10. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Kivetty site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the final disposal of radioactive waste into the bedrock. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on chemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions which control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the bedrock at Kivetty has been created and the significance of chemical reactions along different flowpaths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on groundwater samples (38 altogether) obtained from the soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and five deep multi-packered boreholes (KRI-KR5) in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Kivetty to a depth of 850m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used in the evaluation of evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution and C-14 age calculations of groundwater was given a mass-balance approach (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The hydrogeochemistry of Kivetty is characterised by evolution from low-saline-carbonate-rich recharge water towards Na-Ca-Cl-type water. The salinity remains low. The most important changes in the chemistry of the

  11. Geochemical databases: minding the pitfalls to avoid the pratfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S. L.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2011-12-01

    The field of geochemistry has been revolutionized in recent years by the advent of databases (PetDB, GEOROC, NAVDAT, etc). A decade ago, a geochemical synthesis required major time investments in order to compile relatively small amounts of fragmented data from large numbers of publications, Now virtually all of the published data on nearly any solid Earth topic can be downloaded to nearly any desktop computer with a few mouse clicks. Most solid Earth talks at international meetings show data compilations from these databases. Applications of the data are playing an increasingly important role in shaping our thinking about the Earth. They have changed some fundamental ideas about the compositional structure of the Earth (for example, showing that the Earth's "trace element depleted upper mantle" is not so depleted in trace elements). This abundance of riches also poses new risks. Until recently, important details associated with data publication (adequate metadata and quality control information) were given low priority, even in major journals. The online databases preserve whatever has been published, irrespective of quality. "Bad data" arises from many causes, here are a few. Some are associated with sample processing, including incomplete dissolution of refractory trace minerals, or inhomogeneous powders, or contamination of key elements during preparation (for example, this was a problem for lead when gasoline was leaded, and for niobium when tungsten-carbide mills were used to powder samples). Poor analytical quality is a continual problem (for example, when elemental abundances are at near background levels for an analytical method). Errors in published data tables (more common than you think) become bad data in the databases. The accepted values of interlaboratory standards change with time, while the published data based on old values stay the same. Thus the pitfalls associated with the new data accessibility are dangerous in the hands of the inexperienced

  12. Geochemical Signatures as a Tool for Vermiculite Provenance Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen E. Wright; Carl D. Palmer

    2008-09-01

    Thirty-eight samples of known origin (China, Libby MT, South Africa, South Carolina) and 6 vermiculite product samples of unknown origin were analyzed for major and trace elements, including rare earth elements to determine the feasibility of distinguishing the provenance of the samples based upon a geochemical signature. Probability plots suggest that two of the four groups (Libby, South Carolina) were comprised of two subgroups. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis are highly sensitive to the linkage method chosen. Ward’s method is the most useful for this data and suggests that there are five groups within the data set (South African samples, two subsets of the Libby samples, a subset of the South Carolina samples, and a second subset of the South Carolina samples combined with the China samples). Similar results were obtained using k-cluster analysis. Neither clustering method was able to distinguish samples from China from the South Carolina samples. Discriminant analysis was used on a four-category model comprised of the original four groups and on a six-category model comprised of the five categories identified from the cluster analysis but with the China samples grouped into a sixth category. The discriminant/classification model was able to distinguish all of the groups including the China samples from one another for both the four- and six-category models with 100% of the samples properly classified. The 6 unknown product samples were classified with a probability of consistency of 99%. Both discriminant models were also run with a subset of our analyte set to be consistent with the smaller Gunter et al., (2005) analyte set. Twenty vermiculite samples (nine of known origin and eleven of unknown origin) from their study were classified based on our discriminant models with the reduced set of analytes. Of the twenty samples, Gunter et al. (2005) was able to classify 16 with cluster analysis while our 4-category discriminant analysis model allowed us

  13. Geochemical evaluation of the middle Magdalena basing Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon, J.C; Dzou, L; Giraldo, B

    1997-01-01

    The chemical composition of 25 crude oils from Tertiary reservoirs and 12 rock extracts from five organic-rich Cretaceous formations in the middle Magdalena Basin, Colombia were studied in detail by geochemical methods in order to understand their genetic relationships. The oils have been geochemically classified into four main groups based on the sulfur content, pristane/phytane, dibenzothiophene /phenanthrene, concentrations of oleanane and terpane distributions. Each group occurs in different geographic locations. Oils were mainly derived from calcareous, siliciclastic and mixture of these two facies of the Upper Cretaceous La Luna Formation. Source-oil correlation is supported by sterane and terpane distributions of and carbon isotope ratios. Some oils in the eastern margin contain relatively higher concentrations of higher plant indicators than the remaining oil samples. The molecular compositions of the oils observed in this study appear to be consistent with the inferred depositional sequence of anoxic marine/pelagic carbonate facies in the north/western sector of the Middle Magdalena, while the eastern sector received a higher proportion of clastic input. This documentation supports the interpretation that the Middle Magdalena oils have been generated 'locally', as opposed to have migrated from the region of the Eastern Cordillera. Biomarker maturity parameters indicate that the majority of oils were generated in the early thermal maturity oil window except the Colorado-38 oil, which was generated in the middle thermal maturity oil window. Oil maturity data also supports the short migration distances of oils from the early-mature source rocks to the reservoir rocks. The composition of some oils (e.g., La Cira, Infantas, Conde and Bonanza) is unusual in that gas chromatographic data contains an n-alkane and isoprenoid distribution normally associated with moderately degraded oils, but they also contain a relatively high abundance of gasoline hydrocarbons

  14. Seismic fragility analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, Marin

    2000-01-01

    In the last two decades there is increasing number of probabilistic seismic risk assessments performed. The basic ideas of the procedure for performing a Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of critical structures (NUREG/CR-2300, 1983) could be used also for normal industrial and residential buildings, dams or other structures. The general formulation of the risk assessment procedure applied in this investigation is presented in Franzini, et al., 1984. The probability of failure of a structure for an expected lifetime (for example 50 years) can be obtained from the annual frequency of failure, β E determined by the relation: β E ∫[d[β(x)]/dx]P(flx)dx. β(x) is the annual frequency of exceedance of load level x (for example, the variable x may be peak ground acceleration), P(fI x) is the conditional probability of structure failure at a given seismic load level x. The problem leads to the assessment of the seismic hazard β(x) and the fragility P(fl x). The seismic hazard curves are obtained by the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. The fragility curves are obtained after the response of the structure is defined as probabilistic and its capacity and the associated uncertainties are assessed. Finally the fragility curves are combined with the seismic loading to estimate the frequency of failure for each critical scenario. The frequency of failure due to seismic event is presented by the scenario with the highest frequency. The tools usually applied for probabilistic safety analyses of critical structures could relatively easily be adopted to ordinary structures. The key problems are the seismic hazard definitions and the fragility analyses. The fragility could be derived either based on scaling procedures or on the base of generation. Both approaches have been presented in the paper. After the seismic risk (in terms of failure probability) is assessed there are several approaches for risk reduction. Generally the methods could be classified in two groups. The

