WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous field observations

  1. Higher frequency of hamstring injuries in elite track and field athletes who had a previous injury to the ankle - a 17 years observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliaropoulos, Nikolaos; Bikos, Georgios; Meke, Maria; Vasileios, Korakakis; Valle, Xavier; Lohrer, Heinz; Maffulli, Nicola; Padhiar, Nat

    2018-01-01

    Inversion injury to the ankle and hamstring injuries are common problems in most sports. It is not known whether these injuries constitute a predisposing factor or a precursor of injury or re-injury of these anatomical locations. Therefore, we wished to test the hypothesis that a previous inversion ankle injury exerted a significant effect on the chance of an athlete suffering from a subsequent ipsilateral hamstring injury and vice versa. In an observational cohort study over 17 years (1998-2015), 367 elite track and field athletes, were grouped according to their first traumatic isolated ankle or hamstring injury. Fifty athletes experienced both injuries. The Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests ( p  < 0.05) were performed to test possible associations of ankle and hamstring injury with age, gender, athletics discipline, grade, and type of antecedent injury. Athletes with a preceding ankle injury had a statistically significantly higher chance of experiencing a subsequent hamstring injury compared with athletes who had experienced a hamstring injury as their first traumatic event (x 2  = 4.245, p  = 0.039). The proportion of both ankle and hamstring injury events was not statistically different between female (18%) and male (11%) athletes. Age and grade of injury did not influence the proportion of ankle and/or hamstring injury events. There is a statistically significantly higher frequency of hamstring injuries in elite track and field athletes having experienced a previous ankle ligament injury.

  2. Clinical observation of phacoemulsification in patients with previous trabeculectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinical effect of transparent corneal incision phacoemulsification in cataract patients who had undergone different kinds of glaucoma filtration surgeries.METHODS: Totally 43 cases(50 eyes, in which 23 patients with primary angle-closure glaucoma(group A, 26 eyesand 20 patients with primary open angle glaucoma(group B, 24 eyes, all had undergone glaucoma filtration surgery for more than 6 months. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, slit lamp, gonioscope, corneal endothelial cell counts, etc., were done before surgery.And transparent corneal incision phacoemulsification combined with artificial lens implantation operation were preformed, postoperative follow-up of 3 to 12 months, visual acuity, intraocular pressure, corneal endothelial cell counts and vision field, etc. were observed and recorded.RESULTS: The visual acuity of 50 eyes(100%increased with different degree postoperatively, 41 eyes(82%with postoperative visual acuity ≥0.3; average preoperative intraocular pressure: group A 18.08±5.08mmHg(1mmHg=0.133kpa, group B 14.48±3.52mmHg; Postoperative follow-up average intraocular pressure: group A 13.65±3.51mmHg, group B 14.28±3.41 mmHg, intraocular pressure changed significantly pre and post-operation in group A(PP>0.05; Postoperative intraocular pressure of 1 eye in group A and 3 eyes in group B rose within three days post-operation, the intraocular pressure fluctuated between 21-33mmHg, with drug therapy and drug withdral when intraocular pressure epistrophy; Intraocular pressure was stable in the follow-up process.Corneal endothelial cell density: pre-operation group A was 2 293.57±352.24(cells/mm2, group B 2 658.14±458.69(cells/mm2, post- operation group A 2 175.95±379.16(cells/mm2, group B 2 442.97±477.30(cells/mm2, cell loss rate: 5.13% in group A, and 8.10% in group B. Postoperative visual acuity was related to vision field damage in patients, the more visual field damage, the longer the duration

  3. Field observations and lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  4. Electrolytic tiltmeters inside magnetic fields: Some observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J.M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M.I.; Luque, J.M.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J.C.; Yuste, C.; Calderon, A.; Garcia-Moral, L.A.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F.J.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    We present observations of the electrolytic clinometers behaviour inside magnetic field environments introducing phenomenological expressions to account for the measured output voltage variations as functions of field gradients and field strengths

  5. Influence of Previous Knowledge, Language Skills and Domain-specific Interest on Observation Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhauf, Lucia; Rutke, Ulrike; Neuhaus, Birgit

    2011-10-01

    Many epoch-making biological discoveries (e.g. Darwinian Theory) were based upon observations. Nevertheless, observation is often regarded as `just looking' rather than a basic scientific skill. As observation is one of the main research methods in biological sciences, it must be considered as an independent research method and systematic practice of this method is necessary. Because observation skills form the basis of further scientific methods (e.g. experiments or comparisons) and children from the age of 4 years are able to independently generate questions and hypotheses, it seems possible to foster observation competency at a preschool level. To be able to provide development-adequate individual fostering of this competency, it is first necessary to assess each child's competency. Therefore, drawing on the recent literature, we developed in this study a competency model that was empirically evaluated within learners ( N = 110) from different age groups, from kindergarten to university. In addition, we collected data on language skills, domain-specific interest and previous knowledge to analyse coherence between these skills and observation competency. The study showed as expected that previous knowledge had a high impact on observation competency, whereas the influence of domain-specific interest was nonexistent. Language skills were shown to have a weak influence. By utilising the empirically validated model consisting of three dimensions (`Describing', `Scientific reasoning' and `Interpreting') and three skill levels, it was possible to assess each child's competency level and to develop and evaluate guided play activities to individually foster a child's observation competency.

  6. Previous treatment influences fingolimod efficacy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: results from an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Eleonora; Guareschi, Angelica; Vitetta, Francesca; Senesi, Caterina; Curti, Erica; Montepietra, Sara; Simone, Anna Maria; Immovilli, Paolo; Caniatti, Luisa; Tola, Maria Rosaria; Pesci, Ilaria; Montanari, Enrico; Sola, Patrizia; Granella, Franco; Motti, Luisa; Ferraro, Diana

    2014-09-01

    Fingolimod (FTY) is licensed as a disease-modifying treatment in highly active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of FTY in a real-life setting and to explore the possible role of clinical and MRI parameters, including previous treatment type, in predicting its efficacy. Clinical and MRI data was collected on 127 patients assigned to treatment with FTY in six multiple sclerosis centers in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, between August 2011 and June 2013. During a mean follow-up period of 10 months (range 1-22), we observed a total of 47 relapses in 39 patients (30.7%); new T2 lesions or gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions were present at follow-up MRI in 32/71 patients (45%). Expanded disability status scale (EDSS) at the end of the follow-up period was not different when compared to the baseline EDSS. Serious adverse events occurred in three patients (2.4%). A higher proportion of patients previously treated with natalizumab showed clinical (41%) or MRI activity (54%). Previous treatment with natalizumab increased the risk of a relapse within 30 days (versus immunomodulatory drugs; OR: 4.3; p = 0.011) and at survival analysis (versus remaining patients; HR: 1.9; p = 0.046). Study limitations include a small population sample, a short observation period with variable timing of follow-up MRI and different baseline characteristics of patients previously treated with natalizumab compared to those treated with immunomodulatory drugs. This study confirms the efficacy of FTY in reducing relapse rate in patients previously treated with immunomodulatory drugs, while it seems to be less effective in patients discontinuing natalizumab. Due to the short duration of follow-up it is not possible to evaluate disability progression; however, no difference was observed between the groups.

  7. Validation of SWAT+ at field level and comparison with previous SWAT models in simulating hydrologic quantity

    Science.gov (United States)

    GAO, J.; White, M. J.; Bieger, K.; Yen, H.; Arnold, J. G.

    2017-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) has been adopted by many researches to assess water quantity and quality in watersheds around the world. As the demand increases in facilitating model support, maintenance, and future development, the SWAT source code and data have undergone major modifications over the past few years. To make the model more flexible in terms of interactions of spatial units and processes occurring in watersheds, a completely revised version of SWAT (SWAT+) was developed to improve SWAT's ability in water resource modelling and management. There are only several applications of SWAT+ in large watersheds, however, no study pays attention to validate the new model at field level and assess its performance. To test the basic hydrologic function of SWAT+, it was implemented in five field cases across five states in the U.S. and compared the SWAT+ created results with that from the previous models at the same fields. Additionally, an automatic calibration tool was used to test which model is easier to be calibrated well in a limited number of parameter adjustments. The goal of the study was to evaluate the performance of SWAT+ in simulating stream flow on field level at different geographical locations. The results demonstrate that SWAT+ demonstrated similar performance with previous SWAT model, but the flexibility offered by SWAT+ via the connection of different spatial objects can result in a more accurate simulation of hydrological processes in spatial, especially for watershed with artificial facilities. Autocalibration shows that SWAT+ is much easier to obtain a satisfied result compared with the previous SWAT. Although many capabilities have already been enhanced in SWAT+, there exist inaccuracies in simulation. This insufficiency will be improved with advancements in scientific knowledge on hydrologic process in specific watersheds. Currently, SWAT+ is prerelease, and any errors are being addressed.

  8. WSRT observations of the Hubble Deep Field region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garrett, MA; de Bruyn, AG; Giroletti, M; Baan, WA; Schilizzi, RT

    We present deep WSRT 1.4 GHz observations of the Hubble Deep Field region. At the 5 sigma level, the WSRT clearly detects 85 regions of radio emission in a 10' x 10' field centred on the HDF Eight of these regions fall within the HDF itself, four of these are sources that have not previously been

  9. Osteonecrosis of the jaws in dogs in previously irradiated fields: 13 cases (1989 – 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eNemec

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to characterize osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ in previously irradiated fields in dogs that underwent radiotherapy (RT for oral tumors. Osteoradionecrosis of the jaw (ORNJ was further defined as osteonecrosis in a previously irradiated field in the absence of a tumor. Thirteen dogs clinically diagnosed with fifteen ONJ lesions were included in this retrospective case series. Medical records were reviewed for: breed, sex, weight, and age of the patient, tumor type, location in the oral cavity and size, location of the ONJ, time from RT to ONJ onset, known duration of the ONJ, and tumor presence. Where available, histological assessment of tissues obtained from the primary tumor, and tissues obtained from the ONJ lesion, was performed, and computed tomographic (CT images and dental radiographs were reviewed. Radiotherapy and other treatment details were also reviewed. Twelve dogs developed ONJ in the area of the previously irradiated tumor or the jaw closest to the irradiated mucosal tumor. Recurrence of neoplasia was evident at the time of ONJ diagnosis in five dogs. Time from RT start to ONJ onset varied from 2 - 44 months. In three cases, ORNJ developed after dental extractions in the irradiated field. Dental radiographs mostly revealed a moth-eaten pattern of bone loss, CT mostly revealed osteolysis, and histopathology was consistent with osteonecrosis. To conclude, development of ONJ/ORNJ following RT is a rare, but potentially fatal complication. Patients undergoing RT may benefit from a comprehensive oral and dental examination and treatment prior to RT.

  10. Interstellar magnetic fields: An observational perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    The plausibility of magnetic molecular clouds is established. It is shown that the empirically known relations between spectral line width, density, and cloud size can be derived from a virial equilibrium model where gravity is balanced by the sum of magnetic and pressure support. It is shown that substitution of measured density, cloud size, and line width measurements into the model can predict observed field strength to within a factor of two. The Zeeman effect is discussed and new measurements are presented for magnetic field strength based on OH and HI Zeeman observations at the Arecibo and Green Bank telescopes. The Barnard 1 (B1) region, in the Perseus Molecular Cloud Complex, is discussed in detail. OH spectral line intensity maps are presented for the regions where the OH Zeeman effect was observed, which allow, for the first time, comparison of observed field strength values with predicted field strength values, using emission from a single molecular species. Spatial structure of magnetic fields in molecular clouds are investigated. New optical polarization maps are presented for the dark clouds in Perseus, Taurus, and Ophiuchus. The polarization observed is attributed to preferential extinction of background starlight by magnetically aligned dust grains in the clouds, and we analyze the polarization maps as maps of the projection of the magnetic field onto the plane of the sky

  11. Rhabdomyosarcoma Arising in a Previously Irradiated Field: An Analysis of 43 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Nguyen D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Teh, Bin S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital and Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulino, Arnold C., E-mail: apaulino@tmhs.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Methodist Hospital and Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Patients with soft tissue sarcomas that arise from previously irradiated fields have traditionally been reported to have a poor prognosis. In this report, we examined the characteristics and outcomes of patients who developed a rhabdomyosarcoma in a previously irradiated field (RMS-RIF); we hypothesize that these patients should have a better outcome compared to other postradiation soft tissue sarcomas as these tumors are chemosensitive and radiosensitive. A PubMed search of the literature from 1961-2010 yielded 33 studies with data for patients with RMS-RIF. The study included 43 patients with a median age of 6.5 years at the time of radiation therapy (RT) for the initial tumor. The median RT dose was 48 Gy. The median latency period, the time from RT to development of RMS-RIF, was 8 years. The 3-year overall survival for RMS-RIF was 42%. The 3-year overall survival was 66% for patients receiving chemotherapy and local treatment (surgery and/or RT) compared to 29% for those who had systemic treatment only or local treatment only (P=.049). Other factors associated with increased 3-year overall survival included retinoblastoma initial diagnosis (P<.001), age ≤18 years at diagnosis of RMS-RIF (P=.003), favorable site (P=.008), and stage 1 disease (P=.002). Age at time of RMS-RIF, retinoblastoma initial tumor, favorable site, stage 1 disease, and use of both systemic and local treatment were found to be favorable prognostic factors for 3-year overall survival.

  12. Muir-Torre syndrome-associated pleomorphic liposarcoma arising in a previous radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yozu, Masato; Symmans, Pennie; Dray, Michael; Griffin, Jennifer; Han, Catherine; Ng, Daniel; Parry, Susan; Wong, Kp

    2013-03-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a variant of Lynch syndrome, characterised by sebaceous neoplasia and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Muir-Torre syndrome is caused by germline mutations of one of the mismatch repair genes, frequently MSH2 and less frequently MLH1 and MSH6. Visceral malignancies associated with Muir-Torre syndrome and Lynch syndrome include colorectal, endometrial and other gastrointestinal, urological and gynaecological malignancies. Small numbers of Lynch syndrome-associated soft tissue sarcomas have been reported, but there are no reported cases of soft tissue sarcomas in Muir-Torre syndrome. In this study, we report a 74-year-old man with known Muir-Torre syndrome with confirmed MSH2 germline mutation, diagnosed with pleomorphic liposarcoma of the right buttock in a previous radiation field. The tumour showed loss of expression of MSH2 and MSH6 on immunohistochemistry. Immunohistochemistry on another pleomorphic liposarcoma in a different patient with no previous history of Muir-Torre syndrome or Lynch syndrome showed no loss of expression of mismatch repair proteins. This is the first report of Muir-Torre syndrome-associated sarcoma and the first case of post-radiation sarcoma in Lynch syndrome.

  13. Geomagnetic Observations for Main Field Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzka, Jürgen; Chulliat, A.; Mandea, M.

    2010-01-01

    and the beginning of geomagnetic repeat stations surveys in the 19th century. In the second half of the 20th century, true global coverage with geomagnetic field measurements was accomplished by magnetometer payloads on low-Earth-orbiting satellites. This article describes the procedures and instruments...... for magnetic field measurements on ground and in space and covers geomagnetic observatories, repeat stations, automatic observatories, satellites and historic observations. Special emphasis is laid on the global network of geomagnetic observatories....

  14. The impact of previous knee injury on force plate and field-based measures of balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltich, Jennifer; Whittaker, Jackie; Von Tscharner, Vinzenz; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Nigg, Benno M; Emery, Carolyn

    2015-10-01

    Individuals with post-traumatic osteoarthritis demonstrate increased sway during quiet stance. The prospective association between balance and disease onset is unknown. Improved understanding of balance in the period between joint injury and disease onset could inform secondary prevention strategies to prevent or delay the disease. This study examines the association between youth sport-related knee injury and balance, 3-10years post-injury. Participants included 50 individuals (ages 15-26years) with a sport-related intra-articular knee injury sustained 3-10years previously and 50 uninjured age-, sex- and sport-matched controls. Force-plate measures during single-limb stance (center-of-pressure 95% ellipse-area, path length, excursion, entropic half-life) and field-based balance scores (triple single-leg hop, star-excursion, unipedal dynamic balance) were collected. Descriptive statistics (mean within-pair difference; 95% confidence intervals) were used to compare groups. Linear regression (adjusted for injury history) was used to assess the relationship between ellipse-area and field-based scores. Injured participants on average demonstrated greater medio-lateral excursion [mean within-pair difference (95% confidence interval); 2.8mm (1.0, 4.5)], more regular medio-lateral position [10ms (2, 18)], and shorter triple single-leg hop distances [-30.9% (-8.1, -53.7)] than controls, while no between group differences existed for the remaining outcomes. After taking into consideration injury history, triple single leg hop scores demonstrated a linear association with ellipse area (β=0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.01, 1.01). On average the injured participants adjusted their position less frequently and demonstrated a larger magnitude of movement during single-limb stance compared to controls. These findings support the evaluation of balance outcomes in the period between knee injury and post-traumatic osteoarthritis onset. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  15. Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, P. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gibson, J. P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The campaign “Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma” installed a ground-based magnetometer at Purcell’s U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility boundary installation at the Kessler Atmospheric and Ecological Field Station, University of Oklahoma, to measure local magnetic field variations. It is a part of the nine stations of the Mid-continent MAgnetoseismic Chain (McMAC) placed as close to the 330° magnetic longitude as possible. This is the meridian in the world where land covers the greatest continuous range in magnetic latitude. Figure 1 shows the map of the magnetometer stations along the 330th magnetic meridian, including the Purcell (PCEL) station. The main scientific objective of the campaign is to detect the field line resonance (FLR) frequencies of the magnetic field line connected to the Purcell station. This magnetic field line extends from Purcell to the outer space at distances as far as 2 Earth radii (RE). To accurately identify FLR frequencies, however, simultaneous measurements at slightly different latitudes along the same meridian are necessary to allow the use of the cross-phase technique. This consideration explains the arrangement to operate magnetometers at the Americus (AMER) and Richardson (RICH) stations nearby. The measured resonant frequency can infer the plasma mass density along the field line through the method of normal-mode magnetoseismology. The magnetometer at the Purcell station can detect many other types of magnetic field fluctuations associated with the changes in the electric currents in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, which by large are affected by the solar activity. In other words, the magnetic field data collected by this campaign are also useful for understanding space weather phenomena. The magnetometer was installed at Purcell’s ARM boundary facility in March 27, 2006. The construction of the triaxial fluxgate magnetometer used by the

  16. Observations of the diffuse UV radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Jayant; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    Spectra are presented for the diffuse UV radiation field between 1250 to 3100 A from eight different regions of the sky, which were obtained with the Johns Hopkins UVX experiment. UVX flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986 as part of the Get-Away Special project. The experiment consisted of two 1/4 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometers, covering the spectral range 1250 to 1700 A at 17 A resolution and 1600 to 3100 A at 27 A resolution, respectively, with a field of view of 4 x .25 deg, sufficiently small to pick out regions of the sky with no stars in the line of sight. Values were found for the diffuse cosmic background ranging in intensity from 300 to 900 photons/sq cm/sec/sr/A. The cosmic background is spectrally flat from 1250 to 3100 A, within the uncertainties of each spectrometer. The zodiacal light begins to play a significant role in the diffuse radiation field above 2000 A, and its brightness was determined relative to the solar emission. Observed brightnesses of the zodiacal light in the UV remain almost constant with ecliptic latitude, unlike the declining visible brightnesses, possibly indicating that those (smaller) grains responsible for the UV scattering have a much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering.

  17. The Temperature - Magnetic Field Relation in Observed and Simulated Sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, Michal; Rezaei, Reza

    2017-12-01

    Observations of the relation between continuum intensity and magnetic field strength in sunspots have been made for nearly five decades. This work presents full-Stokes measurements of the full-split (g = 3) line Fe i 1564.85 nm with a spatial resolution of 0.5^'' obtained with the GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph in three large sunspots. The continuum intensity is corrected for instrumental scattered light, and the brightness temperature is calculated. Magnetic field strength and inclination are derived directly from the line split and the ratio of Stokes components. The continuum intensity (temperature) relations to the field strength are studied separately in the umbra, light bridges, and penumbra. The results are consistent with previous studies, and it was found that the scatter of values in the relations increases with increasing spatial resolution thanks to resolved fine structures. The observed relations show trends common for the umbra, light bridges, and the inner penumbra, while the outer penumbra has a weaker magnetic field than the inner penumbra at equal continuum intensities. This fact can be interpreted in terms of the interlocking comb magnetic structure of the penumbra. A comparison with data obtained from numerical simulations was made. The simulated data generally have a stronger magnetic field and a weaker continuum intensity than the observations, which may be explained by stray light and limited spatial resolution of the observations, and also by photometric inaccuracies of the simulations.

  18. Histories and observables in covariant field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paugam, Frédéric

    2011-09-01

    Motivated by DeWitt's viewpoint of covariant field theory, we define a general notion of a non-local classical observable that applies to many physical Lagrangian systems (with bosonic and fermionic variables), by using methods that are now standard in algebraic geometry. We review the methods of local functional calculus, as they are presented by Beilinson and Drinfeld, and relate them to our construction. We partially explain the relation of these with Vinogradov's secondary calculus. The methods present here are all necessary to understand mathematically properly, and with simple notions, the full renormalization of the standard model, based on functional integral methods. Our approach is close in spirit to non-perturbative methods since we work with actual functions on spaces of fields, and not only formal power series. This article can be seen as an introduction to well-grounded classical physical mathematics, and as a good starting point to study quantum physical mathematics, which make frequent use of non-local functionals, like for example in the computation of Wilson's effective action. We finish by describing briefly a coordinate-free approach to the classical Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism for general gauge theories, in the language of homotopical geometry.

  19. Maternal and perinatal outcomes of delivery after a previous Cesarean section in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugwu, George O; Iyoke, Chukwuemeka A; Onah, Hyacinth E; Egwuatu, Vincent E; Ezugwu, Frank O

    2014-01-01

    Obstetricians in developing countries appear generally reluctant to conduct vaginal delivery in women with a previous Cesarean because of lack of adequate facilities for optimal fetomaternal monitoring. To describe delivery outcomes among women with one previous Cesarean section at a tertiary hospital in Southeast Nigeria. This was a prospective observational study to determine maternal and perinatal outcomes of attempted vaginal birth after Cesarean sections (VBAC) following one previous Cesarean section. Analysis was done with SPSS statistical software version 17.0 for Windows using descriptive and inferential statistics at 95% level of confidence. Two thousand six hundred and ten women delivered in the center during the study period, of whom 395 had one previous Cesarean section. A total of 370 women with one previous Cesarean section had nonrecurrent indications, of whom 355 consenting pregnant women with one previous Cesarean section were studied. A majority of the women (320/355, 90.1%) preferred to have vaginal delivery despite the one previous Cesarean section. However, only approximately 54% (190/355) were found suitable for trial of VBAC, out of whom 50% (95/190 had successful VBAC. Ninety-five women (50.0%) had failed attempt at VBAC and were delivered by emergency Cesarean section while 35 women (9.8%) had emergency Cesarean section for other obstetric indications (apart from failed VBAC). There was no case of uterine rupture or neonatal and maternal deaths recorded in any group. Apgar scores of less than 7 in the first minute were significantly more frequent amongst women who had vaginal delivery when compared to those who had elective repeat Cesarean section (P=0.03). Most women who had one previous Cesarean delivery chose to undergo trial of VBAC, although only about half were considered suitable for VBAC. The maternal and fetal outcomes of trial of VBAC in selected women with one previous Cesarean delivery for non-recurrent indications were good

  20. Chronic Chagas disease: PCR-xenodiagnosis without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool to detect viable Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Saavedra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the elimination of the microscopic stage of conventional xenodiagnosis (XD to optimize the parasitological diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi in chronic Chagas disease. To this purpose we applied under informed consent two XD cages to 150 Chilean chronic chagasic patients. The fecal samples (FS of the triatomines at 30, 60 and 90 days post feeding were divided into two parts: in one a microscopic search for mobile trypomastigote and/or epimastigote forms was performed. In the other part, DNA extraction-purification for PCR directed to the conserved region of kDNA minicircles of trypanosomes (PCR-XD, without previous microscopic observation was done. An XD was considered positive when at least one mobile T. cruzi parasite in any one of three periods of incubation was observed, whereas PCR-XD was considered positive when the 330 bp band specific for T. cruzi was detected. 25 of 26 cases with positive conventional XD were PCR-XD positive (concordance 96.2%, whereas 85 of 124 cases with negative conventional XD were positive by PCR-XD (68.5%. Human chromosome 12 detected by Real-time PCR used as exogenous internal control of PCR-XD reaction allowed to discounting of PCR inhibition and false negative in 40 cases with negative PCR-XD. Conclusion: PCR-XD performed without previous microscopic observation is a useful tool for detection of viable parasites with higher efficiency then conventional XD.

  1. A three year review of injuries to professional footballers (1995-98) and comparison with previous observations (1990-93).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, J C; Rae, A; Melvin, W D

    2000-02-01

    A prospective study over a three year period (1995-8) of footballers' injuries in first team players was undertaken in a similar fashion to a previous study (1990-3). During the present study the Club had a major cup success and appeared to have a younger squad with less major injury and subsequent time out of action. As a result of the earlier paper it would appear that some lessons and observations may have been put into action and helped produce a more consistent standard for the club. Increasing recognition of the need to reduce and monitor the levels and types of injuries seems now to be established.

  2. Observations of magnetic fields in diffuse clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, P. C.; Goodman, A. A.; Gusten, R.; Heiles, C.

    1995-03-01

    We report 32 statistically significant measurements of the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field strength, Bz, in four diffuse clouds, via the Zeeman effect in the 21 cm line of H I. The region near Magnani, Blitz, and Mundy 1985 (MBM) 27-30 in the Ursa Major complex has Bz greater than 4 micro-G throughout a filamentary region 15 pc long, with significant structure on scales as small as 1.6 pc. The greatest field strength measured in this cloud is 19 +/- 2 micro-G, greater than in most diffuse clouds by a factor approximately 2. Comparison of measurements with different telescopes suggests that the field strength at the map peak may be significantly greater than 19 micro-G on scales smaller than 1.6 pc. The magnetic and kinetic energy densities M and K in this cloud are comparable, within a factor 2 of 2 x 10-11ergs/cu cm, and greater than the gravitational energy density by a factor approximately 500. Among the four clouds surveyed, six positions where CO emission is a local maximim have essentially the same mean line-of-sight field strength, Bz approximately = 8 micro-G, as do four positions where CO emission is too weak to be detected. The similarity of M and K in the diffuse clouds discussed here, as well as in denser, self-gravitating clouds, suggests strong coupling between magnetic fields and gas motions in some interstellar clouds, independent of their self-gravity. This coupling probably arises from ion-neutral collisions, which allow propagation of MHD waves.

  3. Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigor, Ignatius [Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington; Johnson, Jim [Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington; Motz, Emily [National Ice Center; Bisic, Aaron [National Ice Center

    2017-06-30

    Our ability to understand and predict weather and climate requires an accurate observing network. One of the pillars of this network is the observation of the fundamental meteorological parameters: temperature, air pressure, and wind. We plan to assess our ability to measure these parameters for the polar regions during the Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX, Figure 1) to support the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP), Arctic Observing Network (AON), International Program for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), and Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). Accurate temperature measurements are also necessary to validate and improve satellite measurements of surface temperature across the Arctic. Support for research associated with the campaign is provided by the National Science Foundation, and by other US agencies contributing to the US Interagency Arctic Buoy Program. In addition to the support provided by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow and the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. IABP is supported by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Ice Center (NIC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

  4. Observing the sun a pocket field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Jamey L

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive solar observing guide for use at the telescope by amateur astronomers at all three levels: beginning, intermediate, and advanced. Users will find invaluable information for identifying features through photos, charts, diagrams in a logical, orderly fashion and then interpreting the observations. Because the Sun is a dynamic celestial body in constant flux, astronomers rarely know for certain what awaits them at the eyepiece. All features of the Sun are transient and sometimes rather fleeting. Given the number of features and the complex life cycles of some solar features, it can be a challenging hobby, and this guide provides all of the guidance necessary to inform observers about the sights and events unfolding before their eyes on the most active and powerful member of our Solar System.

  5. Programmable wide field spectrograph for earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2017-11-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return of the instruments must be optimized in future missions. Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) could be key components in future generation of space instruments. These devices are based on the mature micro-electronics technology and in addition to their compactness, scalability, and specific task customization, they could generate new functions not available with current technologies. French and European space agencies, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) and the European Space Agency (ESA) have initiated several studies with LAM and TAS for listing the new functions associated with several types of MEMS, and developing new ideas of instruments.

  6. Field observations of nearshore bar formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Kroon, Aart; Greenwood, Brian

    2008-01-01

    and sediment fluxes were obtained from electromagnetic current meters and optical backscatter sensors. These process measurements showed that a divergence in sediment transport occurred at the location of the developing trough, and observed gradients in cross-shore net sediment flux were consistent...

