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Sample records for previous functional magnetic

  1. Executive Function in Previously Institutionalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Emily C; Harlé, Katia M; Noble, Kimberly G; McCall, Robert B

    2016-06-01

    In studies of children adopted from institutions, being raised in an institution has been associated consistently with an increased risk of persistent cognitive, academic, and social-emotional problems. These findings raise questions about the neurocognitive mechanisms that contribute to these negative outcomes. Theory and models based on studies of animals indicate that development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) may be particularly susceptible to environmental influences during early childhood. In this article, we review recent studies of postinstitutionalized children that examined EF components such as inhibitory control, working memory, shifting, and planning. We then describe emerging research on the structure and function of the PFC. Converging evidence suggests both EF difficulties and alterations in development of the PFC following early institutionalization. We conclude by discussing possible explanations for these findings and implications for prevention and intervention, and by offering suggestions for ongoing research.

  2. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  3. Functional Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, James

    Nanoparticle system research and characterization is the focal point of this research and dissertation. In the research presented here, magnetite, cobalt, and ferrite nanoparticle systems have been explored in regard to their magnetocaloric effect (MCE) properties, as well as for use in polymer composites. Both areas of study have potential applications across a wide variety of interdisciplinary fields. Magnetite nanoparticles have been successfully dispersed in a polymer. The surface chemistry of the magnetic nanoparticle proves critical to obtaining a homogenous and well separated high density dispersion in PMMA. Theoretical studies found in the literature have indicated that surface interface energy is a critical component in dispersion. Oleic acid is used to alter the surface of magnetite nanoparticles and successfully achieve good dispersion in a PMMA thin film. Polypyrrole is then coated onto the PMMA composite layer. The bilayer is characterized using cross-sectional TEM, cross-sectional SEM, magnetic characterization, and low frequency conductivity. The results show that the superparmagnetic properties of the as synthesized particles are maintained in the composite. With further study of the properties of these nanoparticles for real and functional uses, MCE is studied on a variety of magnetic nanoparticle systems. Magnetite, manganese zinc ferrite, and cobalt ferrite systems show significant broadening of the MCE and the ability to tune the peak temperature of MCE by varying the size of the nanoparticles. Four distinct systems are studied including cobalt, cobalt core silver shell nanoparticles, nickel ferrite, and ball milled zinc ferrite. The results demonstrate the importance of surface characteristics on MCE. Surface spin disorder appears to have a large influence on the low temperature magnetic and magnetocalorie characteristics of these nanoparticle systems.

  4. Magnetism: a supramolecular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decurtins, S.; Pellaux, R.; Schmalle, H.W.

    1996-01-01

    The field of molecule-based magnetism has developed tremendously in the last few years. Two different extended molecular - hence supramolecular -systems are presented. The Prussian-blue analogues show some of the highest magnetic ordering temperature of any class of molecular magnets, T c = 315 K, whereas the class of transition-metal oxalate-bridged compounds exhibits a diversity of magnetic phenomena. Especially for the latter compounds, the elastic neutron scattering technique has successfully been proven to trace the magnetic structure of these supramolecular and chiral compounds. (author) 18 figs., 25 refs

  5. Magnetism: a supramolecular function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decurtins, S.; Pellaux, R.; Schmalle, H.W. [Zurich Univ., Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1996-11-01

    The field of molecule-based magnetism has developed tremendously in the last few years. Two different extended molecular - hence supramolecular -systems are presented. The Prussian-blue analogues show some of the highest magnetic ordering temperature of any class of molecular magnets, T{sub c} = 315 K, whereas the class of transition-metal oxalate-bridged compounds exhibits a diversity of magnetic phenomena. Especially for the latter compounds, the elastic neutron scattering technique has successfully been proven to trace the magnetic structure of these supramolecular and chiral compounds. (author) 18 figs., 25 refs.

  6. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...... a reduced blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal increase and a greater asymmetry in the visual cortex, compared with controls. The volume of visual cortical activation was significantly correlated to the result of the contrast sensitivity test. The BOLD signal increase correlated significantly......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...

  7. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...... to both the results of the contrast sensitivity test and to the Snellen visual acuity. Our results indicate that fMRI is a useful method for the study of ON, even in cases where the visual acuity is severely impaired. The reduction in activated volume could be explained as a reduced neuronal input......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...

  8. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in developmental stuttering: Relations with previous neurophysiological research and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busan, P; Battaglini, P P; Sommer, M

    2017-06-01

    Developmental stuttering (DS) is a disruption of the rhythm of speech, and affected people may be unable to execute fluent voluntary speech. There are still questions about the exact causes of DS. Evidence suggests there are differences in the structure and functioning of motor systems used for preparing, executing, and controlling motor acts, especially when they are speech related. Much research has been obtained using neuroimaging methods, ranging from functional magnetic resonance to diffusion tensor imaging and electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography. Studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in DS have been uncommon until recently. This is surprising considering the relationship between the functionality of the motor system and DS, and the wide use of TMS in motor-related disturbances such as Parkinson's Disease, Tourette's Syndrome, and dystonia. Consequently, TMS could shed further light on motor aspects of DS. The present work aims to investigate the use of TMS for understanding DS neural mechanisms by reviewing TMS papers in the DS field. Until now, TMS has contributed to the understanding of the excitatory/inhibitory ratio of DS motor functioning, also helping to better understand and critically review evidence about stuttering mechanisms obtained from different techniques, which allowed the investigation of cortico-basal-thalamo-cortical and white matter/connection dysfunctions. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel functional magnetic materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book presents current research on advanced magnetic materials and multifunctional composites. Recent advances in technology and engineering have resulted from the development of advanced magnetic materials with improved functional magnetic and magneto-transport properties. Certain industrial sectors, such as magnetic sensors, microelectronics, and security, demand cost-effective materials with reduced dimensionality and desirable magnetic properties such as enhanced magnetic softness, giant magnetic field sensitivity, and large magnetocaloric effect.  Expert chapters present the most up-to-date information on the fabrication process, processing, tailoring of properties, and applications of different families of modern functional materials for advanced smart applications. Topics covered include novel magnetic materials and applications; amorphous and nanocrystalline magnetic materials and applications; hard magnetic materials; magnetic shape memory alloys; and magnetic oxides. The book's highly interdis...

  10. Magnetic susceptibility of functional groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herr, T.; Ferraro, M.B.; Contreras, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    Proceeding with a series of works where new criteria are applied to the the calculation of the contribution of molecular fragments to certain properties, results are presented for a group of 1-X-benzenes and 1-X-naphtalenes for the magnetic susceptibility constant. Both the diamagnetic and paramagnetic parts are taken into account. To reduce the problems associated with the Gauge dependence originated in the approximations made, Gauge independent atomic orbitals (GIAO) orbitals are used in the atomic orbital basis. Results are discussed in terms of functional groups. (Author). 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  11. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Alwatban, A Z W

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a ...

  12. Study of functional-performance deficits in athletes with previous ankle sprains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamid Babaee

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Despite the importance of functional-performance deficits in athletes with history of ankle sprain few, studies have been carried out in this area. The aim of this research was to study relationship between previous ankle sprains and functional-performance deficits in athletes. Materials and methods: The subjects were 40 professional athletes selected through random sampling among volunteer participants in soccer, basketball, volleyball and handball teams of Lorestan province. The subjects were divided into 2 groups: Injured group (athletes with previous ankle sprains and healthy group (athletes without previous ankle sprains. In this descriptive study we used Functional-performance tests (figure 8 hop test and side hop test to determine ankle deficits and limitations. They participated in figure 8 hop test including hopping in 8 shape course with the length of 5 meters and side hop test including 10 side hop repetitions in course with the length of 30 centimeters. Time were recorded via stopwatch. Results: After data gathering and assessing information distributions, Pearson correlation was used to assess relationships, and independent T test to assess differences between variables. Finally the results showed that there is a significant relationship between previous ankle sprains and functional-performance deficits in the athletes. Conclusion: The athletes who had previous ankle sprains indicated functional-performance deficits more than healthy athletes in completion of mentioned functional-performance tests. The functional-performance tests (figure 8 hop test and side hop test are sensitive and suitable to assess and detect functional-performance deficits in athletes. Therefore we can use the figure 8 hop and side hop tests for goals such as prevention, assessment and rehabilitation of ankle sprains without spending too much money and time.

  13. Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Planes, Antoni; Saxena, Avadh

    2005-01-01

    Magnetism and Structure in Functional Materials addresses three distinct but related topics: (i) magnetoelastic materials such as magnetic martensites and magnetic shape memory alloys, (ii) the magnetocaloric effect related to magnetostructural transitions, and (iii) colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) and related magnanites. The goal is to identify common underlying principles in these classes of materials that are relevant for optimizing various functionalities. The emergence of apparently different magnetic/structural phenomena in disparate classes of materials clearly points to a need for common concepts in order to achieve a broader understanding of the interplay between magnetism and structure in this general class of new functional materials exhibiting ever more complex microstructure and function. The topic is interdisciplinary in nature and the contributors correspondingly include physicists, materials scientists and engineers. Likewise the book will appeal to scientists from all these areas.

  14. Magnetic fields and density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salsbury, Freddie Jr.

    1999-01-01

    A major focus of this dissertation is the development of functionals for the magnetic susceptibility and the chemical shielding within the context of magnetic field density functional theory (BDFT). These functionals depend on the electron density in the absence of the field, which is unlike any other treatment of these responses. There have been several advances made within this theory. The first of which is the development of local density functionals for chemical shieldings and magnetic susceptibilities. There are the first such functionals ever proposed. These parameters have been studied by constructing functionals for the current density and then using the Biot-Savart equations to obtain the responses. In order to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the local functionals, they were tested numerically on some small molecules

  15. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W

    2002-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  16. Clinical application of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwatban, Adnan Z.W.

    2002-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was carried out at the Magnetic Resonance Centre of the University of Nottingham during the time from May 1998 to April 2001, and is the work of the author except where indicated by reference. The main source of signal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRJ) is the fluctuation of paramagnetic deoxyhaemoglobin in the venous blood during different states of functional performance. For the work of this thesis, fMRI studies were carried out using a 3 T MR system with an echo planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence. Hearing research utilising fMRI has been previously reported in normal subjects. Hearing fMRI is normally performed by stimulating the auditory cortex via an acoustic task presentation such as music, tone, etc. However, performing the same research on deaf subjects requires special equipment to be designed to allow direct stimulation of the auditory nerve. In this thesis, a new method of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve is described that uses a transtympanic electrode implanted onto the surface of the cochlea. This approach would however, result in electromotive forces (EMFs) being induced by the time varying magnetic field, which would lead to current flow and heating, as well as deflection of the metallic electrode within the static magnetic field, and image distortion due to the magnetic susceptibility difference. A gold-plated tungsten electrode with a zero magnetic susceptibility was developed to avoid image distortion. Used with carbon leads and a carbon reference pad, it enabled safe, distortion-free fMRI studies of deaf subjects. The study revealed activation of the primary auditory cortex. This fMRI procedure can be used to demonstrate whether the auditory pathway is fully intact, and may provide a useful method for pre-operative assessment of candidates for cochlear implantation. Glucose is the energy source on which the function of the human brain is entirely dependent. Failure to

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging detection of prostate cancer in men with previous negative prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Matthew; Frye, Thomas P

    2017-06-01

    Use of transrectal ultrasound guided systematic prostate biopsy has poor diagnostic accuracy for prostate cancer (PCa) detection. Recently multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) of the prostate and MR/US fusion biopsy has been gaining popularity for men who have previously undergone a negative biopsy. We performed PubMed ® and Web of Science ® searches to identify studies on this subject, particularly focusing on studies consisting of patients who have had at least one previously negative biopsy. Across the literature, when a suspicious lesion is found on mpMRI, MR/US fusion biopsy has consistently demonstrated higher detection rate for any PCa and clinically significant PCa (csPCa) compared to the traditional repeat systematic biopsy (SB) approach. Furthermore, anteriorly located tumors are frequently identified using MR targeted biopsy (TB), suggesting that an MR guided approach allows for increased accuracy for detecting tumors commonly missed by systematic biopsies. We conclude that men with a prior negative biopsy and continued suspicion of PCa should strongly be encouraged to get a prostate mpMRI prior to a repeat biopsy.

  18. Tutte polynomial in functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillón, Marlly V.

    2015-09-01

    Methods of graph theory are applied to the processing of functional magnetic resonance images. Specifically the Tutte polynomial is used to analyze such kind of images. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging provide us connectivity networks in the brain which are represented by graphs and the Tutte polynomial will be applied. The problem of computing the Tutte polynomial for a given graph is #P-hard even for planar graphs. For a practical application the maple packages "GraphTheory" and "SpecialGraphs" will be used. We will consider certain diagram which is depicting functional connectivity, specifically between frontal and posterior areas, in autism during an inferential text comprehension task. The Tutte polynomial for the resulting neural networks will be computed and some numerical invariants for such network will be obtained. Our results show that the Tutte polynomial is a powerful tool to analyze and characterize the networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  19. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticle analyte sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Maryin G; Warner, Cynthia L; Addleman, Raymond S; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Toloczko, Mychailo B

    2014-03-25

    A method and system for simply and efficiently determining quantities of a preselected material in a particular solution by the placement of at least one superparamagnetic nanoparticle having a specified functionalized organic material connected thereto into a particular sample solution, wherein preselected analytes attach to the functionalized organic groups, these superparamagnetic nanoparticles are then collected at a collection site and analyzed for the presence of a particular analyte.

  20. The Relationship Between Functional Movement, Balance Deficits, and Previous Injury History in Deploying Marine Warfighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Motte, Sarah J; Lisman, Peter; Sabatino, Marc; Beutler, Anthony I; OʼConnor, Francis G; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-06-01

    Screening for primary musculoskeletal injury (MSK-I) is costly and time-consuming. Both the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) and the Y-Balance Test (YBT) have been shown to predict future MSK-I. With a goal of optimizing the efficiency of primary MSK-I screening, we studied associations between performance on the FMS and YBT and whether history of MSK-I influenced FMS and YBT scores. In total, 365 deploying Marines performed the FMS and YBT as prescribed. Composite and individual scores were each categorized as high risk or low risk using published injury thresholds: High-risk FMS included composite scores ≤14 and right-to-left (R/L) asymmetry for Shoulder Mobility, In-Line Lunge, Straight Leg Raise, Hurdle Step, or Rotary Stability. High-risk YBT consisted of anterior, posteromedial, and/or posterolateral R/L differences >4 cm and/or composite differences ≥12 cm. Pearson's χ tests evaluated associations between: (a) all FMS and YBT risk groups and (b) previous MSK-I and all FMS and YBT risk groups. Marines with high-risk FMS were twice as likely to have high-risk YBT posteromedial scores (χ = 10.2, p = 0.001; odds ratio [OR] = 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.3-3.2). History of any MSK-I was not associated with high-risk FMS or high-risk YBT. However, previous lower extremity MSK-I was associated with In-Line Lunge asymmetries (χ = 9.8, p = 0.002, OR = 2.2, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6). Overall, we found limited overlap in FMS and YBT risk. Because both methods seem to assess different risk factors for injury, we recommend FMS and YBT continue to be used together in combination with a thorough injury history until their predictive capacities are further established.

  1. Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Catherine Ann [Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2011-05-01

    Heusler intermetallics Mn2Y Ga and X2MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X2MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn2Y Ga to the logical Mn3Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co2FeSi (Appendix B).

  2. Magnetic coil design considerations for functional magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, V W; Hsiao, I N; Dhaka, V

    2000-05-01

    Our studies have demonstrated effective stimulation of the bladder, bowel, and expiratory muscles in patients with spinal cord injury using functional magnetic stimulation. However, one limitation of the magnetic coils (MC) is related to their inability to specifically stimulate the target tissue without activation of surrounding tissue. The primary goal of this study was to determine the governing parameters in the MC design, such as coil configuration, diameter, and number of turns in one loop of the coil. By varying these parameters, our approach was to design, construct, and evaluate the induced electric field distributions of two sets of novel MC's. Based on the slinky coil design, the first set of coils was constructed to compare their abilities in generating induced electric fields for focal nerve excitation. The second set of coils was built to determine the effect that changes in two parameters, coil diameter and number of turns in one loop, had on field penetration. The results showed that the slinky coil design produced more focalized stimulation when compared to the planar round coils. The primary-to-secondary peak ratios of the induced electric field from slinky 1 to 5 were 1.00, 2.20, 2.85, 2.62, and 3.54. We also determined that coils with larger diameters had better penetration than those with smaller diameters. Coils with less number of turns in one loop had higher initial field strengths; when compared to coils that had more turns per loop, initial field strengths remained higher as distance from the coil increased. In our attempt to customize MC design according to each functional magnetic stimulation application and patients of different sizes, the parameters of MC explored in this study may facilitate designing an optimal MC for a certain clinical application.

  3. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudovan, Dragoș; Balaure, Paul Cătălin; Mihăiescu, Dan Eduard; Fudulu, Adrian; Purcăreanu, Bogdan; Radu, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles followed two main directions in the field of biomedical applications: one direction is as image enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the other is as drugdelivery devices for various biologically-active substances. A third field which just emerges in nanomedicine is the field of the so-called theranostic devices which combines in the same delivery vehicle both the therapeutic agent and the contrast substance. The advantages of using nanoparticles instead of larger carriers for delivery of both drug and image contrast enhancing agents will be highlighted throughout this review article. Despite the ever increasing number of articles reporting both in vitro and in vivo studies carried out on functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and envisaging their potential biomedical applications, only few formulations reached the phase of clinical trials and even fewer became marketed products. The perspectives in the field are open, since new drugs require new delivery devices and possibly new means of functionalization. At the same time, the field of nanomedicine also provides the opportunity to better exploit drugs that are already in clinical use by improving their bioavailability through appropriate nanoformulations.

  4. Hemosiderin detected by T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms: indication of previous bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shihomi; Inoue, Takashi; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-01-01

    Previous bleeding from a cerebral aneurysm indicates a higher risk of rupture. Hemosiderin may be detected during aneurysm surgery or by preoperative imaging sensitive to hemosiderin. The detection of hemosiderin deposits by T(2)*-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was evaluated in 49 patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms who underwent open surgery. MR imaging was performed using 3.0 tesla MR scanner. Two sequences of T(2)*-weighted imaging, and proton density images were obtained. Preliminary study in patients with old subarachnoid hemorrhage provided the definitions of likely pathological findings during surgery and on T(2)*-weighted imaging due to previous hemorrhage. Hemosiderin deposits in the subarachnoid space were observed during surgery in 9 of the 49 patients, although no obvious rupture site was detected around the aneurysm wall. Size, presence of bleb, location, and number of aneurysms showed no significant difference between patients with and without hemosiderin deposition. Hypointense areas on T(2)*-weighted imaging were recognized in four patients. The mean size of the aneurysms in these patients was 9.8 mm, significantly larger than those in other patients (p = 0.029). Hemosiderin deposits were observed during surgery in sites close to the lesions on T(2)*-weighted imaging in two of these four patients. Hemosiderin deposits are not rare in patients with unruptured aneurysms, and preoperative T(2)*-weighted imaging can detect such deposits.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of functional magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, J.; Sanders, J.; Srinath, S.; Srikanth, H.

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes have been excellent functional materials that could be dispersed in polymer matrices for various applications. However, uniform dispersion of particles in polymers without agglomeration is quite challenging. We have fabricated PMMA/polypyrrole bilayer structures embedded with Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles synthesized using wet chemical synthesis. Agglomeration-free dispersion of nanoparticles was achieved by coating the particles with surfactants and by dissolving both the particles and PMMA in chlorobenzene. Structural characterization was done using XRD and TEM. Magnetic properties of the bilayer structures indicated superparamagnetic behavior that is desirable for RF applications as the magnetic losses are reduced. Our polymer nanocomposite bilayer films with conducting polymer coatings are potential candidates for tunable RF applications with integrated EMI suppression. We will also report on our studies of pumped ferrofluids flowing past carbon nanotubes that are arranged in microchannel arrays. Magnetization under various flow conditions is investigated and correlated with the hydrodynamic properties. This scheme provides a novel method of energy conversion and storage using nanocomposite materials.

  6. The statistic-thermodynamically calculations of magnetic thermodynamically functions for nuclear magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenghe; Luo Deli; Feng Kaiming

    2013-01-01

    The present work is to calculate the magnetic thermodynamically functions, i.e. energy, the intensity of magnetization, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs function for nuclear magnetic moments of T, D and neutron n at 2 T and 1, 50, 100 and 150 K from partition functions. It is shown that magnetic saturation of thermonuclear plasma does not easily occur for nuclear magneton is only of 10 -3 of Bohr magneton. The work done by magnetic field is considerable. (authors)

  7. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles: A novel heterogeneous catalyst support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles have emerged as viable alternatives to conventional materials, as robust, high-surface-area heterogeneous catalyst supports. Post-synthetic surface modification protocol for magnetic nanoparticles has been developed that imparts desirable che...

  8. Exploring brain function with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Salle, F.; Formisano, E.; Linden, D.E.J.; Goebel, R.; Bonavita, S.; Pepino, A.; Smaltino, F.; Tedeschi, G.

    1999-01-01

    Since its invention in the early 1990s, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has rapidly assumed a leading role among the techniques used to localize brain activity. The spatial and temporal resolution provided by state-of-the-art MR technology and its non-invasive character, which allows multiple studies of the same subject, are some of the main advantages of fMRI over the other functional neuroimaging modalities that are based on changes in blood flow and cortical metabolism. This paper describes the basic principles and methodology of fMRI and some aspects of its application to functional activation studies. Attention is focused on the physiology of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism and on the acquisition of functional time-series with echo planar imaging (EPI). We also provide an introduction to the current strategies for the correction of signal artefacts and other image processing techniques. In order to convey an idea of the numerous applications of fMRI, we will review some of the recent results in the fields of cognitive and sensorimotor psychology and physiology

  9. Assessment of platelet function in acute ischemic stroke patients previously treated with aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Aida; Parkhutik, Vera; Tembl, Jose Ignacio; Vallés, Juana; Santos, Maria Teresa; Moscardó, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Platelet inhibition measured by platelet function tests could be critical to understand the reasons for early recurrence and to guide therapeutic recommendations. We assess the platelet function during the acute phase of ischemic stroke in patients pretreated with aspirin who continue their treatment with aspirin only, are started on clopidogrel only, or add clopidogrel to aspirin. Sixty-four patients were taking aspirin before the stroke. Depending on the administered antiplatelet, 3 groups were defined: ASA: patients who continued on aspirin orally or intravenous acetylsalicylate of lysine, n = 30; CLO: patients who discontinued aspirin and were started on clopidogrel, n = 16; and ASA + CLO: patients who were prescribed both aspirin and clopidogrel, n = 10. Collagen-induced thromboxane A2 (TXA2) synthesis, ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-induced aggregation, and occlusion time (PF-100) were measured. CLO group only had a marked elevation of TXA2 (17.44 ± 15.62 ng/mL, P = .000) and a shortening of the platelet function analyzer (PFA)-100 closure time (157.13 ± 88 seconds, P = .047) compared with the other 2 groups (ASA: TXA2, .62 ± 1.59 ng/mL; ASA + CLO: TXA2 1.79 ± 4.59 ng/mL). They achieved a small (13%) but significant reduction of ADP-induced aggregation (87.00 ± 23.06 mm, P = .008) compared with the ASA group (102.82 ± 22.38 seconds). Stopping aspirin intake within the first 72 hours of the acute stroke drastically increases TXA2 synthesis. During the same time window, the freshly prescribed clopidogrel manages to reduce the ADP-induced aggregation only slightly (13%). This study offers analytic proof that the common practice of replacing aspirin with clopidogrel does not leave stroke patients fully protected during the first days after an ischemic stroke. Possible solutions could be to preserve aspirin during a few days or to use loading doses of clopidogrel at hospital admission. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc

  10. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Consumer Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, Martin; Schilke, Oliver; Weber, Bernd

    2011-01-01

    of prior fMRI research related to consumer behavior and highlights the features that make fMRI an attractive method for consumer and marketing research. The authors discuss advantages and limitations and illustrate the proposed procedures with an applied study, which investigates loss aversion when buying......Although the field of psychology is undergoing an immense shift toward the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the application of this methodology to consumer research is relatively new. To assist consumer researchers in understanding fMRI, this paper elaborates on the findings...... and selling a common product. Results reveal a significantly stronger activation in the amygdala while consumers estimate selling prices versus buying prices, suggesting that loss aversion is associated with the processing of negative emotion. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  11. Risk of behavioral and adaptive functioning difficulties in youth with previous and current sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfect, Michelle M; Archbold, Kristen; Goodwin, James L; Levine-Donnerstein, Deborah; Quan, Stuart F

    2013-04-01

    To examine the rates of behavioral and adaptive functioning difficulties among youth who never had sleep disordered breathing (SDB), had remitted SDB, had incident SDB, or had persistent SDB; and to determine if there were increased odds of behavioral difficulties among youth with varying SDB histories relative to those who never had SDB. 263 youth had valid polysomnography and neurobehavioral data at two time points approximately 5 years apart from the prospective Tucson Children's Assessment of Sleep Apnea study. Primary outcomes were the behavior assessment scale for children-2(nd) Edition parent report form (BASC-PRF) and Self-Report of Personality (SRP), and the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-2(nd) Edition (ABAS-2). Compared to those who never had SDB, individuals with persistent SDB had significant odds and met more cutoff scores on the BASC-2-PRF externalizing problems composite (odds ratio [OR] 3.29; 8.92% vs. 35.3%), behavioral symptoms index (OR 6.82; 7.4% vs. 35.3%) and Hyperactivity subscale (OR 6.82; 11.1% vs. 41.2%). Similarly, greater difficulties was seen for the group with persistent SDB (relative to never) on the ABAS-2 social domain (OR 3.39; 22% vs. 50%), and Communication (OR 4.26; 15% vs. 42.9%) and Self-Care subscales (OR = 2.97; 25.2% vs. 50%). Relative to youth who never had SDB, youth who developed SDB at Time 2 had compromised adaptive skills as evidenced by the BASC-2 PRF adaptive behavior composite (OR 3.34; 15.6% vs. 38.1%) and the ABAS-2 general adaptive composite (OR 2.83; 20.5% vs. 42.1%). Youth with current SDB exhibited hyperactivity, attention problems, aggressivity, lower social competency, poorer communication, and/or diminished adaptive skills.

  12. Oxygen transport enhancement by functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (FMP) in bioprocesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataide, Filipe Andre Prata

    The enhancement of fluid properties, namely thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity for a wide range of applications, through the use of nanosized particles' suspensions has been gathering increasing interest in the scientific community. In previous studies, Olle et al. (2006) showed an enhancement in oxygen absorption to aqueous solutions of up to 6-fold through the use of functionalized nanosized magnetic particles with oleic acid coating. Krishnamurthy et al. (2006) showed a remarkable 26-fold enhancement in dye diffusion in water. These two publications are landmarks in mass transfer enhancement in chemical systems through the use of nanoparticles. The central goal of this Ph.D. thesis was to develop functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to enhance oxygen transport in bioprocesses. The experimental protocol for magnetic nanoparticles synthesis and purification adopted in this thesis is a modification of that reported by Olle et al. (2006). This is facilitated by employing twice the quantity of ammonia, added at a slower rate, and by filtering the final nanoparticle solution in a cross-flow filtration modulus against 55 volumes of distilled water. This modification in the protocol resulted in improved magnetic nanoparticles with measurably higher mass transfer enhancement. Magnetic nanoparticles with oleic acid and Hitenol-BC coating were screened for oxygen transfer enhancement, since these particles are relatively inexpensive and easy to synthesize. A glass 0.5-liter reactor was custom manufactured specifically for oxygen transport studies in magnetic nanoparticles suspensions. The reactor geometry, baffles and Rushton impeller are of standard dimensions. Mass transfer tests were conducted through the use of the sulphite oxidation method, applying iodometric back-titration. A 3-factor central composite circumscribed design (CCD) was adopted for design of experiments in order to generate sufficiently informative data to model the effect of magnetic

  13. Increase in stability of cellulase immobilized on functionalized magnetic nanospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenjuan; Qiu, Jianhui; Feng, Huixia; Zang, Limin; Sakai, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanospheres were prepared by co-condensation of tetraethylorthosilicate with three different amino-silanes: 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-triethoxysilane (AEAPTES), 3-(2-aminoethylamino propyl)-trimethoxysilane (AEAPTMES) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). Then three functionalized magnetic nanospheres were used as supports for immobilization of cellulase. The three functionalized magnetic nanospheres with core–shell morphologies exhibited higher capacity for cellulase immobilization than unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres. The increasing of surface charge of functionalized magnetic nanospheres leads to an enhancement of the capacity of cellulase immobilization. Particularly, AEAPTMES with methoxy groups was favored to be hydrolyzed and grafted on unfunctionalized magnetic nanospheres than the others. AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres with the highest zeta potential (29 mV) exhibited 87% activity recovery and the maximum amount of immobilized cellulase was 112 mg/g support at concentration of initial cellulase of 8 mg/mL. Immobilized cellulase on AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than other immobilized cellulases and free cellulase. In particular, it can be used in about 40 °C, demonstrating the potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase. - Highlights: • Three Amino-silane modified magnetic nanospheres were prepared. • Cellulase immobilized AEAPTMES functionalized magnetic nanospheres had higher temperature stability and broader pH stability than free cellulase. • The potential of biofuel production using this immobilized cellulase

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  15. Previous exercise training has a beneficial effect on renal and cardiovascular function in a model of diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiton Augusto dos Santos Silva

    Full Text Available Exercise training (ET is an important intervention for chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM. However, it is not known whether previous exercise training intervention alters the physiological and medical complications of these diseases. We investigated the effects of previous ET on the progression of renal disease and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with streptozotocin (STZ-induced DM. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. All groups were followed for 15 weeks. Trained control and trained diabetic rats underwent 10 weeks of exercise training, whereas previously trained diabetic rats underwent 14 weeks of exercise training. Renal function, proteinuria, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and the echocardiographic parameters autonomic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS were evaluated. In the previously trained group, the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was reduced compared with the sedentary diabetic and trained diabetic groups (p<0.05. Additionally, RSNA was normalized in the trained diabetic and previously trained diabetic animals (p<0.05. The ejection fraction was increased in the previously trained diabetic animals compared with the diabetic and trained diabetic groups (p<0.05, and the myocardial performance index was improved in the previously trained diabetic group compared with the diabetic and trained diabetic groups (p<0.05. In addition, the previously trained rats had improved heart rate variability and BRS in the tachycardic response and bradycardic response in relation to the diabetic group (p<0.05. This study demonstrates that previous ET improves the functional damage that affects DM. Additionally, our findings suggest that the development of renal and cardiac dysfunction can be minimized by 4 weeks of ET before the induction of DM by STZ.

  16. Previous exercise training has a beneficial effect on renal and cardiovascular function in a model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kleiton Augusto dos Santos; Luiz, Rafael da Silva; Rampaso, Rodolfo Rosseto; de Abreu, Nayda Parísio; Moreira, Édson Dias; Mostarda, Cristiano Teixeira; De Angelis, Kátia; de Paulo Castro Teixeira, Vicente; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Schor, Nestor

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training (ET) is an important intervention for chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus (DM). However, it is not known whether previous exercise training intervention alters the physiological and medical complications of these diseases. We investigated the effects of previous ET on the progression of renal disease and cardiovascular autonomic control in rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DM. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups. All groups were followed for 15 weeks. Trained control and trained diabetic rats underwent 10 weeks of exercise training, whereas previously trained diabetic rats underwent 14 weeks of exercise training. Renal function, proteinuria, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and the echocardiographic parameters autonomic modulation and baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) were evaluated. In the previously trained group, the urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was reduced compared with the sedentary diabetic and trained diabetic groups (ptrained diabetic and previously trained diabetic animals (ptrained diabetic animals compared with the diabetic and trained diabetic groups (ptrained diabetic group compared with the diabetic and trained diabetic groups (ptrained rats had improved heart rate variability and BRS in the tachycardic response and bradycardic response in relation to the diabetic group (p<0.05). This study demonstrates that previous ET improves the functional damage that affects DM. Additionally, our findings suggest that the development of renal and cardiac dysfunction can be minimized by 4 weeks of ET before the induction of DM by STZ.

  17. Peptide-functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle for gold mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Sharma, Kumakshi; Borujeny, Elham Rafie; Montemagno, Carlo, E-mail: montemag@ualberta.ca [Ingenuity Lab, 1-070C (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    Here, we present our work on preparing a novel nanomaterial composed of inorganic binding peptides and magnetic nanoparticles for inorganic mining. Two previously selected and well-characterized gold-binding peptides from cell surface display, AuBP1 and AuBP2, were exploited. This nanomaterial (AuBP-MNP) was designed to fulfill the following two significant functions: the surface conjugated gold-binding peptide will recognize and selectively bind to gold, while the magnetic nano-sized core will respond and migrate according to the applied external magnetic field. This will allow the smart nanomaterial to mine an individual material (gold) from a pool of mixture, without excessive solvent extraction, filtration, and concentration steps. The working efficiency of AuBP-MNP was determined by showing a dramatic reduction of gold nanoparticle colloid concentration, monitored by spectroscopy. The binding kinetics of AuBP-MNP onto the gold surface was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, which exhibits around 100 times higher binding kinetics than peptides alone. The binding capacity of AuBP-MNP was demonstrated by a bench-top mining test with gold microparticles.

  18. Vision research with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakadomari, Satoshi

    1999-01-01

    Present state of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which is based on changes of MR signals produced by blood circulation changes due to the nerve activity, in vision research was reviewed. In this field, there are international associations of Human Brain Mapping and for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) and reports presented in ARVO in 1998 and 1999 were firstly described. Next, the comparison between two conditions was defined as the experimental paradigm of fMRI and analyses with the event related fMRI and with classification into visual central regions were explained. Major findings obtained by stimulation of visual central regions were discussed on the lateral corpus geniculatum, areas of V1, V2, V3 (VP), V3A, V4A (V8), V5 and LO (lateral occipital complex), and others. In practice of actual fMRI, the noise is often attributable to the examinee factor and notification for speculating the result is important. The value of fMRI in the clinical ophthalmological diagnosis was discussed and thought to be further investigated. (K.H.)

  19. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for medical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichiyanagi, Yuko [Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Physics, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: yuko@ynu.ac.jp; Moritake, Shinji [Graduate School of Engineering, Department of Physics, Yokohama National University, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan); Taira, Shu [Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Molecular Gerontology Research Group, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan); Setou, Mitsutoshi [Mitsubishi Kagaku Institute of Life Sciences, Molecular Gerontology Research Group, Tokyo 194-8511 (Japan)

    2007-03-15

    We prepared an amino-substituted nanoparticle by means of the amino-silane coupling procedure. The original magnetic particles were {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which ranged in size from 1.3 to 34 nm, surrounded by amorphous SiO{sub 2}. The modification of the magnetic particle by the addition of an amino group was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a spinel structure both before and after modification of the amino group. The magnetization curve indicated paramagnetic behavior for the 3 nm particles, superparamagnetic behavior for the 7 nm particles, and ferromagnetic behavior for 9 nm particles at room temperature. A fluorescent reagent was applied to the particle, and the particle was introduced into a cell. The magnetic particles in the cell were localized using an external magnetic field.

  20. Functional magnetic nanoparticles for medical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiyanagi, Yuko; Moritake, Shinji; Taira, Shu; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2007-01-01

    We prepared an amino-substituted nanoparticle by means of the amino-silane coupling procedure. The original magnetic particles were γ-Fe 2 O 3 , which ranged in size from 1.3 to 34 nm, surrounded by amorphous SiO 2 . The modification of the magnetic particle by the addition of an amino group was confirmed using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR). The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a spinel structure both before and after modification of the amino group. The magnetization curve indicated paramagnetic behavior for the 3 nm particles, superparamagnetic behavior for the 7 nm particles, and ferromagnetic behavior for 9 nm particles at room temperature. A fluorescent reagent was applied to the particle, and the particle was introduced into a cell. The magnetic particles in the cell were localized using an external magnetic field

  1. Changes in the functional binocular status of older children and adults with previously untreated infantile esotropia following late surgical realignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Anthony David Neil; Orpen, Jane; Calcutt, Carolyn

    2007-04-01

    Most studies of infantile esotropia concern patients diagnosed in infancy and treated throughout childhood. This prospective study addresses changes in the functional binocular status of older children and adults with previously untreated infantile esotropia, following late surgical realignment. Seventeen patients aged 8 years or more with a history of untreated esotropia occurring within the first 6 months of life were included in this study. All had monocular optokinetic asymmetry, a visual acuity of 20/30 or better in the worse eye, and binocular function assesment preoperatively and postoperatively. All were surgically aligned within 8(Delta) of orthotropia. None had neurologic disease. Preoperatively, all 17 patients demonstrated a monocular response to Bagolini lenses, while postoperatively 15 (88%) of the 17 demonstrated binocular function with Bagolini lenses (in that they could constantly perceive the major part of both arms of the X generated by the Bagolini lenses) and 13/17 (76%) demonstrated an increase in the binocular field. All 17 had no sensory fusion, either preoperatively or postoperatively, when tested with the Worth 4-Dot test or synoptophore, and no stereopsis with the Titmus stereo test. Older children and adults with previously untreated infantile esotropia derive some functional benefits following late surgical realignment. The degree of binocular function may be lower than that achieved in patients aligned before 24 months of age.

  2. Executive Functioning and Visuospatial Abilities in Bulimia Nervosa with or without a Previous History of Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degortes, Daniela; Tenconi, Elena; Santonastaso, Paolo; Favaro, Angela

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate executive functioning and visuospatial abilities in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN), with a particular interest in exploring the impact of a previous diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (AN). Several neuropsychological tasks were administered to 89 BN patients (52 with a previous history of AN and 37 without previous AN) and 160 healthy women. A poorer performance on set-shifting measures (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test) was found only in BN patients with a previous history of AN. Decision-making abilities (Iowa Gambling Task) were significantly impaired in the whole sample of BN patients, but difficulties were more pronounced in the subgroup with previous AN. Finally, we did not find any differences in response inhibition and visuospatial abilities between the two samples of BN patients and healthy women. Our findings support the idea that cognitive abilities in patients with BN are more impaired in the presence of a prior history of AN. The clinical and treatment implications of our findings should be explored in future studies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  3. Hybride magnetic nanostructure based on amino acids functionalized polypyrrole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Alexandrina, E-mail: alexandrina.nan@itim-cj.ro; Bunge, Alexander; Turcu, Rodica [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Conducting polypyrrole is especially promising for many commercial applications because of its unique optical, electric, thermal and mechanical properties. We report the synthesis and characterization of novel pyrrole functionalized monomers and core-shell hybrid nanostructures, consisting of a conjugated polymer layer (amino acids functionalized pyrrole copolymers) and a magnetic nanoparticle core. For functionalization of the pyrrole monomer we used several amino acids: tryptophan, leucine, phenylalanine, serine and tyrosine. These amino acids were linked via different types of hydrophobic linkers to the nitrogen atom of the pyrrole monomer. The magnetic core-shell hybrid nanostructures are characterized by various methods such as FTIR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetic measurements.

  4. The association between subjective memory complaint and objective cognitive function in older people with previous major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Shiang Chu

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to investigate associations between subjective memory complaint and objective cognitive performance in older people with previous major depression-a high-risk sample for cognitive impairment and later dementia. A cross-sectional study was carried out in people aged 60 or over with previous major depression but not fulfilling current major depression criteria according to DSM-IV-TR. People with dementia or Mini-Mental State Examination score less than 17 were excluded. Subjective memory complaint was defined on the basis of a score ≧4 on the subscale of Geriatric Mental State schedule, a maximum score of 8. Older people aged equal or over 60 without any psychiatric diagnosis were enrolled as healthy controls. Cognitive function was evaluated using a series of cognitive tests assessing verbal memory, attention/speed, visuospatial function, verbal fluency, and cognitive flexibility in all participants. One hundred and thirteen older people with previous major depression and forty-six healthy controls were enrolled. Subjective memory complaint was present in more than half of the participants with depression history (55.8%. Among those with major depression history, subjective memory complaint was associated with lower total immediate recall and delayed verbal recall scores after adjustment. The associations between subjective memory complaint and worse memory performance were stronger in participants with lower depressive symptoms (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score<7. The results suggest subjective memory complaint may be a valid appraisal of memory performance in older people with previous major depression and consideration should be given to more proactive assessment and follow-up in these clinical samples.

  5. Functionalization of magnetic nanowires by charged biopolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnin, D.; Callegari, V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We report on a facile method for the preparation of biocompatible and bioactive magnetic nanowires. The method consists of the direct deposition of polysaccharides by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly onto a brush of metallic nanowires; obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores ...

  6. A magnetic window into bodily functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the uses of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in Medical Science. The physics of NMR and the chemical shift are both explained. The use of NMR in studying metabolism and deep tissue is described; these studies include brain metabolites in babies, muscle disorders, and monitoring malfunctions in the human body. (UK)

  7. Amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as robust support for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Biomaterials; enzyme activity; enzyme biocatalysis; nanoparticles; surface properties. Abstract. Preparation of magnetic nanoparticles with controlled size and shape along with modulation of their surface properties via introduction of functional groups holds great prospect in the field of nanotechnology.

  8. Alteration of distortion product otoacoustic emission input/output functions in subjects with a previous history of middle ear dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De P Campos, Ualace; Sanches, Seisse G; Hatzopoulos, Stavros; Carvallo, Renata M M; Kochanek, Krzysztof; Skarżyński, Henryk

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sub-clinical alterations on the amplitudes and slopes of the DPOAE input-output responses from subjects with previous history of middle ear dysfunction. The study included 15 subjects with and 15 subjects without a history of otitis media in the last 10 years. All participants were assessed with acoustic immittance, pure-tone audiometry, and DPOAEs. For the later, I/O functions and I/O slopes were estimated at 1501, 2002, 3174, 4004 and 6384 Hz. No statistically significant differences were found between the 2 groups in terms of behavioral thresholds. The group with a previous history of middle ear dysfunction presented significantly lower mean DPOAE amplitudes at 2002, 3174 and 4004 Hz. In terms of DPOAE slopes, no statistically significant differences were observed at the tested frequencies, except at 3174 Hz. Middle ear pathologies can produce subclinical alterations that are undetectable with traditional pure-tone audiometry. The data from the present study show that reduced amplitude DPOAEs are associated with a previous history of middle ear complications. The corresponding DPOAE slopes were affected at only 1 tested frequency, suggesting that the cochlear non-linearity is preserved. Considering these results, it remains to be elucidated to what degree the DPOAE amplitude attenuation interferes with higher-order auditory tasks.

  9. Familial Essential Tremor Studied With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A.; Salgado, P.; Gil, A.; Barrios, F. A.

    2003-09-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging has become an important analytical tool to study neurodegenerative diseases. We applied the EPI-BOLD functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging technique to acquire functional images of patients with familial essential tremor (FET) disorder and healthy control volunteers, during a motor task activity. Functional and anatomic images were used to produce the brain activation maps of the patients and volunteers. These functional maps of the primary somatosensorial and motor cortexes of patients and control subjects were compared for functional differences per subject. The averaged functional brain images of eight of each case were acquired were, it can be clearly observed the differences in active zones. The results presented in this work show that there are differences in the functional maps during motor task activation between control subjects and FET patients suggesting a cerebral functional reorganization that can be mapped with BOLD-fMRI.

  10. Collisionless distribution function of charged particles ensemble in a tokamak magnetic configuration with magnetic island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podturova, O. I.

    2017-10-01

    The collisionless distribution function of charged particle ensemble in the magnetic field of tokamak with a magnetic island is calculated. The calculation is based on the solution of the kinetic equation with source together with three-dimensional numerical calculations of charged particle trajectories. It is shown that in case of an inhomogeneous source trajectory, motion of trapped particles leads to anisotropization of the initially isotropic distribution of particle ensemble. The absence of contribution from the passing particles decreases the efficiency of spontaneous generation of a non-induction current in the magnetic island in comparison with the bootstrap effect in the system of nested magnetic surfaces.

  11. Cognitive functioning in children and adolescents in their first episode of psychosis: differences between previous cannabis users and nonusers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Serna, Elena; Mayoral, María; Baeza, Inmaculada; Arango, Celso; Andrés, Patricia; Bombin, Igor; González, Cristina; Rapado, Marta; Robles, Olalla; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Jose Manuel; Zabala, Arantzazu; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between cognition and prior cannabis use in children and adolescents presenting a first episode of psychosis. A total of 107 patients with first episode of psychosis and 96 healthy controls, aged 9 to 17 years, were interviewed about their previous substance use and to assess their cognitive functions. Patients were assessed while not using cannabis by means of a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. They were divided into 2 groups depending on the history of prior cannabis use: cannabis users (CU) and cannabis nonusers (CNU). Significant differences were found in all areas evaluated between the 3 groups. Both CU and CNU patients obtained lower scores than controls on verbal learning and memory and working memory. Patients with prior cannabis use performed better on some tests of attention (Continuous performance test (CPT) number of correct responses, p = 0.002; CPT average reaction time, p < 0.001) and executive functions (Trail Making Test, part B (TMT-B) number of mistakes, p < 0.001; Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) number of categories completed, p < 0.001) than CNU patients. CU patients performed better than CNU subjects on some cognitive measures. This may indicate lower individual vulnerability for psychosis in CU patients in whom cannabis use can be a precipitating factor of psychotic episodes.

  12. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical......, if the stimulated cortex makes a critical contribution to the brain functions subserving the task. While the relationship between task and functional activation as revealed by fMRI is correlative in nature, the neurodisruptive effect of TMS reflects a causal effect on brain activity.The use of preoperative f...

  13. Pediatric applications of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Bernal, Byron [Miami Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Neuroradiology, Miami, FL (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric functional MRI has been used for the last 2 decades but is now gaining wide acceptance in the preoperative workup of children with brain tumors and medically refractory epilepsy. This review covers pediatrics-specific difficulties such as sedation and task paradigm selection according to the child's age and cognitive level. We also illustrate the increasing uses of functional MRI in the depiction of cognitive function, neuropsychiatric disorders and response to pharmacological agents. Finally, we review the uses of resting-state fMRI in the evaluation of children and in the detection of epileptogenic regions. (orig.)

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    cerebral pathophysiology, characterization and distinct regional mapping of human cognitive functions such as vision, motor, language, memory, etc. ..... Rosen B R 1991 Functional mapping of the human visual cortex by magnetic resonance imaging; Science 254 716–. 719. Blinkenberg M, Bonde C, Holm S, Svarer C, ...

  15. Magnetic Field Design of Combined-function Magnets Wound with Coated Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Amemiya, N.; Nakamura, T.; Ogitsu, T.

    For accelerator magnets, high Tc superconductors (HTS) are a remarkable option comparing with low Tc superconductors (LTS), since they possess several distinctive characteristics, such as good thermal stability and high cooling efficiency. On the other side, HTSs have strong mechanical constraints which make them hard to shape, like bending and winding. In this paper, a method is proposed to solve the mechanical constraint problems of HTSs, and the feasibility of applying HTSs to combined-function accelerator magnets is proved. The detailed method is presented to apply coated conductors into the design of a combined function accelerator magnet containing both dipole and quadrupole magnetic field components, which is named 2+4 pole magnet in this paper. This method takes electromagnetic characteristics of coated conductors into account, and it is capable of solving their mechanical constraint problems. First a 2D cross-sectional design of the straight section was completed, with a layout in the form of multi-layers to generate required magnetic fields. Then a 3D design was carried out to wind coil ends considering flat-wise/edge- wise bending and torsion tolerance. The locations and angles of coated conductors were optimized to improve the efficiency of field generation and minimize the field error. Results show that coil ends can be successfully designed, and electromagnetic analyses show that the designed magnet can properly generate required magnetic field.

  16. Functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetic nanoparticles with biological entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mǎgeruşan, Lidia; Mrówczyński, Radosław; Turcu, Rodica

    2015-12-01

    New hybrid materials, obtained through introduction of cysteine, lysine and folic acid as biological entities into polydopamine-coated magnetite nanoparticles, are reported. The syntheses are straight forward and various methods were applied for structural and morphological characterization of the resulting nanoparticles. XPS proved a very powerful tool for surface chemical analysis and it evidences the functionalization of polydopamine coated magnetite nanoparticles. The superparamagnetic behavior and the high values of saturation magnetization recommend all products for further application where magnetism is important for targeting, separation, or heating by alternative magnetic fields.

  17. Changes in nonhuman primate brain function following chronic alcohol consumption in previously naïve animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Jared A; Stapleton-Kotloski, Jennifer R; Alberto, Greg E; Davenport, April T; Kotloski, Robert J; Friedman, David P; Godwin, Dwayne W; Daunais, James B

    2017-08-01

    Chronic alcohol abuse is associated with neurophysiological changes in brain activity; however, these changes are not well localized in humans. Non-human primate models of alcohol abuse enable control over many potential confounding variables associated with human studies. The present study utilized high-resolution magnetoencephalography (MEG) to quantify the effects of chronic EtOH self-administration on resting state (RS) brain function in vervet monkeys. Adolescent male vervet monkeys were trained to self-administer ethanol (n=7) or an isocaloric malto-dextrin solution (n=3). Following training, animals received 12 months of free access to ethanol. Animals then underwent RS magnetoencephalography (MEG) and subsequent power spectral analysis of brain activity at 32 bilateral regions of interest associated with the chronic effects of alcohol use. demonstrate localized changes in brain activity in chronic heavy drinkers, including reduced power in the anterior cingulate cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala as well as increased power in the right medial orbital and parietal areas. The current study is the first demonstration of whole-head MEG acquisition in vervet monkeys. Changes in brain activity were consistent with human electroencephalographic studies; however, MEG was able to extend these findings by localizing the observed changes in power to specific brain regions. These regions are consistent with those previously found to exhibit volume loss following chronic heavy alcohol use. The ability to use MEG to evaluate changes in brain activity following chronic ethanol exposure provides a potentially powerful tool to better understand both the acute and chronic effects of alcohol on brain function. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. [Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic neuroanatomy of addictive disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, M E; Shtark, M B

    2014-01-01

    Research into the cerebral patterns that govern the formation and development of addictive behavior is one of the most interesting goals of neurophysiology. Authors of contemporary papers on the matter define a number of symptoms that are all part of substance or non-substance dependence, each one of them leading to abnormalities in the corresponding system of the brain. During the last twenty years the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMR1) technology has been instrumental in locating such abnormalities, identifying specific parts of the brain that, when dysfunctional, may enhance addiction and cause its positive or negative symptoms. This article reviews fMRI studies aimed toward locating areas in the brain that are responsible for cognitive, emotional, and motivational dysfunction. Cerebral correlatives of impulsiveness, behavior control, and drug cravings are reviewed separately. The article also contains an overview of possibilities to further investigate the Selves of those dependent on substances, identify previously unknown diagnostic markers of substance dependence, and evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The research under review in this article provides data that points to a special role of the nucleus caudatus as well as the nucleus accumbens, the thalamus, the insular cortex (IC), the anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal areas in psychological disorders that are part of substance dependence. General findings of the article are in accordance with contemporary models of addictive pattern.

  19. Venous refocusing for volume estimation: VERVE functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Bojana; Pike, G Bruce

    2005-02-01

    A novel, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging-based method for measuring changes in venous cerebral blood volume (CBV(v)) is presented. Venous refocusing for volume estimation (VERVE) exploits the dependency of the spin-spin relaxation rate of deoxygenated blood on the refocusing interval. Interleaved CPMG EPI acquisitions following a train of either tightly or sparsely spaced hard refocusing pulses (every 3.7 or 30 msec, respectively) at matched echo time were used to isolate the blood signal while minimizing the intravascular blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal contribution. The technique was employed to determine the steady-state increase in the CBV(v) in the visual cortex (VC) in seven healthy adult volunteers during flickering checkerboard photic stimulation. A functional activation model and a set of previously collected in vitro human whole blood relaxometry data were used to evaluate the intravascular BOLD effect on the VERVE signal. The average VC venous blood volume change was estimated to be 16 +/- 2%. This method has the potential to provide efficient and continuous monitoring of venous cerebral blood volume, thereby enabling further exploration of the mechanism underlying BOLD signal changes upon physiologic, pathophysiologic, and pharmacologic perturbations.

  20. What is feasible with imaging human brain function and connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurbil, Kamil

    2016-10-05

    When we consider all of the methods we employ to detect brain function, from electrophysiology to optical techniques to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we do not really have a 'golden technique' that meets all of the needs for studying the brain. We have methods, each of which has significant limitations but provide often complimentary information. Clearly, there are many questions that need to be answered about fMRI, which unlike other methods, allows us to study the human brain. However, there are also extraordinary accomplishments or demonstration of the feasibility of reaching new and previously unexpected scales of function in the human brain. This article reviews some of the work we have pursued, often with extensive collaborations with other co-workers, towards understanding the underlying mechanisms of the methodology, defining its limitations, and developing solutions to advance it. No doubt, our knowledge of human brain function has vastly expanded since the introduction of fMRI. However, methods and instrumentation in this dynamic field have evolved to a state that discoveries about the human brain based on fMRI principles, together with information garnered at a much finer spatial and temporal scale through other methods, are poised to significantly accelerate in the next decade.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of higher brain activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui He; Wang Yunjiu; Chen Runsheng; Tang Xiaowei.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance images (fMRIs) exhibit small differences in the magnetic resonance signal intensity in positions corresponding to focal areas of brain activation. These signal are caused by variation in the oxygenation state of the venous vasculature. Using this non-invasive and dynamic method, it is possible to localize functional brain activation, in vivo, in normal individuals, with an accuracy of millimeters and a temporal resolution of seconds. Though a series of technical difficulties remain, fMRI is increasingly becoming a key method for visualizing the working brain, and uncovering the topographical organization of the human brain, and understanding the relationship between brain and the mind

  2. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0624 Reveals a Modular Assembly of Divergently Functionalized and Previously Uncharacterized Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Michelle L; Houston, Simon; Wetherell, Charmaine; Cameron, Caroline E; Boulanger, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, multistage, systemic infection that remains a major global health concern. The molecular mechanisms underlying T. pallidum pathogenesis are incompletely understood, partially due to the phylogenetic divergence of T. pallidum. One aspect of T. pallidum that differentiates it from conventional Gram-negative bacteria, and is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis, is its unusual cell envelope ultrastructure; in particular, the T. pallidum peptidoglycan layer is chemically distinct, thinner and more distal to the outer membrane. Established functional roles for peptidoglycan include contributing to the structural integrity of the cell envelope and stabilization of the flagellar motor complex, which are typically mediated by the OmpA domain-containing family of proteins. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern peptidoglycan binding and cell envelope biogenesis in T. pallidum we report here the structural characterization of the putative OmpA-like domain-containing protein, Tp0624. Analysis of the 1.70 Å resolution Tp0624 crystal structure reveals a multi-modular architecture comprised of three distinct domains including a C-terminal divergent OmpA-like domain, which we show is unable to bind the conventional peptidoglycan component diaminopimelic acid, and a previously uncharacterized tandem domain unit. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analysis indicates that the three domains together are found in all orthologs from pathogenic treponemes, but are not observed together in genera outside Treponema. These findings provide the first structural insight into a multi-modular treponemal protein containing an OmpA-like domain and its potential role in peptidoglycan coordination and stabilization of the T. pallidum cell envelope.

  3. Magnetic elements in otoliths of lagena and their function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Yasuo

    2002-01-01

    The mystery of pigeons' homing abilities has been the subject of much interest, and it is widely believed that information from the earth's magnetic field may be involved. However, no specific magnetic sensory organ has yet been identified. The recent finding of magnetic materials in the lagenal otolith of fishes and birds raises the possibility that these structures might be key elements in the elusive magnetic sensor system. For the elemental analysis inside materials, x-ray fluorescence method (Synchrotron radiation) is one of the most powerful techniques. BL4A beam line of Photo factory of KEK at Tsukuba was used for analysis of the otolith. Comparing the compositions of the three different kinds of otolith among several species of sea fishes and birds, we found that the saccular and utricular otolith rarely contain detectable levels of Fe (iron), but that Fe is present in significant quantities in the lagenal otolith of the birds. The lagenal otolith is tiny crystal that contains magnetic elements and is sensitively displaced by imposed magnetic fields, providing the animal with geomagnetic sensory input, from which the brain would infer navigational information. Behavioral experiments of the homing abilities of the pigeons involving sectioning the lagenal nerves and the magnetic interfere to their lagena were done using 30 controlled birds and 21 treated birds from the same loft of the racing pigeons. The result of homing test of the control and treated pigeons clearly indicates the magnetic influence and lagenal function to pigeon's navigation ability, and the treated pigeons were either lost or significantly delayed, while the controls returned within 30 minutes after the release. Thus the birds' lagena is unique organ, and it may be concluded that the lagena is a key element to magnetic sensory system for birds. (author)

  4. Magnetic Exchange Couplings with Range-Separated Hybrid Density Functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Juan E; Melo, Juan I

    2010-06-08

    We investigate the effect of Hartree-Fock range-separation on the calculation of magnetic exchange couplings in a set of nine bimetallic transition-metal complexes containing 3d elements (V, Cr, Mn, and Cu). To this end, we have compared magnetic exchange couplings calculated as self-consistent energy differences using two global hybrid functionals, B3LYP (Becke 3-parameter exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr correlation) and PBEh (hybrid Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) with the short-range separated HSE (Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof) and the long-range corrected LC-ωPBE. Our results show that, although there is no clear superiority of any of these functionals when compared with experimental data, the LC-ωPBE provides a better description of the magnetization on the metallic centers, yielding self-consistent solutions that mimic more closely a Heisenberg-like behavior.