  15. Geochemical and isotopic investigations on the thermal and mineral underground waters from the Republic of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisi, Barbara; Bogdevich, Oleg; Vaselli, Orlando; Nicoara, Igor; Tassi, Franco; Culighin, Elena; Mogorici, Cristina; Jeleapov, Victor; Mussi, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Republic of Moldova (RM) has a large spectrum of underground mineral waters (16 reservoirs) of eight principal aquifers, most of which affected by contaminants originated by natural sources and anthropogenic activities. Inorganic natural tracers and stable isotopes are useful tools to fingerprint the water source and solutes, respectively. The aim of this investigation was to determine the geochemical and isotopic features of the most important thermo- and mineral waters from RM to trace their flow pathways and evaluate the presence of deep fluid sources discharging from fault systems, developed in response to the structural setting of the area. To the best of our knowledge, no systematic geochemical investigations were previously carried out in this area. RM has an area of 33,840 km2 and lies within the East European Precambrian Platform, two structural and/or stratigraphic layers, which are distinguishable in basement and sedimentary cover in the northern and central part of country. The basement rocks include granites, gneisses and gabbros. The sedimentary cover, overlying the crystalline basement, is almost undeformed and consists of Upper Proterozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geological structure is like a matrix formed from different layers of rocks consisting of permeable and impermeable strata. The deep aquifers are situated down to 1,000 m depth from the bottom to the top: Vendian (Ediocariam) and crystalline basement rocks, Silurian crystalline limestone, Cretaceous limestone, Baden-Sarmatian limestone and clay-sand deposits, middle Sarmatian limestone and clay-sand layers. Other younger aquifers were not investigated. In this framework, 54 samples from the most important underground reservoirs of RM were collected and analyzed for major, trace species and dissolved gases. An inventory of isotopic (18O/16O and 2H/1H ratios in water and 13C/12C in dissolved CO2) features (including tritium units in selected samples) was also provided. By a

  16. Use of geochemical biomarkers in bottom sediment to track oil from a spill, San Francisco Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, F.D.; Rapp, J.B.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1992-01-01

    In April 1988, approximately 1500 m3 of a San Joaquin Valley crude oil were accidentally released from a Shell Oil Co. refinery near Martinez, Californa. The oil flowed into Carquinez Strait and Suisun Bay in northern San Francisco Bay Sediment and oil samples were collected within a week and analysed for geochemical marker compounds in order to track the molecular signature of the oil spill in the bottom sediment. Identification of the spilled oil in the sediment was complicated by the degraded nature of the oil and the similarity of the remaining, chromatographically resolvable constituents to those already present in the sediments from anthropogenic petroleum contamination, pyrogenic sources, and urban drainage. Ratios of hopane and sterane biomarkers, and of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their alkylated derivatives best identified the oil impingement. They showed the oil impact at this early stage to be surficial only, and to be patchy even within an area of heavy oil exposure.

  17. Geochemical and Petrological Studies of Peralkaline Rocks from Laborcita de San Javier, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, J. E.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.

    2013-05-01

    Peralkaline igneous rocks are characterized by a lower total aluminum content in comparison to the total alkalis content (Na + K), and are important to determine the tectonic environment in which they formed. The majority of the volcanic activity in Chihuahua State, northern Mexico, is mostly related to the formation of the Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), product of the subduction of the Farallon plate. Volcanic activity of Paleogene age (late Oligocene) to the SW of Chihuahua city, specifically in the towns of Laborcita de San Javier and Cusihuiriachic, includes 27.5 M.a. peralkaline tuffs, capping the older rhyolites and andesites of the SMO. This sequence becomes thicker and more prominent towards the west. A volcanic section of more than 1,000 m thick is exposed in the Laborcita area, which ranges in age from 27 to 35 Ma. The oldest (bottom) unit is a calc-alkaline felsic ash-flow tuff and rhyolitic lavas interbedded with flows of mafic to intermediate composition. Overlying this unit, there is a basaltic andesite with an age of 30 to 33 Ma. Right at the top of this sequence, there is the widespread peralkaline ash-flow tuff (27.5 M.a.), focus of this study. Geochemical analyses performed to rhyolitic tuffs by Mauger and Dayvault (1983), have a peralkalinity index ranging from 0.94 to 1.20, while analyses prepared for this project only reach an index of 0.60. The appearance of peralkaline rocks in the Chihuahua State indicates the change of tectonic regime from compression (Farallon plate subduction) to distension (Basin and Range and/or Rio Grande Rift), about 27 M.a. ago.

  18. The Geochemical Databases GEOROC and GeoReM - What's New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbas, B.; Jochum, K. P.; Nohl, U.; Weis, U.

    2017-12-01

    The geochemical databases GEOROC (http: georoc.mpch-mainz.gwdg.de) and GeoReM (http: georem.mpch-mainz.gwdg.de) are maintained by the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany. Both online databases became crucial tools for geoscientists from different research areas. They are regularly upgraded by new tools and new data from recent publications obtained from a wide range of international journals. GEOROC is a collection of published analyses of volcanic rocks and mantle xenoliths. Since recently, data for plutonic rocks are added. The analyses include major and trace element concentrations, radiogenic and non-radiogenic isotope ratios as well as analytical ages for whole rocks, glasses, minerals and inclusions. Samples come from eleven geological settings and span the whole geological age scale from Archean to Recent. Metadata include, among others, geographic location, rock class and rock type, geological age, degree of alteration, analytical method, laboratory, and reference. The GEOROC web page allows selection of samples by geological setting, geography, chemical criteria, rock or sample name, and bibliographic criteria. In addition, it provides a large number of precompiled files for individual locations, minerals and rock classes. GeoReM is a database collecting information about reference materials of geological and environmental interest, such as rock powders, synthetic and natural glasses as well as mineral, isotopic, biological, river water and seawater reference materials. It contains published data and compilation values (major and trace element concentrations and mass fractions, radiogenic and stable isotope ratios). Metadata comprise, among others, uncertainty, analytical method and laboratory. Reference materials are important for calibration, method validation, quality control and to establish metrological traceability. GeoReM offers six different search strategies: samples or materials (published values), samples (GeoReM preferred

  19. Website-analyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    eller blindgyder, når han/hun besøger sitet. Studier i design og analyse af de visuelle og æstetiske aspekter i planlægning og brug af websites har imidlertid kun i et begrænset omfang været under reflektorisk behandling. Det er baggrunden for dette kapitel, som indleder med en gennemgang af æstetikkens......Websitet er i stigende grad det foretrukne medie inden for informationssøgning,virksomhedspræsentation, e-handel, underholdning, undervisning og social kontakt. I takt med denne voksende mangfoldighed af kommunikationsaktiviteter på nettet, er der kommet mere fokus på at optimere design og...... planlægning af de funktionelle og indholdsmæssige aspekter ved websites. Der findes en stor mængde teori- og metodebøger, som har specialiseret sig i de tekniske problemstillinger i forbindelse med interaktion og navigation, samt det sproglige indhold på websites. Den danske HCI (Human Computer Interaction...

  20. A channel profile analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobbur, S.G.

    1983-01-01

    It is well understood that due to the wide band noise present in a nuclear analog-to-digital converter, events at the boundaries of adjacent channels are shared. It is a difficult and laborious process to exactly find out the shape of the channels at the boundaries. A simple scheme has been developed for the direct display of channel shape of any type of ADC on a cathode ray oscilliscope display. This has been accomplished by sequentially incrementing the reference voltage of a precision pulse generator by a fraction of a channel and storing ADC data in alternative memory locations of a multichannel pulse height analyser. Alternative channels are needed due to the sharing at the boundaries of channels. In the flat region of the profile alternate memory locations are channels with zero counts and channels with the full scale counts. At the boundaries all memory locations will have counts. The shape of this is a direct display of the channel boundaries. (orig.)

  1. 2 CFR 1.215 - Relationship to previous issuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuances. 1.215 Section 1.215 Grants and Agreements ABOUT TITLE 2 OF THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND SUBTITLE A Introduction toSubtitle A § 1.215 Relationship to previous issuances. Although some of the guidance was...

  2. 2 CFR 230.45 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 230.45 Section 230.45 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-122) § 230.45 Relationship to previous issuance. (a...