  7. The faint radio sky: VLBA observations of the COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Ruiz, N.; Middelberg, E.; Deller, A.; Norris, R. P.; Best, P. N.; Brisken, W.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčić, V.; Delvecchio, I.; Momjian, E.; Bomans, D.; Scoville, N. Z.; Carilli, C.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Quantifying the fraction of active galactic nuclei (AGN) in the faint radio population and understanding their relation with star-forming activity are fundamental to studies of galaxy evolution. Very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations are able to identify AGN above relatively low redshifts (z> 0.1) since they provide milli-arcsecond resolution. Aims: We have created an AGN catalogue from 2865 known radio sources observed in the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field, which has exceptional multi-wavelength coverage. With this catalogue we intend to study the faint radio sky with statistically relevant numbers and to analyse the AGN - host galaxy co-evolution, making use of the large amount of ancillary data available in the field. Methods: Wide-field VLBI observations were made of all known radio sources in the COSMOS field at 1.4 GHz to measure the AGN fraction, in particular in the faint radio population. We describe in detail the observations, data calibration, source detection and flux density measurements, parts of which we have developed for this survey. The combination of number of sources, sensitivity, and area covered with this project are unprecedented. Results: We have detected 468 radio sources, expected to be AGN, with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). This is, to date, the largest sample assembled of VLBI detected sources in the sub-mJy regime. The input sample was taken from previous observations with the Very Large Array (VLA). We present the catalogue with additional optical, infrared and X-ray information. Conclusions: We find a detection fraction of 20 ± 1%, considering only those sources from the input catalogue which were in principle detectable with the VLBA (2361). As a function of the VLA flux density, the detection fraction is higher for higher flux densities, since at high flux densities a source could be detected even if the VLBI core accounts for a small percentage of the total flux density. As a function of

  8. Cosmological field theory for observational astronomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'Dovich, Y.B.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of the very early Universe that use scalar fields (i.e., the so-called inflationary models of the Universe) have now come into wide use. The inflationary universe approach may perhaps solve some of the most difficult enigmas about the Universe as a whole. The inflationary universe forms a good bridge between the quantum theory of the birth of the Universe (which is still in the initial stages of development) and the standard hot Big Bang theory (which is well established, at least qualitatively). Therefore, an understanding of the basic ideas of inflation is a must for astronomers interested in the broad picture of the science. Astronomers are mathematically oriented enough (via celestial mechanics, electromagnetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, nuclear reactions,etc.) that there is no negative attitude towards formulae in general. What the astronomer lacks is a knowledge of recent developments in particle physics and field theory. The astronomer should not be blamed for this, because these branches of physics are developing in a very peculiar fashion: some subfields of it are progressing comparatively slowly, with experimental verifications at each and every step, while other subfields progress rapidly

  9. Validation of a Previously Developed Geospatial Model That Predicts the Prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in New York State Produce Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Daniel; Shiwakoti, Suvash; Bergholz, Peter; Grohn, Yrjo; Wiedmann, Martin; Strawn, Laura K

    2016-02-01

    Technological advancements, particularly in the field of geographic information systems (GIS), have made it possible to predict the likelihood of foodborne pathogen contamination in produce production environments using geospatial models. Yet, few studies have examined the validity and robustness of such models. This study was performed to test and refine the rules associated with a previously developed geospatial model that predicts the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in produce farms in New York State (NYS). Produce fields for each of four enrolled produce farms were categorized into areas of high or low predicted L. monocytogenes prevalence using rules based on a field's available water storage (AWS) and its proximity to water, impervious cover, and pastures. Drag swabs (n = 1,056) were collected from plots assigned to each risk category. Logistic regression, which tested the ability of each rule to accurately predict the prevalence of L. monocytogenes, validated the rules based on water and pasture. Samples collected near water (odds ratio [OR], 3.0) and pasture (OR, 2.9) showed a significantly increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation compared to that for samples collected far from water and pasture. Generalized linear mixed models identified additional land cover factors associated with an increased likelihood of L. monocytogenes isolation, such as proximity to wetlands. These findings validated a subset of previously developed rules that predict L. monocytogenes prevalence in produce production environments. This suggests that GIS and geospatial models can be used to accurately predict L. monocytogenes prevalence on farms and can be used prospectively to minimize the risk of preharvest contamination of produce. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. New Spatially Resolved Observations of the T Cha Transition Disk and Constraints on the Previously Claimed Substellar Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallum, S.; Eisner, J. A.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Bailey, Vanessa; Briguglio, Runa; Follette, Katherine B.; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Puglisi, Alfio; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia J.; Xompero, Marco

    2015-03-01

    We present multi-epoch non-redundant masking observations of the T Cha transition disk, taken at the Very Large Telescope and Magellan in the H, Ks, and L' bands. T Cha is one of a small number of transition disks that host companion candidates discovered by high-resolution imaging techniques, with a putative companion at a position angle of 78°, separation of 62 mas, and contrast of ΔL' = 5.1 mag. We find comparable binary parameters in our re-reduction of the initial detection images, and similar parameters in the 2011 L', 2013 NaCo L', and 2013 NaCo Ks data sets. We find a close-in companion signal in the 2012 NaCo L' data set that cannot be explained by orbital motion, and a non-detection in the 2013 MagAO/Clio2 L' data. However, Monte Carlo simulations show that the best fits to the 2012 NaCo and 2013 MagAO/Clio2 followup data may be consistent with noise. There is also a significant probability of false non-detections in both of these data sets. We discuss physical scenarios that could cause the best fits, and argue that previous companion and scattering explanations are inconsistent with the results of the much larger data set presented here.

  11. NEW SPATIALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF THE T Cha TRANSITION DISK AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE PREVIOUSLY CLAIMED SUBSTELLAR COMPANION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallum, S.; Eisner, J. A.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Bailey, Vanessa; Follette, Katherine B.; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Briguglio, Runa; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco; Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia J.

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-epoch non-redundant masking observations of the T Cha transition disk, taken at the Very Large Telescope and Magellan in the H, Ks, and L' bands. T Cha is one of a small number of transition disks that host companion candidates discovered by high-resolution imaging techniques, with a putative companion at a position angle of 78°, separation of 62 mas, and contrast of ΔL' = 5.1 mag. We find comparable binary parameters in our re-reduction of the initial detection images, and similar parameters in the 2011 L', 2013 NaCo L', and 2013 NaCo Ks data sets. We find a close-in companion signal in the 2012 NaCo L' data set that cannot be explained by orbital motion, and a non-detection in the 2013 MagAO/Clio2 L' data. However, Monte Carlo simulations show that the best fits to the 2012 NaCo and 2013 MagAO/Clio2 followup data may be consistent with noise. There is also a significant probability of false non-detections in both of these data sets. We discuss physical scenarios that could cause the best fits, and argue that previous companion and scattering explanations are inconsistent with the results of the much larger data set presented here

  12. NEW SPATIALLY RESOLVED OBSERVATIONS OF THE T Cha TRANSITION DISK AND CONSTRAINTS ON THE PREVIOUSLY CLAIMED SUBSTELLAR COMPANION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallum, S.; Eisner, J. A.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Bailey, Vanessa; Follette, Katherine B.; Males, Jared R.; Morzinski, Katie M. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Briguglio, Runa; Puglisi, Alfio; Xompero, Marco [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Rodigas, Timothy J.; Weinberger, Alycia J., E-mail: ssallum@email.arizona.edu [Carnegie Institution DTM, 5241 Broad Branch Rd, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    We present multi-epoch non-redundant masking observations of the T Cha transition disk, taken at the Very Large Telescope and Magellan in the H, Ks, and L' bands. T Cha is one of a small number of transition disks that host companion candidates discovered by high-resolution imaging techniques, with a putative companion at a position angle of 78°, separation of 62 mas, and contrast of ΔL' = 5.1 mag. We find comparable binary parameters in our re-reduction of the initial detection images, and similar parameters in the 2011 L', 2013 NaCo L', and 2013 NaCo Ks data sets. We find a close-in companion signal in the 2012 NaCo L' data set that cannot be explained by orbital motion, and a non-detection in the 2013 MagAO/Clio2 L' data. However, Monte Carlo simulations show that the best fits to the 2012 NaCo and 2013 MagAO/Clio2 followup data may be consistent with noise. There is also a significant probability of false non-detections in both of these data sets. We discuss physical scenarios that could cause the best fits, and argue that previous companion and scattering explanations are inconsistent with the results of the much larger data set presented here.

  13. Difference of observability between classical electromagnetic and gravitational gauge fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asorey, M.; Boya, L.J.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis of the observability of the classical electromagnetic gauge field based in its quantum effects shows that this is physically determined up to equivalences. By contrast a similar analysis of the gravitational gauge field from Einstein's General Relativity theory shows that this field is univocally determined by the trajectories of material particles provided they feel only that gravitational field, and its proper gravitational and quantum effects are negligible. This difference of observability in both kinds of gauge fields is caused by the attachment of the gravitational field in the Einstein theory to the space-time, and this difference must be taken into account to formulate unified gauge theories with both kinds of fields. (author)

  14. Compactly supported linearised observables in single-field inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fröob, Markus B.; Higuchi, Atsushi; Hack, Thomas-Paul

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the gauge-invariant observables constructed by smearing the graviton and inflaton fields by compactly supported tensors at linear order in general single-field inflation. These observables correspond to gauge-invariant quantities that can be measured locally. In particular, we show that these observables are equivalent to (smeared) local gauge-invariant observables such as the linearised Weyl tensor, which have better infrared properties than the graviton and inflaton fields. Special cases include the equivalence between the compactly supported gauge-invariant graviton observable and the smeared linearised Weyl tensor in Minkowski and de Sitter spaces. Our results indicate that the infrared divergences in the tensor and scalar perturbations in single-field inflation have the same status as in de Sitter space and are both a gauge artefact, in a certain technical sense, at tree level.

  15. Compactly supported linearised observables in single-field inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fröob, Markus B.; Higuchi, Atsushi [Department of Mathematics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Hack, Thomas-Paul, E-mail: mbf503@york.ac.uk, E-mail: thomas-paul.hack@itp.uni-leipzig.de, E-mail: atsushi.higuchi@york.ac.uk [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Leipzig, Brüderstraße 16, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the gauge-invariant observables constructed by smearing the graviton and inflaton fields by compactly supported tensors at linear order in general single-field inflation. These observables correspond to gauge-invariant quantities that can be measured locally. In particular, we show that these observables are equivalent to (smeared) local gauge-invariant observables such as the linearised Weyl tensor, which have better infrared properties than the graviton and inflaton fields. Special cases include the equivalence between the compactly supported gauge-invariant graviton observable and the smeared linearised Weyl tensor in Minkowski and de Sitter spaces. Our results indicate that the infrared divergences in the tensor and scalar perturbations in single-field inflation have the same status as in de Sitter space and are both a gauge artefact, in a certain technical sense, at tree level.

  16. HST WIDE FIELD PLANETARY CAMERA 2 OBSERVATIONS OF MARS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 data archive contains calibrated data of Mars observed between April 27, 1999 and September 4, 2001. These...

  17. SYNTHETIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN PROTOSTELLAR CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joyce W. Y.; Hull, Charles L. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Offner, Stella S. R., E-mail: chat.hull@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jwyl1g12@soton.ac.uk [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2017-01-10

    The role of magnetic fields in the early stages of star formation is not well constrained. In order to discriminate between different star formation models, we analyze 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of low-mass cores and explore the correlation between magnetic field orientation and outflow orientation over time. We produce synthetic observations of dust polarization at resolutions comparable to millimeter-wave dust polarization maps observed by the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy and compare these with 2D visualizations of projected magnetic field and column density. Cumulative distribution functions of the projected angle between the magnetic field and outflow show different degrees of alignment in simulations with differing mass-to-flux ratios. The distribution function for the less magnetized core agrees with observations finding random alignment between outflow and field orientations, while the more magnetized core exhibits stronger alignment. We find that fractional polarization increases when the system is viewed such that the magnetic field is close to the plane of the sky, and the values of fractional polarization are consistent with observational measurements. The simulation outflow, which reflects the underlying angular momentum of the accreted gas, changes direction significantly over over the first ∼0.1 Myr of evolution. This movement could lead to the observed random alignment between outflows and the magnetic fields in protostellar cores.

  18. Uprooting of flexible riparian vegetation: field and laboratory observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, L.; Calvani, G.; Francalanci, S.

    2017-12-01

    Vegetation is a key element in fluvial systems, controlling river corridor form and dynamics. Plants actively interact with fluvial processes; their aboveground biomass can affect the flow field and sediment transport and therefore river morphological evolution, whereas their belowground biomass modifies the hydraulic and mechanical properties of the substrate, and consequently the moisture regime and erodibility of the soil (Gurnell, 2014; Solari et al., 2015). Vegetation biomass can either increase over time or can die through the mechanism of uprooting. Despite its important implications in river morphodynamics, vegetation uprooting due to sediment transport during flood events have been poorly investigated (Edmaier et al., 2011). Most of previous research focused on the mechanism of root breakage and on measuring the vegetation resistance to uprooting in the vertical direction (Bywater-Reyes et al., 2015, among others). In this work, we focus on the uprooting of flexible juvenile seedlings vegetation due to flow and to bed erosion. First, we derive a physics-based model for the prediction of vegetation uprooting for given root geometry, soil strength characteristics, flow bed shear stress and bed erosion. The model is then tested in a laboratory flume using two different species of vegetation: Avena sativa and Salix purpurea. Various experiments were run considering increasing flow discharges and a quasi- parallel bed erosion. The vegetation model is then applied to a sediment bar in the Ombrone Pistoiese river where we observed the removal of Salix Purpurea during the flood of November 2016. We implemented a 2D hydraulic model to reconstruct the pattern of bed shear stresses on the bar and we compared the prediction of the vegetation model with the field surveys of Salix purpurea before and after the flood. Results suggest that juvenile seedlings can be easily removed by the flow provided sediment transport takes place.

  19. High resolution geomagnetic field observations at Terra Nova bay, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Palangio

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available he preliminary results obtained from the analysis in the micropulsation frequency range of high time resolution magnetic field data recorded at the Antarctic Italian geomagnetic observatory at Terra Nova Bay for 11 consecutive days in February 1994 are reported. The spectral index over the whole Pcl-Pc5 frequency range is of the order of 3.5 and its value significantly increases beyond about 50 mHz. Spectral peaks in the Pc3 frequency range are common, especially during the daytime hours, and are probably due to the direct penetration of upstream waves in the cusp region. From the local time distribution of the micro pulsation power, a signifi - cant activity enhancement around the local magnetic noon emerges, in agreement with previous observations. The analysis of the signal polarisation characteristics in the horizontal plane shows a predominant CW polarisation in the Pcl-Pc3 frequency ranges with the major axis of the polarisation ellipse in the first quadrant.

  20. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  1. A course on quantum field theory and local observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroer, Bert

    1997-03-01

    A monograph on Quantum Field Theory and Local Observables is presented, aiming to unify two presently largely disconnected branches of QFT, as follows: the standard (canonical, functional) approach which is mainly perturbative in the sense of an infinitesimal 'deformation' of free fields; nonperturbative constructions of low-dimensional models as the form factor-bootstrap approach (which for the time being is limited to factorable models in d=1+1 spacetime dimensions) and the non-Lagrangian constructions of conformal chiral QFT's

  2. Observation of asymmetric electromagnetic field profiles in chiral metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamoto, Nobuyuki; Ueda, Tetsuya; Sawada, Kei; Tomita, Satoshi

    2018-02-01

    We experimentally observe asymmetric electromagnetic field profiles along two-dimensional chiral metamaterials. The asymmetric field profiles depending on the chirality and the operation frequency have been reproduced well by the numerical simulation. Around a chiral meta-atom, distribution of a Poynting vector is found to be shifted asymmetrically. These results are explained in terms of an analogy with the side-jump mechanism in the electronic anomalous Hall systems.

  3. Implications of observing and writing field notes through different lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellesø R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ragnhild Hellesø,1 Line Melby,1 Solveig Hauge21Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2Faculty of Health and Social Studies, Telemark University College, Porsgrunn, NorwayBackground: From a philosophy of science perspective, the literature has posited that different research approaches influence field studies. Studies addressing interdisciplinary research have focused on the challenges of organizing and running interdisciplinary teams, cultural differences between and within disciplines, and constraints in conducting interdisciplinary research. Studies exploring and discussing the process and outcome of transferring observations to notes from an interdisciplinary point of view are not identified. The aim of this paper is to explore the characteristics of field notes created by researchers representing different disciplines and experiences.Methods: A case study using a modified dynamic observation method was employed. The analyses were initiated by a researcher who had not been involved in the data collection. The field notes were analyzed using three main steps.Results: The structures of both researchers' field notes were characterized by similarities in their descriptions, but the notes' foci and analytical levels differed.Conclusion: The findings contribute new insights concerning the execution of interdisciplinary observational studies. Our findings demonstrate that entering the field with different lenses produced richer and more varied data, providing a broader platform from which to discuss and interpret a study's findings. From a theoretical point of view, the findings enable a more nuanced discussion and a conceptual elaboration regarding how observational approaches should be pursued in future studies. On a practical level, the findings show that even if the researchers agree on what the overall focus in the observations should be, differences can occur in

  4. An atlas of photospheric magnetic field observations and computed coronal magnetic fields: 1976-1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, J. T.; Scherrer, P. H.

    1986-01-01

    Daily magnetogram observations of the large-scale photospheric magnetic field have been made at the John M. Wilcox Solar Observatory at Stanford since May of 1976. These measurements provide a homogeneous record of the changing solar field through most of solar cycle 21. Using the photospheric data, the configuration of the coronal and heliospheric fields can be calculated using a Potential Field-Source Surface model. This provides a three-dimensional picture of the heliospheric field evolution during the solar cycle. This paper announces the publication of UAG Report No. 94, an Atlas containing the complete set of synoptic charts of the measured photospheric magnetic field, the computed field at the source surface, and the coefficients of the multipole expansion of the coronal field. The general underlying structures of the solar and heliospheric fields, which determine the environment for solar-terrestrial relations and provide the context within which solar activity related events occur, can be approximated from these data.

  5. The Influence of Cloud Field Uniformity on Observed Cloud Amount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, E.; Kleiss, J.; Kassianov, E.; Long, C. N.; Riihimaki, L.; Berg, L. K.

    2017-12-01

    Two ground-based measurements of cloud amount include cloud fraction (CF) obtained from time series of zenith-pointing radar-lidar observations and fractional sky cover (FSC) acquired from a Total Sky Imager (TSI). In comparison with the radars and lidars, the TSI has a considerably larger field of view (FOV 100° vs. 0.2°) and therefore is expected to have a different sensitivity to inhomogeneity in a cloud field. Radiative transfer calculations based on cloud properties retrieved from narrow-FOV overhead cloud observations may differ from shortwave and longwave flux observations due to spatial variability in local cloud cover. This bias will impede radiative closure for sampling reasons rather than the accuracy of cloud microphysics retrievals or radiative transfer calculations. Furthermore, the comparison between observed and modeled cloud amount from large eddy simulations (LES) models may be affected by cloud field inhomogeneity. The main goal of our study is to estimate the anticipated impact of cloud field inhomogeneity on the level of agreement between CF and FSC. We focus on shallow cumulus clouds observed at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma, USA. Our analysis identifies cloud field inhomogeneity using a novel metric that quantifies the spatial and temporal uniformity of FSC over 100-degree FOV TSI images. We demonstrate that (1) large differences between CF and FSC are partly attributable to increases in inhomogeneity and (2) using the uniformity metric can provide a meaningful assessment of uncertainties in observed cloud amount to aide in comparing ground-based measurements to radiative transfer or LES model outputs at SGP.

  6. Observational constraints on gauge field production in axion inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meerburg, P.D.; Pajer, E.

    2013-01-01

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling φF F-tilde to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from μ-distortion using TRIS plus COBE/FIRAS data, but it is much weaker. Finally we comment on a generalization of the model to massive gauge fields. When the mass is generated by some light Higgs field, observably large local non-Gaussianity can be produced

  7. The interplanetary magnetic field observed by Juno enroute to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-06-01

    The Juno spacecraft was launched on 5 August 2011 and spent nearly 5 years traveling through the inner heliosphere on its way to Jupiter. The Magnetic Field Investigation was powered on shortly after launch and obtained vector measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at sample rates from 1 to 64 samples/second. The evolution of the magnetic field with radial distance from the Sun is compared to similar observations obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 and the Ulysses spacecraft, allowing a comparison of the radial evolution between prior solar cycles and the current depressed one. During the current solar cycle, the strength of the IMF has decreased throughout the inner heliosphere. A comparison of the variance of the normal component of the magnetic field shows that near Earth the variability of the IMF is similar during all three solar cycles but may be less at greater radial distances.

  8. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field Observed by Juno Enroute to Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruesbeck, Jacob R.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Espley, Jared R.; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-01-01

    The Juno spacecraft was launched on 5 August 2011 and spent nearly 5 years traveling through the inner heliosphere on its way to Jupiter. The Magnetic Field Investigation was powered on shortly after launch and obtained vector measurements of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at sample rates from 1 to 64 samples/second. The evolution of the magnetic field with radial distance from the Sun is compared to similar observations obtained by Voyager 1 and 2 and the Ulysses spacecraft, allowing a comparison of the radial evolution between prior solar cycles and the current depressed one. During the current solar cycle, the strength of the IMF has decreased throughout the inner heliosphere. A comparison of the variance of the normal component of the magnetic field shows that near Earth the variability of the IMF is similar during all three solar cycles but may be less at greater radial distances.

  9. A course on quantum field theory and local observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [Frankfurt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1997-03-01

    A monograph on Quantum Field Theory and Local Observables is presented, aiming to unify two presently largely disconnected branches of QFT, as follows: the standard (canonical, functional) approach which is mainly perturbative in the sense of an infinitesimal `deformation` of free fields; nonperturbative constructions of low-dimensional models as the form factor-bootstrap approach (which for the time being is limited to factorable models in d=1+1 spacetime dimensions) and the non-Lagrangian constructions of conformal chiral QFT`s

  10. An improved proton magnetometer for Earth's magnetic field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chengyu; Zhang, Shuang; Guo, Xin; Fu, Haoyang

    2015-09-01

    As a precision instrument to measure the earth magnetic field, proton magnetometer is widely used in different fields such as geological survey, buried objects detection and earth field variations. Due to poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the system, proton magnetometer suffers from low sensitivity which directly affects the performance. In order to increase the sensitivity, we present an improved proton magnetometer. First, the effect of matching resistance on Q value is discussed to enhance SNR, and high matching resistance has been chosen to improve the Q value of the resonant circuit. Second, noise induced by pre-amplifier is investigated in order to obtain low noise signal, and we adopt the JFET with noise figure less than 0.5dB as the pre-amplifier. Third, by using band-pass filter, low-noise output signal is obtained. Fourth, the method of period measurement based on CPLD is employed to measure frequency of the square wave shaped from the output sinusoidal signal. High precision temperature compensate crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been used to improve the frequency measurement accuracy. Last, experimental data is obtained through field measurements. By calculating the standard deviation, the sensitivity of the improved proton magnetometer is 0.15nT for Earth's magnetic field observation. Experimental results show that the new magnetometer is sensitive to earth field measurement.

  11. An explanation for parallel electric field pulses observed over thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, M. C.; Barnum, B. H.

    2009-10-01

    Every electric field instrument flown on sounding rockets over a thunderstorm has detected pulses of electric fields parallel to the Earth's magnetic field associated with every strike. This paper describes the ionospheric signatures found during a flight from Wallops Island, Virginia, on 2 September 1995. The electric field results in a drifting Maxwellian corresponding to energies up to 1 eV. The distribution function relaxes because of elastic and inelastic collisions, resulting in electron heating up to 4000-5000 K and potentially observable red line emissions and enhanced ISR electron temperatures. The field strength scales with the current in cloud-to-ground strikes and falls off as r -1 with distance. Pulses of both polarities are found, although most electric fields are downward, parallel to the magnetic field. The pulse may be the reaction of ambient plasma to a current pulse carried at the whistler packet's highest group velocity. The charge source required to produce the electric field is very likely electrons of a few keV traveling at the packet velocity. We conjecture that the current source is the divergence of the current flowing at mesospheric heights, the phenomenon called an elve. The whistler packet's effective radiated power is as high as 25 mW at ionospheric heights, comparable to some ionospheric heater transmissions. Comparing the Poynting flux at the base of the ionosphere with flux an equal distance away along the ground, some 30 db are lost in the mesosphere. Another 10 db are lost in the transition from free space to the whistler mode.

  12. Observer dependence of quantum states in relativistic quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malin, S.

    1982-01-01

    Quantum states can be understood as either (i) describing quantum systems or (ii) representing observers' knowledge about quantum systems. These different meanings are shown to imply different transformation properties in relativistic field theories. The rules for the reduction of quantum states and the transformation properties of quantum states under Lorentz transformations are derived for case (ii). The results obtained are applied to a quantum system recently presented and analyzed by Aharonov and Albert. It is shown that the present results, combined with Aharonov and Albert's, amount to a proof of Bohr's view that quantum states represent observers' knowledge about quantum systems

  13. Magnetic field measurements on the sun and implications for stellar magnetic field observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, W.H.; Giampapa, M.S.; Worden, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of solar magnetic field measurements in plages, sunspot umbrae, and sunspot penumbrae using high spectral resolution, unpolarized infrared H band spectral data are presented. A Fourier deconvolution analysis scheme similar to that utilized for stellar magnetic field measurements is adopted. As an example, a field strength of 3240 + or - 450 G is determined in a sunspot umbra combined with a value of 2000 + or - 180 G in the associated penumbra. These values are compared with a direct measurement of the spot umbra and penumbra field strengths based on the observed separation of the Zeeman components of the magnetically sensitive lines. Possible origins for the discrepancy between the results inferred by these two different techniques are discussed. The Fourier analysis results confirm the widespread occurrence of kilogauss level fields in the solar photosphere. The implications of the solar results for stellar magnetic field measurements are considered. 45 references.

  14. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.S. [Univ. of Sunderland (United Kingdom). Ecology Centre

    1996-05-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at ion-cyclotron resonance conditions for stimulation of Ca{sup 2+} (B{sub H} = 78.3 {micro}T, B{sub HAC} = 40 {micro}T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B{sub v} = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  15. Effects of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on early growth in three plant species and a replication of previous results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, M S

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to replicate the findings of Smith et al., seeds of Raphanus sativus L. (radish), Sinapsis alba L. (mustard), and Hordeum vulgare L. (barley) were grown for between 9 and 21 days in continuous electromagnetic fields (EMFs) at "ion-cyclotron resonance" conditions for stimulation of Ca(2+) (B(H) = 78.3 mu T, B(HAC) = 40 mu T peak-peak at 60 Hz, B(V) = 0). On harvesting, radish showed results similar to those of Smith et al. Dry stem weight and plant height were both significantly greater (Mann-Whitney tests, Ps < 0.05) in EMF-exposed plants than in control plants in each EMF experiment. Wet root weight was significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in two out of three experiments, as were dry leaf weight, dry whole weight, and stem diameter. Dry root weight, wet leaf weight, and wet whole weight were significantly greater in EMF-exposed plants in one of three experiments. All significant differences indicated an increase in weight or size in the EMF-exposed plants. In each of the sham experiments, no differences between exposed and control plants were evident. Mustard plants failed to respond to the EMFs in any of the plant parameters measured. In one experiment, barley similarly failed to respond; but in another showed significantly greater wet root weight and significantly smaller stem diameter and dry seed weight at the end of the experiment in exposed plants compared to control plants. Although these results give no clue about the underlying bioelectromagnetic mechanism, they demonstrate that, at least for one EMF-sensitive biosystem, results can be independently replicated in another laboratory. Such replication is crucial in establishing the validity of bioelectromagnetic science.

  16. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  17. Observation Impact over the Antarctic During the Concordiasi Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullot, Nathalie; Rabier, Florence; Langland, Rolf; Gelaro, Ron; Cardinali, Carla; Guidard, Vincent; Bauer, Peter; Doerenbecher, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    The impact of observations on analysis uncertainty and forecast performance was investigated for Austral Spring 2010 over the Southern polar area for four different systems (NRL, GMAO, ECMWF and Meteo-France), at the time of the Concordiasi field experiment. The largest multi model variance in 500 hPa height analyses is found in the southern sub-Antarctic oceanic region, where there are strong atmospheric dynamics, rapid forecast error growth, and fewer upper air wind observation data to constrain the analyses. In terms of data impact the most important observation components are shown to be AMSU, IASI, AIRS, GPS-RO, radiosonde, surface and atmospheric motion vector observations. For sounding data, radiosondes and dropsondes, one can note a large impact of temperature at low levels and a large impact of wind at high levels. Observing system experiments using the Concordiasi dropsondes show a large impact of the observations over the Antarctic plateau extending to lower latitudes with the forecast range, with a large impact around 50 to 70deg South. These experiments indicate there is a potential benefit of better using radiance data over land and sea-ice and innovative atmospheric motion vectors obtained from a combination of various satellites to fill the current data gaps and improve NWP in this region.

  18. State Guidelines for Mental Retardation and Intellectual Disabilities: A Re-visitation of Previous Analyses in Light of Changes in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polloway, Edward A.; Patton, James R.; Smith, J. David; Lubin, Jacqueline; Antoine, Karian

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the American Association on Mental Retardation (AAMR) (Luckasson et al., 2002) revised their manual on mental retardation. It also extended the changes that had been made in the previous (1992) manual to further promote an alternative approach to definition and classification in the field. The study reported here sought to determine the…

  19. Geomorphology: Perspectives on observation, history, and the field tradition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitek, John D.