  5. Density-functional theory for internal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I.

    2018-01-01

    A density-functional theory is developed based on the Maxwell-Schrödinger equation with an internal magnetic field in addition to the external electromagnetic potentials. The basic variables of this theory are the electron density and the total magnetic field, which can equivalently be represented as a physical current density. Hence, the theory can be regarded as a physical current density-functional theory and an alternative to the paramagnetic current density-functional theory due to Vignale and Rasolt. The energy functional has strong enough convexity properties to allow a formulation that generalizes Lieb's convex analysis formulation of standard density-functional theory. Several variational principles as well as a Hohenberg-Kohn-like mapping between potentials and ground-state densities follow from the underlying convex structure. Moreover, the energy functional can be regarded as the result of a standard approximation technique (Moreau-Yosida regularization) applied to the conventional Schrödinger ground-state energy, which imposes limits on the maximum curvature of the energy (with respect to the magnetic field) and enables construction of a (Fréchet) differentiable universal density functional.

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  7. Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Classification of Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; DuBray, Molly B.; Druzgal, T. Jason; Cariello, Annahir N.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Zielinski, Brandon A.; Ravichandran, Caitlin; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Bigler, Erin D.; Lange, Nicholas; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2011-01-01

    Group differences in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity between individuals with autism and typically developing controls have been widely replicated for a small number of discrete brain regions, yet the whole-brain distribution of connectivity abnormalities in autism is not well characterized. It is also unclear…

  8. Surface functionalized magnetic nanoparticles shift cell behavior with on/off magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seongbeom; Subbiah, Ramesh; Bonaedy, Taufik; Van, Seyoung; Park, Kwideok; Yun, Kyusik

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents and targeted drug delivery systems (TDDS) due to their favorable size, surface charge, and magnetic properties. Unfortunately, the toxicity associated with MNPs limits their biological applications. Surface functionalization of MNPs with selective polymers alters the surface chemistry to impart better biocompatibility. We report the preparation of surface functionalized MNPs using iron oxide NPs (MNPs), poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), and sodium alginate via co-precipitation, emulsification, and electro-spraying, respectively. The NPs are in the nanosize range and negatively charged. Morphological and structural analyses affirm the surface functionalized nanostructure of the NPs. The surface functionalized MNPs are biocompatible, and demonstrate enhanced intracellular delivery under an applied magnetic field (H), which evinces the targeting ability of MNPs. After NP treatment, the physico-mechanical properties of fibroblasts are decided by the selective MNP uptake under "on" or "off" magnetic field conditions. We envision potential use of biocompatible surface functionalized MNP for intracellular-, targeted-DDS, imaging, and for investigating cellular mechanics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Uniform magnetic fields in density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellgren, Erik I; Laestadius, Andre; Helgaker, Trygve; Kvaal, Simen; Teale, Andrew M

    2018-01-14

    We construct a density-functional formalism adapted to uniform external magnetic fields that is intermediate between conventional density functional theory and Current-Density Functional Theory (CDFT). In the intermediate theory, which we term linear vector potential-DFT (LDFT), the basic variables are the density, the canonical momentum, and the paramagnetic contribution to the magnetic moment. Both a constrained-search formulation and a convex formulation in terms of Legendre-Fenchel transformations are constructed. Many theoretical issues in CDFT find simplified analogs in LDFT. We prove results concerning N-representability, Hohenberg-Kohn-like mappings, existence of minimizers in the constrained-search expression, and a restricted analog to gauge invariance. The issue of additivity of the energy over non-interacting subsystems, which is qualitatively different in LDFT and CDFT, is also discussed.

  10. Software Tools for the Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behroozi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has become the most popular method for imaging of brain functions. Currently, there is a large variety of software packages for the analysis of fMRI data, each providing many features for users. Since there is no single package that can provide all the necessary analyses for the fMRI data, it is helpful to know the features of each software package. In this paper, several software tools have been introduced and they have been evaluated for comparison of their functionality and their features. The description of each program has been discussed and summarized.

  11. Software Tools for the Analysis of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Behroozi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has become the most popular method for imaging of brain functions. Currently, there is a large variety of software packages for the analysis of fMRI data, each providing many features for users. Since there is no single package that can provide all the necessary analyses for the fMRI data, it is helpful to know the features of each software package. In this paper, several software tools have been introduced and they have been evaluated for comparison of their functionality and their features. The description of each program has been discussed and summarized

  12. Self-reported previous knee injury and low knee function increase knee injury risk in adolescent female football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M B; Tang, L; Zebis, M K

    2015-01-01

    as independent variables in the risk factor analyses. The study showed that self-reported previous knee injury significantly increased the risk of time-loss knee injury [relative risk (RR): 3.65, 95% confidence (CI) 1.73-7.68; P 

  13. Zero-field magnetic response functions in Landau levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Niu, Qian

    2017-07-01

    We present a fresh perspective on the Landau level quantization rule; that is, by successively including zero-field magnetic response functions at zero temperature, such as zero-field magnetization and susceptibility, the Onsager’s rule can be corrected order by order. Such a perspective is further reinterpreted as a quantization of the semiclassical electron density in solids. Our theory not only reproduces Onsager’s rule at zeroth order and the Berry phase and magnetic moment correction at first order but also explains the nature of higher-order corrections in a universal way. In applications, those higher-order corrections are expected to curve the linear relation between the level index and the inverse of the magnetic field, as already observed in experiments. Our theory then provides a way to extract the correct value of Berry phase as well as the magnetic susceptibility at zero temperature from Landau level fan diagrams in experiments. Moreover, it can be used theoretically to calculate Landau levels up to second-order accuracy for realistic models.

  14. Automated assessment of heart chamber volumes and function in patients with previous myocardial infarction using multidetector computed tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Andreas; Kühl, Jørgen Tobias; Lønborg, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV), right ventricular (RV), and left atrial (LA) volumes and functions contain important prognostic information in ischemic heart disease. Because multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has high spatial resolution, this method may be optimal to obtain this information....

  15. Long-term effects of amlodipine and lisinopril on left ventricular mass and diastolic function in elderly, previously untreated hypertensive patients : the ELVERA trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, WF; May, JF; Smit, AJ; De Graeff, PA; Havinga, TK; van den Veur, E; Schuurman, FH; Meyboom-de Jong, B; Crijns, HJGM

    Objective To compare the effects of a calcium antagonist (amlodipine) and an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril) on left Ventricular mass and diastolic function in elderly, previously untreated hypertensives. Design A double-blind randomized parallel group trial. Effects of

  16. Impact of a High Magnetic Field on the Orientation of Gravitactic Unicellular Organisms—A Critical Consideration about the Application of Magnetic Fields to Mimic Functional Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anja; Waßer, Kai; Hauslage, Jens; Christianen, Peter C.M.; Albers, Peter W.; Lebert, Michael; Richter, Peter; Alt, Wolfgang; Anken, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The gravity-dependent behavior of Paramecium biaurelia and Euglena gracilis have previously been studied on ground and in real microgravity. To validate whether high magnetic field exposure indeed provides a ground-based facility to mimic functional weightlessness, as has been suggested earlier, both cell types were observed during exposure in a strong homogeneous magnetic field (up to 30 T) and a strong magnetic field gradient. While swimming, Paramecium cells were aligned along the magnetic field lines; orientation of Euglena was perpendicular, demonstrating that the magnetic field determines the orientation and thus prevents the organisms from the random swimming known to occur in real microgravity. Exposing Astasia longa, a flagellate that is closely related to Euglena but lacks chloroplasts and the photoreceptor, as well as the chloroplast-free mutant E. gracilis 1F, to a high magnetic field revealed no reorientation to the perpendicular direction as in the case of wild-type E. gracilis, indicating the existence of an anisotropic structure (chloroplasts) that determines the direction of passive orientation. Immobilized Euglena and Paramecium cells could not be levitated even in the highest available magnetic field gradient as sedimentation persisted with little impact of the field on the sedimentation velocities. We conclude that magnetic fields are not suited as a microgravity simulation for gravitactic unicellular organisms due to the strong effect of the magnetic field itself, which masks the effects known from experiments in real microgravity. Key Words: Levitation—Microgravity—Gravitaxis—Gravikinesis—Gravity. Astrobiology 14, 205–215. PMID:24621307

  17. Arbitrary function generator for APS injector synchrotron correction magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despe, O.D.

    1991-01-01

    The APS injector synchrotron has eighty correction magnets around its circumference to provide the vernier field changes required for beam orbit correction during acceleration. The arbitrary function generator (AFG) design is based on scanning out encoded data from a semi-conductor memory, a first-in-first-out (FIFO) device. The data input consists of a maximum of 20 correction values specified within the acceleration window. Additional points between these values are then linearly interpolated to create a uniformly spaced 1000 data-point function stored in the FIFO. Each point, encoded as a 3-bit value is scanned out in synchronism with the injection pulse and used to clock the up/down counter driving the DAC. The DAC produces the analog reference voltage used to control the magnet current. 1 ref., 4 figs

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging based functional imaging in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Karen A; Gill, Simrandip K; MacPherson, Lesley; Foster, Katharine; Oates, Adam; Peet, Andrew C

    2017-02-01

    Imaging is central to management of solid tumours in children. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the standard imaging modality for tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) and limbs and is increasingly used in the abdomen. It provides excellent structural detail, but imparts limited information about tumour type, aggressiveness, metastatic potential or early treatment response. MRI based functional imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion weighted imaging, probe tissue properties to provide clinically important information about metabolites, structure and blood flow. This review describes the role of and evidence behind these functional imaging techniques in paediatric oncology and implications for integrating them into routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in oncology: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Duarte Guimaraes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the investigation of tumors with conventional magnetic resonance imaging, both quantitative characteristics, such as size, edema, necrosis, and presence of metastases, and qualitative characteristics, such as contrast enhancement degree, are taken into consideration. However, changes in cell metabolism and tissue physiology which precede morphological changes cannot be detected by the conventional technique. The development of new magnetic resonance imaging techniques has enabled the functional assessment of the structures in order to obtain information on the different physiological processes of the tumor microenvironment, such as oxygenation levels, cellularity and vascularity. The detailed morphological study in association with the new functional imaging techniques allows for an appropriate approach to cancer patients, including the phases of diagnosis, staging, response evaluation and follow-up, with a positive impact on their quality of life and survival rate.

  20. Influence of 12 weeks of jogging on magnetic resonance-determined left ventricular characteristics in previously sedentary subjects free of cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipola, Petri; Heikkinen, Jari; Laaksonen, David E; Kettunen, Raimo

    2009-02-15

    Hypertrophy of the left ventricle is a diagnostic dilemma in subjects who engage in regular endurance exercise. We studied prospectively whether endurance training in previously sedentary young and middle-aged men and women can alter left ventricular (LV) characteristics. We recruited 33 healthy young and middle-aged subjects (18 women, 15 men, ages 21 to 59 years) to undergo 12 weeks of home-based brisk walking and jogging at a target heart rate > or =120 beats/min for > or =30 minutes 3 times a week. LV characteristics were measured by cine magnetic resonance imaging. Training intensity as estimated by heart rate correlated positively with the increase in LV myocardial area (r = 0.51, p = 0.005) in the 28 men and women completing the study. In the 13 men and women who trained with heart rate of > or =120 beats/min, LV myocardial area was larger after than before training (17.7 +/- 2.9 vs 16.8 +/- 2.8 cm(2), p <0.05). Moreover, in these subjects LV myocardial area increased more (5.5 +/- 9.0% vs -3.0 +/- 5.0%) than in the 15 men and women who trained at a lower intensity (p <0.05). LV end-systolic and end-diastolic area and ejection fraction did not change significantly. In conclusion, moderate-to-vigorous endurance training at moderate volumes does not influence LV end-diastolic volume or ejection fraction, but has a minor influence on LV hypertrophy in previously sedentary young and middle-aged men and women.

  1. 3-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging-guided tumor resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.A.; Truwit, C.L.; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Univ. of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN; Hennepin Country Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN

    2006-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of using 3-tesla (T) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to guide brain tumor resection. Material and methods: From February 2004 to March 2006, fMRI was performed on 13 patients before surgical resection. Functional imaging was used to identify eloquent cortices for motor (8), speech (3), and motor and speech (2) activation using two different 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. Surgical resection was accomplished using a 1.5-T intraoperative MR system. Appropriate MR scan sequences were performed intraoperatively to determine and maximize the extent of the surgical resection. Results: Tumors included six oligodendrogliomas, three meningiomas, two astrocytomas and two glioblastomas multiforme. The fMRI data was accurate in all cases. After surgery, two patients had hemiparesis, two had worsening of their speech, and one had worsening of speech and motor function. Neurological function returned to normal in all patients within 1 month. Complete resections were possible in 10 patients (77%). Two patients had incomplete resections because of the proximity of their tumors to functional areas. Biopsy was performed in another patient with an astrocytoma in the motor strip. Conclusion: 3-T fMRI was accurate for locating neurologic function before tumor resection near eloquent cortex. (orig.)

  2. Quenching of the elastic magnetic response function of 49Ti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selig, A.M.; Suzuki, T.; Lapikas, L.; Witt Huberts, P.K.A. de; Platchkov, S.K.; Frois, B.; Mooy, R.B.M.; Zybert, L.; Glaudemans, P.W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Cross sections for elastic magnetic electron scattering from 49 Ti have been obtained in the momentum transfer range 0.75 -1 . Apart from the M1 and M7 moments the observed quenching of the response function cannot be described by the present large space shell-model calculations. Core-polarization calculations including the effect of meson-exchange currents yield a considerably better description of the present data. (orig.)

  3. Functional renormalization group for three-dimensional quantum magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Yasir; Thomale, Ronny; Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Rachel, Stephan; Reuther, Johannes

    2016-10-01

    We formulate a pseudofermion functional renormalization group (PFFRG) scheme to address frustrated quantum magnetism in three dimensions. In a scenario where many numerical approaches fail due to sign problem or small system size, three-dimensional (3D) PFFRG allows for a quantitative investigation of the quantum spin problem and its observables. We illustrate 3D PFFRG for the simple cubic J1-J2-J3 quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet, and benchmark it against other approaches, if available.

  4. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Stirling

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake.

  5. Left ventricular function improves after pulmonary valve replacement in patients with previous right ventricular outflow tract reconstruction and biventricular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Colin; Kogon, Brian; Pernetz, Maria; McConnell, Michael; Kirshbom, Paul; Rodby, Katherine; Book, Wendy M

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects that have a component of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, such as tetralogy of Fallot, are frequently palliated in childhood by disruption of the pulmonary valve. Although this can provide an initial improvement in quality of life, these patients are often left with severe pulmonary valve insufficiency. Over time, this insufficiency can lead to enlargement of the right ventricle and to the deterioration of right ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary valve replacement in these patients decreases right ventricular volume overload and improves right ventricular performance. To date, few studies have examined the effects of pulmonary valve replacement on left ventricular function in patients with biventricular dysfunction. We sought to perform such an evaluation.Records of adult patients who had undergone pulmonary valve replacement from January 2003 through November 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. We reviewed preoperative and postoperative echocardiograms and calculated left ventricular function in 38 patients.In the entire cohort, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by a mean of 0.07 after pulmonary valve replacement, which was a statistically significant change (P < 0.01). In patients with preoperative ejection fractions of less than 0.50, mean ejection fractions increased by 0.10.We conclude that pulmonary valve replacement in patients with biventricular dysfunction arising from severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular enlargement can improve left ventricular function. Prospective studies are needed to verify this finding.

  6. Left Ventricular Function Improves after Pulmonary Valve Replacement in Patients with Previous Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Reconstruction and Biventricular Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Colin; Kogon, Brian; Pernetz, Maria; McConnell, Michael; Kirshbom, Paul; Rodby, Katherine; Book, Wendy M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital heart defects that have a component of right ventricular outflow tract obstruction, such as tetralogy of Fallot, are frequently palliated in childhood by disruption of the pulmonary valve. Although this can provide an initial improvement in quality of life, these patients are often left with severe pulmonary valve insufficiency. Over time, this insufficiency can lead to enlargement of the right ventricle and to the deterioration of right ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Pulmonary valve replacement in these patients decreases right ventricular volume overload and improves right ventricular performance. To date, few studies have examined the effects of pulmonary valve replacement on left ventricular function in patients with biventricular dysfunction. We sought to perform such an evaluation. Records of adult patients who had undergone pulmonary valve replacement from January 2003 through November 2006 were analyzed retrospectively. We reviewed preoperative and postoperative echocardiograms and calculated left ventricular function in 38 patients. In the entire cohort, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by a mean of 0.07 after pulmonary valve replacement, which was a statistically significant change (P < 0.01). In patients with preoperative ejection fractions of less than 0.50, mean ejection fractions increased by 0.10. We conclude that pulmonary valve replacement in patients with biventricular dysfunction arising from severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular enlargement can improve left ventricular function. Prospective studies are needed to verify this finding. PMID:21720459

  7. Advanced Morphological and Functional Magnetic Resonance Techniques in Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Mastropasqua

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a multifactorial disease that is the leading cause of irreversible blindness. Recent data documented that glaucoma is not limited to the retinal ganglion cells but that it also extends to the posterior visual pathway. The diagnosis is based on the presence of signs of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and consistent functional visual field alterations. Unfortunately these functional alterations often become evident when a significant amount of the nerve fibers that compose the optic nerve has been irreversibly lost. Advanced morphological and functional magnetic resonance (MR techniques (morphometry, diffusion tensor imaging, arterial spin labeling, and functional connectivity may provide a means for observing modifications induced by this fiber loss, within the optic nerve and the visual cortex, in an earlier stage. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if the use of these advanced MR techniques could offer the possibility of diagnosing glaucoma at an earlier stage than that currently possible.

  8. Avian magnetic compass: Its functional properties and physical basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha WILTSCHKO, Wolfgang WILTSCHKO

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The avian magnetic compass was analyzed in bird species of three different orders – Passeriforms, Columbiforms and Galliforms – and in three different behavioral contexts, namely migratory orientation, homing and directional conditioning. The respective findings indicate similar functional properties: it is an inclination compass that works only within a functional window around the ambient magnetic field intensity; it tends to be lateralized in favor of the right eye, and it is wavelength-dependent, requiring light from the short-wavelength range of the spectrum. The underlying physical mechanisms have been identified as radical pair processes, spin-chemical reactions in specialized photopigments. The iron-based receptors in the upper beak do not seem to be involved. The existence of the same type of magnetic compass in only very distantly related bird species suggests that it may have been present already in the common ancestors of all modern birds, where it evolved as an all-purpose compass mechanism for orientation within the home range [Current Zoology 56 (3: 265–276, 2010].

  9. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Saebom; Kim, Eun Song; Park, Siman; Daigle, Hugh; Milner, Thomas E.; Huh, Chun; Bennetzen, Martin V.; Geremia, Giuliano A.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36˜72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  10. Amine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for removal of oil droplets from produced water and accelerated magnetic separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Saebom, E-mail: saebomko@austin.utexas.edu [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Kim, Eun Song [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Park, Siman [University of Texas, Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering (United States); Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Milner, Thomas E. [University of Texas, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Huh, Chun [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States); Bennetzen, Martin V. [Maersk Oil Corporate (Denmark); Geremia, Giuliano A. [Maersk Oil Research and Technology Centre (Qatar)

    2017-04-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with surface coatings designed for water treatment, in particular for targeted removal of contaminants from produced water in oil fields, have drawn considerable attention due to their environmental merit. The goal of this study was to develop an efficient method of removing very stable, micron-scale oil droplets dispersed in oilfield produced water. We synthesized MNPs in the laboratory with a prescribed surface coating. The MNPs were superparamagnetic magnetite, and the hydrodynamic size of amine functionalized MNPs ranges from 21 to 255 nm with an average size of 66 nm. The initial oil content of 0.25 wt.% was reduced by as much as 99.9% in separated water. The electrostatic attraction between negatively charged oil-in-water emulsions and positively charged MNPs controls, the attachment of MNPs to the droplet surface, and the subsequent aggregation of the electrically neutral oil droplets with attached MNPs (MNPs-oils) play a critical role in accelerated and efficient magnetic separation. The total magnetic separation time was dramatically reduced to as short as 1 s after MNPs, and oil droplets were mixed, in contrast with the case of free, individual MNPs with which separation took about 36∼72 h, depending on the MNP concentrations. Model calculations of magnetic separation velocity, accounting for the MNP magnetization and viscous drag, show that the total magnetic separation time will be approximately 5 min or less, when the size of the MNPs-oils is greater than 360 nm, which can be used as an optimum operating condition.

  11. Distinctions between manipulation and function knowledge of objects: evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, Consuelo B; Buxbaum, Laurel J; Coslett, H Branch; Tang, Kathy; Saffran, Eleanor M; Kimberg, Daniel Y; Detre, John A

    2005-05-01

    A prominent account of conceptual knowledge proposes that information is distributed over visual, tactile, auditory, motor and verbal-declarative attribute domains to the degree to which these features were activated when the knowledge was acquired [D.A. Allport, Distributed memory, modular subsystems and dysphagia, In: S.K. Newman, R. Epstein (Eds.), Current perspectives in dysphagia, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, 1985, pp. 32-60]. A corollary is that when drawing upon this knowledge (e.g., to answer questions), particular aspects of this distributed information is re-activated as a function of the requirements of the task at hand [L.J. Buxbaum, E.M. Saffran, Knowledge of object manipulation and object function: dissociations in apraxic and non-apraxic subjects. Brain and Language, 82 (2002) 179-199; L.J. Buxbaum, T. Veramonti, M.F. Schwartz, Function and manipulation tool knowledge in apraxia: knowing 'what for' but not 'how', Neurocase, 6 (2000) 83-97; W. Simmons, L. Barsalou, The similarity-in-topography principle: Reconciling theories of conceptual deficits, Cognitive Neuropsychology, 20 (2003) 451-486]. This account predicts that answering questions about object manipulation should activate brain regions previously identified as components of the distributed sensory-motor system involved in object use, whereas answering questions about object function (that is, the purpose that it serves) should activate regions identified as components of the systems supporting verbal-declarative features. These predictions were tested in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which 15 participants viewed picture or word pairs denoting manipulable objects and determined whether the objects are manipulated similarly (M condition) or serve the same function (F condition). Significantly greater and more extensive activations in the left inferior parietal lobe bordering the intraparietal sulcus were seen in the M condition with pictures and, to a lesser

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Simulating functional magnetic materials on supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, Markus Ernst; Entel, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The recent passing of the petaflop per second landmark by the Roadrunner project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory marks a preliminary peak of an impressive world-wide development in the high-performance scientific computing sector. Also, purely academic state-of-the-art supercomputers such as the IBM Blue Gene/P at Forschungszentrum Jülich allow us nowadays to investigate large systems of the order of 103 spin polarized transition metal atoms by means of density functional theory. Three applications will be presented where large-scale ab initio calculations contribute to the understanding of key properties emerging from a close interrelation between structure and magnetism. The first two examples discuss the size dependent evolution of equilibrium structural motifs in elementary iron and binary Fe-Pt and Co-Pt transition metal nanoparticles, which are currently discussed as promising candidates for ultra-high-density magnetic data storage media. However, the preference for multiply twinned morphologies at smaller cluster sizes counteracts the formation of a single-crystalline L10 phase, which alone provides the required hard magnetic properties. The third application is concerned with the magnetic shape memory effect in the Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloy, which is a technologically relevant candidate for magnetomechanical actuators and sensors. In this material strains of up to 10% can be induced by external magnetic fields due to the field induced shifting of martensitic twin boundaries, requiring an extremely high mobility of the martensitic twin boundaries, but also the selection of the appropriate martensitic structure from the rich phase diagram.

  13. Characterization and Functionality of Immidazolium Ionic Liquids Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,3-Dialkylimidazolium-based ionic liquids were chemically synthesized and bonded on the surface of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs with easy one-step reaction. The obtained six kinds of ionic liquid modified MNPs were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, magnetization, and FTIR, which owned the high adsorption capacity due to the nanometer size and high-density modification with ionic liquids. Functionality of MNPs with ionic liquids greatly influenced the solubility of the MNPs with organic solvents depending on the alkyl chain length and the anions of the ionic liquids. Moreover, the obtained MNPs showed the specific extraction efficiency to organic pollutant, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, while superparamagnetic property of the MNPs facilitated the convenient separation of MNPs from the bulks water samples.

  14. Alternative Equation on Magnetic Pair Distribution Function for Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Katsuaki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Shamoto, Shin-ichi; Otomo, Toshiya

    2017-12-01

    We derive an alternative equation of magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) related to the mPDF equation given in a preceding study [B. A. Frandsen, X. Yang, and S. J. L. Billinge, https://doi.org/10.1107/S2053273313033081" xlink:type="simple">Acta Crystallogr., Sect. A 70, 3 (2014)] for quantitative analysis of realistic experimental data. The additional term related to spontaneous magnetization included in the equation is particularly important for the mPDF analysis of ferromagnetic materials. Quantitative estimation of mPDF from neutron diffraction data is also shown. The experimental mPDFs estimated from the neutron diffraction data of the ferromagnet MnSb and the antiferromagnet MnF2 are quantitatively consistent with the mPDFs calculated using the presented equation.

  15. The "Complex Restrictive" Pulmonary Function Pattern: Clinical and Radiologic Analysis of a Common but Previously Undescribed Restrictive Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Ryan D; Iyer, Vivek N; Reddy, Dereddi Raja; Siontis, Brittany; Scanlon, Paul D

    2017-12-01

    Most patients with restriction have a pulmonary function test (PFT) pattern in which total lung capacity (TLC), FVC, and FEV 1 are reduced to a similar degree. This pattern is called "simple restriction" (SR). In contrast, we commonly observe a pattern in which FVC percent predicted ( pp ) is disproportionately reduced relative to TLC pp . This pattern is termed "complex restriction" (CR), and we attempted to characterize its clinical, radiologic, and physiologic features. This study reviewed PFT results of patients tested between November 2009 and June 2013 who had restriction (TLC less than the lower limit of normal). SR was defined as TLC pp -FVC pp  ≤ 10%, and CR was stratified into four classes based on TLC pp -FVC pp discrepancy: Class 1 CR, TLC pp -FVC pp > 10% and ≤ 15%; Class 2 CR, TLC pp -FVC pp > 15% and ≤20%; Class 3 CR, TLC pp -FVC pp > 20% and ≤ 25%; and Class 4 CR, TLC pp -FVC pp > 25%. The medical records of 150 randomly selected patients with SR and 50 patients from each CR class were reviewed. Of 39,277 PFTs completed, we identified 4,532 patients (11.5%) with restriction: 2,407 (6.1%) with SR, 1,614 (4.1%) with CR, and 511 (1.3%) with a mixed pattern. Patients with CR were younger, were more often women, and had a higher prevalence of neuromuscular disease, BMI > 40 kg/m 2 or pattern with distinct clinical features. The associated clinical entities share impaired lung emptying (eg, neuromuscular disease, occult obstruction, chest wall limitation). Clinicians should be aware of this novel PFT pattern and how it shapes the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Whiplash Injuries Can be Visible by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengt H Johansson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Whiplash trauma can result in injuries that are difficult to diagnose. Diagnosis is particularly difficult in injuries to the upper segments of the cervical spine (craniocervical joint [CCJ] complex. Studies indicate that injuries in that region may be responsible for the cervicoencephalic syndrome, as evidenced by headache, balance problems, vertigo, dizziness, eye problems, tinnitus, poor concentration, sensitivity to light and pronounced fatigue. Consequently, diagnosis of lesions in the CCJ region is important. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a radiological technique that can visualize injuries of the ligaments and the joint capsules, and accompanying pathological movement patterns.

  17. Integrating magnetic resonance imaging postprocessing results into neuronavigation for electrode implantation and resection of subtle focal cortical dysplasia in previously cryptogenic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellmer, Jörg; Parpaley, Yaroslav; von Lehe, Marec; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias (FCDs) are highly epileptogenic lesions. Surgical removal is frequently the best treatment option for pharmacoresistant epilepsy. However, subtle FCDs may remain undetected even after high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Morphometric MRI analysis, which compares the individual brain with a normal database, can facilitate the detection of FCDs. We describe how the results of normal database-based MRI postprocessing can be used to guide stereotactic electrode implantation and subsequent resection of lesions that are suspected to be FCDs. A presurgical evaluation was conducted on a 19-year-old woman with pharmacoresistant hypermotor seizures. Conventional high-resolution MRI was classified as negative for epileptogenic lesions. However, morphometric analysis of the spatially normalized MRI revealed abnormal gyration and blurring of the gray-white matter junction, which was suggestive of a small and deeply seated FCD in the left frontal lobe. The brain region highlighted by morphometric analysis was marked as a region of interest, transferred back to the original dimension of the individual MRI, and imported into a neuronavigation system. This allowed the region of interest-targeted stereotactic implantation of 2 depth electrodes, by which seizure onset was confirmed in the lesion. The electrodes also guided the final resection, which rendered the patient seizure-free. The lesion was histologically classified as FCD Palmini and Lüders IIB. Transferring normal database-based MRI postprocessing results into a neuronavigation system is a new and worthwhile extension of multimodal neuronavigation. The combination of resulting regions of interest with functional and anatomic data may facilitate planning of electrode implantation for invasive electroencephalographic recordings and the final resection of small or deeply seated FCDs.

  18. Relativistic Adiabatic Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Using Hybrid Functionals and Noncollinear Spin Magnetization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bast, Radovan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Saue, Trond

    2009-01-01

    into reduction of algebra from quaternion to complex or real. For hybrid GGAs with noncollinear spin magnetization we derive a new computationally advantageous equation for the full second variational derivatives of such exchange-correlation functionals. We apply our implementation to calculations on the ns2...

  19. Multicentre evaluation of targeted and systematic biopsies using magnetic resonance and ultrasound image-fusion guided transperineal prostate biopsy in patients with a previous negative biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Nienke L; Kesch, Claudia; Barrett, Tristan; Koo, Brendan; Radtke, Jan P; Bonekamp, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Warren, Anne Y; Wieczorek, Kathrin; Hohenfellner, Markus; Kastner, Christof; Hadaschik, Boris

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the detection rates of targeted and systematic biopsies in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) image-fusion transperineal prostate biopsy for patients with previous benign transrectal biopsies in two high-volume centres. A two centre prospective outcome study of 487 patients with previous benign biopsies that underwent transperineal MRI/US fusion-guided targeted and systematic saturation biopsy from 2012 to 2015. Multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) was reported according to Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) Version 1. Detection of Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer on biopsy was the primary outcome. Positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values including 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. Detection rates of targeted and systematic biopsies were compared using McNemar's test. The median (interquartile range) PSA level was 9.0 (6.7-13.4) ng/mL. PI-RADS 3-5 mpMRI lesions were reported in 343 (70%) patients and Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer was detected in 149 (31%). The PPV (95% CI) for detecting Gleason score 7-10 prostate cancer was 0.20 (±0.07) for PI-RADS 3, 0.32 (±0.09) for PI-RADS 4, and 0.70 (±0.08) for PI-RADS 5. The NPV (95% CI) of PI-RADS 1-2 was 0.92 (±0.04) for Gleason score 7-10 and 0.99 (±0.02) for Gleason score ≥4 + 3 cancer. Systematic biopsies alone found 125/138 (91%) Gleason score 7-10 cancers. In patients with suspicious lesions (PI-RADS 4-5) on mpMRI, systematic biopsies would not have detected 12/113 significant prostate cancers (11%), while targeted biopsies alone would have failed to diagnose 10/113 (9%). In equivocal lesions (PI-RADS 3), targeted biopsy alone would not have diagnosed 14/25 (56%) of Gleason score 7-10 cancers, whereas systematic biopsies alone would have missed 1/25 (4%). Combination with PSA density improved the area under the curve of PI-RADS from 0.822 to 0.846. In patients with high probability mpMRI lesions, the highest detection rates of Gleason

  20. Functional imaging of the human placenta with magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siauve, Nathalie; Chalouhi, Gihad E; Deloison, Benjamin; Alison, Marianne; Clement, Olivier; Ville, Yves; Salomon, Laurent J

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal placentation is responsible for most failures in pregnancy; however, an understanding of placental functions remains largely concealed from noninvasive, in vivo investigations. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is safe in pregnancy for magnetic fields of up to 3 Tesla and is being used increasingly to improve the accuracy of prenatal imaging. Functional MRI (fMRI) of the placenta has not yet been validated in a clinical setting, and most data are derived from animal studies. FMRI could be used to further explore placental functions that are related to vascularization, oxygenation, and metabolism in human pregnancies by the use of various enhancement processes. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is best able to quantify placental perfusion, permeability, and blood volume fractions. However, the transplacental passage of Gadolinium-based contrast agents represents a significant safety concern for this procedure in humans. There are alternative contrast agents that may be safer in pregnancy or that do not cross the placenta. Arterial spin labeling MRI relies on magnetically labeled water to quantify the blood flows within the placenta. A disadvantage of this technique is a poorer signal-to-noise ratio. Based on arterial spin labeling, placental perfusion in normal pregnancy is 176 ± 91 mL × min(-1) × 100 g(-1) and decreases in cases with intrauterine growth restriction. Blood oxygen level-dependent and oxygen-enhanced MRIs do not assess perfusion but measure the response of the placenta to changes in oxygen levels with the use of hemoglobin as an endogenous contrast agent. Diffusion-weighted imaging and intravoxel incoherent motion MRI do not require exogenous contrast agents, instead they use the movement of water molecules within tissues. The apparent diffusion coefficient and perfusion fraction are significantly lower in placentas of growth-restricted fetuses when compared with normal pregnancies. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy has the ability to extract

  1. A compatible electrocutaneous display for functional magnetic resonance imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, V; Cappelli, C; Vanello, N; Ricciardi, E; Scilingo, E P; Giovannetti, G; Santarelli, M F; Positano, V; Pietrini, P; Landini, L; Bicchi, A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we propose an MR (magnetic resonance) compatible electrocutaneous stimulator able to inject an electric current, variable in amplitude and frequency, into the fingertips in order to elicit tactile skin receptors (mechanoreceptors). The desired goal is to evoke specific tactile sensations selectively stimulating skin receptors by means of an electric current in place of mechanical stimuli. The field of application ranges from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tactile studies to augmented reality technology. The device here proposed is designed using safety criteria in order to comply with the threshold of voltage and current permitted by regulations. Moreover, MR safety and compatibility criteria were considered in order to perform experiments inside the MR scanner during an fMRI acquisition for functional brain activation analysis. Psychophysical laboratory tests are performed in order to define the different evoked tactile sensation. After verifying the device MR safety and compatibility on a phantom, a test on a human subject during fMRI acquisition is performed to visualize the brain areas activated by the simulated tactile sensation.

  2. PEG-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapu, Murali Mohan; Foy, Susan P; Jain, Tapan K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were tested as a drug carrier system, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent, and ability to conjugate to an antibody. Methods An iron oxide core coated with oleic acid (OA) and then with OA-PEG forms a water dispersible MNP formulation. Hydrophobic doxorubicin partitions into the OA layer for sustained drug delivery. The T1 and T2 MRI contrast properties were determined in vitro and the circulation of the MNPs measured in mouse carotid arteries. An N-hydroxysuccinimide group (NHS) on the OA-PEG-80 was used to conjugate the amine functional group on antibodies for active targeting in the human MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Results The optimized formulation had a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 184 nm with an 8 nm iron-oxide core. The MNPs enhance the T2 MRI contrast, and have a long circulation time in vivo with 30% relative concentration 50 min post-injection. Doxorubicin-loaded MNPs showed sustained drug release and dose-dependent antiproliferative effects in vitro; the drug effect was enhanced with transferrin antibody conjugated MNPs. Conclusion PEG functionalized MNPs could be developed as a targeted drug delivery system and MRI contrast agent. PMID:20845067

  3. Functional and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging at 3 tesla

    CERN Document Server

    Klarhoefer, M

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development and optimization of fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods for non-invasive functional studies of the human brain and perfusion imaging on a 3 Tesla (T) whole body NMR system. The functional MRI (fMRI) experiments performed showed that single-shot multi-echo EPI and spiral imaging techniques provide fast tools to obtain information about T2* distributions during functional activation in the human brain. Both sequences were found to be useful in the separation of different sources contributing to the functional MR signal like inflow or susceptibility effects in the various vascular environments. An fMRI study dealing with the involvement of prefrontal brain regions in movement preparation lead to inconsistent results. It could not be clarified if these were caused by problems during a spatial normalization process of the individual brains or if the functional paradigm, using very short inter-stimulus intervals, was not suited for the problem investigated. Blood flo...

  4. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the frontal eye fields during saccadic eye movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Atsushi; Takagi, Mineo; Abe, Haruki; Nakajima, Takashi; Miyauchi, Satoru.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated activity-induced signal intensity changes in the human cerebral cortex during horizontal saccadic eye movements using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast method. Compared with central fixation, significant signal increases were observed bilaterally in the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 8) during saccadic conditions. The location of the activated area was consistent with that of previously reported frontal eye fields (FEF). These results suggest that fMRI has potential merit for the study of cortical control of eye movements in humans. (author)

  5. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of respiratory movement and lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tetzlaff, R.; Eichinger, M.

    2009-01-01

    Lung function measurements are the domain of spirometry or plethysmography. These methods have proven their value in clinical practice, nevertheless, being global measurements the functional indices only describe the sum of all functional units of the lung. Impairment of only a single component of the respiratory pump or of a small part of lung parenchyma can be compensated by unaffected lung tissue. Dynamic imaging can help to detect such local changes and lead to earlier adapted therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seems to be perfect for this application as it is not hampered by image distortion as is projection radiography and it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful radiation like computed tomography. Unfortunately, lung parenchyma is not easy to image using MRI due to its low signal intensity. For this reason first applications of MRI in lung function measurements concentrated on the movement of the thoracic wall and the diaphragm. Recent technical advances in MRI however might allow measurements of regional dynamics of the lungs. (orig.) [de

  7. Modulating functional and dysfunctional mentalizing by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias eSchuwerk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mentalizing, the ability to attribute mental states to others and oneself, is a cognitive function with high relevance for social interactions. Recent neuroscientific research has increasingly contributed to attempts to decompose this complex social cognitive function into constituting neurocognitive building blocks. Additionally, clinical research that focuses on social cognition to find links between impaired social functioning and neurophysiological deviations has accumulated evidence that mentalizing is affected in most psychiatric disorders. Recently, both lines of research have started to employ transcranial magnetic stimulation: the first to modulate mentalizing in order to specify its neurocognitive components, the latter to treat impaired mentalizing in clinical conditions. This review integrates findings of these two different approaches to draw a more detailed picture of the neurocognitive basis of mentalizing and its deviations in psychiatric disorders. Moreover, we evaluate the effectiveness of hitherto employed stimulation techniques and protocols, paradigms and outcome measures. Based on this overview we highlight new directions for future research on the neurocognitive basis of functional and dysfunctional social cognition.

  8. Independent Component Analysis of Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Pedophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, J M; Lafaille, S J; Hannah, J; Kucyi, A; Soh, D W; Girard, T A; Mikulis, D J

    2016-10-01

    Neuroimaging and other studies have changed the common view that pedophilia is a result of childhood sexual abuse and instead is a neurologic phenomenon with prenatal origins. Previous research has identified differences in the structural connectivity of the brain in pedophilia. To identify analogous differences in functional connectivity. Functional magnetic resonance images were recorded from three groups of participants while they were at rest: pedophilic men with a history of sexual offenses against children (n = 37) and two control groups: non-pedophilic men who committed non-sexual offenses (n = 28) and non-pedophilic men with no criminal history (n = 39). Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were subjected to independent component analysis to identify known functional networks of the brain, and groups were compared to identify differences in connectivity with those networks (or "components"). The pedophilic group demonstrated wide-ranging increases in functional connectivity with the default mode network compared with controls and regional differences (increases and decreases) with the frontoparietal network. Of these brain regions (total = 23), 20 have been identified by meta-analytic studies to respond to sexually relevant stimuli. Conversely, of the brain areas known to be those that respond to sexual stimuli, nearly all emerged in the present data as significantly different in pedophiles. This study confirms the presence of significant differences in the functional connectivity of the brain in pedophilia consistent with previously reported differences in structural connectivity. The connectivity differences detected here and elsewhere are opposite in direction from those associated with anti-sociality, arguing against anti-sociality and for pedophilia as the source of the neuroanatomic differences detected. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in the activation of working memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitzer, M.; Kammer, T.; Bellemann, M.E.; Gueckel, F.; Georgi, M.; Gass, A.; Brix, G.

    1996-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used in conjunction with a letter detection task for the study of working memory in 16 normal subjects. Because of movement artifacts, data from only 9 subjects were analysed. In the activation taks, subjects responded by pressing a button whenever any presented letter was the same as the second last in the sequence. In the control condition, the subjects had to respond to a fixed letter. Hence, the activation condition and the control condition differend only subjectively, i.e., regarding the task demand, whereas the stimuli and the type and frequency of response were identical. The activation condition produced significant activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann's areas 10, 46, and 9). In contrast to experimental tasks previsouly used rather extensively to study the prefrontal cortex, the present paradigm is characterized by its simplicity, interpretability, and its ties to known neurophysiology of the frontal cortex. (orig.) [de

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of autism spectrum disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichter, Gabriel S.

    2012-01-01

    This review presents an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging findings in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), Although there is considerable heterogeneity with respect to results across studies, common themes have emerged, including: (i) hypoactivation in nodes of the “social brain” during social processing tasks, including regions within the prefrontal cortex, the posterior superior temporal sulcus, the amygdala, and the fusiform gyrus; (ii) aberrant frontostriatal activation during cognitive control tasks relevant to restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests, including regions within the dorsal prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia; (iii) differential lateralization and activation of language processing and production regions during communication tasks; (iv) anomalous mesolimbic responses to social and nonsocial rewards; (v) task-based long-range functional hypoconnectivity and short-range hyper-connectivity; and (vi) decreased anterior-posterior functional connectivity during resting states. These findings provide mechanistic accounts of ASD pathophysiology and suggest directions for future research aimed at elucidating etiologic models and developing rationally derived and targeted treatments. PMID:23226956

  11. First order magneto-structural transition in functional magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic materials are used widely in electric motors, loudspeakers, transformers, automobiles, magnetic reso- nance devices, magnetic memory storage and a diverse ..... firm the applicability of disorder-influenced FOPT in. CMR manganites and further emphasize that phase- coexistence can occur in any system in the ...

  12. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H. Y.; Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C.

    2011-06-01

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ( 80 nm) and fluorescent ( 180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  13. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H. Y., E-mail: annetsai@csmu.edu.tw [Chung Shan Medical University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China); Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C., E-mail: cbfuh@ncnu.edu.tw [National Chi Nan University, Department of Applied Chemistry (China)

    2011-06-15

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ({approx}80 nm) and fluorescent ({approx}180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  14. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy on amygdala function in major depression - a longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, R; Bürger, C; Dohm, K; Grotegerd, D; Opel, N; Zaremba, D; Meinert, S; Förster, K; Repple, J; Schnelle, R; Wagenknecht, C; Zavorotnyy, M; Heindel, W; Kugel, H; Gerbaulet, M; Alferink, J; Arolt, V; Zwanzger, P; Dannlowski, U

    2017-09-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, little is known regarding brain functional processes mediating ECT effects. In a non-randomized prospective study, functional magnetic resonance imaging data during the automatic processing of subliminally presented emotional faces were obtained twice, about 6 weeks apart, in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) before and after treatment with ECT (ECT, n = 24). Additionally, a control sample of MDD patients treated solely with pharmacotherapy (MED, n = 23) and a healthy control sample (HC, n = 22) were obtained. Before therapy, both patient groups equally showed elevated amygdala reactivity to sad faces compared with HC. After treatment, a decrease in amygdala activity to negative stimuli was discerned in both patient samples indicating a normalization of amygdala function, suggesting mechanisms potentially unspecific for ECT. Moreover, a decrease in amygdala activity to sad faces was associated with symptomatic improvements in the ECT sample (r spearman = -0.48, p = 0.044), and by tendency also for the MED sample (r spearman = -0.38, p = 0.098). However, we did not find any significant association between pre-treatment amygdala function to emotional stimuli and individual symptom improvement, neither for the ECT sample, nor for the MED sample. In sum, the present study provides first results regarding functional changes in emotion processing due to ECT treatment using a longitudinal design, thus validating and extending our knowledge gained from previous treatment studies. A limitation was that ECT patients received concurrent medication treatment.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human motor cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahira, Masahiro; Asakura, Tetsuhiko; Niiro, Masaki; Haruzono, Akihiro; Hirakawa, Wataru [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Fujimoto, Toshiro

    1995-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain was performed during motor task activation in five normal subjects and a patient with meningioma using conventional fast low-angle shot sequences and a 2.0 T system. A high intensity area in the motor cortex was observed in all normal subjects. Single-slice studies showed the right-sided finger task produced an increase of 1.9-23.5% (6.67{+-}4.36%) in the signal intensity of the left motor cortex, while the left-sided finger task increased the signal by 1.5-18.2% (6.09{+-}3.34%) in the right motor cortex. There was no significant difference between the sides. Multiple-slice studies also showed the activated motor cortex as a high intensity area. The maximum signal intensity increase in the activated motor area was 11.0% for the left motor cortex and 8.8% for the right motor cortex. There was no significant difference between the sides. Preoperative mapping of the patient with meningioma showed that the motor cortex was displaced posteriorly by the tumor. Functional MR imaging is possible with a standard MR imaging system and conventional gradient echo sequences. Useful clinical information can be obtained by preoperative mapping of the motor cortex. (author).

  16. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) and expert testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulich, Ronald; Maciewicz, Raymond; Scrivani, Steven J

    2009-03-01

    Medical experts frequently use imaging studies to illustrate points in their court testimony. This article reviews how these studies impact the credibility of expert testimony with judges and juries. The apparent "objective" evidence provided by such imaging studies can lend strong credence to a judge's or jury's appraisal of medical expert's testimony. However, as the court usually has no specialized scientific expertise, the use of complex images as part of courtroom testimony also has the potential to mislead or at least inappropriately bias the weight given to expert evidence. Recent advances in brain imaging may profoundly impact forensic expert testimony. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and other physiologic imaging techniques currently allow visualization of the activation pattern of brain regions associated with a wide variety of cognitive and behavioral tasks, and more recently, pain. While functional imaging technology has a valuable role in brain research and clinical investigation, it is important to emphasize that the use of imaging studies in forensic matters requires a careful scientific foundation and a rigorous legal assessment.

  17. A hitchhiker’s guide to functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Soares

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies have become increasingly popular both with clinicians and researchers as they are capable of providing unique insights into brain function. However, multiple technical considerations (ranging from specifics of paradigm design to imaging artifacts, complex protocol definition, and multitude of processing and methods of analysis, as well as intrinsic methodological limitations must be considered and addressed in order to optimize fMRI analysis and to arrive at the most accurate and grounded interpretation of the data. In practice, the researcher/clinician must choose, from many available options, the most suitable software tool for each stage of the fMRI analysis pipeline. Herein we provide a straightforward guide designed to address, for each of the major stages, the techniques and tools involved in the process. We have developed this guide both to help those new to the technique to overcome the most critical difficulties in its use, as well as to serve as a resource for the neuroimaging community.

  18. Assessment of cerebral perfusional and functional connectivity in schizophrenia using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ícaro A. F.; Guimarães, Tiago M.; Souza, Roberto M.; Santos, Antônio C. dos; Leoni, Renata F.; Machado-Sousa, João Paulo; Hallak, Jaime E.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a significant mental disorder that compromises structural and functional aspects of the brain, with an extreme effect on the patient’s thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Physiologically, changes in neuronal activity are reported besides functional and structural abnormalities. Since the cerebral blood flow (CBF) is directly related to neuronal activity, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique called arterial spin labeling (ASL), which allows the quantification of CBF, is a useful tool in brain perfusional evaluation. In addition, ASL can be used to assess functional connectivity, which is efficient in investigating functional impairment between regions of the brain. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) images were acquired from 28 schizophrenia patients in treatment and 28 age-matched healthy controls. Static CBF and connectivity patterns were assessed in both groups. Decreased CBF and functional connectivity were observed in regions that form two resting brain networks, default mode (DMN) and salience (SN), for schizophrenia patients. Previous studies related the features of this pathology with altered resting CBF and functional disconnections. Therefore, using a noninvasive technique, it was possible to find CBF deficits and altered functional organization of the brain in schizophrenia patients that are associated with the symptoms and characteristics of the disorder. (author)

  19. Assessment of cerebral perfusional and functional connectivity in schizophrenia using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Ícaro A. F.; Guimarães, Tiago M.; Souza, Roberto M.; Santos, Antônio C. dos; Leoni, Renata F.; Machado-Sousa, João Paulo; Hallak, Jaime E.C.

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a significant mental disorder that compromises structural and functional aspects of the brain, with an extreme effect on the patient’s thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Physiologically, changes in neuronal activity are reported besides functional and structural abnormalities. Since the cerebral blood flow (CBF) is directly related to neuronal activity, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique called arterial spin labeling (ASL), which allows the quantification of CBF, is a useful tool in brain perfusional evaluation. In addition, ASL can be used to assess functional connectivity, which is efficient in investigating functional impairment between regions of the brain. Pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling (pCASL) images were acquired from 28 schizophrenia patients in treatment and 28 age-matched healthy controls. Static CBF and connectivity patterns were assessed in both groups. Decreased CBF and functional connectivity were observed in regions that form two resting brain networks, default mode (DMN) and salience (SN), for schizophrenia patients. Previous studies related the features of this pathology with altered resting CBF and functional disconnections. Therefore, using a noninvasive technique, it was possible to find CBF deficits and altered functional organization of the brain in schizophrenia patients that are associated with the symptoms and characteristics of the disorder. (author)

  20. Low-Functioning Autism and Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbetta, Alessandra; Bulgheroni, Sara; Contarino, Valeria Elisa; Chiapparini, Luisa; Esposito, Silvia; Annunziata, Silvia; Riva, Daria

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroradiologic studies reported a high incidence of abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children. In this population, it is difficult to know which abnormality depends on autism itself and which is related to intellectual disability associated with autism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of neuroradiologic abnormalities in low-functioning autistic children compared to Intellectual Quotient and age-matched nonsyndromic children, using the same set of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences. MRI was rated as abnormal in 44% of autistic and 54% of children with intellectual disability. The main results were mega cisterna magna in autism and hypoplastic corpus callosum in intellectual disability. These abnormalities are morphologically visible signs of altered brain development. These findings, more frequent than expected, are not specific to the 2 conditions. Although MRI cannot be considered mandatory, it allows an in-depth clinical assessment in nonsyndromic intellectual-disabled and autistic children. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. A Miniature Magnetic-Force-Based Three-Axis AC Magnetic Sensor with Piezoelectric/Vibrational Energy-Harvesting Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiao-Fang Hung

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we demonstrate a miniature magnetic-force-based, three-axis, AC magnetic sensor with piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. For magnetic sensing, the sensor employs a magnetic–mechanical–piezoelectric configuration (which uses magnetic force and torque, a compact, single, mechanical mechanism, and the piezoelectric effect to convert x-axis and y-axis in-plane and z-axis magnetic fields into piezoelectric voltage outputs. Under the x-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 0.2–3.2 gauss and the z-axis magnetic field (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 0.2–3.2 gauss, the voltage output with the sensitivity of the sensor are 1.13–26.15 mV with 8.79 mV/gauss and 1.31–8.92 mV with 2.63 mV/gauss, respectively. In addition, through this configuration, the sensor can harness ambient vibrational energy, i.e., possessing piezoelectric/vibrational energy-harvesting functions. Under x-axis vibration (sine-wave, 100 Hz, 3.5 g and z-axis vibration (sine-wave, 142 Hz, 3.8 g, the root-mean-square voltage output with power output of the sensor is 439 mV with 0.333 μW and 138 mV with 0.051 μW, respectively. These results show that the sensor, using this configuration, successfully achieves three-axis magnetic field sensing and three-axis vibration energy-harvesting. Due to these features, the three-axis AC magnetic sensor could be an important design reference in order to develop future three-axis AC magnetic sensors, which possess energy-harvesting functions, for practical industrial applications, such as intelligent vehicle/traffic monitoring, processes monitoring, security systems, and so on.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging research progress on brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weiwei; Liu Hanqiu

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, with the development of functional magnetic resonance imaging technology the brain plasticity and functional reorganization are hot topics in the central nervous system imaging studies. Brain functional reorganization and rehabilitation after peripheral nerve injury may have certain regularity. In this paper, the progress of brain functional magnetic resonance imaging technology and its applications in the world wide clinical and experimental researches of the brain functional reorganization after peripheral nerve injury is are reviewed. (authors)

  3. Assessing motor function in young children with transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana, Shalini; Rezaie, Roozbeh; McAfee, Samuel S; Choudhri, Asim F; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas; Fulton, Stephen; Boop, Frederick A; Wheless, James W; Papanicolaou, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Accurate noninvasive assessment of motor function using functional MRI (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) is a challenge in patients who are very young or who are developmentally delayed. In such cases, passive mapping of the sensorimotor cortex is performed under sedation. We examined the feasibility of using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a motor mapping tool in awake children younger than 3 years of age. Six children underwent motor mapping with TMS while awake as well as passive sensorimotor mapping under conscious sedation with MEG during tactile stimulation (n = 5) and fMRI during passive hand movements (n = 4). Stimulation of the motor cortex via TMS successfully elicited evoked responses in contralateral hand muscles in 5 patients. The location of primary motor cortex in the precentral gyrus identified by TMS corresponded with the postcentral location of the primary sensory cortex identified by MEG in 2 patients and to the sensorimotor cortex identified by fMRI in 3 children. In this cohort, we demonstrate that TMS can illuminate abnormalities in motor physiology including motor reorganization. We also demonstrate the feasibility of using TMS-derived contralateral silent periods to approximate the location of motor cortex in the absence of an evoked response. When compared to chronological age, performance functioning level appears to be better in predicting successful mapping outcome with TMS. Our findings indicate that awake TMS is a safe alternative to MEG and fMRI performed under sedation to localize the motor cortex and provides additional insight into the underlying pathophysiology and motor plasticity in toddlers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic antiepileptic drug use and functional network efficiency: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenendaal, Tamar M; IJff, Dominique M; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Lazeron, Richard H C; Hofman, Paul A M; de Louw, Anton J A; Backes, Walter H; Jansen, Jacobus F A

    2017-06-28

    To increase our insight in the neuronal mechanisms underlying cognitive side-effects of antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment. The relation between functional magnetic resonance-acquired brain network measures, AED use, and cognitive function was investigated. Three groups of patients with epilepsy with a different risk profile for developing cognitive side effects were included: A "low risk" category (lamotrigine or levetiracetam, n = 16), an "intermediate risk" category (carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, phenytoin, or valproate, n = 34) and a "high risk" category (topiramate, n = 5). Brain connectivity was assessed using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging and graph theoretical network analysis. The Computerized Visual Searching Task was used to measure central information processing speed, a common cognitive side effect of AED treatment. Central information processing speed was lower in patients taking AEDs from the intermediate and high risk categories, compared with patients from the low risk category. The effect of risk category on global efficiency was significant ( P effect on the clustering coefficient (ANCOVA, P > 0.2). Also no significant associations between information processing speed and global efficiency or the clustering coefficient (linear regression analysis, P > 0.15) were observed. Only the four patients taking topiramate show aberrant network measures, suggesting that alterations in functional brain network organization may be only subtle and measureable in patients with more severe cognitive side effects.

  5. Contributions of structural connectivity and cerebrovascular parameters to functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mice at rest and during sensory paw stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Grandjean, Joanes; Schlegel, Felix; Saab, Bechara J; Rudin, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Previously, we reported widespread bilateral increases in stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging signals in mouse brain to unilateral sensory paw stimulation. We attributed the pattern to arousal-related cardiovascular changes overruling cerebral autoregulation thereby masking specific signal changes elicited by local neuronal activity. To rule out the possibility that interhemispheric neuronal communication might contribute to bilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging responses, we compared stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to unilateral hindpaw stimulation in acallosal I/LnJ, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice. We found bilateral blood-oxygenation-level dependent signal changes in all three strains, ruling out a dominant contribution of transcallosal communication as reason for bilaterality. Analysis of functional connectivity derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, revealed that bilateral cortical functional connectivity is largely abolished in I/LnJ animals. Cortical functional connectivity in all strains correlated with structural connectivity in corpus callosum as revealed by diffusion tensor imaging. Given the profound influence of systemic hemodynamics on stimulus-evoked functional magnetic resonance imaging outcomes, we evaluated whether functional connectivity data might be affected by cerebrovascular parameters, i.e. baseline cerebral blood volume, vascular reactivity, and reserve. We found that effects of cerebral hemodynamics on functional connectivity are largely outweighed by dominating contributions of structural connectivity. In contrast, contributions of transcallosal interhemispheric communication to the occurrence of ipsilateral functional magnetic resonance imaging response of equal amplitude to unilateral stimuli seem negligible.

  6. [Magnetic micro-/nano-materials: functionalization and their applications in pretreatment for food samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qiang; Feng, Yuqi

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic solid phase extraction technique, based on functional magnetic materials, is currently a hot topic in the separation and analysis of complex samples. This paper reviews the reported methods for the functionalization of magnetic micro-/nano-materials, such as sur- face grafting organic groups, coating carbon or inorganic oxide, grafting or coating polymer, being loaded to the surface or pores of supports, being introduced into the skeleton of sup- ports, and physically co-mixing methods. Moreover, we briefly introduce the applications of the functional magnetic micro-/nano-materials in pretreatment for food samples.

  7. Treatment response in psychotic patients classified according to social and clinical needs, drug side effects, and previous treatment; a method to identify functional remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alenius, Malin; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig

    2009-01-01

    ; underestimating residual symptoms, negative symptoms, and side effects; or being to open for individual interpretation. The aim of this study was to present and evaluate a new method of classification according to treatment response and, thus, to identify patients in functional remission. METHOD: A naturalistic......, cross-sectional study was performed using patient interviews and information from patient files. The new classification method CANSEPT, which combines the Camberwell Assessment of Need rating scale, the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser side effect rating scale (SE), and the patient's previous treatment...... history (PT), was used to group the patients according to treatment response. CANSEPT was evaluated by comparison of expected and observed results. RESULTS: In the patient population (n = 123), the patients in functional remission, as defined by CANSEPT, had higher quality of life, fewer hospitalizations...