  3. Research Note Effects of previous cultivation on regeneration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Note Effects of previous cultivation on regeneration of Julbernadia globiflora and Brachystegia spiciformis in grazing areas of Mupfurudzi ... Plant attributes for Julbernadia globiflora and Brachystegia spiciformis were measured in previously cultivated and uncultivated sites making up rangelands of the scheme.

  4. 49 CFR 173.23 - Previously authorized packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Previously authorized packaging. 173.23 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Preparation of Hazardous Materials for Transportation § 173.23 Previously authorized packaging. (a) When the regulations specify a packaging with a specification marking...

  5. 75 FR 76056 - FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: STATUS: Closed meeting. PLACE: 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC. DATE AND TIME OF PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED MEETING: Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 2 p.m. CHANGE IN THE MEETING: Time change. The closed...

  6. Triple outlet right ventricle: a previously unknown cardiac malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingo, Jennifer E; Carroll, Sheila J; Crystal, Matthew A

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of an infant with three distinct outflow tracts from the right ventricle. Three outlets from the heart have been previously named the "Tritruncal Heart". We review the two previously reported cases of tritruncal hearts and describe the anatomy, diagnosis, surgical management, and outcome of our case. Embryologic implications are also discussed.

  7. Implant breast reconstruction after salvage mastectomy in previously irradiated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichetti, Paolo; Cagli, Barbara; Simone, Pierfranco; Cogliandro, Annalisa; Fortunato, Lucio; Altomare, Vittorio; Trodella, Lucio

    2009-04-01

    The most common surgical approach in case of local tumor recurrence after quadrantectomy and radiotherapy is salvage mastectomy. Breast reconstruction is the subsequent phase of the treatment and the plastic surgeon has to operate on previously irradiated and manipulated tissues. The medical literature highlights that breast reconstruction with tissue expanders is not a pursuable option, considering previous radiotherapy a contraindication. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the influence of previous radiotherapy on 2-stage breast reconstruction (tissue expander/implant). Only patients with analogous timing of radiation therapy and the same demolitive and reconstructive procedures were recruited. The results of this study prove that, after salvage mastectomy in previously irradiated patients, implant reconstruction is still possible. Further comparative studies are, of course, advisable to draw any conclusion on the possibility to perform implant reconstruction in previously irradiated patients.

  8. No discrimination against previous mates in a sexually cannibalistic spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhage, Lutz; Schneider, Jutta M.

    2005-09-01

    In several animal species, females discriminate against previous mates in subsequent mating decisions, increasing the potential for multiple paternity. In spiders, female choice may take the form of selective sexual cannibalism, which has been shown to bias paternity in favor of particular males. If cannibalistic attacks function to restrict a male's paternity, females may have little interest to remate with males having survived such an attack. We therefore studied the possibility of female discrimination against previous mates in sexually cannibalistic Argiope bruennichi, where females almost always attack their mate at the onset of copulation. We compared mating latency and copulation duration of males having experienced a previous copulation either with the same or with a different female, but found no evidence for discrimination against previous mates. However, males copulated significantly shorter when inserting into a used, compared to a previously unused, genital pore of the female.

  9. Mineralogical, geochemical, and magnetic signatures of surface sediments from the Canadian Beaufort Shelf and Amundsen Gulf (Canadian Arctic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa, Adriana; Montero-Serrano, Jean-Carlos; St-Onge, Guillaume; Rochon, André; Desiage, Pierre-Arnaud

    2017-02-01

    Mineralogical, geochemical, magnetic, and siliciclastic grain-size signatures of 34 surface sediment samples from the Mackenzie-Beaufort Sea Slope and Amundsen Gulf were studied in order to better constrain the redox status, detrital particle provenance, and sediment dynamics in the western Canadian Arctic. Redox-sensitive elements (Mn, Fe, V, Cr, Zn) indicate that modern sedimentary deposition within the Mackenzie-Beaufort Sea Slope and Amundsen Gulf took place under oxic bottom-water conditions, with more turbulent mixing conditions and thus a well-oxygenated water column prevailing within the Amundsen Gulf. The analytical data obtained, combined with multivariate statistical (notably, principal component and fuzzy c-means clustering analyses) and spatial analyses, allowed the division of the study area into four provinces with distinct sedimentary compositions: (1) the Mackenzie Trough-Canadian Beaufort Shelf with high phyllosilicate-Fe oxide-magnetite and Al-K-Ti-Fe-Cr-V-Zn-P contents; (2) Southwestern Banks Island, characterized by high dolomite-K-feldspar and Ca-Mg-LOI contents; (3) the Central Amundsen Gulf, a transitional zone typified by intermediate phyllosilicate-magnetite-K-feldspar-dolomite and Al-K-Ti-Fe-Mn-V-Zn-Sr-Ca-Mg-LOI contents; and (4) mud volcanoes on the Canadian Beaufort Shelf distinguished by poorly sorted coarse-silt with high quartz-plagioclase-authigenic carbonate and Si-Zr contents, as well as high magnetic susceptibility. Our results also confirm that the present-day sedimentary dynamics on the Canadian Beaufort Shelf is mainly controlled by sediment supply from the Mackenzie River. Overall, these insights provide a basis for future studies using mineralogical, geochemical, and magnetic signatures of Canadian Arctic sediments in order to reconstruct past variations in sediment inputs and transport pathways related to late Quaternary climate and oceanographic changes.

  10. Long-Lived Mantle Plumes Sample Multiple Deep Mantle Geochemical Domains: The Example of the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, L.; Weis, D.

    2017-12-01

    Oceanic island basalts provide the opportunity for the geochemist to study the deep mantle source removed from continental sources of contamination and, for long-lived systems, the evolution of mantle sources with time. In the case of the Hawaiian-Emperor (HE) chain, formation by a long-lived (>81 Myr), deeply-sourced mantle plume allows for insight into plume dynamics and deep mantle geochemistry. The geochemical record of the entire chain is now complete with analysis of Pb-Hf-Nd-Sr isotopes and elemental compositions of the Northwest Hawaiian Ridge (NWHR), which consists of 51 volcanoes spanning 42 Ma between the bend in the chain and the Hawaiian Islands. This segment of the chain previously represented a significant data gap where Hawaiian plume geochemistry changed markedly, along with magmatic flux: only Kea compositions have been observed on Emperor seamounts (>50 Ma), whereas the Hawaiian Islands (drift through different lower mantle geohemical domains.

  11. Geochemical correlations between uranium and other components in U-bearing formations of Ogcheon belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.S.; Chon, H.T.

    1980-01-01

    Some components in uranium-bearing formations which consist mainly of black shale, slate and low grade coal-bearing formation of Ogcheon Belt were processed statistically in order to find out the geochemical correlations with uranium. Geochemical enrichment of uranium, vanadium and molybdenum in low grade coal-bearing formations and surrounding rocks is remarkable in the studied area. Geochemical correlation coefficient of uranium and molybdenum in the rocks displays about 0.6 and that of uranium and fixed carbon about 0.4. Uranium and vanadium in uranium-bearing low grade coals denote very high correlation with fixed carbon, which is considered to be responsible for enrichment of metallic elements, especially molybdenum. Close geochemical correlation of uranium-molybdenum couple in the rocks can be applied as a competent exploration guide to low grade uranium deposits of this area. (author)

  12. Some geochemical characteristics of the Pachuca Obsidian Region: a strategy for interpreting artifact groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neivens, M.; Harbottle, G.; Kimberlin, J.