    2013-10-01

    Other than a common interest in form and process, current geomorphologists have little in common with those who established the foundations of this science. Educated people who had an interest in Earth processes during the nineteenth century cannot be compared to the scholars who study geomorphology in the twenty-first century. Whereas Earth has undergone natural change from the beginning of time, the human record of observing and recording processes and changes in the surface Is but a recent phenomena. Observation is the only thread, however, that connects all practitioners of geomorphology through time. As people acquired knowledge related to all aspects of life, technological revolutions, such as the Iron Age, Bronze Age, agricultural revolution, the atomic age, and the digital age, shaped human existence and thought. Technology has greatly changed the power of human observation, including inward to the atomic scale and outward into the realm of space.Books and articles describe how to collect and analyze data but few references document the field experience. Each of us, however, has experienced unique circumstances during field work and we learned from various mentors how to observe. The surface of Earth on which we practice the vocation of geomorphology may not be much different from a hundred years ago but many things about how we collect data, analyze it and disseminate the results have changed. How we function in the field, including what we wear, what we eat, how we get there, and where we choose to collect data, clearly reflects the complexity of the human system on Earth and the processes and forms that arouse our interest. Computers, miniaturization of electronics, satellite communications and observation platforms in space provide access to data to aid in our quest to understand Earth surface processes. Once, people lived closer to nature in primitive shelters in contrast with life in urban environments. But as urban life continues to expand and people

  20. MMS Multipoint Electric Field Observations of Small-Scale Magnetic Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Katherine A.; Ergun, Robert E.; Wilder, Frederick; Burch, James; Torbert, Roy; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Russell, Christopher; Strangeway, Robert; Magnus, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale magnetic holes (MHs), local depletions in magnetic field strength, have been observed multiple times in the Earths magnetosphere in the bursty bulk flow (BBF) braking region. This particular subset of MHs has observed scale sizes perpendicular to the background magnetic field (B) less than the ambient ion Larmor radius (p(sib i)). Previous observations by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) indicate that this subset of MHs can be supported by a current driven by the E x B drift of electrons. Ions do not participate in the E x B drift due to the small-scale size of the electric field. While in the BBF braking region, during its commissioning phase, the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft observed a small-scale MH. The electric field observations taken during this event suggest the presence of electron currents perpendicular to the magnetic field. These observations also suggest that these currents can evolve to smaller spatial scales.

  1. Near Field Observations of Seismicity in Volcanic Environments: A Read-Made Field Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, C. J.; Thun, J.; Eibl, E. P. S.; Benson, P. M.; Rowley, P.; Lokmer, I.; Cauchie, L.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic environments experience periods of rapid stress fluctuations and consequent seismicity. This volcano seismicity is diverse in character, spanning the range from discrete high frequency events through low-frequency earthquakes and tremor. The inter-relationships between these events appear to be controlled by edifice rheology, stress state and the presence of fluids (which help modulate the stress field). In general volcanoes are accessible to instrumentation, allowing near-field access to the seismicity at play. Here we present results from a range of field, numerical and laboratory experiments that demonstrate the controls that rheology and strain rate play on seismicity type. In particular we demonstrate the role played by internal friction angles on the initiation and evolution of seismicity, in dry weak-compliant volcanic materials. Furthermore we show the importance of near field observation in constraining details of the seismic source, in a meso-scale field setting.

  2. Using Clocks and Atomic Interferometry for Gravity Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    New technology developed in the frame of fundamental physics may lead to enhanced capabilities for geodetic applications such as refined observations of the Earth's gravity field. Here, we will present new sensor measurement concepts that apply atomic interferometry for gravimetry and clock measurements for observing potential values. In the first case, gravity anomalies can be determined by observing free-falling atoms (quantum gravimetry). In the second case, highly precise optical clocks can be used to measure differences of the gravity potential over long distances (relativistic geodesy). Principally, also inter-satellite ranging between test masses in space with nanometer accuracy belongs to these novel developments. We will show, how the new measurement concepts are connected to classical geodetic concepts, e.g. geopotential numbers and clock readings. We will illustrate the application of these new methods and their benefit for geodesy, where local and global mass variations can be observed with unforeseen accuracy and resolution, mass variations that reflect processes in the Earth system. We will present a few examples where geodesy will potentially benefit from these developments. Thus, the novel technologies might be applied for defining and realizing height systems in a new way, but also for fast local gravimetric surveys and exploration.

  3. C/NOFS Observations of AC Electric Field Fields Associated with Equatorial Spread-F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Liebrecht, C.

    2009-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set in which to acquire detailed knowledge of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations, primarily gathered within the ELF band (1 Hz to 250 Hz) on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The data will be used to explore the anisotropy/isotropy of the waves, their wavelength and phase velocity, as well as their spectral distributions. When analyzed in conjunction with the driving DC electric fields and detailed plasma number density measurements, the combined data reveal important information concerning the instability mechanisms themselves. We also present high resolution, vector measurements of intense lower hybrid waves that have been detected on numerous occasions by the VEFI burst memory VLF electric field channels.

  4. Lightning Performance on Overhead Distribution Lines : After Improvement Field Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynaldo Zoro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Two feeders of 20 kV overhead distribution lines which are located in a high lightning density area are chosen to be observed as a field study due to their good lightning performance after improvement of lightning protection system. These two feeders used the new overhead ground wire and new line arrester equipped with lightning counter on the main lines. The significant reduced of lines outages are reported. Study was carried out to observe these improvements by comparing to the other two feeders line which are not improved and not equipped yet with the ground wire and line arrester. These two feeders located in the nearby area. Two cameras were installed to record the trajectory of the lightning strikes on the improved lines. Lightning peak currents are measured using magnetic tape measurement system installed on the grounding lead of lightning arrester. Lightning overvoltage calculations are carried out by using several scenarios based on observation results and historical lightning data derived from lightning detection network. Lightning overvoltages caused by indirect or direct strikes are analyzed to get the lightning performance of the lines. The best scenario was chosen and performance of the lines were improved significantly by installing overhead ground wire and improvement of lightning arrester installation.

  5. The link between laboratory/field observations and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, C.R.; Foley, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The various linkages in system performance assessments that integrate disposal program elements must be understood. The linkage between model development and field/laboratory observations is described as the iterative program of site and system characterization for development of an observational-confirmatory data base. This data base is designed to develop, improve, and support conceptual models for site and system behavior. The program consists of data gathering and experiments to demonstrate understanding at various spatial and time scales and degrees of complexity. Understanding and accounting for the decreasing characterization certainty that arises with increasing space and time scales is an important aspect of the link between models and observations. The performance allocation process for setting performance goals and confidence levels, coupled with a performance assessment approach that provides these performance and confidence estimates, will determine when sufficient characterization has been achieved. At each iteration, performance allocation goals are reviewed and revised as necessary. The updated data base and appropriate performance assessment tools and approaches are utilized to identify and design additional tests and data needs necessary to meet current performance allocation goals

  6. Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed periods - 1986 Sundial observations and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, B. G.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Foster, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    F-region incoherent scatter radar drift observations from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F observations from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed periods. The observations are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run that involved a sharp increase in the polar cap potential drop followed by a subsequent decrease. The zonal disturbance electric field pattern is latitude independent, and the corresponding amplitudes change approximately as L exp n (where n is about 1.5). The meridional electric field patterns and amplitudes have larger latitudinal variations. The mid-, low, and equatorial electric fields from the Rice Convection Model are in good agreement with previous results from the semianalytic, Senior-Blanc (1987) model. Also discussed are three physical mechanisms (over-shielding, fossil winds, and magnetic reconfiguration) that contribute to the long lasting (1-2 h) equatorial zonal electric field perturbations associated with a sudden northward turning of the IMF. It is predicted that the penetration of high latitude electric fields to low latitudes should, in general, be closely related to the rate of motion of the shielding layer and the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora.

  7. Observations of the diffuse near-UV radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1990-01-01

    The diffuse radiation field from 1650-3100 A has been observed by spectrometer aboard the Space Shuttle, and the contributions of the zodiacal light an the diffuse cosmic background to the signal have been derived. Colors ranging from 0.65 to 1.2 are found for the zodiacal light with an almost linear increase in the color with ecliptic latitude. This rise in color is due to UV brightness remaining almost constant while the visible brightnesses drop by almost a factor of two. This is interpreted as evidence that the grains responsible for the UV scattering have much more uniform distribution with distance from the ecliptic plane than do those grains responsible for the visible scattering. Intensities for the cosmic diffuse background ranging from 300 units to 900 units are found which are not consistent with either a correlation with N(H I) or with spatial isotropy.

  8. Coronal magnetic fields inferred from IR wavelength and comparison with EUV observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Liu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectropolarimetry using IR wavelength of 1075 nm has been proved to be a powerful tool for directly mapping solar coronal magnetic fields including transverse component directions and line-of-sight component intensities. Solar tomography, or stereoscopy based on EUV observations, can supply 3-D information for some magnetic field lines in bright EUV loops. In a previous paper \\citep{liu08} the locations of the IR emission sources in the 3-D coordinate system were inferred from the comparison between the polarization data and the potential-field-source-surface (PFSS model, for one of five west limb regions in the corona (Lin et al., 2004. The paper shows that the region with the loop system in the active region over the photospheric area with strong magnetic field intensity is the region with a dominant contribution to the observed Stokes signals. So, the inversion of the measured Stokes parameters could be done assuming that most of the signals come from a relatively thin layer over the area with a large photospheric magnetic field strength. Here, the five limb coronal regions are studied together in order to study the spatial correlation between the bright EUV loop features and the inferred IR emission sources. It is found that, for the coronal regions above the stronger photospheric magnetic fields, the locations of the IR emission sources are closer to or more consistent with the bright EUV loop locations than those above weaker photospheric fields. This result suggests that the structures of the coronal magnetic fields observed at IR and EUV wavelengths may be different when weak magnetic fields present there.

  9. Modular model for Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within the average observed magnetopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Haje; Tsyganenko, Nikolai A; Johnson, Catherine L; Philpott, Lydia C; Anderson, Brian J; Al Asad, Manar M; Solomon, Sean C; McNutt, Ralph L

    2015-06-01

    Accurate knowledge of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field is required to understand the sources of the planet's internal field. We present the first model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field confined within a magnetopause shape derived from Magnetometer observations by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging spacecraft. The field of internal origin is approximated by a dipole of magnitude 190 nT R M 3 , where R M is Mercury's radius, offset northward by 479 km along the spin axis. External field sources include currents flowing on the magnetopause boundary and in the cross-tail current sheet. The cross-tail current is described by a disk-shaped current near the planet and a sheet current at larger (≳ 5  R M ) antisunward distances. The tail currents are constrained by minimizing the root-mean-square (RMS) residual between the model and the magnetic field observed within the magnetosphere. The magnetopause current contributions are derived by shielding the field of each module external to the magnetopause by minimizing the RMS normal component of the magnetic field at the magnetopause. The new model yields improvements over the previously developed paraboloid model in regions that are close to the magnetopause and the nightside magnetic equatorial plane. Magnetic field residuals remain that are distributed systematically over large areas and vary monotonically with magnetic activity. Further advances in empirical descriptions of Mercury's magnetospheric external field will need to account for the dependence of the tail and magnetopause currents on magnetic activity and additional sources within the magnetosphere associated with Birkeland currents and plasma distributions near the dayside magnetopause.

  10. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  11. A comparison of field-line resonances observed at the Goose Bay and Wick radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Provan

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous observations with the Goose Bay HF coherent-scatter radar have revealed structured spectral peaks at ultra-low frequencies. The frequencies of these spectral peaks have been demonstrated to be extremely consistent from day to day. The stability of these spectral peaks can be seen as evidence for the existence of global magnetospheric cavity modes whose resonant frequencies are independent of latitude. Field-line resonances occur when successive harmonics of the eigenfrequency of the magnetospheric cavity or waveguide match either the first harmonic eigenfrequency of the geomagnetic field lines or higher harmonics of this frequency. Power spectra observed at the SABRE VHF coherent-scatter radar at Wick, Scotland, during night and early morning are revealed to show similarly clearly structured spectral peaks. These spectral peaks are the result of local field-line resonances due to Alfvén waves standing on magnetospheric field lines. A comparison of the spectra observed by the Goose Bay and Wick radars demonstrate that the frequencies of the field-line resonances are, on average, almost identical, despite the different latitudinal ranges covered by the two radars. Possible explanations for the similarity of the signatures on the two radar systems are discussed.

  12. [Inter-observer variability of decision concerning the route of delivery in case of one previous cesarean section and abnormal pelvic measures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, M; Ceccaldi, P F; Girard, G; Koskas, M; Goffinet, F; Le Ray, C

    2016-11-01

    To study inter-observer variability of decision concerning the route of delivery using pelvimetry in case of one previous cesarean section and abnormal pelvic measures. Observational study conducted in 2014 in 4 university maternity units among 36 obstetricians. Two groups of obstetricians - as they practiced in a center where pelvimetry was routinely performed (n=12) or not (n=24) - had to choose a route of delivery for 10 clinical cases of women with a single uterine scar and a tight pelvis. The "routine pelvimetry" group had pelvimetry results. The group "no pelvimetry" became aware of pelvimetry results as a second step and had to indicate whether this information changed or not their management. The measurement of the inter-observer variability was estimated by estimating the proportion of agreement according to Grant method. The proportion of agreements of an attempted vaginal delivery between obstetricians in the group "routine pelvimetry" was 64.7% (95% CI [61-68.5]) and 97.3% (95% CI [96.4 to 98.3]) in the group "no pelvimetry", prior knowledge of pelvimetry results. An attempted vaginal delivery was decided in 77.5% versus 98.7% (Pcesarean section, in case of tight pelvis discovered after pelvimetry, inter-observer variability of decision concerning the route of delivery is increased. Centers that choose to continue using the routine pelvimetry should develop procedures to limit this variability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Field Observations of Coastal Air-Sea Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Suslow, D. G.; Haus, B. K.; Williams, N. J.; Graber, H. C.

    2016-12-01

    In the nearshore zone wind, waves, and currents generated from different forcing mechanisms converge in shallow water. This can profoundly affect the physical nature of the ocean surface, which can significantly modulate the exchange of momentum, heat, and mass across the air-sea interface. For decades, the focus of air-sea interaction research has been on the open ocean while the shallow water regime has been relatively under-explored. This bears implications for efforts to understand and model various coastal processes, such as mixing, surface transport, and air-sea gas flux. The results from a recent study conducted at the New River Inlet in North Carolina showed that directly measured air-sea flux parameters, such as the atmospheric drag coefficient, are strong functions of space as well as the ambient conditions (i.e. wind speed and direction). The drag is typically used to parameterize the wind stress magnitude. It is generally assumed that the wind direction is the direction of the atmospheric forcing (i.e. wind stress), however significant wind stress steering off of the azimuthal wind direction was observed and was found to be related to the horizontal surface current shear. The authors have just returned from a field campaign carried out within Monterey Bay in California. Surface observations made from two research vessels were complimented by an array of beach and inland flux stations, high-resolution wind forecasts, and satellite image acquisitions. This is a rich data set and several case studies will be analyzed to highlight the importance of various processes for understanding the air-sea fluxes. Preliminary findings show that interactions between the local wind-sea and the shoaling, incident swell can have a profound effect on the wind stress magnitude. The Monterey Bay coastline contains a variety of topographical features and the importance of land-air-sea interactions will also be investigated.

  14. Controllability and observability of 2D thermal flow in bulk storage facilities using sensitivity fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grubben, Nik L.M.; Keesman, Karel J.

    2017-01-01

    To control and observe spatially distributed thermal flow systems, the controllable field and observable field around the actuator and sensor are of interest, respectively. For spatially distributed systems, the classical systems theoretical concepts of controllability and observability are, in

  15. Competition Between Fusarium pseudograminearum and Cochliobolus sativus Observed in Field and Greenhouse Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troth, Erin E Gunnink; Johnston, Jeffrey A; Dyer, Alan T

    2018-02-01

    Among root pathogens, one of the most documented antagonisms is the suppression of Cochliobolus sativus by Fusarium (roseum) species. Unfortunately, previous studies involved single isolates of each pathogen and thus, provided no indication of the spectrum of responses that occur across the respective species. To investigate the variability in interactions between Cochliobolus sativus and Fusarium pseudograminearum, field and greenhouse trials were conducted that included monitoring of spring wheat plant health and monitoring of pathogen populations via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The interactions between two isolates of C. sativus and four isolates of F. pseudograminearum were explored in three geographically distinct wheat fields. To complement field trials and to limit potentially confounding environmental variables that are often associated with field studies, greenhouse trials were performed that investigated the interactions among and between three isolates of C. sativus and four isolates of F. pseudograminearum. Across field locations, C. sativus isolate Cs2344 consistently and significantly reduced Fusarium populations by an average of 20.1%. Similarly, F. pseudograminearum isolate Fp2228 consistently and significantly reduced C. sativus field populations by an average of 30.9%. No interaction was detected in the field between pathogen species with regards to disease or crop losses. Greenhouse results confirmed a powerful (>99%), broadly effective suppression of Fusarium populations by isolate Cs2344. Among greenhouse trials, additional isolate-isolate interactions were observed affecting Fusarium populations. Due to lower C. sativus population sizes in greenhouse trials, significant Fusarium suppression of C. sativus was only detected in one isolate-isolate interaction. This study is the first to demonstrate suppression of Fusarium spp. by C. sativus in field and greenhouse settings. These findings also reveal a complex competitive

  16. Gridded field observations of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane in the atmosphere of north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifan; Ma, Jin; Qiu, Xinghua; Lin, Yan; Yang, Qiaoyun; Zhu, Tong

    2013-08-06

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are important pollutants, yet few data on ambient BFRs levels have been available for North China, one of the most developed regions of the country. In this study, we investigated levels and spatial distributions of BFRs based on gridded field observations coupled with passive air sampling in the aforementioned region. A model incorporating both point and nonpoint sources was developed to simulate the spatial distribution and to achieve source apportionment. Although high concentration was observed at an electronic-waste (e-waste) recycling site, the median level of the sum of tri-, tetra-, hepta-, hexa-, and hepta-PBDEs (∑10PBDEs) was 0.56 ng/sample, which was lower than those observed previously in mainland China. Source apportionment revealed that nonpoint emissions contributed nearly 78% of ∑10PBDEs observed in this study. In contrast, high levels of BDE-209 and DBDPE were observed, with median concentrations of 4.0 and 10.2 ng/sample, respectively. Point sources located in the region around Laizhou Bay, Shandong Province were the major sources, which contributed 31% of BDE-209 and 70% of DBDPE observed in this study, indicating that this manufacturing base was the most important source region for atmospheric deca-BFRs in North China. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report source apportionment of atmospheric BFRs based on gridded field observations.

  17. Food intake during the previous 24 h as a percentage of usual intake: a marker of hypoxia in infants with bronchiolitis: an observational, prospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrard François

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia associated with bronchiolitis is not always easy to assess on clinical grounds alone. The aim of this study was to determine the value of food intake during the previous 24 hours (bottle and spoon feeding, as a percentage of usual intake (24h FI, as a marker of hypoxia, and to compare its diagnostic value with that of usual clinical signs. Methods In this observational, prospective, multicenter study, 18 community pediatricians, enrolled 171 infants, aged from 0 to 6 months, with bronchiolitis (rhinorrhea + dyspnea + cough + expiratory sounds. Infants with risk factors (history of prematurity, chronic heart or lung disorders, breast-fed infants, and infants having previously been treated for bronchial disorders were excluded. The 24h FI, subcostal, intercostal, supracostal retractions, nasal flaring, respiratory rate, pauses, cyanosis, rectal temperature and respiratory syncytial virus test results were noted. The highest stable value of transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 was recorded. Hypoxia was noted if SpO2 was below 95% and verified. Results 24h FI ≥ 50% was associated with a 96% likelihood of SpO2 ≥ 95% [95% CI, 91–99]. In univariate analysis, 24h FI  Conclusion In practice, the measure of 24 h FI may be useful in identifying hypoxia and deserves further study.

  18. Observational Evidences for Multi-component Magnetic Field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... ... these data we conclude that a four-component magnetic field structure is a possible explanation. The field strengths are about ±1.05 kG in the background field, and 1.3–1.5, 3.9–4.0, and 7.4–7.8 kG at level of middle photosphere (ℎ ≈ 300 km) in the spatially unresolved, small-scale magnetic elements.

  19. Mirror activity in the human brain while observing hand movements: a comparison between EEG desynchronization in the mu-range and previous fMRI results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Anat; Bentin, Shlomo

    2009-07-28

    Mu (mu) rhythms are EEG oscillations between 8-13 Hz distinguished from alpha by having more anterior distribution and being desynchronized by motor rather than visual activity. Evidence accumulating during the last decade suggests that the desynchronization of mu rhythms (mu suppression) might be also a manifestation of a human Mirror Neuron System (MNS). To further explore this hypothesis we used a paradigm that, in a previous fMRI study, successfully activated this putative MNS in humans. Our direct goal was to provide further support for a link between modulation of mu rhythms and the MNS, by finding parallels between the reported patterns of fMRI activations and patterns of mu suppression. The EEG power in the mu range has been recorded while participants passively observed either a left or a right hand, reaching to and grasping objects, and compared it with that recorded while participants observed the movement of a ball, and while observing static grasping scenes or still objects. Mirroring fMRI results (Shmuelof, L., Zohary, E., 2005. Dissociation between ventral and dorsal fMRI activation during object and action recognition. Neuron 47, 457-470), mu suppression was larger in the hemisphere contra-lateral to the moving hand and larger when the hands grasped different objects in different ways than when the movement was repetitive. No suppression was found while participants observed still objects but mu suppression was also found while seeing static grasping postures. These data are discussed in light of similar parallels between modulations of alpha waves and fMRI while recording EEG in the magnet. The present data support a link between mu suppression and a human MNS.

  20. Effect of donepezil in patients with Alzheimer's disease previously untreated or treated with memantine or nootropic agents in Germany: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Tatjana; Ibach, Bernd; Schoenknecht, Peter; Kamleiter, Martin; Silver, Gabrielle; Schroeder, Johannes; Mielke, Ruediger

    2005-05-01

    This open-label, prospective, observational, Post-Marketing Surveillance (PMS) study assessed the efficacy and safety of donepezil in patients who had been switched from therapies currently used in Germany to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as memantine and nootropics, due to insufficient efficacy or poor tolerability. A treatment-naive population was included as a comparator. Patients with AD were treated with donepezil and observed for a period of approximately 3 months. A cognitive assessment was made using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Quality of life (QoL) was assessed by the investigators who answered the question 'How did therapy with donepezil influence the QoL of the patient and/or his family over the observation period?' and was graded using three ratings: improved/unchanged/worsened. Adverse events (AEs) were also monitored. A total of 913 patients entered the study (mean +/- SD MMSE score 18.03 +/- 5.34). Efficacy assessments were analyzed for three groups: an overall group of patients who had received any form of prior AD drug therapy (N+ group; n = 709); a subgroup of patients from the N+ group who had received prior memantine therapy only (M+ group; n = 111) and patients who were drug treatment naive (N- group; n = 204). In the evaluable population donepezil improved MMSE scores by 2.21 +/- 3.47 points on average, with similar improvements observed in all three groups. QoL was judged to be improved in at least 70% of patients, again with similar results obtained for all three groups. Donepezil was well tolerated, with 85 of 913 (9.3%) patients reporting AEs. The most common AEs were those typically seen with cholinergic therapies (i.e., diarrhoea, vomiting and nausea). In this observational PMS study, donepezil was shown to be efficacious and well tolerated in patients who were being insufficiently treated with memantine or nootropic therapy. The magnitude of response was similar to that observed in patients who were previously

  1. Cluster magnetic field observations at a quasi-parallel bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available We present four-point Cluster magnetic field data from a quasi-parallel shock crossing which allows us to probe the three-dimensional structure of this type of shock for the first time. We find that steepened ULF waves typically have a scale larger than the spacecraft separation ( ~ 400–1000 km, while SLAMS-like magnetic field enhancements have different signatures in | B | at the four spacecraft, suggesting that they have a smaller scale size. In the latter case, however, the angular variations of B are similar, consistent with the space-craft making different trajectories through the same structure. The field enhancements have different orientations relative to a model bow shock normal, which might arise from different degrees of deceleration and deflection of the surrounding solar wind plasma. The observed rotation of the magnetic field rising from a direction approximately parallel to the model bow shock normal to a direction more perpendicular to the model normal across the field enhancement is consistent with previously published results. Successive magnetic field enhancements or ULF waves, and the leading and trailing edges of the same structure, are found to have different orientations.Key words. Interplanetary physics (planetary bow shocks

  2. Cluster magnetic field observations at a quasi-parallel bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    Full Text Available We present four-point Cluster magnetic field data from a quasi-parallel shock crossing which allows us to probe the three-dimensional structure of this type of shock for the first time. We find that steepened ULF waves typically have a scale larger than the spacecraft separation ( ~ 400–1000 km, while SLAMS-like magnetic field enhancements have different signatures in | B | at the four spacecraft, suggesting that they have a smaller scale size. In the latter case, however, the angular variations of B are similar, consistent with the space-craft making different trajectories through the same structure. The field enhancements have different orientations relative to a model bow shock normal, which might arise from different degrees of deceleration and deflection of the surrounding solar wind plasma. The observed rotation of the magnetic field rising from a direction approximately parallel to the model bow shock normal to a direction more perpendicular to the model normal across the field enhancement is consistent with previously published results. Successive magnetic field enhancements or ULF waves, and the leading and trailing edges of the same structure, are found to have different orientations.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (planetary bow shocks

  3. In vivo observation of tree drought response with low-field NMR and neutron imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Malone

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a simple low-field NMR system, we monitored water content in a livingtree in a greenhouse over two months. By continuously running thesystem, we observed changes in tree water content on a scale of halfan hour. The data showed a diurnal change in water content consistentboth with previous NMR and biological observations. Neutron imaging experiments showthat our NMR signal is primarily due to water being rapidly transported through the plant, and not to other sources of hydrogen, such as water in cytoplasm, or water in cell walls. After accountingfor the role of temperature in the observed NMR signal, we demonstratea change in the diurnal signal behavior due to simulated drought conditionsfor the tree. These results illustrate the utility of our system toperform noninvasive measurements of tree water content outside of a temperature controlled environment.

  4. Effects of the Observed Meridional Flow Variations since 1996 on the Sun's Polar Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.; Upton, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The cause of the low and extended minimum in solar activity between Sunspot Cycles 23 and 24 was the small size of Sunspot Cycle 24 itself - small cycles start late and leave behind low minima. Cycle 24 is small because the polar fields produced during Cycle 23 were substantially weaker than those produced during the previous cycles and those (weak) polar fields are the seeds for the activity of the following cycle. The polar fields are produced by the latitudinal transport of magnetic flux that emerged in low-latitude active regions. The polar fields thus depend upon the details of both the flux emergence and the flux transport. We have measured the flux transport flows (differential rotation, meridional flow, and supergranules) since 1996 and find systematic and substantial variation in the meridional flow alone. Here we present experiments using a Surface Flux Transport Model in which magnetic field data from SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI are assimilated into the model only at latitudes between 45-degrees north and south of the equator (this assures that the details of the active region flux emergence are well represented). This flux is then transported in both longitude and latitude by the observed flows. In one experiment the meridional flow is given by the time averaged (and north-south symmetric) meridional flow profile. In the second experiment the time-varying and north-south asymmetric meridional flow is used. Differences between the observed polar fields and those produced in these two experiments allow us to ascertain the effects of these meridional flow variations on the Sun s polar fields.

  5. Plasmasphere and ring current electric fields observed by GEOS 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, R.; Pedersen, A.

    1988-01-01

    The electric field double probe data from GEOS 2 have been statistically examined to study the consecutive passage of the afternoon plasmaspheric bulge and the trough at the geostationary orbit. It was found that the average location of the bulge depends on the magnetic activity and was encountered at earlier local times for higher magnetospheric activity. Within the bulge the electric field showed very frequently a typical directional change from dawnward outside to duskward inside the bulge. The magnitude of the magnetic field was frequently much smaller near the outbound crossing of the plasmaspheric bulge than is expected from a long-term average. The E x B/B-squared drift pointed azimuthally eastward prior to the encounter of the bulge and rotated into the sunward direction within the bulge. Following its passage through the dense, cold plasma in the bulge, GEOS 2 encountered a hot and tenuous plasma sheet-type plasma in the trough that occasionally corrupted the electric field measurements. Generally, the electric field in the trough is much smaller than in the bulge. A possible cause of the sunward plasma flow within the bulge is discussed on the basis of these data. 13 references

  6. SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROMETER 16 μm OBSERVATIONS OF THE GOODS FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplitz, Harry I.; Chary, Ranga; Elbaz, David; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Dickinson, Mark; Bridge, Carrie; Howell, Justin H.; Siana, Brian; Colbert, James; Scarlata, Claudia; Frayer, David T.; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew; Papovich, Casey; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer 16 μm imaging of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) fields. We survey 150 arcmin 2 in each of the two GOODS fields (North and South), to an average 3σ depth of 40 and 65 μJy, respectively. We detect ∼1300 sources in both fields combined. We validate the photometry using the 3-24 μm spectral energy distribution of stars in the fields compared to Spitzer spectroscopic templates. Comparison with ISOCAM and AKARI observations in the same fields shows reasonable agreement, though the uncertainties are large. We provide a catalog of photometry, with sources cross-correlated with available Spitzer, Chandra, and Hubble Space Telescope data. Galaxy number counts show good agreement with previous results from ISOCAM and AKARI with improved uncertainties. We examine the 16-24 μm flux ratio and find that for most sources it lies within the expected locus for starbursts and infrared luminous galaxies. A color cut of S 16 /S 24 >1.4 selects mostly sources which lie at 1.1 -2 sr -1 .