  8. Multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollinger, L.R.; Crawford, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multi-function magnetic jack control drive mechanism is described for controlling a nuclear reactor comprising: an elongate pressure housing; closely-spaced drive rods located in the pressure housing, the drive rod being connected to a reactor rod which is insertable in a reactor core; electrochemical stationary latch means which are selectively actuatable for holding a respective one of the drive rods stationary with respect to the pressure housing, the plurality of stationary latch means including at least one coil located about the pressure housing; longitudinally spaced electromechanical movable latch means, individually associated with one of the drive rods and each including a base for the drive rod associated therewith, for, when actuated, holding the associated drive rod stationary with respect to the base associated therewith, the movable latch means including an associated coil located about the pressure housing; and longitudinally spaced electromechanical lift means, individually associated with the base, for, when actuated, moving an associated base longitudinally along the pressure housing from a first position to a second position to thereby enable movement of one or more of the other drive rods longitudinally independently of the other drive rods in response to sequential and repeated operation of the electromechanical means, the lift means including an associated coil located about the pressure housing

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of internet addiction in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepede, Gianna; Tavino, Margherita; Santacroce, Rita; Fiori, Federica; Salerno, Rosa Maria; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2016-02-28

    To report the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies pertaining internet addiction disorder (IAD) in young adults. We conducted a systematic review on PubMed, focusing our attention on fMRI studies involving adult IAD patients, free from any comorbid psychiatric condition. The following search words were used, both alone and in combination: fMRI, internet addiction, internet dependence, functional neuroimaging. The search was conducted on April 20(th), 2015 and yielded 58 records. Inclusion criteria were the following: Articles written in English, patients' age ≥ 18 years, patients affected by IAD, studies providing fMRI results during resting state or cognitive/emotional paradigms. Structural MRI studies, functional imaging techniques other than fMRI, studies involving adolescents, patients with comorbid psychiatric, neurological or medical conditions were excluded. By reading titles and abstracts, we excluded 30 records. By reading the full texts of the 28 remaining articles, we identified 18 papers meeting our inclusion criteria and therefore included in the qualitative synthesis. We found 18 studies fulfilling our inclusion criteria, 17 of them conducted in Asia, and including a total number of 666 tested subjects. The included studies reported data acquired during resting state or different paradigms, such as cue-reactivity, guessing or cognitive control tasks. The enrolled patients were usually males (95.4%) and very young (21-25 years). The most represented IAD subtype, reported in more than 85% of patients, was the internet gaming disorder, or videogame addiction. In the resting state studies, the more relevant abnormalities were localized in the superior temporal gyrus, limbic, medial frontal and parietal regions. When analyzing the task related fmri studies, we found that less than half of the papers reported behavioral differences between patients and normal controls, but all of them found significant differences in cortical

  10. Investigating short-range magnetism in strongly correlated materials via magnetic pair distribution function analysis and ab initio theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin; Page, Katharine; Brunelli, Michela; Staunton, Julie; Billinge, Simon

    Short-range magnetic correlations are known to exist in a variety of strongly correlated electron systems, but our understanding of the role they play is challenged by the difficulty of experimentally probing such correlations. Magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) analysis is a newly developed neutron total scattering method that can reveal short-range magnetic correlations directly in real space, and may therefore help ameliorate this difficulty. We present temperature-dependent mPDF measurements of the short-range magnetic correlations in the paramagnetic phase of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. We observe significant correlations on a ~1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range-ordered spin arrangement. With no free parameters, ab initio calculations using the self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory quantitatively reproduce the magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. These results yield valuable insight into the magnetic exchange in MnO and showcase the utility of the mPDF technique for studying magnetic properties of strongly correlated electron systems.

  11. Bilingual brain organization: a functional magnetic resonance adaptation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Denise; Zatorre, Robert J; Chen, Jen-Kai; Milner, Brenda; Crane, Joelle; Belin, Pascal; Bouffard, Marc

    2006-05-15

    We used functional magnetic resonance adaptation (fMRA) to examine whether intra-voxel functional specificity may be present for first (L1)- and second (L2)-language processing. We examined within- and across-language adaptation for spoken words in English-French bilinguals who had acquired their L2 after the age of 4 years. Subjects listened to words presented binaurally through earphones. In two control conditions (one for each language), six identical words were presented to obtain maximal adaptation. The remaining six conditions each consisted of five words that were identical followed by a sixth word that differed. There were thus a total of eight experimental conditions: no-change (sixth word identical to first five); a change in meaning (different final word in L1); a change in language (final item translated into L2); a change in meaning and language (different final word in L2). The same four conditions were presented in L2. The study also included a silent baseline. At the neural level, within- and across-language word changes resulted in release from adaptation. This was true for separate analyses of L1 and L2. We saw no evidence for greater recovery from adaptation in across-language relative to within-language conditions. While many brain regions were common to L1 and L2, we did observe differences in adaptation for forward translation (L1 to L2) as compared to backward translation (L2 to L1). The results support the idea that, at the lexical level, the neural substrates for L1 and L2 in bilinguals are shared, but with some populations of neurons within these shared regions showing language-specific responses.

  12. Robot-assisted radical prostatectomy in the setting of previous abdominal surgery: Perioperative results, oncological and functional outcomes, and complications in a single surgeon's series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, Giovanni Battista; Grande, Pietro; Mordasini, Livio; Danuser, Hansjörg; Mattei, Agostino

    2016-12-01

    Data on safety and efficacy of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) after previous abdominal surgery are scarce. Hence, we assessed perioperative, oncological and functional outcomes, and complications of RARP in patients with previous abdominal surgery after 1-year minimum follow-up. Prospectively collected data from 339 consecutive patients undergoing transperitoneal RARP by a single surgeon (AM) between November 2008 and May 2014 were analysed. Complications were classified according to Modified Clavien System. Biochemical recurrence (BCR) was defined as two consecutive PSA values ≥ 0.2 ng/ml. Functional outcomes were assessed using validated, self-administered questionnaires. In particular, only patients undergoing nerve-sparing RARP with no erectile dysfunction (baseline IIEF-5 score >21) and no use of phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors preoperatively who were interested in erections and required no adjuvant therapy (radiation, orchiectomy and androgen-deprivation therapy) were evaluated concerning potency recovery. Patients without and with previous abdominal surgery were compared using Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests (or Fisher exact test). On 339 patients, 247 (71.6%) had not undergone previous abdominal surgery (Group 1) and 92 (28.4%) were pre-operated (Group 2). There were no statistically significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 regarding mean operative time (260 vs. 257 min; p = 0.597), median number of resected nodes (16 vs. 17; p = 0.484), mean length of stay (7.2 vs. 7.1 d; p = 0.151), positive surgical margin (12.5% vs. 16.3%; p = 0.233) and complication rates (26.7% vs. 31.5%; p = 0.187). Median (IQR) follow-up was 36 (12-48) months. For Groups 1 and 2, BCR-free survival rates were 78.5% and 79.8% (p = 0.467); continence rates were 97.9% and 100% (p = 0.329), whereas a potency recovery was achieved in 69.5% and 62.2% of patients (p = 0.460), respectively. Transperitoneal RARP is a safe and efficient treatment for

  13. Theory of multichannel magnetic stimulation: toward functional neuromuscular rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohonen, J; Ravazzani, P; Grandori, F; Ilmoniemi, R J

    1999-06-01

    Human excitable cells can be stimulated noninvasively with externally applied time-varying electromagnetic fields. The stimulation can be achieved either by directly driving current into the tissue (electrical stimulation) or by means of electro-magnetic induction (magnetic stimulation). While the electrical stimulation of the peripheral neuromuscular system has many beneficial applications, peripheral magnetic stimulation has so far only a few. This paper analyzes theoretically the use of multiple magnetic stimulation coils to better control the excitation and also to eventually mimic electrical stimulation. Multiple coils allow electronic spatial adjustment of the shape and location of the stimulus without moving the coils. The new properties may enable unforeseen uses for peripheral magnetic stimulation, e.g., in rehabilitation of patients with neuromuscular impairment.

  14. Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the decontamination of water polluted with cesium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Helal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are attracting considerable interest because of their potential applications in practically all fields of science and technology, including the removal of heavy metals from contaminated waters. It is, therefore, of great importance to adapt the surfaces of these nanoparticles according to the application. In this work advanced nanoparticles (NPs with well-tailored surface functionalities were synthesized using the polyol method. The efficiency of a chelating agent, succinyl-β-cyclodextrin (SBCD, was first investigated spectrophotometrically and by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC. SBCD was then grafted onto nanoparticles previously functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxsilane (NP-APTES. The resulting NP-SBCD system was then incubated with a solution of cesium. After magnetic separation, the solid residue was removed from the supernatant and characterized by X-Ray Photoelectron spectrometry (XPS, X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometry (XRF and Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID magnetometry. These characterizations show the presence of cesium in the solid residue, which indicates Cs uptake by the NP-SBCD system. This nanohybrid system constitutes a promising model for heavy metal decontamination.

  15. Functional magnetic resonance maps obtained by personal computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, F. j.; Manjon, J. V.; Robles, M.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Dosda, R.; Molla, E.

    2001-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) is of special relevance in the analysis of certain types of brain activation. The present report describes the development of a simple software program for use with personal computers (PCs) that analyzes these images and provides functional activation maps. Activation maps are based on the temporal differences in oxyhemoglobin in tomographic images. To detect these differences, intensities registered repeatedly during brain control and activation are compared. The experiments were performed with a 1.5-Tesla MR unit. To verify the reliability of the program fMR studies were carried out in 4 healthy individuals (12 contiguous slices, 80 images per slice every 3.1 seconds for a total of 960 images). All the images were transferred to a PC and were processed pixel by pixel within each sequence to obtain an intensity/time curve. The statistical study of the results (Student's test and cross correlation analysis) made it possible to establish the activation of each pixel. The images were prepared using spatial filtering, temporal filtering, baseline correction, normalization and segmentation of the parenchyma. The postprocessing of the results involved the elimination of single pixels, superposition of an anatomical image of greater spatial resolution and anti-aliasing. The application (Xfun 1.0, Valencia, Spain) was developed in Microsoft Visual C++5.0 Developer Studio for Windows NT Workstation. As a representative example, the program took 8.2 seconds to calculate and present the results of the entire study (12 functional maps). In the motor and visual activation experiments, the activation corresponding to regions proximal to the central sulcus of the hemisphere contralateral to the hand that moved and in the occipital cortex were observed. While programs that calculate activation maps are available, the development of software for PCs running Microsoft Windows ensures several key features for its use on a daily basis: it is easy

  16. Motor system hyperconnectivity in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: a cognitive functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmar, Christian; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Barker, Gareth J; Symms, Mark R; Thompson, Pamela; Kumari, Veena; Duncan, John S; Janz, Dieter; Richardson, Mark P; Koepp, Matthias J

    2011-06-01

    Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is the most frequent idiopathic generalized epilepsy syndrome. It is characterized by predominant myoclonic jerks of upper limbs, often provoked by cognitive activities, and typically responsive to treatment with sodium valproate. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological and imaging studies in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have consistently pointed towards subtle abnormalities in the medial frontal lobes. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging with an executive frontal lobe paradigm, we investigated cortical activation patterns and interaction between cortical regions in 30 patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and 26 healthy controls. With increasing cognitive demand, patients showed increasing coactivation of the primary motor cortex and supplementary motor area. This effect was stronger in patients still suffering from seizures, and was not seen in healthy controls. Patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy showed increased functional connectivity between the motor system and frontoparietal cognitive networks. Furthermore, we found impaired deactivation of the default mode network during cognitive tasks with persistent activation in medial frontal and central regions in patients. Coactivation in the motor cortex and supplementary motor area with increasing cognitive load and increased functional coupling between the motor system and cognitive networks provide an explanation how cognitive effort can cause myoclonic jerks in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The supplementary motor area represents the anatomical link between these two functional systems, and our findings may be the functional correlate of previously described structural abnormalities in the medial frontal lobe in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging as predictor of functional outcome in craniopharyngiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortini, Pietro; Gagliardi, Filippo; Bailo, Michele; Spina, Alfio; Parlangeli, Andrea; Falini, Andrea; Losa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life of craniopharyngioma patients can be severely impaired by derangement of hypothalamic function. A classification, taking into account preoperative hypothalamic damage, evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlating it with postoperative weight change is still missing in the literature. The aim of our study is to identify objective radiological criteria as preoperative prognostic factors for hypothalamic damage. Pre- and post-operative MRI and clinical data of 47 patients, treated at our Institution for craniopharyngioma, were retrospectively analyzed, based on radiological variables, identified as prognostic factor for hypothalamic involvement. Main factors associated with postoperative obesity were hypothalamic hyperintensity in T2-weighted/FLAIR imaging (p < 0.033), mammillary body involvement according to Müller classification (p < 0.020), unidentifiable pituitary stalk (p < 0.001), dislocated chiasm (p < 0.038), either not visible infundibular recess (p < 0.019) or unrecognizable supra-optic recess (p < 0.004), and retrochiasmatic tumor extension (p < 0.019). Accordingly, postoperative hypothalamic syndrome was associated with peritumoral edema in T2-weighted/FLAIR images (p < 0.003), unidentifiable hypothalamus (p < 0.024), hypothalamic compression (p < 0.006), fornix displacement (p < 0.032), and unrecognizable supra-optic recess (p < 0.031). Ultimately, variables identified as predictive factors of postoperative hypothalamic syndrome were the degree of hypothalamic involvement according to the classification described by Sainte-Rose and Puget (p < 0.002; grade 0 vs 2 p < 0.001), Van Gompel (p < 0.002; grade 0 vs 1, p < 0.027; and grade 0 vs 2, p < 0.002), and Muller (p < 0.006; grade 0 vs 1, p < 0.05; and grade 0 vs 2, p < 0.004). The identification of these predictive factors will help to define and score the preoperative hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma patients.

  18. Lectin-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for reproductive improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Semen ejaculates contain heterogeneous sperm populations that can jeopardize male fertility. Recent development of nanotechnology in physiological systems may have applications in reproductive biology. Here, we used magnetic nanoparticles as a novel strategy for sperm purification to imp...

  19. Expression patterns of platypus defensin and related venom genes across a range of tissue types reveal the possibility of broader functions for OvDLPs than previously suspected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Camilla M; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Kuchel, Philip W; Belov, Katherine

    2008-09-15

    The platypus, as an egg-laying mammal, displays an unusual mixture of reptilian and mammalian characteristics. It is also venomous, and further investigations into its little-studied venom may lead to the development of novel pharmaceuticals and drug targets and provide insights into the origins of mammalian venom. Here we investigate the expression patterns of antimicrobial genes called defensins, and also the venom peptides called defensin-like peptides (OvDLPs). We show, in the first expression study on any platypus venom gene, that the OvDLPs are expressed in a greater range of tissues than would be expected for genes with specific venom function, and thus that they may have a wider role than previously suspected.

  20. Longitudinal magnetization dynamics in Heisenberg magnets: Spin Green functions approach (Review Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivoruchko, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    In spite of the fact that dynamical properties of magnets have been extensively studied over the past years, the longitudinal magnetization dynamics is still much less understood than transverse one even in the equilibrium state of a system. In this paper, we give a review of existing, based on quantum-mechanical approach, theoretical descriptions of the longitudinal magnetization dynamics for ferro-, ferri- and antiferromagnetic dielectrics. The aim is to reveal specific features of this type of magnetization vibrations under description a system within the framework of one of the basic model theory of magnetism—the Heisenberg model. Related experimental investigations as well as open questions are also briefly discussed. We hope that understanding of the longitudinal magnetization dynamics distinctive features in the equilibrium state have to be a reference point for a theory uncovering the physical mechanisms that govern ultrafast spin dynamics after femtosecond laser pulse demagnetization when a system is far beyond an equilibrium state.

  1. Interpreting "Personality" Taxonomies: Why Previous Models Cannot Capture Individual-Specific Experiencing, Behaviour, Functioning and Development. Major Taxonomic Tasks Still Lay Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Jana

    2015-12-01

    As science seeks to make generalisations, a science of individual peculiarities encounters intricate challenges. This article explores these challenges by applying the Transdisciplinary Philosophy-of-Science Paradigm for Research on Individuals (TPS-Paradigm) and by exploring taxonomic "personality" research as an example. Analyses of researchers' interpretations of the taxonomic "personality" models, constructs and data that have been generated in the field reveal widespread erroneous assumptions about the abilities of previous methodologies to appropriately represent individual-specificity in the targeted phenomena. These assumptions, rooted in everyday thinking, fail to consider that individual-specificity and others' minds cannot be directly perceived, that abstract descriptions cannot serve as causal explanations, that between-individual structures cannot be isomorphic to within-individual structures, and that knowledge of compositional structures cannot explain the process structures of their functioning and development. These erroneous assumptions and serious methodological deficiencies in widely used standardised questionnaires have effectively prevented psychologists from establishing taxonomies that can comprehensively model individual-specificity in most of the kinds of phenomena explored as "personality", especially in experiencing and behaviour and in individuals' functioning and development. Contrary to previous assumptions, it is not universal models but rather different kinds of taxonomic models that are required for each of the different kinds of phenomena, variations and structures that are commonly conceived of as "personality". Consequently, to comprehensively explore individual-specificity, researchers have to apply a portfolio of complementary methodologies and develop different kinds of taxonomies, most of which have yet to be developed. Closing, the article derives some meta-desiderata for future research on individuals' "personality".

  2. Engineering magnetism at functional oxides interfaces: manganites and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Di; Lu, Nianpeng; Chen, Xuegang; Shen, Shengchun; Yu, Pu

    2017-11-08

    The family of transition metal oxides (TMOs) is a large class of magnetic materials that has been intensively studied due to the rich physics involved as well as the promising potential applications in next generation electronic devices. In TMOs, the spin, charge, orbital and lattice are strongly coupled, and significant advances have been achieved to engineer the magnetism by different routes that manipulate these degrees of freedom. The family of manganites is a model system of strongly correlated magnetic TMOs. In this review, using manganites thin films and the heterostructures in conjunction with other TMOs as model systems, we review the recent progress of engineering magnetism in TMOs. We first discuss the role of the lattice that includes the epitaxial strain and the interface structural coupling. Then we look into the role of charge, focusing on the interface charge modulation. Having demonstrated the static effects, we continue to review the research on dynamical control of magnetism by electric field. Next, we review recent advances in heterostructures comprised of high T c cuprate superconductors and manganites. Following that, we discuss the emergent magnetic phenomena at interfaces between 3d TMOs and 5d TMOs with strong spin-orbit coupling. Finally, we provide our outlook for prospective future directions.

  3. Bacterial Nanocellulose Magnetically Functionalized for Neuro-Endovascular Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverry-Rendon, Mónica; Reece, Lisa M; Pastrana, Fernando; Arias, Sandra L; Shetty, Akshath R; Pavón, Juan Jose; Allain, Jean Paul

    2017-06-01

    Current treatments for brain aneurysms are invasive, traumatic, and not suitable in most patients with increased risks. A new alternative method is using scaffold stents to create a local and focal attraction force of cells for an in situ reconstruction of the tunica media. For this purpose, a nanostructured bioactive coating is designed to render an asymmetric region of the stent scaffold magnetic and biomimetic, which utilizes bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) as a platform for both magnetic and cell attraction as well as proliferation. The magnetization of the BNC is realized through the reaction of Fe III and II, precipitating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION). Subsequently, magnetic bacterial nanocellulose (MBNC) is coated with polyethylene glycol to improve its biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility are evaluated using porcine aortic smooth muscle cells. Preliminary cellular migration assays demonstrate the behavior between MBNC and cells labeled with SPION. In this work, (1) synthesis of BNC impregnated with magnetic nanoparticles is successfully demonstrated; (2) a viable, resilient, and biocompatible hydrogel membrane is tested for neuroendovascular application using a stent scaffold; (3) cell viability and minimal cytotoxicity is achieved; (4) cell migration tests and examination of cellular magnetic attraction confirm the viability of MBNC as a multifunctional coating. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Magnetostatic Green's functions for the description of spin waves in finite rectangular magnetic dots and stripes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guslienko, Konstantin Y.; Slavin, Andrei N.

    2011-01-01

    We present derivation of the magnetostatic Green's functions used in calculations of spin-wave spectra of finite-size non-ellipsoidal (rectangular) magnetic elements. The elements (dots) are assumed to be single domain particles having uniform static magnetization. We consider the case of flat dots, when the in-plane dot size is much larger than the dot height (film thickness), and assume the uniform distribution of the variable magnetization along the dot height. The limiting cases of magnetic waveguides with rectangular cross-section and thin magnetic stripes are also considered. The developed method of tensorial Green's functions is used to solve the Maxwell equations in the magnetostatic limit, and to represent the Landau-Lifshitz equation of motion for the magnetization of a magnetic element in a closed integro-differential form. - Highlights: → The Green's functions method is used to solve the magnetostatic equations. → Explicit Green's functions are written for thin magnetic dots and stripes. → Spin-wave frequencies for finite rectangular magnetic elements are calculated.

  5. Green’s function theory of ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic superlattices with damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, R.K.; Guo, F.F.; Zhang, Z.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explore a quantum Green’s-function method to study the resonance absorption of magnetic materials. The relationship between the resonance magnon (spin wave) density and the resonance frequency of a superlattice consisting of two magnetic layers with damping and antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling is studied. The effects of temperature, interlayer coupling, anisotropy, external magnetic field and damping on the the resonance frequency and resonance magnon density are investigated. The resonance excitation probability for a magnon is proportional to the resonance magnon density. In the classic methods, the imaginary part of magnetic permeability represents the resonance absorption in magnetic materials. In the quantum approach, the resonance magnon density can be used to estimate the strength of the resonance absorption. In the present work, a quantum approach is developed to study resonance absorption of magnetic materials and the results show the method to obtain a magnetic multilayered materials with both high resonance frequency and high resonance absorption.

  6. Influence of External Static Magnetic Fields on Properties of Metallic Functional Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Zuo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of external static magnetic fields on solidification, solid phase transformation of metallic materials have been reviewed in terms of Lorentz force, convection, magnetization, orientation, diffusion, and so on. However, the influence of external static magnetic fields on properties of metallic functional materials is rarely reviewed. In this paper, the effect of static magnetic fields subjected in solidification and/or annealing on the properties of Fe–Ga magnetostrictive material, high strength high conductivity Cu-based material (Cu–Fe and Cu–Ag alloys, and Fe–Sn magnetic material were summarized. Both the positive and negative impacts from magnetic fields were found. Exploring to maximize the positive influence of magnetic fields is still a very meaningful and scientific issue in future.

  7. Treatment response in psychotic patients classified according to social and clinical needs, drug side effects, and previous treatment; a method to identify functional remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenius, Malin; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Hartvig, Per; Sundquist, Staffan; Lindström, Leif

    2009-01-01

    Various approaches have been made over the years to classify psychotic patients according to inadequate treatment response, using terms such as treatment resistant or treatment refractory. Existing classifications have been criticized for overestimating positive symptoms; underestimating residual symptoms, negative symptoms, and side effects; or being to open for individual interpretation. The aim of this study was to present and evaluate a new method of classification according to treatment response and, thus, to identify patients in functional remission. A naturalistic, cross-sectional study was performed using patient interviews and information from patient files. The new classification method CANSEPT, which combines the Camberwell Assessment of Need rating scale, the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser side effect rating scale (SE), and the patient's previous treatment history (PT), was used to group the patients according to treatment response. CANSEPT was evaluated by comparison of expected and observed results. In the patient population (n = 123), the patients in functional remission, as defined by CANSEPT, had higher quality of life, fewer hospitalizations, fewer psychotic symptoms, and higher rate of workers than those with the worst treatment outcome. In the evaluation, CANSEPT showed validity in discriminating the patients of interest and was well tolerated by the patients. CANSEPT could secure inclusion of correct patients in the clinic or in research.

  8. Quantal density-functional theory in the presence of a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tao; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-01-01

    We generalize the quantal density-functional theory (QDFT) of electrons in the presence of an external electrostatic field E(r)=-∇v(r) to include an external magnetostatic field B(r)=∇xA(r), where (v(r),A(r)) are the respective scalar and vector potentials. The generalized QDFT, valid for nondegenerate ground and excited states, is the mapping from the interacting system of electrons to a model of noninteracting fermions with the same density ρ(r) and physical current density j(r), and from which the total energy can be obtained. The properties (ρ(r),j(r)) constitute the basic quantum-mechanical variables because, as proved previously, for a nondegenerate ground state they uniquely determine the potentials (v(r),A(r)). The mapping to the noninteracting system is arbitrary in that the model fermions may be either in their ground or excited state. The theory is explicated by application to a ground state of the exactly solvable (two-dimensional) Hooke's atom in a magnetic field, with the mapping being to a model system also in its ground state. The majority of properties of the model are obtained in closed analytical or semianalytical form. A comparison with the corresponding mapping from a ground state of the (three-dimensional) Hooke's atom in the absence of a magnetic field is also made.

  9. Evaporation rate of water as a function of a magnetic field and field gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-12-11

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air.

  10. Evaporation Rate of Water as a Function of a Magnetic Field and Field Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yun-Zhu; Yin, Da-Chuan; Cao, Hui-Ling; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Yan; Liu, Yong-Ming; Huang, Huan-Huan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yan; Guo, Wei-Hong; Qian, Ai-Rong; Shang, Peng

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetic fields on water is still a highly controversial topic despite the vast amount of research devoted to this topic in past decades. Enhanced water evaporation in a magnetic field, however, is less disputed. The underlying mechanism for this phenomenon has been investigated in previous studies. In this paper, we present an investigation of the evaporation of water in a large gradient magnetic field. The evaporation of pure water at simulated gravity positions (0 gravity level (ab. g), 1 g, 1.56 g and 1.96 g) in a superconducting magnet was compared with that in the absence of the magnetic field. The results showed that the evaporation of water was indeed faster in the magnetic field than in the absence of the magnetic field. Furthermore, the amount of water evaporation differed depending on the position of the sample within the magnetic field. In particular, the evaporation at 0 g was clearly faster than that at other positions. The results are discussed from the point of view of the evaporation surface area of the water/air interface and the convection induced by the magnetization force due to the difference in the magnetic susceptibility of water vapor and the surrounding air. PMID:23443127

  11. Design, Development & Functional Validation of Magnets system in support of 42 GHz Gyrotron in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, S.; Raj, P.; Prasad, U.; Ghate, M.; Khristi, Y.; Panchal, A.; Bhavsar, D.; Banudha, M.; Kedia, S.; Sharma, A. N.; Kanabar, D.; Parghi, B.

    2017-07-01

    A multi institutional initiative is underway towards the development of 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron system in India under the frame work of Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. Indigenous realization comprising of design, fabrication, prototypes and functional validations of an appropriate Magnet System is one of the primary technological objective of these initiatives. The 42 GHz gyrotron magnet system comprises of a warm gun magnet, a NbTi/Cu based high homogenous superconducting cavity magnet and three warm collector magnets. The superconducting cavity magnet has been housed inside a low loss cryostat. The magnet system has been designed in accordance with gyrotron physics and engineering considerations respecting highly homogenous spatial field profile as well as maintaining steep gradient as per the compression and velocity ratios between the emission and resonator regions. The designed magnet system further ensures the co-linearity of the magnetic axis with that of the beam axis with custom winding techniques apart from a smooth collection of beam with the collector magnet profiles. The designed magnets have been wound after several R & D validations. The superconducting magnet has been housed inside a low loss designed cryostat with in-built radial and axial alignment flexibilities to certain extent. The cryostat further houses liquid helium port, liquid nitrogen ports, current communication ports, ports for monitoring helium level and other instrumentations apart from over-pressure safety intensive burst disks etc. The entire magnet system comprising of warm and superconducting magnets has been installed and integrated in the Gyrotron test set-up. The magnet system has been aligned in both warm and when the superconducting cavity magnet is cold. The integrated geometric axes have been experimentally ensured as well as the field profiles have been measured with the magnets being charged. Under experimental conditions, all magnets including

  12. Design, Development & Functional Validation of Magnets system in support of 42 GHz Gyrotron in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradhan S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A multi institutional initiative is underway towards the development of 42 GHz, 200 kW gyrotron system in India under the frame work of Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. Indigenous realization comprising of design, fabrication, prototypes and functional validations of an appropriate Magnet System is one of the primary technological objective of these initiatives. The 42 GHz gyrotron magnet system comprises of a warm gun magnet, a NbTi/Cu based high homogenous superconducting cavity magnet and three warm collector magnets. The superconducting cavity magnet has been housed inside a low loss cryostat. The magnet system has been designed in accordance with gyrotron physics and engineering considerations respecting highly homogenous spatial field profile as well as maintaining steep gradient as per the compression and velocity ratios between the emission and resonator regions. The designed magnet system further ensures the co-linearity of the magnetic axis with that of the beam axis with custom winding techniques apart from a smooth collection of beam with the collector magnet profiles. The designed magnets have been wound after several R & D validations. The superconducting magnet has been housed inside a low loss designed cryostat with in-built radial and axial alignment flexibilities to certain extent. The cryostat further houses liquid helium port, liquid nitrogen ports, current communication ports, ports for monitoring helium level and other instrumentations apart from over-pressure safety intensive burst disks etc. The entire magnet system comprising of warm and superconducting magnets has been installed and integrated in the Gyrotron test set-up. The magnet system has been aligned in both warm and when the superconducting cavity magnet is cold. The integrated geometric axes have been experimentally ensured as well as the field profiles have been measured with the magnets being charged. Under experimental conditions

  13. Superconducting toroidal combined-function magnet for a compact ion beam cancer therapy gantry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, D.S.; Arbelaez, D.; Caspi, S.; Sun, C.; Sessler, A.; Wan, W.; Yoon, M.

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting, combined-function, 5 T, 90°, toroidal magnet with a large bore is described in this paper. This magnet is designed to be the last and most difficult part of a compact superconducting magnet-based carbon gantry optics for ion beam cancer therapy. The relatively small size of this toroidal magnet allows for a gantry the size of which is smaller or at least comparable to that of a proton gantry. The gantry design places the toroidal magnet between the scanning magnets and the patient, that is the scanning magnets are placed midway through the gantry. By optimizing the coil winding configuration of this magnet, near point-to-parallel optics is achieved between the scanning magnets and the patient; while at the same time there is only a small distortion of the beam-shape when scanning. We show that the origin of the beam-shape distortion is the strong sextupole components, whose effects are greatly pronounced when the beam is widely steered in the magnet. A method to correct such an undesirable effect is suggested and demonstrated by a numerical particle tracking through the calculated three-dimensional magnetic field.

  14. Static high-gradient magnetic fields affect the functionality of monocytic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syrovets, T.; Schmidt, Z.; Buechele, B.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Dejneka, Alexandr; Dempsey, N.; Simmet, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 1 (2014), s. 1-2 ISSN 0892-6638 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : static high-gradient * magnet ic fields * affect the functionality * monocytic cells Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnet ism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.)

  15. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes previously related to genetic variation in fertility with phenotypic measurements of reproductive function in Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, M Sofia; Denicol, Anna C; Cole, John B; Null, Daniel J; Taylor, Jeremy F; Schnabel, Robert D; Hansen, Peter J

    2017-05-01

    Many genetic markers related to health or production traits are not evaluated in populations independent of the discovery population or related to phenotype. Here we evaluated 68 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in candidate genes previously associated with genetic merit for fertility and production traits for association with phenotypic measurements of fertility in a population of Holstein cows that was selected based on predicted transmitting ability (PTA) for daughter pregnancy rate (DPR; high, ≥1, n = 989; low, ≤ -1.0, n = 1,285). Cows with a high PTA for DPR had higher pregnancy rate at first service, fewer services per conception, and fewer days open than cows with a low PTA for DPR. Of the 68 SNP, 11 were associated with pregnancy rate at first service, 16 with services per conception, and 19 with days open. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in 12 genes (BDH2, BSP3, CAST, CD2, CD14, FUT1, FYB, GCNT3, HSD17B7, IBSP, OCLN, and PCCB) had significant associations with 2 fertility traits, and SNP in 4 genes (CSPP1, FCER1G, PMM2, and TBC1D24) had significant associations with each of the 3 traits. Results from this experiment were compared with results from 2 earlier studies in which the SNP were associated with genetic estimates of fertility. One study involved the same animals as used here, and the other study was of an independent population of bulls. A total of 13 SNP associated with 1 or more phenotypic estimates of fertility were directionally associated with genetic estimates of fertility in the same cow population. Moreover, 14 SNP associated with reproductive phenotype were directionally associated with genetic estimates of fertility in the bull population. Nine SNP (located in BCAS, BSP3, CAST, FUT1, HSD17B7, OCLN, PCCB, PMM2, and TBC1D24) had a directional association with fertility in all 3 studies. Examination of the function of the genes with SNP associated with reproduction in more than one study indicates the importance of steroid hormones

  16. Density functional theory study of structure, electronic and magnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHIJIT DUTTA

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Abstract. Rhodium clusters are very important finite size materials because of their unique electronic, magnetic and catalytic properties. Tuning the physical and chemical properties of rhodium clusters by incorporating different metal and non-metal atoms have found a great research interest in recent years.

  17. Cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using the Stroop task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soeda, Akio; Iwama, Toru; Nakashima, Toshihiko; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2005-01-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a key role in cognition, motor function, and emotion processing. However, little is known about how traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the ACC system. Our purpose was to compare, by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the patterns of cortical activation in patients with cognitive impairment after TBI and those of normal subjects. Cortical activation maps of 11 right-handed healthy control subjects and five TBI patients with cognitive impairment were recorded in response to a Stroop task during a block-designed fMRI experiment. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used for individual subjects and group analysis. In TBI patients and controls, cortical activation, found in similar regions of the frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes, resembled patterns of activation documented in previous neuroimaging studies of the Stroop task in healthy controls. However, the TBI patients showed a relative decrease in ACC activity compared with the controls. Cognitive impairment in TBI patients seems to be associated with alterations in functional cerebral activity, especially less activation of the ACC. These changes are probably the result of destruction of neural networks after diffuse axonal injury and may reflect cortical disinhibition attributable to disconnection or compensation for an inefficient cognitive process. (orig.)

  18. Cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using the Stroop task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Akio; Iwama, Toru [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Gifu City (Japan); Nakashima, Toshihiko; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun [Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Department of Neurosurgery, Minokamo (Japan); Kuwata, Kazuo [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Gifu (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) plays a key role in cognition, motor function, and emotion processing. However, little is known about how traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the ACC system. Our purpose was to compare, by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the patterns of cortical activation in patients with cognitive impairment after TBI and those of normal subjects. Cortical activation maps of 11 right-handed healthy control subjects and five TBI patients with cognitive impairment were recorded in response to a Stroop task during a block-designed fMRI experiment. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM99) was used for individual subjects and group analysis. In TBI patients and controls, cortical activation, found in similar regions of the frontal, occipital, and parietal lobes, resembled patterns of activation documented in previous neuroimaging studies of the Stroop task in healthy controls. However, the TBI patients showed a relative decrease in ACC activity compared with the controls. Cognitive impairment in TBI patients seems to be associated with alterations in functional cerebral activity, especially less activation of the ACC. These changes are probably the result of destruction of neural networks after diffuse axonal injury and may reflect cortical disinhibition attributable to disconnection or compensation for an inefficient cognitive process. (orig.)

  19. A Computerized Tablet with Visual Feedback of Hand Position for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta eKarimpoor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological tests - behavioral tasks that very commonly involve handwriting and drawing - are widely used in the clinic to detect abnormal brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI may be useful in increasing the specificity of such tests. However, performing complex pen-and-paper tests during fMRI involves engineering challenges. Previously, we developed an fMRI-compatible, computerized tablet system to address this issue. However, the tablet did not include visual feedback of hand position (VFHP, a human factors component that may be important for fMRI of certain patient populations. A real-time system was thus developed to provide VFHP and integrated with the tablet in an augmented reality display. The effectiveness of the system was initially tested in young healthy adults who performed various handwriting tasks in front of a computer display with and without VFHP. Pilot fMRI of writing tasks were performed by two representative individuals with and without VFHP. Quantitative analysis of the behavioral results indicated improved writing performance with VFHP. The pilot fMRI results suggest that writing with VFHP requires less neural resources compared to the without VFHP condition, to maintain similar behavior. Thus, the tablet system with VFHP is recommended for future fMRI studies involving patients with impaired brain function and where ecologically valid behavior is important.

  20. Brain functional magnetic resonance imaging response to glucose and fructose infusions in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: In animals, intracerebroventricular glucose and fructose have opposing effects on appetite and weight regulation. In humans, functional brain magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies during carbohydrate ingestion suggest that glucose may regulate HT signaling but are potentially confoun...

  1. Declarative memory consolidation in humans: a prospective functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takashima, A.; Petersson, K.M.; Rutters, F.; Tendolkar, I.; Jensen, O.; Zwarts, M.J.; McNaughton, B.L.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2006-01-01

    Retrieval of recently acquired declarative memories depends on the hippocampus, but with time, retrieval is increasingly sustainable by neocortical representations alone. This process has been conceptualized as system-level consolidation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we assessed over

  2. Time-Evolution Contrast of Target MRI Using High-Stability Antibody Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. W. Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, high-quality antibody functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are synthesized. Such physical characterizations as particle morphology, particle size, stability, and relaxivity of magnetic particles are investigated. The immunoreactivity of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles is examined by utilizing immunomagnetic reduction. The results show that the mean diameter of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles is around 50 nm, and the relaxivity of the magnetic particles is 145 (mM·s−1. In addition to characterizing the magnetic nanoparticles, the feasibility of using the antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles for the contrast medium of target magnetic resonance imaging is investigated. These antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are injected into mice bearing with tumor. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes darker after the injection and then recovers 50 hours after the injection. The tumor magnetic-resonance image becomes the darkest at around 20 hours after the injection. Thus, the observing time window for the specific labeling of tumors with antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles was found to be 20 hours after injecting biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles into mice. The biopsy of tumor is stained after the injection to prove that the long-term darkness of tumor magnetic-resonance image is due to the specific anchoring of antibody functionalized magnetic nanoparticles at tumor.

  3. Single step synthesis, characterization and applications of curcumin functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhandari, Rohit; Gupta, Prachi; Dziubla, Thomas; Hilt, J. Zach, E-mail: zach.hilt@uky.edu

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been well known for their applications in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia, targeted drug delivery, etc. The surface modification of these magnetic nanoparticles has been explored extensively to achieve functionalized materials with potential application in biomedical, environmental and catalysis field. Herein, we report a novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers, using a simple coprecipitation technique. The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) molecule. - Graphical abstract: Novel single step curcumin coated magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles without any additional linkers for medical, environmental, and other applications. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A novel and versatile single step methodology for developing curcumin functionalized magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles is reported. • The magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were characterized using TEM, XRD, FTIR and TGA. • The developed MNPs were employed in a cellular application for protection against an inflammatory agent, a polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB).

  4. Small-angle neutron scattering correlation functions of bulk magnetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettus, Denis; Michels, Andreas

    2015-10-01

    On the basis of the continuum theory of micromagnetics, the correlation function of the spin-misalignment small-angle neutron scattering cross section of bulk ferromagnets ( e.g. elemental polycrystalline ferromagnets, soft and hard magnetic nanocomposites, nanoporous ferromagnets, or magnetic steels) is computed. For such materials, the spin disorder which is related to spatial variations in the saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy field results in strong spin-misalignment scattering dΣ M /dΩ along the forward direction. When the applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the incoming neutron beam, the characteristics of dΣ M /dΩ ( e.g. the angular anisotropy on a two-dimensional detector or the asymptotic power-law exponent) are determined by the ratio of magnetic anisotropy field strength H p to the jump Δ M in the saturation magnetization at internal interfaces. Here, the corresponding one- and two-dimensional real-space correlations are analyzed as a function of applied magnetic field, the ratio H p /Δ M , the single-particle form factor and the particle volume fraction. Finally, the theoretical results for the correlation function are compared with experimental data on nanocrystalline cobalt and nickel.

  5. High pressure cells for magnetic measurements - destruction and functional tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamarád, Jiří; Machátová, Zuzana; Arnold, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 11 (2004), s. 5022-5025 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739; GA AV ČR IAA1010315 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : pressure cells * pressure transmitting media * CuBe * MP35N Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.226, year: 2004

  6. Copper nanoparticles functionalized PE: Preparation, characterization and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reznickova, A., E-mail: alena.reznickova@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Orendac, M., E-mail: martin.orendac@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Kolska, Z., E-mail: zdenka.kolska@seznam.cz [Faculty of Science, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Cizmar, E., E-mail: erik.cizmar@upjs.sk [Faculty of Science, P.J. Safarik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04013 Kosice (Slovakia); Dendisova, M., E-mail: vyskovsm@vscht.cz [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V., E-mail: vaclav.svorcik@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, University of Chemistry and Technology, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Polyethylene (PE) surface was activated by argon plasma discharge. • Copper nanoparticles were coated on polyethylene via dithiol interlayer. • Prepared samples exhibit excellent structural and magnetic properties. • Studied properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of electronic devices. - Abstract: We report grafting of copper nanoparticles (CuNP) on plasma activated high density polyethylene (HDPE) via dithiol interlayer pointing out to the structural and magnetic properties of those composites. The as-synthesized Cu nanoparticles have been characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM/TEM) and UV–vis spectroscopy. Properties of pristine PE and their plasma treated counterparts were studied by different experimental techniques: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV–vis spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), zeta potential, electron spin resonance (ESR) and SQUID magnetometry. From TEM and HRTEM analyses, it is found that the size of high purity Cu nanoparticles is (12.2 ± 5.2) nm. It was determined that in the CuNPs, the copper atoms are arranged mostly in the (111) and (200) planes. Absorption in UV–vis region by these nanoparticles is ranging from 570 to 670 nm. EDS revealed that after 1 h of grafting are Cu nanoparticles homogeneously distributed over the whole surface and after 24 h of grafting Cu nanoparticles tend to aggregate slightly. The combined investigation of magnetic properties using ESR spectrometry and SQUID magnetometry confirmed the presence of copper nanoparticles anchored on PE substrate and indicated ferromagnetic interactions.

  7. Age-related normal structural and functional ventricular values in cardiac function assessed by magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiechter, Michael; Gaemperli, Oliver; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Fuchs, Tobias A; Gebhard, Catherine; Stehli, Julia; Klaeser, Bernd; Stähli, Barbara E; Manka, Robert; Manes, Costantina; Tanner, Felix C

    2013-01-01

    The heart is subject to structural and functional changes with advancing age. However, the magnitude of cardiac age-dependent transformation has not been conclusively elucidated. This retrospective cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) study included 183 subjects with normal structural and functional ventricular values. End systolic volume (ESV), end diastolic volume (EDV), and ejection fraction (EF) were obtained from the left and the right ventricle in breath-hold cine CMR. Patients were classified into four age groups (20–29, 30–49, 50–69, and ≥70 years) and cardiac measurements were compared using Pearson’s rank correlation over the four different groups. With advanced age a slight but significant decrease in ESV (r=−0.41 for both ventricles, P<0.001) and EDV (r=−0.39 for left ventricle, r=−0.35 for right ventricle, P<0.001) were observed associated with a significant increase in left (r=0.28, P<0.001) and right (r=0.27, P<0.01) ventricular EF reaching a maximal increase in EF of +8.4% (P<0.001) for the left and +6.1% (P<0.01) for the right ventricle in the oldest compared to the youngest patient group. Left ventricular myocardial mass significantly decreased over the four different age groups (P<0.05). The aging process is associated with significant changes in left and right ventricular EF, ESV and EDV in subjects with no cardiac functional and structural abnormalities. These findings underline the importance of using age adapted values as standard of reference when evaluating CMR studies

  8. Longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with an applied magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Tang, Jing; Gao, Yunan; Sun, Yue; Qiu, Kangsheng; Zhao, Yanhui; He, Min; Shi, Jin-An; Gu, Lin; Williams, David A; Sheng, Weidong; Jin, Kuijuan; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-27

    Controlling single-particle wave functions in single semiconductor quantum dots is in demand to implement solid-state quantum information processing and spintronics. Normally, particle wave functions can be tuned transversely by an perpendicular magnetic field. We report a longitudinal wave function control in single quantum dots with a magnetic field. For a pure InAs quantum dot with a shape of pyramid or truncated pyramid, the hole wave function always occupies the base because of the less confinement at base, which induces a permanent dipole oriented from base to apex. With applying magnetic field along the base-apex direction, the hole wave function shrinks in the base plane. Because of the linear changing of the confinement for hole wave function from base to apex, the center of effective mass moves up during shrinking process. Due to the uniform confine potential for electrons, the center of effective mass of electrons does not move much, which results in a permanent dipole moment change and an inverted electron-hole alignment along the magnetic field direction. Manipulating the wave function longitudinally not only provides an alternative way to control the charge distribution with magnetic field but also a new method to tune electron-hole interaction in single quantum dots.

  9. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on rectal function and emotion in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizawa, Yuuichi; Morishita, Joe; Kano, Michiko; Mori, Takayuki; Izumi, Shin-ichi; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Fukudo, Shin; Tsutsui, Kenichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    A previous brain imaging study demonstrated activation of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) during visceral nociception, and this activation was associated with anxiety. We hypothesized that functional modulation of the right DLPFC by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can reveal the actual role of right DLPFC in brain-gut interactions in humans. Subjects were 11 healthy males aged 23.5±1.4 (mean±spin echo (SE)) years. Viscerosensory evoked potential (VEP) with sham (0 mA) or actual (30 mA) electrical stimulation (ES) of the rectum was taken after sham, low frequency rTMS at 0.1 Hz, and high frequency rTMS at 10 Hz to the right DLPFC. Rectal tone was measured with a rectal barostat. Visceral perception and emotion were analyzed using an ordinate scale, rectal barostat, and VEP. Low frequency rTMS significantly reduced anxiety evoked by ES at 30 mA (p<0.05). High frequency rTMS-30 mA ES significantly produced more phasic volume events than sham rTMS-30 mA ES (p<0.05). We successfully modulated the gastrointestinal function of healthy individuals through rTMS to the right DLPFC. Thus, rTMS to the DLPFC appears to modulate the affective, but not direct, component of visceral perception and motility of the rectum. (author)

  10. Prediction of memory rehabilitation outcomes in traumatic brain injury by using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Gary E; O'Neil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Goldstein, Richard; Kelkar, Kalika; Katz, Douglas I; Burke, David; Rauch, Scott L; Savage, Cary R; Glenn, Mel B

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the ability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures collected from people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) to provide predictive value for rehabilitation outcomes over and above standard predictors. Prospective study. Academic medical center. Persons (N=54) with TBI greater than 1 year postinjury. A novel 12-session group rehabilitation program focusing on internal strategies to improve memory. The Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) delayed recall score. fMRI measures were collected while participants performed a strategically directed word memorization task. Prediction models were multiple linear regressions with the following primary predictors of outcome: age, education, injury severity, preintervention HVLT-R, and task-related fMRI activation of the left dorsolateral and left ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC). Baseline HVLT-R was a significant predictor of outcome (P=.007), as was injury severity (for severe vs mild, P=.049). We also found a significant quadratic (inverted-U) effect of fMRI in the VLPFC (P=.007). This study supports previous evidence that left prefrontal activity is related to strategic verbal learning, and the magnitude of this activation predicted success in response to cognitive memory rehabilitation strategies. Extreme under- or overactivation of VLPFC was associated with less successful learning after rehabilitation. Further study is necessary to clarify this relationship and to expand and optimize the possible uses of functional imaging to guide rehabilitation therapies.

  11. Cardiovascular risks and brain function: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of executive function in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yi-Fang; Eldreth, Dana; Erickson, Kirk I; Varma, Vijay; Harris, Gregory; Fried, Linda P; Rebok, George W; Tanner, Elizabeth K; Carlson, Michelle C

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are associated with cognitive impairment and risk of dementia in older adults. However, the mechanisms linking them are not clear. This study aims to investigate the association between aggregate CV risk, assessed by the Framingham general cardiovascular risk profile, and functional brain activation in a group of community-dwelling older adults. Sixty participants (mean age: 64.6 years) from the Brain Health Study, a nested study of the Baltimore Experience Corps Trial, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging using the Flanker task. We found that participants with higher CV risk had greater task-related activation in the left inferior parietal region, and this increased activation was associated with poorer task performance. Our results provide insights into the neural systems underlying the relationship between CV risk and executive function. Increased activation of the inferior parietal region may offer a pathway through which CV risk increases risk for cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Structure, function, and use of the magnetic sense in animals (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Michael M.; Diebel, Carol E.; Green, Colin R.

    2000-05-01

    The hypothesis that animals navigate magnetically is attractive because the earth's magnetic field provides consistent information about position and direction in all environments through which animals travel. However, the hypothesis has been difficult to test because (i) the structure and function of the sense could not readily be analyzed in the laboratory and (ii) the effects of experimental treatments on behavior in the laboratory and field could not be reliably predicted. Our research is focused on the structure and function of the sense in rainbow trout and on applying the understanding gained in the laboratory to studies of navigation by homing pigeons. We have found iron-rich crystals (most likely single-domain magnetite) in candidate magnetoreceptor cells located within a discrete layer of sensory tissue in the nose of rainbow trout. The candidate receptor cells are closely associated with a branch of the trigeminal nerve that responds to changes in intensity but not direction of magnetic fields. In parallel work, we have developed a model of magnetic position determination in which pigeons derive magnetic analogues of geographic latitude and longitude from (i) the total intensity and (ii) the direction of the intensity slope of the earth's magnetic field. Taken together with our other results, the model gives us confidence that a coherent understanding of the structure, function, and use of the magnetic sense in animals is now developing.

  13. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Skouras, Stavros; Jentschke, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram) which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM) and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM) neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females) while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music). ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens). Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality) showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females) showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ) correlates with both function (increased network centrality) and structure (grey matter volume) of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  14. Neural correlates of emotional personality: a structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Koelsch

    Full Text Available Studies addressing brain correlates of emotional personality have remained sparse, despite the involvement of emotional personality in health and well-being. This study investigates structural and functional brain correlates of psychological and physiological measures related to emotional personality. Psychological measures included neuroticism, extraversion, and agreeableness scores, as assessed using a standard personality questionnaire. As a physiological measure we used a cardiac amplitude signature, the so-called E κ value (computed from the electrocardiogram which has previously been related to tender emotionality. Questionnaire scores and E κ values were related to both functional (eigenvector centrality mapping, ECM and structural (voxel-based morphometry, VBM neuroimaging data. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data were obtained from 22 individuals (12 females while listening to music (joy, fear, or neutral music. ECM results showed that agreeableness scores correlated with centrality values in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, and the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens. Individuals with higher E κ values (indexing higher tender emotionality showed higher centrality values in the subiculum of the right hippocampal formation. Structural MRI data from an independent sample of 59 individuals (34 females showed that neuroticism scores correlated with volume of the left amygdaloid complex. In addition, individuals with higher E κ showed larger gray matter volume in the same portion of the subiculum in which individuals with higher E κ showed higher centrality values. Our results highlight a role of the amygdala in neuroticism. Moreover, they indicate that a cardiac signature related to emotionality (E κ correlates with both function (increased network centrality and structure (grey matter volume of the subiculum of the hippocampal formation, suggesting a role of the hippocampal formation for

  15. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  16. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on lower extremity spasticity and motor function in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastgoo, Maryam; Naghdi, Sofia; Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Olyaei, Gholamreza; Jalaei, Shohreh; Forogh, Bijan; Najari, Hamidreza

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effect of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on lower extremity (LE) spasticity, motor function and motor neurone excitability in chronic stroke patients. This study was a randomised sham-controlled cross-over trial with 1-week follow-up. A total of 20 post-stroke patients were randomised to receive active (n = 10) or sham (n = 10) rTMS. Fourteen of them (7 in each group) crossed over to the sham or active rTMS after a washout period of 1 month. Interventions consist of five consecutive daily sessions of active or sham rTMS to the unaffected lower extremity motor area (1000 pulses; 1 Hz; 90% of the tibialis anterior motor threshold). Outcome measures were modified modified ashworth scale (MMAS), the H-reflex, lower extremity section of Fugl-Mayer assessment (LE-FMA) and timed UP and GO (TUG) test. All outcomes were measured at three levels in each intervention period: pre- and post-intervention and 1-week follow-up. Friedman's test revealed significant improvement in MMAS score only after active rTMS. This improvement lasted for one week after the active rTMS. Repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed significant time*intervention interaction for LE-FMA. There are no differences between groups for the MMAS and LE-FMA. No significant change in Hmax/Mmax ratio and TUG test was noted. Low-frequency rTMS over the LE motor area can improve clinical measures of muscle spasticity and motor function. More studies are needed to clarify the changes underlying this improvement in spasticity. Implications for Rehabilitation Spasticity is a common disorder and one of the causes of long-term disability after stroke. Physical therapy modalities, oral medications, focal intervention and surgical procedures have been used for spasticity reduction. Beneficial effect of the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for post-stroke upper extremity spasticity reduction and motor function improvement was

  17. Magnetic-Field Density-Functional Theory (BDFT): Lessons from the Adiabatic Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Sarah; Borgoo, Alex; Tellgren, Erik I; Teale, Andrew M; Helgaker, Trygve

    2017-09-12

    We study the effects of magnetic fields in the context of magnetic field density-functional theory (BDFT), where the energy is a functional of the electron density ρ and the magnetic field B. We show that this approach is a worthwhile alternative to current-density functional theory (CDFT) and may provide a viable route to the study of many magnetic phenomena using density-functional theory (DFT). The relationship between BDFT and CDFT is developed and clarified within the framework of the four-way correspondence of saddle functions and their convex and concave parents in convex analysis. By decomposing the energy into its Kohn-Sham components, we demonstrate that the magnetizability is mainly determined by those energy components that are related to the density. For existing density functional approximations, this implies that, for the magnetizability, improvements of the density will be more beneficial than introducing a magnetic-field dependence in the correlation functional. However, once a good charge density is achieved, we show that high accuracy is likely only obtainable by including magnetic-field dependence. We demonstrate that adiabatic-connection (AC) curves at different field strengths resemble one another closely provided each curve is calculated at the equilibrium geometry of that field strength. In contrast, if all AC curves are calculated at the equilibrium geometry of the field-free system, then the curves change strongly with increasing field strength due to the increasing importance of static correlation. This holds also for density functional approximations, for which we demonstrate that the main error encountered in the presence of a field is already present at zero field strength, indicating that density-functional approximations may be applied to systems in strong fields, without the need to treat additional static correlation.

  18. Spherical agarose-coated magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with a new salen for magnetic solid-phase extraction of uranyl ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serenjeh, Fariba Nazari; Hashemi, Payman; Ghiasvand, Ali Reza; Naeimi, Hossein; Zakerzadeh, Elham

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a method for magnetic solid phase extraction of uranyl ions from water samples. It is based on the use of spherical agarose-coated magnetic nanoparticles along with magnetic field agitation. The salen type Schiff base N,N’-bis(4-hydroxysalicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine was synthesized from resorcinol in two steps and characterized by infrared and nucleic magnetic resonance spectroscopies. The particles were then activated by an epichlorohydrin method and functionalized with the Schiff base which acts as a selective ligand for the extraction of UO 2 (II). Following preconcentration and elution with HCl, the ions were quantified by spectrophotometry using Arsenazo III as the indicator. The effects of pH value, ionic strength and amount of the adsorbent on the extraction of UO 2 (II) were optimized by a multivariate central composite design method. Six replicate analyses under optimized conditions resulted in a recovery of 96.6 % with a relative standard deviation of 3.4 % for UO 2 (II). The detection limit of the method (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3σ) is 10 μg L -1 . The method was successfully applied to the determination of UO 2 (II) in spiked water samples. (author)

  19. Static magnetic field influence on rat tail nerve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, C Z; Harmon, D; Yu, J

    1986-10-01

    Motor nerve conduction and excitability were measured on the tail nerve of anesthetized rats before and after the nerve was exposed perpendicularly to a static electromagnetic field of various intensities and durations. There was no significant change in either the distal latencies or the amplitudes of the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) measured from stimulating the tail nerve after it was exposed to the electromagnetic field with a density up to 1.2 Tesla (T) for a duration of 60 seconds. However, the nerve excitability expressed as changes of the amplitudes of the submaximally evoked CMAP increased significantly when the tail nerve was exposed to a magnetic field with a density higher than 0.5T for more than 30 seconds. The finding that an electromagnetic field increases motor nerve excitability suggests a possible mechanism of its therapeutic effects.

  20. Group Theory of Wannier Functions Providing the Basis for a Deeper Understanding of Magnetism and Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Krüger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the group theory of optimally-localized and symmetry-adapted Wannier functions in a crystal of any given space group G or magnetic group M. Provided that the calculated band structure of the considered material is given and that the symmetry of the Bloch functions at all of the points of symmetry in the Brillouin zone is known, the paper details whether or not the Bloch functions of particular energy bands can be unitarily transformed into optimally-localized Wannier functions symmetry-adapted to the space group G, to the magnetic group M or to a subgroup of G or M. In this context, the paper considers usual, as well as spin-dependent Wannier functions, the latter representing the most general definition of Wannier functions. The presented group theory is a review of the theory published by one of the authors (Ekkehard Krüger in several former papers and is independent of any physical model of magnetism or superconductivity. However, it is suggested to interpret the special symmetry of the optimally-localized Wannier functions in the framework of a nonadiabatic extension of the Heisenberg model, the nonadiabatic Heisenberg model. On the basis of the symmetry of the Wannier functions, this model of strongly-correlated localized electrons makes clear predictions of whether or not the system can possess superconducting or magnetic eigenstates.

  1. Multichannel superconducting gap function in a quantizing magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewski, L.; Nogala, M.M.; Thomas, M.; Wojciechowski, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Temperature and field dependences of the gap functions in s-wave and p-wave superconductors are presented. For both cases of local attractive interactions the pairing within the nth Landau level is realized via n+1 channels. ((orig.))