    1981-01-01

    Obsidian research has revealed geochemical anomalies. Neutron activation analysis was used to analyze the samples. Correlations were made between element pairs (Sc and Fe, Ba and Co). Tests were made for homogeneity. 5 figures. (DLC)

  13. Uruguay mining Inventory: geochemical prospecting results of Cerro de las Cuentas mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spangenberg, J.; Filippini, J.

    1986-01-01

    This work is about the geochemical prospecting carried out into the Uruguay mining inventory framework. In this case the survey was in Cerro de las Cuentas mapping. Cerro Largo department. Scale 1 / 50000.

  14. Establishing nursery estuary otolith geochemical tags for Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Is temporal stability estuary dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Diarmuid; Wögerbauer, Ciara; Roche, William

    2016-12-01

    The ability to determine connectivity between juveniles in nursery estuaries and adult populations is an important tool for fisheries management. Otoliths of juvenile fish contain geochemical tags, which reflect the variation in estuarine elemental chemistry, and allow discrimination of their natal and/or nursery estuaries. These tags can be used to investigate connectivity patterns between juveniles and adults. However, inter-annual variability of geochemical tags may limit the accuracy of nursery origin determinations. Otolith elemental composition was used to assign a single cohort of 0-group sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax to their nursery estuary thus establishing an initial baseline for stocks in waters around Ireland. Using a standard LDFA model, high classification accuracies to nursery sites (80-88%) were obtained. Temporal stability of otolith geochemical tags was also investigated to assess if annual sampling is required for connectivity studies. Geochemical tag stability was found to be strongly estuary dependent.

  15. Quantitative determination of 210Po in geochemical samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyck, W.; Bristow, Q.

    1984-01-01

    To test the usefulness of 210 Po in soils as a means of detecting buried U mineralization, methods for the determination of 210 Po were investigated and adapted for routine production of 210 Po data from geochemical samples. A number of conditions affecting autodeposition and detection of 210 Po were investigated. The optimum area of deposition with a 450 mm 2 solid state detector was found to be 300 mm 2 . Convenience dictated room temperature over-night deposition times, although increased temperature increased speed and efficiency of deposition. A clear inverse relationship was observed between volume of solution and deposition efficiency with stirring times of less than 2 hours. For routine analysis, soil and rock powders were dissolved by leaching 1 g samples in teflon beakers successively with conc. HNO 3 , HF, and HNO 3 -HClO 4 , evaporating the solution to dryness between leaches, and taking the residue up in 20 mL 0.5 M HCl. The 210 Po was deposited on 19 mm diameter Ni discs and counted with an alpha spectrometer system employing 450 mm 2 ruggedized surface barrier detectors. The method achieved 90 percent recovery of 210 Po from solution and a detection efficiency of 30 percent. With a counting time of 3 hours, the method is capable of detecting 0.2 pCi of 210 Po per gram of sample

  16. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Burnley, Pamela [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Hausrath, Elisabeth [Uniiversity of Nevada, Las Vegas; Haber, Daniel [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Adcock, Christopher [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  17. Application of geochemical methods in earthquake prediction in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong-liang, J.; Gui-ru, L.

    1981-05-01

    Several geochemical anomalies were observed before the Haichen, Longling, Tangshan, and Songpan earthquakes and their strong aftershocks. They included changes in groundwater radon levels; chemical composition of the groundwater (concentration of Ca/sup + +/, Mg/sup + +/, Cl/sup -/, So/sub 4//sup , and HCO/sub 3//sup -/ ions); conductivity; and dissolved gases such as H/sub 2/, CO/sub 2/, etc. In addition, anomalous changes in water color and quality were observed before these large earthquakes. Before some events gases escaped from the surface, and there were reports of ''ground odors'' being smelled by local residents. The large amount of radon data can be grouped into long-term and short-term anomalies. The long-term anomalies have a radon emission build up time of from a few months to more than a year. The short-term anomalies have durations from a few hours or less to a few months.

  18. Rock Weathering and Geochemical Characteristics in the KURT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon; Cho, Won Jin; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2006-01-01

    A basic research was conducted on the mineral weathering and geochemical characteristics in the KURT (KAERI Underground Research Tunnel), which was recently constructed at a site in KAERI. Some rock samples exposed during the KURT construction were examined using a microscope and chemical analysis for some micro-changes of the rocks caused by the chemical weathering. The weathered granite has some small and fine cracks around the rock-forming minerals. In particular, there are a characteristic weathering of feldspar mineral and a preferential leaching of Ca component from the mineral dissolution. In addition, by the dissolution of biotite containing Fe 2- component there were iron-oxides precipitates as secondary products into the microcracks of around minerals. The results also show that the micro-cracks initiated from the mineral interior are extended and connected into the larger cracks along the grain boundary with the progress of the weathering. Thus, it is considered that some chemicals dissolved from the fresh rock would be involved in the formation of secondary minerals and migrate interacting with them.

  19. Leaching and geochemical behavior of fired bricks containing coal wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Yassine; Benzaazoua, Mostafa; Edahbi, Mohamed; Mansori, Mohammed; Hakkou, Rachid

    2018-03-01

    High amounts of mine wastes are continuously produced by the mining industry all over the world. Recycling possibility of some wastes in fired brick making has been investigated and showed promising results. However, little attention is given to the leaching behavior of mine wastes based fired bricks. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the geochemical behavior of fired bricks containing different types of coal wastes. The leachates were analyzed for their concentration of As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Zn and sulfates using different leaching tests; namely Tank Leaching tests (NEN 7375), Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and pH dependence test (EPA, 1313). The results showed that the release of constituents of potential interest was highly reduced after thermal treatment and were immobilized within the glassy matrix of the fired bricks. Moreover, it was also highlighted that the final pH of all fired samples changed and stabilized around 8-8.5 when the initial pH of leaching solution was in the range 2.5-11.5. The release of heavy metals and metalloids (As) tended to decrease with the increase of pH from acidic to alkaline solutions while Mo displayed a different trend. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cool seafloor hydrothermal springs reveal global geochemical fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Fisher, Andrew T.; McManus, James; Hulme, Samuel M.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2017-10-01

    We present geochemical data from the first samples of spring fluids from Dorado Outcrop, a basaltic edifice on 23 M.y. old seafloor of the Cocos Plate, eastern Pacific Ocean. These samples were collected from the discharge of a cool hydrothermal system (CHS) on a ridge flank, where typical reaction temperatures in the volcanic crust are low (2-20 °C) and fluid residence times are short. Ridge-flank hydrothermal systems extract 25% of Earth's lithospheric heat, with a global discharge rate equivalent to that of Earth's river discharge to the ocean; CHSs comprise a significant fraction of this global flow. Upper crustal temperatures around Dorado Outcrop are ∼15 °C, the calculated residence time is concentrations in spring fluids are indistinguishable from those of bottom seawater; however, concentrations of Rb, Mo, V, U, Mg, phosphate, Si and Li are different. Applying these observed differences to calculated global CHS fluxes results in chemical fluxes for these ions that are ≥15% of riverine fluxes. Fluxes of K and B also may be significant, but better analytical resolution is required to confirm this result. Spring fluids also have ∼50% less dissolved oxygen (DO) than bottom seawater. Calculations of an analytical model suggest that the loss of DO occurs primarily (>80%) within the upper basaltic crust by biotic and/or abiotic consumption. This calculation demonstrates that permeable pathways within the upper crust can support oxic water-rock interactions for millions of years.