  7. Environmental change and household livelihood strategies: preliminary observations from field work in different locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Preston

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical framework and objectives of a study of environmental change and evolving household livelihood strategies, which will include field work in Central Java, are outlined. Preliminary results of previous, related field work in Luzon (Philippines and highland Ecuador (South America are reported. Two changes that seem of importance in both areas so far studied are the increasing importance of commercial farming in central locations (near to village centres and the decreasing intensity of use of land on the periphery of rural communities. Preliminary observations in Central Java suggest that household livelihood strategies are more diversified than in either case study area in Luzon or Ecuador and that such diversification has increased through time. The relative importance of farming and the use of natural resources does not seem to have diminished.

  8. Observational Evidences for Multi-component Magnetic Field ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Really, detailed magnetic characteristics of the flare volume are practically unknown due to essential problems with the magnetic field measurements in solar active regions and flares. This prob- lem has been discussed by many authors, e.g., by Lozitska & Lozitsky (1982), Moore et al. (1984), and Staude & Hofmann (1988).

  9. High-intensity geomagnetic field 'spike' observed at ca. 3000 cal BP in Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Mark D.; Feinberg, Joshua M.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Waters, Michael R.; Lundelius, Ernest; Forman, Steven L.

    2016-05-01

    By observing the fluctuations in direction and intensity of the Earth's magnetic field through time, we increase our understanding of the fluid motions of the Earth's outer core that sustain the geomagnetic field, the geodynamo. Recent archaeomagnetic studies in the Near East have found extremely rapid increases - 'spikes' - in geomagnetic field intensity at ca. 3000 yr cal BP. These observations have proved problematic for our current understanding of core-flow. However, until now, these geomagnetic spikes had not been observed outside of the Near East, where they have been preserved in metallurgical slag and fired, mud brick walls. We present a new, fully oriented, geomagnetic secular variation and relative palaeointensity (RPI) record for the last 17,000 yr from Hall's Cave, Texas, whose complete, >3.8 m thick sedimentary sequence spans from the present to 16 , 850 ± 110 RC yr BP (Modern to 20,600 cal BP). Within the stable, cool climate of the cave, pedogenic and bioturbation processes are negligible to non-existent, thereby limiting post-depositional physical and geochemical alteration of the magnetic record. The sub-aerial and subterranean setting of the sedimentary sequence in Hall's Cave enabled us to collect oriented palaeomagnetic cubes from a previously excavated stratigraphic section. The palaeomagnetic samples yielded high-quality vectors. An age model for the sequence, determined using 15 AMS 14C-dates on individual bones from microvertebrates, was combined with the palaeomagnetic data to construct a secular variation record. The record is in broad agreement with predictions by Holocene field models for the site's location. However, starting ca. 3000 yr ago, the RPI data indicate an almost four-fold increase in geomagnetic field intensity lasting several hundred years. This record presents well-dated evidence, obtained using conventional techniques, for the existence of a geomagnetic intensity spike in North America that is contemporaneous with the

  10. The Temperature - Magnetic Field Relation in Observed and Simulated Sunspots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sobotka, Michal; Rezaei, R.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 12 (2017), 188/1-188/12 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-04338S; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E13003 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 312495 - SOLARNET Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : sunspots * magnetic fields * comparison Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  11. Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is tolerant to higher levels of salinity than previous guidelines indicated: Implications of field and greenhouse studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Daniel H.; Benes, Sharon; Galdi, Giuliano; Hutmacher, Bob; Grattan, Steve

    2017-04-01

    Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is the most widely grown leguminous forage crop in North America and is valued for high productivity, quality, economic value, and for dairy productivity. Alfalfa has historically been classified as moderately sensitive to saline conditions, with yield declines predicted at >2 dS/m in the saturated soil paste extract. However, greenhouse, sand tank, and field studies over the past five years have confirmed that alfalfa can be grown with limited negative effects at much higher salinity levels. A broad collection of alfalfa varieties has exhibited a range of resistance at irrigation water salinities >5 dS/m ECw in greenhouse trials, with significant variation due to variety. USDA-ARS sand tank studies indicated similar or greater tolerances closer to 8 dS/m in the soil water, in addition to confirmation of significant varietal differences. A three-year field study on clay loam soil with applications of 5-7 dS/m ECw irrigation water indicated normal yields and excellent stand survivability. A second field study in the same soil type with levels from 8-10 dS/m ECw showed yield reductions of 10-15% but economic yields were still achieved at those levels. Field and greenhouse studies were conducted with mixed salt saline sodic waters typical of the San Joaquin Valley of California. Field evaluation of variety performance was subject to greater variation due to secondary salinity-soil interactions including water infiltration and crusting problems, not only salinity per-se. Thus, adequate irrigation water availability to the crop may be as important as salinity in impacting yields under field conditions. Once established, the deep-rooted characteristics of alfalfa enable utilization of deeper subsurface moisture, even at moderate to high salinity levels, as documented by USDA lysimeter studies. Significant advantages to salinity-tolerant varieties have been observed. It will be important to consider specific management factors which may enable

  12. Laboratory Observation of Magnetic Field Growth Driven by Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, Thomas; Dorf, L.; Sun, X.; Sears, J.; Weber, T.; Feng, Y.

    2013-04-01

    We have measured in the laboratory profiles of magnetic flux ropes, that include ion flow, magnetic field, current density, and plasma pressure. The electron flows v_e can therefore be inferred, and we use this information to evaluate the Hall J × B term in a two fluid magnetohydrodynamic Ohm’s Law. Mutually attracted and compressed flux ropes break the cylindrical symmetry. This simple and coherent example of shear flow supports magnetic field growth corresponding to non vanishing curl × v_e × B. In the absence of magnetic reconnection we measure and predict a quadrupole out of plane magnetic field δBz, even though this has historically been invoked to be the signature of Hall magnetic reconnection. This provides a natural and general mechanism for large scale sheared flows to acquire smaller scale magnetic features, disordered structure, and possibly turbulence. *Supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under LANS contract DE-AC52-06NA25369, NASA Geospace NNHIOA044I, Basic

  13. Meteor observations with Mini-Mega-TORTORA wide-field monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, S.; Orekhova, N.; Beskin, G.; Biryukov, A.; Bondar, S.; Ivanov, E.; Katkova, E.; Perkov, A.; Sasyuk, V.

    2016-12-01

    Here we report on the results of meteor observations with 9-channel Mini-Mega-TORTORA (MMT-9) optical monitoring system with the wide field and high temporal resolution. During the first 1.5 years of operation more than 90 thousands of meteors have been detected, at a rate of 300-350 per night, with durations from 0.1 to 2.5 seconds and angular velocities up to 38 degrees per second. The faintest detected meteors have peak brightnesses about 10 mag, while the majority have them ranging from 4 to 8 mag. Some of the meteors have been observed in BVR filters simultaneously. Color variations along the trail for them have been determined. The parameters of the detected meteors have been published online. The database also includes data from 10 thousands of meteors detected by our previous FAVOR camera during 2006-2009.

  14. Field observations of artificial sand and oil agglomerates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalyander, Patricia (Soupy); Long, Joseph W.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; McLaughlin, Molly R.; Mickey, Rangley C.

    2015-01-01

    Oil that comes into the surf zone following spills, such as occurred during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout, can mix with local sediment to form heavier-than-water sand and oil agglomerates (SOAs), at times in the form of mats a few centimeters thick and tens of meters long. Smaller agglomerates that form in situ or pieces that break off of larger mats, sometimes referred to as surface residual balls (SRBs), range in size from sand-sized grains to patty-shaped pieces several centimeters (cm) in diameter. These mobile SOAs can cause beach oiling for extended periods following the spill, on the scale of years as in the case of DWH. Limited research, including a prior effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigating SOA mobility, alongshore transport, and seafloor interaction using numerical model output, focused on the physical dynamics of SOAs. To address this data gap, we constructed artificial sand and oil agglomerates (aSOAs) with sand and paraffin wax to mimic the size and density of genuine SOAs. These aSOAs were deployed in the nearshore off the coast of St. Petersburg, Florida, during a field experiment to investigate their movement and seafloor interaction. This report presents the methodology for constructing aSOAs and describes the field experiment. Data acquired during the field campaign, including videos and images of aSOA movement in the nearshore (1.5-meter and 0.5-meter water depth) and in the swash zone, are also presented in this report.

  15. A physical interpretation of field observations that precede large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyehiro, K.; Sacks, S. I.; Rydelek, P. A.; Smith, D. E.; Takanami, T.

    2016-12-01

    A cellular automaton model of earthquake faulting adopting Coulomb's failure criterion developed by Sacks and Rydelek (1995) successfully generates catalogs that satisfy Gutenberg-Richter's Law, the observed decreases in b-value before large events, as well as the propagation of the rupture front. Model runs indicate that redistributed stresses remain on the ruptured area and that some slips recur on the same cells forming dynamic asperities of high slips. We found that the observed magnitude-dependent seismicity quiescence can be explained by the introduction of dilatancy hardening into the model. Only a few % of the total number of model cells need be strengthened by a small amount. This indicates the difficulty of detecting their presence using seismic imaging. However, the observed long term ( years) temporal changes in seismicity, gravity, and electrical resistivity may be causally linked to the volume change from microfractures and the effect of pore pressure changes on fault strength. Our model predicts the process occurs at points sparcely distributed. Water migrations into unfilled microfractures act to lower the strength, thus promoting the occurrence of seismic slips. These slips may expel water that will influence aquifer levels, which may be observed at regional water wells. Drilling in seismic fault zones, such as at the 1995 Kobe earthquake fault, has revealed that the permeability on the main fault plane was many orders of magnitude higher than the surrounding rocks. We suggest the same water migration process at highly permeable zone can occur at short time scale to grow into a large magnitude slip or may manifest as a slow slip. The aftershock sequence of the 1978 Izu-Oshima earthquake shows that it overlaps the inferred slow slip on the fault following the main shock, thus suggesting that a fault can slip in various ways in the same time interval. We propose new observations that are sensitive to crustal water migration such as vertical

  16. The Gravity Field, Orientation, and Ephemeris of Mercury from MESSENGER Observations After Three Years in Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarico, Erwan M.; Genova, Antonio; Goossens, Sander; Lemoine, Gregory; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    We have analyzed three years of radio tracking data from the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury and determined the gravity field, planetary orientation, and ephemeris of the innermost planet. With improvements in spatial coverage, force modeling, and data weighting, we refined an earlier global gravity field both in quality and resolution, and we present here a spherical harmonic solution to degree and order 50. In this field, termed HgM005, uncertainties in low-degree coefficients are reduced by an order of magnitude relative to the earlier global field, and we obtained a preliminary value of the tidal Love number k(sub 2) of 0.451+/-0.014. We also estimated Mercury's pole position, and we obtained an obliquity value of 2.06 +/- 0.16 arcmin, in good agreement with analysis of Earth-based radar observations. From our updated rotation period (58.646146 +/- 0.000011 days) and Mercury ephemeris, we verified experimentally the planet's 3: 2 spin-orbit resonance to greater accuracy than previously possible. We present a detailed analysis of the HgM005 covariance matrix, and we describe some near-circular frozen orbits around Mercury that could be advantageous for future exploration.

  17. Models of field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substorm variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Volkov

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available We have used the global numerical model of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere-protonosphere system to simulate the electric-field, ion- and electron-temperature and -concentration variations observed by EISCAT during the substorm event of 25 March 1987. In our previous studies we adopted the model input data for field-aligned currents and precipitating electron fluxes to obtain an agreement between observed and modelled ionospheric variations. Now, we have calculated the field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substrom variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT. The calculations of the field-aligned currents have been performed by means of numerical integration of the time-dependent continuity equation for the cold magnetospheric electrons. This equation was added to the system of the modelling equations including the equation for the electric-field potential to be solved jointly. In this case the inputs of the model are the spatial and time variations of the electric-field potential at the polar-cap boundaries and those of the cold magnetospheric electron concentration which have been adopted to obtain the agreement between the observed and modelled ionospheric variations for the substorm event of 25 March 1987. By this means it has been found that during the active phase of the substorm the current wedge is formed. It is connected with the region of the decreased cold magnetospheric electron content travelling westwards with a velocity of about 1 km s–1 at ionospheric levels.

  18. Observed chlorine concentrations during Jack Rabbit I and Lyme Bay field experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph; Huq, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    As part of planning for a series of field experiments where large quantities (up to 20 tons) of pressurized liquefied chlorine will be released, observations from previous chlorine field experiments are analyzed to estimate the ranges of chlorine concentrations expected at various downwind distances. In five field experiment days during the summer 2010 Jack Rabbit I (JR I) field trials, up to two tons of chlorine were released and concentrations were observed at distances, x, from 25 to 500 m. In the 1927 Lyme Bay (LB) experiments, there were four days of trials, where 3-10 tons of chlorine were released in about 15 min from the back of a ship. Concentrations were sampled at LB from four ships sailing across the cloud path at downwind distances in the range from about 350 to 3000 m. Thus, the distances from which JR I concentrations were available slightly overlapped the LB distances. One-minute arc-maximum chlorine concentrations, C (g/m3), were analyzed from four JR I trials and two LB trials. Normalized concentrations (Cu/Q) were plotted versus x (m), where u (m/s) is measured wind speed at heights of 2-10 m and Q (g/s) is continuous mass release rate. It is found that the JR I and LB Cu/Q observations smoothly merge with each other and fall along a line with approximate slope of -2 at distances beyond about 200 m (i.e., Cu/Q is proportional to x-2). At x < 200 m, where dense gas effects are more important, the slope is less (about -1.5). Most of the data points are within a factor of two of the "best-fit" line.

  19. Prominence plasma and magnetic field structure - A coordinated observation with IRIS, Hinode and THEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Labrosse, Nicolas; Levens, Peter; Lopez Ariste, Arturo

    2016-07-01

    During an international campaign in 2014, utilising both space-based (IRIS and Hinode) and ground-based (THEMIS) instruments, we focused on observing prominences. We compare IRIS observations with those of Hinode (EIS and SOT) in order to build a more complete picture of the prominence structure for a quiescent prominence observed on 15 July 2014, identified to have tornado-like structure. THEMIS provides valuable information on the orientation and strength of the internal magnetic field. Here we find there is almost ubiquitously horizontal field with respect to the local limb, with possibly a turbulent component. The Mg II lines form the majority of our IRIS analysis, with a mixture of reversed and non-reversed profiles present in the prominence spectra. Comparing the differences between the Mg II data from IRIS and the Ca II images from Hinode/SOT provides an intriguing insight into the prominence legs in these channels. We present plasma diagnostics from IRIS, with line of sight velocities of around 10 km/s in either direction along the magnetic loops of material in the front of the prominence, and line widths comparable to those found for prominences by previous authors (e.g. Schmieder et al. 2014). We also take a look into the lines formed at higher, coronal plasma temperatures, as seen by Hinode/EIS, to compare plasma structures at a full range of temperatures.

  20. A Field Observation of Rotational Feeding by Neogobius melanostomus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted R. Angradi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neogobius melanostomus, the round goby, was recorded by underwater video feeding on crushed dreissenid mussels at a depth of 12 m in Georgian Bay of Lake Huron, a Laurentian Great Lake. In the video, gobies used rotational or twist feeding to tear away particles from crushed mussels. At least 43 examples of this feeding maneuver occur in the video. Up to 120 gobies m−2 were visible at a time in the video. Mean standard length of gobies appearing in the video was 37 mm. Mean standard length of fish exhibiting twist feeding was larger, 48 mm. Mean size of intact mussels in visible clusters was about 10 × 20 mm, a size which exceeds the gape width of the largest gobies observed in the video. Neogobius melanostomus is known to use twisting to wrest small attached mussels from the substrates which can be crushed by their pharyngeal teeth. I surmise that the behavior observed in the video is an opportunistic manifestation of this inherent behavioral adaptation to overcome gap limitation and exploit a temporary windfall of food.

  1. Evaluation of High-resolution Geomagnetic Field Observation System Using HTS-SQUID Magnetometer and its Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Y.; Okubo, K.; Hato, T.; Tsukamoto, A.; Tanabe, K.; Onishi, N.; Furukawa; Isogami, S.; Takeuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field changes associated with earthquakes have been investigated previously (1964 Stacey, 1994 Johnston et al.). Our research group also reported successful observation of "co-faulting" Earth's magnetic field changes due to piezomagnetic effects caused by earthquake rupturing in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake of M7.2 (2011 Okubo et al.) using optoelectronic observation system with flux-gate magnetometers. This is an important finding; the electromagnetic fields originating from such sources satisfy the Maxwell equations and hence they propagate from the sources to the observation site at a speed of light in the crustal materials. Further efforts could lead us to a new system for super-early warning of destructive earthquakes with the magnetic measurements. On the other hand, the observed result in 2008 Iwate-Miyagi Nairiku earthquake was suggested that the geomagnetic variation signal accompanying fault movement, whose sources are the piezomagnetic effects, is very small; therefore development of a high-sensitive magnetometer system is very important. To solve this problem, we introduce long-term precise geomagnetic observations using high-temperature-superconductor based superconducting-quantum-interference-device (HTS-SQUID) magnetometer system. That is, our research group developed the HTS-SQUID magnetometer system for high-resolution observation of Earth's magnetic field. Since March 2012, we have observed the geomagnetic field using a HTS-SQUID magnetometer at Iwaki observation site (IWK) in Fukushima, Japan. The sampling interval of the magnetometer is 0.04 sec. The observation clock has been synchronized by use of GPS signals. An accelerometer is also installed at observation point. Additionally, in the next stage, we develop the HTS- SQUID magnetometer system Unit No.2 (mark II). In the present study, we show the results observed by our HTS-SQUID magnetometer system and make an evaluation of our geomagnetic field observation system.

  2. Balloon-Borne Electric-Field Observations Relevant to Models for Sprites and Jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beasley, William

    1999-01-01

    We designed and built a new balloon-borne electric-field-change instrument and launched five of them into thunderstorms to observe changes in the vertical component of electric field caused by lightning...

  3. Self-Localization and Stream Field Based Partially Observable Moving Object Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Shih Tseng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-localization and object tracking are key technologies for human-robot interactions. Most previous tracking algorithms focus on how to correctly estimate the position, velocity, and acceleration of a moving object based on the prior state and sensor information. What has been rarely studied so far is how a robot can successfully track the partially observable moving object with laser range finders if there is no preanalysis of object trajectories. In this case, traditional tracking algorithms may lead to the divergent estimation. Therefore, this paper presents a novel laser range finder based partially observable moving object tracking and self-localization algorithm for interactive robot applications. Dissimilar to the previous work, we adopt a stream field-based motion model and combine it with the Rao-Blackwellised particle filter (RBPF to predict the object goal directly. This algorithm can keep predicting the object position by inferring the interactive force between the object goal and environmental features when the moving object is unobservable. Our experimental results show that the robot with the proposed algorithm can localize itself and track the frequently occluded object. Compared with the traditional Kalman filter and particle filter-based algorithms, the proposed one significantly improves the tracking accuracy.

  4. An observation planning algorithm applied to multi-objective astronomical observations and its simulation in COSMOS field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Gu, Yonggang; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic sky surveys are now booming, such as LAMOST already built by China, BIGBOSS project put forward by the U.S. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and GTC (Gran Telescopio Canarias) telescope developed by the United States, Mexico and Spain. They all use or will use this approach and each fiber can be moved within a certain area for one astrology target, so observation planning is particularly important for this Sky Surveys. One observation planning algorithm used in multi-objective astronomical observations is developed. It can avoid the collision and interference between the fiber positioning units in the focal plane during the observation in one field of view, and the interested objects can be ovserved in a limited round with the maximize efficiency. Also, the observation simulation can be made for wide field of view through multi-FOV observation. After the observation planning is built ,the simulation is made in COSMOS field using GTC telescope. Interested galaxies, stars and high-redshift LBG galaxies are selected after the removal of the mask area, which may be bright stars. Then 9 FOV simulation is completed and observation efficiency and fiber utilization ratio for every round are given. Otherwise,allocating a certain number of fibers for background sky, giving different weights for different objects and how to move the FOV to improve the overall observation efficiency are discussed.

  5. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  6. Swarm observation of field-aligned current and electric field in multiple arc systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Knudsen, D. J.; Gillies, M.; Donovan, E.; Burchill, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    It is often thought that auroral arcs are a direct consequence of upward field-aligned currents. In fact, the relation between currents and brightness is more complicated. Multiple auroral arc systems provide and opportunity to study this relation in detail. In this study, we have identified two types of FAC configurations in multiple parallel arc systems using ground-based optical data from the THEMIS all-sky imagers (ASIs), magnetometers and electric field instruments onboard the Swarm satellites during the period from December 2013 to March 2015. In type 1 events, each arc is an intensification within a broad, unipolar current sheet and downward currents only exist outside the upward current sheet. These types of events are termed "unipolar FAC" events. In type 2 events, multiple arc systems represent a collection of multiple up/down current pairs, which are termed as "multipolar FAC" events. Comparisons of these two types of FAC events are presented with 17 "unipolar FAC" events and 12 "multipolar FAC" events. The results show that "unipolar FAC" and "multipolar FAC" events have systematic differences in terms of MLT, arc width and separation, and dependence on substorm onset time. For "unipolar FAC" events, significant electric field enhancements are shown on the edges of the broad upward current sheet. Electric field fluctuations inside the multiple arc system can be large or small. For "multipolar FAC" events, a strong correlation between magnetic and electric field indicate uniform conductance within each upward current sheet. The electrodynamical structures of multiple arc systems presented in this paper represents a step toward understanding arc generation.

  7. Low back pain in military recruits in relation to social background and previous low back pain. A cross-sectional and prospective observational survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbæk, Lise; Larsen, K.; Weidich, F.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Traditionally, studies on the etiology of low back pain have been carried out in adult populations. However, since low back pain often appears early in life, more research on young populations is needed. This study focuses on the importance of social background factors and previous lo...... at baseline. This protective effect disappears, when the person becomes physically active. For predicting trouble related to the low back during service, the duration of low back pain prior to service and IQ-level are the most important factors....... back pain in the development of low back pain in military recruits. METHODS: During a three-month period, Danish military recruits with different social backgrounds live and work under the same conditions. Thus, there is an opportunity to investigate the influence of social background...... to 1,711 recruits before and after this three-month period. RESULTS: Sedentary occupation was negatively associated with long-lasting low back pain (>30 days during the past year) at baseline with an odds ratios of 0.55 (95% CI: 0.33-0.90). This effect vanished during service. Having parents...

  8. MESSENGER Magnetic Field Observations of Upstream Ultra-Low Frequency Waves at Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Boardsen, S.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Anderosn, B. J.; Korth, H.

    2012-01-01

    The region upstream from a planetary bow shock is a natural plasma laboratory containing a variety of wave particle phenomena. The study of foreshocks other than the Earth's is important for extending our understanding of collisionless shocks and foreshock physics since the bow shock strength varies with heliocentric distance from the Sun, and the sizes of the bow shocks are different at different planets. The Mercury's bow shock is unique in our solar system as it is produced by low Mach number solar wind blowing over a small magnetized body with a predominately radial interplanetary magnetic field. Previous observations of Mercury upstream ultra-low frequency (ULF) waves came exclusively from two Mercury flybys of Mariner 10. The MESSENGER orbiter data enable us to study of upstream waves in the Mercury's foreshock in depth. This paper reports an overview of upstream ULF waves in the Mercury's foreshock using high-time resolution magnetic field data, 20 samples per second, from the MESSENGER spacecraft. The most common foreshock waves have frequencies near 2 Hz, with properties similar to the I-Hz waves in the Earth's foreshock. They are present in both the flyby data and in every orbit of the orbital data we have surveyed. The most common wave phenomenon in the Earth's foreshock is the large-amplitude 30-s waves, but similar waves at Mercury have frequencies at near 0.1 Hz and occur only sporadically with short durations (a few wave cycles). Superposed on the "30-s" waves, there are spectral peaks at near 0.6 Hz, not reported previously in Mariner 10 data. We will discuss wave properties and their occurrence characteristics in this paper.

  9. Models of field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substorm variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Volkov

    Full Text Available We have used the global numerical model of the coupled ionosphere-thermosphere-protonosphere system to simulate the electric-field, ion- and electron-temperature and -concentration variations observed by EISCAT during the substorm event of 25 March 1987. In our previous studies we adopted the model input data for field-aligned currents and precipitating electron fluxes to obtain an agreement between observed and modelled ionospheric variations. Now, we have calculated the field-aligned currents needful to simulate the substrom variations of the electric field and other parameters observed by EISCAT. The calculations of the field-aligned currents have been performed by means of numerical integration of the time-dependent continuity equation for the cold magnetospheric electrons. This equation was added to the system of the modelling equations including the equation for the electric-field potential to be solved jointly. In this case the inputs of the model are the spatial and time variations of the electric-field potential at the polar-cap boundaries and those of the cold magnetospheric electron concentration which have been adopted to obtain the agreement between the observed and modelled ionospheric variations for the substorm event of 25 March 1987. By this means it has been found that during the active phase of the substorm the current wedge is formed. It is connected with the region of the decreased cold magnetospheric electron content travelling westwards with a velocity of about 1 km s–1 at ionospheric levels.

  10. Responses to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccines in participants previously vaccinated with seasonal influenza vaccine: a randomized, observer-blind, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Van der Most, Robbert; Li, Ping; Vaughn, David W

    2014-11-01

    Prior receipt of a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV) can affect hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses to pandemic influenza vaccines. We investigated the effect of TIV priming on humoral responses to AS03-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, the role of AS03 on cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and vaccine safety. Healthy adults (aged 19-40 years) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive TIV or saline followed 4 months later by 2 doses, 3 weeks apart, of adjuvanted or nonadjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine and followed up to study end (day 507). Pre- and postvaccination responses of HI and neutralizing antibody, CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts were assessed. Ninety-nine of the 133 participants enrolled completed the study. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were recorded. In TIV-primed participants, A(H1N1)pdm09-specific antibody and CD4(+) T-cell and memory B-cell responses to the pandemic vaccine tended to be diminished. Vaccine adjuvantation led to increased responses of vaccine-homologous and -heterologous HI and neutralizing antibodies and CD4(+) T cells, homologous memory B cells, and plasmablasts. In healthy adults, prior TIV administration decreased humoral and CMI responses to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. Adjuvantation of A(H1N1)pdm09 antigen helped to overcome immune interference between the influenza vaccines. No safety concerns were observed. Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT00707967. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. Responses to A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza Vaccines in Participants Previously Vaccinated With Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: A Randomized, Observer-Blind, Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Ghanta, Sumita; Van der Most, Robbert; Li, Ping; Vaughn, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Prior receipt of a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV) can affect hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody responses to pandemic influenza vaccines. We investigated the effect of TIV priming on humoral responses to AS03-adjuvanted and nonadjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, the role of AS03 on cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, and vaccine safety. Methods. Healthy adults (aged 19–40 years) were randomized 1:1:1:1 to receive TIV or saline followed 4 months later by 2 doses, 3 weeks apart, of adjuvanted or nonadjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine and followed up to study end (day 507). Pre- and postvaccination responses of HI and neutralizing antibody, CD4+/CD8+ T cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts were assessed. Results. Ninety-nine of the 133 participants enrolled completed the study. No vaccine-related serious adverse events were recorded. In TIV-primed participants, A(H1N1)pdm09-specific antibody and CD4+ T-cell and memory B-cell responses to the pandemic vaccine tended to be diminished. Vaccine adjuvantation led to increased responses of vaccine-homologous and -heterologous HI and neutralizing antibodies and CD4+ T cells, homologous memory B cells, and plasmablasts. Conclusions. In healthy adults, prior TIV administration decreased humoral and CMI responses to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. Adjuvantation of A(H1N1)pdm09 antigen helped to overcome immune interference between the influenza vaccines. No safety concerns were observed. Registration. Clinical Trials.gov identifier NCT00707967. PMID:24864125

  12. X-ray observations of dust obscured galaxies in the Chandra deep field south

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Comastri, A.; Ranalli, P.; Akylas, A.; Salvato, M.; Lanzuisi, G.; Vignali, C.; Koutoulidis, L.

    2016-08-01

    We present the properties of X-ray detected dust obscured galaxies (DOGs) in the Chandra deep field south. In recent years, it has been proposed that a significant percentage of the elusive Compton-thick (CT) active galactic nuclei (AGN) could be hidden among DOGs. This type of galaxy is characterized by a very high infrared (IR) to optical flux ratio (f24 μm/fR > 1000), which in the case of CT AGN could be due to the suppression of AGN emission by absorption and its subsequent re-emission in the IR. The most reliable way of confirming the CT nature of an AGN is by X-ray spectroscopy. In a previous work, we presented the properties of X-ray detected DOGs by making use of the deepest X-ray observations available at that time, the 2Ms observations of the Chandra deep fields, the Chandra deep field north (CDF-N), and the Chandra deep field south (CDF-S). In that work, we only found a moderate percentage (DOGs sample. However, we pointed out that the limited photon statistics for most of the sources in the sample did not allow us to strongly constrain this number. In this paper, we further explore the properties of the sample of DOGs in the CDF-S presented in that work by using not only a deeper 6Ms Chandra survey of the CDF-S, but also by combining these data with the 3Ms XMM-Newton survey of the CDF-S. We also take advantage of the great coverage of the CDF-S region from the UV to the far-IR to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of our sources. Out of the 14 AGN composing our sample, 9 are highly absorbed (NH > 1023 cm-2), whereas 2 look unabsorbed, and the other 3 are only moderately absorbed. Among the highly absorbed AGN, we find that only three could be considered CT AGN. In only one of these three cases, we detect a strong Fe Kα emission line; the source is already classified as a CT AGN with Chandra data in a previous work. Here we confirm its CT nature by combining Chandra and XMM-Newton data. For the other two CT candidates, the non-detection of

  13. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ivankov, Olexandr I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskiy per. 9, Dolgoprudniy 141700 (Russian Federation); Feoktystov, Artem [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Technical University of Košice, Letná 9, 04200 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  14. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajnak, Michal; Petrenko, Viktor I.; Avdeev, Mikhail V.; Ivankov, Olexandr I.; Feoktystov, Artem; Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan

    2015-08-01

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  15. Magnetographic observations of magnetic fields in quiet and active regions of the Sun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsap, T.T.