  2. Magnetic edge states in MoS2 characterized using density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Hinnemann, B.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the edges of a two-dimensional slab of insulating MoS2 exhibit one-dimensional metallic edge states, the so-called "brim states." Here, we find from density-functional theory calculations that several edge structures, which are relevant for the hydrodesulfurization process......, are magnetic. The magnetism is an edge phenomenon associated with certain metallic edge states. Interestingly, we find that among the two low-index edges, only the S edge displays magnetism under hydrodesulfurization conditions. In addition, the implications of this on the catalytic activity are investigated...

  3. Nanometric resolution magnetic resonance imaging methods for mapping functional activity in neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretti, Albert; Castelletto, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    This contribution highlights and compares some recent achievements in the use of k-space and real space imaging (scanning probe and wide-filed microscope techniques), when applied to a luminescent color center in diamond, known as nitrogen vacancy (NV) center. These techniques combined with the optically detected magnetic resonance of NV, provide a unique platform to achieve nanometric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) resolution of nearby nuclear spins (known as nanoMRI), and nanometric NV real space localization. •Atomic size optically detectable spin probe.•High magnetic field sensitivity and nanometric resolution.•Non-invasive mapping of functional activity in neuronal networks.

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with the Wet Form of Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lešták, Jan; Tintěra, Jaroslav; Karel, Ivan; Svatá, Zuzana; Rozsíval, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The study is designed to determine the relationship between the progress of the wet form of age-related macular degeneration and the activity of the visual cortex examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Ten patients with the wet form of age-related macular degeneration (9 female and 1 male) with a mean age of 74.7 years (58–85 years) at various stages of bilateral involvement of the disease were included. Patients did not suffer from any other ocular nor neurological disease. All the patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging examinations with stimulation of both eyes using a black-and-white checkerboard of size 25.8 × 16.2 degrees. The group was compared with a group of healthy subjects with an average age of 54.1 years (45–65 years). For statistical evaluation, the Mann-Whitney U test was used. Comparing the extent of visual cortex activations we found a statistically significant difference between both the groups (p = 0.0247). However, the dependence of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity on visual acuity was not statistically significant (p = 0.223). We conclude that in patients with the wet form of age-related macular degeneration, lower functional magnetic resonance imaging activity of the visual cortex was found compared with the control group of healthy subjects. Dependence of functional magnetic resonance imaging activity on visual acuity was not statistically significant. PMID:28167987

  5. Tailored functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI, drug delivery, magnetic separation and immobilization of biosubstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hola, Katerina; Markova, Zdenka; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2015-11-01

    In this critical review, we outline various covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Tuning the surface chemistry and design of magnetic nanoparticles are described in relation to their applicability in advanced medical technologies and biotechnologies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, targeted drug delivery, magnetic separations and immobilizations of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, targeting agents and other biosubstances. We review synthetic strategies for the controlled preparation of IONPs modified with frequently used functional groups including amine, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups as well as the preparation of IONPs functionalized with other species, e.g., epoxy, thiol, alkane, azide, and alkyne groups. Three main coupling strategies for linking IONPs with active agents are presented: (i) chemical modification of amine groups on the surface of IONPs, (ii) chemical modification of bioactive substances (e.g. with fluorescent dyes), and (iii) the activation of carboxyl groups mainly for enzyme immobilization. Applications for drug delivery using click chemistry linking or biodegradable bonds are compared to non-covalent methods based on polymer modified condensed magnetic nanoclusters. Among many challenges, we highlight the specific surface engineering allowing both therapeutic and diagnostic applications (theranostics) of IONPs and magnetic/metallic hybrid nanostructures possessing a huge potential in biocatalysis, green chemistry, magnetic bioseparations and bioimaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ``Green'' functionalization of magnetic nanoparticles via tea polyphenol for magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen; Lai, Kuilin; Liu, Kexia; Xia, Rui; Gao, Fabao; Wu, Yao; Gu, Zhongwei

    2014-01-01

    Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake.Tea polyphenol serves as an environmentally friendly ligand-exchange molecule to synthesize multifunctional metal-doped superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via a catechol-metal coordination interaction. The resultant particles not only exhibit excellent hydrophilicity and protein adsorption resistance, but also are applicable as magnetic resonance/fluorescent dual-imaging probes due to their high T2 relaxivity, autofluorescence and large cellular uptake. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional information and figures (Fig. S1-S7), including experimental sections, characterization of the products, protein corona analysis, cytotoxicity and cellular uptake quantification. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05003c

  7. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  8. Amine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles as robust support for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and 2,2 -(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) (EDBE) as amine precursors. These aminated nanoparticles were used as support for the immobilization of lipase, an important industrial enzyme. Lipase was immobilized via glutaraldehyde coupling agent. These functionalized nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TEM,.

  9. Function's evaluation, perfusion and metabolism by positron emission tomography associated with multislice tomography (PET/CT) in patient with previous diagnosis to myocardial necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campisi, Roxana; Aramayo, Natalia; Osorio, Amilcar

    2010-01-01

    A 64-years-old male patient with previous diagnosis of myocardial necrosis as assessed by myocardial perfusion gated single photon emission computed tomography (gSPECT) with 3-vessel-disease, left ventricular dysfunction and symptomatic by epigastric pain. The patient was referred for myocardial viability assessment by positron emission tomography (PET) to define clinical management decision. (authors) [es

  10. A comprehensive neuropsychological mapping battery for functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Sirel; Baran, Zeynel; Ceylan, Arzu Ozkan; Tileylioglu, Emre; Tali, Turgut; Karakas, Hakki Muammer

    2013-11-01

    Existing batteries for FMRI do not precisely meet the criteria for comprehensive mapping of cognitive functions within minimum data acquisition times using standard scanners and head coils. The goal was to develop a battery of neuropsychological paradigms for FMRI that can also be used in other brain imaging techniques and behavioural research. Participants were 61 healthy, young adult volunteers (48 females and 13 males, mean age: 22.25 ± 3.39 years) from the university community. The battery included 8 paradigms for basic (visual, auditory, sensory-motor, emotional arousal) and complex (language, working memory, inhibition/interference control, learning) cognitive functions. Imaging was performed using standard functional imaging capabilities (1.5-T MR scanner, standard head coil). Structural and functional data series were analysed using Brain Voyager QX2.9 and Statistical Parametric Mapping-8. For basic processes, activation centres for individuals were within a distance of 3-11 mm of the group centres of the target regions and for complex cognitive processes, between 7 mm and 15 mm. Based on fixed-effect and random-effects analyses, the distance between the activation centres was 0-4 mm. There was spatial variability between individual cases; however, as shown by the distances between the centres found with fixed-effect and random-effects analyses, the coordinates for individual cases can be used to represent those of the group. The findings show that the neuropsychological brain mapping battery described here can be used in basic science studies that investigate the relationship of the brain to the mind and also as functional localiser in clinical studies for diagnosis, follow-up and pre-surgical mapping. © 2013.

  11. An agent harms a victim: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on specific moral emotions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kedia, G.; Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L.; Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L.; Kedia, G.; Hilton, D.; Berthoz, S.; Wessa, M.

    2008-01-01

    The statement 'An agent harms a victim' depicts a situation that triggers moral emotions. Depending on whether the agent and the victim are the self or someone else, it can lead to four different moral emotions: self-anger ('I harm myself'), guilt ('I harm someone'), other-anger ('someone harms me'), and compassion ('someone harms someone'). In order to investigate the neural correlates of these emotions, we examined brain activation patterns elicited by variations in the agent (self vs. other) and the victim (self vs. other) of a harmful action. Twenty-nine healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while imagining being in situations in which they or someone else harmed themselves or someone else. Results indicated that the three emotional conditions associated with the involvement of other, either as agent or victim (guilt, other-anger, and compassion conditions), all activated structures that have been previously associated with the Theory of Mind (ToM, the attribution of mental states to others), namely, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Moreover, the two conditions in which both the self and other were concerned by the harmful action (guilt and other-anger conditions) recruited emotional structures (i. e., the bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate, and basal ganglia). These results suggest that specific moral emotions induce different neural activity depending on the extent to which they involve the self and other. (authors)

  12. Structural and magnetic properties of turmeric functionalized CoFe2O4 nanocomposite powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehran, E.; Farjami Shayesteh, S.; Sheykhan, M.

    2016-10-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of the synthesized pure and functionalized CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are studied by analyzing the results from the x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To extract the structure and lattice parameters from the XRD analysis results, we first apply the pseudo-Voigt model function to the experimental data obtained from XRD analysis and then the Rietveld algorithm is used in order to optimize the model function to estimate the true intensity values. Our simulated intensities are in good agreement with the experimental peaks, therefore, all structural parameters such as crystallite size and lattice constant are achieved through this simulation. Magnetic analysis reveals that the synthesized functionalized NPs have a saturation magnetization almost equal to that of pure nanoparticles (PNPs). It is also found that the presence of the turmeric causes a small reduction in coercivity of the functionalized NPs in comparison with PNP. Our TGA and FTIR results show that the turmeric is bonded very well to the surface of the NPs. So it can be inferred that a nancomposite (NC) powder of turmeric and nanoparticles is produced. As an application, the anti-arsenic characteristic of turmeric makes the synthesized functionalized NPs or NC powder a good candidate for arsenic removal from polluted industrial waste water. Project supported by the University of Guilan and the Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council.

  13. Structural and magnetic properties of turmeric functionalized CoFe2O4 nanocomposite powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehran, E; Farjami Shayesteh, S; Sheykhan, M

    2016-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of the synthesized pure and functionalized CoFe 2 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are studied by analyzing the results from the x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT–IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To extract the structure and lattice parameters from the XRD analysis results, we first apply the pseudo-Voigt model function to the experimental data obtained from XRD analysis and then the Rietveld algorithm is used in order to optimize the model function to estimate the true intensity values. Our simulated intensities are in good agreement with the experimental peaks, therefore, all structural parameters such as crystallite size and lattice constant are achieved through this simulation. Magnetic analysis reveals that the synthesized functionalized NPs have a saturation magnetization almost equal to that of pure nanoparticles (PNPs). It is also found that the presence of the turmeric causes a small reduction in coercivity of the functionalized NPs in comparison with PNP. Our TGA and FTIR results show that the turmeric is bonded very well to the surface of the NPs. So it can be inferred that a nancomposite (NC) powder of turmeric and nanoparticles is produced. As an application, the anti-arsenic characteristic of turmeric makes the synthesized functionalized NPs or NC powder a good candidate for arsenic removal from polluted industrial waste water. (paper)

  14. Caffeine and cognition in functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelstaetter, Florian; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Siedentopf, Christian M; Ischebeck, Anja; Kolbitsch, Christian; Mottaghy, Felix M; Felber, Stephan R; Jaschke, Werner R; Krause, Bernd J

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine has been consumed since ancient times due to its beneficial effects on attention, psychomotor function, and memory. Caffeine exerts its action mainly through an antagonism of cerebral adenosine receptors, although there are important secondary effects on other neurotransmitter systems. Recently, functional MRI (fMRI) entered the field of neuropharmacology to explore the intracerebral sites and mechanisms of action of pharmacological agents. However, as caffeine possesses vasoconstrictive properties it may interfere with the mechanisms underlying the functional contrast in fMRI. Yet, only a limited number of studies dealt with the effect of caffeine on measures in fMRI. Even fewer neuroimaging studies examined the effects that caffeine exerts on cognition: Portas and colleagues used fMRI in an attentional task under different levels of arousal (sleep deprivation or caffeine administration), concluding that the thalamus is involved in mediating the interaction of attention and arousal. Bendlin and colleagues found caffeine to stabilize the extent of neuronal activation in repetitive word stem completion, counteracting the general task practice effect. Recently, Koppelstaetter and colleagues assessed the effect of caffeine on verbal working memory demonstrating a modulatory effect of caffeine on brain regions (medial frontopolar and anterior cingulate cortex) that have been associated with attentional and executive functions. This review surveys and discusses neuroimaging findings on 1) how caffeine affects the contrast underlying fMRI techniques, particularly the blood oxygen level dependent contrast (BOLD fMRI), and 2) how caffeine operates on neuronal activity underlying cognition, to understand the effect of caffeine on behavior and its neurobiological underpinnings.

  15. Distribution functions of magnetic nanoparticles determined by a numerical inversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, P; Balceris, C; Ludwig, F; Posth, O; Bogart, L K; Szczerba, W; Castro, A; Nilsson, L; Costo, R; Gavilán, H; González-Alonso, D; Pedro, I de; Barquín, L Fernández; Johansson, C

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we applied a regularized inversion method to extract the particle size, magnetic moment and relaxation-time distribution of magnetic nanoparticles from small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), DC magnetization (DCM) and AC susceptibility (ACS) measurements. For the measurements the particles were colloidally dispersed in water. At first approximation the particles could be assumed to be spherically shaped and homogeneously magnetized single-domain particles. As model functions for the inversion, we used the particle form factor of a sphere (SAXS), the Langevin function (DCM) and the Debye model (ACS). The extracted distributions exhibited features/peaks that could be distinctly attributed to the individually dispersed and non-interacting nanoparticles. Further analysis of these peaks enabled, in combination with a prior characterization of the particle ensemble by electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering, a detailed structural and magnetic characterization of the particles. Additionally, all three extracted distributions featured peaks, which indicated deviations of the scattering (SAXS), magnetization (DCM) or relaxation (ACS) behavior from the one expected for individually dispersed, homogeneously magnetized nanoparticles. These deviations could be mainly attributed to partial agglomeration (SAXS, DCM, ACS), uncorrelated surface spins (DCM) and/or intra-well relaxation processes (ACS). The main advantage of the numerical inversion method is that no ad hoc assumptions regarding the line shape of the extracted distribution functions are required, which enabled the detection of these contributions. We highlighted this by comparing the results with the results obtained by standard model fits, where the functional form of the distributions was a priori assumed to be log-normal shaped. (paper)

  16. Functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles for U removal from low and high pH groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Dien, E-mail: dien.li@srs.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Egodawatte, Shani [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Larsen, Sarah C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Serkiz, Steven M. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Seaman, John C. [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles were functionalized with organic molecules. • The functionalized nanoparticles had high surface areas and consistent pore sizes. • The functionalized nanoparticles were easily separated due to their magnetism. • They exhibited high capacity for uranium removal from low- or high-pH groundwater. - Abstract: U(VI) species display limited adsorption onto sediment minerals and synthetic sorbents in pH <4 or pH >8 groundwater. In this work, magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MMSNs) with magnetite nanoparticle cores were functionalized with various organic molecules using post-synthetic methods. The functionalized MMSNs were characterized using N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), {sup 13}C cross polarization and magic angle spinning (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), which indicated that mesoporous silica (MCM-41) particles of 100–200 nm formed around a core of magnetic iron oxide, and the functional groups were primarily grafted into the mesopores of ∼3.0 nm in size. The functionalized MMSNs were effective for U removal from pH 3.5 and 9.6 artificial groundwater (AGW). Functionalized MMSNs removed U from the pH 3.5 AGW by as much as 6 orders of magnitude more than unfunctionalized nanoparticles or silica and had adsorption capacities as high as 38 mg/g. They removed U from the pH 9.6 AGW as much as 4 orders of magnitude greater than silica and 2 orders of magnitude greater than the unfunctionalized nanoparticles with adsorption capacities as high as 133 mg/g. These results provide an applied solution for treating U contamination that occurs at extreme pH environments and a scientific foundation for solving critical industrial issues related to environmental stewardship and nuclear power production.

  17. Interface Behavior in Functionally Graded Ceramics for the Magnetic Refrigeration: Numerical Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    material is needed. Tape casting is a common process in producing functional ceramics, and it has recently been established for producing side-by-side (SBS) functionally graded ceramics (FGCs). The main goal of the present work is to study the multiple material flows in SBS tape casting and analyze......The active magnetic regenerator refrigerator is currently the most common magnetic refrigeration device for near room temperature applications, and it is driven by the magnetocaloric effect in the regenerator material. In order to make this efficient, a graded configuration of the magnetocaloric...

  18. Source-Free Exchange-Correlation Magnetic Fields in Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Gross, E K U; Sanna, A; Dewhurst, J K

    2018-03-13

    Spin-dependent exchange-correlation energy functionals in use today depend on the charge density and the magnetization density: E xc [ρ, m]. However, it is also correct to define the functional in terms of the curl of m for physical external fields: E xc [ρ,∇ × m]. The exchange-correlation magnetic field, B xc , then becomes source-free. We study this variation of the theory by uniquely removing the source term from local and generalized gradient approximations to the functional. By doing so, the total Kohn-Sham moments are improved for a wide range of materials for both functionals. Significantly, the moments for the pnictides are now in good agreement with experiment. This source-free method is simple to implement in all existing density functional theory codes.

  19. Special Considerations for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pediatric Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsoni, Eleni; Byrd, Dana; Casey, BJ

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) provides a non-invasive means of studying both typical and atypical brain development in vivo. However, the developmental and clinical status of the populations of interest impact how neuroimaging data should be collected, analyzed, and interpreted. In the present paper, we review methodological and theoretical issues relevant to developmental and clinical neuroimaging research and provide possible approaches for addressing each. These issues include accounting for differences in biological noise, neuroanatomy, motion, and task performance. Finally, we emphasize the importance of a converging methods approach in constraining and supporting interpretations of pediatric imaging results. PMID:16649204

  20. Density functional approximation for spin dependent quantum transport in magnetic nano structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyunt, Khine

    2009-01-01

    In quasi-classical theoretical framework, the transport of electrons and holes in semiconductor devices is treated with the Boltzmann transport equation or quantum-mechanical energy band theory - viz., the effective mass approximation and the random phase approximation. On the other hand, in the mesoscopic, nano electronic devices, for three- and lower- dimensional structures with nanometer scaling, the wave properties, spin, charge and the interactions between spin and charge of electrons are fully utilized, such as in artificial mini-Brillouin zones, quantum size effects, Coulomb blockade of single-electron tunneling and spin-polarized giant magnetoresistance tunneling. The complexity associated with the classical quantum-mechanical formalism in the study of transport in magnetic nano structures can be avoided by applying the so-called, Hohenberg-Kohns density functional theory. In particular, the N-electron problem is formulated as N one-electron equations where each electron interacts with all other electrons via an effective exchange-correlation potential. These interactions are augmented using the electron charge density. Plane wave sets and total energy pseudo-potential methods can be used self-consistently, to solve the Kohn-Sham one-electron equations. Because of the limitations of quasi-classical theory, it is more appropriate to treat the magneto-transport problem in nano structures by using quantum many-body theory. The starting point of the quantum transport theory is to take an external field as a perturbation for the many-particle system in equilibrium. This leads to a linear response and gives corresponding transport coefficients. One useful application of the Greens function techniques in quantum magneto-transport is to convert a homogeneous differential equation into an integral equation, viz., as in the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. We have applied to scattering of nano structural defects (impurities) in the electron gas (metal) as many

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging and dementia; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie und Demenz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, F.L. [Abteilung fuer onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (dkfz) Heidelberg (Germany); Abteilung fuer onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (dkfz), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Hempel, A.; Schoenknecht, P.; Schroeder, J. [Sektion Gerontopsychiatrie, Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg (Germany); Wuestenberg, T. [Neurologische Klinik der Charite, Humboldt-Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Weber, M.A.; Essig, M. [Abteilung fuer onkologische Diagnostik und Therapie, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (dkfz) Heidelberg (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Currently, different cerebral neuroimaging methods are being applied to varying questions in the diagnosis of dementia. In patients with manifest Alzheimer's disease a reduction of cortical perfusion and metabolism in temporal and temporoparietal regions has been demonstrated when compared to healthy controls on a diversity of memory tasks. Since differing levels of performance and varying degrees of cortical atrophy may influence functional results considerably, an understanding of the processes associated with normal ageing is perceived as prerequisite for studies applying functional neuroimaging. The integration of knowledge concerning neuropsychological and neurobiological alterations associated with healthy ageing allows hypotheses for the differentiation of pathological ageing processes to be phrased. In this connection non-invasive methods such as fMRI and ASL are of increasing importance. (orig.) [German] In der zerebralen Bildgebung werden heute verschiedene Methoden zu einzelnen Fragestellungen in der Demenzdiagnostik mit unterschiedlichem Stellenwert eingesetzt. Bei Patienten mit manifester Alzheimer-Demenz wurde eine Verminderung der kortikalen Durchblutung bzw. des zerebralen Glukoseumsatzes in temporalen Strukturen und im temporoparietalen Uebergang im Vergleich zu Gesunden unter verschiedenen Gedaechtnisaufgaben nachgewiesen. Da unterschiedliche Testleistungen und unterschiedliche Auspraegungen der kortikalen Atrophie die funktionellen Befunde wesentlich beeinflussen, wird das Verstaendnis der normalen Alterungsprozesse als Voraussetzung fuer neuere Studien mittels funktioneller Bildgebung angesehen. Die Integration der Kenntnisse ueber neuropsychologische und neurobiologische Veraenderungen gesunden Alterns erlaubt Hypothesen zur Differenzierung pathologischer Alterungsprozesse. Dabei nehmen heute die nichtinvasiven Verfahren wie fMRT und ASL einen zunehmenden Stellenwert ein. (orig.)

  2. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with magnetic nanoparticles: general nonaqueous synthesis and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Du Ning; Wu Ping; Chen Bingdi; Yang Deren

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach has been developed to synthesize magnetic nanoparticle and carbon nanotube (CNT) core-shell nanostructures, such as CoO/CNTs and Mn 3 O 4 /CNTs, by the nonaqueous solvothermal treatment of metal carbonyl on CNT templates using hexane as the solvent. The morphological and structural characterizations indicate that numerous cubic CoO or tetragonal Mn 3 O 4 nanoparticles are deposited on the surfaces of the CNTs to form CNT-based core-shell nanostructures. It is revealed that the hydrophobic interaction between nanoparticles and CNTs in hexane plays the critical role for the formation of CNT-based core-shell nanostructures. A physical property measurement system (PPMS-9, Quantum Design) analysis indicates that the CoO/CNT core-shell nanostructures show weak ferromagnetic performance at 300 K due to the ferromagnetic Co clusters and the uncompensated surface spin states, while the Mn 3 O 4 /CNT core-shell nanostructures display ferromagnetic behavior at low temperature (34.5 K), which transforms into paramagnetic behavior with increasing temperature

  3. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoli, Chuka; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  4. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoli, Chuka; Boutonnet, Magali; Järås, Sven; Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna

    2012-10-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  5. Protein-functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: time efficient potential-water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okoli, Chuka [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Environmental Microbiology (Sweden); Boutonnet, Magali; Jaeras, Sven [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Chemical Technology (Sweden); Rajarao-Kuttuva, Gunaratna, E-mail: gkr@kth.se [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Environmental Microbiology (Sweden)

    2012-10-15

    Recent advances in nanoscience suggest that the existing issues involving water quality could be resolved or greatly improved using nanomaterials, especially magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. Magnetic nanoparticles have been synthesized for the development and use, in association with natural coagulant protein for water treatment. The nanoparticles size, morphology, structure, and magnetic properties were characterized by transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry. Purified Moringa oleifera protein was attached onto microemulsions-prepared magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ME-MION) to form stable protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PMO+ME-MION). The turbidity removal efficiency in both synthetic and surface water samples were investigated and compared with the commonly used synthetic coagulant (alum) as well as PMO. More than 90 % turbidity could be removed from the surface waters within 12 min by magnetic separation of PMO+ME-MION; whereas gravimetrically, 70 % removal in high and low turbid waters can be achieved within 60 min. In contrast, alum requires 180 min to reduce the turbidity of low turbid water sample. These data support the advantage of separation with external magnetic field (magnetophoresis) over gravitational force. Time kinetics studies show a significant enhancement in ME-MION efficiency after binding with PMO implying the availability of large surface of the ME-MION. The coagulated particles (impurities) can be removed from PMO+ME-MION by washing with mild detergent or cleaning solution. To our knowledge, this is the first report on surface water turbidity removal using protein-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle.

  6. Brain Activity in Patients With Adductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Detected by Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyuna, Asanori; Kise, Norimoto; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Kondo, Shunsuke; Uehara, Takayuki; Maeda, Hiroyuki; Ganaha, Akira; Suzuki, Mikio

    2017-05-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is considered a focal dystonia. However, the detailed pathophysiology of SD remains unclear, despite the detection of abnormal activity in several brain regions. The aim of this study was to clarify the pathophysiological background of SD. This is a case-control study. Both task-related brain activity measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging by reading the five-digit numbers and resting-state functional connectivity (FC) measured by 150 T2-weighted echo planar images acquired without any task were investigated in 12 patients with adductor SD and in 16 healthy controls. The patients with SD showed significantly higher task-related brain activation in the left middle temporal gyrus, left thalamus, bilateral primary motor area, bilateral premotor area, bilateral cerebellum, bilateral somatosensory area, right insula, and right putamen compared with the controls. Region of interest voxel FC analysis revealed many FC changes within the cerebellum-basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex loop in the patients with SD. Of the significant connectivity changes between the patients with SD and the controls, the FC between the left thalamus and the left caudate nucleus was significantly correlated with clinical parameters in SD. The higher task-related brain activity in the insula and cerebellum was consistent with previous neuroimaging studies, suggesting that these areas are one of the unique characteristics of phonation-induced brain activity in SD. Based on FC analysis and their significant correlations with clinical parameters, the basal ganglia network plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SD. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Recommendations for Conducting Differential Item Functioning (DIF) Analyses for Students with Disabilities Based on Previous DIF Studies. Research Report. ETS RR-11-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzick, Heather; Stone, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to help ensure that strategies for differential item functioning (DIF) detection for students with disabilities are appropriate and lead to meaningful results. We surveyed existing DIF studies for students with disabilities and describe them in terms of study design, statistical approach, sample characteristics, and…

  8. First order magneto-structural phase transition and associated multi-functional properties in magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sindhunil Barman

    2013-01-01

    We show that the first order magneto-structural phase transitions observed in various classes of magnetic solids are often accompanied by useful multi-functional properties, namely giant magneto-resistance, magneto-caloric effect and magneto-striction. We highlight various characteristic features associated with a disorder influenced first order phase transition namely supercooling, superheating, phase-coexistence and metastability, in several magnetic materials and discuss how a proper understanding of the transition process can help in fine tuning of the accompanied functional properties. Magneto-elastic coupling is a key element in this first order phase transition, and methods need to be explored for maximizing the contributions from both the lattice and the magnetic degree of freedom while simultaneously minimizing the thermomagnetic hysteresis loss. An analogy is also drawn with the first order phase transition observed in dielectric materials and vortex matter of type-II superconductors. (topical review)

  9. First order magneto-structural phase transition and associated multi-functional properties in magnetic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sindhunil Barman

    2013-05-08

    We show that the first order magneto-structural phase transitions observed in various classes of magnetic solids are often accompanied by useful multi-functional properties, namely giant magneto-resistance, magneto-caloric effect and magneto-striction. We highlight various characteristic features associated with a disorder influenced first order phase transition namely supercooling, superheating, phase-coexistence and metastability, in several magnetic materials and discuss how a proper understanding of the transition process can help in fine tuning of the accompanied functional properties. Magneto-elastic coupling is a key element in this first order phase transition, and methods need to be explored for maximizing the contributions from both the lattice and the magnetic degree of freedom while simultaneously minimizing the thermomagnetic hysteresis loss. An analogy is also drawn with the first order phase transition observed in dielectric materials and vortex matter of type-II superconductors.

  10. Oscillatory magnetism of palladium nano-film depending on its film thickness: Density functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon Cheol; Lee, Jae Il; Wu, Ruqian

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the magnetism of palladium nano-films, we performed first-principles calculations employing the highly precise full-potential linerized augmented plane-wave method based on density functional theory. The magnetism is investigated as a function of the thickness of the Pd thickness within a range of 1-21 monolayers. The magnetic stability of the Pd nano-films is calculated to depend delicately on its thickness. The ferromagnetic state is calculated to be stable for only some particular thicknesses of 1, 3, 9, and 15 layers. Invoking the ferromagnetism is not due to the localization at the surface but to the high density of states (DOS) at Fermi energy at the second layer from the surface

  11. Impaired emotion processing in functional (psychogenic tremor: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto J. Espay

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: In response to emotional stimuli, functional tremor is associated with alterations in activation and functional connectivity in networks involved in emotion processing and theory of mind. These findings may be relevant to the pathophysiology of functional movement disorders.

  12. Motor circuit computer model based on studies of functional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Ramo, Karla Batista; Rodriguez Rojas, Rafael; Carballo Barreda, Maylen

    2012-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a complex network of subcortical nuclei involved in motor control, sensorimotor integration, and cognitive processes. Their functioning and interaction with other cerebral structures remains as a subject of debate. The aim of the present work was to simulate the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuitry interaction in motor program selection, supported by functional connectivity pattern obtained by functional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Determination of connections weights between neural populations by functional magnetic resonance imaging, contributed to a more realistic formulation of the model; and consequently to obtain similar results to clinical and experimental data. The network allowed to describe the participation of the basal ganglia in motor program selection and the changes in Parkinson disease. The simulation allowed to demonstrate that dopamine depletion above to 40 % leads to a loss of action selection capability, and to reflect the system adaptation ability to compensate dysfunction in Parkinson disease, coincident with experimental and clinical studies

  13. Non-invasive mapping of bilateral motor speech areas using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Mervi; Tamsi, Niko; Säisänen, Laura; Kemppainen, Samuli; Määttä, Sara; Julkunen, Petro; Jutila, Leena; Äikiä, Marja; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Niskanen, Eini; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Mervaala, Esa

    2015-06-15

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is a modern precise method to activate and study cortical functions noninvasively. We hypothesized that a combination of nTMS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could clarify the localization of functional areas involved with motor control and production of speech. Navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS) with short bursts was used to map speech areas on both hemispheres by inducing speech disruption during number recitation tasks in healthy volunteers. Two experienced video reviewers, blinded to the stimulated area, graded each trial offline according to possible speech disruption. The locations of speech disrupting nTMS trials were overlaid with fMRI activations of word generation task. Speech disruptions were produced on both hemispheres by nTMS, though there were more disruptive stimulation sites on the left hemisphere. Grade of the disruptions varied from subjective sensation to mild objectively recognizable disruption up to total speech arrest. The distribution of locations in which speech disruptions could be elicited varied among individuals. On the left hemisphere the locations of disturbing rTMS bursts with reviewers' verification followed the areas of fMRI activation. Similar pattern was not observed on the right hemisphere. The reviewer-verified speech disruptions induced by nTMS provided clinically relevant information, and fMRI might explain further the function of the cortical area. nTMS and fMRI complement each other, and their combination should be advocated when assessing individual localization of speech network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal visual system in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A.P.; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Rostrup, Egill

    2000-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in young children may provide information about the development of the visual cortex, and may have predictive value for later visual performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of fMRI for examining cerebral processing of visi...

  15. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to improve mood and motor function in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmich, R.C.G.; Siebner, H.R.; Bakker, M.; Munchau, A.; Bloem, B.R.

    2006-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that can produce lasting changes in excitability and activity in cortical regions underneath the stimulation coil (local effect), but also within functionally connected cortical or subcortical regions

  16. Time of acquisition and network stability in pediatric resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.H. White (Tonya); R.L. Muetzel (Ryan); M. Schmidt (Marcus); S.J.E. Langeslag (Sandra); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); A. Hofman (Albert); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractResting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) has been shown to elucidate reliable patterns of brain networks in both children and adults. Studies in adults have shown that rs-fMRI acquisition times of ∼5 to 6 min provide adequate sampling to produce stable spatial maps

  17. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Connectivity Analyses Reveal Efference-Copy to Primary Somatosensory Area, BA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M.; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively.

  18. Functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity analyses reveal efference-copy to primary somatosensory area, BA2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Fang; Arnstein, Dan; Thomas, Rajat Mani; Maurits, Natasha M; Keysers, C.; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Some theories of motor control suggest efference-copies of motor commands reach somatosensory cortices. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test these models. We varied the amount of efference-copy signal by making participants squeeze a soft material either actively or passively.

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cognitive Processing in Young Adults with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacola, Lisa M.; Byars, Anna W.; Chalfonte-Evans, Melinda; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Hickey, Fran; Patterson, Bonnie; Hotze, Stephanie; Vannest, Jennifer; Chiu, Chung-Yiu; Holland, Scott K.; Schapiro, Mark B.

    2011-01-01

    The authors used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural activation during a semantic-classification/object-recognition task in 13 persons with Down syndrome and 12 typically developing control participants (age range = 12-26 years). A comparison between groups suggested atypical patterns of brain activation for the…

  20. Sulphamic acid-functionalized magnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 4. Sulphamic acid-functionalized magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles as recyclable catalyst for synthesis of imidazoles under microwave irradiation. Javad Safari Zohre Zarnegar. Volume 125 Issue 4 July 2013 pp 835-841 ...

  1. Functional Assessment of Corticospinal Conduction with Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Basic Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groppa, S.; Peller, M.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2010-01-01

    Here we review how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is used in clinical practice to examine the functional integrity of the fast conducting fibres of the human corticomotor path ways. We first summarise the technical and physiological principles of TMS that are relevant to its clinical use...

  2. Study of human brain functions by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and spectroscopy (fMRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful tool in the detection and assessment of cerebral pathophysiology and the regional mapping and characterization of cognitive processes such as motor skills, vision, language and memory. The results of the effect of motor cortex stimulation during repetitive hand squeezing task activation using in-vivo single voxel NMR spectroscopy carried out on normal volunteer subjects are presented

  3. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d?Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present stu...

  4. Variability in functional magnetic resonance imaging : influence of the baseline vascular state and physiological fluctuations

    OpenAIRE

    Behzadi, Yashar

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become an increasingly important tool for studying the working human brain. The blood oxygenation level dependent signal signal used in most fMRI experiments is an indirect measure of neural activity and reflects local changes in deoxyhemoglobin content, which is a complex function of dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen. Although significant progress has been ...

  5. Testicular function in boys previously treated with recombinant-human growth hormone for non-growth hormone-deficient short stature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicioni, A F; Paris, E; De Marco, E; Anzuini, A; Gandini, L; Lenzi, A

    2007-12-01

    Data on the effects of recombinant human GH (hGH) therapy during male puberty on future testis function are still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of recombinant hGH treatment on reproductive function in non-GH-deficient short stature boys. Eight boys with non-GH-deficient short stature, affected by constitutional delay of puberty or idiopathic short stature, were retrospectively studied after recombinant-hGH treatment to verify gonadal development, hormone production and semen quality. Auxological data, endocrinological/ andrological parameters and laboratory evaluation (GH, IGF-I, FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B) were assessed before treatment; after completion of pubertal development, the same parameters plus SHBG levels were evaluated and a seminal fluid examination was conducted (ejaculate volume, pH, sperm concentration, total sperm count, forward and total motility, morphology). All patients showed normal testicular volume at the final pubertal stage, with regular androgenization. Hormonal levels were within the normal adult range in all boys. Considering the immature reproductive system of these patients in comparison with adults, semen parameters (sperm count, motility, and morphology) were within almost normal limits, except in one patient. Although patients showed the wide fluctuation of semen values frequently observed at the end of puberty, the hypophysis-gonadal axis hormones were in the normal range in all adolescents. Pathological measurements of some seminal parameters were found in one patient only. This study suggests that recombinant hGH treatment has no detrimental effects on the development and maturation of male gonadal function in non- GH deficient short stature young patients.

  6. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  8. Effect of subsequent vaginal delivery on bowel symptoms and anorectal function in women who sustained a previous obstetric anal sphincter injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Polly A; Naidu, Madhu; Thakar, Ranee; Sultan, Abdul H

    2018-03-29

    Our primary objective was to prospectively evaluate anorectal symptoms, anal manometry and endoanal ultrasound (EAUS) in women who followed the recommended mode of subsequent delivery following index obstetric anal sphincter injuries (OASIs) using our unit's standardised protocol. Our secondary objectives were to evaluate the role of internal anal sphincter defects and also to compare outcomes in a subgroup of symptomatic women with normal anorectal physiology. This is a prospective follow-up study of pregnant women with previous OASIs who were counselled regarding subsequent mode of delivery between January 2003 and December 2014. Assessment involved the St Mark's Incontinence Score (SMIS), anal manometry and EAUS at both antepartum and 3-month postpartum visits. Data were analysed using Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U tests. Three hundred and fifty women attended the perineal clinic over the study period, of whom 122 met the inclusion criteria (99 vaginal delivery [VD], 23 caesarean section). No significant worsening of anorectal symptoms was observed following subsequent delivery in the VD group (p = 0.896), although a reduced squeeze pressure was observed at 3 months postpartum (p delivery. In the absence of a randomised study, use of this protocol can aid clinicians in their decision-making.

  9. Alterations in Spontaneous Brain Activity and Functional Network Reorganization following Surgery in Children with Medically Refractory Epilepsy: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available For some patients with medically refractory epilepsy (MRE, surgery is a safe and effective treatment for controlling epilepsy. However, the functional consequences of such surgery on brain activity and connectivity in children remain unknown. In the present study, we carried out a longitudinal study using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 children with MRE before and again at a mean of 79 days after surgery, as well as in a group of 28 healthy controls. Compared with the controls, children with epilepsy exhibited abnormalities in intrinsic activity in the thalamus, putamen, pallidum, insula, hippocampus, cerebellum, and cingulate gyrus both before and after surgery. Longitudinal analyses showed that the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF increased in the parietal–frontal cortex and decreased in the deep nuclei from pre- to post-surgery. The percentage changes in ALFF values in the deep nuclei were positively correlated with the age of epilepsy onset. Functional connectivity (FC analyses demonstrated a reorganization of FC architecture after surgery. These changes in brain activity and FC after surgery might indicate that the previously disrupted functional interactions were reorganized after surgery. All these results provide preliminary evidence that the age of epilepsy onset may have some potential to predict the outcome of brain functional reorganization after surgery in children with MRE.

  10. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death

    KAUST Repository

    Martinez Banderas, Aldo Isaac

    2016-10-24

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  11. Functionalized magnetic nanowires for chemical and magneto-mechanical induction of cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Banderas, Aldo Isaac; Aires, Antonio; Teran, Francisco J; Perez, Jose Efrain; Cadenas, Jael F; Alsharif, Nouf; Ravasi, Timothy; Cortajarena, Aitziber L; Kosel, Jürgen

    2016-10-24

    Exploiting and combining different properties of nanomaterials is considered a potential route for next generation cancer therapies. Magnetic nanowires (NWs) have shown good biocompatibility and a high level of cellular internalization. We induced cancer cell death by combining the chemotherapeutic effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-functionalized iron NWs with the mechanical disturbance under a low frequency alternating magnetic field. (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were separately used for coating NWs allowing further functionalization with DOX. Internalization was assessed for both formulations by confocal reflection microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. From confocal analysis, BSA formulations demonstrated higher internalization and less agglomeration. The functionalized NWs generated a comparable cytotoxic effect in breast cancer cells in a DOX concentration-dependent manner, (~60% at the highest concentration tested) that was significantly different from the effect produced by free DOX and non-functionalized NWs formulations. A synergistic cytotoxic effect is obtained when a magnetic field (1 mT, 10 Hz) is applied to cells treated with DOX-functionalized BSA or APTES-coated NWs, (~70% at the highest concentration). In summary, a bimodal method for cancer cell destruction was developed by the conjugation of the magneto-mechanical properties of iron NWs with the effect of DOX producing better results than the individual effects.

  12. Writing affects the brain network of reading in Chinese: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fan; Vu, Marianne; Chan, Derek Ho Lung; Lawrence, Jason M; Harris, Lindsay N; Guan, Qun; Xu, Yi; Perfetti, Charles A

    2013-07-01

    We examined the hypothesis that learning to write Chinese characters influences the brain's reading network for characters. Students from a college Chinese class learned 30 characters in a character-writing condition and 30 characters in a pinyin-writing condition. After learning, functional magnetic resonance imaging collected during passive viewing showed different networks for reading Chinese characters and English words, suggesting accommodation to the demands of the new writing system through short-term learning. Beyond these expected differences, we found specific effects of character writing in greater activation (relative to pinyin writing) in bilateral superior parietal lobules and bilateral lingual gyri in both a lexical decision and an implicit writing task. These findings suggest that character writing establishes a higher quality representation of the visual-spatial structure of the character and its orthography. We found a greater involvement of bilateral sensori-motor cortex (SMC) for character-writing trained characters than pinyin-writing trained characters in the lexical decision task, suggesting that learning by doing invokes greater interaction with sensori-motor information during character recognition. Furthermore, we found a correlation of recognition accuracy with activation in right superior parietal lobule, right lingual gyrus, and left SMC, suggesting that these areas support the facilitative effect character writing has on reading. Finally, consistent with previous behavioral studies, we found character-writing training facilitates connections with semantics by producing greater activation in bilateral middle temporal gyri, whereas pinyin-writing training facilitates connections with phonology by producing greater activation in right inferior frontal gyrus. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Audiovisual functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals multisensory integration effects in object-related sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doehrmann, Oliver; Weigelt, Sarah; Altmann, Christian F; Kaiser, Jochen; Naumer, Marcus J

    2010-03-03

    Information integration across different sensory modalities contributes to object recognition, the generation of associations and long-term memory representations. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation to investigate the presence of sensory integrative effects at cortical levels as early as nonprimary auditory and extrastriate visual cortices, which are implicated in intermediate stages of object processing. Stimulation consisted of an adapting audiovisual stimulus S(1) and a subsequent stimulus S(2) from the same basic-level category (e.g., cat). The stimuli were carefully balanced with respect to stimulus complexity and semantic congruency and presented in four experimental conditions: (1) the same image and vocalization for S(1) and S(2), (2) the same image and a different vocalization, (3) different images and the same vocalization, or (4) different images and vocalizations. This two-by-two factorial design allowed us to assess the contributions of auditory and visual stimulus repetitions and changes in a statistically orthogonal manner. Responses in visual regions of right fusiform gyrus and right lateral occipital cortex were reduced for repeated visual stimuli (repetition suppression). Surprisingly, left lateral occipital cortex showed stronger responses to repeated auditory stimuli (repetition enhancement). Similarly, auditory regions of interest of the right middle superior temporal gyrus and sulcus exhibited repetition suppression to auditory repetitions and repetition enhancement to visual repetitions. Our findings of crossmodal repetition-related effects in cortices of the respective other sensory modality add to the emerging view that in human subjects sensory integrative mechanisms operate on earlier cortical processing levels than previously assumed.

  14. An agent harms a victim: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study on specific moral emotions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kedia, G. [INSERM, Inst Hlth et Med Res, U797, Res Unit Neuroimaging Psychiat, F-91401 Orsay (France); Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L. [CEA, DSV, I2BM, SHFJ, Orsay (France); Kedia, G.; Martinot, J.L. [Univ Paris Sud, U797, Paris (France); Kedia, G.; Hilton, D. [Univ Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Berthoz, S. [Paris Descartes Univ, U797, Paris (France); Wessa, M. [Univ Heidelber, Cent Inst Mental Hlth, D-6800 Mannheim (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The statement 'An agent harms a victim' depicts a situation that triggers moral emotions. Depending on whether the agent and the victim are the self or someone else, it can lead to four different moral emotions: self-anger ('I harm myself'), guilt ('I harm someone'), other-anger ('someone harms me'), and compassion ('someone harms someone'). In order to investigate the neural correlates of these emotions, we examined brain activation patterns elicited by variations in the agent (self vs. other) and the victim (self vs. other) of a harmful action. Twenty-nine healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while imagining being in situations in which they or someone else harmed themselves or someone else. Results indicated that the three emotional conditions associated with the involvement of other, either as agent or victim (guilt, other-anger, and compassion conditions), all activated structures that have been previously associated with the Theory of Mind (ToM, the attribution of mental states to others), namely, the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, the precuneus, and the bilateral temporo-parietal junction. Moreover, the two conditions in which both the self and other were concerned by the harmful action (guilt and other-anger conditions) recruited emotional structures (i. e., the bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate, and basal ganglia). These results suggest that specific moral emotions induce different neural activity depending on the extent to which they involve the self and other. (authors)

  15. Gold and magnetic oxide/gold core/shell nanoparticles as bio-functional nanoprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, I-Im S; Njoki, Peter N; Wang, Lingyan; Mott, Derrick; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Park, Hye-Young; Wang Xin

    2008-01-01

    The ability to create bio-functional nanoprobes for the detection of biological reactivity is important for developing bioassay and diagnostic methods. This paper describes the findings of an investigation of the surface functionalization of gold (Au) and magnetic nanoparticles coated with gold shells (M/Au) by proteins and spectroscopic labels for the creation of nanoprobes for use in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assays. Highly monodispersed Au nanoparticles and M/Au nanoparticles with two types of magnetic nanoparticle cores (Fe 2 O 3 and MnZn ferrite) were studied as model systems for the bio-functionalization and Raman labeling. Comparison of the SERS intensities obtained with different particle sizes (30-100 nm) and samples in solution versus on solid substrates have revealed important information about the manipulation of the SERS signals. In contrast to the salt-induced uncontrollable and irreversible aggregation of nanoparticles, the ability to use a centrifugation method to control the formation of stable small clustering sizes of nanoparticles was shown to enhance SERS intensities for samples in solution as compared with samples on solid substrates. A simple method for labeling protein-capped Au nanoparticles with Raman-active molecules was also described. The functionalized Au and M/Au nanoparticles are shown to exhibit the desired functional properties for the detection of SERS signals in the magnetically separated reaction products. These results are discussed in terms of the interparticle distance dependence of 'hot-spot' SERS sites and the delineation of the parameters for controlling the core-shell reactivity of the magnetic functional nanocomposite materials in bio-separation and spectroscopic probing

  16. Quantification of right and left ventricular function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellenger, N.G.; Smith, G.C.; Pennell, D.J.; Grothues, F.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac dysfunction is a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Accurate and reproducible assessment of cardiac function is essential for the diagnosis, the assessment of prognosis and evaluation of a patient's response to therapy. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides a measure of global and regional function that is not only accurate and reproducible but is noninvasive, free of ionising radiation, and independent of the geometric assumptions and acoustic windows that limit echocardiography. With the advent of faster scanners, automated analysis, increasing availability and reducing costs, CMR is fast becoming a clinically tenable reference standard for the measurement of cardiac function. (orig.) [de

  17. FUNCTIONAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION – A NEW PROMISING TREATMENT METHOD FOR WOMEN WITH URINARY INCONTINENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor But

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. For urinary incontinence there are different treatment options available and among them we are in favor of those, which are the least aggressive and are similarly efficient at the same time. In the last decade there has been an increasing body of evidence suggesting that the functional magnetic stimulation (FMS might be a new and promising treatment modality for treating of women with urinary incontinence. FMS has been applied to pelvic floor therapy and the treatment of urinary incontinence for the first time in 1999. Contrary to electrical stimulation, FMS aims to stimulate the pelvic floor muscles without insertion of a vaginal probe. During the treatment patient is positioned in a special chair. Under the seat is a magnetic field generator which is producing a pulsating magnetic field which is penetrating the perineum. Structures such as pudendal nerves can therefore be magnetically stimulated without patient’s discomfort or inconvenience of probe insertion as it may be true for electrical stimulation. One of the drawbacks of FMS with magnetic chair is the need for repeated office-based treatment, what may represent a major burden for patients and also for national healthcare system. Therefore we developed a new small magnetic stimulator producing electromagnetic pulses which penetrate either the perineum or pubic bone and thus stimulate the pelvic floor and detrusor muscle. One of advantages of this small portable stimulator apart of its clinical eficacy is a continuous 24-hours stimulation which can be performed either at home/work or during different activities. Conclusions. In this article we are presenting the literature overview regarding magnetic stimulation including our initial experiencies with this new treatment method. Based on our clinical results we feel that FMS represents a new and noninvasive treatment method for urinary incontinence.

  18. Fabrication of a Functionalized Magnetic Bacterial Nanocellulose with Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Sandra L; Shetty, Akshath R; Senpan, Angana; Echeverry-Rendón, Mónica; Reece, Lisa M; Allain, Jean Paul

    2016-05-26

    In this study, bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) produced by the bacteria Gluconacetobacter xylinus is synthesized and impregnated in situ with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) (Fe3O4) to yield a magnetic bacterial nanocellulose (MBNC). The synthesis of MBNC is a precise and specifically designed multi-step process. Briefly, bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) pellicles are formed from preserved G. xylinus strain according to our experimental requirements of size and morphology. A solution of iron(III) chloride hexahydrate (FeCl3·6H2O) and iron(II) chloride tetrahydrate (FeCl2·4H2O) with a 2:1 molar ratio is prepared and diluted in deoxygenated high purity water. A BNC pellicle is then introduced in the vessel with the reactants. This mixture is stirred and heated at 80 °C in a silicon oil bath and ammonium hydroxide (14%) is then added by dropping to precipitate the ferrous ions into the BNC mesh. This last step allows forming in situ magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) inside the bacterial nanocellulose mesh to confer magnetic properties to BNC pellicle. A toxicological assay was used to evaluate the biocompatibility of the BNC-IONP pellicle. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used to cover the IONPs in order to improve their biocompatibility. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that the IONP were located preferentially in the fibril interlacing spaces of the BNC matrix, but some of them were also found along the BNC ribbons. Magnetic force microscope measurements performed on the MBNC detected the presence magnetic domains with high and weak intensity magnetic field, confirming the magnetic nature of the MBNC pellicle. Young's modulus values obtained in this work are also in a reasonable agreement with those reported for several blood vessels in previous studies.

  19. Transcranial magnetic stimulation--may be useful as a preoperative screen of motor tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Gloria M; Dias, Brennan R; Brown, Judy L; Henry, Christina M; Brooks, David A; Buggie, Ed W

    2013-08-01

    Transcranial motor stimulation with noninvasive cortical surface stimulation, using a high-intensity magnetic field referred to as transcranial magnetic stimulation generally, is considered a nonpainful technique. In contrast, transcranial electric stimulation of the motor tracts typically cannot be done in unanesthesized patients. Intraoperative monitoring of motor tract function with transcranial electric stimulation is considered a standard practice in many institutions for patients during surgical procedures in which there is potential risk of motor tract impairment so that the risk of paraplegia or paraparesis can be reduced. Because transcranial electric stimulation cannot be typically done in the outpatient setting, transcranial magnetic stimulation may be able to provide a well-tolerated method for evaluation of the corticospinal motor tracts before surgery. One hundred fifty-five patients aged 5 to 20 years were evaluated preoperatively with single-stimulation nonrepetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for preoperative assessment. The presence of responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation reliably predicted the presence of responses to transcranial electric stimulation intraoperatively. No complications occurred during the testing, and findings were correlated to the clinical history and used in the setup of the surgical monitoring.

  20. Feasibility Study of Large Combined Function Magnets for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindza, P. D.; LeRose, J. J.; Leung, E. M.

    2005-01-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab has identified two new large spectrometers as Physics detectors for the project. The first is a 7.5 Gev/c 35 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a pair of identical Combined Function Superconducting Magnets (CFSM) that can simultaneously produce 1.5 T dipole fields and 4.5 T/m quadrupole fields inside a warm bore of 120 cm. The second is an 11 GeV/c 2 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a CFSM that simultaneously produces a dipole field of 4.0 T and a quadruple field of 3.0 T/m in a 60 cm warm bore. Magnetic designs using TOSCA 3D have been performed to realize the magnetic requirements, provide 3d fields for optics analysis and produce field and force information for the engineering feasibility of the magnets. A two-sector cos(theta)/cos(2theta) design with a low nominal current density, warm bore and warm iron design has been selected and analyzed. These low current densities are consistent with the limits for a cryostable winding. The current paper will summarize the requirement definition of these two magnets. The conceptual design arrived at during the feasibility study involving the choice of conductors, thermal and structural analyses will be presented. A discussion of the manufacturing approach and challenges will be provided

  1. Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials and magnetic resonance imaging findings in paraplegic dogs with recovery of motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedenburg, Johannes S; Wang-Leandro, Adriano; Amendt, Hanna-Luise; Rohn, Karl; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M

    2018-03-22

    Transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials (TMMEP) are associated with severity of clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with spinal cord disease. That in initially paraplegic dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH), MRI findings before surgery and TMMEPs obtained after decompressive surgery are associated with long-term neurological status and correlate with each other. Seventeen client-owned paraplegic dogs with acute thoracolumbar IVDH. Prospective observational study. TMMEPs were obtained from pelvic limbs and MRI (3T) of the spinal cord was performed at initial clinical presentation. Follow-up studies were performed ≤ 2 days after reappearance of motor function and 3 months later. Ratios of compression length, intramedullary hyperintensities' length (T2-weighted hyperintensity length ratio [T2WLR]), and lesion extension (T2-weighted-lesion extension ratio) in relation to the length of the 2nd lumbar vertebral body were calculated. TMMEPs could be elicited in 10/17 (59%) dogs at 1st and in 16/17 (94%) dogs at 2nd follow-up. Comparison of TMMEPs of 1st and 2nd follow-up showed significantly increased amplitudes (median from 0.19 to 0.45 mV) and decreased latencies (from 69.38 to 40.26 ms; P = .01 and .001, respectively). At 2nd follow-up latencies were significantly associated with ambulatory status (P = .024). T2WLR obtained before surgery correlated with latencies at 2nd follow-up (P = .04). TMMEP reflect motor function recovery after severe spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  2. Development of magnetic resonance imaging based detection methods for beta amyloids via sialic acid-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouyoumdjian, Hovig

    The development of a non-invasive method for the detection of Alzheimer's disease is of high current interest, which can be critical in early diagnosis and in guiding preventive treatment of the disease. The aggregates of beta amyloids are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Carbohydrates such as sialic acid terminated gangliosides have been shown to play significant roles in initiation of amyloid aggregation. Herein, we report a biomimetic approach using sialic acid coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles for in vitro detection in addition to the assessment of the in vivo mouse-BBB (Blood brain barrier) crossing of the BSA (bovine serum albumin)-modified ones. The sialic acid functionalized dextran nanoparticles were shown to bind with beta amyloids through several techniques including ELISA (enzyme linked immunosorbent assay), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), TEM (transmission electron microscopy), gel electrophoresis and tyrosine fluorescence assay. The superparamagnetic nature of the nanoparticles allowed easy detection of the beta amyloids in mouse brains in both in vitro and ex vivo model by magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, the sialic acid nanoparticles greatly reduced beta amyloid induced cytotoxicity to SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, highlighting the potential of the glyconanoparticles for detection and imaging of beta amyloids. Sialic acid functionalized BSA (bovine serum albumin) nanoparticles also showed significant binding to beta amyloids, through ELISA and ex vivo mouse brain MRI experiments. Alternatively, the BBB crossing was demonstrated by several techniques such as confocal microscopy, endocytosis, exocytosis assays and were affirmed by nanoparticles transcytosis assays through bEnd.3 endothelial cells. Finally, the BBB crossing was confirmed by analyzing the MRI signal of nanoparticle-injected CD-1 mice.

  3. [Functional connectivity of temporal parietal junction in online game addicts:a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ji; Qian, Ruobing; Lin, Bin; Fu, Xianming; Wei, Xiangpin; Weng, Chuanbo; Niu, Chaoshi; Wang, Yehan

    2014-02-11

    To explore the functions of temporal parietal junction (TPJ) as parts of attention networks in the pathogenesis of online game addiction using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). A total of 17 online game addicts (OGA) were recruited as OGA group and 17 healthy controls during the same period were recruited as CON group. The neuropsychological tests were performed for all of them to compare the inter-group differences in the results of Internet Addiction Test (IAT) and attention functions. All fMRI data were preprocessed after resting-state fMRI scanning. Then left and right TPJ were selected as regions of interest (ROIs) to calculate the linear correlation between TPJ and entire brain to compare the inter-group differences. Obvious differences existed between OGA group (71 ± 5 scores) and CON group (19 ± 7 scores) in the IAT results and attention function (P online game addicts showed decreased functional connectivity with bilateral ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC), bilateral hippocampal gyrus and bilateral amygdaloid nucleus, but increased functional connectivity with right cuneus.However, left TPJ demonstrated decreased functional connectivity with bilateral superior frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyrus, but increased functional connectivity with bilateral cuneus (P online game addicts.It suggests that TPJ is an important component of attention networks participating in the generation of online game addiction.

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  5. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  7. Covalent functionalization of octagraphene with magnetic octahedral B6- and non-planar C6- clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigo-Anota, E.; Cárdenas-Jirón, G.; Salazar Villanueva, M.; Bautista Hernández, A.; Castro, M.

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between the magnetic boron octahedral (B6-) and non-planar (C6-) carbon clusters with semimetal nano-sheet of octa-graphene (C64H24) in the gas phase is studied by means of DFT calculations. These results reveal that non-planar-1 (anion) carbon cluster exhibits structural stability, low chemical reactivity, magnetic (1.0 magneton bohr) and semiconductor behavior. On the other hand, there is chemisorption phenomena when the stable B6- and C6- clusters are absorbed on octa-graphene nanosheets. Such absorption generates high polarity and the low-reactivity remains as on the individual pristine cases. Electronic charge transference occurs from the clusters toward the nanosheets, producing a reduction of the work function for the complexes and also induces a magnetic behavior on the functionalized sheets. The quantum descriptors obtained for these systems reveal that they are feasible candidates for the design of molecular circuits, magnetic devices, and nano-vehicles for drug delivery.

  8. A disposable electrochemical immunosensor for prolactin involving affinity reaction on streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Guzman, Maria; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Pingarron, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the determination of the hormone prolactin. The design involved the use of screen-printed carbon electrodes and streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles. Biotinylated anti-prolactin antibodies were immobilized onto the functionalized magnetic particles and a sandwich-type immunoassay involving prolactin and anti-prolactin antibody labelled with alkaline phosphatase was employed. The resulting bio-conjugate was trapped on the surface of the screen-printed electrode with a small magnet and prolactin quantification was accomplished by differential pulse voltammetry of 1-naphtol formed in the enzyme reaction using 1-naphtyl phosphate as alkaline phosphatase substrate. All variables involved in the preparation of the immunosensor and in the electrochemical detection step were optimized. The calibration plot for prolactin exhibited a linear range between 10 and 2000 ng mL -1 with a slope value of 7.0 nA mL ng -1 . The limit of detection was 3.74 ng mL -1 . Furthermore, the modified magnetic beads-antiprolactin conjugates showed an excellent stability. The immunosensor exhibited also a high selectivity with respect to other hormones. The analytical usefulness of the immnunosensor was demonstrated by analyzing human sera spiked with prolactin at three different concentration levels.