  1. GEMAS: Geochemical Distribution of Thallium in European Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriades, Alecos; Birke, Manfred; Reimann, Clemens; Mann, Alan; Kaminari, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Thallium concentrations are reported for the Portugal, Massif Central in France, and Bohemian Massif in Czechia). The median Tl concentration of Ap soil samples in the mobile metal ion (MMI®) partial extraction is 0.0006 mg/kg, and almost 50% of all samples report concentrations below detection. There is no pronounced difference between northern and southern Europe anymore, and the ice age limit of the last glaciation remains invisible. The main anomaly is related to the alkaline volcanic rocks in Italy. Many granitic intrusions are indicated by somewhat enhanced Tl concentrations (e.g., northern Portugal, north-western Spain, Massif Central in France, south-west England, and Bohemian Massif in Czechia). An interesting NE to SW anomalous pattern occurs in Scotland, partly following the Great Glen fault, and occurrences of granitic intrusions. Almost all of central Europe is marked by enhanced Tl values, and one wonders whether agriculture might have had an impact on this unusual pattern. Finally, the GEMAS data set defines the geochemical background variation of Tl in aqua regia and MMI® extraction for European agricultural and grazing land soil at the 2008 timeline.

  2. MINTEQ2 geochemical code: provisionary organic data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrey, J.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Dove, F.H.

    1985-10-01

    Organic components in aqueous radioactive chemical sources, surface waters, and ground waters could substantially alter the mobility of radioactive and other important nonradioactive elements released from a defense waste disposal system. It is therefore important to be able to predict, as accurately as possible, the effects of selected organic components on the solubilities of radionuclides and important nonradioactive elements. The geochemical code MINTEQ2 can be used to assess solubilities provided that appropriate thermochemical data for organic and inorganic aqueous species and solids are available for its use. The code accepts an assemblage of gaseous and solid phases in contact with an aqueous phase and calculates the thermochemical equilibrium between these phases. Unlike typical hydrologic flow and transport codes where the data base is entirely site specific (i.e., parameters particular to the specific site), MINTEQ2 requires an additional generic thermochemical data base. This report discusses the addition of provisionary organic reactions and associated equilibrium constants to the generic data base that can be used by MINTEQ2 in scoping calculations or preliminary performance assessments

  3. Evaporation of J13 water: laboratory experiments and geochemical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibley, M.J.; Knauss, K.G.; Rosenberg, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    We report results from experiments on the evaporative chemical evolution of synthetic J13 water, representative of water from well J13, a common reference water in the Yucca Mountain Project. Data include anion and cation analysis and qualitative mineral identification for a series of open system experiments, with and without crushed tuff present, conducted at sub-boiling temperatures. Ca and Mg precipitated readily as carbonates and anions Cl, F, NO 3 and SO 4 remained in solution in nearly identical ratios. The pH stabilized at about 10. After ∼ 1000x concentration, the minerals formed were amorphous silica, aragonite and calcite. The presence of tuff appears to have very little effect on the relative distribution of the anions in solution, except for possibly F, which had a relatively lower concentration ratio. The Si was lower in the solutions with tuff present suggesting that the tuff enhances SiO 2 precipitation. Even though the tools to model highly-concentrated salt solutions are limited, we compare our experimental results with the results of geochemical models, with (perhaps) surprising good results. In response to different assumed CO 2 levels, pH varied, but anion concentrations were not greatly affected

  4. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  5. New geochemical investigations in Platanares and Azacualpa geothermal sites (Honduras)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberi, Franco; Carapezza, Maria Luisa; Cioni, Roberto; Lelli, Matteo; Menichini, Matia; Ranaldi, Massimo; Ricci, Tullio; Tarchini, Luca

    2013-05-01

    Platanares and Azacualpa geothermal sites of Honduras are located in an inner part of the Caribbean Plate far from the active volcanic front of Central America. Here geology indicates that there are not the conditions for the occurrence of shallow magmatic heat sources for high-enthalpy geothermal resources. Geothermal perspectives are related to the possibility of a deep circulation of meteoric water along faults and the storage of the heated fluid in fractured permeable reservoirs. Geochemical geothermometers indicate a temperature for the deeper part of the geothermal reservoir close to 200 °C for Platanares and of 150-170 °C for Azacualpa. Calcite scaling, with subordinate silica deposition has to be expected in both sites. CO2 soil flux investigations have been carried out in both areas and reveal the presence of positive anomalies likely corresponding to the presence at depth of fractured degassing geothermal reservoirs. Compared with the geothermal areas of Central Italy whose reservoirs are hosted in carbonate rocks, e.g. Latera (Chiodini et al., 2007), the CO2 soil flux measured in Honduras is significantly lower (mean of 17 g/m2day at Platanares and of 163 g/m2day at Azacualpa) probably because of the dominant silicate nature of the deep reservoirs.

  6. Evaluation of uranium geochemical anomalies in the Charlotte 10 x 20 NTMS quadrangle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, R.H.

    1981-11-01

    This report contains a synthesis of published geological, geophysical, and geochemical information for portions of Cabarrus and Rowan Counties, NC, where uranium geochemical anomalies have been described by Heffner and Ferguson (1978). The results of a ground radiation survey in selected areas are also described. Based on an evaluation of published information and the data obtained in the field study, conclusions are made regarding the possible occurrence of uranium concentration. Recommendations for detailed surveys in certain areas are also presented

  7. Applications of geochemical modeling to site characterization and radionuclide transport in the NNWSI project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project (NNWSI) is studying a site at Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, as a possible nuclear waste repository. Los Alamos National Laboratory is responsible for the geochemical aspects of site characterization at Yucca Mountain. Geochemical models are being used in site characterization to help understand (a) local water chemistry, (b) local mineralogy, (c) the relation between water chemistry and mineralogy, and (d) the effects of water chemistry and mineralogy on waste-element solubility and transport

  8. Comparison of results analyzed by Chinese and European laboratories for FOREGS geochemical baselines mapping samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Yao

    2011-04-01

    This study demonstrates that consistent analytical data for certain elements of global geochemical mapping samples can be achieved by different qualified laboratories, such as China’s IGGE laboratory and some European laboratories. For some elements, such as Ag, further research on the selection of the proper analytical methods and on the development of quality control methods should be undertaken — with final recommendations adhered to by all participants of the global geochemical mapping program.

  9. Environmental and geochemical assessment of surface sediments on irshansk ilmenite deposit area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталия Олеговна Крюченко

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is revealed the problem of pollution of surface sediments of Irshansk ilmenite deposit area of various chemical elements hazard class (Mn, V, Ba, Ni, Co, Cr, Mo, Cu, Pb, Zn. It is determined its average content in surface sediments of various functional areas (forest and agricultural land, flood deposits, reclaimed land, calculated geochemical criteria, so given ecological and geochemical assessment of area

  10. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism experiencing mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Heathcote

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available No research has previously been done regarding the phenomenon of adolescents who have previously been involved in Satanism and who experience obstacles in their strive for mental health. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism present behavioral problems like aggressive outbursts, depression, “ psychosis” or suicide attempts, that could lead to suicide. In the phenomenonanalysis semi-structured, phenomenological interviews were performed with the respondents and their parents. The respondents were requested to write a naïve sketch about their life. After completion of the data-control, guidelines for nursing staff were set.