    1979-01-01

    The results of measurement of the solar longitudinal magnetic field carried out on the double magnetograph of the Crimea astrophysical observatory in the FeI 5250 A and 5233 A lines are presented. The registration of magnetic field is performed with the high resolution of 1x1''. It is found that in the most cases the measured magnetic field intensity outside active areas does not exceed 20-25 Hauss. In rare cases magnetic fields with the intensity greater than 500 Hauss are observed. The magnetic field intensity in the flocculas is greater in average than in nondisturbed areas

  16. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations. II. Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, I. O. I.; Virtanen, I. I.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Yeates, A.; Mursula, K.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. Methods: We tested the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and studied how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affected the simulation. We compared the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion, and input data. We also compared the simulated magnetic field with observations. Results: We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. Although the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, which often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are somewhat minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  17. Reconstructing solar magnetic fields from historical observations: Testing the surface flux transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Iiro; Virtanen, Ilpo; Pevtsov, Alexei; Yeates, Anthony; Mursula, Kalevi

    2017-04-01

    We aim to use the surface flux transport model to simulate the long-term evolution of the photospheric magnetic field from historical observations. In this work we study the accuracy of the model and its sensitivity to uncertainties in its main parameters and the input data. We test the model by running simulations with different values of meridional circulation and supergranular diffusion parameters, and study how the flux distribution inside active regions and the initial magnetic field affect the simulation. We compare the results to assess how sensitive the simulation is to uncertainties in meridional circulation speed, supergranular diffusion and input data. We also compare the simulated magnetic field with observations. We find that there is generally good agreement between simulations and observations. While the model is not capable of replicating fine details of the magnetic field, the long-term evolution of the polar field is very similar in simulations and observations. Simulations typically yield a smoother evolution of polar fields than observations, that often include artificial variations due to observational limitations. We also find that the simulated field is fairly insensitive to uncertainties in model parameters or the input data. Due to the decay term included in the model the effects of the uncertainties are rather minor or temporary, lasting typically one solar cycle.

  18. Changes in Earth's core-generated magnetic field, as observed by Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    . In this contribution, we will present the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, as seen by ESA's Earth explorer mission Swarm. We will present a new time-dependent geomagnetic field model, called CHAOS-6, derived from satellite data collected by the Swarm constellation, as well as data from...... the previous missions CHAMP and Oersted together with ground observatory data. Advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of the Swarm mission by ingesting field differences along track and across track between the lower pair of Swarm satellites. Evaluating the global field model at the outer boundary...... of the source region, the core-mantle boundary, we present maps of the detailed structure of the geodynamo, and how this is presently evolving. Both the trend (secular variation) and accelerations in the field changes since the launch of the Swarm mission will be presented. Assuming that field changes...

  19. High-latitude dayside electric fields and currents during strong northward interplanetary magnetic field: Observations and model simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clauer, C.R.; Friis-Christensen, E.

    1988-01-01

    On July 23, 1983, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field turned strongly northward, becoming about 22 nT for several hours. Using a combined data set of ionospheric convection measurements made by the Sondre Stromfjord incoherent scatter radar and convection inferred from Greenland magnetometer measurements, we observe the onset of the reconfiguration of the high-latitude ionospheric currents to occur about 3 min following the northward IMF encountering the magnetopause. The large-scale reconfiguration of currents, however, appears to evolve over a period of about 22 min. Using a computer model in which the distribution of field-aligned current in the polar cleft is directly determined by the strength and orientation of the interplanetary electric field, we are able to simulate the time-varying pattern of ionospheric convection, including the onset of high-latitude ''reversed convection'' cells observed to form during the interval of strong northward IMF. These observations and the simulation results indicate that the dayside polar cap electric field observed during strong northward IMF is produced by a direct electrical current coupling with the solar wind. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  20. Experimental observation of pulsating instability under acoustic field in downward-propagating flames at large Lewis number

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Sung Hwan

    2017-10-12

    According to previous theory, pulsating propagation in a premixed flame only appears when the reduced Lewis number, β(Le-1), is larger than a critical value (Sivashinsky criterion: 4(1 +3) ≈ 11), where β represents the Zel\\'dovich number (for general premixed flames, β ≈ 10), which requires Lewis number Le > 2.1. However, few experimental observation have been reported because the critical reduced Lewis number for the onset of pulsating instability is beyond what can be reached in experiments. Furthermore, the coupling with the unavoidable hydrodynamic instability limits the observation of pure pulsating instabilities in flames. Here, we describe a novel method to observe the pulsating instability. We utilize a thermoacoustic field caused by interaction between heat release and acoustic pressure fluctuations of the downward-propagating premixed flames in a tube to enhance conductive heat loss at the tube wall and radiative heat loss at the open end of the tube due to extended flame residence time by diminished flame surface area, i.e., flat flame. The thermoacoustic field allowed pure observation of the pulsating motion since the primary acoustic force suppressed the intrinsic hydrodynamic instability resulting from thermal expansion. By employing this method, we have provided new experimental observations of the pulsating instability for premixed flames. The Lewis number (i.e., Le ≈ 1.86) was less than the critical value suggested previously.

  1. Adaptive Backstepping design of an Observer for the Rotor Speed and Field of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    is de-veloped. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the rotor field. The rotor speed and the stator resis-tance are estimated by adaptive backstepping. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves stability with guaran-teed region of attraction. The adaptive...... backstepping observer is used in a rotor field oriented controller and robustness due to variation of motor parameters is analysed by simulation....

  2. Nutrient deficiencies in export tree and food crops: literature review and field observations

    OpenAIRE

    Hartemink, A.E.; Bourke, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews nutrient deficiencies in agricultural crops of PNG using the literature of agronomic trials and field observations made throughout the country. Nutrient deficiencies have been investigated systematically since the mid-1950s, but research has mainly focused on export tree crops and relatively little information is available on food crops. Literature analysis and field observations showed consistent trends, with deficiencies of boron and phosphorus in large parts of the PNG h...

  3. On transient electric fields observed in chemical release experiments by rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.; Brenning, N.; Holmgren, G.; Haerendel, G.

    1986-06-01

    As a follow-up to the successful chemical release experiment Trigger in 1977, the TOR (Trigger Optimized Repetition) rocket was launched from Esrange on Oct. 24, 1984. Like in the Trigger experiment a large amplitude electric field pulse of 200 mV/m was detected shortly after the explosion. The central part of the pulse was found to be clearly correlated with an intense layer of swept up ambient particles behind a propagating shock-front. The field was directed towards the centre of the expanding ionized cloud, which is indicative of a polarisation electric field source. Expressions for this radial polarisation field and the much weaker azimuthal induced electric field are derived from a simple cylindrical model for the field and the expanding neutral cloud. Time profiles of the radial electric field are shown to be in good agreement with observations. (authors)

  4. Modelling of near-field radionuclide transport phenomena in a KBS-3V type of repository for nuclear waste with Goldsim Code - and verification against previous methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Nordman, H.

    2010-03-01

    Traditional radionuclide transport models overestimate significantly some phenomena, or completely ignore them. This motivates the development of new more precise models. As a result, this work is a description of commissioning of a new KBS-3V near-field radionuclide transport model, which has been done with a commercial software called GoldSim. According to earlier models, GoldSim model uses rz coordinates, but the solubilities of radionuclides have been treated more precisely. To begin with, the physical phenomena concerning near-field transport have been introduced according to GoldSim way of thinking. Also, the computational methods of GoldSim have been introduced and compared to methods used earlier. The actual verification of GoldSim model has been carried out by comparing the GoldSim results from simple cases to the corresponding results obtained with REPCOM, a software developed by VTT and used in several safety assessments. The results agree well. Finally, a few complicated cases were studied. In these cases, the REPCOM's limitations in handling of some phenomena become evident. The differences in the results are caused especially by the extension of the solubility limit to the whole computational domain, and the element-wise treatment of the solubilities which was used instead of nuclide-wise treatment. This work has been carried out as a special assignment to the former laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems in Helsinki University of Technology. The work was done at VTT. (orig.)

  5. Modelling of near-field radionuclide transport phenomena in a KBS-3V type of repository for nuclear waste with Goldsim Code - and verification against previous methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pulkkanen, V.-M.; Nordman, H. (VTT Technical Research Centre, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    Traditional radionuclide transport models overestimate significantly some phenomena, or completely ignore them. This motivates the development of new more precise models. As a result, this work is a description of commissioning of a new KBS-3V near-field radionuclide transport model, which has been done with a commercial software called GoldSim. According to earlier models, GoldSim model uses rz coordinates, but the solubilities of radionuclides have been treated more precisely. To begin with, the physical phenomena concerning near-field transport have been introduced according to GoldSim way of thinking. Also, the computational methods of GoldSim have been introduced and compared to methods used earlier. The actual verification of GoldSim model has been carried out by comparing the GoldSim results from simple cases to the corresponding results obtained with REPCOM, a software developed by VTT and used in several safety assessments. The results agree well. Finally, a few complicated cases were studied. In these cases, the REPCOM's limitations in handling of some phenomena become evident. The differences in the results are caused especially by the extension of the solubility limit to the whole computational domain, and the element-wise treatment of the solubilities which was used instead of nuclide-wise treatment. This work has been carried out as a special assignment to the former laboratory of Advanced Energy Systems in Helsinki University of Technology. The work was done at VTT. (orig.)

  6. Kinetic physics in exhausts formed by guide field reconnection within the magnetosheath, as observed by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, R.; Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T.; Cassak, P.; Shay, M. A.; Haggerty, C. C.; Oieroset, M.; Goldman, M. V.; Giles, B. L.; Gershman, D. J.; Paterson, W. R.; Russell, C. T.; Lindqvist, P. A.; Ergun, R.; Torbert, R. B.; Burch, J. L.; Zhao, C.; Strangeway, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    MMS has allowed, for the first time, particle observations of reconnection to be made on ion and electron scales. These extremely high resolution measurements can be used to investigate the kinetic physics of reconnection that are known to be essential to the dissipation mechanisms at play in the diffusion region. Kinetic effects, however, are not limited to the diffusion region, and both simulations and observations have shown that kinetic processes can occur in the exhaust region downstream of the reconnection site. Whilst the primary targets of MMS are reconnection at the magnetopause and magnetotail, excursions of the spacecraft into the magnetosheath allow for observations in the less frequently accessible reconnection regime of symmetric reconnection with large guide fields. Here we present MMS observations of magnetosheath reconnection exhausts made approximately 75 ion inertial lengths downstream of the X-line. These exhausts are observed in the magnetosheath-proper, and as such have relatively symmetric inflow conditions. Furthermore, these exhausts have guide fields of a strength comparable to that of the reconnecting magnetic field. We use high resolution MMS observations of these events to study the effects of guide fields on the exhausts that form in symmetric reconnection. We find that non-uniform electron heating which occurs near the X-line in the presence of a guide field persists downstream, at least to the distance of these observations. Additionally, the electron velocity is resolved below the ion kinetic scale, where it is highly disrupted compared to the case of anti-parallel reconnection, with narrow field-aligned electron flows towards the X-line. These flows result in the generation of Hall currents and magnetic fields within the exhaust region itself, allowing Hall effects to persist beyond the ion diffusion region. The effects of the guide field on counter-streaming ion beams within the exhaust are also presented, as well as brief periods

  7. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Bottaro, Márcio; Nagy, Balázs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naïve human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according t...

  8. 3-D modelling the electric field due to ocean tidal flow and comparison with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, A.; Junge, A.; Utada, H.

    2006-01-01

    The tidal motion of the ocean water through the ambient magnetic field, generates secondary electric field. This motionally induced electric field can be detected in the sea or inland and has a potential for electrical soundings of the Earth. A first goal of the paper is to gain an understanding...... that in some coastal regions the amplitudes of the electric field can reach 100 mV/km and 10 mV/km for M2 and O1 tides respectively. The changes of lithosphere resistance produce detectable changes in the tidal electric signals. We show that our predictions are in a good agreement with observations....

  9. The Ionospheric Bubble Index deduced from magnetic field and plasma observations onboard Swarm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Jaeheung; Noja, Max; Stolle, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In the post-sunset tropical ionospheric F-region plasma density often exhibits depletions, which are usually called equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs). In this paper we give an overview of the Swarm Level 2 Ionospheric Bubble Index (IBI), which is a standard scientific data of the Swarm mission....... This product called L2-IBI is generated from magnetic field and plasma observations onboard Swarm, and gives information as to whether a Swarm magnetic field observation is affected by EPBs. We validate the performance of the L2-IBI product by using magnetic field and plasma measurements from the CHAMP...... satellite, which provided observations similar to those of the Swarm. The L2-IBI product is of interest not only for ionospheric studies, but also for geomagnetic field modeling; modelers can de-select magnetic data which are affected by EPBs or other unphysical artifacts....

  10. Interplanetary and Interstellar Dust Observed by the Wind/WAVES Electric Field Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Horanyi, M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B., III; Kersten, K.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of hypervelocity dust particles impacting the Wind spacecraft are reported here for the first time using data from the WindWAVES electric field instrument. A unique combination of rotating spacecraft, amplitude-triggered high-cadence waveform collection, and electric field antenna configuration allow the first direct determination of dust impact direction by any spacecraft using electric field data. Dust flux and impact direction data indicate that the observed dust is approximately micron-sized with both interplanetary and interstellar populations. Nanometer radius dust is not detected by Wind during times when nanometer dust is observed on the STEREO spacecraft and both spacecraft are in close proximity. Determined impact directions suggest that interplanetary dust detected by electric field instruments at 1 AU is dominated by particles on bound trajectories crossing Earths orbit, rather than dust with hyperbolic orbits.

  11. Backstepping design of a Nonlinear Observer for the Rotor Field of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a new approach for the design of flux observers is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the amplitude and angle of the field. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves stability...... with guaranteed region of attraction. Rubustness due to variation of motor parameters is analysed by simulation. The result is compared to the flux estimate used in a conventional field oriented controller Using backstepping, which is a recursive nonlinear design method, a new approach for the design of flux...... observers is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the amplitude and angle of the field. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves stability with guaranteed region of attraction. Rubustness due to variation of motor parameters is analysed by simulation...

  12. Microscopic Observation of Ferroelectric Domains in SrTiO3 Using Birefringence Imaging Techniques under High Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaka, Hirotaka; Nozaki, Hirofumi; Miura, Yoko

    2017-11-01

    Phase transitions in SrTiO3 between quantum paraelectric, coherent paraelectric, and electric-field-induced ferroelectric states are governed by tetragonal domains with quantum fluctuations. However, their characteristics are still unclear. To observe the electric-field-induced ferroelectric state using birefringence imaging techniques, we developed a suitable sample holder to apply high electric fields of up to E ≃ 5 kV/cm and temperatures down to T = 20 K. From birefringence imaging measurements of the ferroelectric LiNbO3 with varying electric field, distributions of the electric field in the sample stage were found to be negligible. In SrTiO3, a huge-retardance area corresponding to the ferroelectric domains appears at E > 2 kV/cm and T ≤ 60 K even though the paraelectric domains partially remain. Furthermore, the fast-axis direction rotates by 90° at the ferroelectric phase transition because of an electrostrictive effect in ferroelectrics. The phase diagram of the critical electric field and temperature agrees with previous reports obtained from dielectric and neutron scattering measurements.

  13. Microscopic observation of ferroelectric domains in SrTiO3 using birefringence imaging techniques under high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaka, Hirotaka; Nozaki, Hirofumi; Miura, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Phase transitions in SrTiO 3 between quantum paraelectric, coherent paraelectric, and electric-field-induced ferroelectric states are governed by tetragonal domains with quantum fluctuations. However, their characteristics are still unclear. To observe the electric-field-induced ferroelectric state using birefringence imaging techniques, we developed a suitable sample holder to apply high electric fields of up to E ≃ 5 kV/cm and temperatures down to T = 20 K. From birefringence imaging measurements of the ferroelectric LiNbO 3 with varying electric field, distributions of the electric field in the sample stage were found to be negligible. In SrTiO 3 , a huge-retardance area corresponding to the ferroelectric domains appears at E > 2 kV/cm and T ≤ 60 K even though the paraelectric domains partially remain. Furthermore, the fast-axis direction rotates by 90° at the ferroelectric phase transition because of an electrostrictive effect in ferroelectrics. The phase diagram of the critical electric field and temperature agrees with previous reports obtained from dielectric and neutron scattering measurements. (author)

  14. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Nagy, Balazs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral, E-mail: marcio@iee.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Optics and Engineering Informatics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest (Hungary)

    2017-04-15

    Introduction: To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods: Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naive human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results: In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion: As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer's edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients. (author)

  15. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Nagy, Balazs Vince; Soares, Fernanda Cristina Salvador; Rosendo, Danilo Cabral

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods: Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naive human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results: In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion: As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer's edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients. (author)

  16. Results of magnetic field measurements performed with the 6-m telescope. IV. Observations in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.; Moiseeva, A. V.; Yakunin, I. A.

    2017-10-01

    We present the results of measurements of magnetic fields, radial velocities and rotation velocities for 92 objects, mainly main-sequence chemically peculiar stars. Observations were performed at the 6-m BTA telescope using Main Stellar Spectrograph with a Zeeman analyzer. In 2010, twelve new magnetic stars were discovered: HD 17330, HD 29762, HD 49884, HD 54824, HD 89069, HD 96003, HD 113894, HD 118054, HD 135679, HD 138633, HD 138777, BD +53.1183. The presence of a field is suspected in HD 16705, HD 35379 and HD 35881. Observations of standard stars without a magnetic field confirm the absence of systematic errors which can introduce distortions into the measurements of longitudinal field. The paper gives comments on the results of investigation of each star.

  17. Magnetospheric Multiscale Observations of the Electron Diffusion Region of Large Guide Field Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.; Wilder, F. D.; Ergun, R. E.; Schwartz, S. J.; Cassak, P. A.; Burch, J. L.; Chen, Li-Jen; Torbert, R. B.; Phan, T. D.; Lavraud, B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) satellites of a large guide field magnetic reconnection event. The observations suggest that two of the four MMS spacecraft sampled the electron diffusion region, whereas the other two spacecraft detected the exhaust jet from the event. The guide magnetic field amplitude is approximately 4 times that of the reconnecting field. The event is accompanied by a significant parallel electric field (E(sub parallel lines) that is larger than predicted by simulations. The high-speed (approximately 300 km/s) crossing of the electron diffusion region limited the data set to one complete electron distribution inside of the electron diffusion region, which shows significant parallel heating. The data suggest that E(sub parallel lines) is balanced by a combination of electron inertia and a parallel gradient of the gyrotropic electron pressure.

  18. Attainment of students’ conception in magnetic fields by using of direct observation and symbolic language ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desy Fatmaryanti, Siska; Suparmi; Sarwanto; Ashadi

    2017-11-01

    This study focuses on description attainment of students’ conception in the magnetic field. The conception was based by using of direct observation and symbolic language ability. The method used is descriptive quantitative research. The subject of study was about 86 students from 3 senior high school at Purworejo. The learning process was done by guided inquiry model. During the learning, students were required to actively investigate the concept of a magnetic field around a straight wire electrical current Data retrieval was performed using an instrument in the form of a multiple choice test reasoned and observation during the learning process. There was four indicator of direct observation ability and four indicators of symbolic language ability to grouping category of students conception. The results of average score showed that students conception about the magnitude more better than the direction of magnetic fields in view of symbolic language. From the observation, we found that students could draw the magnetic fields line not from a text book but their direct observation results. They used various way to get a good accuracy of observation results. Explicit recommendations are presented in the discussion section at the end of this paper.

  19. Surveying all public drinking water fountains in a city: outdoor field observations and Google Street View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Signal, Louise; Thomson, George

    2018-02-01

    Drinking fountains are a public amenity that may help counter the obesogenic environment (sugary beverages) and reduce the risk of heat stroke during heat waves. As a case study, we aimed to survey all public fountains in a city: Wellington, New Zealand, and to determine the utility of Google Street View in studying drinking fountains. Using a sample of all public drinking fountains in a City Council map, a field observer assessed their exact location and tap functionality, and photographed them. Google Street View was also used by the field observer and an independent observer to attempt fountain detection. There were 47 fountains, found in only 6% of children's playgrounds and 29% of the parks (for a sample of the 10 largest suburbs). While the field observations showed that all 74 taps at the fountains delivered water, only 47% had taps for easy filling of drinking water bottles, and only 15% had bowls for dogs to drink from. Visible discolouration from algae/metal degradation was adjacent to 47% of nozzles. Google Street View detection of fountains by the field observer was successful for 68% and for 52% by the independent observer. The fountains were of generally high quality, but discolouration around the nozzle was common. Implications for public health: Additional investment in public fountains may be needed. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Observation of nanostructure by scanning near-field optical microscope with small sphere probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshikane, Toshihiko Kataoka, Mitsuru Okuda, Seiji Hara, Haruyuki Inoue and Motohiro Nakano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Step and terrace structure has been observed in an area of 1 μm×1 μm on the cleaved surface of KCl–KBr solid-solution single crystal by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM with a small sphere probe of 500 nm diameter. Lateral spatial resolution of the SNOM system was estimated to be 20 nm from the observation of step width and the scanning-step interval. Vertical spatial resolution was estimated to be 5–2 nm from the observation of step height and noise level of photomultiplier tube (PMT. With applying a dielectric dipole radiation model to the probe surface, the reason why such a high spatial resolution was obtained in spite of the 500 nm sphere probe, was understood as the effect of the near-field term appeared in the radiation field equations.

  1. Isolated electrostatic structures observed throughout the Cluster orbit: relationship to magnetic field strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Isolated electrostatic structures are observed throughout much of the 4RE by 19.6RE Cluster orbit. These structures are observed in the Wideband plasma wave instrument's waveform data as bipolar pulses (one positive and one negative peak in the electric field amplitude and tripolar pulses (two positive and one negative peak, or vice versa. These structures are observed at all of the boundary layers, in the solar wind and magnetosheath, and along auroral field lines at 4.5-6.5RE. Using the Wideband waveform data from the various Cluster spacecraft we have carried out a survey of the amplitudes and time durations of these structures and how these quantities vary with the local magnetic field strength. Such a survey has not been carried out before, and it reveals certain characteristics of solitary structures in a finite magnetic field, a topic still inadequately addressed by theories. We find that there is a broad range of electric field amplitudes at any specific magnetic field strength, and there is a general trend for the electric field amplitudes to increase as the strength of the magnetic field increases over a range of 5 to 500nT. We provide a possible explanation for this trend that relates to the structures being Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal mode solitary waves. There is no corresponding dependence of the duration of the structures on the magnetic field strength, although a plot of these two quantities reveals the unexpected result that with the exception of the magnetosheath, all of the time durations for all of the other regions are comparable, whereas the magnetosheath time durations clearly are in a different category of much smaller time duration. We speculate that this implies that the structures are much smaller in size. The distinctly different pulse durations for the magnetosheath pulses indicate the possibility that the pulses are generated by a mechanism which is different from the mechanism operating in other regions.

  2. High performance field emission and Nottingham effect observed from carbon nanotube yarn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Chul; Kang, Jun-Tae; Park, Sora; Go, Eunsol; Jeon, Hyojin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ho; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on a four inch wafer, followed by the preparation of a CNT yarn. The yarn emitter was found to have an extremely high field enhancement factor, which was confirmed to have originated from multi-stage effect. In addition to superb field emission characteristics, the energy exchange during field emission, called Nottingham effect, was observed from the CNT yarn emitter. A CNT yarn was attached to the thermistor whose resistance depends on temperature. Then, the change of resistance was monitored during the field emission, which enabled us to calculate the energy exchange. It was found that the observed heating originated from both Nottingham and Joule heating. Nottingham heating was dominant at low current region while Joule heating became larger contribution at high current region. Very large Nottingham region of up to 33.35 mA was obtained, which is due presumably to the high performance field emission characteristics of a CNT yarn. This is believed to be an important observation for developing reliable field emission devices with suppressed Joule heating effect.

  3. Magnetospheric Multiscale Satellites Observations of Parallel Electric Fields Associated with Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K. A.; Wilder, F. D.; Holmes, J. C.; Stawarz, J. E.; Eriksson, S.; Sturner, A. P.; Malaspina, D. M.; Usanova, M. E.; Torbert, R. B.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Burch, J. L.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Pollock, C. J.; Giles, B. L.; Hesse, M.; Chen, L. J.; Lapenta, G.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Eastwood, J. P.; Phan, T. D.; Mozer, F. S.; Drake, J.; Shay, M. A.; Cassak, P. A.; Nakamura, R.; Marklund, G.

    2016-06-01

    We report observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale satellites of parallel electric fields (E∥ ) associated with magnetic reconnection in the subsolar region of the Earth's magnetopause. E∥ events near the electron diffusion region have amplitudes on the order of 100 mV /m , which are significantly larger than those predicted for an antiparallel reconnection electric field. This Letter addresses specific types of E∥ events, which appear as large-amplitude, near unipolar spikes that are associated with tangled, reconnected magnetic fields. These E∥ events are primarily in or near a current layer near the separatrix and are interpreted to be double layers that may be responsible for secondary reconnection in tangled magnetic fields or flux ropes. These results are telling of the three-dimensional nature of magnetopause reconnection and indicate that magnetopause reconnection may be often patchy and/or drive turbulence along the separatrix that results in flux ropes and/or tangled magnetic fields.

  4. Automated and observer based light field indicator edge evaluation in diagnostic X-ray equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Bottaro

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To analyze edge detection and optical contrast calculation of light field-indicators used in X-ray via automated- and observer-based methods, and comparison with current standard approaches, which do not give exact definition for light field edge determination. Methods Automated light sensor array was used to measure the penumbra zone of the edge in the standard X-ray equipment, while trained and naïve human observers were asked to mark the light field edge according to their own determination. Different interpretations of the contrast were then calculated and compared. Results In contrast to automated measurements of edge definition and detection, measurements by human observers showed large inter-observer variation independent of their training with X-ray equipment. Different contrast calculations considering the different edge definitions gave very different contrast values. Conclusion As the main conclusion, we propose a more exact edge definition of the X-ray light field, corresponding well to the average human observer’s edge determination. The new edge definition method with automated systems would reduce human variability in edge determination. Such errors could potentially affect the approval of X-ray equipment, and also increase the radiation dose. The automated measurement based on human observers’ edge definition and the corresponding contrast calculation may lead to a more precise light field calibration, which enables reduced irradiation doses on radiology patients.

  5. Auroral arc classification scheme based on the observed arc-associated electric field pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marklund, G.

    1983-06-01

    Radar and rocket electric field observations of auroral arcs have earlier been used to identify essentially four different arc types, namely anticorrelation and correlation arcs (with, respectively, decreased and increased arc-assocaited field) and asymmetric and reversal arcs. In this paper rocket double probe and supplementary observations from the literature, obtained under various geophysical conditions, are used to organize the different arc types on a physical rather than morphological basis. This classification is based on the relative influence on the arc electric field pattern from the two current continuity mechanisms, polarisation electric fields and Birkeland currents. In this context the tangential electric field plays an essential role and it is thus important that it can be obtained with both high accuracy and resolution. In situ observations by sounding rockets are shown to be better suited for this specific task than monostatic radar observations. Depending on the dominating mechanism, estimated quantitatively for a number of arc-crossings, the different arc types have been grouped into the following main categories: Polarisation arcs, Birkeland current arcs and combination arcs. Finally the high altitude potential distributions corresponding to some of the different arc types are presented. (author)

  6. Field trip report: Observations made at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. Special report No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.A.

    1993-03-01

    A field trip was made to the Yucca Mountain area on December 5-9, 1992 by Jerry Frazier, Don Livingston, Christine Schluter, Russell Harmon, and Carol Hill. Forty-three separate stops were made and 275 lbs. of rocks were collected during the five days of the field trip. Key localities visited were the Bare Mountains, Yucca Mountain, Calico Hills, Busted Butte, Harper Valley, Red Cliff Gulch, Wahmonie Hills, Crater Flat, and Lathrop Wells Cone. This report only describes field observations made by Carol Hill. Drawings are used rather than photographs because cameras were not permitted on the Nevada Test Site during this trip

  7. Study of luminous phenomena observed on contaminated metallic surfaces submitted to high RF fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maissa, S.; Junquera, T.; Fouaidy, M.; Le Goff, A.; Bonin, B.; Luong, M.; Safa, H.; Tan, J.

    1995-01-01

    The RF field emission from a sample subjected to high RF fields in a copper cavity has been investigated. The study is focused on the luminous emissions occurring on the RF surface simultaneously with the electron emission. The optical apparatus attached to the cavity permits to observe the evolution of the emitters and the direct effects of the surface conditioning. Also, the parameters of the emitted radiation (intensity, glowing duration, spectral distribution) may provide additional informations on the field emission phenomena. Some results concerning samples intentionally contaminated with particles (metallic or dielectric) are presented. (K.A.)