  9. Development of New Contrast Agents for Imaging Function and Metabolism by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Carvalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Liposomes are interesting nanosystems with a wide range of medical application. One particular application is their ability to enhance contrast in magnetic resonance images; when properly loaded with magnetic/superparamagnetic nanoparticles, this means to act as contrast agents. The design of liposomes loaded with magnetic particles, magnetoliposomes, presents a large number of possibilities depending on the application from image function to metabolism. More interesting is its double function application as theranostics (diagnostics and therapy. The synthesis, characterization, and possible medical applications of two types of magnetoliposomes are reviewed. Their performance will be compared, in particular, their efficiency as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, measured by their relaxivities r 1 and r 2 relating to their particular composition. One of the magnetoliposomes had 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (soy as the main phospholipid component, with and without cholesterol, varying its phospholipid to cholesterol molar ratios. The other formulation is a long-circulating liposome composed of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (egg, cholesterol, and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine- N -[methoxy(polyethylene glycol-2000]. Both nanosystems were loaded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with different sizes and coatings.

  10. Functional expression of an scFv on bacterial magnetic particles by in vitro docking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugamata, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Yoshino, Tomoko, E-mail: y-tomoko@cc.tuat.ac.jp

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • We present a novel expression system called “in vitro docking” on bacterial magnetic particles. • An scFv–Fc was functionally expressed on bacterial magnetic particles of magnetotactic bacteria. • Our novel expression system on BacMPs will be effective for disulfide-bonded proteins. - Abstract: A Gram-negative, magnetotactic bacterium, Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 produces nano-sized magnetic particles (BacMPs) in the cytoplasm. Although various applications of genetically engineered BacMPs have been demonstrated, such as immunoassay, ligand–receptor interaction or cell separation, by expressing a target protein on BacMPs, it has been difficult to express disulfide-bonded proteins on BacMPs due to lack of disulfide-bond formation in the cytoplasm. Here, we propose a novel dual expression system, called in vitro docking, of a disulfide-bonded protein on BacMPs by directing an immunoglobulin Fc-fused target protein to the periplasm and its docking protein ZZ on BacMPs. By in vitro docking, an scFv–Fc fusion protein was functionally expressed on BacMPs in the dimeric or trimeric form. Our novel disulfide-bonded protein expression system on BacMPs will be useful for efficient screening of potential ligands or drugs, analyzing ligand–receptor interactions or as a magnetic carrier for affinity purification.

  11. A disposable electrochemical immunosensor for prolactin involving affinity reaction on streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Guzman, Maria; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Computense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma, E-mail: yseo@quim.ucm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Computense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pingarron, Jose M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Computense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-29

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the determination of the hormone prolactin. The design involved the use of screen-printed carbon electrodes and streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles. Biotinylated anti-prolactin antibodies were immobilized onto the functionalized magnetic particles and a sandwich-type immunoassay involving prolactin and anti-prolactin antibody labelled with alkaline phosphatase was employed. The resulting bio-conjugate was trapped on the surface of the screen-printed electrode with a small magnet and prolactin quantification was accomplished by differential pulse voltammetry of 1-naphtol formed in the enzyme reaction using 1-naphtyl phosphate as alkaline phosphatase substrate. All variables involved in the preparation of the immunosensor and in the electrochemical detection step were optimized. The calibration plot for prolactin exhibited a linear range between 10 and 2000 ng mL{sup -1} with a slope value of 7.0 nA mL ng{sup -1}. The limit of detection was 3.74 ng mL{sup -1}. Furthermore, the modified magnetic beads-antiprolactin conjugates showed an excellent stability. The immunosensor exhibited also a high selectivity with respect to other hormones. The analytical usefulness of the immnunosensor was demonstrated by analyzing human sera spiked with prolactin at three different concentration levels.

  12. Bio-inactivation of human malignant cells through highly responsive diluted colloidal suspension of functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Roberta V.; Silva-Caldeira, Priscila P.; Pereira-Maia, Elene C.; Fabris, José D.; Cavalcante, Luis Carlos D.; Ardisson, José D.; Domingues, Rosana Z.

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fluids, more specifically aqueous colloidal suspensions containing certain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), have recently been gaining special interest due to their potential use in clinical treatments of cancerous formations in mammalians. The technological application arises mainly from their hyperthermic behavior, which means that the nanoparticles dissipate heat upon being exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF). If the temperature is raised to slightly above 43 °C, cancer cells are functionally inactivated or killed; however, normal cells tend to survive under those same conditions, entirely maintaining their bioactivity. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that under simultaneous exposure to an AMF and magnetic nanoparticles, certain lines of cancer cells are bio-inactivated even without experiencing a significant temperature increase. This non-thermal effect is cell specific, indicating that MNPs, under alternating magnetic fields, may effectively kill cancer cells under conditions that were previously thought to be implausible, considering that the temperature does not increase more than 5 °C, which is also true in cases for which the concentration of MNPs is too low. To experimentally test for this effect, this study focused on the feasibility of inducing K562 cell death using an AMF and aqueous suspensions containing very low concentrations of MNPs. The assay was designed for a ferrofluid containing magnetite nanoparticles, which were obtained through the co-precipitation method and were functionalized with citric acid; the particles had an average diameter of 10 ± 2 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of approximately 40 nm. Experiments were first performed to test for the ability of the ferrofluid to release heat under an AMF. The results show that for concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 1.0 × 103 mg L-1, the maximum temperature increase was actually less than 2 °C. However, the in vitro test results from K562 cells and suspensions

  13. Functional magnetic resonance microscopy at single-cell resolution in Aplysia californica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Guillaume; Nargeot, Romuald; Jelescu, Ileana Ozana; Le Bihan, Denis; Ciobanu, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we show the feasibility of performing functional MRI studies with single-cell resolution. At ultrahigh magnetic field, manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy allows the identification of most motor neurons in the buccal network of Aplysia at low, nontoxic Mn2+ concentrations. We establish that Mn2+ accumulates intracellularly on injection into the living Aplysia and that its concentration increases when the animals are presented with a sensory stimulus. We also show that we can distinguish between neuronal activities elicited by different types of stimuli. This method opens up a new avenue into probing the functional organization and plasticity of neuronal networks involved in goal-directed behaviors with single-cell resolution. PMID:24872449

  14. Detection of cortical activities on eye movement using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kitahara, Kenji [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Soulie, D.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1997-11-01

    Cortical activity during eye movement was examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Horizontal saccadic eye movements and smooth pursuit eye movements were elicited in normal subjects. Activity in the frontal eye field was found during both saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements at the posterior margin of the middle frontal gyrus and in parts of the precentral sulcus and precentral gyrus bordering the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann`s areas 8, 6, and 9). In addition, activity in the parietal eye field was found in the deep, upper margin of the angular gyrus and of the supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann`s areas 39 and 40) during saccadic eye movement. Activity of V5 was found at the intersection of the ascending limb of the inferior temporal sulcus and the lateral occipital sulcus during smooth pursuit eye movement. Our results suggest that functional magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting cortical activity during eye movement. (author)

  15. Detection of cortical activities on eye movement using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Kitahara, Kenji; Soulie, D.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Iba-Zizen, M.T.; Cabanis, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Cortical activity during eye movement was examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Horizontal saccadic eye movements and smooth pursuit eye movements were elicited in normal subjects. Activity in the frontal eye field was found during both saccadic and smooth pursuit eye movements at the posterior margin of the middle frontal gyrus and in parts of the precentral sulcus and precentral gyrus bordering the middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 8, 6, and 9). In addition, activity in the parietal eye field was found in the deep, upper margin of the angular gyrus and of the supramarginal gyrus (Brodmann's areas 39 and 40) during saccadic eye movement. Activity of V5 was found at the intersection of the ascending limb of the inferior temporal sulcus and the lateral occipital sulcus during smooth pursuit eye movement. Our results suggest that functional magnetic resonance imaging is useful for detecting cortical activity during eye movement. (author)

  16. Scalable synthesis and functionalization of cobalt nanoparticles for versatile magnetic separation and metal adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Pipsa; Heinonen, Hanna; Loimula, Kalle; Forsman, Johanna; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Tapper, Unto; Mahlberg, Riitta; Hentze, Hans-Peter; Auvinen, Ari; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Milani, Roberto

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic cobalt nanoparticles coated with a thin carbon shell were produced by means of a scalable method based on hydrogen reduction synthesis. The presence of oxidized groups on the surface of the carbon shell enabled the reaction with alkoxysilanes bearing amino and thiol reactive functions under mild conditions, and therefore the formation of a thin functional silane layer which holds the potential for further modification in consideration of specific applications, e.g., in the separation and catalysis fields. The magnetic nanoparticles bearing surface thiol groups were also used in metal adsorption tests. These nanoparticles could efficiently adsorb not only gold from a chloride salt aqueous solution, but also several other metals when incubated in a thiocyanate-leached solution obtained from crushed printed circuit boards. The combination of a scalable production method with a simple and versatile surface modification strategy opens up a wide array of potential industrial applications in the fields of separation, sensing, and biomedical devices.

  17. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Designing the coordinate transformation function for non-magnetic invisibility cloaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xiaofei; Feng Yijun; Zhao Lin; Jiang Tian [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Lu Chunhua; Xu Zhongzi [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, 210009 (China)], E-mail: yjfeng@nju.edu.cn

    2008-11-07

    An optical invisibility cloak based on a transformation approach has recently been proposed by a reduced set of material properties due to their easier implementation in reality and little need for an inhomogeneous permeability distribution, but the drawback of undesired scattering caused by the impedance mismatching at the outer boundary is unavoidable in such a cloak. By properly designing the coordinate transformation function to ensure impedance matching at the outer surface, we show that the performance of a nonmagnetic cylindrical cloak could be improved with minimized scattering fields. Using either a single high order power function or an optimized piecewise continuous power function, a cylindrical non-magnetic cloak has been designed with nearly perfect cloaking performance, which is better than those generated with a linear or a quadratic function. Due to the monotonicity of the designed power functions, the resulting cloak has no restriction on the size of the cloaking shell, therefore is suitable for both thick and thin cloaking structures.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  3. Direct electrochemistry and electrocatalysis of lobetyolin via magnetic functionalized reduced graphene oxide film fabricated electrochemical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bolu; Gou, Xiaodan; Bai, Ruibin; Abdelmoaty, Ahmed Attia Ahmed; Ma, Yuling; Zheng, Xiaoping; Hu, Fangdi

    2017-05-01

    A novel lobetyolin electrochemical sensor based on a magnetic functionalized reduced graphene oxide/Nafion nanohybrid film has been introduced in this work. The magnetic functionalized reduced graphene oxide was characterized by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The scanning electron microscopy characterized the morphology and microstructure of the prepared sensors, and the electrochemical effective surface areas of the prepared sensors were also calculated by chronocoulometry method. The electrochemical behavior of lobetyolin on the magnetic functionalized reduced graphene oxide/Nafion nanohybrid modified glassy carbon electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry in a phosphate buffer solution of pH6.0. The electron-transfer coefficient (α), electron transfer number (n), and electrode reaction rate constant (Κs) were calculated as 0.78, 0.73, and 4.63s -1 , respectively. Under the optimized conditions, the sensor based on magnetic functionalized reduced graphene oxide/Nafion showed a linear voltammetric response to the lobetyolin concentration at 1.0×10 -7 to 1.0×10 -4 mol/L with detection limit (S/N=3)of 4.3×10 -8 mol/L. The proposed sensor also displayed acceptable reproducibility, long-term stability, and high selectivity, and performs well for analysis of lobetyolin in real samples. The voltammetric sensor was successfully applied to detect lobetyolin in Codonopsis pilosula with recovery values in the range of 96.12%-102.66%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Visual Imagery and False Memory for Pictures: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Healthy Participants

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan-Otto, Christian; Siddi, Sara; Senior, Carl; Mu?oz-Samons, Daniel; Ochoa, Susana; S?nchez-Laforga, Ana Mar?a; Br?bion, Gildas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Visual mental imagery might be critical in the ability to discriminate imagined from perceived pictures. Our aim was to investigate the neural bases of this specific type of reality-monitoring process in individuals with high visual imagery abilities. METHODS: A reality-monitoring task was administered to twenty-six healthy participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging. During the encoding phase, 45 words designating common items, and 45 pictures of other common items, ...

  5. Cognitive Modules Utilized for Narrative Comprehension in Children: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    OpenAIRE

    Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Holland, Scott K.; Plante, Elena

    2005-01-01

    The ability to comprehend narratives constitutes an important component of human development and experience. The neural correlates of auditory narrative comprehension in children were investigated in a large-scale functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study involving 313 subjects ages 5–18. Using group Independent Component Analysis (ICA), bilateral task-related components were found comprising the primary auditory cortex, the mid-superior temporal gyrus, the hippocampus, the angular g...

  6. Functional magnetic resonance imaging measure of automatic and controlled auditory processing

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Teresa V.; Morey, Rajendra A.; Inan, Seniha; Belger, Aysenil

    2005-01-01

    Activity within fronto-striato-temporal regions during processing of unattended auditory deviant tones and an auditory target detection task was investigated using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging. Activation within the middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, thalamus, and basal ganglia were analyzed for differences in activity patterns between the two stimulus conditions. Unattended deviant tones elicited robust acti...

  7. Cognitive Function and 3-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tractography of White Matter Hyperintensities in Elderly Persons

    OpenAIRE

    Reginold, William; Luedke, Angela C.; Tam, Angela; Itorralba, Justine; Fernandez-Ruiz, Juan; Reginold, Jennifer; Islam, Omar; Garcia, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: This study used 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tractography to determine if there was an association between tracts crossing white matter hyperintensities (WMH) and cognitive function in elderly persons. Methods: Brain T2-weighted fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and diffusion tensor MRI scans were acquired in participants above the age of 60 years. Twenty-six persons had WMH identified on T2 FLAIR scans. They completed a battery of neuropsychological tes...

  8. Pt/Ru-functionalized magnetic spheres for a magnetic-field stimulated methanol and oxygen redox processes. Towards on-demand activation of fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Joseph; Musameh, Mustafa; Laocharoensuk, Rawiwan; Gonzalez-Garcia, Olga; Oni, Joshua; Gervasio, Don [Departments of Chemical and Materials Engineering and Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering, The Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 876006, Tempe, AZ 85287-5801 (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Pt/Ru-functionalized magnetic spheres were used for a magnetic-field stimulated methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction processes. The electrocatalytic alloy magnetic particles were prepared by a galvanostatic co-deposition of platinum and ruthenium onto nickel spheres. The electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol and reduction of oxygen could be triggered by switching the position of an external magnet below the surface of the carbon electrode to confine the Pt/Ru-coated particles. The magnetic stimulation of the redox processes of methanol and oxygen allowed the reversible activation and deactivation of the operation of direct-methanol fuel cells. Such switching of fuel cells would enable on-demand power generation, for meeting the specific needs of power consuming units. (author)

  9. Facile and green synthesis of core-shell structured magnetic chitosan submicrospheres and their surface functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiya; Yuan, Dongying; Dong, Mingjie; Chai, Zhihua; Fu, Guoqi

    2013-09-17

    Submicrometer-sized magnetite colloid nanocrystal clusters (MCNCs) provide a new avenue for constructing uniformly sized and highly magnetic composite submicrospheres. Herein, a facile and eco-friendly method is described for the synthesis of Fe3O4@poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)/chitosan (CS) core-shell submicrospheres using MCNCs bearing carboxyl groups as the magnetic cores. It is based on the self-assembly of positively charged CS chains on the surface of the oppositely charged MCNCs dispersed in the aqueous solution containing acrylic acid (AA) and a cross-linker N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) (MBA), followed by radical induced cross-linking copolymerization of AA and MBA along the CS chains. The resulting polymer shell comprises a medium shell of cross-linked PAA/CS polyelectrolyte complexes and an outer shell of protonated CS chains. It was found that the shell thickness could be tuned by varying either the concentration of radical initiator or the molar ratio of AA to aminoglucoside units of CS. To the surface of thus obtained Fe3O4@PAA/CS particles, Au nanoparticles, a variety of functional groups such as fluorescein, carboxyl, quaternary ammonium, and aliphatic bromide, and even functional polymer chains were successfully introduced. Therefore, such Fe3O4@PAA/CS submicrospheres may be used as versatile magnetic functional scaffolds in biorelated areas like bioseparation and medical assay, considering the unique features of CS like nontoxicity and biocompatibility.

  10. Temporal changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging activation of heterosexual couples for visual stimuli of loved partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won; Kim, Seungyeon; Jeong, Jaeseung; Lee, Kyung-Uk; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Chung, Yong-An; Hong, Keun-Young; Chae, Jeong-Ho

    2009-03-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies on romantic love have focused on determining how the visual stimuli that serve as a representation of loved ones induce the neural activation patterns of romantic love. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal changes in romantic love over a period of 6 months and their correlated neurophysiological changes. Five heterosexual couples (n=10, mean age 21.1+/-1.97) who started dating not less than 100 days previously were recruited to measure their blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while showing them pictures of their loved ones and their previously identified, opposite-sex friends. Subsequently, the subjects were scanned under the same experimental conditions to assess possible changes in their brain activities after 180 days. WE FOUND THAT THEIR PASSIONATE LOVE SCORE (PLS) VALUES (M: 118.6+/-9.1, F: 120.2+/-7.0) were significantly reduced after 6 months (M: 110.8+/-4.0, F: 106.2+/-3.0). Furthermore, significantly increased activations were found in the cingulate gyri, inferior frontal gyri, supramarginal gyri, etc., after 6 months, whereas the head and tail of the right caudate nucleus were deactivated, which is indicative of the inhibition of expression and sensory neglect. These findings suggest that dynamic neural processes in the cortical-subcortical regions are involved in temporal changes in romantic love.

  11. Functionality of veterinary identification microchips following low- (0.5 tesla) and high-field (3 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesnack, Susann; Frame, Mairi E; Oechtering, Gerhard; Ludewig, Eberhard

    2013-01-01

    The ability to read patient identification microchips relies on the use of radiofrequency pulses. Since radiofrequency pulses also form an integral part of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) process, the possibility of loss of microchip function during MRI scanning is of concern. Previous clinical trials have shown microchip function to be unaffected by MR imaging using a field strength of 1 Tesla and 1.5. As veterinary MRI scanners range widely in field strength, this study was devised to determine whether exposure to lower or higher field strengths than 1 Tesla would affect the function of different types of microchip. In a phantom study, a total of 300 International Standards Organisation (ISO)-approved microchips (100 each of three different types: ISO FDX-B 1.4 × 9 mm, ISO FDX-B 2.12 × 12 mm, ISO HDX 3.8 × 23 mm) were tested in a low field (0.5) and a high field scanner (3.0 Tesla). A total of 50 microchips of each type were tested in each scanner. The phantom was composed of a fluid-filled freezer pack onto which a plastic pillow and a cardboard strip with affixed microchips were positioned. Following an MRI scan protocol simulating a head study, all of the microchips were accurately readable. Neither 0.5 nor 3 Tesla imaging affected microchip function in this study. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  12. The effects of functional magnetic nanotubes with incorporated nerve growth factor in neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Varadan, Vijay K.; Yancey, Justin; Srivatsan, Malathi

    2008-03-01

    In this in vitro study the efficiency of magnetic nanotubes to bind with nerve growth factor (NGF) and the ability of NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes to release the bound NGF are investigated using rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells). It is found that functional magnetic nanotubes with NGF incorporation enabled the differentiation of PC12 cells into neurons exhibiting growth cones and neurite outgrowth. Microscope observations show that filopodia extending from neuron growth cones were in close proximity to the NGF-incorporated magnetic nanotubes, at times appearing to extend towards or into them. These results show that magnetic nanotubes can be used as a delivery vehicle for NGF and thus may be exploited in attempts to treat neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease with neurotrophins. Further neurite outgrowth can be controlled by manipulating magnetic nanotubes with external magnetic fields, thus helping in directed regeneration.

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the kidneys; Funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie der Nieren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzman, R.S.; Wittsack, H.J. [Universitaetsklinik Duesseldorf, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Notohamiprodjo, M. [Universitaetsklinik Tuebingen, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Interest in functional renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has significantly increased in recent years. This review article provides an overview of the most important functional imaging techniques and their potential clinical applications for assessment of native and transplanted kidneys, with special emphasis on the clarification of renal tumors. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle MRT der Nieren hat in den letzten Jahren zunehmend an Bedeutung gewonnen. In diesem Uebersichtsartikel werden die wichtigsten funktionellen Untersuchungstechniken vorgestellt und deren potenzielle klinische Bedeutung zur Evaluation von Nieren und Transplantatnieren hervorgehoben, wobei ein besonderes Augenmerk auf die Abklaerung von Nierentumoren gelegt wird. (orig.)

  14. Measuring and manipulating brain connectivity with resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Michael D.; Halko, Mark A.; Eldaief, Mark C.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    Both resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly popular techniques that can be used to non-invasively measure brain connectivity in human subjects. TMS shows additional promise as a method to manipulate brain connectivity. In this review we discuss how these two complimentary tools can be combined to optimally study brain connectivity and manipulate distributed brain networks. Important clinical applications include...

  15. "Chess-board pattern" spatial modulation of magnetization. Assessment of myocardial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C

    1992-01-01

    . Through spatial modulation of the magnetization the entire image can be labeled in different patterns. Two new pulse sequences are presented, giving a chess-board like spatial modulation. These pulse sequences have several advantages compared with the previously published methods, as the modulation time...... is half that required to obtain a 2-dimensional grid, the area in the image with high signal intensity was significantly larger, and the radiofrequency power deposition was substantially decreased. By labeling the heart at diastole the chess-board pattern tagging of the heart wall could be followed...

  16. Design and fabrication of magnetically functionalized flexible micropillar arrays for rapid and controllable microfluidic mixing

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, BingPu

    2015-03-25

    Magnetically functionalized PDMS-based micropillar arrays have been successfully designed, fabricated and implanted for controllable microfluidic mixing. The arrangement of PDMS micropillar arrays inside the microchannel can be flexibly controlled by an external magnetic field. As a consequence, the flow fields inside the microchannel can be regulated at will via magnetic activation conveniently. When a microchannel is implanted with such micropillar arrays, two microstreams can be mixed easily and controllably upon the simple application of an on/off magnetic signal. Mixing efficiencies based on micropillar arrays with different densities were investigated and compared. It was found that micropillar arrays with higher density (i.e. smaller pillar pitch) would render better mixing performance. Our microfluidic system is capable of generating highly reproducible results within many cycles of mixing/non-mixing conversion. We believe that the simple mixing-triggering method together with rapid and controllable mixing control will be extraordinarily valuable for various biological or chemical applications in the future. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  17. Feasibility study of large combined function magnets for the Jefferson lab 12 GeV upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Brindza, P D; Leung, E M; 10.1109/TASC.2005.849574

    2005-01-01

    The 12 GeV upgrade at Jefferson Lab has identified two new large spectrometers as Physics detectors for the project. The first is a 7.5 Gev/c 35 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a pair of identical Combined Function Superconducting Magnets (CFSM) that can simultaneously produce 1.5 T dipole fields and 4.5 T/m quadrupole fields inside a warm bore of 120cm. The second is an 11 GeV/c 2 m-sr. spectrometer that requires a CFSM that simultaneously produces a dipole field of 4.0 T and a quadruple field of 3.0 T/m in a 60 cm warm bore. Magnetic designs using TOSCA 3D have been performed to realize the magnetic requirements, provide 3d fields for optics analysis and produce field and force information for the engineering feasibility of the magnets. A two-sector cos( theta )/cos(2 theta ) design with a low nominal current density, warm bore and warm iron design has been selected and analyzed. These low current densities are consistent with the limits for a cryostable winding. The current paper will summarize the requir...

  18. Scaling Behavior of Structure Functions of the Longitudinal Magnetic Field in Active Regions on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramenko, V. I.; Yurchyshyn, V. B.; Wang, H.; Spirock, T. J.; Goode, P. R.

    2002-05-01

    In the framework of a refined Kolmogorov's hypotheses, the scaling behavior of the BZ--component of the photospheric magnetic field is analyzed and compared with flaring activity in solar active regions. We used SOHO/MDI, Huairou (China) and Big Bear measurements of the Bz-component in the photosphere for nine active regions. We show that there is no universal behavior in the scaling of the Bz-structure functions for different active regions. Scaling for a given active region is caused by intermittency in the field, ǎrepsilon(B)(ěc x), of magnetic energy dissipation. When intermittency is weak, the Bz-field behaves as a passive scalar in the turbulent flow and the energy dissipation is largely determined by the dissipation of kinetic energy in active regions with low flare productivity. However, when the field ǎrepsilon(B)(ěc x) is highly intermittent, the structure functions behave as transverse structure functions of a fully developed turbulent vector field and the scaling of the energy dissipation is mostly determined by the dissipation of the magnetic energy (active regions with strong flaring productivity). We found that the spectrum of dissipation of the Bz component is strongly related to the level of flare productivity of a solar active region. When the flare productivity is high, the corresponding spectrum is less steep. We also found that during the evolution of an NOAA AR 9393 the Bz dissipation spectrum becomes less steep as the active region's flare activity increases. We suggest that the relation between scaling exponents and flare productivity of an active region enables us to monitor and forecast flare activity using only measurements of the Bz component of the photospheric magnetic field. This work was supported in part by the Ukrainian Ministry of Science and Education, NSF-ATM (0076602 and 0086999) and NASA (9682 and 9738) grants. SOHO is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  20. A novel passive paradigm for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to localize brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasser, T.; Sandalcioglu, I.E.; Skwarek, V.; Gizewski, E.; Stolke, D.; Hans, V.

    2003-01-01

    The design of a shielded stimulation-device for electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves in the MRI-environment as passive fMRI-paradigm is content of this study. Especially the technical aspects and selection criteria of the stimulation-parameters are discussed. The clinical value for neurosurgical patients is outlined by supplying data from clinical studies, evaluating this novel paradigm. Thus neurosurgeons are supplied with superior information about functional anatomy, therefore being able to preserve functionally relevant brain-structures. (orig.) [de

  1. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain - a link between brain morphology and function, imaging of the functional status of the brain on a detailed anatomic background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenberger, J.; Seidl, Z.; Ruzicka, E.; Jech, R.; Krasensky, J.

    1998-01-01

    The basic principles of functional magnetic resonance imaging are outlined. The current status of knowledge and ideas for a future development are highlighted. The application fields of this technique include neurosurgery, neurology, psychiatry. The method also serves as a research tool, where it may prove helpful in solving problems of sleep disorder and the generation and perception of speech. A brief overview of the requirements and the necessary background is given for those wishing to start their own activity in this field

  2. Comparative studies of density-functional approximations for light atoms in strong magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Zhang, Liang; Trickey, S. B.

    2014-08-01

    For a wide range of magnetic fields, 0≤B≤2000 a.u., we present a systematic comparative study of the performance of different types of density-functional approximations in light atoms (2≤Z≤6). Local, generalized-gradient approximation (GGA; semilocal), and meta-GGA ground-state exchange-correlation (xc) functionals are compared on an equal footing with exact-exchange, Hartree-Fock (HF), and current-density-functional-theory (CDFT) approximations. Comparison also is made with published quantum Monte Carlo data. Though all approximations give qualitatively reasonable results, the exchange energies from local and GGA functionals are too negative for large B. Results from the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof ground-state GGA and Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) ground-state meta-GGA functionals are very close. Because of confinement, self-interaction error in such functionals is more severe at large B than at B =0, hence self-interaction correction is crucial. Exact exchange combined with the TPSS correlation functional results in a self-interaction-free (xc) functional, from which we obtain atomic energies of comparable accuracy to those from correlated wave-function methods. Specifically for the B and C atoms, we provide beyond-HF energies in a wide range of B fields. Fully self-consistent CDFT calculations were done with the Vignale-Rasolt-Geldart (VRG) functional in conjunction with the PW92 xc functional. Current effects turn out to be small, and the vorticity variable in the VRG functional diverges in some low-density regions. This part of the study suggests that nonlocal, self-interaction-free functionals may be better than local approximations as a starting point for CDFT functional construction and that some basic variable other than the vorticity could be helpful in making CDFT calculations practical.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of functional connectivity in Parkinson disease in the resting brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xian; Liu Bo; Luo Xiaodong; Li Ningna; Chen Zhiguang; Chen Jun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate functional connectivity changes in Parkinson disease in the resting brain using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Nine patients with Parkinson disease and eight age-matched healthy volunteers were entered into the study. The bilateral globus pallidus were chosen as seed points, the functional MR data acquired in the resting state were processed to investigate functional connectivity in PD patients and the results were compared with those of the controls. Results: In age-matched healthy controls, there are regions which had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus, including bilateral temporal poles, bilateral hippocampus, bilateral thalami, posterior cingulate cortex, right middle occipital gyms and right superior parietal gyms. In PD patients, brain regions including bilateral cerebellum, left hippocampus, bilateral superior temporal gyri, left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus, left inferior parietal gyrus and left superior parietal gyrus, had functional connectivity with bilateral globus pallidus. Compared to healthy controls, increased functional connectivity in bilateral cerebellum, bilateral temporal lobes, left frontal lobe and left parietal lobe, and decreased functional connectivity in bilateral thalami were observed in PD patients. Conclusion: Abnormal changes of brain functional connectivity exists in Parkinson's disease in the resting state. (authors)

  4. Are trinuclear superhalogens promising candidates for building blocks of novel magnetic materials? A theoretical prospect from combined broken-symmetry density functional theory and ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Li, Chen; Yin, Bing; Li, Jian-Li; Huang, Yuan-He; Wen, Zhen-Yi; Jiang, Zhen-Yi

    2013-08-07

    The structures, relative stabilities, vertical electron detachment energies, and magnetic properties of a series of trinuclear clusters are explored via combined broken-symmetry density functional theory and ab initio study. Several exchange-correlation functionals are utilized to investigate the effects of different halogen elements and central atoms on the properties of the clusters. These clusters are shown to possess stronger superhalogen properties than previously reported dinuclear superhalogens. The calculated exchange coupling constants indicate the antiferromagnetic coupling between the transition metal ions. Spin density analysis demonstrates the importance of spin delocalization in determining the strengths of various couplings. Spin frustration is shown to occur in some of the trinuclear superhalogens. The coexistence of strong superhalogen properties and spin frustration implies the possibility of trinuclear superhalogens working as the building block of new materials of novel magnetic properties.

  5. EDTA functionalized magnetic nanoparticle as a multifunctional adsorbent for Congo red dye from contaminated water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Jitendra Kumar; Rath, Juhi; Dash, Priyabrat; Sahoo, Harekrushna

    2017-05-01

    The present work reports the applicability of magnetite iron nanoparticles (Fe3O4) functionalized with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of Congo red (CR) dye from contaminated water. Magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) are prepared by chemical precipitation method in which Fe2+ and Fe3+ salt from aqueous solution were reacted in presence of ammonia solution. The surface of Fe3O4 nanoparticle was first coated with (3-aminopropyl) triethoxy silane (APTES) by a salinization reaction and then linked with EDTA via reaction between -NH2 and -COOH to form well dispersed surface functionalised biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles. The obtained EDTA functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are characterized in terms of their morphological, XRD, BET surface area analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The adsorption of CR on Fe3O4-APTES-EDTA nanocomposite corresponds well to the Langmuir model and the Freundlich model respectively. The adsorption processes for CR followed the pseudo-second-order model.

  6. Exact transfer functions for the PEP storage ring magnets and some general characteristics and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1982-05-01

    The exact, ion-optical transfer functions for the dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the PEP standard PODC cell are calculated for any single particle with initial coordinates (r, p, s). Modifications resulting from radiative energy loss are also calculated and discussed. These functions allow one to characterize individual magnets or classes of magnets by their aberrations and thereby simplify their study and correction. In contrast to high-energy spectrometers where aberrations are often analyzed away, those in storage rings drive series of high order resonances, even for perfect magnets (2), that can produce stop bands and other effects which can seriously limit performance. Thus, one would like to eliminate them altogether or failing this to develop local and global correction schemes. Even then, one should expect higher order effects to influence injection, extraction or single-pass systems either because of orbit distortions or overly large phase spece distortions such as may occur in low-beta insertions or any final-focus optics. The term exact means that the results here are based on solving the relativistic Lorentz force equation with accurate representations of measured magnetostatic fields. Such fields satisfy Maxwell's equations and are the actual fields seen by a particle as it propagates around a real storage ring. This is discussed in detail and illustrated with examples that show that this is possible, practical and may even be useful

  7. Succinate Functionalization of Hyperbranched Polyglycerol-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles as a Draw Solute During Forward Osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee-Man; Choi, Hye Min; Jang, Sung-Chan; Han, Myeong Jin; Seo, Bum-Kyoung; Moon, Jei-Kwon; Lee, Kune-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbranched polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SHPG-MNPs) were functionalized with succinate groups to form a draw solute for use in a forward osmosis (FO). After the one-step synthesis of hyperbranched polyglycerol-coated magnetic nanoparticles (HPG-MNPs), the polyglycerol groups on the surfaces of the HPG-MNPs were functionalized with succinic anhydride moieties. The resulting SHPG-MNPs showed no change of size and magnetic property compared with HPG-MNPs and displayed excellent dispersibility in water up to the concentration of 400 g/L. SHPG-MNPs solution showed higher osmotic pressure than that of HPG-MNPs solution due to the presence of surface carboxyl groups in SHPG-MNPs and could draw water from a feed solution across an FO membrane without any reverse draw solute leakage during FO process. Moreover, the water flux remained nearly constant over several SHPG-MNP darw solute regeneration cycles applied to the ultrafiltration (UF) process. The SHPG-MNPs demonstrate strong potential for use as a draw solute in FO processes.

  8. Collective magnetic behavior of biocompatible systems of maghemite particles coated with functional polymer shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demchenko, P.; Nedelko, N. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Mitina, N. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Lewińska, S.; Dłużewski, P. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Greneche, J.M. [Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283, Université du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans (France); Ubizskii, S.; Navrotskyi, S.; Zaichenko, A. [Lviv Polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera, Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Ślawska-Waniewska, A., E-mail: slaws@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    Three series of core–shell maghemite nanoparticles were prepared by a template synthesis using surface active oligoperoxides and further surface initiated grafting functional polymers, forming shell suitable for biomedical applications. Because the polymer shells prevent exchange coupling between maghemite particles, the overall magnetic properties of the samples studied are dominated by dipolar interparticle interactions. Only the sample with the highest polymer fraction displays superparamagnetic relaxation phenomena close to the room temperature. On cooling, the magnetostatic interactions lead to a disordered collective magnetic state that should be described in terms of a spin-glass phenomenology. This collective freezing cannot however be considered as a generic spin-glass phase transition at a well-defined temperature but rather as freezing to a metastable glass-like state of locally correlated structural domains (clusters) without a long-range order. A quasi static spin ordering is only achieved at temperatures much below the freezing temperature. - Highlights: • Core–shell γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/polymer particles were prepared using new surface active oligoperoxides. • Grafting of particle shells with functional polymers, suitable for biomedical applications. • Magnetic properties of nanocomposites are dominated by dipolar interactions. • On cooling magnetostatic interactions lead to a spin-glass-like state. • The most diluted maghemite particles display superparamagnetism at 300 K.

  9. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikayel, Dabaghyan; Iga, Muradyan; James, Butler; Eric, Frederick; Feng, Zhou; Angelos, Kyriazis; Charles, Hardin; Samuel, Patz; Mirko, Hrovat

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). PMID:24953556

  10. A portable single-sided magnet system for remote NMR measurements of pulmonary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Muradyan, Iga; Hrovat, Alan; Butler, James; Frederick, Eric; Zhou, Feng; Kyriazis, Angelos; Hardin, Charles; Patz, Samuel; Hrovat, Mirko

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we report initial results from a light-weight, low field magnetic resonance device designed to make relative pulmonary density measurements at the bedside. The development of this device necessarily involves special considerations for the magnet, RF and data acquisition schemes as well as a careful analysis of what is needed to provide useful information in the ICU. A homogeneous field region is created remotely from the surface of the magnet such that when the magnet is placed against the chest, an NMR signal is measured from a small volume in the lung. In order to achieve portability, one must trade off field strength and therefore spatial resolution. We report initial measurements from a ping-pong ball size region in the lung as a function of lung volume. As expected, we measured decreased signal at larger lung volumes since lung density decreases with increasing lung volume. Using a CPMG sequence with ΔTE=3.5 ms and a 20 echo train, a signal to noise ratio ~1100 was obtained from an 8.8mT planar magnet after signal averaging for 43 s. This is the first demonstration of NMR measurements made on a human lung with a light-weight planar NMR device. We argue that very low spatial resolution measurements of different lobar lung regions will provide useful diagnostic information for clinicians treating Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as clinicians want to avoid ventilator pressures that cause either lung over distension (too much pressure) or lung collapse (too little pressure). Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging mapping of the motor cortex in patients with cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.M.; Zerrin Yetkin, F.; Hammeke, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to map cerebral functions in patients with frontal or parietal tumors. Methods. Charts and images of patients with cerebral tumors or vascular malformations who underwent FMRI with an echo-planar technique were reviewed. The FMRI maps of motor (11 patients), tactile sensory (12 patients) and language tasks (4 patients) were obtained. The location of the FMRI activation and the positive responses to intraoperative cortical stimulation were compared. The reliability of the paradigms for mapping the rolandic cortex was evaluated. Results. Rolandic cortex was activated by tactile tasks in hall 12 patients and by motor tasks in 10 of 11 patients. Language tasks elicited activation in each of the four patients. Activation was obtained within edematous brain and adjacent to tumors. FMRI in three cases with intraoperative electro-cortical mapping results showed activation for a language, tactile, or motor task within the same gyrus in which stimulation elicited a related motor, sensory, or language function. In patients with >2 cm between the margin of the tumor, as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging, and the activation, no decline in motor function occurred from surgical resection. Conclusions. FMRI of tactile, motor, and language tasks is feasible in patients with cerebral tumors. FMRI shows promise as a means of determining the risk of a postoperative motor deficit from surgical resection of frontal or parietal tumors. (authors)

  12. Ring-averaged ion velocity distribution function probe for laboratory magnetized plasma experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Chen, Jinting; Lin, Chiahsuan; Lee, Zongmau

    2017-10-01

    Ring-averaged velocity distribution function of ions at a fixed guiding center position is a fundamental quantity in the gyrokinetic plasma physics. We have developed a diagnostic tool for the ring averaged velocity distribution function of ions for laboratory plasma experiments, which is named as the ring-averaged ion distribution function probe (RIDFP). The RIDFP is a set of ion collectors for different velocities. It is designed to be immersed in magnetized plasmas and achieves momentum selection of incoming ions by the selection of the ion Larmor radii. To nullify the influence of the sheath potential surrounding the RIDFP on the orbits of the incoming ions, the electrostatic potential of the RIDFP body is automatically adjusted to coincide with the space potential of the target plasma with the use of an emissive probe and a voltage follower. The developed RIDFP successfully measured the equilibrium ring-averaged velocity distribution function of a laboratory magnetized plasma, which was in accordance with the Maxwellian distribution having an ion temperature of 0.2 eV.

  13. Ring-averaged ion velocity distribution function probe for laboratory magnetized plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Chen, Jinting; Lin, Chiahsuan; Lee, Zongmau

    2017-10-01

    Ring-averaged velocity distribution function of ions at a fixed guiding center position is a fundamental quantity in the gyrokinetic plasma physics. We have developed a diagnostic tool for the ring averaged velocity distribution function of ions for laboratory plasma experiments, which is named as the ring-averaged ion distribution function probe (RIDFP). The RIDFP is a set of ion collectors for different velocities. It is designed to be immersed in magnetized plasmas and achieves momentum selection of incoming ions by the selection of the ion Larmor radii. To nullify the influence of the sheath potential surrounding the RIDFP on the orbits of the incoming ions, the electrostatic potential of the RIDFP body is automatically adjusted to coincide with the space potential of the target plasma with the use of an emissive probe and a voltage follower. The developed RIDFP successfully measured the equilibrium ring-averaged velocity distribution function of a laboratory magnetized plasma, which was in accordance with the Maxwellian distribution having an ion temperature of 0.2 eV.

  14. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  15. Ising model with conserved magnetization on the human connectome: Implications on the relation structure-function in wakefulness and anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramaglia, S.; Pellicoro, M.; Angelini, L.; Amico, E.; Aerts, H.; Cortés, J. M.; Laureys, S.; Marinazzo, D.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamical models implemented on the large scale architecture of the human brain may shed light on how a function arises from the underlying structure. This is the case notably for simple abstract models, such as the Ising model. We compare the spin correlations of the Ising model and the empirical functional brain correlations, both at the single link level and at the modular level, and show that their match increases at the modular level in anesthesia, in line with recent results and theories. Moreover, we show that at the peak of the specific heat (the critical state), the spin correlations are minimally shaped by the underlying structural network, explaining how the best match between the structure and function is obtained at the onset of criticality, as previously observed. These findings confirm that brain dynamics under anesthesia shows a departure from criticality and could open the way to novel perspectives when the conserved magnetization is interpreted in terms of a homeostatic principle imposed to neural activity.

  16. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  17. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  18. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  19. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  20. Cardiac Function After Multimodal Breast Cancer Therapy Assessed With Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Echocardiography Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heggemann, Felix, E-mail: felix.heggemann@umm.de [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Grotz, Hanna; Welzel, Grit [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Dösch, Christina [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Hansmann, Jan [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Attenberger, Ulrike; Schönberg, Stephan Oswald [German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, Martin [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Papavassiliu, Theano [First Medical Department, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Breast intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) reduces high-dose heart volumes but increases low-dose volumes. We prospectively assessed heart changes after 3D conformal RT (3DCRT) and IMRT for left-sided breast cancer. Heart dose was analyzed individually, 3DCRT patients were moderately exposed, and IMRT was performed only in patients with unacceptably high heart doses upon 3DCRT planning. Methods and Materials: In 49 patients (38 patients received 3DCRT; 11 patients received IMRT; and 20 patients received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography were performed before and at 6, 12, and 24 months after treatment. Results: Mean heart dose for IMRT was 12.9 ± 3.9 Gy versus 4.5 ± 2.4 Gy for 3DCRT. Heart volumes receiving >40 Gy were 2.6% (3DCRT) versus 1.3% (IMRT); doses were >50 Gy only with 3DCRT. Temporary ejection fraction (EF) decrease was observed on MRI after 6 months (63%-59%, P=.005) resolving at 24 months. Only 3 patients had pronounced largely transient changes of EF and left ventricular enddiastolic diameter (LVEDD). Mitral (M) and tricuspid (T) annular plane systolic excursion (MAPSE and TAPSE) were reduced over the whole cohort (still within normal range). After 24 months left ventricular remodeling index decreased in patients receiving chemotherapy (0.80 vs 0.70, P=.028). Neither wall motion abnormalities nor late enhancements were found. On echocardiography, in addition to EF findings that were similar to those on MRI, global strain was unchanged over the whole cohort at 24 months after a transient decrease at 6 and 12 months. Longitudinal strain decreased in the whole cohort after 24 months in some segments, whereas it increased in others. Conclusions: Until 24 months after risk-adapted modern multimodal adjuvant therapy, only subclinical cardiac changes were observed in both 3DCRT patients with inclusion of small to moderate amounts of heart volume in RT tangents and

  1. Neural Correlates of Symptom Dimensions in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Andrew R.; Akkal, Dalila; Almeida, Jorge R. C.; Mataix-Cols, David; Kalas, Catherine; Devlin, Bernie; Birmaher, Boris; Phillips, Mary L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of functional magnetic resonance imaging on a group of pediatric subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder reveals that this group has reduced activity in neural regions underlying emotional processing, cognitive processing, and motor performance as compared to control subjects.

  2. Effect of heroin use on changes of brain functions as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging, a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fareed, Ayman; Kim, Jungjin; Ketchen, Bethany; Kwak, Woo Jin; Wang, Danzhao; Shongo-Hiango, Hilaire; Drexler, Karen

    2017-01-01

    In this study the authors focus on reviewing imaging studies that used resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging for individuals with a history of heroin use. This review study compiled existing research addressing the effect of heroin use on decision making by reviewing available functional neuroimaging data. Systematic review of the literatures using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist. Eligible articles were retrieved through a computer-based MEDLINE and PsycINFO search from 1960 to December 2015 using the major medical subject headings "heroin, fMRI" (all fields). Only English language was included. Thirty-seven articles were initially included in the review. Sixteen were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. The results of 21 articles that met all the inclusion criteria were presented. Based on the 21 studies included in the current review, there is evidence that heroin use may have a direct and damaging effect on certain brain functions and that these changes may be associated with impulsive and unhealthy decision making. From the review of these studies, the authors understand that a longer duration of heroin use may be associated with more damaging effects on brain functions. The authors also understand that these brain changes could last long after abstinence, which may increase the risk of relapse to heroin use. More research is needed to create a biomarker map for patients with heroin use disorder that can be used to guide and assess response to treatment.

  3. SSC superconducting dipole magnet cryostat magnet cryostat model style B construction experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, N.H.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.A.; Gonczy, J.D.; Larson, E.T.; Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Sorenson, D.; Zink, R.

    1989-01-01

    A program to upgrade the full scale SSC dipole magnet cryostat model function and assembly methods has resulted in a series of dipole magnets designated as style B construction. New design features and assembly techniques have produced a magnet and cryostat assembly that is the basis for Phase I of the SSC dipole magnet industrialization program. Details of the assembly program, assembly experience, and comparison to previous assembly experiences are presented. Improvements in magnet assembly techniques are also evaluated. 6 refs., 5 figs

  4. Design of covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes filled with metal oxide nanoparticles for imaging, therapy, and magnetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaojie; Marangon, Iris; Melinte, Georgian; Wilhelm, Claire; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Pichon, Benoit P; Ersen, Ovidiu; Aubertin, Kelly; Baaziz, Walid; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence; Bégin, Dominique

    2014-11-25

    Nanocomposites combining multiple functionalities in one single nano-object hold great promise for biomedical applications. In this work, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were filled with ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) to develop the magnetic manipulation of the nanotubes and their theranostic applications. The challenges were both the filling of CNTs with a high amount of magnetic NPs and their functionalization to form biocompatible water suspensions. We propose here a filling process using CNTs as nanoreactors for high-yield in situ growth of ferrite NPs into the inner carbon cavity. At first, NPs were formed inside the nanotubes by thermal decomposition of an iron stearate precursor. A second filling step was then performed with iron or cobalt stearate precursors to enhance the encapsulation yield and block the formed NPs inside the tubes. Water suspensions were then obtained by addition of amino groups via the covalent functionalization of the external surface of the nanotubes. Microstructural and magnetic characterizations confirmed the confinement of NPs into the anisotropic structure of CNTs making them suitable for magnetic manipulations and MRI detection. Interactions of highly water-dispersible CNTs with tumor cells could be modulated by magnetic fields without toxicity, allowing control of their orientation within the cell and inducing submicron magnetic stirring. The magnetic properties were also used to quantify CNTs cellular uptake by measuring the cell magnetophoretic mobility. Finally, the photothermal ablation of tumor cells could be enhanced by magnetic stimulus, harnessing the hybrid properties of NP loaded-CNTs.

  5. Investigations of functional and structural changes in migraine with aura by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    MRI-BOLD activation can be determined using the proposed method, and c) visual responses to symmetric full-field visual stimulation are asymmetrically distributed between the cerebral hemispheres. We investigated the effects of migraine aura, by including 20 patients with frequent side-fixed visual aura attacks, i...... stimulation. By using this method we discovered a lateralized alteration of a visually driven functional network in patients with side-fixed aura. These findings suggest a hyperexcitability of the visual system in the interictal phase of migraine with visual aura. Further, this abnormal function...... technology to study these features of migraine with aura (MA) is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the potential not only to detect, but also to localize hypersensitive cortex. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the cortical responsivity of patients with MA during...

  6. Uncomplicated obesity is associated with abnormal aortic function assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Channon Keith M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims Obese subjects with insulin resistance and hypertension have abnormal aortic elastic function, which may predispose them to the development of left ventricular dysfunction. We hypothesised that obesity, uncomplicated by other cardiovascular risk factors, is independently associated with aortic function. Methods and results We used magnetic resonance imaging to measure aortic compliance, distensibility and stiffness index in 27 obese subjects (BMI 33 kg/m2 without insulin resistance and with normal cholesterol and blood pressure, and 12 controls (BMI 23 kg/m2. Obesity was associated with reduced aortic compliance (0.9 ± 0.1 vs. 1.5 ± 0.2 mm2/mmHg in controls, p -1 × 10-3, p Conclusion Aortic elastic function is abnormal in obese subjects without other cardiovascular risk factors. These findings highlight the independent importance of obesity in the development of cardiovascular disease.

  7. Spin and orbital magnetism of coinage metal trimers (Cu3, Ag3, Au3: A relativistic density functional theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Afshar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated electronic structure and magnetic properties of Cu3, Ag3 and Au3 trimers using a full potential local orbital method in the framework of relativistic density functional theory. We have also shown that the non-relativistic generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional gives reliable magnetic properties in coinage metal trimers compared to experiment. In addition we have indicated that the spin-orbit coupling changes the structure and magnetic properties of gold trimer while the structure and magnetic properties of copper and silver trimers are marginally affected. A significant orbital moment of 0.21μB was found for most stable geometry of the gold trimer whereas orbital magnetism is almost quenched in the copper and silver trimers.

  8. Task-evoked brain functional magnetic susceptibility mapping by independent component analysis (χICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, independent component analysis (ICA) is performed on an fMRI magnitude dataset to analyze brain functional mapping (AICA). By solving the inverse problem of fMRI, we can reconstruct the brain magnetic susceptibility (χ) functional states. Upon the reconstructed χ dataspace, we propose an ICA-based brain functional χ mapping method (χICA) to extract task-evoked brain functional map. A complex division algorithm is applied to a timeseries of fMRI phase images to extract temporal phase changes (relative to an OFF-state snapshot). A computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) model is used to reconstruct a 4D brain χ response dataset. χICA is implemented by applying a spatial InfoMax ICA algorithm to the reconstructed 4D χ dataspace. With finger-tapping experiments on a 7T system, the χICA-extracted χ-depicted functional map is similar to the SPM-inferred functional χ map by a spatial correlation of 0.67 ± 0.05. In comparison, the AICA-extracted magnitude-depicted map is correlated with the SPM magnitude map by 0.81 ± 0.05. The understanding of the inferiority of χICA to AICA for task-evoked functional map is an ongoing research topic. For task-evoked brain functional mapping, we compare the data-driven ICA method with the task-correlated SPM method. In particular, we compare χICA with AICA for extracting task-correlated timecourses and functional maps. χICA can extract a χ-depicted task-evoked brain functional map from a reconstructed χ dataspace without the knowledge about brain hemodynamic responses. The χICA-extracted brain functional χ map reveals a bidirectional BOLD response pattern that is unavailable (or different) from AICA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrinsic functional brain mapping in reconstructed 4D magnetic susceptibility (χ) data space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-02-15

    By solving an inverse problem of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for a dynamic fMRI study, we reconstruct a 4D magnetic susceptibility source (χ) data space for intrinsic functional mapping. A 4D phase dataset is calculated from a 4D complex fMRI dataset. The background field and phase wrapping effect are removed by a Laplacian technique. A 3D χ source map is reconstructed from a 3D phase image by a computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) scheme. A 4D χ data space is reconstructed by repeating the 3D χ source reconstruction for each time point. A functional map is calculated by a temporal correlation between voxel signals in the 4D χ space and the timecourse of the task paradigm. With a finger-tapping experiment, we obtain two 3D functional mappings in the 4D magnitude data space and in the reconstructed 4D χ data space. We find that the χ-based functional mapping reveals co-occurrence of bidirectional responses in a 3D activation map that is different from the conventional magnitude-based mapping. The χ-based functional mapping can also be achieved by a 3D deconvolution of a phase activation map. Based on a subject experimental comparison, we show that the 4D χ tomography method could produce a similar χ activation map as obtained by the 3D deconvolution method. By removing the dipole effect and other fMRI technological contaminations, 4D χ tomography provides a 4D χ data space that allows a more direct and truthful functional mapping of a brain activity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Love-related changes in the brain: A resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen eSong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Studies with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI have found activation increases in brain regions involved in processing of reward, emotion, motivation when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known on whether romantic love affects the brain’s functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC across a lover group (LG, N=34, currently intensely in love, ended-love group (ELG, N=34, romantic relationship ended recently, and single group (SG, N=32, never fallen in love.The results showed that:1 ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG; 2 ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; 3 functional connectivity (FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala and nucleus accumbens and the social cognition network (temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC, inferior parietal, precuneus and temporal lobe was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG; 4 in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the love duration in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations of brain functional architecture. The results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the possibility of applying a resting state approach for investigating romantic love.

  11. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. I. The kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide. In Europe alone, at least 8% of the population currently has some degree of CKD. CKD is associated with serious comorbidity, reduced life expectancy, and high economic costs; hence, the early detection and adequate treatment of kidney disease is important. Pre-clinical research can not only give insights into the mechanisms of the various kidney diseases but it also allows for investigating the outcome of new drugs developed to treat kidney disease. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive access to tissue and organ function in animal models. Advantages over classical animal research approaches are numerous: the same animal might be repeatedly imaged to investigate a progress or a treatment of disease over time. This has also a direct impact on animal welfare and the refinement of classical animal experiments as the number of animals in the studies might be reduced. In this paper, we review current state of the art in functional magnetic resonance imaging with a focus on pre-clinical kidney imaging.

  12. Functional magnetic stimulation using a parabolic coil for dysphagia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Ryo; Abo, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shu; Kakuda, Wataru; Yamada, Naoki; Mochio, Kenjiro

    2014-10-01

    Recently, the usefulness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for poststroke dysphagia has been reported. However, there is no report that describes the effectiveness of functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) for dysphagia. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effectiveness of FMS for poststroke dysphagia. Twenty poststroke dysphagic patients (age at treatment: 51-80 years; interval between onset of stroke and treatment: 6 to 36 months) were randomly assigned to a real group or a sham group. In the real group, FMS of 30 Hz was applied for suprahyoid muscles in a 20-sec train using a parabolic coil for 10 min (total 1200 pulses). In the sham group, sham stimulation was applied for 10 min at the same site. Swallowing function was evaluated by the timed water swallow test, interswallow interval (ISI), swallowing volume velocity (speed), and volume per swallow (capacity) were measured before and after stimulation. All patients completed the stimulation and none showed any adverse reactions throughout the stimulation. The improvement of speed and capacity of swallowing after stimulation was significantly larger in the real group compared with the sham group (all p < 0.05). However, no significant difference in the ISI was found between the groups. FMS using a parabolic coil can potentially improve swallowing function in poststroke dysphagic patients. © 2013 International Neuromodulation Society.

  13. Pre-clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging. Pt. I. The kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoellner, Frank G.; Kalayciyan, Raffi; Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Zimmer, Fabian; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2014-07-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasing worldwide. In Europe alone, at least 8% of the population currently has some degree of CKD. CKD is associated with serious comorbidity, reduced life expectancy, and high economic costs; hence, the early detection and adequate treatment of kidney disease is important. Pre-clinical research can not only give insights into the mechanisms of the various kidney diseases but it also allows for investigating the outcome of new drugs developed to treat kidney disease. Functional magnetic resonance imaging provides non-invasive access to tissue and organ function in animal models. Advantages over classical animal research approaches are numerous: the same animal might be repeatedly imaged to investigate a progress or a treatment of disease over time. This has also a direct impact on animal welfare and the refinement of classical animal experiments as the number of animals in the studies might be reduced. In this paper, we review current state of the art in functional magnetic resonance imaging with a focus on pre-clinical kidney imaging.

  14. Magnetically responsive ordered mesoporous materials: A burgeoning family of functional composite nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yonghui; Cai, Yue; Sun, Zhenkun; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2011-06-01

    Magnetic mesoporous materials, as a family of novel functional nanomaterials, have attracted increasing attention due to their unique properties. Much work has been done to synthesize these materials and to explore applications in various fields, such as catalysis, separation, hyperthermia, drug delivery, and MR imaging. This Letter reviews the synthesis approaches, which can be grouped into three categories, i.e. sol-gel coating, post-loading, and nanocasting approaches. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of the design principles, synthesis strategies and the properties-applications relationship of the mesoporous materials.

  15. Interaction of electromagnetic radiation with magnetically functionalized CNT nanocomposite in the subterahertz frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atdaev, A.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Labunov, V. A.; Prischepa, S. L., E-mail: prischepa@bsuir.by [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Pavlov, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Nanotechnologies (Russian Federation); Basaev, A. S.; Shaman, Yu. P. [SMC Technological Center (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation with a magnetically functionalized nanocomposite based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is considered using the model of random distribution of ferromagnetic nanoparticles in the carbon matrix characterized by the presence of resistive–inductive–capacitive coupling (contours). The model is based on the representation of the nanocomposite as a system consisting of the CNT matrix, ferromagnetic nanoparticles, and the interfaces between CNTs and nanoparticles. The wide range of possible resonant phenomena caused both by the presence of contours and the properties of the CNT nanocomposite is shown.