  11. Role of geochemical background at evaluation of investment attractiveness of recreational territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vdovina Ol'ga Konstantinovna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the role of natural geochemical background when estimating investment attractiveness of recreational areas. It is noted, that geochemical background influence on people's sickness rate isn't considered now. Though it's understood, that even insignificant increase of geochemical background in relation to percentage abundance of Earth crest may lead to endemic diseases of people, animals and plants. An indicator of geochemical endemicity areas was proposed for assessing the impact of storage elements and of a lack of geological environment on human health. Thanks to this measure, and taking into account landscape features of the area, the authors allocated lands, dangerous and potentially dangerous in terms of endemicity. The importance of ratings was achieved by the use of those factors that could have a great influence on the cost of land development. This includes, first of all, the factors that affect population health, and economic and geographic factors that minimize the cost of the territory development and the factors that give rise to financial risks and risks of human losses. The main risk factors include: potential ecological and geochemical risk; high absolute heights, development and activity of dangerous geological processes and phenomena. Systemacity of researches was reached by using factors, that characterize the object from different aspects; readiness of area infrastructure to its exploration and possible risks. Objectivity was achieved by the use of figures obtained from the results of geochemical and engineering surveys with their metrological support.

  12. Molecular ecological network analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Ye

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the interaction among different species within a community and their responses to environmental changes is a central goal in ecology. However, defining the network structure in a microbial community is very challenging due to their extremely high diversity and as-yet uncultivated status. Although recent advance of metagenomic technologies, such as high throughout sequencing and functional gene arrays, provide revolutionary tools for analyzing microbial community structure, it is still difficult to examine network interactions in a microbial community based on high-throughput metagenomics data. Results Here, we describe a novel mathematical and bioinformatics framework to construct ecological association networks named molecular ecological networks (MENs through Random Matrix Theory (RMT-based methods. Compared to other network construction methods, this approach is remarkable in that the network is automatically defined and robust to noise, thus providing excellent solutions to several common issues associated with high-throughput metagenomics data. We applied it to determine the network structure of microbial communities subjected to long-term experimental warming based on pyrosequencing data of 16 S rRNA genes. We showed that the constructed MENs under both warming and unwarming conditions exhibited topological features of scale free, small world and modularity, which were consistent with previously described molecular ecological networks. Eigengene analysis indicated that the eigengenes represented the module profiles relatively well. In consistency with many other studies, several major environmental traits including temperature and soil pH were found to be important in determining network interactions in the microbial communities examined. To facilitate its application by the scientific community, all these methods and statistical tools have been integrated into a comprehensive Molecular Ecological

  13. Geological and Geochemical Criteria for the Estimation of the Area of The Lesser Hinggan for the Endogenous Gold Mineralization (The Far East, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Yuriy

    2015-04-01

    The Area of the Lesser Hinggan in the middle of the XIX century has been known as one of the Gold areas of the Far East. Exploration of gold in different years were engaged by P.K. Yavorovskiy (1904), E.E. Anert (1928), G.V. Itsikson (1961), V.A. Buryak (1999, 2002, 2003), A.M. Zhirnov (1998, 2000, 2008), L.V. Eyrish (1960, 1964, 1995, 1999, 2002, 2008) and many others. But despite the abundance of factual materials in the problem of the gold metallogeny of the Lesser Hinggan are more aspects that still have not received a answer. Among them is the key issue about indigenous sources of the gold. First for the Lesser Hinggan area, structural-geochemical zoning at 1:200 000 scale was carried out based on the results of the precise analyses of over 2,600 soil and sediment stream samples. Three anomalous geochemical zones and nine anomalous geochemical clusters in their contours specialized for gold mineralization were revealed. Regional clarkes (fersms) for 19 chemical elements were calculated. Geological formations geochemically specialized for gold and their role in endogenous ore-forming processes were defined. Geochemical criteria for endogenous gold mineralization and its ore-formational affiliation were defined as well. Thus, from the geological and geochemical data, are the following signs of the gold mineralization of the Lesser Hinggan: 1. Some geological formations are geochemical specialized by the gold (carbon ("black") schists and ferruginous quartzite Vendian-Cambrian Hinggan series). They're considered as a source of the gold, involved in younger epigenetic processes of mobilization and redistribution of this element; 2. Contrasting geochemical anomalies of the gold and elements satellites in the secondary halos and stream sediments displayed in the contours of the geological formations of a wide age range - terrigenous-carbonate rocks of the Hinggan series, the Paleozoic granitoid massives, the Cretaceous volcanic fields ; 3. Samples of the native gold

  14. Influence of previous participation in physical activity on its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... participation can influence perceptions of PA among the students. Physical activity promotion programmes should consider the role of these factors which should be emphasised from childhood. Keywords: physical activity, students, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, previous participation, sedentary lifestyle, Rwanda

  15. Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family planning clinic in Northern Nigeria. Amina Mohammed‑Durosinlorun, Joel Adze, Stephen Bature, Caleb Mohammed, Matthew Taingson, Amina Abubakar, Austin Ojabo, Lydia Airede ...

  16. Payload specialist Reinhard Furrer show evidence of previous blood sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Reinhard Furrer shows evidence of previous blood sampling while Wubbo J. Ockels, Dutch payload specialist (only partially visible), extends his right arm after a sample has been taken. Both men show bruises on their arms.

  17. Delivery outcomes at term after one previous cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani-Zamzami, Tarik Y

    2007-12-01

    To determine the maternal and perinatal outcomes at term in women with one previous cesarean delivery and with no history of vaginal birth. This is a case-control study conducted at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2002. One hundred sixty-two women with one previous cesarean delivery and with no previous vaginal birth were compared with 324 control women. The cesarean section rate was higher in the study group 40 (24.7%) versus 23 (7.1%) in the control group and was statistically significant (phistory of vaginal delivery are considered less favorable, the vaginal birth after cesarean section success rate may be even lower if the indication for previous primary cesarean delivery was failure to progress, and may be associated with increased risk of uterine rupture. Further study is required to confirm our findings.

  18. [Influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on gynecological laparoscopic operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoran; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Yingfang; Wu, Beisheng; Peng, Chao

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on gynecological laparoscopic operation. A retrospective analysis of 3 283 cases of gynecological diseases by laparoscopic operation patients in Peking University First Hospital from 2007 January to 2012 December, among them, 719 (21.90%) patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery history (study Group), 2 564 (78.10%)patients have no history of abdominopelvic surgery (control group). Study group 719 patients, previous operation times: one time in 525 cases, 194 cases were multiple; previous operation: 185 cases of gynecological surgery, 305 cases of obstetric surgery, 108 cases of general surgery, and 121 complex surgery (include at least two kinds of surgery); previous operative approach: 650 cases laparotomy and 69 cases laparoscopy. Compared two groups of patients with abdominopelvic adhesion and the gynecologic laparoscopic operation situation, analyzed the influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on abdominopelvic adhesion on and gynecological laparoscopic operation. The incidence of abdominopelvic adhesion in the patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery was 51.2% (368/719), which was significantly higher than that of 8.2% (211/2 564)in patients without previous abdominopelvic surgery (P surgery (23.1%, 166/719) was significantly higher than that in the control group (3.3% , 85/2 564;P laparotomy was 0.6% (4/719) significantly more than the control groups (0.1%, 2/2 564; P = 0.023). Compared with other groups, patients with gynecological or complex surgery or multiple operation history presented more severe abdominopelvic adhesion both in the score and degree (P laparotomy showed no statistical difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). The laparoscopic operation could be carried out successfully and safely in patients with a history of various abdominopelvic operations, but the conversion rate increases, for patients with a history of multiple operation because of pelvic adhesion

  19. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes IV: Geochemical, thermal and mass consequences of energy-constrained recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendy A. Bohrson Department of Geological Sciences, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington, 98926, USA; Frank J. Spera Institute for Crustal Studies and Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, 93106, USA