  8. Probes and Tests of Strong-Field Gravity with Observations in the Electromagnetic Spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psaltis Dimitrios

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutron stars and black holes are the astrophysical systems with the strongest gravitational fields in the universe. In this article, I review the prospect of using observations of such compact objects to probe some of the most intriguing general relativistic predictions in the strong-field regime: the absence of stable circular orbits near a compact object and the presence of event horizons around black-hole singularities. I discuss the need for a theoretical framework, within which future experiments will provide detailed, quantitative tests of gravity theories. Finally, I summarize the constraints imposed by current observations of neutron stars on potential deviations from general relativity.

  9. Displacement field in Lorca (Murcia, Spain) subsidence area: Observation and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J.; Camacho, A. G.; Luzon, F.; Prieto, J. F.; Escayo, J.; Rodríguez-Velasco, G.; Tiampo, K. F.; Palano, M.; Velasco, J.; Abajo, T.; Perez, E.; Gomez, I.; Herrero, T.; Bru, G.; Aguirre, J.; Mateos, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Lorca area, Alto Guadalentín Basin, located in southern Spain, is affected by the highest subsidence rates measured in Europe (about 10 cm/yr) produced by a long-term aquifer exploitation (González and Fernández, 2011). This subsidence has been studied using satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) using images from different satellites (ERS and ENVISAT radar data spanning the 1992 - 2007 period; ALOS PALSAR data for the period 2007-2010; and COSMO-SkyMed data for the period 2011-2012). González et al. (2012) found a relationship between the crust unloading produced by the groundwater overexploitation and the stress change on the regional active tectonic faults in relation with the May 2008 Lorca earthquake. The InSAR results have been compared with measurements acquired by two permanent GNSS stations located in the study area, and with geological and hydrogeological data collected and analyzed in order to assess aquifer system compressibility and groundwater level changes in the past 50 years. All the previous studies of the area were based on satellite radar interferometry using just ascending or descending acquisitions, without any combination among them, to obtain vertical and horizontal (E-W) components. However, it is important to obtain the 3D motion field in order to perform a correct interpretation of the observations, as well as to carry out an advanced numerical model of the aquifer evolution, to be consider for sustainable management plans of groundwater resources and hazard assessments. To solve this problem, we defined a GNSS network, and various surveys have been carried out, from November 2015, showing the regional 3D displacement field associated to the exploitation of the aquifer. GNSS and InSAR results has been compared, obtaining a good agreement. We present the results obtained from both techniques, the comparison between them, and interpretation results using different inversion techniques. REFERENCESGonzález, P.J., Fernández, J., 2011

  10. A new Observer for Speed Sensorless Field Oriented Control of an Induction Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    Using adaptive Lyapunov design a new approach for the design of an observer for speed sensorless field oriented control is developed. The resulting scheme leads to a nonlinear full order observer for the motor states including the rotor speed. Assuming motor parameters known the design achieves...... stability with guaranteed region of attraction. Experiments on a real motor demonstrate high dynamic performance even at very low rotor speed and stability is extended to zero speed....

  11. Tsunami Source Estimate for the 1960 Chilean Earthquake from Near- and Far-Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, T.; Satake, K.; Watada, S.; Fujii, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The tsunami source of the 1960 Chilean earthquake was estimated from the near- and far-field tsunami data. The 1960 Chilean earthquake is known as the greatest earthquake instrumentally ever recorded. This earthquake caused a large tsunami which was recorded by 13 near-field tidal gauges in South America, and 84 far-field stations around the Pacific Ocean at the coasts of North America, Asia, and Oceania. The near-field stations had been used for estimating the tsunami source [Fujii and Satake, Pageoph, 2013]. However, far-field tsunami waveforms have not been utilized because of the discrepancy between observed and simulated waveforms. The observed waveforms at the far-field stations are found systematically arrived later than the simulated waveforms. This phenomenon has been also observed in the tsunami of the 2004 Sumatra earthquake, the 2010 Chilean earthquake, and the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Recently, the factors for the travel time delay have been explained [Watada et al., JGR, 2014; Allgeyer and Cummins, GRL, 2014], so the far-field data are usable for tsunami source estimation. The phase correction method [Watada et al., JGR, 2014] converts the tsunami waveforms computed by the linear long wave into the dispersive waveform which accounts for the effects of elasticity of the Earth and ocean, ocean density stratification, and gravitational potential change associated with tsunami propagation. We apply the method to correct the computed waveforms. For the preliminary initial sea surface height inversion, we use 12 near-field stations and 63 far-field stations, located in the South and North America, islands in the Pacific Ocean, and the Oceania. The estimated tsunami source from near-field stations is compared with the result from both near- and far-field stations. Two estimated sources show a similar pattern: a large sea surface displacement concentrated at the south of the epicenter close to the coast and extended to south. However, the source estimated from

  12. MAVEN observations of complex magnetic field configuration in the Martian magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBraccio, G. A.; Luhmann, J. G.; Curry, S.; Espley, J. R.; Gruesbeck, J.; Xu, S.; Mitchell, D. L.; Soobiah, Y. I. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Dong, C.; Harada, Y.; Ruhunusiri, S.; Halekas, J. S.; Hara, T.; Ma, Y.; Brain, D.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2017-12-01

    The magnetosphere of Mars has attributes of both induced and intrinsic magnetospheres, forming as a result of direct solar wind interaction with the planet's upper atmosphere and local crustal magnetic fields. Magnetic reconnection is able to occur between the draped interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and closed crustal magnetic fields, creating an open field topology with one end attached to the planet and the other flowing in the solar wind. For this reason, the Martian magnetotail becomes a complex menagerie of various field topologies that may contribute to atmospheric escape to space. We explore these magnetic topologies in the Martian magnetotail using a combination of observations from the the Mars Atmosphere Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft along with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. Preliminary MHD results suggest that the central tail contains two lobes composed of open crustal fields, which are twisted by roughly 45°, either clockwise or counterclockwise from the ecliptic plane, in response to the east-west component of the IMF. These simulated open-field lobes are enveloped by an induced comet-like tail formed by the draped IMF. Using two Earth years of data, we analyze MAVEN Magnetometer and Solar Wind Ion Analyzer (SWIA) measurements to assess the tail magnetic field configuration as a function of IMF orientation. We infer, through data-model comparisons, that the open-field tail lobes are likely a result of reconnection between the crustal fields and the IMF. The open topology of these fields may in fact contribute to atmospheric loss to space. This investigation confirms that the Martian magnetotail is a hybrid configuration between intrinsic and induced magnetospheres, shifting the paradigm of Mars' magnetosphere as we have understood it thus far.

  13. CONSTRAINING THE NFW POTENTIAL WITH OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXY VELOCITY FIELDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzio de Naray, Rachel; McGaugh, Stacy S.; Mihos, J. Christopher

    2009-01-01

    We model the Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) potential to determine if, and under what conditions, the NFW halo appears consistent with the observed velocity fields of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. We present mock DensePak Integral Field Unit (IFU) velocity fields and rotation curves of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric potentials that are well matched to the spatial resolution and velocity range of our sample galaxies. We find that the DensePak IFU can accurately reconstruct the velocity field produced by an axisymmetric NFW potential and that a tilted-ring fitting program can successfully recover the corresponding NFW rotation curve. We also find that nonaxisymmetric potentials with fixed axis ratios change only the normalization of the mock velocity fields and rotation curves and not their shape. The shape of the modeled NFW rotation curves does not reproduce the data: these potentials are unable to simultaneously bring the mock data at both small and large radii into agreement with observations. Indeed, to match the slow rise of LSB galaxy rotation curves, a specific viewing angle of the nonaxisymmetric potential is required. For each of the simulated LSB galaxies, the observer's line of sight must be along the minor axis of the potential, an arrangement that is inconsistent with a random distribution of halo orientations on the sky.

  14. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramar, M.; Lin, H.; Tomczyk, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments

  15. Substorm Electric And Magnetic Fields In The Earth's Magnetotail: Observations Compared To The WINDMI Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, P. G.; Spencer, E. A.; Vadepu, S. K.; Horton, W., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    We compare satellite observations of substorm electric fields and magnetic fields to the output of a low dimensional nonlinear physics model of the nightside magnetosphere called WINDMI. The electric and magnetic field satellite data are used to calculate the E X B drift, which is one of the intermediate variables of the WINDMI model. The model uses solar wind and IMF measurements from the ACE spacecraft as input into a system of 8 nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The state variables of the differential equations represent the energy stored in the geomagnetic tail, central plasma sheet, ring current and field aligned currents. The output from the model is the ground based geomagnetic westward auroral electrojet (AL) index, and the Dst index.Using ACE solar wind data, IMF data and SuperMAG identification of substorm onset times up to December 2015, we constrain the WINDMI model to trigger substorm events, and compare the model intermediate variables to THEMIS and GEOTAIL satellite data in the magnetotail. By forcing the model to be consistent with satellite electric and magnetic field observations, we are able to track the magnetotail energy dynamics, the field aligned current contributions, energy injections into the ring current, and ensure that they are within allowable limts. In addition we are able to constrain the physical parameters of the model, in particular the lobe inductance, the plasma sheet capacitance, and the resistive and conductive parameters in the plasma sheet and ionosphere.

  16. Engineering studies on joint bar integrity, part I : field surveys and observed failure modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-02

    This paper is the first of a two-part series describing a : research project, sponsored by the Federal Railroad : Administration (FRA), to study the structural integrity of joint : bars. In Part I of this series, observations from field surveys : con...

  17. Nutrient deficiencies in export tree and food crops: literature review and field observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.; Bourke, R.M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews nutrient deficiencies in agricultural crops of PNG using the literature of agronomic trials and field observations made throughout the country. Nutrient deficiencies have been investigated systematically since the mid-1950s, but research has mainly focused on export tree crops and

  18. A serendipitous observation of the gamma-ray burst GRB 921013b field with EUVE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1999-01-01

    We report a serendipitous extreme ultraviolet observation by EUVE of the field containing GRB 921013b, similar to 11 hours after its occurrence. This burst was detected on 1992 October 13 by the WATCH and PHEBUS on Granat, and by the GRB experiment on Ulysses. The lack of any transient (or...

  19. The Kinematics of Core and Cusp Galaxies: Comparing HST Imaging and Integral-Field Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falcón-Barroso, J.; Bacon, R.; Cappellari, M.; Davies, R. L.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Emsellem, E.; Krajnović, D.; Kuntschner, H.; McDermid, R. M.; Peletier, R. F.; Sarzi, M.; van de Ven, G.

    2010-01-01

    In this proceeding we look at the relationship between the photometric nuclear properties of early-type galaxies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging and their overall kinematics as observed with the SAURON integral-field spectrograph. We compare the inner slope of their photometric profiles and the

  20. Post-Newtonian (and higher order) observational constraints on gravitation field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordtvedt, K.

    1982-01-01

    The empirically confirmed premise that gravity is a metric theory is accepted. The general class of all Lagrangian-based metric field theories of gravity is considered. A collection of observational tests of gravitational phenomena which points to a specific metric theory of gravity and rules out alternatives is created

  1. Modeling of the coseismic electromagnetic fields observed during the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yongxin; Harris, Jerry M.; Wen, Jian; Huang, Yihe; Twardzik, Cedric; Chen, Xiaofei; Hu, Hengshan

    2016-01-01

    The coseismic electromagnetic signals observed during the 2004 Mw 6 Parkfield earthquake are simulated using electrokinetic theory. By using a finite fault source model obtained via kinematic inversion, we calculate the electric and magnetic responses to the earthquake rupture. The result shows that the synthetic electric signals agree with the observed data for both amplitude and wave shape, especially for early portions of the records (first 9 s) after the earthquake, supporting the electrokinetic effect as the reasonable mechanism for the generation of the coseismic electric fields. More work is needed to explain the magnetic fields and the later portions of the electric fields. Analysis shows that the coseismic electromagnetic (EM) signals are sensitive to both the material properties at the location of the EM sensors and the electrochemical heterogeneity in the vicinity of the EM sensors and can be used to characterize the underground electrochemical properties.

  2. Spatial Variations of Poloidal and Toroidal Mode Field Line Resonances Observed by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Chi, P. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Kepko, L.; Nakamura, R.; Plaschke, F.; Torbert, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    Field line resonances (FLRs) are magnetosphere's responses to solar wind forcing and internal instabilities generated by solar wind-magnetospheric interactions. They are standing waves along the Earth's magnetic field lines oscillating in either poloidal or toroidal modes. The two types of waves have their unique frequency characteristics. The eigenfrequency of FLRs is determined by the length of the field line and the plasma density, and thus gradually changes with L. For toroidal mode oscillations with magnetic field perturbations in the azimuthal direction, ideal MHD predicts that each field line oscillates independently with its own eigenfrequency. For poloidal mode waves with field lines oscillating radially, their frequency cannot change with L easily as L shells need to oscillate in sync to avoid efficient damping due to phase mixing. Observations, mainly during quiet times, indeed show that poloidal mode waves often exhibit nearly constant frequency across L shells. Our recent observations, on the other hand, reveal a clear L-dependent frequency trend for a long lasting storm-time poloidal wave event, indicating the wave can maintain its power with changing frequencies for an extended period [Le et al., 2017]. The spatial variation of the frequency shows discrete spatial structures. The frequency remains constant within each discrete structure that spans about 1 REalong L, and changes discretely. We present a follow-up study to investigate spatial variations of wave frequencies using the Wigner-Ville distribution. We examine both poloidal and toroidal waves under different geomagnetic conditions using multipoint observations from MMS, and compare their frequency and occurrence characteristics for insights into their generation mechanisms. Reference: Le, G., et al. (2017), Global observations of magnetospheric high-m poloidal waves during the 22 June 2015 magnetic storm, Geophys. Res. Lett., 44, 3456-3464, doi:10.1002/2017GL073048.

  3. Observations of Pc5 micropulsation-related electric field oscillations in the equatorial ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Reddy

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available A 54.95-MHz coherent backscatter radar, an ionosonde and the magnetometer located at Trivandrum in India (8.5°N, 77°E, 0.5°N dip angle recorded large-amplitude ionospheric fluctuations and magnetic field fluctuations associated with a Pc5 micropulsation event, which occurred during an intense magnetic storm on 24 March 1991 (Ap=161. Simultaneous 100-nT-level fluctuations are also observed in the H-component at Brorfelde, Denmark (55.6°N gm and at Narsarsuaq, Greenland (70.6°N gm. Our study of the above observations shows that the E-W electric field fluctuations in the E- and F-regions and the magnetic field fluctuations at Thumba are dominated by a near-sinusoidal oscillation of 10 min during 1730-1900 IST (1200-1330 UT, the amplitude of the electric field oscillation in the equatorial electrojet (EEJ is 0.1-0.25 mV m-1 and it increases with height, while it is about 1.0 mV m-1 in the F-region, the ground-level H-component oscillation can be accounted for by the ionospheric current oscillation generated by the observed electric field oscillation in the EEJ and the H-component oscillations at Trivandrum and Brorfelde are in phase with each other. The observations are interpreted in terms of a compressional cavity mode resonance in the inner magnetosphere and the associated ionospheric electric field penetrating from high latitudes to the magnetic equator.

  4. Observation of thermally driven field-like spin torque in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Arnab, E-mail: arnabbose@ee.iitb.ac.in; Jain, Sourabh; Asam, Nagarjuna; Bhuktare, Swapnil; Singh, Hanuman; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Shukla, Amit Kumar; Konishi, Katsunori; Lam, Duc Duong; Fujii, Yuya; Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2016-07-18

    We report the thermally driven giant field-like spin-torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) on application of heat current from top to bottom. The field-like term is detected by the shift of the magneto-resistance hysteresis loop applying temperature gradient. We observed that the field-like term depends on the magnetic symmetry of the MTJ. In asymmetric structures, with different ferromagnetic materials for free and fixed layers, the field-like term is greatly enhanced. Our results show that a pure spin current density of the order of 10{sup 9 }A/m{sup 2} can be produced by creating a 120 mK temperature difference across 0.9 nm thick MgO tunnelling barrier. Our results will be useful for writing MTJ and domain wall-based memories using thermally driven spin torque.

  5. Observation of Landau levels in potassium-intercalated graphite under a zero magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Donghui; Kondo, Takahiro; Machida, Takahiro; Iwatake, Keigo; Okada, Susumu; Nakamura, Junji

    2012-01-01

    The charge carriers in graphene are massless Dirac fermions and exhibit a relativistic Landau-level quantization in a magnetic field. Recently, it has been reported that, without any external magnetic field, quantized energy levels have been also observed from strained graphene nanobubbles on a platinum surface, which were attributed to the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions in graphene formed by a strain-induced pseudomagnetic field. Here we show the generation of the Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions on a partially potassium-intercalated graphite surface without applying external magnetic field. Landau levels of massless Dirac fermions indicate the graphene character in partially potassium-intercalated graphite. The generation of the Landau levels is ascribed to a vector potential induced by the perturbation of nearest-neighbour hopping, which may originate from a strain or a gradient of on-site potentials at the perimeters of potassium-free domains.

  6. 3-D modelling the electric field due to ocean tidal flow and comparison with observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvshinov, A.; Junge, A.; Utada, H.

    2006-01-01

    of the global distribution of the electric signal due to tidal ocean flow. We simulate the electric signals for two tidal constituents - lunar semidiurnal (M2) and diurnal (O1) tides. We assume a realistic Earth's conductivity model with a surface thin shell and 1-D mantle underneath. Simulations demonstrate...... that in some coastal regions the amplitudes of the electric field can reach 100 mV/km and 10 mV/km for M2 and O1 tides respectively. The changes of lithosphere resistance produce detectable changes in the tidal electric signals. We show that our predictions are in a good agreement with observations.......The tidal motion of the ocean water through the ambient magnetic field, generates secondary electric field. This motionally induced electric field can be detected in the sea or inland and has a potential for electrical soundings of the Earth. A first goal of the paper is to gain an understanding...

  7. Observation of Self-Sustaining Relativistic Ionization Wave Launched by a Sheath Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M.; Arefiev, A. V.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bengtson, R. D.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental evidence supported by simulations of a relativistic ionization wave launched into a surrounding gas by the sheath field of a plasma filament with high energy electrons. Such a filament is created by irradiating a clustering gas jet with a short pulse laser (115 fs) at a peak intensity of 5×1017 W/cm2. We observe an ionization wave propagating radially through the gas for about 2 ps at 0.2-0.5 c after the laser has passed, doubling the initial radius of the filament. The gas is ionized by the sheath field, while the longevity of the wave is explained by a moving field structure that traps the high energy electrons near the boundary, maintaining a strong sheath field despite the significant expansion of the plasma.

  8. Improving our knowledge of rapid geomagnetic field intensity changes observed in Europe between 200 and 1400 AD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Paccard, Miriam; Chauvin, Annick; Lanos, Philippe; Dufresne, Philippe; Kovacheva, Mary; Hill, Mimi J.; Beamud, Elisabet; Blain, Sophie; Bouvier, Armel; Guibert, Pierre; Archaeological Working Team

    2012-11-01

    Available archaeomagnetic data indicate that during the past 2500 yr there have been periods of rapid geomagnetic field intensity fluctuations interspersed with periods of almost constant field strength. Despite Europe being the most widely covered region in terms of archaeomagnetic data the occurrence and the behaviour of these rapid geomagnetic field intensity changes is under discussion and the challenge now is to precisely describe them. The aim of this study is to obtain an improved description of the sharp intensity change that took place in western Europe around 800 AD as well as to investigate if this peak is observed at the continental scale. For this purpose 13 precisely dated early medieval Spanish pottery fragments, four archaeological French kilns and three collections of bricks used for the construction of different French historical buildings with ages ranging between 335 and 1260 AD have been studied. Classical Thellier experiments performed on 164 specimens, and including anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetisation and cooling rate corrections, gave 119 reliable results. The 10 new high-quality mean archaeointensities obtained confirm the existence of an intensity maximum of ˜85 μT (at the latitude of Paris) centred at ˜800 AD and suggest that a previous abrupt intensity change occurred around 600 AD. Together with previously published data from western Europe that we deem to be the most reliable, the new data also suggest the existence of two other abrupt geomagnetic field intensity variations during the 12th century and around the second half of the 13th century AD. High-quality archaeointensities available from eastern Europe indicate that very similar geomagnetic field intensity changes occurred in this region. European data indicate that very rapid intensity changes (of at least 20 μT/century) took place in the recent history of the Earth's magnetic field. The results call for additional high-quality archaeointensities obtained from

  9. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  10. Observation of large low-field magnetoresistance in spinel cobaltite: A new half-metal

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2015-12-10

    Low-field magnetoresistance is an effective and energy-saving way to use half-metallic materials in magnetic reading heads and magnetic random access memory. Common spin-polarized materials with low field magnetoresistance effect are perovskite-type manganese, cobalt, and molybdenum oxides. In this study, we report a new type of spinel cobaltite materials, self-assembled nanocrystalline NiCo2O4, which shows large low field magnetoresistance as large as –19.1% at 0.5 T and –50% at 9 T (2 K). The large low field magnetoresistance is attributed to the fast magnetization rotation of the core nanocrystals. The surface spin-glass is responsible for the observed weak saturation of magnetoresistance under high fields. Our calculation demonstrates that the half-metallicity of NiCo2O4 comes from the hopping eg electrons within the tetrahedral Co-atoms and the octahedral Ni-atoms. The discovery of large low-field magnetoresistance in simple spinel oxide NiCo2O4, a non-perovskite oxide, leads to an extended family of low-field magnetoresistance materials. (© 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH &Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Constraints on Particles and Fields from Full Stokes Observations of AGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C. Homan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Combined polarization imaging of radio jets from Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN in circular and linear polarization, also known as full Stokes imaging, has the potential to constrain both the magnetic field structure and particle properties of jets. Although only a small fraction of the emission when detected, typically less than a few tenths of a percent but up to as much as a couple of percent in the strongest resolved sources, circular polarization directly probes the magnetic field and particles within the jet itself and is not expected to be modified by external screens. A key to using full Stokes observations to constrain jet properties is obtaining a better understanding of the emission of circular polarization, including its variability and spectrum. We discuss what we have learned so far from parsec scale monitoring observations in the MOJAVE program and from multi-frequency observations of selected AGN.

  12. Unusual lightning electric field waveforms observed in Kathmandu, Nepal, and Uppsala, Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Pitri Bhakta; Sharma, Shriram; Baral, Kedarnath; Rakov, Vladimir A.

    2017-11-01

    Unusual lightning events have been observed in Uppsala, Sweden, and Kathmandu, Nepal, using essentially the same electric field measuring system developed at Uppsala University. They occurred in the storms that also generated ;normal; lightning events. The unusual events recorded in Uppsala occurred on one thunderstorm day. Similar events were observed in Kathmandu on multiple thunderstorm days. The unusual events were analyzed in this study assuming them to be positive ground flashes (+CGs), although we cannot rule out the possibility that some or most of them were actually cloud discharges (ICs). The unusual events were each characterized by a relatively slow, negative (atmospheric electricity sign convention) electric field waveform preceded by a pronounced opposite-polarity pulse whose duration was some tens of microseconds. To the best of our knowledge, such unusual events have not been reported in the literature. The average amplitudes of the opposite-polarity pulses with respect to those of the following main waveform were found to be about 33% in Uppsala (N = 31) and about 38% in Kathmandu (N = 327). The average durations of the main waveform and the preceding opposite-polarity pulse in Uppsala were 8.24 ms and 57.1 μs, respectively, and their counterparts in Kathmandu were 421 μs and 39.7 μs. Electric field waveforms characteristic of negative ground flashes (-CGs) were also observed, and none of them exhibited an opposite-polarity pulse prior to the main waveform. Possible origins of the unusual field waveforms are discussed.

  13. Observations of field-aligned energetic electron and ion distributions near the magnetopause at geosynchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korth, A.; Kremser, G.; Daly, P.W.; Amata, E.

    1982-01-01

    On August 28, 1978, the dayside magnetopause crossed the geosynchronous satellite GEOS 2 several times during a geomagnetically disturbed period, and clear signatures of the interconnection of field lines through the magnetopause were observed. The MPAE particle spectrometer provided high time resolution observations of the distribution of energetic electrons (E>22 keV) and ions (E>27 keV). Magnetometer data were used to determine the location of GEOS 2 relative to the magnetopause. The pitch angle distributions of ions and electrons were found to be strongly asymmetric with respect to 90 0 , and the asymmetries have been interpreted in terms of field-aligned particle streaming. Evidence is provided for the first time for electron streaming inside the magnetopause which continues for many bounce periods. It is concluded that magnetospheric field lines opened, at least for brief time intervals, as a consequence of interconnection with magnetosheath field lines. Comparisons of electron spectra provide evidence that the streaming electrons observed in the magnetosheath originate in the magnetosphere

  14. Observation of thermoelectric currents in high-field superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolenda, Stefan; Wolf, Michael J.; Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We report on the experimental observation of thermoelectric currents in superconductor-ferromagnet tunnel junctions in high magnetic fields. The thermoelectric signals are due to a spin-dependent lifting of particle-hole symmetry, and are found to be in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. The maximum Seebeck coefficient inferred from the data is about -100 μ V/K, much larger than commonly found in metalic structures. Our results directly give proof of the coupling of spin and heat transport in high-field superconductors.

  15. Possible signature of the magnetic fields related to quasi-periodic oscillations observed in microquasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolos, Martin; Tursunov, Arman; Stuchlik, Zdenek [Silesian University in Opava, Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Opava (Czech Republic)

    2017-12-15

    The study of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) of X-ray flux observed in the stellar-mass black hole binaries can provide a powerful tool for testing of the phenomena occurring in the strong gravity regime. Magnetized versions of the standard geodesic models of QPOs can explain the observationally fixed data from the three microquasars. We perform a successful fitting of the HF QPOs observed for three microquasars, GRS 1915+105, XTE 1550-564 and GRO 1655-40, containing black holes, for magnetized versions of both epicyclic resonance and relativistic precession models and discuss the corresponding constraints of parameters of the model, which are the mass and spin of the black hole and the parameter related to the external magnetic field. The estimated magnetic field intensity strongly depends on the type of objects giving the observed HF QPOs. It can be as small as 10{sup -5} G if electron oscillatory motion is relevant, but it can be by many orders higher for protons or ions (0.02-1 G), or even higher for charged dust or such exotic objects as lighting balls, etc. On the other hand, if we know by any means the magnetic field intensity, our model implies strong limit on the character of the oscillating matter, namely its specific charge. (orig.)

  16. Wide-Field Imaging Telescope-0 (WIT0) with automatic observing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tae-Geun; Byeon, Seoyeon; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Lee, Sang-Yun; Hwang, Sungyong; Choi, Changsu; Gibson, Coyne Andrew; Kuehne, John W.; Prochaska, Travis; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2018-01-01

    We introduce Wide-Field Imaging Telescope-0 (WIT0), with an automatic observing system. It is developed for monitoring the variabilities of many sources at a time, e.g. young stellar objects and active galactic nuclei. It can also find the locations of transient sources such as a supernova or gamma-ray bursts. In 2017 February, we installed the wide-field 10-inch telescope (Takahashi CCA-250) as a piggyback system on the 30-inch telescope at the McDonald Observatory in Texas, US. The 10-inch telescope has a 2.35 × 2.35 deg field-of-view with a 4k × 4k CCD Camera (FLI ML16803). To improve the observational efficiency of the system, we developed a new automatic observing software, KAOS30 (KHU Automatic Observing Software for McDonald 30-inch telescope), which was developed by Visual C++ on the basis of a windows operating system. The software consists of four control packages: the Telescope Control Package (TCP), the Data Acquisition Package (DAP), the Auto Focus Package (AFP), and the Script Mode Package (SMP). Since it also supports the instruments that are using the ASCOM driver, the additional hardware installations become quite simplified. We commissioned KAOS30 in 2017 August and are in the process of testing. Based on the WIT0 experiences, we will extend KAOS30 to control multiple telescopes in future projects.

  17. Coordinated observation of field line resonance in the mid-tail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Standing Alfvén waves of 1.1 mHz (~15 min in period were observed by the Cluster satellites in the mid-tail during 06:00-07:00 UT on 8 August 2003. Pulsations with the same frequency were also observed at several ground stations near Cluster's footpoint. The standing wave properties were determined from the electric and magnetic field measurements of Cluster. Data from the ground magnetometers indicated a latitudinal amplitude and phase structure consistent with the driven field line resonance (FLR at 1.1 mHz. Simultaneously, quasi-periodic oscillations at different frequencies were observed in the post-midnight/early morning sector by GOES 12 (l0≈8.7, Polar (l0≈11-14 and Geotail (l0≈9.8. The 8 August 2003 event yields rare and interesting datasets. It provides, for the first time, coordinated in situ and ground-based observations of a very low frequency FLR in the mid-tail on stretched field lines.

  18. Nanoparticle kinetic effects experimentally observed in a magnetic fluid under a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelina, J., E-mail: julius.stelina@fel.uniza.sk [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia); Musil, C. [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2012-05-15

    The effect of a quasi-homogeneous external magnetic field on a created and decaying space nanoparticle structure and its distribution in a sample of a magnetic fluid was studied. This space structure was created as a grating by applying an interference field of two crossed Ar laser beams. The magnetic field was formed using two electromagnets and was applied in three main directions of the created nanoparticle grating. The magnetic field oriented parallel to the strips of the grating or perpendicular to the grating plain does not significantly change the shape of it. The magnetic field oriented in the perpendicular direction to the grating plain causes redistribution of the nanoparticles and as a consequence a perpendicular nanoparticle 'quasi-grating' arises. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer External magnetic field creates a new nanoparticle quasi-grating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find that the new grating is perpendicular to the original one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observe a planar grating in the transitional phase of about 15 s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We speculate that the new grating is related to structuralization of particles.