  16. Topology in SU(2) lattice gauge theory and parallelization of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solbrig, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, I discuss topological properties of quenched SU(2) lattice gauge fields. In particular, clusters of topological charge density exhibit a power-law. The exponent of that power-law can be used to validate models for lattice gauge fields. Instead of working with fixed cutoffs of the topological charge density, using the notion of a ''watermark'' is more convenient. Furthermore, I discuss how a parallel computer, originally designed for lattice gauge field simulations, can be used for functional magnetic resonance imaging. Multi parameter fits can be parallelized to achieve almost real-time evaluation of fMRI data. (orig.)

  17. Topology in SU(2) lattice gauge theory and parallelization of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, I discuss topological properties of quenched SU(2) lattice gauge fields. In particular, clusters of topological charge density exhibit a power-law. The exponent of that power-law can be used to validate models for lattice gauge fields. Instead of working with fixed cutoffs of the topological charge density, using the notion of a ''watermark'' is more convenient. Furthermore, I discuss how a parallel computer, originally designed for lattice gauge field simulations, can be used for functional magnetic resonance imaging. Multi parameter fits can be parallelized to achieve almost real-time evaluation of fMRI data. (orig.)

  18. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Language Mapping in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a noninvasive technique that is increasingly used to understand the cerebral cortical networks and organizations. In this paper, we describe the role of fMRI for mapping language networks in the presurgical workup of patients with medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Studies comparing fMRI with the intracarotid sodium amobarbital (Wada test and fMRI with intraoperative cortical stimulation mapping for language lateralization and/or localization in medically intractable TLE are discussed.

  19. The QED vacuum polarization function at four loops and the anomalous magnetic moment at five loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikov, P.

    2013-07-01

    The anomalous moment of the muon is one of the most fundamental observables. It has been measured experimentally with a very high precision and on theory side the contributions from perturbative QED have been calculated up to five-loop level by numerical methods. Contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from certain diagram classes are also accessible by alternative methods. In this paper we present the evaluation of contributions to the QCD corrections due to insertions of the vacuum polarization function at five-loop level.

  20. Functional magnetic nanoshells integrated nanosensor for trace analysis of environmental uranium contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Reshmi [Nanobioengineering/Bioelectronics Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Katsenovich, Yelena; Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Senn, Mark [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, TX (United States); Naja, Melodie [Everglades Foundation, 18001 Old Cutler Road, Palmetto Bay, FL 33157 (United States); Balsamo, Vittoria [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Valle de Sartenejas, Baruta 1080, Edo. Miranda, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Pannell, Keith H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at El Paso, TX (United States); Li Chenzhong, E-mail: licz@fiu.ed [Nanobioengineering/Bioelectronics Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

    2010-11-30

    Transuranic radionuclides such as uranium tend to be a pervasive environmental contaminant. It is absorbed through the intestine or a lung, deposited in the tissues, predominantly kidney and bone, and is carcinogenic. A novel nanosensor system has been developed for voltammetric tracing of environmental uranium contamination. The sensor consists of an organophosphorous ligand, (t-butylphenyl)-N,N-di-(isobutyl) carbamoylmethylphosphineoxide (CMPO) functionalized superparamagnetic core-shell magnetic nanoparticles and magnet based electrodes. It exploits the natural affinity of uranium for phosphate molecules to fabricate a highly specific and reproducible sensor. The small dimension along with a dramatically increased contact surface has lead to a faster response and higher sensitivity. The system uses an external magnetic field gradient for preconcentration and removal of the analyte from the surrounding aqueous media. The redox properties of the analyte are exploited for enumeration of variables by electrochemical techniques such as square wave voltammetry. The detection limit of the system is observed to be in parts-per-billion (ppb) of the uranyl concentration.

  1. High-capacity adsorption of dissolved hexavalent chromium using amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen; Gao, Baoyu; Zhang, Tengge; Xu, Xing; Huang, Xin; Yu, Huan; Yue, Qinyan

    2015-08-01

    Easily separable amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites (AF-MCS) were employed for effective adsorption and reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to nontoxic Cr(III). The saturated magnetization of AF-MCS reached 6.2emu/g, and as a result, it could be separated from aqueous solution by a magnetic process for its superparamagnetism. The studies of various factors influencing the sorption behavior indicated that the optimum AF-MCS dosage for Cr(VI) adsorption was 1g/L, and the maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 3.0. The chromium adsorption perfectly fitted the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model. Furthermore, characterization of AF-MCS was investigated by means of XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, BET, VSM and XPS analysis to discuss the uptake mechanism. Basically, these results demonstrated that AF-MCS prepared in this work has shown its merit in effective removal of Cr(VI) and rapid separation from effluents simultaneously. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Methionine-mediated synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles and functionalization with gold quantum dots for theranostic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arūnas Jagminas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatible superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs through smart chemical functionalization of their surface with fluorescent species, therapeutic proteins, antibiotics, and aptamers offer remarkable potential for diagnosis and therapy of disease sites at their initial stage of growth. Such NPs can be obtained by the creation of proper linkers between magnetic NP and fluorescent or drug probes. One of these linkers is gold, because it is chemically stable, nontoxic and capable to link various biomolecules. In this study, we present a way for a simple and reliable decoration the surface of magnetic NPs with gold quantum dots (QDs containing more than 13.5% of Au+. Emphasis is put on the synthesis of magnetic NPs by co-precipitation using the amino acid methionine as NP growth-stabilizing agent capable to later reduce and attach gold species. The surface of these NPs can be further conjugated with targeting and chemotherapy agents, such as cancer stem cell-related antibodies and the anticancer drug doxorubicin, for early detection and improved treatment. In order to verify our findings, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, FTIR spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS of as-formed CoFe2O4 NPs before and after decoration with gold QDs were applied.

  3. Effective heavy metal removal from aqueous systems by thiol functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guoliang; Zhao Zongshan; Liu Jiyan; Jiang Guibin

    2011-01-01

    A thiol-functionalized magnetic mesoporous silica material (called SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 ), synthesized by a modified Stoeber method, has been investigated as a convenient and effective adsorbent for heavy metal ions. Structural characterization by powder X-ray diffraction, N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherm, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analyses confirms the mesoporous structure and the organic moiety content of this adsorbent. The high saturation magnetization (38.4 emu/g) make it easier and faster to be separated from water under a moderate magnetic field. Adsorption kinetics was elucidated by pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and exhibited 3-stage intraparticle diffusion mode. Adsorption isotherms of Hg and Pb fitted well with Langmuir model, exhibiting high adsorption capacity of 260 and 91.5 mg of metal/g of adsorbent, respectively. The distribution coefficients of the tested metal ions between SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 and different natural water sources (groundwater, lake water, tap water and river water) were above the level of 10 5 mL/g. The material was very stable in different water matrices, even in strong acid and alkaline solutions. Metal-loaded SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 was able to regenerate in acid solution under ultrasonication. This novel SH-mSi-Fe 3 O 4 is suitable for repeated use in heavy metal removal from different water matrices.

  4. Real-space investigation of short-range magnetic correlations in fluoride pyrochlores NaCaCo2F7 and NaSrCo2F7 with magnetic pair distribution function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Ross, Kate A.; Krizan, Jason W.; Nilsen, Gøran J.; Wildes, Andrew R.; Cava, Robert J.; Birgeneau, Robert J.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2017-12-01

    We present time-of-flight neutron total scattering and polarized neutron scattering measurements of the magnetically frustrated compounds NaCaCo2F7 and NaSrCo2F7 , which belong to a class of recently discovered pyrochlore compounds based on transition metals and fluorine. The magnetic pair distribution function (mPDF) technique is used to analyze and model the total scattering data in real space. We find that a previously proposed model of short-range XY-like correlations with a length scale of 10-15 Å, combined with nearest-neighbor collinear antiferromagnetic correlations, accurately describes the mPDF data at low temperature, confirming the magnetic ground state in these materials. This model is further verified by the polarized neutron scattering data. From an analysis of the temperature dependence of the mPDF and polarized neutron scattering data, we find that short-range correlations persist on the nearest-neighbor length scale up to 200 K, approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the spin freezing temperatures of these compounds. These results highlight the opportunity presented by these new pyrochlore compounds to study the effects of geometric frustration at relatively high temperatures, while also advancing the mPDF technique and providing an opportunity to investigate a genuinely short-range-ordered magnetic ground state directly in real space.

  5. Application of Tsallis functions for analysis of line shapes in electron magnetic resonance spectra of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksharov, Yu. A.

    2015-10-01

    An effective electron magnetic resonance study of nanoparticles requires, in addition to an adequate theory (which is absent nowadays), standard spectral characteristics making it possible to compare the spectra. For characterizing the electron magnetic resonance spectra of magnetic nanoparticles, it has been proposed to use the decomposition of the spectra using the parameters of Tsallis distributions (lines with smoothly varying shapes). This method has been tested on a two-component spectrum of colloidal magnetite nanoparticles and on poorly resolved broad spectra of iron-containing nanoparticles stabilized on microgranules.

  6. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  8. Measurement of human advanced brain function in calculation processing using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashida, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Syuichi; Wu, Jing-Long

    2001-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated the activated areas of the human brain related with calculation processing as an advanced function of the human brain. Furthermore, we investigated differences in activation between visual and auditory calculation processing. The eight subjects (all healthy men) were examined on a clinical MR unit (1.5 tesla) with a gradient echo-type EPI sequence. SPM99 software was used for data processing. Arithmetic problems were used for the visual stimulus (visual image) as well as for the auditory stimulus (audible voice). The stimuli were presented to the subjects as follows: no stimulation, presentation of random figures, and presentation of arithmetic problems. Activated areas of the human brain related with calculation processing were the inferior parietal lobule, middle frontal gyrus, and inferior frontal gyrus. Comparing the arithmetic problems with the presentation of random figures, we found that the activated areas of the human brain were not differently affected by visual and auditory systems. The areas activated in the visual and auditory experiments were observed at nearly the same place in the brain. It is possible to study advanced functions of the human brain such as calculation processing in a general clinical hospital when adequate tasks and methods of presentation are used. (author)

  9. Neural Correlates of Sevoflurane-induced Unconsciousness Identified by Simultaneous Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranft, Andreas; Golkowski, Daniel; Kiel, Tobias; Riedl, Valentin; Kohl, Philipp; Rohrer, Guido; Pientka, Joachim; Berger, Sebastian; Thul, Alexander; Maurer, Max; Preibisch, Christine; Zimmer, Claus; Mashour, George A; Kochs, Eberhard F; Jordan, Denis; Ilg, Rüdiger

    2016-11-01

    The neural correlates of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness have yet to be fully elucidated. Sedative and anesthetic states induced by propofol have been studied extensively, consistently revealing a decrease of frontoparietal and thalamocortical connectivity. There is, however, less understanding of the effects of halogenated ethers on functional brain networks. The authors recorded simultaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography in 16 artificially ventilated volunteers during sevoflurane anesthesia at burst suppression and 3 and 2 vol% steady-state concentrations for 700 s each to assess functional connectivity changes compared to wakefulness. Electroencephalographic data were analyzed using symbolic transfer entropy (surrogate of information transfer) and permutation entropy (surrogate of cortical information processing). Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed by an independent component analysis and a region-of-interest-based analysis. Electroencephalographic analysis showed a significant reduction of anterior-to-posterior symbolic transfer entropy and global permutation entropy. At 2 vol% sevoflurane concentrations, frontal and thalamic networks identified by independent component analysis showed significantly reduced within-network connectivity. Primary sensory networks did not show a significant change. At burst suppression, all cortical networks showed significantly reduced functional connectivity. Region-of-interest-based thalamic connectivity at 2 vol% was significantly reduced to frontoparietal and posterior cingulate cortices but not to sensory areas. Sevoflurane decreased frontal and thalamocortical connectivity. The changes in blood oxygenation level dependent connectivity were consistent with reduced anterior-to-posterior directed connectivity and reduced cortical information processing. These data advance the understanding of sevoflurane-induced unconsciousness and contribute to a

  10. Evaluation of cerebral blood flow, cerebral metabolism and cerebral function by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro; Umeda, Masahiro; Naruse, Shoji; Horikawa, Yoshiharu; Ueda, Satoshi; Furuya, Seiichi.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic resonance (MR) method has the unique potentiality of detecting cerebral metabolites, cerebral blood flow and brain functions in a noninvasive fashion. We have developed several MR techniques to detect these cerebral parameters with the use of clinical MRI scanners. By modifying the MR spectroscopy (MRS) technique, both 31 P- and 1 H-MRS data can be obtained from multiple, localized regions (multi-voxel method) of the brain, and the distribution of each metabolite in the brain can be readily visualized by metabolite mapping. The use of diffusion weighted images (DWI) permits visualization of the anisotropy of water diffusion in white matter, and based on the difference of diffusion coefficiency, the differential diagnosis between epidermoid tumor and arachnoid cyst can be made. By employing dynamic-MRI (Dyn-MRI) with Gd-DTPA administration, it is possible to examine the difference in blood circulation between brain tumor tissue and normal tissue, as well as among different types of brain tumors. By using magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging, it has become possible to detect brain tumors, and with a small dose of Gd-DTPA, to visualize the vascular system. Functional MRI (fMRI) visualizes the activated brain by using conventional gradient echo technique on conventional MRI scanners. This method has the unique characteristic of detecting a brain function with high spatial and temporal resolution by using the intrinsic substance. Moreover, the localization of motor and sensory areas was detected by noninvasive means within few minutes. The fMRI procedure will be used in the future to analyze the higher and complex brain functions. In conclusion, multi-modality MR is a powerful technique that is useful for investigating the pathogenesis of many diseases, and provides a noninvasive analytic modality for studying brain function. (author)

  11. H-1 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Metabolomics Analysis Identifies Novel Urinary Biomarkers for Lung Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCClay, Joseph L.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Isern, Nancy G.; O' Connell, Thomas M.; Wooten, Jan B.; Zedler, Barbara K.; Dasika, Madhukar S.; Webb, B. T.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Murrelle, Edward L.; Leppert, Mark F.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2010-06-04

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), characterized by chronic airflow limitation, is a serious and growing public health concern. The major environmental risk factor for COPD is tobacco smoking, but the biological mechanisms underlying COPD are not well understood. In this study, we used proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy to identify and quantify metabolites associated with lung function in COPD. Plasma and urine were collected from 197 adults with COPD and from 195 adults without COPD. Samples were assayed using a 600 MHz NMR spectrometer, and the resulting spectra were analyzed against quantitative spirometric measures of lung function. After correcting for false discoveries and adjusting for covariates (sex, age, smoking) several spectral regions in urine were found to be significantly associated with baseline lung function. These regions correspond to the metabolites trigonelline, hippurate and formate. Concentrations of each metabolite, standardized to urinary creatinine, were associated with baseline lung function (minimum p-value = 0.0002 for trigonelline). No significant associations were found with plasma metabolites. Two of the three urinary metabolites positively associated with baseline lung function, i.e. hippurate and formate, are often related to gut microflora. This suggests that the microbiome composition is variable between individuals with different lung function. Alternatively, the nature and origins of all three associated metabolites may reflect lifestyle differences affecting overall health. Our results will require replication and validation, but demonstrate the utility of NMR metabolomics as a screening tool for identifying novel biomarkers of lung disease or disease risk.

  12. Does polycystic ovary syndrome affect cognition? A functional magnetic resonance imaging study exploring working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleman, Remi S; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Veltman, Dick J; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Hompes, Peter G A; Drent, Madeleine L; Lambalk, Cornelis B

    2016-05-01

    To study effects of overexposure to androgens and subsequent antiandrogenic treatment on brain activity during working memory processes in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). In this longitudinal study, working memory function was evaluated with the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in women with PCOS before and after antiandrogenic treatment. Department of reproductive medicine, university medical center. Fourteen women with PCOS and with hyperandrogenism and 20 healthy control women without any features of PCOS or other hormonal disorders. Antiandrogenic hormone treatment. Functional MRI response during a working memory task. At baseline women with PCOS showed more activation than the control group within the right superior parietal lobe and the inferior parietal lobe during task (all memory conditions). Task performance (speed and accuracy) did not differ between the groups. After antiandrogenic treatment the difference in overall brain activity between the groups disappeared and accuracy in the high memory load condition of the working memory task increased in women with PCOS. Women with PCOS may need additional neural resources during a working memory task compared with women without PCOS, suggesting less efficient executive functioning. This inefficiency may have effects on daily life functioning of women with PCOS. Antiandrogenic treatment appears to have a beneficial effect on this area of cognitive functioning. NTR2493. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of regional abdominal muscle function in elite AFL players with and without low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hides, Julie; Hughes, Brita; Stanton, Warren

    2011-06-01

    Changes in the motor control of trunk muscles have been identified in people with low back pain (LBP) including elite football players. Previous research has found functional differences in the anatomical regions of abdominal muscles; however, this has not been examined in football players with LBP. The aim of this study was to investigate if the ability to draw-in the abdominal wall is altered among football players with LBP, and to determine if there are functional differences between the middle and lower abdominal regions in participants with and without LBP. Forty-three elite Australian Football League players were imaged using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as they drew in their abdominal walls, and the trunk cross-sectional area (CSA) was measured in relaxed and contracted states. At the lower region, participants with LBP (1.1%) reduced their trunk CSA to a lesser extent than those without LBP (3.2%) (P = 0.018). The results also showed that the draw-in of the abdominal wall was smaller in Region 1 (8.8%) compared to Region 2 (16.0%) and Region 3 (19.7%) (P < 0.001). This study provides evidence of regional differences in motor control and altered control of the lower region in participants with LBP. This may direct physiotherapists, especially those treating athletes, to focus on the lower abdominal region in those with LBP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functional Classification of the Gut Microbiota: The Key to Cracking the Microbiota Composition Code: Functional classifications of the gut microbiota reveal previously hidden contributions of indigenous gut bacteria to human health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Connor E; Palm, Noah W

    2017-12-01

    The last decade has seen an explosion of research on the gut microbiota-the trillions of microorganisms that colonize the human gut. It is now clear that interindividual diversity in microbiota composition plays an important role in determining susceptibility to a wide variety of diseases. However, identifying the precise changes in microbiota composition that play causal roles has remained a largely unrealized goal. Here, we propose that functional classifications of microbes based on their interactions with and effects on the host-particularly the host immune system-will illuminate the role of the microbiota in shaping human physiology. We outline the benefits of "functional" classification compared to phylogenetic classifications, and review current efforts at functional classification of the microbiota. Finally, we outline a theoretical framework for classifying host-microbiota interactions. Future advances enabling broader functional classifications of the microbiota promise to revolutionize our understanding of the role of gut microbes in health and disease. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Towards The Generation of Functionalized Magnetic Nanowires to Target Leukemic Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alsharif, Nouf

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanowires (NWs) have been widely used for their therapeutic potential in biomedical applications. The use of iron (Fe) NWs combines two important properties, biocompatibility and remote manipulation by magnetic fields. In addition the NWs can be coated and functionalized to target cells of interest and, upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field, have been shown to induce cell death on several types of adherent cells, including several cancer cell types. For suspension cells, however, using these NWs has been much less effective primarily due to the free-floating nature of the cells minimizing the interaction between them and the NWs. Leukemic cells express higher levels of the cell surface marker CD44 (Braumüller, Gansauge, Ramadani, & Gansauge, 2000), compared to normal blood cells. The goal of this study was to functionalize Fe NWs with a specific monoclonal antibody towards CD44 in order to target leukemic cells (HL-60 cells). This approach is expected to increase the probability of a specific binding to occur between HL-60 cells and Fe NWs. Fe NWs were fabricated with an average diameter of 30-40 nm and a length around 3-4 μm. Then, they were coated with both 3-Aminopropyl-triethoxysilane and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to conjugate them with an anti-CD44 antibody (i.e. anti-CD44-iron NWs). The antibody interacts with the amine group in the BSA via the 1-Ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling. The NWs functionalization was confirmed using a number of approaches including: infrared spectroscopy, Nanodrop to measure the concentration of CD44 antibody, as well as fluorescent-labeled secondary antibody staining to detect the primary CD44 antibody. To confirm that the anti-CD44-iron NWs and bare Fe NWs, in the absence of a magnetic field, were not toxic to HL-60 cells, cytotoxicity assays using XTT (2,3-Bis-2-Methoxy-4-Nitro-5-Sulfophenyl-2H-Tetrazolium-5-Carboxanilide) were performed and

  16. Repetitive magnetic stimulation improves retinal function in a rat model of retinal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenstreich, Ygal; Tzameret, Adi; Levi, Nir; Kalish, Sapir; Sher, Ifat; Zangen, Avraham; Belkin, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Vision incapacitation and blindness associated with retinal dystrophies affect millions of people worldwide. Retinal degeneration is characterized by photoreceptor cell death and concomitant remodeling of remaining retinal cells. Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation (RMS) is a non-invasive technique that creates alternating magnetic fields by brief electric currents transmitted through an insulated coil. These magnetic field generate action potentials in neurons, and modulate the expression of neurotransmitter receptors, growth factors and transcription factors which mediate plasticity. This technology has been proven effective and safe in various psychiatric disorders. Here we determined the effect of RMS on retinal function in Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, a model for retinal dystrophy. Four week-old RCS and control Spargue Dawley (SD) rats received sham or RMS treatment over the right eye (12 sessions on 4 weeks). RMS treatment at intensity of at 40% of the maximal output of a Rapid2 stimulator significantly increased the electroretinogram (ERG) b-wave responses by up to 6- or 10-fold in the left and right eye respectively, 3-5 weeks following end of treatment. RMS treatment at intensity of 25% of the maximal output did not significant effect b-wave responses following end of treatment with no adverse effect on ERG response or retinal structure of SD rats. Our findings suggest that RMS treatment induces delayed improvement of retinal functions and may induce plasticity in the retinal tissue. Furthermore, this non-invasive treatment may possibly be used in the future as a primary or adjuvant treatment for retinal dystrophy.

  17. Recent developments in optimal experimental designs for functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ming-Hung; Temkit, M'hamed; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-07-28

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the leading brain mapping technologies for studying brain activity in response to mental stimuli. For neuroimaging studies utilizing this pioneering technology, there is a great demand of high-quality experimental designs that help to collect informative data to make precise and valid inference about brain functions. This paper provides a survey on recent developments in experimental designs for fMRI studies. We briefly introduce some analytical and computational tools for obtaining good designs based on a specified design selection criterion. Research results about some commonly considered designs such as blocked designs, and m-sequences are also discussed. Moreover, we present a recently proposed new type of fMRI designs that can be constructed using a certain type of Hadamard matrices. Under certain assumptions, these designs can be shown to be statistically optimal. Some future research directions in design of fMRI experiments are also discussed.

  18. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  19. A comparison of functional electrical and magnetic stimulation for propelled cycling of paretic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szecsi, Johann; Schiller, Martin; Straube, Andreas; Gerling, Dieter

    2009-04-01

    To compare isometric torque and cycling power, smoothness and symmetry using repetitive functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) and functional electrical stimulation (FES) in patients with paretic legs with preserved sensibility and in patients without sensibility. Repeated-measures design. Laboratory setting. Eleven subjects with complete spinal cord injury (SCI) and 29 subjects with chronic hemiparesis (16.6+/-5.5mo poststroke) volunteered. Using a tricycle testbed, participants were exposed to isometric measurements and ergometric cycling experiments, performed during both 20Hz FMS and FES stimulation. Subjects with hemiparesis and with complete SCI were stimulated at maximally tolerable level and maximal intensity, respectively. Maximal isometric pedaling torque and mean ergometric power, smoothness, and symmetry were recorded for voluntary, FES, and FMS conditions. Two different patterns of the efficacy of FMS were identified. (1) Patients with complete SCI did not benefit (less torque and power was evoked with FMS than with FES, Psensibility could improve their torque output (Psensibility.

  20. Magnetically induced behaviour of ferritin corpuscles in avian ears: can cuticulosomes function as magnetosomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandacka, Petr; Burda, Hynek; Pistora, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoreception is an enigmatic, poorly understood sensory ability, described mainly on the basis of behavioural studies in animals of diverse taxa. Recently, corpuscles containing superparamagnetic iron-storage protein ferritin were found in the inner ear hair cells of birds, a predominantly single ferritin corpuscle per cell. It was suggested that these corpuscles might represent magnetosomes and function as magnetosensors. Here we determine ferritin low-field paramagnetic susceptibility to estimate its magnetically induced intracellular behaviour. Physical simulations show that ferritin corpuscles cannot be deformed or rotate in weak geomagnetic fields, and thus cannot provide magnetoreception via deformation of the cuticular plate. Furthermore, we reached an alternative hypothesis that ferritin corpuscle in avian ears may function as an intracellular electromagnetic oscillator. Such an oscillator would generate additional cellular electric potential related to normal cell conditions. Though the phenomenon seems to be weak, this effect deserves further analyses. PMID:25551148

  1. Visual activation in infants and young children studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, Alfred Peter; Leth, H; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo

    1998-01-01

    flow during activation. The different response patterns in young children and adults can reflect developmental or behavioral differences. Localization of the activation seemed to be age-dependent. In the older children and the adults, it encompassed the whole length of the calcarine sulcus, whereas......The purpose of this study was to determine whether visual stimulation in sleeping infants and young children can be examined by functional magnetic resonance imaging. We studied 17 children, aged 3 d to 48 mo, and three healthy adults. Visual stimulation was performed with 8-Hz flickering light...... it was restricted to the anterior and medial part of the calcarine sulcus in the younger infants. This may reflect a different functional organization of the young child's visual cortex or the on-going retinal development....

  2. Recombination yield of geminate radical pairs in low magnetic fields - A Green's function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doktorov, A.B.; Hansen, M.J.; Pedersen, J. Boiden

    2006-01-01

    An analytic expression for the recombination yield of a geminate radical pair with a single spin one half nuclei is derived. The expression is valid for any field strength of the static magnetic field. It is assumed that the spin mixing is caused solely by the hyperfine interaction of the nuclear spin and the difference in Zeeman energies of the two radical partners, that the recombination occurs at the distance of closest approach, and that there is a locally strong dephasing at contact. This is a special result of a new general approach where a Green's function technique is used to recast the stochastic Liouville equation into a low dimensional matrix equation that is particularly convenient for locally strong dephasing systems. The equation is expressed in terms of special values (determined by the magnetic parameters) of the Green's function for the relative motion of the radicals and it is therefore valid for any motional model, e.g. diffusion, one and two site models. The applicability of the strong dephasing approximation is illustrated by comparison with numerical exact results

  3. Changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging cortical activation with cross education to an immobilized limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farthing, Jonathan P; Krentz, Joel R; Magnus, Charlene R A; Barss, Trevor S; Lanovaz, Joel L; Cummine, Jacqueline; Esopenko, Carrie; Sarty, Gordon E; Borowsky, Ron

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess cortical activation associated with the cross-education effect to an immobilized limb, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen right-handed participants were assigned to two groups. One group (n = 7) wore a cast and strength trained the free arm (CAST-TRAIN). The second group (n = 7) wore a cast and did not strength train (CAST). Casts were applied to the nondominant (left) wrist and hand. Strength training was maximal isometric handgrip contractions (right hand) 5 d·wk(-1). Peak force (handgrip dynamometer), muscle thickness (ultrasound), EMG, and cortical activation (functional magnetic resonance imaging) were assessed before and after the intervention. CAST-TRAIN improved right handgrip strength by 10.7% (P TRAIN was maintained, whereas the immobilized arm of CAST significantly decreased by 11% (P TRAIN showed an increasing trend and CAST showed a decreasing trend, pooled across arms. For the immobilized arm of CAST-TRAIN, there was a significant increase in contralateral motor cortex activation after training (P training of the free limb attenuated strength loss during unilateral immobilization. The maintenance of strength in the immobilized limb via the cross-education effect may be associated with increased motor cortex activation.

  4. Density-matrix-functional calculations for matter in strong magnetic fields: Ground states of heavy atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kristinn; Yngvason, Jakob

    1996-01-01

    We report on a numerical study of the density matrix functional introduced by Lieb, Solovej, and Yngvason for the investigation of heavy atoms in high magnetic fields. This functional describes exactly the quantum mechanical ground state of atoms and ions in the limit when the nuclear charge Z...... and the electron number N tend to infinity with N/Z fixed, and the magnetic field B tends to infinity in such a way that B/Z4/3→∞. We have calculated electronic density profiles and ground-state energies for values of the parameters that prevail on neutron star surfaces and compared them with results obtained...... by other methods. For iron at B=1012 G the ground-state energy differs by less than 2% from the Hartree-Fock value. We have also studied the maximal negative ionization of heavy atoms in this model at various field strengths. In contrast to Thomas-Fermi type theories atoms can bind excess negative charge...

  5. Sensing-area distribution functions for one- and three-loop superconductive magnetic-monopole detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrera, B.; Gardner, R.; King, R.

    1985-01-01

    We have calculated the response of the existing one- and three-loop superconductive magnetic-monopole detectors to an isotropic distribution of monopole trajectories passing through the detectors. The effective sensing area of the three-loop detector is shown to be 476 cm 2 for events greater than 0.1Phi 0 (Phi 0 = hc/2e) in at least two of the three loops. These calculations include the effects of the cylindrical superconducting shields surrounding the loops. First the interior magnetic-field distribution within the cylindrical shield is found for a doubly quantized vortex located in the shield wall. Next the coupling of this field to each superconducting loop is computed as a function of the position of the vortex relative to the loop. Then the current change induced in the loops is found for each monopole trajectory by combining the direct coupling to the entering and exiting cylinder wall vortices. The one- and three-loop sensing-area distribution functions are then found using a Monte Carlo technique on a large number of isotropically distributed trajectories

  6. Covalent Immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase on Aldehyde-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chun Chi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the synthesis and use of surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for the covalent immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (BlGGT. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by an alkaline solution of divalent and trivalent iron ions, and they were subsequently treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APES to obtain the aminosilane-coated nanoparticles. The functional group on the particle surface and the amino group of BlGGT was then cross-linked using glutaraldehyde as the coupling reagent. The loading capacity of the prepared nanoparticles for BlGGT was 34.2 mg/g support, corresponding to 52.4% recovery of the initial activity. Monographs of transmission electron microscopy revealed that the synthesized nanoparticles had a mean diameter of 15.1 ± 3.7 nm, and the covalent cross-linking of the enzyme did not significantly change their particle size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the immobilization of BlGGT on the magnetic nanoparticles. The chemical and kinetic behaviors of immobilized BlGGT are mostly consistent with those of the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme could be recycled ten times with 36.2% retention of the initial activity and had a comparable stability respective to free enzyme during the storage period of 30 days. Collectively, the straightforward synthesis of aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticles and the efficiency of enzyme immobilization offer wide perspectives for the practical use of surface-bound BlGGT.

  7. Lateral flow biosensor for multiplex detection of nitrofuran metabolites based on functionalized magnetic beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xuewen; Liang, Xiaoling; Dong, Jianghong; Fang, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Lingwen

    2016-09-01

    The use of potential mutagenic nitrofuran antibiotic in food animal production has been banned world-wide. Common methods for nitrofuran detection involve complex extraction procedures. In the present study, magnetic beads functionalized with antibody against nitrofuran derivative were used as both the extraction and color developing media in lateral flow biosensor. Derivatization reagent carboxybenzaldehyde is firstly modified with ractopamine. After reaction with nitrofuran metabolites, the resultant molecule has two functional groups: the metabolite moiety and the ractopamine moiety. Metabolite moiety is captured by the antibody that is coated on magnetic beads. This duplex is then loaded onto biosensor and ractopamine moiety is further captured by the antibody immobilized on the test zone of nitrocellulose membrane. Without tedious organic reagent-based extraction procedure, this biosensor was capable of visually detecting four metabolites simultaneously with a detection limit of 0.1 μg/L. No cross-reactivity was observed in the presence of 50 μg/L interferential components. Graphical abstract Derivatization of nitrofuran metabolites (AHD, AOZ, SEM, or AMOZ) and LFA detection of the derivative products.

  8. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Systolic Function in Chagas Disease Using Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Henrique T; Volpe, Gustavo J; Marin-Neto, José A; Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Nwabuo, Chike C; Trad, Henrique S; Romano, Minna M D; Pazin-Filho, Antonio; Maciel, Benedito C; Lima, João A C; Schmidt, André

    2017-03-01

    Right ventricular (RV) impairment is postulated to be responsible for prominent systemic congestion in Chagas disease. However, occurrence of primary RV dysfunction in Chagas disease remains controversial. We aimed to study RV systolic function in patients with Chagas disease using cardiac magnetic resonance. This cross-sectional study included 158 individuals with chronic Chagas disease who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance. RV systolic dysfunction was defined as reduced RV ejection fraction based on predefined cutoffs accounting for age and sex. Multivariable logistic regression was used to verify the relationship of RV systolic dysfunction with age, sex, functional class, use of medications for heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mean age was 54±13 years, 51.2% men. RV systolic dysfunction was identified in 58 (37%) individuals. Although usually associated with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, isolated RV systolic dysfunction was found in 7 (4.4%) patients, 2 of them in early stages of Chagas disease. Presence of RV dysfunction was not significantly different in patients with indeterminate/digestive form of Chagas disease (35.7%) compared with those with Chagas cardiomyopathy (36.8%) ( P =1.000). In chronic Chagas disease, RV systolic dysfunction is more commonly associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction, although isolated and early RV dysfunction can also be identified. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Effect of midazolam on memory: a study of process dissociation procedure and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, S Y; Zou, L; Quan, X; Zhang, Y; Xue, F S; Ye, T H

    2010-06-01

    To assess the effects of midazolam on explicit and implicit memories, 12 volunteers were randomly divided into the two groups: one with an Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation score of 3 (mild sedation) and one with a score of 1 (deep sedation). Blood oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging was measured before and during an auditory stimulus, then with midazolam sedation, and then during a second auditory stimulus with continuous midazolam sedation. After 4 h, explicit and implicit memories were assessed. There was no evidence of explicit memory at the two levels of midazolam sedation. Implicit memory was retained at a mild level of midazolam sedation but absent at a deep level of midazolam sedation. At a mild level of midazolam sedation, activation of all brain areas by auditory stimulus (as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging) was uninhibited. However, a deep level of midazolam sedation depressed activation of the superior temporal gyrus by auditory stimulus. We conclude that midazolam does not abolish implicit memory at a mild sedation level, but can abolish both explicit and implicit memories at a deep sedation level. The superior temporal gyrus may be one of the target areas.

  10. Wada-test, functional magnetic resonance imaging and direct electrical stimulation - brain mapping methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkin, K.; Tanova, R.; Busarski, A.; Penkov, M.; Penev, L.; Hadjidekov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Modern neurosurgery requires accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization of brain pathologies but also of brain functions. The presence of individual variations in healthy subjects and the shift of brain functions in brain diseases provoke the introduction of various methods for brain mapping. The aim of this paper was to analyze the most widespread methods for brain mapping: Wada-test, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES). This study included 4 patients with preoperative brain mapping using Wada-test and fMRI. Intraoperative mapping with DES during awake craniotomy was performed in one case. The histopathological diagnosis was low-grade glioma in 2 cases, cortical dysplasia (1 patient) and arteriovenous malformation (1 patient). The brain mapping permits total lesion resection in three of four patients. There was no new postoperative deficit despite surgery near or within functional brain areas. Brain plasticity provoking shift of eloquent areas from their usual locations was observed in two cases. The brain mapping methods allow surgery in eloquent brain areas recognized in the past as 'forbidden areas'. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. The precise location of brain functions and pathologies frequently requires combination of different brain mapping methods. (authors)

  11. Routine evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function by cardiovascular magnetic resonance: A practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vido Diane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR has excellent capabilities to assess ventricular systolic function. Current clinical scenarios warrant routine evaluation of ventricular diastolic function for complete evaluation, especially in congestive heart failure patients. To our knowledge, no systematic assessment of diastolic function over a range of lusitropy has been performed using CMR. Methods and Results Left ventricular diastolic function was assessed in 31 subjects (10 controls who underwent CMR and compared with Transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE evaluation of mitral valve (MV and pulmonary vein (PV blood flow. Blood flow in the MV and PV were successfully imaged by CMR for all cases (31/31,100% while TTE evaluated flow in all MV (31/31,100% but only 21/31 PV (68% cases. Velocities of MV flow (E and A measured by CMR correlated well with TTE (r = 0.81, p Conclusion We have shown that there is homology between CMR and TTE for the assessment of diastolic inflow over a wide range of conditions, including normal, impaired relaxation and restrictive. There is excellent agreement of quantitative velocity measurements between CMR and TTE. Diastolic blood flow assessment by CMR can be performed in a single scan, with times ranging from 20 sec to 3 min, and we show that there is good indication for applying CMR to assess diastolic conditions, either as an adjunctive test when evaluating systolic function, or even as a primary test when TTE data cannot be obtained.

  12. Investigations of the human visual system using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollias, Spyros S.

    2004-01-01

    The application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in studies of the visual system provided significant advancement in our understanding of the organization and functional properties of visual areas in the human cortex. Recent technological and methodological improvements allowed studies to correlate neuronal activity with visual perception and demonstrated the ability of fMRI to observe distributed neural systems and to explore modulation of neural activity during higher cognitive processes. Preliminary applications in patients with visual impairments suggest that this method provides a powerful tool for the assessment and management of brain pathologies. Recent research focuses on obtaining new information about the spatial localization, organization, functional specialization and participation in higher cognitive functions of visual cortical areas in the living human brain and in further establishment of the method as a useful clinical tool of diagnostic and prognostic significance for various pathologic processes affecting the integrity of the visual system. It is anticipated that the combined neuroimaging approach in patients with lesions and healthy controls will provide new insight on the topography and functional specialization of cortical visual areas and will further establish the clinical value of the method for improving diagnostic accuracy and treatment planning

  13. Paradigm free mapping with sparse regression automatically detects single-trial functional magnetic resonance imaging blood oxygenation level dependent responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Gaudes, César; Petridou, Natalia; Francis, Susan T; Dryden, Ian L; Gowland, Penny A

    2013-03-01

    The ability to detect single trial responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies is essential, particularly if investigating learning or adaptation processes or unpredictable events. We recently introduced paradigm free mapping (PFM), an analysis method that detects single trial blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses without specifying prior information on the timing of the events. PFM is based on the deconvolution of the fMRI signal using a linear hemodynamic convolution model. Our previous PFM method (Caballero-Gaudes et al., 2011: Hum Brain Mapp) used the ridge regression estimator for signal deconvolution and required a baseline signal period for statistical inference. In this work, we investigate the application of sparse regression techniques in PFM. In particular, a novel PFM approach is developed using the Dantzig selector estimator, solved via an efficient homotopy procedure, along with statistical model selection criteria. Simulation results demonstrated that, using the Bayesian information criterion to select the regularization parameter, this method obtains high detection rates of the BOLD responses, comparable with a model-based analysis, but requiring no information on the timing of the events and being robust against hemodynamic response function variability. The practical operation of this sparse PFM method was assessed with single-trial fMRI data acquired at 7T, where it automatically detected all task-related events, and was an improvement on our previous PFM method, as it does not require the definition of a baseline state and amplitude thresholding and does not compromise on specificity and sensitivity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Magnetic capture from blood rescues molecular motor function in diagnostic nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Saroj; Ten Siethoff, Lasse; Persson, Malin; Albet-Torres, Nuria; Månsson, Alf

    2013-05-03

    Introduction of effective point-of-care devices for use in medical diagnostics is part of strategies to combat accelerating health-care costs. Molecular motor driven nanodevices have unique potentials in this regard due to unprecedented level of miniaturization and independence of external pumps. However motor function has been found to be inhibited by body fluids. We report here that a unique procedure, combining separation steps that rely on antibody-antigen interactions, magnetic forces applied to magnetic nanoparticles (MPs) and the specificity of the actomyosin bond, can circumvent the deleterious effects of body fluids (e.g. blood serum). The procedure encompasses the following steps: (i) capture of analyte molecules from serum by MP-antibody conjugates, (ii) pelleting of MP-antibody-analyte complexes, using a magnetic field, followed by exchange of serum for optimized biological buffer, (iii) mixing of MP-antibody-analyte complexes with actin filaments conjugated with same polyclonal antibodies as the magnetic nanoparticles. This causes complex formation: MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin, and magnetic separation is used to enrich the complexes. Finally (iv) the complexes are introduced into a nanodevice for specific binding via actin filaments to surface adsorbed molecular motors (heavy meromyosin). The number of actin filaments bound to the motors in the latter step was significantly increased above the control value if protein analyte (50-60 nM) was present in serum (in step i) suggesting appreciable formation and enrichment of the MP-antibody-analyte-antibody-actin complexes. Furthermore, addition of ATP demonstrated maintained heavy meromyosin driven propulsion of actin filaments showing that the serum induced inhibition was alleviated. Detailed analysis of the procedure i-iv, using fluorescence microscopy and spectroscopy identified main targets for future optimization. The results demonstrate a promising approach for capturing analytes from serum for

  15. Functional changes during visuo-spatial working memory in autism spectrum disorder: 2-year longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogan, Vanessa M; Morgan, Benjamin R; Smith, Mary Lou; Taylor, Margot J

    2018-03-01

    This study examined functional changes longitudinally over 2 years in neural correlates associated with working memory in youth with and without autism spectrum disorder, and the impact of increasing cognitive load. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a visuo-spatial 1-back task with four levels of difficulty. A total of 14 children with autism spectrum disorder and 15 typically developing children (ages 7-13) were included at baseline and followed up approximately 2 years later. Despite similar task performance between groups, differences were evident in the developmental trajectories of neural responses. Typically developing children showed greater load-dependent activation which intensified over time in the frontal, parietal and occipital lobes and the right fusiform gyrus, compared to those with autism spectrum disorder. Children with autism spectrum disorder showed minimal age-related changes in load-dependent activation, but greater longitudinal load-dependent deactivation in default mode network compared to typically developing children. Results suggest inadequate modulation of neural activity with increasing cognitive demands in children with autism spectrum disorder, which does not mature into adolescence, unlike their typically developing peers. Diminished ability for children with autism spectrum disorder to modulate neural activity during this period of maturation suggests that they may be more vulnerable to the increasing complexity of social and academic demands as they progress through adolescence than their peers.

  16. Vacancy-induced magnetism in BaTiO3(001) thin films based on density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Dan; Cai, Meng-Qiu; Hu, Wang-Yu; Yu, Ping; Huang, Hai-Tao

    2011-03-14

    The origin of magnetism induced by vacancies on BaTiO(3)(001) surfaces is investigated systematically by first-principles calculations within density-functional theory. The calculated results show that O vacancy is responsible for the magnetism of the BaO-terminated surface and the magnetism of the TiO(2)-terminated surface is induced by Ti vacancy. For the BaO-terminated surface, the magnetism mainly arises from the unpaired electrons that are localized in the O vacancy basin. In contrast, for the TiO(2)-terminated surface, the magnetism mainly originates from the partially occupied O-2p states of the first nearest neighbor O atoms surrounding the Ti vacancy. These results suggest the possibility of implementing magneto-electric coupling in conventional ferroelectric materials.

  17. Safety, efficacy, and functionality of high-field strength interventional magnetic resonance imaging for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W A; Liu, H; Martin, A J; Pozza, C H; Maxwell, R E; Truwit, C L

    2000-03-01

    Interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows neurosurgeons to interactively perform surgery using MRI guidance. High-field strength (1.5-T) imaging permits exceptional observation of intracranial and spinal pathological features. The development of this technology and its application to a variety of neurosurgical procedures are described. We report on the first 101 cases that were treated in the interventional MRI unit (between January 1997 and September 1998). These cases included 39 brain biopsies, 30 tumor resections, 9 functional neurosurgical cases, 8 cyst drainages, 5 laminectomies, and 10 miscellaneous cases. Patients ranged in age from 14 months to 84 years (median, 43 yr); 61 patients were male and 40 were female. Intraoperative functional techniques that were used to influence surgical decision-making included magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional MRI, magnetic resonance angiography and venography, chemical shift imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging. All surgery was performed using MRI-compatible instruments within the 5-gauss line and conventional instruments outside that line. All 39 brain biopsies yielded diagnostic tissue. Of the 30 tumor resections, 24 (80%) were considered radiographically complete. The incidence of serious complications was low and was comparable to that associated with conventional operating rooms. One patient developed a Propionibacterium acnes brain abscess 6 weeks after surgery and another patient experienced Staphylococcus aureus scalp cellulitis after a brain biopsy, yielding an infection rate of less than 2%. No clinically significant hemorrhage was observed in immediate postoperative imaging scans, although one patient developed a delayed hematoma after a thalamotomy. One patient experienced a stroke after resection of a hippocampal tumor. No untoward events were associated with MRI-compatible instrumentation or intraoperative patient monitoring. High-field (1.5-T) interventional MRI is a safe and

  18. The Effectiveness of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Poststroke Apathy Is Associated with Improved Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitaki, Shingo; Onoda, Keiichi; Abe, Satoshi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-12-01

    Poststroke apathy is relatively common and has negative effects on the functional recovery of the patient; however, few reports have demonstrated the existence of effective treatments for poststroke apathy. Here, we describe a case of poststroke apathy that was successfully treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we detected improved interhemispheric functional connectivity that was correlated with the patient's recovery from poststroke apathy. Our case suggests that rTMS can improve the transfer of information through the corpus callosum, which is crucial for helping patients recover from poststroke apathy. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic characteristics in patients with fecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, Maaike P.; Deutekom, Marije; Beets-Tan, Regina G. H.; Engel, Alexander F.; Janssen, Lucas W. M.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E. E.; Dobben, Annette C.; Baeten, Cor G. M. I.; de Priester, Jacobus A.; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: External anal sphincter atrophy at endoanal magnetic resonance imaging has been associated with poor outcome of anal sphincter repair. We studied the relationship between external anal sphincter atrophy on endoanal magnetic resonance imaging and clinical, functional, and anatomic

  20. Affinity capture using peptide-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles to target Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Fang-Yin; Lin, Wei-Lien; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the peptide HHHHHHDEEGLFVD (D). The peptide D was comprised of three domains: polyhistidine (H6) used as the linker, DEE added as the spacer, and GLFVD used for targeting S. aureus. D was immobilized on the surface of Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs through H6-Al chelation. Our results showed that the D-functionalized Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs (D-Fe3O4 MNPs) possess the capability to target S. aureus. The selective trapping experiments were conducted under microwave-heating for only 60 s, and sufficient bacterial cells were trapped by the MNPs to be identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We demonstrated that the D-Fe3O4@Al2O3 MNPs combined with MALDI-MS can be used to rapidly characterize trace amounts of S. aureus in complex juice and egg samples.Staphylococcus aureus, a commonly found pathogen, can cause food poisoning and infections. Thus, it is necessary to develop analytical methods for the rapid screening of S. aureus in suspicious samples. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are widely used as affinity probes to selectively enrich target species from complex samples because of their high specific surface area and magnetic properties. The MNP surface should be functionalized to have the capability to target specific species. We herein propose a straightforward method to functionalize aluminum oxide-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4@Al2O3) MNPs with the

  1. Magnetism in Sc-doped ZnO with zinc vacancies: A hybrid density functional and GGA + U approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Kanoun, Mohammed

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the zinc vacancy effects on the electronic structures and magnetic properties of Sc-doped ZnO, by performing first-principles calculations within both GGA + U and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof hybrid functional methods. We find that Sc impurities stabilize considerably Zn vacancies. The electronic and magnetic analysis shows a half metallic ferromagnetic character with a total magnetic moment of 2.01 μ B. The magnetism mainly stems from the O 2p states around the Zn vacancies. Calculations with the hybrid density functional agree with the GGA + U results but give an accurate description of the electronic structure for pure ZnO and Sc-doped ZnO with Zn vacancies. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  5. Efficient isolation of pure and functional mitochondria from mouse tissues using automated tissue disruption and enrichment with anti-TOM22 magnetic beads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    Full Text Available To better understand molecular mechanisms regulating changes in metabolism, as observed e.g. in diabetes or neuronal disorders, the function of mitochondria needs to be precisely determined. The usual isolation methods such as differential centrifugation result in isolates of highly variable quality and quantity. To fulfill the need of a reproducible isolation method from solid tissues, which is suitable to handle parallel samples simultaneously, we developed a protocol based on anti-TOM22 (translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 22 homolog antibody-coupled magnetic beads. To measure oxygen consumption rate in isolated mitochondria from various mouse tissues, a traditional Clark electrode and the high-throughput XF Extracellular Flux Analyzer were used. Furthermore, Western blots, transmission electron microscopic and proteomic studies were performed to analyze the purity and integrity of the mitochondrial preparations. Mitochondrial fractions isolated from liver, brain and skeletal muscle by anti-TOM22 magnetic beads showed oxygen consumption capacities comparable to previously reported values and little contamination with other organelles. The purity and quality of isolated mitochondria using anti-TOM22 magnetic beads was compared to traditional differential centrifugation protocol in liver and the results indicated an obvious advantage of the magnetic beads method compared to the traditional differential centrifugation technique.

  6. Cardiac structure and function in Cushing's syndrome: a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenický, Peter; Redheuil, Alban; Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-11-01

    Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2-12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P < .001 for all) and increased end-diastolic LV segmental thickness (P < .001). Treatment of hypercortisolism was associated with an improvement in ventricular and atrial systolic performance, as reflected by a 15% increase in the LV ejection fraction (P = .029), a 45% increase in the LA ejection fraction (P < .001), and an 11% increase in the RV ejection fraction (P = NS). After treatment, the LV mass index and end-diastolic LV mass to volume ratio decreased by 17% (P < .001) and 10% (P = .002), respectively. None of the patients had late gadolinium myocardial enhancement. Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism.

  7. Effectiveness of functional magnetic versus electrical stimulation in women with urinary incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölükbaş, N; Vural, M; Karan, A; Yalçin, O; Eskiyurt, N

    2005-12-01

    Urinary incontinence is one of the most common medical complaints in women. We here propose to evaluate and compare the effects of 2 conservative treatment modalities, functional electrical stimulation (FES) and functional magnetic stimulation (FMS). We studied 22 female patients with urinary incontinence and divided them into 2 treatment groups (14 patients in the FES and 8 in the FMS group). The mean age of the patients in the FES group was 51.14+/-11.9 and in the FMS group 42.25+/-6.9 years. Functional electrical stimulation was applied continuously at 10 Hz and 30-50 Hz in urge and stress urinary incontinence respectively. In mixed urinary incontinence stimulation was applied at 10 Hz for 15 min and at 50 Hz for 15 min. The treatment sessions were for 20 min, 3 times a week for 6-8 weeks (12 with mixed, 2 with stress incontinence). FMS was applied by a magnetic chair, twice weekly for 6 weeks (6 with mixed, 1 with stress urinary and 1 with urge urinary incontinence). The efficacy of the treatment was judged from patient impressions, records in urinary diaries, results of 1 h pad test, perineometry value and digital palpation score. The perineometry value, digital palpation score increased significantly during stimulation compared with prestimulation levels in both groups (Purinary diaries and frequency of micturition were significantly more cured or improved in the FES group (P0.05). Both FES and FMS treatments were effective. FMS does not involve intravaginal stimulation and it is twice a week. Although FMS is not often used it is more cost effective than FES. In order to have exact knowledge of this issue; more research than has been done in a greater number of subjects is required.

  8. Fast Transverse Beam Instability Caused by Electron Cloud Trapped in Combined Function Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antipov, Sergey [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Electron cloud instabilities affect the performance of many circular high-intensity particle accelerators. They usually have a fast growth rate and might lead to an increase of the transverse emittance and beam loss. A peculiar example of such an instability is observed in the Fermilab Recycler proton storage ring. Although this instability might pose a challenge for future intensity upgrades, its nature had not been completely understood. The phenomena has been studied experimentally by comparing the dynamics of stable and unstable beam, numerically by simulating the build-up of the electron cloud and its interaction with the beam, and analytically by constructing a model of an electron cloud driven instability with the electrons trapped in combined function dipoles. Stabilization of the beam by a clearing bunch reveals that the instability is caused by the electron cloud, trapped in beam optics magnets. Measurements of microwave propagation confirm the presence of the cloud in the combined function dipoles. Numerical simulations show that up to 10$^{-2}$ of the particles can be trapped by their magnetic field. Since the process of electron cloud build-up is exponential, once trapped this amount of electrons significantly increases the density of the cloud on the next revolution. In a combined function dipole this multi-turn accumulation allows the electron cloud reaching final intensities orders of magnitude greater than in a pure dipole. The estimated fast instability growth rate of about 30 revolutions and low mode frequency of 0.4 MHz are consistent with experimental observations and agree with the simulations. The created instability model allows investigating the beam stability for the future intensity upgrades.

  9. Activation of auditory white matter tracts as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae, Woo Suk [Kangwon National University, Neuroscience Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Yakunina, Natalia; Nam, Eui-Cheol [Kangwon National University, Neuroscience Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, Chuncheon, Kangwon-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Su [Kangwon National University Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University, Neuroscience Research Institute, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Kangwon National University, Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    The ability of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to detect activation in brain white matter (WM) is controversial. In particular, studies on the functional activation of WM tracts in the central auditory system are scarce. We utilized fMRI to assess and characterize the entire auditory WM pathway under robust experimental conditions involving the acquisition of a large number of functional volumes, the application of broadband auditory stimuli of high intensity, and the use of sparse temporal sampling to avoid scanner noise effects and increase signal-to-noise ratio. Nineteen healthy volunteers were subjected to broadband white noise in a block paradigm; each run had four sound-on/off alternations and was repeated nine times for each subject. Sparse sampling (TR = 8 s) was used. In addition to traditional gray matter (GM) auditory center activation, WM activation was detected in the isthmus and midbody of the corpus callosum (CC), tapetum, auditory radiation, lateral lemniscus, and decussation of the superior cerebellar peduncles. At the individual level, 13 of 19 subjects (68 %) had CC activation. Callosal WM exhibited a temporal delay of approximately 8 s in response to the stimulation compared with GM. These findings suggest that direct evaluation of the entire functional network of the central auditory system may be possible using fMRI, which may aid in understanding the neurophysiological basis of the central auditory system and in developing treatment strategies for various central auditory disorders. (orig.)

  10. Laterality of motor cortical function measured by transcranial magnetic stimulation threshold tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kazumoto; Park, Susanna B; Howells, James; Huynh, William; Noto, Yu-Ichi; Shahrizaila, Nortina; Matamala, José M; Vucic, Steve; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2017-03-01

    Threshold tracking paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TTTMS) examines cortical function and is useful for diagnosis of motor neuron disorders. Differences in cortical function have been identified between dominant and non-dominant limbs using constant stimulus methods, but they remain unclear, potentially due to methodological differences. In this study we aimed to clarify differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant limbs using TTTMS. Single-pulse TMS, TTTMS, and nerve conduction studies were performed in 25 healthy, right-handed participants by recording from the abductor pollicis brevis muscle. There were no side-to-side differences observed in resting motor threshold, motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, central motor conduction time, cortical silent period, short-interval intracortical inhibition and facilitation, compound muscle action potential (CMAP) amplitude, CMAP latency, F-wave latency, or neurophysiological index. These findings suggest that, when using TTTMS, there are no differences in cortical function between dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Muscle Nerve 55: 424-427, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Structural and functional cardiac changes in myotonic dystrophy type 1: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermans Mieke CE

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (MD1 is a neuromuscular disorder with potential involvement of the heart and increased risk of sudden death. Considering the importance of cardiomyopathy as a predictor of prognosis, we aimed to systematically evaluate and describe structural and functional cardiac alterations in patients with MD1. Methods Eighty MD1 patients underwent physical examination, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Blood samples were taken for determination of NT-proBNP plasma levels and CTG repeat length. Results Functional and structural abnormalities were detected in 35 patients (44%. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction was found in 20 cases, left ventricular dilatation in 7 patients, and left ventricular hypertrophy in 6 patients. Myocardial fibrosis was seen in 10 patients (12.5%. In general, patients had low left ventricular mass indexes. Right ventricular involvement was uncommon and only seen together with left ventricular abnormalities. Functional or structural cardiac involvement was associated with age (p = 0.04, male gender (p Conclusions CMR can be useful to detect early structural and functional myocardial abnormalities in patients with MD1. Myocardial involvement is strongly associated with conduction abnormalities, but a normal ECG does not exclude myocardial alterations. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that MD1 patients have a complex cardiac phenotype, including both myocardial and conduction system alteration.