    2003-01-01

    A wealth of geochemical and petrological data provide evidence that the processes of fractional crystallization, assimilation, and magma recharge (replenishment) dominate the chemical signatures of many terrestrial igneous rocks. Previous work [Spera and Bohrson, 2001 ; Bohrson and Spera, 2001] has established the importance of integrating energy, species and mass conservation into simulations of complex magma chamber processes. An extended version of the energy-constrained formulation, Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC), tracks mass and compositional variations of melt, cumulates, and enclaves in a magma body undergoing simultaneous recharge, assimilation, and fractional crystallization [Spera and Bohrson, 2002]. Because many EC-RAFC results are distinct from those predicted by extant RAFC formulations, the primary goal of this paper is to present a range of geochemical and mass relationships for selected cases that highlight issues relevant to modern petrology. Among the plethora of petrologic problems that have important, well-documented analogues in nature are the geochemical distinctions that arise when a magma body undergoes continuous versus episodic recharge, the connection between erupted magmas and associated cumulate bodies, the behavior of recharge-fractionation dominated systems (RFC), thermodynamic conditions that promote the formation of enclaves versus cumulates, and the conditions under which magma bodies may be described as chemically homogeneous. Investigation of the effects of continuous versus episodic recharge for mafic magma undergoing RAFC in the lower crust indicates that the resulting geochemical trends for melt and solids are sensitive to the intensity and composition of recharge, suggesting that EC-RAFC may be used as a tool to distinguish the nature of the recharge events. Compared to the record preserved in melts, the geochemical and mass characteristics of solids associated with particular

  20. Geochemical Modeling Of F Area Seepage Basin Composition And Variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-01-01

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin

  1. Comparison on humus and soil geochemical baselines in Southern Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minolfi, Giulia; Tarvainen, Timo; Jarva, Jaana

    2016-04-01

    Humus has been recognized since a survey in 1977 (Allen and Steinnes, 1980) as one of the best sampling media for mapping regional environmental contamination because of the strong geochemical contrast between anomalous and background concentrations resulting from its capacity to accumulate high levels of trace metals. This study is in the framework of the comparison between humus, topsoil and moss deposition data, in order to analyze the humus behavior and to find possible similarities to underlying geology and long-range atmospheric deposition. The analyzed samples are part of a geochemical mapping programme carried out by the Geological Survey of Finland (GTK); subsoil, topsoil and humus samples have been collected in a large area in Southern Finland since 2002. 816 sample pairs (humus and topsoil samples) were selected for statistical analysis. Statistical graphs, like histograms, CP plots and box plots, were realized for 31 elements, and showed that most of the elements have completely different distribution of concentrations in humus and in topsoil samples. Then the correlation between the element concentrations in humus and minerogenic topsoil has been evaluated measuring the Spearman rank correlation value and elaborating scatter plots between the element concentrations in humus and minerogenic topsoil, and between the content of the element vs. the content of organic C. The concentrations of some elements, like K, Mg, Fe, Al, in humus samples are controlled by the content of mineral matter, derived by the soil dust. Other elements, such as As, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Th, V and Zn showed evident outliers, with probable anthropogenic origin. In order to explain these anomalous high values in humus, the geographic distributions of these elements in humus and topsoil were analyzed and then compared to the deposition data obtained by the national moss data. High values appear in areas where the anthropogenic impact is strong, like the Harjavalta

  2. Geochemical water signature in the Bahariya Depression, Western Desert, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Alessandra; Mazzini, Adriano; Lupi, Matteo; Hammed, Mohammed S.

    2017-04-01

    The Bahariya Oasis is located about 200 km SW of Cairo in the central part of the Western Desert of Egypt. It occupies a sub-elliptic 40 km wide depression stretching NE-SW for approximately 90 km. The Bahariya Oasis has been targeted for numerous geological studies on structural geology, stratigraphy, and iron ore deposits. The oasis was characterized since the Roman times by the presence of natural hydrothermal springs venting water from the relatively shallow Nubia Sandstone formation. Inside the depression are visible numerous circular concentric features that morphologically resemble the hydrothermal vent complexes observed at igneous provinces in other localities of the planet. In order to investigate the origin and the mechanisms of formation of these features, we conducted a fieldwork survey as well as fluids sampling from the available well sites. The aim was to constrain the origin of the fluids that potentially triggered or facilitated the formation of the concentric structures observed on the field. This study presents the geochemical results of groundwaters and soil gas samples. Ten samples were collected from deep wells present in the area. In particular, 8 warm waters were collected by wells between 800 m and 1200 m deep. The measured temperatures at these sites range from 36.5 °C to 52.3°C, while the coldest wells have temperatures ranging from 27.9 °C to 36.5°C. For each sample collected from the wells we analyzed the major, minor and trace elements, dissolved gases (He, Ne, H2, O2, N2, CH4, CO2, Rn), and relative isotopic values. In the areas around the wells we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes as well as radon activity. Overall, the water showed a high value of dissolved Rn, ranging from 9 to 43 Bq/l, and dissolved CO2 ranging from 5.9 to 17.4 cc/l. The waters show a radiogenic signature of isotopic helium, highlighting very prolonged interaction with local crust enriched in radiogenic elements. The isotopic values of δ18O and δD show a clear

  3. Geochemical Fate and Transport of Sildenafil and Vardenafil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, L.; Boudinot, G.; Vulava, V. M.; Cory, W. C.

    2015-12-01

    The geochemical fate of pharmaceuticals and their degradation products is a developing environmental field. The geologic, chemical, and biological fate of these pollutants has become very relevant with the increase in human population and the resulting increase in pollutant concentrations in the environment. In this study, we focus on sildenafil (SDF) and vardenafil (VDF), active compounds in Viagra and Levitra, respectively, two commonly used erectile dysfunction drugs. The main objective is to determine the sorption potential and transport behavior of these two compounds in natural soils. Both SDF and VDF are complex organic molecules with multiple amine functional groups in their structures. Two types of natural acidic soils (pH≈4.5), an organic-rich soil (7.6% OM) and clay-rich soil (5.1% clay) were used in this study to determine which soil components influence sorption behavior of both compounds. Sorption isotherms measured using batch reactors were nearly linear, but sorption was stronger in soil that contained higher clay content. Both compounds have multiple pKas due to the amine functional groups, the relevant pKas of SDF are 5.97 and 7.27, and those of VDF's are 4.72 and 6.21. These values indicate that these compounds likely behave as cations in soil suspensions and hence were strongly sorbed to negatively-charged clay minerals present in both soils. The clay composition in both soils is predominantly kaolinite with smaller amount of montmorillonite, both of which have a predominantly negative surface charge. Transport experiments using glass chromatography columns indicated that both compounds were more strongly retarded in the clay-rich soils. Breakthrough curves from the transport experiments were modeled using convection-dispersion transport equations. The organic matter in the soil seemed to play a less dominant role in the geochemistry in this study, but is likely to transform both compounds into derivative compounds as seen in other studies.