  19. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  20. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 1969 - 2010: Multicolor Photometric Observations of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, A. G. Davis

    2010-05-01

    From 1969 to 2010 I have been involved in a photometric study of Population II Field Horizontal-Branch stars. I started by making Stromgren four-color observations at Kitt Peak National Observatory and then Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory. I had taken spectral plates of all my selected areas on which I marked all the A-type stars. These stars were then observed photometrically. New FHB stars could be identified by their large c1 indices, caused by their greater (u-b) colors. Later four new filters were added ( U V B S ). With Richard Boyle of the Vatican Observatory we observed on Mt. Graham (Arizona) on the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope.We plan follow-up observations of the new FHB stars found.

  2. Orbit and Gravity Field Solutions from Swarm GPS Observations - First Result

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeggi, A.; Dahle, C.; Arnold, D.; Bock, H.; Flechtner, F.

    2014-12-01

    Although ESA's Earth Explorer Mission Swarm is primarily dedicated to measure the Earth's magnetic field, it may also serve as a gravity field mission. Equipped with GPS receivers, accelerometers, star-tracker assemblies and laser retro-reflectors, the three Swarm satellites are potentially capable to be used as a high-low satellite-to-satellite tracking (hl-SST) observing system, following the missions CHAMP (first single-satellite hl-SST mission), GRACE (twin-satellite mission with additional ultra-precise low-low SST and GOCE (single-satellite mission additionally equipped with a gradiometer). GRACE, dedicated to measure the time-variability of the gravity field, is the only mission still in orbit, but its lifetime will likely end before launch of its follow-on mission GRACE-FO in August 2017 primarily due to aging of the onboard batteries after meanwhile more than 12 years of operation. Swarm is probably a good candidate to provide time-variable gravity field solutions and to close a potential gap between GRACE and GRACE-FO. Consisting of three satellites, Swarm also offers to use inter-satellite GPS-derived baselines as additional observations. However, as of today it is not clear if such information will substantially improve the gravity field solutions. Nevertheless, the properties of the Swarm constellation with two lower satellites flying in a pendulum-like orbit and a slightly differently inclined third satellite at higher altitude still represent a unique observing system raising expectations at least compared to CHAMP derived time-variable gravity field solutions. Whatever processing method will be applied for Swarm gravity field recovery, its success strongly depends on the quality of the Swarm Level 1b data as well as the quality of the derived Swarm orbits. With first Level 1b data sets available since mid of May 2014 (excluding accelerometer data), first results for Swarm orbits and baselines, as well as Swarm gravity field solutions are presented

  3. Field Observation of Soil Displacements Resulting Due Unsupported Excavation and Its Effects on Proposed Adjacent Piles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Nasir Al-Jorany

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil movement resulting due unsupported excavation nearby axially loaded piles imposes significant structural troubles on geotechnical engineers especially for piles that are not designed to account for loss of lateral confinement. In this study the field excavation works of 7.0 m deep open tunnel was continuously followed up by the authors. The work is related to the project of developing the Army canal in the east of Baghdad city in Iraq. A number of selected points around the field excavation are installed on the ground surface at different horizontal distance. The elevation and coordinates of points are recorded during 23 days with excavation progress period. The field excavation process was numerically simulated by using the finite element package PLAXIS 3D foundation. The obtained analysis results regarding the displacements of the selected points are compared with the field observation for verification purpose. Moreover, finite element analysis of axially loaded piles that are presumed to be existed at the locations of the observation points is carried out to study the effect of excavation on full scale piles behaviors. The field observation monitored an upward movement and positive lateral ground movement for shallow excavation depth. Later on and as the excavation process went deeper, a downward movement and negative lateral ground movement are noticed. The analyses results are in general well agreed with the monitored values of soil displacements at the selected points. It is found also that there are obvious effects of the nearby excavation on the presumed piles in terms of displacements and bending moments.

  4. In situ observation of magnetic orientation process of feeble magnetic materials under high magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Hirota et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An in situ microscopic observation of the magnetic orientation process of feeble magnetic fibers was carried out under high magnetic fields of up to 10 T using a scanning laser microscope. In the experiment, carbon fibers and needle-like titania fibers with a length of 1 to 20 μm were used. The fibers were observed to gradually orient their axes parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. The orientation behavior of the sample fibers was evaluated on the basis of the measured duration required for a certain angular variation. As predicted from the theoretical consideration, it was confirmed that the duration required for a certain angular variation normalized by the viscosity of the fluid is described as a function of the fiber length. The results obtained here appear useful for the consideration of the magnetic orientation of materials suspended in a static fluid.

  5. The underlying magnetic field direction in Ulysses observations of the southern polar heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, R. J.; Balogh, A.; Smith, E. J.; Murphy, N.; McComas, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Between May 1993 and January 1995, the Ulysses spacecraft has probed the southern polar heliosphere at latitudes greater than 30 deg S, reaching a maximum latitude of 80.2 deg S in September 1994. Using hourly averages of the data obtained by the magnetometer experiment on Ulysses we have studied the underlying direction of the magnetic field threading this region of the heliosphere, away from the influence of the magnetic sector structure which complicates similar analyses in the ecliptic plane. We have constructed histograms of the measured magnetic field direction using the simple Parker spiral model field direction as a reference. We find that throughout this region the meridional angle between the field vector and the Parker model direction has a distribution which is symmetric and has a most probable value consistent with the model. At latitudes below about 60 deg S the azimuthal angle distribution also has a most probable value consistent with the model but this distribution is highly asymmetric with a greater number of observations of field lines less tightly wound than the expected spiral direction. At latitudes greater than 60 deg S the most probable value of the azimuthal angle is found to have become nearly 30 more tightly wound than the expected direction, but due to the asymmetric distribution still with a greater number of observations less tightly wound than expected. We consider possible causes of both the asymmetry in the distributions and the shift in the most probable value at the highest latitudes, one of which may be the presence of large amplitude, long period Alfven waves in the magnetic field originating from the Sun's southern polar coronal hole.

  6. Diversity in Neutron Stars: X-ray Observations of High-Magnetic-Field Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-09-01

    Young neutron stars show a surprising diversity in observational behavior. Many different `classes' of these objects are presently inferred, including rotation-powered pulsars, magnetars, CCOs, INSs, among others. In this presentation I review a critical group of neutron stars that sit at the juncture of multiple such classes: the high-magnetic field rotation-powered pulsars. Deep X-ray studies of multiple high-B sources have now been done, and have revealed possible evidence for enhanced thermal emission, as predicted by models of magneto-thermal evolution. These observations will be described, and the evidence for enhanced cooling presented.

  7. Can Hall drag be observed in Coulomb coupled quantum wells in a magnetic field?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    1997-01-01

    We study the transresistivity rho(21) (or equivalently, the drag rate) of two Coulomb-coupled quantum wells in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, using semi-classical transport theory. Elementary arguments seem to preclude any possibility of observation of ''Hall drag'' (i.e., a non......-zero off-diagonal component in rho(21)). We show that these arguments are specious, and in fact Hall drag can be observed at sufficiently high temperatures when the intralayer transport time tau has significant energy-dependence around the Fermi energy epsilon(F). The ratio of the Hall to longitudinal...

  8. Dynamics of tachyon fields and inflation - comparison of analytical and numerical results with observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role tachyon fields may play in evolution of early universe is discussed in this paper. We consider the evolution of a flat and homogeneous universe governed by a tachyon scalar field with the DBI-type action and calculate the slow-roll parameters of inflation, scalar spectral index (n, and tensor-scalar ratio (r for the given potentials. We pay special attention to the inverse power potential, first of all to V (x ~ x−4, and compare the available results obtained by analytical and numerical methods with those obtained by observation. It is shown that the computed values of the observational parameters and the observed ones are in a good agreement for the high values of the constant X0. The possibility that influence of the radion field can extend a range of the acceptable values of the constant X0 to the string theory motivated sector of its values is briefly considered. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176021, br. 174020 i br. 43011

  9. CONSTRAINING THE SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH USING SPLIT-BAND TYPE II RADIO BURST OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, 2nd Block, Koramangala, Bangalore—560034 (India); Gopalswamy, N., E-mail: kishore@iiap.res.in [Code 671, Solar Physics Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    We report on low-frequency radio (85–35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  10. Interaction of the solar wind with the planet Mars: Phobos 2 magnetic field observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedler, W.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Lichtenegger, H.

    1991-01-01

    The magnetometers on board the Phobos 2 spacecraft provided the opportunity to study the magnetic environment around Mars, including regions which have never been explored before, such as at low altitudes (down to 850 km above the surface of Mars) and in the tail. The data revealed a bow shock, characterized by a distinct jump in the magnetic field strength and a boundary denoted ''planetopause'', where the level of turbulence of the magnetic field changes. Inside the planetopause the field remains quiet. Some of the main characteristics of the bow shock and the magnetosheath can be reproduced by computer simulations within the framework of a gas-dynamic model using the observed planetopause as an obstacle for the incoming solar wind. In many spacecraft orbits around Mars, reversals of the B x -component were found which are typical for tail crossings. A first analysis of the tail data from the circular orbits at a distance of 2.8 Mars radii showed several cases where the reversal of the tail lobes was controlled by the IMF. This supports the idea of an induced character of the solar wind interaction with Mars outside a distance of about 2.8 Mars radii. However, there are certain features in the magnetic field data which could be interpreted as traces of a weak Martian intrinsic field. (author)

  11. Low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region: Venus Express observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guicking

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate wave properties of low-frequency magnetic field fluctuations in Venus' solar wind interaction region based on the measurements made on board the Venus Express spacecraft. The orbit geometry is very suitable to investigate the fluctuations in Venus' low-altitude magnetosheath and mid-magnetotail and provides an opportunity for a comparative study of low-frequency waves at Venus and Mars. The spatial distributions of the wave properties, in particular in the dayside and nightside magnetosheath as well as in the tail and mantle region, are similar to observations at Mars. As both planets do not have a global magnetic field, the interaction process of the solar wind with both planets is similar and leads to similar instabilities and wave structures. We focus on the spatial distribution of the wave intensity of the fluctuating magnetic field and detect an enhancement of the intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and a strong decrease towards the terminator. For a detailed investigation of the intensity distribution we adopt an analytical streamline model to describe the plasma flow around Venus. This allows displaying the evolution of the intensity along different streamlines. It is assumed that the waves are generated in the vicinity of the bow shock and are convected downstream with the turbulent magnetosheath flow. However, neither the different Mach numbers upstream and downstream of the bow shock, nor the variation of the cross sectional area and the flow velocity along the streamlines play probably an important role in order to explain the observed concentration of wave intensity in the dayside magnetosheath and the decay towards the nightside magnetosheath. But, the concept of freely evolving or decaying turbulence is in good qualitative agreement with the observations, as we observe a power law decay of the intensity along the streamlines. The observations support the assumption of wave convection through the magnetosheath, but

  12. REFIR/BB initial observations in the water vapour rotational band: Results from a field campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esposito, F.; Grieco, G.; Leone, L.; Restieri, R.; Serio, C.; Bianchini, G.; Palchetti, L.; Pellegrini, M.; Cuomo, V.; Masiello, G.; Pavese, G.

    2007-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the far infrared spectral region 17-50 μm as a remote sensing tool in atmospheric sciences, since this portion of the spectrum contains the characteristic molecular rotational band for water vapour. Much of the Earth energy lost to space is radiated through this spectral region. The Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed Breadboard (REFIR/BB) spectrometer was born because of the quest to make observations in the far infrared. REFIR/BB is a Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a sampling resolution of 0.5 cm -1 and it was tested for the first time in the field to check its reliability and radiometric performance. The field campaign was held at Toppo di Castelgrande (40 o 49' N, 15 o 27' E, 1258 m a. s. l.), a mountain site in South Italy. The spectral and radiometric performance of the instrument and initial observations are shown in this paper. Comparisons to both (1) BOMEM MR100 Fourier Transform spectrometer observations and (2) line-by-line radiative transfer calculations for selected clear sky are presented and discussed. These comparisons (1) show a very nice agreement between radiance measured by REFIR/BB and by BOMEM MR100 and (2) demonstrate that REFIR/BB accurately observes the very fine spectral structure in the water vapour rotational band

  13. Estimation of Transpiration and Water Use Efficiency Using Satellite and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Quick, B. E.

    2003-01-01

    Structure and function of terrestrial plant communities bring about intimate relations between water, energy, and carbon exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Total evaporation, which is the sum of transpiration, soil evaporation and evaporation of intercepted water, couples water and energy balance equations. The rate of transpiration, which is the major fraction of total evaporation over most of the terrestrial land surface, is linked to the rate of carbon accumulation because functioning of stomata is optimized by both of these processes. Thus, quantifying the spatial and temporal variations of the transpiration efficiency (which is defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and transpiration), and water use efficiency (defined as the ratio of the rate of carbon accumulation and total evaporation), and evaluation of modeling results against observations, are of significant importance in developing a better understanding of land surface processes. An approach has been developed for quantifying spatial and temporal variations of transpiration, and water-use efficiency based on biophysical process-based models, satellite and field observations. Calculations have been done using concurrent meteorological data derived from satellite observations and four dimensional data assimilation for four consecutive years (1987-1990) over an agricultural area in the Northern Great Plains of the US, and compared with field observations within and outside the study area. The paper provides substantive new information about interannual variation, particularly the effect of drought, on the efficiency values at a regional scale.

  14. A Photometric Observing Program at the VATT: Setting Up a Calibration Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis Philip, A. G.; Boyle, R. P.; Janusz, R.

    2009-05-01

    Philip and Boyle have been making Strömgren and then Strömvil photometric observations of open and globular clusters at the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope located on Mt. Graham in Arizona. Our aim is to obtain CCD photometric indices good to 0.01 magnitude. Indices of this quality can later be analyzed to yield estimates of temperature, luminosity and metallicity. But we have found that the CCD chip does not yield photometry of this quality without further corrections. Our most observed cluster is the open cluster, M 67. This cluster is also very well observed in the literature. We took the best published values and created a set of "standard" stars for our field. Taking our CCD results we could calculate deltas, as a function of position on the chip, which we then applied to all the CCD frames that we obtained. With this procedure we were able to obtain the precision of 0.01 magnitudes in all the fields that we observed. When we started we were able to use the "A" two-inch square Strömgren four-color set from KPNO. Later the Vatican Observatory bought a set of 3.48 inch square Strömgren filters, The Vatican Observatory had a set of circular Vilnius filters There was also an X filter. These eight filters made our Strömvil set.

  15. Observer variability when evaluating patient movement from electronic portal images of pelvic radiotherapy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraint Lewis, D.; Ryan, Karen R.; Smith, Cyril W.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: A study has been performed to evaluate inter-observer variability when assessing pelvic patient movement using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Materials and methods: Four patient image sets were used with 3-6 portal images per set. The observer group consisted of nine radiographers with 3-18 months clinical EPID experience. The observers outlined bony landmarks on a digital simulator image and used matching software to evaluate field placement errors (FPEs) on each portal image relative to the reference simulator image. Data were evaluated statistically, using a two-component analysis of variance technique, to quantify both the inter-observer variability in evaluating FPEs and inter-fraction variability in patient position relative to the residuals of the analysis. Intra-observer variability was also estimated using four of the observers carrying out three sets of repeat readings. Results: Eight sets of variance data were analysed, based on FPEs in two orthogonal directions for each of the four patient image sets studied. Initial analysis showed that both inter-observer variation and inter-fraction-patient position variation were statistically significant (P<0.05) in seven of the eight cases evaluated. The averaged root-mean-square (RMS) deviation of the observers from the group mean was 1.1 mm, with a maximum deviation of 5.0 mm recorded for an individual observer. After additional training and re-testing of two of the observers who recorded the largest deviations from the group mean, a subsequent analysis showed the inter-observer variability for the group to be significant in only three of the eight cases, with averaged RMS deviation reduced to 0.5 mm, with a maximum deviation of 2.7 mm. The intra-observer variability was 0.5 mm, averaged over the four observers tested. Conclusions: We have developed a quantitative approach to evaluate inter-observer variability in terms of its statistical significance compared to inter

  16. Theoretical interpretation of the observed interplanetary magnetic field radial variation in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, S. T.; Thomas, B. T.; Nerney, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of the azimuthal component of the IMF are evaluated through the use of an MHD model which shows the effect of magnetic flux tubes opening in the outer solar system. It is demonstrated that the inferred meridional transport of magnetic flux is consistent with predictions by the MHD model. The computed azimuthal and radial magnetic flux deficits are almost identical to the observations. It is suggested that the simplest interpretation of the observations is that meridional flows are created by a direct body force on the plasma. This is consistent with the analytic model of Nerney and Suess (1975), in which such flux deficits in the IMF arise naturally from the meridional gradient in the spiralling field.

  17. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  18. A comparison of predicted and observed turbulent wind fields present in natural and internal wind park environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, N D; Wright, A D

    1991-10-01

    This paper assesses the accuracy of simulated wind fields for both the natural flow and that within a wind park environment. The simulated fields are compared with the observed ones in both the time and frequency domains. Actual measurements of the wind fields and the derived kinematic scaling parameters upwind and downwind of a large San Gorgonio Pass wind park are used. The deviations in the modeled wind field from the observed are discussed. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Technetium-99 behavior in the terrestrial environment. Field observations and radiotracer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko

    2003-01-01

    Obtaining data on 99 Tc in the rice paddy field environment is important because Tc is a redox sensitive element. The behavior of Tc is expected to be different under upland field and rice paddy field conditions since the redox conditions in the soil environment differ. However, most of the data on the nuclide behavior in soil were obtained under upland field conditions. To understand the global fallout 99 Tc distributions in soil samples collected in Japan, a simple and rapid separation method was developed in order to determine low-levels of 99 Tc in soil samples by an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Also, radiotracer experiments using soils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were carried out to clarify the Tc behavior under paddy field conditions. The results of determination of global fallout 99 Tc in Japanese soils indicated that the radionuclide had been accumulating in rice paddy fields. The mechanisms can be explained by the immobilization of Tc in soil under anaerobic conditions. From the radiotracer experiments, it was clear that under waterlogged conditions, the highly mobile TcO 4 - in soil was readily changed to other immobilized forms, such as TcO 2 , TcS 2 and organically bound forms. To this immobilization, the microbial activity seemed to have an important role in Tc sorption reactions. When the soil, which was once kept in anaerobic conditions, was air-dried again and kept in aerobic conditions, the chemical forms of immobilized Tc did not change remarkably. Interestingly, the similar Tc behavior was observed in a real wet forest near the Chernobyl Reactor. (author)

  20. Wide-field infrared survey explorer observations of young stellar objects in the Lynds 1509 dark cloud in Auriga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wilson M.; McCollum, Bruce; Fajardo-Acosta, Sergio [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Padgett, Deborah L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Terebey, Susan; Angione, John [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Rebull, Luisa M. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Leisawitz, David, E-mail: wliu@ipac.caltech.edu [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 605, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    The Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) has uncovered a striking cluster of young stellar object (YSO) candidates associated with the L1509 dark cloud in Auriga. The WISE observations, at 3.4 μm, 4.6 μm, 12 μm, and 22 μm, show a number of objects with colors consistent with YSOs, and their spectral energy distributions suggest the presence of circumstellar dust emission, including numerous Class I, flat spectrum, and Class II objects. In general, the YSOs in L1509 are much more tightly clustered than YSOs in other dark clouds in the Taurus-Auriga star forming region, with Class I and flat spectrum objects confined to the densest aggregates, and Class II objects more sparsely distributed. We estimate a most probable distance of 485-700 pc, and possibly as far as the previously estimated distance of 2 kpc.

  1. STAR FORMATION IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: OBSERVATIONS CONFRONT SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damen, Maaike; Franx, Marijn; Foerster Schreiber, Natascha M.; Labbe, Ivo; Toft, Sune; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Wuyts, Stijn

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the star formation history of the universe using FIREWORKS, a multiwavelength survey of the Chandra Deep Field South. We study the evolution of the specific star formation rate (sSFR) with redshift in different mass bins from z = 0 to z ∼ 3. We find that the sSFR increases with redshift for all masses. The logarithmic increase of the sSFR with redshift is nearly independent of mass, but this cannot yet be verified at the lowest-mass bins at z>0.8, due to incompleteness. We convert the sSFRs to a dimensionless growth rate to facilitate a comparison with a semianalytic galaxy formation model that was implemented on the Millennium Simulation. The model predicts that the growth rates and sSFRs increase similarly with redshift for all masses, consistent with the observations. However, we find that for all masses, the inferred observed growth rates increase more rapidly with redshift than the model predictions. We discuss several possible causes for this discrepancy, ranging from field-to-field variance, conversions to SFR, and shape of the initial mass function. We find that none of these can solve the discrepancy completely. We conclude that the models need to be adapted to produce the steep increase in growth rate between redshift z = 0 and z = 1.

  2. Cluster observations of a field aligned current at the dawn flank of a bursty bulk flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Snekvik

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes observations of a bursty bulk flow (BBF in the outer central plasma sheet. The observations are made with the Cluster satellites, located approximately 19 RE downtail, close to the midnight sector in the Southern Hemisphere. 40–60 s after Cluster first detected the BBF, there was a large bipolar perturbation in the magnetic field. A Grad-Shafranov reconstruction has revealed that this is created by a field-aligned current at the flank of the BBF. Further analysis of the plasma moments has shown that the BBF has the properties of a depleted flux tube. Depleted flux tubes are an important theoretical model for how plasma and magnetic flux can be transported Earthward in the magnetotail as part of the Dungey cycle. The field aligned current is directed Earthward and is located at the dawn side of the BBF. Thus, it is consistent with the magnetic shear at the flank of an Earthward moving BBF. The total current has been estimated to be about 0.1 MA.

  3. Cluster observations of a field aligned current at the dawn flank of a bursty bulk flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Snekvik

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes observations of a bursty bulk flow (BBF in the outer central plasma sheet. The observations are made with the Cluster satellites, located approximately 19 RE downtail, close to the midnight sector in the Southern Hemisphere. 40–60 s after Cluster first detected the BBF, there was a large bipolar perturbation in the magnetic field. A Grad-Shafranov reconstruction has revealed that this is created by a field-aligned current at the flank of the BBF. Further analysis of the plasma moments has shown that the BBF has the properties of a depleted flux tube. Depleted flux tubes are an important theoretical model for how plasma and magnetic flux can be transported Earthward in the magnetotail as part of the Dungey cycle. The field aligned current is directed Earthward and is located at the dawn side of the BBF. Thus, it is consistent with the magnetic shear at the flank of an Earthward moving BBF. The total current has been estimated to be about 0.1 MA.

  4. Observation of soil moisture variability in agricultural and grassland field soils using a wireless sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesack, Eckart; Schuh, Max

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture dynamics is a key factor of energy and matter exchange between land surface and atmosphere. Therefore long-term observation of temporal and spatial soil moisture variability is important in studying impacts of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems and their possible feedbacks to the atmosphere. Within the framework of the network of terrestrial environmental observatories TERENO we installed at the research farm Scheyern in soils of two fields (of ca. 5 ha size each) the SoilNet wireless sensor network (Biogena et al. 2010). The SoilNet in Scheyern consists of 94 sensor units, 45 for the agricultural field site and 49 for the grassland site. Each sensor unit comprises 6 SPADE sensors, two sensors placed at the depths 10, 30 and 50 cm. The SPADE sensor (sceme.de GmbH, Horn-Bad Meinberg Germany) consists of a TDT sensor to estimate volumetric soil water content from soil electrical permittivity by sending an electromagnetic signal and measuring its propagation time, which depends on the soil dielectric properties and hence on soil water content. Additionally the SPADE sensor contains a temperature sensor (DS18B20). First results obtained from the SoilNet measurements at both fields sites will be presented and discussed. The observed high temporal and spatial variability will be analysed and related to agricultural management and basic soil properties (bulk density, soil texture, organic matter content and soil hydraulic characteristics).

  5. Observation of Novel Low-Field FMR modes in Permalloy Antidot Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Long, Lance; Bhat, Vinayak; Farmer, Barry; Woods, Justin; Hastings, Todd; Sklenar, Joseph; Ketterson, John

    2013-03-01

    Permalloy films of thickness 23 nm were patterned with square arrays of square antidots (AD) with feature size D = 120 nm, and lattice constants d = 200, 300, 500 and 700 nm (total sample area = 2 mm x 2mm), using electron beam lithography. Our broad-band (frequencies f = 10 MHz-15 GHz) and narrow-band (9.7 GHz) FMR measurements of even dilute (D/d <<1) AD lattices (ADL) reveal remarkably reproducible absorption spectra in the low-frequency, hysteretic regime in which disordered domain wall (DW) patterns and unsaturated magnetization textures are expected for unpatterned films, but in the present case are strongly affected by the periodic ADL. Other modes in the saturated regime exhibit strong dependence on the angle between the applied DC field H and the ADL axes, as confirmed by our micromagnetic simulations. Novel modes are observed at DC fields above that of the uniform mode, which simulations indicate are localized at AD edges. Other novel modes are observed for DC fields below that of the uniform mode, which simulated power and phase maps indicate are confined to ADL interstices oriented parallel to H. These results show even dilute AD concentrations can effect strong control of DW evolution. Research at Kentucky is supported by U.S. DoE Grant DE-FG02-97ER45653 and NSF Grant EPS-0814194.

  6. Prediction and near-field observation of skull-guided acoustic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Ultrasound waves propagating in water or soft biological tissue are strongly reflected when encountering the skull, which limits the use of ultrasound-based techniques in transcranial imaging and therapeutic applications. Current knowledge on the acoustic properties of the cranial bone is restricted to far-field observations, leaving its near-field unexplored. We report on the existence of skull-guided acoustic waves, which was herein confirmed by near-field measurements of optoacoustically-induced responses in ex-vivo murine skulls immersed in water. Dispersion of the guided waves was found to reasonably agree with the prediction of a multilayered flat plate model. We observed a skull-guided wave propagation over a lateral distance of at least 3 mm, with a half-decay length in the direction perpendicular to the skull ranging from 35 to 300 μm at 6 and 0.5 MHz, respectively. Propagation losses are mostly attributed to the heterogenous acoustic properties of the skull. It is generally anticipated that our findings may facilitate and broaden the application of ultrasound-mediated techniques in brain diagnostics and therapy.

  7. Phenocams Bridge the Gap between Field and Satellite Observations in an Arid Grassland Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn M. Browning

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Near surface (i.e., camera and satellite remote sensing metrics have become widely used indicators of plant growing seasons. While robust linkages have been established between field metrics and ecosystem exchange in many land cover types, assessment of how well remotely-derived season start and end dates depict field conditions in arid ecosystems remain unknown. We evaluated the correspondence between field measures of start (SOS; leaves unfolded and canopy greenness >0 and end of season (EOS and canopy greenness for two widespread species in southwestern U.S. ecosystems with those metrics estimated from near-surface cameras and MODIS NDVI for five years (2012–2016. Using Timesat software to estimate SOS and EOS from the phenocam green chromatic coordinate (GCC greenness index resulted in good agreement with ground observations for honey mesquite but not black grama. Despite differences in the detectability of SOS and EOS for the two species, GCC was significantly correlated with field estimates of canopy greenness for both species throughout the growing season. MODIS NDVI for this arid grassland site was driven by the black grama signal although a mesquite signal was discernable in average rainfall years. Our findings suggest phenocams could help meet myriad needs in natural resource management.

  8. Spatial configuration of a flux rope observed downstream from the Martian crustal magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, T.; Seki, K.; Hasegawa, H.; Brain, D. A.; Saito, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    Mars is a unique planet since it locally possesses strong crustal magnetic fields mainly located in the southern hemisphere [e.g., Acuna et al., 1999]. The Martian electromagnetic environment can thus become highly complicated and variable, since the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) embedded in the solar wind interacts with the Martian crustal magnetic field. Whereas it is known that the Martian upper atmosphere is escaping to interplanetary space due to the interaction with the solar wind [e.g., Lundin et al., 1989; Barabash et al., 2007], the contribution of crustal magnetic fields to atmospheric escape from Mars has not yet been well understood. Flux ropes are characteristic magnetic field structures seen throughout the solar system, e.g., at the Sun, in the interplanetary space, and at the Earth often in association with substorms. Flux ropes are also observed at planets such as at Venus and Mars [e.g., Russell and Elphic, 1979; Vignes et al., 2004], which do not possess a global magnetic field. Recently, Brain et al. [2010] found a large-scale isolated flux rope filled with Martian atmospheric plasma located downstream from the crustal magnetic fields with respect to the solar wind flow based on their analyses of the magnetic field and suprathermal electron measurements from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft. They suggested that the flux rope can intermittently carry significant amounts of atmosphere away from Mars by a bulk removal process such as magnetic reconnection between the IMF and the crustal magnetic fields. They supposed that this process occurs frequently and may account for as much as 10 % of the total present-day ion escape from Mars. We here attempt to reconstruct the spatial configuration of the reported flux rope using the Grad-Shafranov (GS) reconstruction technique, assuming that it has a magnetohydrostatic, two-dimensional magnetic field structure [Hu and Sonnerup, 2002]. The GS reconstruction technique is capable of recovering a

  9. DMSP F7 observations of a substorm field-aligned current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Spence, H. E.; Meng, C.-I.