  12. 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Modified Magnetic Nanoparticles with Dual Functional Properties: Nanothermotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lingyun; Zheng, Yajing; Yan, Hao; Xie, WenSheng; Sun, Xiaodan; Li, Ning; Tang, Jintian

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with appropriate surface chemistry have attracted wild attention in medical and biological application because of their current and potential usefulness such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast enhancement, magnetic mediated hyperthermia (MMH), immunoassay, and in drug delivery, etc. In this study, we investigated the MRI contrast agents and MMH mediators properties of the novel 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) modified SPIONs. As a non-metabolizable glucose analogue, 2-DG can block glycolysis and inhibits protein glycosylation. Moreover, SPIONs coated with 2-DG molecules can be particularly attractive to resource-hungry cancer cells, therefore to realize the targeting strategy for the SPIONs. SPIONs with amino silane as the capping agent for amino-group surface modification were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method with modification. Glutaraldehyde was further applied as an activation agent through which 2-DG was conjugated to the amino-coated SPIONs. Physicochemical characterizations of the 2-DG-SPIONs, such as surface morphology, surface charge and magnetic properties were investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), ζ-Potential and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM), etc. Magnetic inductive heating characteristics of the 2-DG-SPIONs were analyzed by exposing the SPIONs suspension (magnetic fluid) under alternative magnetic field (AMF). U-251 human glioma cells with expression of glucose transport proteins type 1 and 3 (GLUT1 and GLUT 3), and L929 murine fibroblast cell as negative control, were employed to study the effect of 2-DG modification on the cell uptake for SPIONs. TEM images for ultra-thin sections as well as ICP-MS were applied to evaluate the SPIONs internalization within the cells. In vitro MRI was performed after cells were co-incubated with SPIONs and the T2 relaxation time was measured and compared. The results demonstrate that 2-DG-SPIONs were supermagnetic and in

  13. Extraction of triazole fungicides in environmental waters utilizing poly (ionic liquid)-functionalized magnetic adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng; Liao, Yingmin; Huang, Xiaojia

    2017-11-17

    This work prepared a new poly (ionic liquid)-functionalized magnetic adsorbent (PFMA) for the extraction of triazole fungicides (TFs) in environmental waters prior to determination by high performance liquid chromatography/diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). A polymerizable ionic liquid, 1-methyl-3-allylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide was employed to copolymerize with divinylbenzene on the surface of modified magnetite to fabricate the PFMA. The morphology, spectroscopic and magnetic properties of the new adsorbent were investigated by different techniques. A series of key parameters that influence the extraction performance including the amount of PFMA, desorption solvent, adsorption and desorption time, sample pH value and ionic strength were optimized in detail. Under the optimum conditions, the prepared PFMA could extract targeted TFs effectively and quickly under the format of magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE). Satisfactory linearities were achieved in the range of 0.1-200.0μg/L for triadimenol and 0.05-200.0μg/L for other TFs with good coefficients of determination above 0.99 for all analytes. The limits of detection (S/N=3) and limits of quantification (S/N=10) for TFs were in the range of 0.0050-0.0078μg/L and 0.017-0.026μg/L, respectively. Environmental waters including lake, river and well waters were used to demonstrate the applicability of developed MSPE-HPLC-DAD method, and satisfactory recoveries and repeatability were obtained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. pH-responsive deoxyribonucleic acid capture/release by polydopamine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yu; Ma, Xiangdong; Ding, Chun; Jia, Li

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • PDA@Fe 3 O 4 were prepared and applied for efficient extraction of DNA from pathogens. • The DNA capture and release by PDA@Fe 3 O 4 was pH-induced. • The adsorption capacity of PDA@Fe 3 O 4 for DNA was 161 mg g −1 . • PDA@Fe 3 O 4 based MSPE was combined with PCR and CE for rapid detection of pathogens. - Abstract: Polydopamine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PDA@Fe 3 O 4 ) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, zeta potential and vibrating sample magnetometry. They were found to enable highly efficient capture of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The adsorption capacity of PDA@Fe 3 O 4 for genomic DNA can reach 161 mg g −1 . The extraction protocol used aqueous solutions for DNA binding to and releasing from the surface of the magnetic particles based on the pH inducing the charge switch of amino and phenolic hydroxyl groups on PDA@Fe 3 O 4 . The extracted DNA with high quality (A 260 /A 280 = 1.80) can be directly used as templates for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. None of the toxic chemical reagents and PCR inhibitors was used throughout the whole procedure. PDA@Fe 3 O 4 based magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) method was superior to those using commercial kit and traditional phenol–chloroform extraction methods in yield of DNA. The developed PDA@Fe 3 O 4 based MSPE-PCR-CE method was applied for simultaneous and fast detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in milk

  15. pH-responsive deoxyribonucleic acid capture/release by polydopamine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu; Ma, Xiangdong; Ding, Chun; Jia, Li, E-mail: jiali@scnu.edu.cn

    2015-03-03

    Highlights: • PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} were prepared and applied for efficient extraction of DNA from pathogens. • The DNA capture and release by PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was pH-induced. • The adsorption capacity of PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} for DNA was 161 mg g{sup −1}. • PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} based MSPE was combined with PCR and CE for rapid detection of pathogens. - Abstract: Polydopamine functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, zeta potential and vibrating sample magnetometry. They were found to enable highly efficient capture of genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The adsorption capacity of PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} for genomic DNA can reach 161 mg g{sup −1}. The extraction protocol used aqueous solutions for DNA binding to and releasing from the surface of the magnetic particles based on the pH inducing the charge switch of amino and phenolic hydroxyl groups on PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The extracted DNA with high quality (A{sub 260}/A{sub 280} = 1.80) can be directly used as templates for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by capillary electrophoresis (CE) analysis. None of the toxic chemical reagents and PCR inhibitors was used throughout the whole procedure. PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} based magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) method was superior to those using commercial kit and traditional phenol–chloroform extraction methods in yield of DNA. The developed PDA@Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} based MSPE-PCR-CE method was applied for simultaneous and fast detection of Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in milk.

  16. Seeking tools for image fusion between computed tomography, structural and functional magnetic resonance methods for applications in neurosurgery; Ferramentas para fusao de imagens dos metodos de tomografia computadorizada, ressonancia magnetica e ressonancia magnetica funcional para aplicacao pre-neurocirurgica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Liana Guerra Sanches da, E-mail: liana@einstein.br [Departamento de Diagnostico por Imagem, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo (SP) (Brazil); Amaro Junior, Edson [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Sao Paulo - USP, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Deptartamento de Diagnostico por Imagem; Instituto do Cerebro - InCe, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein - HIAE, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate tools for the fusion of images generated by tomography and structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Methods: Magnetic resonance and functional magnetic resonance imaging were performed while a volunteer who had previously undergone cranial tomography performed motor and somatosensory tasks in a 3-Tesla scanner. Image data were analyzed with different programs, and the results were compared. Results: We constructed a flow chart of computational processes that allowed measurement of the spatial congruence between the methods. There was no single computational tool that contained the entire set of functions necessary to achieve the goal. Conclusion: The fusion of the images from the three methods proved to be feasible with the use of four free-access software programs (OsiriX, Register, MRIcro and FSL). Our results may serve as a basis for building software that will be useful as a virtual tool prior to neurosurgery. (author)

  17. Automated magnetic sorbent extraction based on octadecylsilane functionalized maghemite magnetic particles in a sequential injection system coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for metal determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giakisikli, Georgia; Anthemidis, Aristidis N

    2013-06-15

    A new automatic sequential injection (SI) system for on-line magnetic sorbent extraction coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) has been successfully developed for metal determination. In this work, we reported effective on-line immobilization of magnetic silica particles into a microcolumn by the external force of two strong neodymium iron boron (NdFeB) magnets across it, avoiding the use of frits. Octadecylsilane functionalized maghemite magnetic particles were used as sorbent material. The potentials of the system were demonstrated for trace cadmium determination in water samples. The method was based on the on-line complex formation with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC), retention of Cd-DDTC on the surface of the MPs and elution with isobutyl methyl ketone (IBMK). The formation mechanism of the magnetic solid phase packed column and all critical parameters (chemical, flow, graphite furnace) influencing the performance of the system were optimized and offered good analytical characteristics. For 5 mL sample volume, a detection limit of 3 ng L(-1), a relative standard deviation of 3.9% at 50 ng L(-1) level (n=11) and a linear range of 9-350 ng L(-1) were obtained. The column remained stable for more than 600 cycles keeping the cost down in routine analysis. The proposed method was evaluated by analyzing certified reference materials and natural waters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  19. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Goal-Directed Reaching in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. G. Salowitz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An unanswered question concerning the neural basis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD is how sensorimotor deficits in individuals with ASD are related to abnormalities of brain function. We previously described a robotic joystick and video game system that allows us to record functional magnetic resonance images (FMRI while adult humans make goal-directed wrist motions. We anticipated several challenges in extending this approach to studying goal-directed behaviors in children with ASD and in typically developing (TYP children. In particular we were concerned that children with autism may express increased levels of anxiety as compared to typically developing children due to the loud sounds and small enclosed space of the MRI scanner. We also were concerned that both groups of children might become restless during testing, leading to an unacceptable amount of head movement. Here we performed a pilot study evaluating the extent to which autistic and typically developing children exhibit anxiety during our experimental protocol as well as their ability to comply with task instructions. Our experimental controls were successful in minimizing group differences in drop-out due to anxiety. Kinematic performance and head motion also were similar across groups. Both groups of children engaged cortical regions (frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital while making goal-directed movements. In addition, the ASD group exhibited task-related correlations in subcortical regions (cerebellum, thalamus, whereas correlations in the TYP group did not reach statistical significance in subcortical regions. Four distinct regions in frontal cortex showed a significant group difference such that TYP children exhibited positive correlations between the hemodynamic response and movement, whereas children with ASD exhibited negative correlations. These findings demonstrate feasibility of simultaneous application of robotic manipulation and functional imaging to study goal

  20. Electromagnetic Processing of Materials Materials Processing by Using Electric and Magnetic Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, Shigeo

    2012-01-01

    This book is both a course book and a monograph. In fact, it has developed from notes given to graduate course students on materials processing in the years 1989 to 2006. Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (EPM), originates from a branch of materials science and engineering developed in the 1980s as a field aiming to create new materials and/or design processes by making use of various functions which appear when applying the electric and magnetic fields to materials. It is based on transport phenomena, materials processing and magnetohydrodynamics. The first chapter briefly introduces the history, background and technology of EPM. In the second chapter, the concept of transport phenomena is concisely introduced and in the third chapter the essential part of magnetohydrodynamics is transcribed and readers are shown that the concept of transport phenomena does not only apply to heat, mass and momentum, but also magnetic field. The fourth chapter describes electromagnetic processing of electrica...

  1. Principles of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and its Applications in Cognitive Neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şule Tınaz

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a neuroimaging technique that provides brain activation maps with a spatial resolution of a few millimeters. The BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent fMRI method is the most commonly used technique. It measures the hemodynamic response to neural activity. The BOLD fMRI signal is based on the magnetic properties of the oxygenated / deoxygenated hemoglobin which is the oxygen carrier in blood. FMRI is noninvasive, and unlike in positron emission tomography (PET individuals are not exposed to radiation. This allows data collection from the same individual over multiple sessions. The relatively high temporal resolution of fMRI compared to PET provides flexibility in experimental designs of cognitive tasks. In this paper we review the key principles of MRI physics, and the underlying metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrophysiological mechanisms of BOLD signal. We introduce frequently used experimental design paradigms and present examples. Next, we give an overview of theoretical considerations and applications of analysis methods in fMRI time series. Neural network modeling based on fMRI data is also discussed. Finally, we present an ongoing study in our laboratory to demonstrate the application of design types and analysis methods

  2. The influence of surface functionalization on the enhanced internalization of magnetic nanoparticles in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Angeles; Canete, Magdalena; Calero, Macarena; Roca, Alejandro G; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino; Serna, Carlos J; Del Puerto Morales, Maria; Miranda, Rodolfo

    2009-01-01

    The internalization and biocompatibility of iron oxide nanoparticles surface functionalized with four differently charged carbohydrates have been tested in the human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa). Neutral, positive, and negative iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by coating with dextran, aminodextran, heparin, and dimercaptosuccinic acid, resulting in colloidal suspensions stable at pH 7 with similar aggregate size. No intracellular uptake was detected in cells incubated with neutral charged nanoparticles, while negative particles showed different behaviour depending on the nature of the coating. Thus, dimercaptosuccinic-coated nanoparticles showed low cellular uptake with non-toxic effects, while heparin-coated particles showed cellular uptake only at high nanoparticle concentrations and induced abnormal mitotic spindle configurations. Finally, cationic magnetic nanoparticles show excellent properties for possible in vivo biomedical applications such as cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and cancer treatment by hyperthermia: (i) they enter into cells with high effectiveness, and are localized in endosomes; (ii) they can be easily detected inside cells by optical microscopy, (iii) they are retained for relatively long periods of time, and (iv) they do not induce any cytotoxicity.

  3. Density functional theory study of magnetic coupling in the Gd12O18 cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Lixin; Zhang, Yongfan; Cui, Zhifeng; Trioni, Mario Italo; Brivio, Gian Paolo

    2008-12-25

    The magnetic properties of the Gd(12)O(18) cluster cut from the bulk Gd(2)O(3) crystal are investigated using the spin-polarized density functional theory within the broken-symmetry approach. Our work reveals that in the ground state of the cluster the antiferromagnetic coupling between adjacent Gd (4f(7)) spins is preferred energetically. This result is in contrast to a recent prediction made by Pedersen and Ojamae (Pedersen, H.; Ojamae, L. Nano Lett. 2006, 6, 2004) but is consistent with recent experimental observations. The optimized structures of the cluster in the lowest-energy broken-symmetry state and the highest-spin ferromagnetic state are almost identical. The latter state is 71.5 cm(-1) higher in energy than the former one, giving a value of about -0.24 cm(-1) for the magnetic coupling constant, which is comparable to that estimated from experiments on the bulk crystal. The relative energies of various 4f(7) spin patterns of the cluster are calculated, and certain characteristics of the cluster in the lowest-energy broken-symmetry state are discussed.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cardiovascular Function and the Brain: Is Dementia a Cardiovascular-Driven Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; van der Grond, Jeroen; Mitchell, Gary; Westenberg, Jos

    2017-05-30

    The proximal aorta acts as a coupling device between heart and brain perfusion, modulating the amount of pressure and flow pulsatility transmitted into the cerebral microcirculation. Stiffening of the proximal aorta is strongly associated with age and hypertension. The detrimental effects of aortic stiffening may result in brain damage as well as heart failure. The resulting cerebral small vessel disease and heart failure may contribute to early cognitive decline and (vascular) dementia. This pathophysiological sequence of events underscores the role of cardiovascular disease as a contributory mechanism in causing cognitive decline and dementia and potentially may provide a starting point for prevention and treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging is well suited to assess the function of the proximal aorta and the left ventricle (eg, aortic arch pulse wave velocity and distensibility) as well as the various early and late manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease (eg, microbleeds and white matter hyperintensities in strategically important regions of the brain). Specialized magnetic resonance imaging techniques are explored for diagnosing preclinical changes in white matter integrity or brain microvascular pulsatility. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Fluorescence-Magnetism Functional EuS Nanocrystals with Controllable Morphologies for Dual Bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanqing; Wang, Dandan; Zhao, Tianxin; Jiang, Yingnan; Zhao, Yueqi; Wang, Chuanxi; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai; Lin, Quan

    2016-12-14

    Multiple functions incorporated in one single component material offer important applications in biosystems. Here we prepared a divalent state of rare earth EuS nanocrystals (NCs), which provides luminescent and magnetic properties, using both 1-Dodecanethiol (DT) and oleylamine (OLA) as reducing agents. The resultant EuS NCs exhibit controllable shapes, uniform size, and bright luminescence with a quantum yield as high as 3.5%. OLA as a surface ligand plays an important role in tunable morphologies, such as nanowires, nanorods, nanospheres et al. Another attractive nature of the EuS NCs is their paramagnetism at room temperature. In order to expand the biological applications, the resultant EuS NCs were modified with amphiphilic block copolymer F127 and transferred from oil to water phase. The excellent biocompatibility of EuS NCs is demonstrated as well as preservation of their luminescence and paramagnetic properties. The EuS NCs offer multifunction and great advantages of bright luminescence, paramagnetic, controllable morphologies, and good biocompatibility promising applications in the field of simultaneous magnetic resonance and fluorescence bioimaging.

  6. Application of C18-functional magnetic nanoparticles for extraction of aromatic amines from human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunzhu; Sun, Ying; Yu, Xi; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yuanpeng; Zhang, Hanqi; Song, Daqian

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a novel method using C18-functional ultrafine magnetic silica nanoparticles (C18-UMS NPs) as adsorbents was developed for rapid extraction and enrichment of aromatic amines from urine. C18-UMS NPs were prepared by chemical coprecipitation, silanization and alkylation. The aromatic amines can be adsorbed on C18-UMS NPs and isolated easily from the matrix with an external magnetic field. After desorption with acetonitrile, the aromatic amines were determined by ultra fast liquid chromatography. The experimental parameters, such as pH value of sample solution, amount of C18-UMS NPs, extraction time, type and volume of desorption solvent, and desorption time were optimized. The analytical performances of the present method were also evaluated. The limits of detection for 1-aminonaphthalene, 4-aminobiphenyl, 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane and 4-aminophenylthioether were 1.3, 0.88, 1.1 and 1.1 ng mL(-1), respectively. The results showed that the present method was simple, highly efficient and rapid for the extraction and enrichment of aromatic amines from urine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alterations in brain metabolism and function following administration of low-dose codeine phosphate: 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Zhen; Lin, Pei-Yin; Shen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Ren-Hua; Xiao, Ye-Yu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify alterations in brain function following administration of a single, low-dose of codeine phosphate in healthy volunteers using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In addition, the metabolic changes in the two sides of the frontal lobe were identified using 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). A total of 20 right-handed healthy participants (10 males, 10 females) were evaluated, and a Signa HDx 1.5T MRI scanner was use...

  8. Love-related changes in the brain: a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongwen; Zou, Zhiling; Kou, Juan; Liu, Yang; Yang, Lizhuang; Zilverstand, Anna; d'Oleire Uquillas, Federico; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2015-01-01

    Romantic love is a motivational state associated with a desire to enter or maintain a close relationship with a specific other person. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have found activation increases in brain regions involved in the processing of reward, motivation and emotion regulation, when romantic lovers view photographs of their partners. However, not much is known about whether romantic love affects the brain's functional architecture during rest. In the present study, resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data was collected to compare the regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) across an "in-love" group (LG, N = 34, currently intensely in love), an "ended-love" group (ELG, N = 34, ended romantic relationship recently), and a "single" group (SG, N = 32, never fallen in love). Results show that: (1) ReHo of the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and the SG); (2) ReHo of the left dACC was positively correlated with length of time in love in the LG, and negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration since breakup in the ELG; (3) FC within the reward, motivation, and emotion regulation network (dACC, insula, caudate, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens) as well as FC in the social cognition network [temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC), inferior parietal, precuneus, and temporal lobe] was significantly increased in the LG (in comparison to the ELG and SG); (4) in most regions within both networks FC was positively correlated with the duration of love in the LG but negatively correlated with the lovelorn duration of time since breakup in the ELG. This study provides first empirical evidence of love-related alterations in brain functional architecture. Furthermore, the results shed light on the underlying neural mechanisms of romantic love, and demonstrate the

  9. [Research progress of functional magnetic resonance imaging in mechanism studies of tinnitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B B; Li, M; Zhang, J N

    2018-02-07

    Tinnitus is a subjective symptom of phantom sound in the ear or brain without sound or electrical stimulation in the environment. The mechanism of tinnitus is complicated and mostly unclear. Recent studies suggested that the abnormal peripheral auditory input lead to neuroplasticity changes in central nervous system followed by tinnitus. More research concerned on the tinnitus central mechanism. A rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique made it more widely used in tinnitus central mechanism research. fMRI brought new findings but also presented some shortages in technology and cognition in tinnitus study. This article summarized the outcomes of fMRI research on tinnitus in recent years, exploring its existing problems and application prospects.

  10. Different patterns of auditory cortex activation revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formisano, E.; Pepino, A.; Bracale, M.; Di Salle, F.; Lanfermann, H.; Zanella, F.E.

    1998-01-01

    In the last few years, functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) has been widely accepted as an effective tool for mapping brain activities in both the sensorimotor and the cognitive field. The present work aims to assess the possibility of using fMRI methods to study the cortical response to different acoustic stimuli. Furthermore, we refer to recent data collected at Frankfurt University on the cortical pattern of auditory hallucinations. Healthy subjects showed broad bilateral activation, mostly located in the transverse gyrus of Heschl. The analysis of the cortical activation induced by different stimuli has pointed out a remarkable difference in the spatial and temporal features of the auditory cortex response to pulsed tones and pure tones. The activated areas during episodes of auditory hallucinations match the location of primary auditory cortex as defined in control measurements with the same patients and in the experiments on healthy subjects. (authors)

  11. Ecological nuances in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI): psychological stressors, posture, and hydrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Amir; Lieber, Baruch; Soliman, Fatima; Buhle, Jason; Posner, Jonathan; Peterson, Bradley S; Posner, Michael I

    2005-03-01

    Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have forged an impressive link between psychology and neuroscience. Whereas most experiments in cognitive psychology require participants to perform while sitting upright in front of display devices, fMRI obliges participants to perform cognitive tasks while lying supine and motionless inside a narrow bore. In addition to introducing psychological and physical stressors, such as loud thumps and head restraints, fMRI procedures also alter brain hydrostatics. The ecological factors associated with current fMRI technology, such as supine posture, may skew cognitive processing and influence hemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements, especially in extreme age groups and pathological populations. Recognizing the central role of fMRI in unraveling the neural mechanisms of cognition, we outline ways to address these limitations.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and abnormal visual system in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Born, A.P.; Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Rostrup, Egill

    2000-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in young children may provide information about the development of the visual cortex, and may have predictive value for later visual performance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of fMRI for examining cerebral processing of vision...... in very young infants and in infants with brain damage. We examined 15 preterm infants, 12 children suspected of having a cerebral visual impairment and 10 children with a normal visual system, all of whom were either spontaneously asleep or sedated with chloral hydrate. Cortical response to stroboscopic...... light stimulation could be demonstrated in all technically acceptable data sets from children with a post-menstrual age (PMA) of > 41 weeks, but not in younger infants. Children children...

  13. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Hui; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Shenoy, Vivek B; Gao, Huajian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurit...

  14. Involvement of the Extrageniculate System in the Perception of Optical Illusions: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Tabei

    Full Text Available Research on the neural processing of optical illusions can provide clues for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception. Previous studies have shown that some visual areas contribute to the perception of optical illusions such as the Kanizsa triangle and Müller-Lyer figure; however, the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of these and other optical illusions have not been clearly identified. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we determined which brain regions are active during the perception of optical illusions. For our study, we enrolled 18 participants. The illusory optical stimuli consisted of many kana letters, which are Japanese phonograms. During the shape task, participants stated aloud whether they perceived the shapes of two optical illusions as being the same or not. During the word task, participants read aloud the kana letters in the stimuli. A direct comparison between the shape and word tasks showed activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, and right pulvinar. It is well known that there are two visual pathways, the geniculate and extrageniculate systems, which belong to the higher-level and primary visual systems, respectively. The pulvinar belongs to the latter system, and the findings of the present study suggest that the extrageniculate system is involved in the cognitive processing of optical illusions.

  15. Involvement of the Extrageniculate System in the Perception of Optical Illusions: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Ken-Ichi; Satoh, Masayuki; Kida, Hirotaka; Kizaki, Moeni; Sakuma, Haruno; Sakuma, Hajime; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2015-01-01

    Research on the neural processing of optical illusions can provide clues for understanding the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception. Previous studies have shown that some visual areas contribute to the perception of optical illusions such as the Kanizsa triangle and Müller-Lyer figure; however, the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of these and other optical illusions have not been clearly identified. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we determined which brain regions are active during the perception of optical illusions. For our study, we enrolled 18 participants. The illusory optical stimuli consisted of many kana letters, which are Japanese phonograms. During the shape task, participants stated aloud whether they perceived the shapes of two optical illusions as being the same or not. During the word task, participants read aloud the kana letters in the stimuli. A direct comparison between the shape and word tasks showed activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus, left medial frontal gyrus, and right pulvinar. It is well known that there are two visual pathways, the geniculate and extrageniculate systems, which belong to the higher-level and primary visual systems, respectively. The pulvinar belongs to the latter system, and the findings of the present study suggest that the extrageniculate system is involved in the cognitive processing of optical illusions.

  16. Synthesis of Natural Electric and Magnetic Time Series Using Impulse Responses of Inter-station Transfer Functions and a Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Cheng, J.

    2017-12-01

    A method to Synthesis natural electric and magnetic Time series is proposed whereby the time series of local site are derived using an Impulse Response and a reference (STIR). The method is based on the assumption that the external source of magnetic fields are uniform, and the electric and magnetic fields acquired at the surface satisfy a time-independent linear relation in frequency domain.According to the convolution theorem, we can synthesize natural electric and magnetic time series using the impulse responses of inter-station transfer functions with a reference. Applying this method, two impulse responses need to be estimated: the quasi-MT impulse response tensor and the horizontal magnetic impulse response tensor. These impulse response tensors relate the local horizontal electric and magnetic components with the horizontal magnetic components at a reference site, respectively. Some clean segments of times series are selected to estimate impulse responses by using least-square (LS) method. STIR is similar with STIN (Wang, 2017), but STIR does not need to estimate the inter-station transfer functions, and the synthesized data are more accurate in high frequency, where STIN fails when the inter-station transfer functions are contaminated severely. A test with good quality of MT data shows that synthetic time-series are similar to natural electric and magnetic time series. For contaminated AMT example, when this method is used to remove noise present at the local site, the scatter of MT sounding curves are clear reduced, and the data quality are improved. *This work is funded by National Key R&D Program of China(2017YFC0804105),National Natural Science Foundation of China (41604064, 51574250), State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining ,China University of Mining & Technology,(SKLCRSM16DC09)

  17. Evaluation of glomerular function in individual kidneys using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Y.; Watanabe, H.; Tomita, T.; Katayama, H.; Miyano, T.; Yabuta, K.

    1996-01-01

    We used the fast field-echo technique of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with an intravenous bolus injection of paramagnetic contrast agent to evaluate glomerular function. The time-dependent curves of changes in signal intensity observed in the renal cortex and renal medulla brought about by the paramagnetic contrast agent allowed insight into excretory kinetics. The time at which the cortical and medullary curves cross, the cortico-medullary (C-M) junction time, was delayed with a decrease in glomerular function. The mean C-M junction time in both kidneys showed a significant inverse correlation with total creatinine clearance (Ccr), indicating the glomerular filtration rate. The C-M junction time in an individual kidney also showed an inverse correlation with individual Ccr in each kidney. Results suggest that dynamic MR imaging is a useful tool in evaluating renal morphology and in evaluating semiquantitatively the glomerular function of the kidneys, singly and together, in a manner analogous to radionuclide scintigraphy. (orig.). With 6 figs

  18. Combining transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional imaging in cognitive brain research: possibilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, Alexander T; Linden, David E J

    2003-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a widely used tool for the non-invasive study of basic neurophysiological processes and the relationship between brain and behavior. We review the physical and physiological background of TMS and discuss the large body of perceptual and cognitive studies, mainly in the visual domain, that have been performed with TMS in the past 15 years. We compare TMS with other neurophysiological and neuropsychological research tools and propose that TMS, compared with the classical neuropsychological lesion studies, can make its own unique contribution. As the main focus of this review, we describe the different approaches of combining TMS with functional neuroimaging techniques. We also discuss important shortcomings of TMS, especially the limited knowledge concerning its physiological effects, which often make the interpretation of TMS results ambiguous. We conclude with a critical analysis of the resulting conceptual and methodological limitations that the investigation of functional brain-behavior relationships still has to face. We argue that while some of the methodological limitations of TMS applied alone can be overcome by combination with functional neuroimaging, others will persist until its physical and physiological effects can be controlled.

  19. Neuropsychiatric dynamics: the study of mental illness using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callicott, Joseph H. E-mail: callicoj@intra.nimh.nih.gov; Weinberger, Daniel R

    1999-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is poised to make significant contributions to the study of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Whatever neural pathology attends such illnesses has proven subtle at best. By identifying predictable, regionally specific deficits in brain function, fMRI can suggest brain regions for detailed cellular analyses, provide valuable in vivo data regarding effective connectivity, provide a means to model the effects of various drug challenge paradigms, and characterize intermediate phenotypes in the search for the genes underlying mental illness. Nonetheless, as promising as fMRI appears to be in terms of its relative safety, repeatability, ability to generate individual brain maps and widespread availability, it is still subject to a number of unresolved conceptual conundrums inherited from earlier neuroimaging work. For example, functional neuroimaging has not generated any pathognomic findings in mental illness, has not established a clear link between neurophysiology and observable behavior, and has not resolved the potential confounds of medication. In this article, we will review the relevant historical background preceding fMRI, address methodological considerations in fMRI, and summarize recent fMRI findings in psychiatry. Finally, fMRI is being used to simplify the complex genetics of neuropsychiatric illness by generating quantitative and qualitative brain phenotypes.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging: basic principles and application in the neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé Atenas, T; Ciampi Díaz, E; Cruz Quiroga, J P; Uribe Arancibia, S; Cárcamo Rodríguez, C

    2018-03-12

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an advanced tool for the study of brain functions in healthy subjects and in neuropsychiatric patients. This tool makes it possible to identify and locate specific phenomena related to neuronal metabolism and activity. Starting with the detection of changes in the blood supply to a region that participates in a function, more complex approaches have been developed to study the dynamics of neuronal networks. Studies examining the brain at rest or involved in different tasks have provided evidence related to the onset, development, and/or response to treatment in various diseases. The diversity of the possible artifacts associated with image registration as well as the complexity of the analytical experimental designs has generated abundant debate about the technique behind fMRI. This article aims to introduce readers to the fundamentals underlying fMRI, to explain how fMRI studies are interpreted, and to discuss fMRI's contributions to the study of the mechanisms underlying diverse diseases of the nervous system. Copyright © 2018 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Migraine classification using magnetic resonance imaging resting-state functional connectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Catherine D; Gaw, Nathan; Fu, Yinlin; Li, Jing; Wu, Teresa; Schwedt, Todd J

    2017-08-01

    Background This study used machine-learning techniques to develop discriminative brain-connectivity biomarkers from resting-state functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging ( rs-fMRI) data that distinguish between individual migraine patients and healthy controls. Methods This study included 58 migraine patients (mean age = 36.3 years; SD = 11.5) and 50 healthy controls (mean age = 35.9 years; SD = 11.0). The functional connections of 33 seeded pain-related regions were used as input for a brain classification algorithm that tested the accuracy of determining whether an individual brain MRI belongs to someone with migraine or to a healthy control. Results The best classification accuracy using a 10-fold cross-validation method was 86.1%. Resting functional connectivity of the right middle temporal, posterior insula, middle cingulate, left ventromedial prefrontal and bilateral amygdala regions best discriminated the migraine brain from that of a healthy control. Migraineurs with longer disease durations were classified more accurately (>14 years; 96.7% accuracy) compared to migraineurs with shorter disease durations (≤14 years; 82.1% accuracy). Conclusions Classification of migraine using rs-fMRI provides insights into pain circuits that are altered in migraine and could potentially contribute to the development of a new, noninvasive migraine biomarker. Migraineurs with longer disease burden were classified more accurately than migraineurs with shorter disease burden, potentially indicating that disease duration leads to reorganization of brain circuitry.

  2. Vascular function assessed with cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts survival in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steedman Tracey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased arterial stiffness is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR permits assessment of the central arteries to measure aortic function. Methods We studied the relationship between central haemodynamics and outcome using CMR in 144 chronic kidney disease patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate Results Median follow up after the scan was 24 months. There were no significant differences in aortic distensibilty or aortic volumetric arterial strain between pre-dialysis and dialysis patients. Aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain negatively correlated with age. Aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain were lower in diabetics, patients with ischaemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. During follow up there were 20 deaths. Patients who died had lower aortic distensibilty than survivors. In a survival analysis, diabetes, systolic blood pressure and aortic distensibilty were independent predictors of mortality. There were 12 non-fatal cardiovascular events during follow up. Analysing the combined end point of death or a vascular event, diabetes, aortic distensibilty and volumetric arterial strain were predictors of events. Conclusion Deranged vascular function measured with CMR correlates with cardiovascular risk factors and predicts outcome. CMR measures of vascular function are potential targets for interventions to reduce cardiovascular risk.

  3. General structure of fermion two-point function and its spectral representation in a hot magnetized medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Aritra; Bandyopadhyay, Aritra; Roy, Pradip K.; Mustafa, Munshi G.

    2018-02-01

    We have systematically constructed the general structure of the fermion self-energy and the effective quark propagator in the presence of a nontrivial background such as a hot magnetized medium. This is applicable to both QED and QCD. The hard thermal loop approximation has been used for the heat bath. We have also examined transformation properties of the effective fermion propagator under some of the discrete symmetries of the system. Using the effective fermion propagator we have analyzed the fermion dispersion spectra in a hot magnetized medium along with the spinor for each fermion mode obtained by solving the modified Dirac equation. The fermion spectra is found to reflect the discrete symmetries of the two-point functions. We note that for a chirally symmetric theory the degenerate left- and right-handed chiral modes in vacuum or in a heat bath get separated and become asymmetric in the presence of a magnetic field without disturbing the chiral invariance. The obtained general structure of the two-point functions is verified by computing the three-point function, which agrees with the existing results in one-loop order. Finally, we have computed explicitly the spectral representation of the two-point functions which would be very important to study the spectral properties of the hot magnetized medium corresponding to QED and QCD with background magnetic field.

  4. Characteristics of brain functional alterations and task functional magnetic resonance imaging in patients with Cushing’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-dan LIU

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the relationship between the brain functional alterations of patients with Cushing's disease (CD and patients' mental symptom by applying the Evaluating Emotional Scales and task functional magnetic resonance imaging (Task fMRI. Methods Task fMRI was performed on 8 patients with diagnosed CD admitted in the Department of Endocrinology of Chinese PLA General Hospital from Nov. 2015 to Nov. 2016 and 21 healthy people with matched age, gender and education level as control. Meanwhile, Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS, Positive and Negative Affective Scale (PANAS and Cushing Quality of Life Scale (Cushing QOL were obtained to assess the brain functions. Results Significant depression and anxiety were observed in patients with CD, and their positive affective score was substantially lower while the negative affective score was relatively higher compared with that in the controls. Task fMRI revealed that, when watching the positive pictures, the activation degree of left cerebellum and right postcentral gyrus weakened in CD patients than in the controls, and the positive correlations existed between the activation degree of left cerebellum and the 16 o'clock adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH level, and between the activation degree of right postcentral gyrus and the urinary free cortisol (UFC level in CD patients. In contrast, when watching the negative pictures, the activation degree of left cerebellum, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus and left inferior frontal gyrus was weakened in CD patients than in the controls, and the activation degree of left cerebellum was negatively correlated to the 0 o'clock cortisol level and SAS score, but is positively correlated to the UFC level. When watching the neutral pictures, the activation degree of left cerebellum and left parahippocampal gyrus was weakened in CD patients than in the controls. Conclusions CD patients may have impaired brain function with

  5. Altered Functional Connectivity in Patients with Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment--A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Ding

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have shown that people with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment (sVCI have structural and functional abnormalities in the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites. In this study, we used seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC analysis and voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC techniques to investigate the alteration of rsFC in patients with sVCI. rsFC and structural magnetic resonance images were acquired for 51 patients with subcortical cerebrovascular disease. All patients were subdivided based on cognitive status into 29 with sVCI and 22 controls; patient characteristics were matched. rsFC of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC and VMHC were calculated separately, and rsFC of the PCC and VMHC between the two groups were compared. The regions showing abnormal rsFC of the PCC or VMHC in sVCI patients were adopted as regions of interest for correlation analyses. Our results are as follows: The patients with sVCI exhibited increases in rsFC in the left middle temporal lobe, right inferior temporal lobe and left superior frontal gyrus, and significant decreases in rsFC of the left thalamus with the PCC. sVCI patients showed a significant deficit in VMHC between the bilateral lingual gyrus, putamen, and precentral gyrus. Additionally, the z-memory score was significantly positively associated with connectivity between the left thalamus and the PCC (r = 0.41, p = 0.03, uncorrected in the sVCI group. Our findings suggest that the frontal lobe and subcortical brain sites play an important role in the pathogenesis of sVCI. Furthermore, rsFC between the left thalamus and the PCC might indicate the severity of sVCI.

  6. A multicentre year-long randomised controlled trial of exercise training targeting physical functioning in men with prostate cancer previously treated with androgen suppression and radiation from TROG 03.04 RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Daniel A; Spry, Nigel; Denham, James; Taaffe, Dennis R; Cormie, Prue; Joseph, David; Lamb, David S; Chambers, Suzanne K; Newton, Robert U

    2014-05-01

    Long-term prostate cancer (PCa) survivors are at increased risk for comorbidities and physical deconditioning. To determine the effectiveness of a year-long randomised controlled trial of exercise training in PCa survivors >5 yr postdiagnosis on physical functioning. Between 2010 and 2011, 100 long-term PCa survivors from Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 03.04 Randomised Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy previously treated with androgen-deprivation therapy and radiation therapy were randomly assigned to 6 mo of supervised exercise followed by 6 mo of a home-based maintenance programme (n=50) or printed educational material about physical activity (n=50) for 12 mo across 13 university-affiliated exercise clinics in Australia and New Zealand. Supervised resistance and aerobic exercise or printed educational material about physical activity. The primary end point was a 400-m walk as a measure of cardiovascular fitness. Secondary end points were physical function, patient-reported outcomes, muscle strength, body composition, and biomarkers. Analysis of covariance was used to compare outcomes for groups at 6 and 12 mo adjusted for baseline values. Participants undergoing supervised exercise showed improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness performance at 6 mo (-19 s [p=0.029]) and 12 mo (-13 s [p=0.028]) and better lower-body physical function across the 12-mo period (pphysical functioning at 6 (p=.006) and 12 mo (p=0.002), appendicular skeletal muscle at 6 mo (p=0.019), and objective measures of muscle strength at 6 and 12 mo (pphysical functioning measures, and inclusion of well-functioning individuals. Supervised exercise training in long-term PCa survivors is more effective than physical activity educational material for increasing cardiorespiratory fitness, physical function, muscle strength, and self-reported physical functioning at 6 mo. Importantly, these benefits were maintained in the long term with a home-based programme with follow-up at 12 mo. The

  7. Abnormal Default-Mode Network Activation in Cirrhotic Patients: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jiang Zhang; Guifen Yang; Jianzhong Yin; Yawu Liu; Ji Qi [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Central Hospital, Tianjin Medical Univ., Tianjin (China)

    2007-09-15

    Background: Recently, increasing numbers of studies have demonstrated that, in humans, a default-mode functional network exists in the resting state. Abnormal default-mode network in various diseases has been reported; however, no report concerning hepatic cirrhosis has been published to date. Purpose: To prospectively explore whether the resting-state network in patients with hepatic cirrhosis is abnormal or not, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Material and Methods: 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis (12 male, two female; 45{+-}9 years) and 14 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (12 male, two female; 42{+-}10 years) participated in a blocked-design fMRI study. A modified Stroop task with Chinese characters was used as the target stimulus. Statistical Parametric Mapping 99 software was employed to process the functional data. Individual maps and group data were generated for patients with hepatic cirrhosis and for healthy controls, respectively. Intergroup analysis between patients and healthy controls was also generated using the two-sample t-test model. Cluster analyses were done based on the group data, and an identical P value 0.01 with continuously connected voxels of no less than 10 was defined as significant deactivation. After fMRI scanning was complete, behavioral Stroop interference tests were performed on all subjects; reaction time and error number were recorded. Results: Functionally, deactivation of the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and precuneus was absent when subjects performed the incongruous word-reading task; deactivation of the PCC, precuneus, and ventral medial prefrontal cortex was increased when they performed the incongruous color-naming task. Conclusion: The functional as well as behavioral data suggest that cirrhotic patients may have an abnormal deactivation mode. The absence of deactivation in the PCC and precuneus may be a sensitive rather than specific marker in patients with hepatic cirrhosis.

  8. Functional and quantitative magnetic resonance myelography of symptomatic stenoses of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, Knut [District Hospital Castle of Werneck, MRI Center of Excellence, Werneck (Germany); Ganslandt, Oliver [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Stadlbauer, Andreas [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany); Medical University Vienna, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-12-15

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that functional, quantitative magnetic resonance myelography (MRM) allows standardized diagnosis of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenoses which show at least equal detectability compared to functional myelography and postmyelographic CT (pmCT) based on intra- and postoperative findings. We investigated 43 volunteers and 47 patients with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenoses using MRM in normal position as well as in flexion and extension in a standard whole-body MR scanner. Twenty volunteers were additionally examined under axial loading. All patients were investigated by functional myelography and pmCT and 10 patients had a functional lumbar MRM postoperatively. Range of motion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes in normal position, flexion, extension, and under axial loading (volunteers) were assessed for each segment. Detectability was determined by using intraoperative findings, and postoperative freedom of symptoms was correlated with CSF volume changes in MRM. The ranges of motion in a standard whole-body MR scanner provide adequate scope for investigations into function (flexion and extension) in both volunteers and patients. Axial loading was associated with a mechanism of extension, albeit to a far smaller extent. Detectability of lumbar stenoses was 100 % for MRM, 58 % for conventional myelography, and 68 % for pmCT. Postoperative changes in CSF volume of levels with stenoses in MRM strongly correlated with freedom of symptoms (R = 0.772). This MRM method allows for exact diagnosis and reproducible quantification of stenoses, motion-related changes, and spondylolistheses of the lumbar spine. It may be useful for early detection of alterations in order to avoid neuronal compression. (orig.)

  9. Biotransformation of magnetic nanoparticles as a function of coating in a rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A; Gutiérrez, L; Cáceres-Vélez, P R; Santos, D; Chaves, S B; Fascineli, M L; Garcia, M P; Azevedo, R B; Morales, M P

    2015-10-21

    Long-term in vivo studies in murine models have shown that DMSA-coated nanoparticles accumulate in spleen, liver and lung tissues during extended periods of time (at least up to 3 months) without any significant signs of toxicity detected. During that time, nanoparticles undergo a process of biotransformation either by reducing the size or the particle aggregation or both. Using a rat model, we have evaluated the transformations of magnetic nanoparticles injected at low doses. Particles with two different coatings, dimercaptosuccinic acid (NP-DMSA) and polyethylene glycol (NP-PEG-(NH2)2) have been administered to animals, to evaluate the role of coating in the degradation of the particles. We have found that low doses of magnetic nanoparticles are quickly metabolized by the animals. In fact, using a nanoparticle dose four times lower than in previous experiments, NP-DMSA were not observed 24 h after the administration either in the liver or in the lungs. Interestingly, an increased amount of ferritin, the iron storage protein, was observed in liver tissues from rats that were treated with the low dose of NP-DMSA in comparison with the control ones, suggesting a rapid metabolization of the particles into ferritin iron. On the other side we have found that, NP-PEG-(NH2)2 are still detectable in several organs 24 h after their administration at low doses. Probably, due to the longer circulation times of the NP-PEG-(NH2)2, there is a delay in the arrival of the particles to the tissue and this is the reason why we are able to see the particles 24 h post-administration. PEG coating could also be protecting the nanoparticles from rapid degradation of the reticuloendothelial system. Knowledge on the biodistribution, circulation time and degradation processes is required to gain a better understanding of the safety evaluation of this kind of nanomaterial for biomedical applications.

  10. Functional magnetic resonance imaging study of neuronal activation during cognitive tasks related to frontal lobe functions in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Hazuki

    2010-01-01

    Previous neurological studies and brain activation studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI) have suggested frontal lobe dysfunctions in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, no f-MRI study has used cognitive tasks reflecting fluency of ideas and memory related to frontal lobe functions. The purposes of this study are to assess the neuropsychological examinations and brain activities of OCD patients using f-MRI, as well as, to investigate the relationship between the severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and frontal lobe functions. The subjects were 22 right-handed persons consisting of 11 outpatients who had received a diagnosis of OCD based on diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-fourth edition (DMS-IV) and age- and sex-matched 11 healthy controls. All subjects were examined using Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS), Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-3 rd edition (WAIS-III), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Modified Stroop Test (MST), Verbal Fluency Test (VFT), Idea Fluency Test (IFT), and Rey-Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT). The brain activities were measured with f-MRI during three cognitive tasks; Task 1: idea generation (IFT), Task 2: word generation (VFT), and Task 3: remembrance of words (RAVLT). The block design was used in the trials, in which rest and activating tasks were alternated for five times in each task. The neuropsychological examinations revealed significant differences in the numbers of categories achieved and total errors in WCST, times of Part I in MST, scores of VFT and IFT, and the results of RAVLT between the OCD patients and healthy controls. Using functional brain imaging with f-MRI, noticeable activations were found in the superior, middle, inferior frontal gyri, and the cingulate gyrus during all tasks in both the OCD and control groups. The OCD patients had significantly higher activation in the cingulate gyrus than normal controls during Task 1 (IFT

  11. A mixed-effects, spatially varying coefficients model with application to multi-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuqing; Bartsch, Andreas J; Berrocal, Veronica J; Johnson, Timothy D

    2018-01-01

    Spatial resolution plays an important role in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies as the signal-to-noise ratio increases linearly with voxel volume. In scientific studies, where functional magnetic resonance imaging is widely used, the standard spatial resolution typically used is relatively low which ensures a relatively high signal-to-noise ratio. However, for pre-surgical functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis, where spatial accuracy is paramount, high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging may play an important role with its greater spatial resolution. High spatial resolution comes at the cost of a smaller signal-to-noise ratio. This begs the question as to whether we can leverage the higher signal-to-noise ratio of a standard functional magnetic resonance imaging study with the greater spatial accuracy of a high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging study in a pre-operative patient. To answer this question, we propose to regress the statistic image from a high resolution scan onto the statistic image obtained from a standard resolution scan using a mixed-effects model with spatially varying coefficients. We evaluate our model via simulation studies and we compare its performance with a recently proposed model that operates at a single spatial resolution. We apply and compare the two models on data from a patient awaiting tumor resection. Both simulation study results and the real data analysis demonstrate that our newly proposed model indeed leverages the larger signal-to-noise ratio of the standard spatial resolution scan while maintaining the advantages of the high spatial resolution scan.

  12. SSC superconducting dipole magnet cryostat model style B construction experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, N.H.; Bossert, R.C.; Carson, J.A.; Gonczy, J.D.; Larson, E.T.; Nicol, T.H.; Niemann, R.C.; Sorensen, D.; Zink, R.

    1989-03-01

    A program to upgrade the full scale SSC dipole magnet cryostat model function and assembly methods has resulted in a series of dipole magnets designated as style B construction. New design features and assembly techniques have produced a magnet and cryostat assembly that is the basis for Phase 1 of the SSC dipole magnet industrialization program. Details of the assembly program, assembly experience, and comparison to previous assembly experiences are presented. Improvements in magnet assembly techniques are also evaluated. 6 refs., 5 figs

  13. How Energy Metabolism Supports Cerebral Function: Insights from 13C Magnetic Resonance Studies In vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sonnay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral function is associated with exceptionally high metabolic activity, and requires continuous supply of oxygen and nutrients from the blood stream. Since the mid-twentieth century the idea that brain energy metabolism is coupled to neuronal activity has emerged, and a number of studies supported this hypothesis. Moreover, brain energy metabolism was demonstrated to be compartmentalized in neurons and astrocytes, and astrocytic glycolysis was proposed to serve the energetic demands of glutamatergic activity. Shedding light on the role of astrocytes in brain metabolism, the earlier picture of astrocytes being restricted to a scaffold-associated function in the brain is now out of date. With the development and optimization of non-invasive techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, several groups have worked on assessing cerebral metabolism in vivo. In this context, 1H MRS has allowed the measurements of energy metabolism-related compounds, whose concentrations can vary under different brain activation states. 1H-[13C] MRS, i.e., indirect detection of signals from 13C-coupled 1H, together with infusion of 13C-enriched glucose has provided insights into the coupling between neurotransmission and glucose oxidation. Although these techniques tackle the coupling between neuronal activity and metabolism, they lack chemical specificity and fail in providing information on neuronal and glial metabolic pathways underlying those processes. Currently, the improvement of detection modalities (i.e., direct detection of 13C isotopomers, the progress in building adequate mathematical models along with the increase in magnetic field strength now available render possible detailed compartmentalized metabolic flux characterization. In particular, direct 13C MRS offers more detailed dataset acquisitions and provides information on metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, and their role in supporting neurotransmission. Here

  14. Magnetic properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    netic moments of the particles, i.e. Zeeman energy, µH, where µ is the magnetic moment of the particle and H .... the domain magnetization of particle. Here, we have assumed a log-normal distribution function, P(D), for ... Effect of texturing field on a magnetically textured fluid magnetization for (a) (HT || H) and (b) (HT ⊥ H) ...

  15. The Solar Wind - Magnetosphere Energy Coupling Function and Open Magnetic Flux Estimation: Two Science Aspects of the SMILE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C.; Dai, L.; Sun, T.; Han, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar wind Magnetosphere Ionosphere Link Explorer (SMILE) is a novel self-standing mission to observe solar wind - magnetosphere coupling via simultaneous in situ solar wind /magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field measurements, X-ray images of the magnetosphere, and UV images of global auroral distribution defining system - level consequences. The SMILE mission is jointly supported by ESA and CSA, and the launch date is expected to be in 2021. SMILE will address several key outstanding questions concerning how the solar wind interacts with the magnetospheres on a global level. Quantitatively estimating the energy input from the solar wind into the magnetosphere on a global scale is still an observational challenge. Using global MHD simulations, we derive a new solar wind - magnetosphere energy coupling function. The X-ray images of the magnetosphere from the SMILE mission will help estimate the energy transfer from the solar wind into the magnetosphere. A second aspect SMILE can address is the open magnetic flux, which is closely related to magnetic reconnections in the dayside magnetopause and magnetotail. In a similar way, we find that the open magnetic flux can be estimated through a combined parameter f, which is a function of the solar wind velocity, number density, the southern interplanetary magnetic field strength, and the ionospheric Pederson conductance. The UV auroral images from SMILE will be used to determine the open magnetic flux, which may serve as a key space weather forecast element in the future.

  16. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage. PMID:21711614

  17. Metal-functionalized single-walled graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes: a first-principles study on magnetic property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The magnetic properties of metal-functionalized graphitic carbon nitride nanotubes were investigated based on first-principles calculations. The graphitic carbon nitride nanotube can be either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic by functionalizing with different metal atoms. The W- and Ti-functionalized nanotubes are ferromagnetic, which are attributed to carrier-mediated interactions because of the coupling between the spin-polarized d and p electrons and the formation of the impurity bands close to the band edges. However, Cr-, Mn-, Co-, and Ni-functionalized nanotubes are antiferromagnetic because of the anti-alignment of the magnetic moments between neighboring metal atoms. The functionalized nanotubes may be used in spintronics and hydrogen storage.

  18. Functional rearrangement of language areas in patients with tumors of the central nervous system using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kośla, Katarzyna; Pfajfer, Lucjan; Bryszewski, Bartosz; Jaskólski, Dariusz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Majos, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reorganization of the language areas in patients with tumors located near speech centers using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI was performed prior to the surgical treatment of 11 right-handed patients with tumors located close to the Broca’s or Wernicke’s areas of the left hemisphere. The analysis included a record of the activity in four regions of interest (ROIs): Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas, and their anatomic homologues in the right hemisphere. For each patient a regional lateralization index was calculated separately for Broca’s area versus its right-hemisphere homolog and Wernicke’s area versus its right-hemisphere homolog. The results were correlated with the histopathological type of the tumor and its size. Our fMRI examinations showed activation of the Broca’s area in the right hemisphere in 3/4 cases of low grade gliomas (LGG) localized in the left frontal lobe. In one case of the high grade glioma (HGG) only the left hemisphere Broca’s area was activated (LI=1). Activation in Wernicke’s area in both hemispheres was obtained irrespective of the size and histological type of the tumor. All tumors localized in the left temporal lobe were HGG. We obtained activation only in the right hemisphere Wernicke’s area in 4/5 of the cases. In 4/5 of the cases activation in Broca’s area was present- in 2 cases in the left hemisphere, in 1 case in the right hemisphere and in 1 case bilateral. The presence of a neoplastic lesion in close topographic relationship to language areas induces their functional reorganization. fMRI is an useful method for determination of language areas localization in pre-operative planning. HGG tumors localized near Wernicke’s area lead to transfer its function to the healthy hemisphere and/or to decreased activity in the affected hemisphere

  19. Assessing and inducing neuroplasticity with transcranial magnetic stimulation and robotics for motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Marcia K; Ro, Tony; Levin, Harvey S

    2006-12-01

    To describe 2 new ways of assessing and inducing neuroplasticity in the human brain--transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and robotics--and to investigate and promote the recovery of motor function after brain damage. We identified recent articles and books directly bearing on TMS and robotics. Articles using these tools for purposes other than rehabilitation were excluded. From these studies, we emphasize the methodologic and technical details of these tools as applicable for assessing and inducing plasticity. Because both tools have only recently been used for rehabilitation, the majority of the articles selected for this review have been published only within the last 10 years. We used the PubMed and Compendex databases to find relevant peer-reviewed studies for this review. The studies were required to be relevant to rehabilitation and to use TMS or robotics methodologies. Guidelines were applied via independent extraction by multiple observers. Despite the limited amount of research using these procedures for assessing and inducing neuroplasticity, there is growing evidence that both TMS and robotics can be very effective, inexpensive, and convenient ways for assessing and inducing rehabilitation. Although TMS has primarily been used as an assessment tool for motor function, an increasing number of studies are using TMS as a tool to directly induce plasticity and improve motor function. Similarly, robotic devices have been used for rehabilitation because of their suitability for delivery of highly repeatable training. New directions in robotics-assisted rehabilitation are taking advantage of novel measurements that can be acquired via the devices, enabling unique methods of assessment of motor recovery. As refinements in technology and advances in our knowledge continue, TMS and robotics should play an increasing role in assessing and promoting the recovery of function. Ongoing and future studies combining TMS and robotics within the same populations may

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of respiratory movement and lung function; Magnetresonanztomographie der Atembewegung und Lungenfunktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tetzlaff, R. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Medizinische und Biologische Informatik, Heidelberg (Germany); Eichinger, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Lung function measurements are the domain of spirometry or plethysmography. These methods have proven their value in clinical practice, nevertheless, being global measurements the functional indices only describe the sum of all functional units of the lung. Impairment of only a single component of the respiratory pump or of a small part of lung parenchyma can be compensated by unaffected lung tissue. Dynamic imaging can help to detect such local changes and lead to earlier adapted therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) seems to be perfect for this application as it is not hampered by image distortion as is projection radiography and it does not expose the patient to potentially harmful radiation like computed tomography. Unfortunately, lung parenchyma is not easy to image using MRI due to its low signal intensity. For this reason first applications of MRI in lung function measurements concentrated on the movement of the thoracic wall and the diaphragm. Recent technical advances in MRI however might allow measurements of regional dynamics of the lungs. (orig.) [German] Die Lungenfunktion wird bislang hauptsaechlich durch die Spirometrie oder Plethysmographie untersucht. Diese Methoden sind zwar sehr leistungsfaehig zur Diagnostik von Lungenerkrankungen, sind jedoch globale Messmethoden, deren Messparameter immer die Summe aller funktionellen Einheiten der Lunge beschreiben. Veraenderungen, die auf eine Teilkomponente der Atempumpe beschraenkt sind oder kleine Teile des Lungengewebes betreffen, koennen durch gesunde Lungenanteile kompensiert werden. Mit dynamischen bildgebenden Verfahren koennten solche regionalen Veraenderungen erfasst und so eine fruehere Therapie ermoeglicht werden. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) bietet sich hier ideal an, da sie als Schnittbildverfahren weder die Probleme der Bildverzerrung, der Projektionsverfahren noch die Strahlenbelastung der Computertomographie hat. Allerdings wird die MRT der Lunge durch das geringe Signal des

  1. Generation of Internal-Image Functional Aptamers of Okadaic Acid via Magnetic-Bead SELEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Okadaic acid (OA is produced by Dinophysis and Prorocentrum dinoflagellates and primarily accumulates in bivalves, and this toxin has harmful effects on consumers and operators. In this work, we first report the use of aptamers as novel non-toxic probes capable of binding to a monoclonal antibody against OA (OA-mAb. Aptamers that mimic the OA toxin with high affinity and selectivity were generated by the magnetic bead-assisted systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX strategy. After 12 selection rounds, cloning, sequencing and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis, four candidate aptamers (O24, O31, O39, O40 were selected that showed high affinity and specificity for OA-mAb. The affinity constants of O24, O31, O39 and O40 were 8.3 × 108 M−1, 1.47 × 109 M−1, 1.23 × 109 M−1 and 1.05 × 109 M−1, respectively. Indirect competitive ELISA was employed to determine the internal-image function of the aptamers. The results reveal that O31 has a similar competitive function as free OA toxin, whereas the other three aptamers did not bear the necessary internal-image function. Based on the derivation of the curvilinear equation for OA/O31, the equation that defined the relationship between the OA toxin content and O31 was Y = 2.185X − 1.78. The IC50 of O31 was 3.39 ng·mL−1, which was close to the value predicted by the OA ELISA (IC50 = 4.4 ng·mL−1; the IC10 was 0.33 ng·mL−1. The above data provides strong evidence that internal-image functional aptamers could be applicable as novel probes in a non-toxic assay.

  2. Automatic selection of resting-state networks with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Francesca eStorti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a resting-state condition can reveal the co-activation of specific brain regions in distributed networks, called resting-state networks, which are selected by independent component analysis (ICA of the fMRI data. One of the major difficulties with component analysis is the automatic selection of the ICA features related to brain activity. In this study we describe a method designed to automatically select networks of potential functional relevance, specifically, those regions known to be involved in motor function, visual processing, executive functioning, auditory processing, memory, and the default-mode network. To do this, image analysis was based on probabilistic ICA as implemented in FSL software. After decomposition, the optimal number of components was selected by applying a novel algorithm which takes into account, for each component, Pearson's median coefficient of skewness of the spatial maps generated by FSL, followed by clustering, segmentation, and spectral analysis. To evaluate the performance of the approach, we investigated the resting-state networks in 25 subjects. For each subject, three resting-state scans were obtained with a Siemens Allegra 3 T scanner (NYU data set. Comparison of the visually and the automatically identified neuronal networks showed that the algorithm had high accuracy (first scan: 95%, second scan: 95%, third scan: 93% and precision (90%, 90%, 84%. The reproducibility of the networks for visual and automatic selection was very close: it was highly consistent in each subject for the default-mode network (≥ 92% and the occipital network, which includes the medial visual cortical areas (≥ 94%, and consistent for the attention network (≥ 80%, the right and/or left lateralized frontoparietal attention networks, and the temporal-motor network (≥ 80%. The automatic selection method may be used to detect neural networks and reduce subjectivity in ICA

  3. ROAM: a Radial-basis-function Optimization Approximation Method for diagnosing the three-dimensional coronal magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Dalmasse

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP routinely performs coronal polarimetric measurements using the Fe XIII 10747 $AA$ and 10798 $AA$ lines, which are sensitive to the coronal magnetic field. However, inverting such polarimetric measurements into magnetic field data is a difficult task because the corona is optically thin at these wavelengths and the observed signal is therefore the integrated emission of all the plasma along the line of sight. To overcome this difficulty, we take on a new approach that combines a parameterized 3D magnetic field model with forward modeling of the polarization signal. For that purpose, we develop a new, fast and efficient, optimization method for model-data fitting: the Radial-basis-functions Optimization Approximation Method (ROAM. Model-data fitting is achieved by optimizing a user-specified log-likelihood function that quantifies the differences between the observed polarization signal and its synthetic/predicted analogue. Speed and efficiency are obtained by combining sparse evaluation of the magnetic model with radial-basis-function (RBF decomposition of the log-likelihood function. The RBF decomposition provides an analytical expression for the log-likelihood function that is used to inexpensively estimate the set of parameter values optimizing it. We test and validate ROAM on a synthetic test bed of a coronal magnetic flux rope and show that it performs well with a significantly sparse sample of the parameter space. We conclude that our optimization method is well-suited for fast and efficient model-data fitting and can be exploited for converting coronal polarimetric measurements, such as the ones provided by CoMP, into coronal magnetic field data.