  4. Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi 2 area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO 4 ), xenotime (Y,DyPO 4 ), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO 4 ) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy

  5. The Alto Paraguay Alkaline Province: petrographic, geochemical and geochronological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velazquez Fernandez, Victor

    1996-01-01

    The Alto Paraguay Province is located at the border of the State of Mato Grosso do Sul and Paraguay, between the coordinates 21 deg 10 ' to 23 deg 25 ' of Southern latitude and 57 deg 10 ' to 58 deg 00 ' , having the city of Porto Murtinho as the main reference point. The geotectonic domain of the area is governed by the precambric units of the Southern extreme of the Amazonic craton which developed a long and accentuated activity, giving rise to folds and important faults, that in several cases seem to have exerted an effective control of the magmatic manifestations. Radiometric data indicate that the emplacement of the syenitic bodies took place in the Permo-Triassic period, with a major incidence in the interval 260-240 Ma, representing thus, an important phase of alkaline magmatic affinity associated to the Parana Basin which is believed is to be unique, since the other known areas (Central, Amambay and Rio Apa Provinces, Paraguay, Velasco Province, Bolivia) are considerably younger (140-120 Ma). Syenitic rocks from the Alto Paraguay Province show wide variation in the ratio 87 Sr/ 86 Sr (0.703361 - 0.707734). Excluding the Cerro Boggiani rocks (0.703837-0.707734), values for the nepheline syenites (0.703361-0.703672) general lower than those of the other syenites types. Alkaline syenites cover the interval 0.703510- 0.703872, while quartz syenites and syenogranites are 0.704562 and 0.707076, respectively. geologic evidence, in addition to petrographic, geochemical and isotopic (Sr) data, suggest that the syenitic rocks have been derived from an unique mantelic parental liquid, by fractional crystallization and assimilation processes, which are assumed to be occurred during the emplacement of the magma in the crust. (author)

  6. A Mobile App for Geochemical Field Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J. F.; Reid, N.; Ballsun-Stanton, B.; White, A.; Sobotkova, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a geochemical sampling application for use on Android tablets. This app was developed together with the Federated Archaeological Information Management Systems (FAIMS) at Macquarie University and is based on the open source FAIMS mobile platform, which was originally designed for archaeological field data collection. The FAIMS mobile platform has proved valuable for hydrogeochemical, biogeochemical, soil and rock sample collection due to the ability to customise data collection methodologies for any field research. The module we commissioned allows for using inbuilt or external GPS to locate sample points, it incorporates standard and incremental sampling names which can be easily fed into the International Geo-Sample Number (IGSN). Sampling can be documented not only in metadata, but also accompanied by photographic documentation and sketches. The module is augmented by dropdown menus for fields specific for each sample type and user defined tags. The module also provides users with an overview of all records from a field campaign in a records viewer. We also use basic mapping functionality, showing the current location, sampled points overlaid on preloaded rasters, and allows for drawing of points and simple polygons to be later exported as shape files. A particular challenge is the remoteness of the sampling locations, hundreds of kilometres away from network access. The first trial raised the issue of backup without access to the internet, so in collaboration with the FAIMS team and Solutions First, we commissioned a vehicle mounted portable server. This server box is constantly syncing with the tablets in the field via Wi-Fi, it has an uninterruptible power supply that can run for up to 45 minutes when the vehicle is turned off, and a 1TB hard drive for storage of all data and photographs. The server can be logged into via any of the field tablets or laptop to download all the data collected to date or to just view it on the server.

  7. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2011-01-01

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  8. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2012-01-31

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  9. Development of a method for the classification of geochemical data quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, Kenichirou

    2005-03-01

    This report describes the development of a method for the classification of geochemical data quality. The project had four tasks: (1) review of quality information; (2) development of Evidence Support Logic (ESL) models; (3) development of rules for choosing parameter values; (4) classification of existing data. During H15, JNC developed a preliminary system for classifying groundwater chemical data according to its quality. This system gives a very general indication of data quality, but has a number of limitations. Notably, it is based on adding together scores for individual quality indicators, so that high scores given by some indicators tend to compensate for low scores given by other indicators. Additionally, the system does not distinguish between cases where data quality is poor and cases where data quality is unknown. A further limitation is that the system is based on only a small number of the quality indicators that could be used. By using ESL to develop a new system for classifying geochemical data quality, these limitations can be avoided. This methodology involves weighing evidence for and against a particular hypothesis being true or reliable. Varied evidence, which may be quantitative or qualitative, can be evaluated in an integrated fashion. A process model is constructed to link a hypothesis of interest to evidence corresponding to observations and quantitative data, usually via intermediate processes. An arithmetical approach is then used to propagate evidence through the model. Thus, the approach does not rely on simple addition of quality scores for individual parameters. In this project, evidence for and evidence against the hypothesis that groundwater chemical data represent in-situ conditions are evaluated independently. Both kinds of evidence are represented using numerical scales from 0 to 1. Lack of information about data quality is then represented by 1 - evidence for - evidence against. In this way the situation where the available

  10. Investigating the effect of previous treatments on wheat biomass over multiple spatial frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, A. E.; Castellanos, M. T.; Cartagena, M. C.; Tarquis, A. M.; Lark, R. M.

    2010-09-01

    In this study we use the maximum overlap discrete packet transform (MODWPT) to investigate residual effects on wheat biomass of fertigation treatments applied to a previous crop. The wheat crop covered nine subplots from a previous experiment on melon response to fertigation. Each subplot had previously received a different level of applied nitrogen. Many factors affect wheat biomass, causing it to vary at different spatial frequencies. We hypothesize that these will include residual effects from fertilizer application (at relatively low spatial frequencies) and the local influence of individual plants from the previous melon crop (at high frequency). To test this hypothesis we use the MODWPT to identify the dominant spatial frequencies of wheat biomass variation, and analyse the relationship to both the previous fertilizer application and the location of individual melon plants in the previous crop. The MODWPT is particularly appropriate for this because it allows us first to identify the key spatial frequencies in the wheat biomass objectively and to analyse them, and their relationship to hypothesized driving factors without any assumptions of uniformity (stationarity) of wheat-biomass variation. The results showed that the applied nitrogen dominated the wheat biomass response, and that there was a noticeable component of wheat-biomass variation at the spatial frequency that corresponds to the melon cropping. We expected wheat biomass to be negatively correlated with the position of melons in the previous crop, due to uptake of the applied nitrogen. The MODWPT, which allows us to detect changes in correlation between variables at different frequencies, showed that such a relationship was found across part of the experiment but not uniformly.

  11. Geochemically tracking provenance changes in marine sediment from the South Pacific Gyre throughout the Cenozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlea, A. G.; Murray, R. W.; Sauvage, J.; Spivack, A. J.; Harris, R. N.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    The South Pacific Gyre (SPG), characterized by extremely slow sedimentation rates, is the world's largest oceanic desert. The little eolian dust from continents in the Southern Hemisphere must traverse great distances to reach the SPG, and the ultra-oligotrophic waters minimize the biogenic flux of sediment to the seafloor. However sparse, the pelagic sediment that is ultimately found on the seafloor retains a chemical record that can be used to trace its origin. Using cores from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 329, we trace downcore fluctuations in major, trace, and rare earth element (REE) composition and flux to yield clues to the geological, chemical, and biological evolution of the SPG throughout the Cenozoic. The shipboard scientific party generally described the completely oxic, brown pelagic clays recovered during Exp. 329 as zeolitic metalliferous clay. The homogenous, very fine-grained nature of these sediments speaks to the challenges we face in resolving eolian detrital material ("dust"), fine-grained ash (commonly altered), and authigenic aluminosilicates from one another. Based on ICP-ES and ICP-MS analyses followed by multivariate statistical treatments, we are developing chemical records from a number of sites located throughout the SPG. Building on earlier work at DSDP Site 596 (Zhou and Kyte, 1992, Paleocean., 7, 441-465), and based on backtrack paths from 100 Ma forward, we are working to construct a regionally and temporally continuous paleoclimatological history of the SPG. Preliminary La-Th-Sc concentrations from Sites U1367, U1368, and U1369 show a distinct authigenic influence, but several refractory elements retain their original provenance signature. Sediment ages are constrained using a constant-Co model, based on the geochemically similar work that Zhou and Kyte (1992) performed in the SPG. REE concentrations normalized to post-archean average shale (PAAS) reveal a negative Ce anomaly that becomes more pronounced closer to

  12. Meteoric diagenesis of Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene-Eocene shallow-water carbonates in the Kruja Platform (Albania): geochemical evidence