  4. The effects of combined repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation on motor function in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Tae Gun; Park, Eunhee; Kang, Chung; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2016-11-22

    Both transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), when provided to stroke patients in combination with motor training, enhance therapeutic efficacy and motor function. However, the majority of previous studies have only examined a single treatment modality. The authors investigated the modulating influence of combination dual-mode brain stimulation upon bihemispheric stimulation with motor training in stroke patients. Twenty stroke patients with hemiparesis underwent five randomly arranged sessions of diverse combinations of rTMS and tDCS. We applied cathodal or anodal tDCS over the contralesional primary motor cortex (cM1) and 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (iM1) in a simultaneous or preconditioning method including sham stimulation. Immediately after dual-mode stimulation, sequential hand motor training was performed for 5 minutes. The total pulses of rTMS and the duration of tDCS and motor training were the same for all sessions. Cortical excitability and sequential motor performance were evaluated before and after each session. Motor function and corticomotor excitability following simultaneous stimulation via cathodal tDCS over the cM1 combined with 10 Hz rTMS over the iM1 were significantly increased after the intervention, with significantly greater motor improvement than seen with other treatment conditions (P motor performance in stroke patients than other combination methods. This result seemed to be related to effective modulation of interhemispheric imbalance of cortical excitability by dual-mode stimulation.

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging study of external source memory and its relation to cognitive insight in non-clinical subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchy, Lisa; Hawco, Colin; Bodnar, Michael; Izadi, Sarah; Dell'Elce, Jennifer; Messina, Katrina; Lepage, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Previous research has linked cognitive insight (a measure of self-reflectiveness and self-certainty) in psychosis with neurocognitive and neuroanatomical disturbances in the fronto-hippocampal neural network. The authors' goal was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of cognitive insight during an external source memory paradigm in non-clinical subjects. At encoding, 24 non-clinical subjects travelled through a virtual city where they came across 20 separate people, each paired with a unique object in a distinct location. fMRI data were then acquired while participants viewed images of the city, and completed source recognition memory judgments of where and with whom objects were seen, which is known to involve prefrontal cortex. Cognitive insight was assessed with the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale. External source memory was associated with neural activity in a widespread network consisting of frontal cortex, including ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), temporal and occipital cortices. Activation in VLPFC correlated with higher self-reflectiveness and activation in midbrain correlated with lower self-certainty during source memory attributions. Neither self-reflectiveness nor self-certainty significantly correlated with source memory accuracy. By means of virtual reality and in the context of an external source memory paradigm, the study identified a preliminary functional neural basis for cognitive insight in the VLPFC in healthy people that accords with our fronto-hippocampal theoretical model as well as recent neuroimaging data in people with psychosis. The results may facilitate the understanding of the role of neural mechanisms in psychotic disorders associated with cognitive insight distortions. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  6. Neural substrates of emotion as revealed by functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory P; Meador, Kimford J; Loring, David W; Allison, Jerry D; Brown, Warren S; Paul, Lynn K; Pillai, Jay J; Lavin, Thomas B

    2004-03-01

    To examine the brain circuitry involved in emotional experience and determine whether the cerebral hemispheres are specialized for positive and negative emotional experience. Recent research has provided a preliminary sketch of the neurologic underpinnings of emotional processing involving specialized contributions of limbic and cortical brain regions. Electrophysiologic, functional imaging, and Wada test data have suggested positive, approach-related emotions are associated with left cerebral hemisphere regions, whereas negative, withdrawal-related emotions appear to be more aligned with right hemisphere mechanisms. These emotional-neural associations were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging in 10 healthy controls with 20 positively and 20 negatively valenced pictures from the International Affective Picture System in a counterbalanced order. Pictures were viewed within a 1.5 Telsa scanner through computerized video goggles. Emotional pictures resulted in significantly increased blood flow bilaterally in the mesial frontal lobe/anterior cingulate gyrus, dorsolateral frontal lobe, amygdala/anterior temporal regions, and cerebellum. Negative emotional pictures resulted in greater activation of the right hemisphere, and positive pictures caused greater activation of the left hemisphere. Results are consistent with theories emphasizing the importance of circuitry linking subcortical structures with mesial temporal, anterior cingulate, and frontal lobe regions in emotion and with the valence model of emotion that posits lateralized cerebral specialization for positive and negative emotional experience.

  7. Functional magnetic resonance imaging using non-Fourier, spatially selective radiofrequency encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, S S; Guttmann, C R; Panych, L P

    1999-04-01

    A new method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) employing non-Fourier encoding using spatially selective radiofrequency (RF) excitation is presented. The method uses manipulation of spatially selective RF pulses to encode spins in the slice-select direction. The method has several advantages over standard multislice approaches. It provides a simple means for monitoring irregularly distributed sections throughout a volume without the need to encode the whole volume. It offers the potential for increased signal-to-noise ratio if an appropriate basis is used for encoding. With a unique design of excitation pulses, it also appears possible to significantly reduce in-flow effects. An interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) sequence was adapted for non-Fourier encoding in the slice-select direction and was implemented on a conventional 1.5-Telsa system. The method was then used for functional mapping of the visual and motor areas where significant reduction of in-flow effect was demonstrated. This approach can be adapted to other imaging sequences that are used for fMRI, such as single-shot EPI.

  8. Methods for modeling and quantification in functional imaging by positron emissions tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    This report presents experiences and researches in the field of in vivo medical imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In particular, advances in terms of reconstruction, quantification and modeling in PET are described. The validation of processing and analysis methods is supported by the creation of data by simulation of the imaging process in PET. The recent advances of combined PET/MRI clinical cameras, allowing simultaneous acquisition of molecular/metabolic PET information, and functional/structural MRI information opens the door to unique methodological innovations, exploiting spatial alignment and simultaneity of the PET and MRI signals. It will lead to an increase in accuracy and sensitivity in the measurement of biological phenomena. In this context, the developed projects address new methodological issues related to quantification, and to the respective contributions of MRI or PET information for a reciprocal improvement of the signals of the two modalities. They open perspectives for combined analysis of the two imaging techniques, allowing optimal use of synchronous, anatomical, molecular and functional information for brain imaging. These innovative concepts, as well as data correction and analysis methods, will be easily translated into other areas of investigation using combined PET/MRI. (author) [fr

  9. Effective Uranium (VI) Sorption from Alkaline Solutions Using Bi-Functionalized Silica-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.; He, L.; Liu, B.; Tang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    High temperature gas reactor is one of generation IV reactors that can adapt the future energy market, of which the preparation of fuel elements will produce a large amount of radioactive wastewater with uranium and high-level ammonia. Sorption treatment is one of the most important method to recover uranium from wastewater. However, there are few report on uranium sorbent that can directly be applied in wastewater with ammonia. Therefore, the development of a sorbent that can recover uranium in basic environment will greatly decrease the cost of fuel element production and the risk of radioactive pollution. In this work, ammonium-phosphonate-bifunctionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles has been developed for effective sorption of uranium from alkaline media, which are not only advantaged in the uranium separation from liquid phase, but also with satisfactory adsorption rate, amount and reusability. The as-prepared sorbent is found to show a maximum uranium sorption capacity of 70.7 mg/g and a fast equilibrium time of 2 h at pH 9.5 under room temperature. Compared with the mono-functionalized (phosphonate alone and ammonium alone) particles, the combination of the bi-functionalized groups gives rise to an excellent ability to remove uranium from basic environment. The sorbent can be used as a promising solid phase candidate for highly-efficient removal of uranium from basic solution. (author)

  10. Accurate estimation of the myocardium global function from reduced magnetic resonance image acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rewaidy, Hossam; Khalifa, Ayman; Fahmy, Ahmed S

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating the heart global function from magnetic resonance images is based on estimating a number of functional parameters such as the left ventricular (LV) volume, LV mass, ejection fraction, and stroke volume. Estimating these parameters requires accurate calculation of the volumes enclosed by the inner and outer surfaces of the LV chamber at the max contraction and relaxation states of the heart. Currently, this is achieved through acquisition and segmentation of a large number of short-axis (SAX) views of the LV, which is time-consuming and expensive. Reducing the number of acquisitions results in undersampling the LV surfaces and hence increases the calculation errors. In this work, we describe and evaluate a method for estimating the cardiac parameters from a small number of image acquisitions that includes one long-axis (LAX) view of the LV. In this method, the LAX contour is used to swipe the SAX contours to fill in the missed LV surface between the SAX slices. Results on 25 patients and CT phantoms shows that, given the same number of slices, the proposed method is superior to other methods.

  11. Suggestion-Induced Modulation of Semantic Priming during Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ulrich

    Full Text Available Using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a primed visual lexical decision task, we investigated the neural and functional mechanisms underlying modulations of semantic word processing through hypnotic suggestions aimed at altering lexical processing of primes. The priming task was to discriminate between target words and pseudowords presented 200 ms after the prime word which was semantically related or unrelated to the target. In a counterbalanced study design, each participant performed the task once at normal wakefulness and once after the administration of hypnotic suggestions to perceive the prime as a meaningless symbol of a foreign language. Neural correlates of priming were defined as significantly lower activations upon semantically related compared to unrelated trials. We found significant suggestive treatment-induced reductions in neural priming, albeit irrespective of the degree of suggestibility. Neural priming was attenuated upon suggestive treatment compared with normal wakefulness in brain regions supporting automatic (fusiform gyrus and controlled semantic processing (superior and middle temporal gyri, pre- and postcentral gyri, and supplementary motor area. Hence, suggestions reduced semantic word processing by conjointly dampening both automatic and strategic semantic processes.

  12. [Olfactory functional magnetic resonance imaging with modified OEP-98C olfactometer and event-related design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Hui; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jian-Feng; Feng, Feng; Ni, Dao-Feng; Jin, Zheng-Yu

    2009-04-01

    To explore the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in analysis of olfaction function with modified OEP-98C olfactometer and event-related design. Six young right-handed men underwent olfactory fMRI with event-related design. OEP-98C olfactometer was modified to accommodate MR environment. There were 2 types of tasks in the experiment. In one task, only isoamyl acetate was used as odorant. In the other task, to avoid possible decreased olfactory attention, vanillin was given before each presentation of isoamyl acetate. In both tasks, uniform activation in piriform cortex and secondary olfactory cortexes was determined. The activation of piriform cortex was not significantly different between the two tasks (P > 0.01). With isoamyl acetate as odorant, modified OEP-98C olfactometer, and event-related design, olfaction fMRI can depict cortex activation at primary and secondary olfactory cortex. Applying other odorant with similar quality to avoid olfactory attention decrease can not promote depiction of activation in primary olfactory cortex.

  13. Measurement of single-kidney glomerular filtration function from magnetic resonance perfusion renography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Meiying; Cheng, Yingsheng [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Zhao, Binghui, E-mail: binghuizhao@163.com [Department of Radiology, Shanghai Tenth People' s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • MRPR monitors the transit of contrast material through nephron. • MRPR could reveal renal physiological characteristics in quality and quantity. • This review outlines the basics and future challenges of DCE MRPR. - Abstract: Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) describes the flow rate of filtered fluid through the kidney, and is considered to be the reference standard in the evaluation of renal function. There are many ways to test the GFR clinically, such as serum creatinine concentration, blood urea nitrogen and SPECT renography, however, they’re all not a good standard to evaluate the early damage of renal function. In recent years, the improvement of MRI hardware and software makes it possible to reveal physiological characteristics such as renal blood flow or GFR by dynamic contrast enhancement magnetic resonance perfusion renography (DEC MRPR). MRPR is a method used to monitor the transit of contrast material, typically a gadolinium chelate, through the renal cortex, the medulla, and the collecting system. This review outlines the basics of DCE MRPR included acquisition of dynamic MR perfusion imaging, calculation of the contrast concentration from signal intensity and compartment models, and some challenges of MRPR method faced in prospective clinical application.

  14. Memory Deficits in Schizophrenia: A Selective Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C. Lahti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex chronic mental illness that is characterized by positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Cognitive deficits are most predictive of long-term outcomes, with abnormalities in memory being the most robust finding. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has allowed exploring neural correlates of memory deficits in vivo. In this article, we will give a selective review of fMRI studies probing brain regions and functional networks that are thought to be related to abnormal memory performance in two memory systems prominently affected in schizophrenia; working memory and episodic memory. We revisit the classic “hypofrontality” hypothesis of working memory deficits and explore evidence for frontotemporal dysconnectivity underlying episodic memory abnormalities. We conclude that fMRI studies of memory deficits in schizophrenia are far from universal. However, the current literature does suggest that alterations are not isolated to a few brain regions, but are characterized by abnormalities within large-scale brain networks.

  15. Learning alters the tuning of functional magnetic resonance imaging patterns for visual forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiaxiang; Meeson, Alan; Welchman, Andrew E; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2010-10-20

    Learning is thought to facilitate the recognition of objects by optimizing the tuning of visual neurons to behaviorally relevant features. However, the learning mechanisms that shape neural selectivity for visual forms in the human brain remain essentially unknown. Here, we combine behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements to test the mechanisms that mediate enhanced behavioral sensitivity in the discrimination of visual forms after training. In particular, we used high-resolution fMRI and multivoxel pattern classification methods to investigate fine learning-dependent changes in neural preference for global forms. We measured the observers' choices when discriminating between concentric and radial patterns presented in noise before and after training. Similarly, we measured the choices of a pattern classifier when predicting each stimulus from fMRI activity. Comparing the performance of human observers and classifiers demonstrated that learning alters the observers' sensitivity to visual forms and the tuning of fMRI activation patterns in visual areas selective for task-relevant features. In particular, training on low-signal stimuli enhanced the amplitude but reduced the width of pattern-based tuning functions in higher dorsal and ventral visual areas. Thus, our findings suggest that learning of visual patterns is implemented by enhancing the response to the preferred stimulus category and reducing the response to nonpreferred stimuli in higher extrastriate visual cortex.

  16. Silver(I) dithiocarbamate on modified magnetic cellulose: Synthesis, density functional theory study and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabaqian, Samaneh; Nemati, Firouzeh; Nahzomi, Hossein Taherpour; Heravi, Majid M

    2018-03-15

    A magnetically retrievable catalytic system involving Ag(I) dithiocarbamate supported on functionalized cellulose was prepared. The structure of this hybrid nano-composite was characterized by various techniques. In addition, to describe the metal-ligand interactions present in the nano-composite, covalent and electrostatic interactions, density functional theory model and quantum theory of atoms in molecule method were employed. The resultant nano-composite exhibits remarkable catalytic efficacy in the synthesis of 2-amino-6-(2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-4-phenylnicotinonitriles from the reaction of 3-acetylcoumarin, aromatic aldehydes, and malononitrile. Its recoverability and reusability for this catalyst was examined in several runs, which showed no appreciable loss after five runs. The facile accessibility to the starting materials, and conducting the reactions in the eco-friendly and cost-effective conditions are the other merits of such new catalyst. Ambient reaction conditions, wide substrate scope, and facile accessibility to the starting materials, are some of the other outstanding features of this protocol that make it economic and sustainable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acupuncture at Waiguan (SJ5) and sham points influences activation of functional brain areas of ischemic stroke patients: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Ji; Chen, Junqi; Huang, Yong; Lai, Xinsheng; Tang, Chunzhi; Yang, Junjun; Chen, Hua; Qu, Shanshan

    2014-01-01

    Most studies addressing the specificity of meridians and acupuncture points have focused mainly on the different neural effects of acupuncture at different points in healthy individuals. This study examined the effects of acupuncture on brain function in a pathological context. Sixteen patients with ischemic stroke were randomly assigned to true point group (true acupuncture at right Waiguan (SJ5)) and sham point group (sham acupuncture). Results of functional magnetic resonance imaging revea...

  18. Development of superparamagnetic high-magnetization C18-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles as sorbents for enrichment and determination of methylprednisolone in rat plasma by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Panfeng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xifeng; Zhang, Xuesong; Shen, Shun; Wang, Yan

    2010-09-23

    In this study, a novel extraction and enrichment technique based on superparamagnetic high-magnetization C(18)-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles (C(18)-MNPs) as sorbents was successfully developed for the determination of methylprednisolone (MP) in rat plasma by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The synthesized silica-coated magnetite modified with chlorodimethyl-n-octadecylsilane was about 320 nm in diameter with strong magnetism and high surface area. It provided an efficient way for extraction and concentration of MP in the samples through hydrophobic interaction by the interior C(18) groups. Moreover, MP adsorbed with C(18)-MNPs could be simply and rapidly isolated through placing a strong magnet on the bottom of container, and then easily eluted from C(18)-MNPs by n-hexane solution. Extraction conditions such as amounts of C(18)-MNPs added, adsorption time and desorption solvent, were investigated. Method validations including linear range, detection limit, precision, and recovery were also studied. The results showed that the proposed method based on C(18)-MNPs was a simple, accurate and high efficient approach for the analysis of MP in the complex plasma samples. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Highlights from the previous volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergini Eduardo, G.; Pan, Y.; al., Vardi R. et; al., Akkermans Eric et; et al.

    2014-01-01

    Semiclassical propagation up to the Heisenberg time Superconductivity and magnetic order in the half-Heusler compound ErPdBi An experimental evidence-based computational paradigm for new logic-gates in neuronal activity Universality in the symmetric exclusion process and diffusive systems

  20. Enhanced adsorption removal of anionic dyes via a facile preparation of amino-functionalized magnetic silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Shui; Fan, Yu-Han; Zhang, Shou-Wen; Qi, Shi-Hua

    2017-03-01

    A novel amino-functionalized magnetic silica (Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 ) was easily prepared via a one-step method integrating the immobilization of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane with a sol-gel process of tetraethyl orthosilicate into a single process. This showed significant improvement in the adsorption capacity of anionic dyes. The product (Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 ) was characterized with scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, zeta potential and vibrating sample magnetometry. The adsorption performance of Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 was then tested by removing acid orange 10 (AO10) and reactive black 5 (RB5) from the aqueous solutions under various experimental conditions including initial solution pH, initial dye concentrations, reaction time and temperature. The results indicated that the maximum adsorption capacity of AO10 and RB5 on Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 was 621.9 and 919.1 mg g -1 at pH 2, respectively. The sorption isotherms fit the Langmuir model nicely. Similarly, the sorption kinetic data were better fitted into the pseudo-second order kinetic model than the pseudo-first order model. In addition, the thermodynamic data demonstrated that the adsorption process was endothermic, spontaneous and physical. Furthermore, Fe 3 O 4 @SiO 2 -NH 2 could be easily separated from aqueous solutions by an external magnetic field, and the preparation was reproducible.

  1. Altered functional magnetic resonance imaging responses to nonpainful sensory stimulation in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Solà, Marina; Pujol, Jesus; Wager, Tor D; Garcia-Fontanals, Alba; Blanco-Hinojo, Laura; Garcia-Blanco, Susana; Poca-Dias, Violant; Harrison, Ben J; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Monfort, Jordi; Garcia-Fructuoso, Ferran; Deus, Joan

    2014-11-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a disorder characterized by chronic pain and enhanced responses to acute noxious events. However, the sensory systems affected in FM may extend beyond pain itself, as FM patients show reduced tolerance to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation. Characterizing the neural substrates of multisensory hypersensitivity in FM may thus provide important clues about the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. The aim of this study was to characterize brain responses to non-nociceptive sensory stimulation in FM patients and their relationship to subjective sensory sensitivity and clinical pain severity. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to assess brain response to auditory, visual, and tactile motor stimulation in 35 women with FM and 25 matched controls. Correlation and mediation analyses were performed to establish the relationship between brain responses and 3 types of outcomes: subjective hypersensitivity to daily sensory stimulation, spontaneous pain, and functional disability. Patients reported increased subjective sensitivity (increased unpleasantness) in response to multisensory stimulation in daily life. Functional MRI revealed that patients showed reduced task-evoked activation in primary/secondary visual and auditory areas and augmented responses in the insula and anterior lingual gyrus. Reduced responses in visual and auditory areas were correlated with subjective sensory hypersensitivity and clinical severity measures. FM patients showed strong attenuation of brain responses to nonpainful events in early sensory cortices, accompanied by an amplified response at later stages of sensory integration in the insula. These abnormalities are associated with core FM symptoms, suggesting that they may be part of the pathophysiology of the disease. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  2. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  3. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of chronic medical nephropathies with impaired renal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalla-Palma, L.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Cova, M.; Meduri, S.; Panzetta, G.; Galli, G.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic renal disease with renal insufficiency. In 33 consecutive patients (21 vascular nephropathy, 12 glomerular nephropathy) MRI was performed using a 1.5-T unit and a body coil, with SE T1-weighted (TR/TE = 600/19 ms) and dynamic TFFE T1-weighted sequences (TR/TE = 12/5 ms, flip angle = 25 ) after manual bolus injection (via a cubital vein) of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA-BMA. Morphological evaluation was performed in unblinded fashion by three radiologists, evaluating renal size, cortical thickness, and corticomedullary differentiation. Functional analysis was performed by one reviewer. Time-signal intensity curves, peak intensity value (P), time to peak intensity (T), and the P/T ratio were obtained at the cortex, medulla, and pyelocaliceal system of each kidney. The relationship of these parameters to serum creatinine and with creatinine clearance was investigated. A good correlation between morphological features of the kidneys and serum creatinine values was found. Morphological findings could not distinguish between vascular and glomerular nephropathies. A statistically significant correlation (P <0.01) between cortical P, cortical P/T, medullary P, and serum creatinine and creatinine clearance was found. A significant correlation (P <0.01) was also found between cortical T, medullary P/T, T of the excretory system, and creatinine clearance. The cortical T value was significantly higher (P <0.01) in vascular nephropathy than in glomerular nephropathy. Thus in patients with chronic renal failure dynamic MRI shows both morphological and functional changes. Morphological changes are correlated with the degree of renal insufficiency and not with the type of nephropathy; the functional changes seem to differ in vascular from glomerular nephropathies. (orig.)

  4. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the assessment of chronic medical nephropathies with impaired renal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla-Palma, L.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Cova, M.; Meduri, S. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Panzetta, G.; Galli, G. [Hemodialysis Service, Ospedale Maggiore, Trieste (Italy)

    2000-02-01

    We examined the value of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic renal disease with renal insufficiency. In 33 consecutive patients (21 vascular nephropathy, 12 glomerular nephropathy) MRI was performed using a 1.5-T unit and a body coil, with SE T1-weighted (TR/TE = 600/19 ms) and dynamic TFFE T1-weighted sequences (TR/TE = 12/5 ms, flip angle = 25 ) after manual bolus injection (via a cubital vein) of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA-BMA. Morphological evaluation was performed in unblinded fashion by three radiologists, evaluating renal size, cortical thickness, and corticomedullary differentiation. Functional analysis was performed by one reviewer. Time-signal intensity curves, peak intensity value (P), time to peak intensity (T), and the P/T ratio were obtained at the cortex, medulla, and pyelocaliceal system of each kidney. The relationship of these parameters to serum creatinine and with creatinine clearance was investigated. A good correlation between morphological features of the kidneys and serum creatinine values was found. Morphological findings could not distinguish between vascular and glomerular nephropathies. A statistically significant correlation (P <0.01) between cortical P, cortical P/T, medullary P, and serum creatinine and creatinine clearance was found. A significant correlation (P <0.01) was also found between cortical T, medullary P/T, T of the excretory system, and creatinine clearance. The cortical T value was significantly higher (P <0.01) in vascular nephropathy than in glomerular nephropathy. Thus in patients with chronic renal failure dynamic MRI shows both morphological and functional changes. Morphological changes are correlated with the degree of renal insufficiency and not with the type of nephropathy; the functional changes seem to differ in vascular from glomerular nephropathies. (orig.)

  5. Laterality in Metaphor Processing: Lack of Evidence from Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for the Right Hemisphere Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Alexander M.; Leube, Dirk T.; Erb, Michael; Grodd, Wolfgang; Kircher, Tilo T. J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated processing of metaphoric sentences using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Seventeen healthy subjects (6 female, 11 male) read 60 novel short German sentence pairs with either metaphoric or literal meaning and performed two different tasks: judging the metaphoric content and judging whether the sentence…

  6. Myocardial Steatosis and Left Ventricular Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus : Assessed with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, Rutger Wouter van der

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to provide more insight into the influence of myocardial steatosis on left ventricular function in healthy volunteers and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore we developed a reproducible proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopic technique with respiratory

  7. A Preliminary Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study of Cortical Inhibition and Excitability in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G.; Rinehart, Nicole J.; Tonge, Bruce J.; Bradshaw, John L.; Fitzgerald, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: Controversy surrounds the distinction between high-functioning autism (HFA) and Asperger disorder, but motor abnormalities are associated features of both conditions. This study examined motor cortical inhibition and excitability in HFA and Asperger disorder using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Method: Participants were diagnosed by…

  8. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study mapping the episodic memory encoding network in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Meneka K.; Stretton, Jason; Winston, Gavin P.; Bonelli, Silvia; Centeno, Maria; Vollmar, Christian; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J.; Koepp, Matthias J.

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging has demonstrated reorganization of memory encoding networks within the temporal lobe in temporal lobe epilepsy, but little is known of the extra-temporal networks in these patients. We investigated the temporal and extra-temporal reorganization of memory encoding networks in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy and the neural correlates of successful subsequent memory formation. We studied 44 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis (24 left) and 26 healthy control subjects. All participants performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging memory encoding paradigm of faces and words with subsequent out-of-scanner recognition assessments. A blocked analysis was used to investigate activations during encoding and neural correlates of subsequent memory were investigated using an event-related analysis. Event-related activations were then correlated with out-of-scanner verbal and visual memory scores. During word encoding, control subjects activated the left prefrontal cortex and left hippocampus whereas patients with left hippocampal sclerosis showed significant additional right temporal and extra-temporal activations. Control subjects displayed subsequent verbal memory effects within left parahippocampal gyrus, left orbitofrontal cortex and fusiform gyrus whereas patients with left hippocampal sclerosis activated only right posterior hippocampus, parahippocampus and fusiform gyrus. Correlational analysis showed that patients with left hippocampal sclerosis with better verbal memory additionally activated left orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and left posterior hippocampus. During face encoding, control subjects showed right lateralized prefrontal cortex and bilateral hippocampal activations. Patients with right hippocampal sclerosis showed increased temporal activations within the superior temporal gyri bilaterally and no increased extra-temporal areas of activation compared with

  9. Measuring and manipulating brain connectivity with resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Michael D; Halko, Mark A; Eldaief, Mark C; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2012-10-01

    Both resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly popular techniques that can be used to non-invasively measure brain connectivity in human subjects. TMS shows additional promise as a method to manipulate brain connectivity. In this review we discuss how these two complimentary tools can be combined to optimally study brain connectivity and manipulate distributed brain networks. Important clinical applications include using resting state fcMRI to guide target selection for TMS and using TMS to modulate pathological network interactions identified with resting state fcMRI. The combination of TMS and resting state fcMRI has the potential to accelerate the translation of both techniques into the clinical realm and promises a new approach to the diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric diseases that demonstrate network pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging: exposure times and functional outcomes at preschool age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouyssi-Kobar, Marine; Du Plessis, Adre J.; Robertson, Richard L.; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been routinely used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for more than a decade; however, there is a paucity of follow-up studies examining the effects of prenatal exposure to 1.5-T MRI on developmental outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the safety of 1.5-T fetal MRI by evaluating functional outcomes of preschool children who were exposed in utero. In the context of a prospective observational study, healthy pregnant women underwent a 1.5-T MRI study using single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The study was approved by the institutional review board at our institution, and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. MRI scanning times were recorded, and prenatal/postnatal clinical data were collected prospectively. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS), a widely used, norm-referenced and psychometrically sound functional assessment. We studied 72 healthy pregnant women, who underwent fetal MRI at a mean gestational age of 30.5 ± 3.1 weeks. The cohort of fetuses was composed of 43% females, and 18 fetuses were scanned during the second trimester. All fetuses were born at term with appropriate birth weights (3.54 ± 0.5 kg) for gestational age. Mean age at follow-up testing was 24.5 ± 6.7 months. All children had age-appropriate scores in the communication, daily living, socialization and motor skills subdomains of the VABS (z-scores, P > 0.05). Furthermore, all children passed their newborn otoacoustic emission test and had normal hearing at preschool age. MRI study duration and exposure time to radio frequency waves and SSFSE sequences were not associated with adverse functional outcomes or hearing impairment. Prenatal exposure to 1.5-T MRI during the second or third trimester of pregnancy in a cohort of healthy fetuses is not associated with disturbances in functional outcomes or

  11. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging: exposure times and functional outcomes at preschool age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouyssi-Kobar, Marine [George Washington University, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Washington, DC (United States); Children' s National Health System, Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research Laboratory, Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Du Plessis, Adre J. [Children' s National Health System, Fetal and Transitional Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Robertson, Richard L. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Limperopoulos, Catherine [Children' s National Health System, Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research Laboratory, Departments of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Washington, DC (United States); Children' s National Health System, Fetal and Transitional Medicine, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been routinely used as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for more than a decade; however, there is a paucity of follow-up studies examining the effects of prenatal exposure to 1.5-T MRI on developmental outcome. The objective of this study was to assess the safety of 1.5-T fetal MRI by evaluating functional outcomes of preschool children who were exposed in utero. In the context of a prospective observational study, healthy pregnant women underwent a 1.5-T MRI study using single-shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) sequences during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. The study was approved by the institutional review board at our institution, and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. MRI scanning times were recorded, and prenatal/postnatal clinical data were collected prospectively. Functional outcomes were assessed using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS), a widely used, norm-referenced and psychometrically sound functional assessment. We studied 72 healthy pregnant women, who underwent fetal MRI at a mean gestational age of 30.5 ± 3.1 weeks. The cohort of fetuses was composed of 43% females, and 18 fetuses were scanned during the second trimester. All fetuses were born at term with appropriate birth weights (3.54 ± 0.5 kg) for gestational age. Mean age at follow-up testing was 24.5 ± 6.7 months. All children had age-appropriate scores in the communication, daily living, socialization and motor skills subdomains of the VABS (z-scores, P > 0.05). Furthermore, all children passed their newborn otoacoustic emission test and had normal hearing at preschool age. MRI study duration and exposure time to radio frequency waves and SSFSE sequences were not associated with adverse functional outcomes or hearing impairment. Prenatal exposure to 1.5-T MRI during the second or third trimester of pregnancy in a cohort of healthy fetuses is not associated with disturbances in functional outcomes or

  12. Two-functional sensor of magnetic field and deformation based on Si microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This research investigates complex studies of electrical conductivity and magnetoresistance of both strain and non-strain samples of p-type Si whiskers with different degrees of doping with boron and nickel in a wide temperature range from 4.2 to 300 K. It is established that the greatest manifestation of the piezoresistive effect is observed in the vicinity of concentrations which correspond to the metal-insulator transition. Investigation of the magnetoresistance of crystals was carried out in the range of fields with induction up to 14 T. Whiskers of silicon with a doping concentration of boron of 5·1018 cm-3 can be used as a sensitive element for two-functional deformation and magnetic field sensors in difficult operating conditions. Microwires for research were grown by chemical transport reactions with the crystallographic orientation and with the concentration of charge carriers, which corresponds to the vicinity of metal-insulator transition (5·1018 см-3. The nickel doping was conducted by the low-temperature diffusion from the precipitated film on the surface of the crystal. The uniaxial strain of Si microcrystals was carried out by fixing them on substrates with the different coefficient of thermal. The metallic-type temperature dependence on the resistivity is typical for heavily doped silicon microcrystals (with the bor concenctation >5·1018 сm-3 for both deformed and non deformed samples. Significant influence of the deformation on characteristics of microcrystals wasn't found. The maximum magnetoresistance of such samples doesn't exceed 4% in magnetic fields with induction of 14 T at the temperature of liquefied helium. The resistivity of Si crystals with ρ300К = 0.012 Оhm·сm (which corresponds to the dielectric side of MIT is reduced in several times at the the temperature of liquefied helium and under the uniaxial deformation. Decreasing of boron concentration reduces this effect. This is also confirmed by the

  13. Verification of Anderson Superexchange in MnO via Magnetic Pair Distribution Function Analysis and ab initio Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A.; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J.; Staunton, Julie B.; Billinge, Simon J. L.

    2016-05-01

    We present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ˜1 nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominated by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. The Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory.

  14. Verification of Anderson Superexchange in MnO via Magnetic Pair Distribution Function Analysis and ab initio Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Benjamin A; Brunelli, Michela; Page, Katharine; Uemura, Yasutomo J; Staunton, Julie B; Billinge, Simon J L

    2016-05-13

    We present a temperature-dependent atomic and magnetic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of neutron total scattering measurements of antiferromagnetic MnO, an archetypal strongly correlated transition-metal oxide. The known antiferromagnetic ground-state structure fits the low-temperature data closely with refined parameters that agree with conventional techniques, confirming the reliability of the newly developed magnetic PDF method. The measurements performed in the paramagnetic phase reveal significant short-range magnetic correlations on a ∼1  nm length scale that differ substantially from the low-temperature long-range spin arrangement. Ab initio calculations using a self-interaction-corrected local spin density approximation of density functional theory predict magnetic interactions dominated by Anderson superexchange and reproduce the measured short-range magnetic correlations to a high degree of accuracy. Further calculations simulating an additional contribution from a direct exchange interaction show much worse agreement with the data. The Anderson superexchange model for MnO is thus verified by experimentation and confirmed by ab initio theory.

  15. High-speed ac motor including the function of a magnetic frequency tripler

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Sotoshi; Takeuchi, A.; Sudani, T.; Bessho, Kazuo

    1986-01-01

    The new electric motor is the magnetic combination of a magnetic frequency multiplier and a AC motor which share the common magnetic yoke. The motor operates near the synchronous speed (10,800 rpm) by applied the single-phase commercial source at 60 Hz. The new machine is called “high-speed hybrid AC motor” because the combination of a motor and a frequency converter. This paper describes the structure and the operating characteristics of the new motor.

  16. Different aberrant mentalizing networks in males and females with autism spectrum disorders: Evidence from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Lee, Jonathan

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have found that individuals with autism spectrum disorders show impairments in mentalizing processes and aberrant brain activity compared with typically developing participants. However, the findings are mainly from male participants and the aberrant effects in autism spectrum disorder females and sex differences are still unclear. To address these issues, this study analyzed intrinsic functional connectivity of mentalizing regions using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data of 48 autism spectrum disorder males and females and 48 typically developing participants in autism brain imaging data exchange. Whole-brain analyses showed that autism spectrum disorder males had hyperconnectivity in functional connectivity of the bilateral temporal-parietal junction, whereas autism spectrum disorder females showed hypoconnectivity in functional connectivity of the medial prefrontal cortex, precuneus, and right temporal-parietal junction. Interaction between sex and autism was found in both short- and long-distance functional connectivity effects, confirming that autism spectrum disorder males showed overconnectivity, while autism spectrum disorder females showed underconnectivity. Furthermore, a regression analysis revealed that in autism spectrum disorder, males and females demonstrated different relations between the functional connectivity effects of the mentalizing regions and the core autism spectrum disorder deficits. These results suggest sex differences in the mentalizing network in autism spectrum disorder individuals. Future work is needed to examine how sex interacts with other factors such as age and the sex differences during mentalizing task performance.

  17. Highlights from the previous volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacopo, Iacovacci; Takahiro, Kohsokabe; Kunihiko, Kaneko; al., Lange Steffen et; al., Helden Laurent et; et al.

    2017-04-01

    Functional Multiplex PageRank: The centrality is a functionPattern formation induced by fixed boundary conditionPower-law distributed Poincaré recurrences in higher-dimensional systemsMeasurement of second-order response without perturbation

  18. Current-density functional theory study of the H2 molecule evolving under a strong ultrashort magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas, Hash(0xb7f6e60)

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen molecule in a strong ultrashort magnetic field is investigated through a current-density functional theory (CDFT) and quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based approach employing current-density dependent vector exchange-correlation potential and energy density functional derived with a vorticity variable. The numerical computations through the CDFT based approach are performed for the H2 molecule, starting initially from its field-free ground state, in a parallel internuclear axis and magnetic field-axis configuration with the internuclear separation R ranging from 0.1 a.u. to 14.0 a.u., and the strength of the time-dependent (TD) magnetic field varying between 0-1011 G over a few femtoseconds. The numerical results are compared with that obtained using an approach based on the current-density independent approximation under similar computational constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The current-density based approach yields exchange- and correlation energy as well as electronic charge-density of the H2 molecule drastically different from that obtained using current-independent approach, in particular, at TD magnetic field-strengths >109 G during a typical time-period of the field when the magnetic-field had attained maximum applied field-strength and is switched to a decreasing ramp function. This nonadiabatic behavior of the TD electronic charge-density is traced to the TD vorticity-dependent vector exchange-correlation potential of the CDFT based approach. The interesting electron dynamics of the H2 molecule in strong TD magnetic field is further elucidated by treating electronic charge-density as an `electron-fluid'. The present work also reveals interesting real-time dynamics on the attosecond time-scale in the electronic charge-density distribution of the hydrogen molecule.

  19. Investigations of functional and structural changes in migraine with aura by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougaard, Anders

    2015-08-01

    Migraine sufferers with aura often report visual discomfort outside of attacks and many consider bright or flickering light an attack-precipitating factor. The nature of this visual hypersensitivity and its relation to the underlying pathophysiology of the migraine aura is unknown. A useful technology to study these features of migraine with aura (MA) is functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which has the potential not only to detect, but also to localize hypersensitive cortex. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the cortical responsivity of patients with MA during visual stimulation using fMRI. To optimize sensitivity, we applied a within-patient design by assessing functional interhemispheric differences in patients consistently experiencing visual aura in the same visual hemifield. To validate our data analysis methods, we initially studied healthy volunteers using single hemifield visual stimulation and compared the "stimulated" hemispheres (i.e. hemispheres contralateral to the visual stimulation) to the "non-stimulated" hemispheres. We then applied this validated method of interhemispheric comparison of fMRI-blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation to compare left versus right hemisphere responses to symmetric full-field visual stimulation in 54 healthy subjects (study I). This study concluded that, a) the applied visual stimulation is effective in activating large expanses of visual cortex, b) interhemispheric differences in fMRI-BOLD activation can be determined using the proposed method, and c) visual responses to symmetric full-field visual stimulation are asymmetrically distributed between the cerebral hemispheres. We investigated the effects of migraine aura, by including 20 patients with frequent side-fixed visual aura attacks, i.e. ≥= 90% of auras occurring in the same visual hemifield (study II). To circumvent bias relating to differences between right and left hemispheres (e.g. caused by physiological left

  20. Heterogenous migraine aura symptoms correlate with visual cortex functional magnetic resonance imaging responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Hougaard, Anders; Ahmadi, Khazar; Vestergaard, Mark Bitsch; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Larsson, Henrik Bo Wiberg; Olesen, Jes; Hoffmann, Michael B; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-12-01

    Migraine aura is sparsely studied due to the highly challenging task of capturing patients during aura. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is likely the underlying phenomenon of aura. The possible correlation between the multifaceted phenomenology of aura symptoms and the effects of CSD on the brain has not been ascertained. Five migraine patients were studied during various forms of aura symptoms induced by hypoxia, sham hypoxia, or physical exercise with concurrent photostimulation. The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal response to visual stimulation was measured in retinotopic mapping-defined visual cortex areas V1 to V4. We found reduced BOLD response in patients reporting scotoma and increased response in patients who only experienced positive symptoms. Furthermore, patients with bilateral visual symptoms had corresponding bihemispherical changes in BOLD response. These findings suggest that different aura symptoms reflect different types of cerebral dysfunction, which correspond to specific changes in BOLD signal reactivity. Furthermore, we provide evidence of bilateral CSD recorded by fMRI during bilateral aura symptoms. Ann Neurol 2017;82:925-939. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  1. Reward abnormalities among women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohon, Cara; Stice, Eric

    2011-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that women with full and subthreshold bulimia nervosa show abnormal neural activation in response to food intake and anticipated food intake relative to healthy control women. Females with and without full/subthreshold bulimia nervosa recruited from the community (N = 26) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during receipt and anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake and a tasteless control solution. Women with bulimia nervosa showed trends for less activation than healthy controls in the right anterior insula in response to anticipated receipt of chocolate milkshake (vs. tasteless solution) and in the left middle frontal gyrus, right posterior insula, right precentral gyrus, and right mid dorsal insula in response to consumptions of milkshake (vs. tasteless solution). Bulimia nervosa may be related to potential hypofunctioning of the brain reward system, which may lead these individuals to binge eat to compensate for this reward deficit, though the hypo-responsivity might be a result of a history of binge eating highly palatable foods. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Neural correlates underlying mental calculation in abacus experts: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Takashi; Honda, Manabu; Okada, Tomohisa; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    Experts of abacus operation demonstrate extraordinary ability in mental calculation. There is psychological evidence that abacus experts utilize a mental image of an abacus to remember and manipulate large numbers in solving problems; however, the neural correlates underlying this expertise are unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared the neural correlates associated with three mental-operation tasks (numeral, spatial, verbal) among six experts in abacus operations and eight nonexperts. In general, there was more involvement of neural correlates for visuospatial processing (e.g., right premotor and parietal areas) for abacus experts during the numeral mental-operation task. Activity of these areas and the fusiform cortex was correlated with the size of numerals used in the numeral mental-operation task. Particularly, the posterior superior parietal cortex revealed significantly enhanced activity for experts compared with controls during the numeral mental-operation task. Comparison with the other mental-operation tasks indicated that activity in the posterior superior parietal cortex was relatively specific to computation in 2-dimensional space. In conclusion, mental calculation of abacus experts is likely associated with enhanced involvement of the neural resources for visuospatial information processing in 2-dimensional space.

  3. An examination of the rapid automatized naming-reading relationship using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummine, J; Chouinard, B; Szepesvari, E; Georgiou, G K

    2015-10-01

    Rapid automatized naming (RAN) has been established to be a strong predictor of reading. Yet, the neural correlates underlying the RAN-reading relationship remain unknown. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine: (a) the extent to which RAN and reading activate similar brain regions (within subjects), (b) whether RAN and reading are directly related in the shared activity network outlined in (a), and (c) to what extent RAN neural activation predicts behavioral reading performance. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), university students (N=15; Mean age=20.6 years) were assessed on RAN (letters and digits) and single-word reading (words and non-words). The results revealed a common RAN-reading network that included regions associated with motor planning (cerebellum), semantic access (middle temporal gyrus), articulation (supplementary motor area, pre-motor), and grapheme-phoneme translation (supramarginal gyrus). We found differences between RAN and reading with respect to percent signal change (PSC) in phonological and orthographic regions, but not in articulatory regions. Significant correlations between the neural RAN and reading parameters were found primarily in motor/articulatory regions. Further, we found a unique relationship between in-scanner reading response time and RAN PSC in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Taken together, these findings support the notion that RAN and reading activate similar neural networks. However, the relationship between RAN and reading is primarily driven by commonalities in the motor-sequencing/articulatory processes. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Egocentric spatial learning in schizophrenia investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerkus, Jakob; Irle, Eva; Schmidt-Samoa, Carsten; Dechent, Peter; Weniger, Godehard

    2012-01-01

    Psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are related to disturbed self-recognition and to disturbed experience of agency. Possibly, these impairments contribute to first-person large-scale egocentric learning deficits. Sixteen inpatients with schizophrenia and 16 matched healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while finding their way in a virtual maze. The virtual maze presented a first-person view, lacked any topographical landmarks and afforded egocentric navigation strategies. The participants with schizophrenia showed impaired performance in the virtual maze when compared with controls, and showed a similar but weaker pattern of activity changes during egocentric learning when compared with controls. Especially the activity of task-relevant brain regions (precuneus and posterior cingulate and retrosplenial cortex) differed from that of controls across all trials of the task. Activity increase within the right-sided precuneus was related to worse virtual maze performance and to stronger positive symptoms in participants with schizophrenia. We suggest that psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia are related to aberrant neural activity within the precuneus. Possibly, first-person large-scale egocentric navigation and learning designs may be a feasible tool for the assessment and treatment of cognitive deficits related to self-recognition in patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Visual Imagery and False Memory for Pictures: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Healthy Participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan-Otto, Christian; Siddi, Sara; Senior, Carl; Muñoz-Samons, Daniel; Ochoa, Susana; Sánchez-Laforga, Ana María; Brébion, Gildas

    2017-01-01

    Visual mental imagery might be critical in the ability to discriminate imagined from perceived pictures. Our aim was to investigate the neural bases of this specific type of reality-monitoring process in individuals with high visual imagery abilities. A reality-monitoring task was administered to twenty-six healthy participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging. During the encoding phase, 45 words designating common items, and 45 pictures of other common items, were presented in random order. During the recall phase, participants were required to remember whether a picture of the item had been presented, or only a word. Two subgroups of participants with a propensity for high vs. low visual imagery were contrasted. Activation of the amygdala, left inferior occipital gyrus, insula, and precuneus were observed when high visual imagers encoded words later remembered as pictures. At the recall phase, these same participants activated the middle frontal gyrus and inferior and superior parietal lobes when erroneously remembering pictures. The formation of visual mental images might activate visual brain areas as well as structures involved in emotional processing. High visual imagers demonstrate increased activation of a fronto-parietal source-monitoring network that enables distinction between imagined and perceived pictures.

  6. Impaired cognitive functions in mild traumatic brain injury patients with normal and pathologic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurca, E.; Sivak, S.; Kucera, P.

    2006-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common neurological (neurotraumatological) diagnosis. As well as different subjective symptoms, many patients develop neuropsychological dysfunction with objective impairment of attention, memory and certain executive functions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not routinely used in MTBI patients despite its proven greater sensitivity and specificity in comparison with computed tomography (CT). The patient group consisted of 30 persons with MTBI and the control group consisted of 30 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers. Both groups underwent neurological examination, neuropsychological testing (including the Postconcussion Symptoms Scale questionnaire, PCSS) and brain MRI (the patient group within 96 h after injury). The analyzed groups did not differ significantly in terms of sex, age, or level or duration of education. MRI pathological findings (traumatic and nonspecific) were present in nine patients. Traumatic lesions were found in seven patients. Nonspecific white matter lesions were found in five healthy controls. There were significant differences between MTBI patients and controls in terms of subjective symptoms (PCSS) and selected neuropsychological tests. Statistically significant neuropsychological differences were found between MTBI patients with true traumatic lesions and MTBI patients with nonspecific lesions. There is evidence that MTBI patients with true traumatic MRI lesions are neuropsychologically different from MTBI patients with nonspecific MRI lesions or normal brain MRI. These results support the hypothesis that some acute MTBI signs and symptoms have a real organic basis which can be detected by selected new MRI modalities. (orig.)

  7. Statistical improvements in functional magnetic resonance imaging analyses produced by censoring high-motion data points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Joshua S; Power, Jonathan D; Dubis, Joseph W; Vogel, Alecia C; Church, Jessica A; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-05-01

    Subject motion degrades the quality of task functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Here, we test two classes of methods to counteract the effects of motion in task fMRI data: (1) a variety of motion regressions and (2) motion censoring ("motion scrubbing"). In motion regression, various regressors based on realignment estimates were included as nuisance regressors in general linear model (GLM) estimation. In motion censoring, volumes in which head motion exceeded a threshold were withheld from GLM estimation. The effects of each method were explored in several task fMRI data sets and compared using indicators of data quality and signal-to-noise ratio. Motion censoring decreased variance in parameter estimates within- and across-subjects, reduced residual error in GLM estimation, and increased the magnitude of statistical effects. Motion censoring performed better than all forms of motion regression and also performed well across a variety of parameter spaces, in GLMs with assumed or unassumed response shapes. We conclude that motion censoring improves the quality of task fMRI data and can be a valuable processing step in studies involving populations with even mild amounts of head movement. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Directionality analysis on functional magnetic resonance imaging during motor task using Granger causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, A R; Muthalib, M; Perrey, S; Galka, A; Granert, O; Wolff, S; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2012-01-01

    Directionality analysis of signals originating from different parts of brain during motor tasks has gained a lot of interest. Since brain activity can be recorded over time, methods of time series analysis can be applied to medical time series as well. Granger Causality is a method to find a causal relationship between time series. Such causality can be referred to as a directional connection and is not necessarily bidirectional. The aim of this study is to differentiate between different motor tasks on the basis of activation maps and also to understand the nature of connections present between different parts of the brain. In this paper, three different motor tasks (finger tapping, simple finger sequencing, and complex finger sequencing) are analyzed. Time series for each task were extracted from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, which have a very good spatial resolution and can look into the sub-cortical regions of the brain. Activation maps based on fMRI images show that, in case of complex finger sequencing, most parts of the brain are active, unlike finger tapping during which only limited regions show activity. Directionality analysis on time series extracted from contralateral motor cortex (CMC), supplementary motor area (SMA), and cerebellum (CER) show bidirectional connections between these parts of the brain. In case of simple finger sequencing and complex finger sequencing, the strongest connections originate from SMA and CMC, while connections originating from CER in either direction are the weakest ones in magnitude during all paradigms.

  9. Functional Polymers in Protein Detection Platforms: Optical, Electrochemical, Electrical, Mass-Sensitive, and Magnetic Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahm, Jong-in

    2011-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of proteomics and related applied sectors in the life sciences demands convenient methodologies for detecting and measuring the levels of specific proteins as well as for screening and analyzing for interacting protein systems. Materials utilized for such protein detection and measurement platforms should meet particular specifications which include ease-of-mass manufacture, biological stability, chemical functionality, cost effectiveness, and portability. Polymers can satisfy many of these requirements and are often considered as choice materials in various biological detection platforms. Therefore, tremendous research efforts have been made for developing new polymers both in macroscopic and nanoscopic length scales as well as applying existing polymeric materials for protein measurements. In this review article, both conventional and alternative techniques for protein detection are overviewed while focusing on the use of various polymeric materials in different protein sensing technologies. Among many available detection mechanisms, most common approaches such as optical, electrochemical, electrical, mass-sensitive, and magnetic methods are comprehensively discussed in this article. Desired properties of polymers exploited for each type of protein detection approach are summarized. Current challenges associated with the application of polymeric materials are examined in each protein detection category. Difficulties facing both quantitative and qualitative protein measurements are also identified. The latest efforts on the development and evaluation of nanoscale polymeric systems for improved protein detection are also discussed from the standpoint of quantitative and qualitative measurements. Finally, future research directions towards further advancements in the field are considered. PMID:21691441

  10. Cortical representation of facial and tongue movements: a task functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fu-Long; Gao, Pei-Yi; Qian, Tian-Yi; Sui, Bin-Bin; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Jian; Lin, Yan

    2017-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) mapping can present the activated cortical area during movement, while little is known about precise location in facial and tongue movements. To investigate the representation of facial and tongue movements by task fMRI. Twenty right-handed healthy subjects were underwent block design task fMRI examination. Task movements included lip pursing, cheek bulging, grinning and vertical tongue excursion. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM8) was applied to analysis the data. One-sample t-test was used to calculate the common activation area between facial and tongue movements. Also, paired t-test was used to test for areas of over- or underactivation in tongue movement compared with each group of facial movements. The common areas within facial and tongue movements suggested the similar motor circuits of activation in both movements. Prior activation in tongue movement was situated laterally and inferiorly in sensorimotor area relative to facial movements. Prior activation of tongue movement was investigated in left superior parietal lobe relative to lip pursing. Also, prior activation in bilateral cuneus lobe in grinning compared with tongue movement was detected. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Visual Imagery and False Memory for Pictures: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study in Healthy Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan-Otto, Christian; Siddi, Sara; Senior, Carl; Muñoz-Samons, Daniel; Ochoa, Susana; Sánchez-Laforga, Ana María; Brébion, Gildas

    2017-01-01

    Background Visual mental imagery might be critical in the ability to discriminate imagined from perceived pictures. Our aim was to investigate the neural bases of this specific type of reality-monitoring process in individuals with high visual imagery abilities. Methods A reality-monitoring task was administered to twenty-six healthy participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging. During the encoding phase, 45 words designating common items, and 45 pictures of other common items, were presented in random order. During the recall phase, participants were required to remember whether a picture of the item had been presented, or only a word. Two subgroups of participants with a propensity for high vs. low visual imagery were contrasted. Results Activation of the amygdala, left inferior occipital gyrus, insula, and precuneus were observed when high visual imagers encoded words later remembered as pictures. At the recall phase, these same participants activated the middle frontal gyrus and inferior and superior parietal lobes when erroneously remembering pictures. Conclusions The formation of visual mental images might activate visual brain areas as well as structures involved in emotional processing. High visual imagers demonstrate increased activation of a fronto-parietal source-monitoring network that enables distinction between imagined and perceived pictures. PMID:28046076

  12. The effects of methylphenidate on cognitive control in active methamphetamine dependence using functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Kais Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA dependence is associated with cognitive deficits. Methylphenidate (MPH has been shown to improve inhibitory control in healthy and cocaine-dependent subjects. This study aimed to understand the neurophysiological effects before and after acute MPH administration in active MA-dependent and control subjects. Fifteen MA-dependent and 18 control subjects aged 18-46 years were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging before and after either a single oral dose of MPH (18mg or placebo while performing a colour-word Stroop task.Baseline accuracy was lower (p=0.026 and response time (RT was longer (pPost- compared to pre-MPH treatment, increased RT and DLPFC activation for the Stroop effect were observed in MA-dependent subjects (pDue to the small sample size, the results from this study are preliminary; however, they inform us about the effects of MPH on the neural correlates of cognitive control in active MA-dependent subjects

  13. Functional and morphological cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of mice using a cryogenic quadrature radiofrequency coil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babette Wagenhaus

    Full Text Available Cardiac morphology and function assessment by magnetic resonance imaging is of increasing interest for a variety of mouse models in pre-clinical cardiac research, such as myocardial infarction models or myocardial injury/remodeling in genetically or pharmacologically induced hypertension. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR constraints, however, limit image quality and blood myocardium delineation, which crucially depend on high spatial resolution. Significant gains in SNR with a cryogenically cooled RF probe have been shown for mouse brain MRI, yet the potential of applying cryogenic RF coils for cardiac MR (CMR in mice is, as of yet, untapped. This study examines the feasibility and potential benefits of CMR in mice employing a 400 MHz cryogenic RF surface coil, compared with a conventional mouse heart coil array operating at room temperature. The cryogenic RF coil affords SNR gains of 3.0 to 5.0 versus the conventional approach and hence enables an enhanced spatial resolution. This markedly improved image quality--by better deliniation of myocardial borders and enhanced depiction of papillary muscles and trabeculae--and facilitated a more accurate cardiac chamber quantification, due to reduced intraobserver variability. In summary the use of a cryogenically cooled RF probe represents a valuable means of enhancing the capabilities of CMR of mice.

  14. Dual breath-hold magnetic resonance cine evaluation of global and regional cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintersperger, Bernd J.; Dietrich, Olaf; Huber, Armin; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Sincleair, Spencer; Runge, Val M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of a multislice cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with parallel imaging in regard to global and regional left ventricular function. Forty-two individuals underwent cine MRI on a 1.5-tesla scanner. Cine MRI used a steady-state free precession technique and was performed as a single-slice technique (nonTSENSE cine) and an accelerated multislice technique (TSENSE cine) with five slices per breath-hold. End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV), and ejection fraction (EF) were evaluated for all data sets and in regard to regional wall motion and regional wall motion analysis, and quantitative regional wall thickness and systolic thickening were also assessed. EDV, ESV, and EF based on TSENSE cine showed excellent correlation to the nonTSENSE cine approach (all r 2 =0.99, P<0.001). While EDV evaluations showed a small underestimation for TSENSE cine, ESV and EF showed accurate results compared with nonTSENSE cine. Both readers showed good agreement (κ=0.72) in regional wall motion assessment comparing both techniques. Data acquisition for the multislice approach was significantly shorter (∝75%) that in single-slice cine. We conclude that accurate evaluation of regional wall motion and left ventricular EF is possible using accelerated multislice cine MR with high spatial and temporal resolution. (orig.)

  15. Sleep stabilizes visuomotor adaptation memory: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albouy, Genevieve; Vandewalle, Gilles; Sterpenich, Virginie; Rauchs, Geraldine; Desseilles, Martin; Balteau, Evelyne; Degueldre, Christian; Phillips, Christophe; Luxen, Andre; Maquet, Pierre

    2013-04-01

    The beneficial effect of sleep on motor memory consolidation is well known for motor sequence memory, but remains unsettled for visuomotor adaptation in humans. The aim of this study was to characterize more clearly the influence of sleep on consolidation of visuomotor adaptation using a between-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design contrasting sleep to total sleep deprivation. Our behavioural results, based on seven different parameters, show that sleep stabilizes performance whereas sleep deprivation deteriorates it. During training, while a set of cerebellar, striatal and cortical areas is activated in proportion to performance improvement, the recruitment of the hippocampus and frontal cortex protects motor memory against the detrimental effects of sleep deprivation. During retest after sleep loss a cerebello-cortical network, usually involved in the earliest stage of learning, was recruited to perform the task. In contrast, no changes in cerebral activity were observed after sleep, suggesting that it may only support the stabilization of the visuomotor adaptation memory trace. © 2012 European Sleep Research Society.