    1991-01-01

    Observations are described of a substorm field-aligned current (FAC) system traversed by the DMSP F7 spacecraft just after 0300 UT on April 25, 1985. It is shown that the substorm FAC portion of the current system was located equatorward of the boundary between open and closed field lines. The equatorward boundary of the substorm FAC into the magnetotail was mapped using the Tsyganenko (1987) model, showing that the boundary corresponds to 6.9 earth radii. The result is consistent with the suggestion of Akasofu (1972) and Lopez and Lui (1990) that the region of substorm initiation lies relatively close to the earth and the concept that an essential feature of substorms is the disruption and diversion of the near-earth current sheet.

  10. Inferring spatial clouds statistics from limited field-of-view, zenith observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.H.; Thorne, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Many of the Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) measurements produce a time series of zenith observations, but spatial averages are often the desired data product. One possible approach to deriving spatial averages from temporal averages is to invoke Taylor`s hypothesis where and when it is valid. Taylor`s hypothesis states that when the turbulence is small compared with the mean flow, the covariance in time is related to the covariance in space by the speed of the mean flow. For clouds fields, Taylor`s hypothesis would apply when the {open_quotes}local{close_quotes} turbulence is small compared with advective flow (mean wind). The objective of this study is to determine under what conditions Taylor`s hypothesis holds or does not hold true for broken cloud fields.

  11. Interaction between Japanese flowering cherry trees and some wild animals observed during physiological experiment in fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Teruko

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the weeping habit of Japanese flowering cherry tree in the field of Tama Forest Science Garden, Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute at the foot of Mt. Takao. Since cherry trees at various age were the materials for our plant physiology experiments, our studies were conducted in the fields where we experienced certain difficulties. Even under such difficult environment that was rather unexpected and uncontrollable, we could obtain fruitful results on the growth of cherry tree, and found them scientifically significant, especially in terms of biological effects of gravity on earth. Moreover, a lot of interesting interactions of cherry trees with various kinds of animals were observed in parallel to the plant physiology.

  12. Thermal field emission observation of single-crystal LaB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, H.; Harada, K.; Shimizu, R.

    1990-01-01

    TFE (thermal field emission) properties of LaB 6 left-angle 100 right-angle and left-angle 310 right-angle single crystals were investigated by emission pattern observation. It was found that field evaporation with the tip temperature held at ∼1500 degree C is very useful to get a clean pattern of fourfold symmetry. Each of four bright spots in the clean pattern was presumed to correspond to left-angle 310 right-angle emission. It is proposed, as the most appropriate operating condition, to use the left-angle 310 right-angle LaB 6 tip at a temperature ∼1000 degree C in vacuum of 10 -9 Torr region, promising a new TF emitter of high brightness and stability for practical use

  13. Observation, modeling, and temperature dependence of doubly peaked electric fields in irradiated silicon pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Swartz, M.; Allkofer, Y.; Bortoletto, D.; Cremaldi, L.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dorokhov, A.; Hoermann, C.; Kim, D.; Konecki, M.; Kotlinski, D.; Prokofiev, Kirill; Regenfus, Christian; Rohe, T.; Sanders, D.A.; Son, S.; Speer, T.

    2006-01-01

    We show that doubly peaked electric fields are necessary to describe grazing-angle charge collection measurements of irradiated silicon pixel sensors. A model of irradiated silicon based upon two defect levels with opposite charge states and the trapping of charge carriers can be tuned to produce a good description of the measured charge collection profiles in the fluence range from 0.5x10^{14} Neq/cm^2 to 5.9x10^{14} Neq/cm^2. The model correctly predicts the variation in the profiles as the temperature is changed from -10C to -25C. The measured charge collection profiles are inconsistent with the linearly-varying electric fields predicted by the usual description based upon a uniform effective doping density. This observation calls into question the practice of using effective doping densities to characterize irradiated silicon.

  14. Cluster magnetic field observations in the magnetosheath: four-point measurements of mirror structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Lucek

    Full Text Available The Cluster spacecraft have returned the first simultaneous four-point measurements of the magnetosheath. We present an analysis of data recorded on 10 November 2000, when the four spacecrafts observed an interval of strong mirrorlike activity. Correlation analysis between spacecraft pairs is used to examine the scale size of the mirror structures in three dimensions. Two examples are presented which suggest that the scale size of mirror structures is ~ 1500–3000 km along the flow direction, and shortest along the magnetopause normal (< 600 km, which, in this case, is approximately perpendicular to both the mean magnetic field and the magnetosheath flow vector. Variations on scales of ~ 750–1000 km are found along the maximum variance direction. The level of correlation in this direction, however, and the time lag observed, are found to be variable. These first results suggest that variations occur on scales of the order of the spacecraft separation ( ~ 1000 km in at least two directions, but analysis of further examples and a statistical survey of structures observed with different magnetic field orientations and tetrahedral configurations will enable us to describe more fully the size and orientation of mirror structures.

    Key words. Magnetosphenic physics (magnetosheath; plasma waves and instabilities

  15. Understanding the Internal Magnetic Field Configurations of ICMEs Using More than 20 Years of Wind Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Vourlidas, A.; Raymond, J. C.; Linton, M. G.; Al-haddad, N.; Savani, N. P.; Szabo, A.; Hidalgo, M. A.

    2018-02-01

    The magnetic topology, structure, and geometry of the magnetic obstacles embedded within interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are not yet fully and consistently described by in situ models and reconstruction techniques. The main goal of this work is to better understand the status of the internal magnetic field of ICMEs and to explore in situ signatures to identify clues to develop a more accurate and reliable in situ analytical models. We take advantage of more than 20 years of Wind observations of transients at 1 AU to compile a comprehensive database of ICMEs through three solar cycles, from 1995 to 2015. The catalog is publicly available at wind.gsfc.nasa.gov and is fully described in this article. We identify and collect the properties of 337 ICMEs, of which 298 show organized magnetic field signatures. To allow for departures from idealized magnetic configurations, we introduce the term "magnetic obstacle" (MO) to signify the possibility of more complex configurations. To quantify the asymmetry of the magnetic field strength profile within these events, we introduce the distortion parameter (DiP) and calculate the expansion velocity within the magnetic obstacle. Circular-cylindrical geometry is assumed when the magnetic field strength displays a symmetric profile. We perform a statistical study of these two parameters and find that only 35% of the events show symmetric magnetic profiles and a low enough expansion velocity to be compatible with the assumption of an idealized cylindrical static flux rope, and that 41% of the events do not show the expected relationship between expansion and magnetic field compression in the front, with the maximum magnetic field closer to the first encounter of the spacecraft with the magnetic obstacle; 18% show contractions ( i.e. apparent negative expansion velocity), and 30% show magnetic field compression in the back. We derive an empirical relation between DiP and expansion velocity that is the first step toward

  16. Observing and Modeling Temporal Variations of Seismic Velocities at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, V. H.; Tsai, V. C.; Taira, T.

    2016-12-01

    Perturbations in subsurface elastic parameters induce changes in seismic velocity. To understand the stress perturbations due to geothermal operation, we apply seismic noise interferometry to examine the temporal variations of seismic velocity (dv/v) at the Geysers Geothermal Field, California. Our observations show a strong positive correlation between dv/v and net production (steam production minus fluid injection), and a strong negative correlation between dv/v and fluid injection. Notably, there is little time lag (less than a month) between dv/v and fluid injection in the SE region of the field, suggesting a rapid response in elastic properties in this highly saturated region. The influx of fluid decreases the effective shear modulus, which in turn decreases the velocities. A number of hypotheses have been suggested to cause stress perturbations in the field, including poroelastic-induced stresses, direct elastic loading and thermoelastic-induced stresses. We perform a 1-D hydrological simulation to calculate the expected variations in dv/v due to different stresses by considering Murnaghan's theory of finite deformations and the third-order terms in the strain energy function. The synthetic dv/v measurements are spatially averaged based on computed sensitivity kernels, allowing for direct comparison with both the amplitude and phase of dv/v observations. We show the order-of-magnitude effect that each of the stresses have on the dv/v measurement, and explore the possibility of using dv/v to constrain important hydrological and elastic properties such as hydraulic conductivity in the field.

  17. MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY IN LOW-MASS STARS: SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC OBSERVATIONS OF M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan-Bao, Ngoc; Lim, Jeremy; Donati, Jean-Francois; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; MartIn, Eduardo L.

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic field topology plays an important role in the understanding of stellar magnetic activity. While it is widely accepted that the dynamo action present in low-mass partially convective stars (e.g., the Sun) results in predominantly toroidal magnetic flux, the field topology in fully convective stars (masses below ∼0.35 M sun ) is still under debate. We report here our mapping of the magnetic field topology of the M4 dwarf G 164-31 (or Gl 490B), which is expected to be fully convective, based on time series data collected from 20 hr of observations spread over three successive nights with the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter. Our tomographic imaging technique applied to time series of rotationally modulated circularly polarized profiles reveals an axisymmetric large-scale poloidal magnetic field on the M4 dwarf. We then apply a synthetic spectrum fitting technique for measuring the average magnetic flux on the star. The flux measured in G 164-31 is |Bf| = 3.2 ± 0.4 kG, which is significantly greater than the average value of 0.68 kG determined from the imaging technique. The difference indicates that a significant fraction of the stellar magnetic energy is stored in small-scale structures at the surface of G 164-31. Our Hα emission light curve shows evidence for rotational modulation suggesting the presence of localized structure in the chromosphere of this M dwarf. The radius of the M4 dwarf derived from the rotational period and the projected equatorial velocity is at least 30% larger than that predicted from theoretical models. We argue that this discrepancy is likely primarily due to the young nature of G 164-31 rather than primarily due to magnetic field effects, indicating that age is an important factor which should be considered in the interpretation of this observational result. We also report here our polarimetric observations of five other M dwarfs with spectral types from M0 to M4.5, three of them showing strong Zeeman signatures.

  18. New Magnetic Field Model for Saturn From Cassini Radio and Magnetometers Observations: The Birotor Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galopeau, P. H. M.

    2017-12-01

    Since the insertion of Cassini in the Saturnian system in July 2004, the radio and plasma wave science (RPWS) experiment on board the spacecraft revealed the presence of two distinct and variable rotation periods in the Saturnian kilometric radiation (SKR) which were attributed to the northern and southern hemispheres respectively. The present study is based on the hypothesis that the periodic time modulations present in the SKR are mainly due to the rotation of Saturn's inner magnetic field. The existence of a double period implies that the inner field is not only limited to a simple rotation dipole but displays more complex structures having the same time periodicities than the radio emission. In order to build a model of this complex magnetic field, it is absolutely necessary to know the accurate phases of rotation linked with the two periods. The radio observations from the RPWS experiment allow a continuous and accurate follow-up of these rotation phases, since the SKR emission is permanently observable and produced very close to the planetary surface. A continuous wavelet transform analysis of the intensity of the SKR signal received at 290 kHz between July 2004 and June 2012 was performed in order to calculate in the same time the different periodicities and phases. The rotation phases associated to the main two periods allow us to define a North and South longitude system essential for such a study. In this context, a dipole model ("birotor dipole") was proposed for Saturn's inner magnetic field: this dipole presents the particularity to have North and South poles rotating around Saturn's axis at two different angular velocities; this dipole is tilted and not centered. 57 Cassini's revolutions, the periapsis of which is less than 5 Saturnian radii, have been selected for this study. For each of these chosen orbits, it is possible to fit with high precision the measurements of the MAG data experiment given by the magnetometers embarked on board Cassini. A

  19. Inverse Scattering and Local Observable Algebras in Integrable Quantum Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazzawi, Sabina; Lechner, Gandalf

    2017-09-01

    We present a solution method for the inverse scattering problem for integrable two-dimensional relativistic quantum field theories, specified in terms of a given massive single particle spectrum and a factorizing S-matrix. An arbitrary number of massive particles transforming under an arbitrary compact global gauge group is allowed, thereby generalizing previous constructions of scalar theories. The two-particle S-matrix S is assumed to be an analytic solution of the Yang-Baxter equation with standard properties, including unitarity, TCP invariance, and crossing symmetry. Using methods from operator algebras and complex analysis, we identify sufficient criteria on S that imply the solution of the inverse scattering problem. These conditions are shown to be satisfied in particular by so-called diagonal S-matrices, but presumably also in other cases such as the O( N)-invariant nonlinear {σ}-models.

  20. Biome-Scale Forest Properties in Amazonia Based on Field and Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana O. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amazonian forests are extremely heterogeneous at different spatial scales. This review intends to present the large-scale patterns of the ecosystem properties of Amazonia, and focuses on two parts of the main components of the net primary production: the long-lived carbon pools (wood and short-lived pools (leaves. First, the focus is on forest biophysical properties, and secondly, on the macro-scale leaf phenological patterns of these forests, looking at field measurements and bringing into discussion the recent findings derived from remote sensing dataset. Finally, I discuss the results of the three major droughts that hit Amazonia in the last 15 years. The panorama that emerges from this review suggests that slow growing forests in central and eastern Amazonia, where soils are poorer, have significantly higher above ground biomass and higher wood density, trees are higher and present lower proportions of large-leaved species than stands in northwest and southwest Amazonia. However, the opposite pattern is observed in relation to forest productivity and dynamism, which is higher in western Amazonia than in central and eastern forests. The spatial patterns on leaf phenology across Amazonia are less marked. Field data from different forest formations showed that new leaf production can be unrelated to climate seasonality, timed with radiation, timed with rainfall and/or river levels. Oppositely, satellite images exhibited a large-scale synchronized peak in new leaf production during the dry season. Satellite data and field measurements bring contrasting results for the 2005 drought. Discussions on data processing and filtering, aerosols effects and a combined analysis with field and satellite images are presented. It is suggested that to improve the understanding of the large-scale patterns on Amazonian forests, integrative analyses that combine new technologies in remote sensing and long-term field ecological data are imperative.

  1. Disordered electrical potential observed on the surface of SiO2 by electric field microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GarcIa, N; Yan Zang; Ballestar, A; Barzola-Quiquia, J; Bern, F; Esquinazi, P

    2010-01-01

    The electrical potential on the surface of ∼300 nm thick SiO 2 grown on single-crystalline Si substrates has been characterized at ambient conditions using electric field microscopy. Our results show an inhomogeneous potential distribution with fluctuations up to ∼0.4 V within regions of 1 μm. The potential fluctuations observed at the surface of these usual dielectric holders of graphene sheets should induce strong variations in the graphene charge densities and provide a simple explanation for some of the anomalous behaviors of the transport properties of graphene.

  2. Results of the magnetic field measurements of CP stars carried out with the Russian 6-m telescope. II. Observations in 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanyuk, I. I.; Semenko, E. A.; Kudryavtsev, D. O.

    2015-10-01

    We present the results of the magnetic field measurements of 37 chemically peculiar and 4 normal main sequence stars using circularly polarized spectra obtained in 2008 with a Zeeman analyzer on the Main Stellar Spectrograph (MSS) of the Russian 6-m telescope (BTA). Four new magnetic stars have been discovered (HD25999, HD35100, HD96237, and HD279021), the presence of a field was suspected in two stars (HD2887 and BD-12°2366), 16 previously known CP stars were continued to be monitored to study their fields. The results of the longitudinal magnetic field B e measurements show that in stars with narrow spectral lines, systematic errors in B e determination do not exceed 10-20 G, which is within the statistical error. Our study of stars with reliable phase curves of the longitudinal field B e show that there are no instrumental effects which can distort the observations.

  3. The Double Star magnetic field investigation: instrument design, performance and highlights of the first year's observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Carr

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary objectives of the Double Star mission is the accurate measurement of the magnetic field vector along the orbits of the two spacecraft. The magnetic field is an essential parameter for the understanding of space plasma processes and is also required for the effective interpretation of data from the other instruments on the spacecraft. We present the design of the magnetic field instrument onboard both of the Double Star spacecraft and an overview of the performance as measured first on-ground and then in-orbit. We also report the results of in-flight calibration of the magnetometers, and the processing methods employed to produce the final data products which are provided to Double Star investigators, and the wider community in general. Particular attention is paid to the techniques developed for removing magnetic interference generated by the solar arrays on the first (equatorial orbiting spacecraft. Results from the first year of operations are reviewed in the context of combined observations by Double Star and Cluster, and examples given from the different regions visited by the spacecraft to date.

  4. Observing soil water dynamics under two field conditions by a novel sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, W.; Sun, Y.; Schulze Lammers, P.; Schumann, H.; Berg, A.; Shi, C.; Wang, C.

    2011-10-01

    SummarySufficiently available soil water is a basic requirement in agricultural production. Monitoring soil water dynamics (SWD) in the root zone is an optimal approach for managing a crop's growth. This study presents a novel sensor system that simultaneously measures volumetric soil water content (VSWC), apparent electrical conductivity (EC a) and soil temperature at two different soil depths (shallow: 16 cm; deep: 36 cm). For testing its feasibility in the field, two prototypes were installed, one in bare soil and the other in a sugar beet ( Beta vulgaris L.) field in the summer of 2010. Following a sequence of rainfall events randomly distributed over the experimental period, we observed distinct responses from the sensors at each monitored depth in both field conditions. In addition to the multi-parameter measurements, the novel sensor design includes a series of technical advantages such as solar-powered operation, wireless communication, and being relatively easy to install/remove. Thus, the developed wireless sensor system is promising for networked applications in precision farming.

  5. Observations Of Polarized Dust Emission In Protostars: How To Reconstruct Magnetic Field Properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Anaëlle; Galametz, M.; Girart; Guillet; Hennebelle, P.; Houde; Rao; Valdivia, V.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-10-01

    I will present our ALMA Cycle 2 polarized dust continuum data towards the Class 0 protostar B335 where the absence of detected rotational motions in the inner envelope might suggest an efficient magnetic braking at work to inhibit the formation of a large disk. The Band 6 data we obtained shows an intriguing polarized vectors topology, which could either suggest (i) at least two different grain alignment mechanisms at work in B335 to produce the observed polarization pattern, or (ii) an interferometric bias leading to filtering of the polarized signal that is different from the filtering of Stokes I. I will discuss both options, proposing multi-wavelength and multi observatory (ALMA Band3 data in Cycle 5, NIKA2Pol camera on the IRAM-30m) strategies to lift the degeneracy when using polarization observations as a proxy of magnetic fields in dense astrophysical environments. This observational effort in the framework of the MagneticYSOs project, is also supported by our development of an end-to-end chain of ALMA synthetic observations of the polarization from non-ideal MHD simulations of protostellar collapse (see complementary contributions by V. Valdivia and M. Galametz).

  6. Field and LiDAR observations of the Hector Mine California 1999 surface rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, F.; Akciz, S. O.; Harvey, J. C.; Hudnut, K. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Scharer, K. M.; Stock, J. M.; Witkosky, R.; Kendrick, K. J.; Wespestad, C.

    2014-12-01

    We report new field- and computer-based investigations of the surface rupture of the October 16, 1999 Hector Mine Earthquake. Since May 2012, in cooperation with the United States Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) at Twentynine Palms, CA, our team has been allowed ground and aerial access to the entire surface rupture. We have focused our new field-based research and imagery analysis along the ~10 kilometer-long maximum slip zone (MSZ) which roughly corresponds to the zone of >4 meter dextral horizontal offset. New data include: 1) a 1 km wide aerial LiDAR survey along the entire surface rupture (@ 10 shots/m2, May 2012, www.opentopography.org); 2) terrestrial LiDAR surveys at 5 sites within the MSZ (@ >1000 shots/m2, April 2014); 3) low altitude aerial photography and ground based photography of the entire MSZ; 4) a ground-truthed database of 87 out of the 94 imagery-based offset measurements made within the MSZ; and 5) a database of 50 new field-based offset measurements made within the MSZ by our team on the ground, 31 of which have also been made on the computer (Ladicaoz) with both the 2000 LiDAR data (@ 0.5 m DEM resolution; Chen et al, in review) and 2012 LiDAR data (@ 35 cm DEM resolution; our team). New results to date include 1) significant variability (> 2 m) in horizontal offsets measured along short distances of the surface rupture (~100 m) within segments of the surface rupture that are localized to a single fault strand; 2) strong dependence of decadal scale fault scarp preservation on local lithology (bedrock vs. alluvial fan vs. fine sediment) and geomorphology (uphill vs. downhill facing scarp); 3) newly observed offset features which were never measured during the post-event field response; 4) newly observed offset features too small to be resolved in airborne LiDAR data (judged by our team to warrant removal from the database due to incorrect feature reconstruction; and 6) significant variability in both accuracy of LiDAR offset

  7. Field observed relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning during secondary succession in a tropical lowland rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wensheng; Zang, Runguo; Ding, Yi

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) is one of the most concerned topics in ecology. However, most of the studies have been conducted in controlled experiments in grasslands, few observational field studies have been carried out in forests. In this paper, we report variations of species diversity, functional diversity and aboveground biomass (AGB) for woody plants (trees and shrubs) along a chronosequence of four successional stages (18-year-old fallow, 30-year-old fallow, 60-year-old fallow, and old-growth forest) in a tropical lowland rainforest recovered after shifting cultivation on Hainan Island, China. Fifty randomly selected sample plots of 20 m × 20 m were investigated in each of the four successional stages. Four functional traits (specific leaf area, wood density, maximum species height and leaf dry matter content) were measured for each woody plants species and the relationships between species/functional diversity and AGB during secondary succession were explored. The results showed that both plant diversity and AGB recovered gradually with the secondary succession. AGB was positively correlated with both species and functional diversity in each stage of succession. Consistent with many controlled experimental results in grasslands, our observational field study confirms that ecosystem functioning is closely related to biodiversity during secondary succession in species rich tropical forests.

  8. LAMOST OBSERVATIONS IN THE KEPLER FIELD. I. DATABASE OF LOW-RESOLUTION SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cat, P. De; Ren, A. B.; Yang, X. H. [Royal observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Fu, J. N. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, 19 Avenue Xinjiekouwai, Beijing 100875 (China); Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Yang, M.; Wang, J. L.; Zhang, H. T.; Shi, H. M.; Zhang, W. [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Dong, Subo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Yi He Yuan Road 5, Hai Dian District, Beijing, 100871 (China); Catanzaro, G.; Frasca, A. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Catania, Via S. Sofia 78, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Corbally, C. J. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Gray, R. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States); Żakowicz, J. Molenda- [Astronomical Institute of the University of Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11, 51-622 Wrocław (Poland); Uytterhoeven, K. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Briquet, M. [Institut d’Astrophysique et de Géophysique, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 19C, B-4000 Liège (Belgium); Bruntt, H., E-mail: Peter.DeCat@oma.be [Stellar Astrophysics Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); and others

    2015-09-15

    The nearly continuous light curves with micromagnitude precision provided by the space mission Kepler are revolutionizing our view of pulsating stars. They have revealed a vast sea of low-amplitude pulsation modes that were undetectable from Earth. The long time base of Kepler light curves allows for the accurate determination of the frequencies and amplitudes of pulsation modes needed for in-depth asteroseismic modeling. However, for an asteroseismic study to be successful, the first estimates of stellar parameters need to be known and they cannot be derived from the Kepler photometry itself. The Kepler Input Catalog provides values for the effective temperature, surface gravity, and metallicity, but not always with sufficient accuracy. Moreover, information on the chemical composition and rotation rate is lacking. We are collecting low-resolution spectra for objects in the Kepler field of view with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (lamost, Xinglong observatory, China). All of the requested fields have now been observed at least once. In this paper, we describe those observations and provide a useful database for the whole astronomical community.

  9. Infrasound pulses from lightning and electrostatic field changes: Observation and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chum, J.; Diendorfer, G.; Å indelářová, T.; Baše, J.; Hruška, F.

    2013-10-01

    Narrow (~1-2 s) infrasound pulses that followed, with ~11 to ~50 s delays, rapid changes of electrostatic field were observed by a microbarometer array in the Czech Republic during thunderstorm activity. A positive pressure fluctuation (compression phase) always preceded decompression; the compression was usually higher than the decompression. The angles of arrival (azimuth and elevation) were analyzed for selected distinct events. Comparisons of distances and azimuths of infrasound sources from the center of microbarometer array with lightning locations determined by the European Cooperation for Lighting Detection lightning detection network show that most of the selected events can be very likely associated with intracloud (IC) discharges. The preceding rapid changes of electrostatic field, their potential association with IC discharges, and high-elevation angles of arrival for near infrasound sources indicate that an electrostatic mechanism is probably responsible for their generation. It is discussed that distinguishing the relative role of thermal and electrostatic mechanism is difficult and that none of the published models of electrostatic production of infrasound thunder can explain the presented observations precisely. A modification of the current models, based on consideration of at least two charged layers, is suggested. Further theoretical and experimental investigations are however needed to get a better description of the generation mechanism.

  10. Herbarium specimens, photographs, and field observations show Philadelphia area plants are responding to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchen, Zoe A; Primack, Richard B; Anisko, Tomasz; Lyons, Robert E

    2012-04-01

    The global climate is changing rapidly and is expected to continue changing in coming decades. Studying changes in plant flowering times during a historical period of warming temperatures gives us a way to examine the impacts of climate change and allows us to predict further changes in coming decades. The Greater Philadelphia region has a long and rich history of botanical study and documentation, with abundant herbarium specimens, field observations, and botanical photographs from the mid-1800s onward. These extensive records also provide an opportunity to validate methodologies employed by other climate change researchers at a different biogeographical area and with a different group of species. Data for 2539 flowering records from 1840 to 2010 were assessed to examine changes in flowering response over time and in relation to monthly minimum temperatures of 28 Piedmont species native to the Greater Philadelphia region. Regression analysis of the date of flowering with year or with temperature showed that, on average, the Greater Philadelphia species studied are flowering 16 d earlier over the 170-yr period and 2.7 d earlier per 1°C rise in monthly minimum temperature. Of the species studied, woody plants with short flowering duration are the best indicators of a warming climate. For monthly minimum temperatures, temperatures 1 or 2 mo prior to flowering are most significantly correlated with flowering time. Studies combining herbarium specimens, photographs, and field observations are an effective method for detecting the effects of climate change on flowering times.

  11. Evaluation of team lifting on work demands, workload and workers' evaluation: an observational field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Steven; van der Molen, Henk F; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Hoozemans, Marco J M; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess differences in work demands, energetic workload and workers' discomfort and physical effort in two regularly observable workdays in ironwork; one where loads up to 50kg were handled with two persons manually (T50) and one where loads up to 100kg were handled manually with four persons (T100). Differences between these typical workdays were assessed with an observational within-subject field study of 10 ironworkers. No significant differences were found for work demands, energetic workload or discomfort between T50 and T100 workdays. During team lifts, load mass exceeded 25kg per person in 57% (T50 workday) and 68% (T100 workday) of the lifts. Seven ironworkers rated team lifting with two persons as less physically demanding compared with lifting with four persons. When loads heavier than 25kg are lifted manually with a team, regulations of the maximum mass weight are frequently violated. Loads heavier than 25kg are frequently lifted during concrete reinforcement work and should be lifted by a team of persons. However, the field study showed that loads above 25kg are most of the time not lifted with the appropriate number of workers. Therefore, loads heavier than 25kg should be lifted mechanically. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of the plasmapause boundary using ground magnetometer field line resonances, satellite observations, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Jorgensen, A. M.; Yizengaw, E.; Chi, P. J.; Moldwin, M.; Carranza, T.; Mann, I. R.; Johnston, W. R.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The plasmapause boundary layer (PBL) separates the cold and dense plasmaspheric plasma from the more tenuous and hot plasma sheet plasma and organizes the spatial distribution of ULF and VLF waves that can contribute to acceleration or loss processes of radiation belt particles through wave-particle interactions. The PBL has been traditionally determined by in situ observations and can be given by empirical models. Recent work has shown that a mid-latitude chain of well-spaced ground magnetometers can also determine the PBL boundary location. Spectral properties, like the cross-phase reversal between two stations closely aligned in latitude, have been shown to indicate the presence of a sharp PBL. We show here an example of such a PBL identification during the moderate storm of Nov 9-12, 2006. We combine observations from the SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array), MEASURE (Magnetometers along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education), McMAC (Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain), and CARISMA ground magnetometer chains covering L values from L=2 to L=5 to statistically determine how commonly the PBL is determined from ground magnetometers. In our initial study we examine observations from June to December, 2006. We compare our PBL determinations with the determination of the same boundary from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, based on the H+ density observations, which have been shown to accurately identify the PBL from a low-Earth orbiting satellite. We also compare our PBL identification with those determined from a global GPS TEC map and GPS TEC tomography technique used by a chain of ground GPS receivers. Finally, we compare our observations with results from the Dynamic Global Core Plasma Model (DGCPM), as well as existing empirical models based on in situ observations.

  13. Atmospheric Benzene Observations from an Oil and Gas Field in the Denver Julesburg Basin in July and August 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Hannah S.; Thompson, Anne M.; Wisthaler, Armin; Blake, Donald; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Mueller, Markus; Eichler, Philipp; Apel, Eric C.; Hills, Alan

    2016-01-01

    High time resolution measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collectedusing a proton-transfer-reaction quadrupole mass spectrometry (PTR-QMS) instrument at the PlattevilleAtmospheric Observatory (PAO) in Colorado to investigate how oil and natural gas (ONG) developmentimpacts air quality within the Wattenburg Gas Field (WGF) in the Denver-Julesburg Basin. The measurementswere carried out in July and August 2014 as part of NASAs Deriving Information on Surface Conditions fromColumn and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) field campaign. ThePTR-QMS data were supported by pressurized whole air canister samples and airborne vertical and horizontalsurveys of VOCs. Unexpectedly high benzene mixing ratios were observed at PAO at ground level (meanbenzene 0.53 ppbv, maximum benzene 29.3 ppbv), primarily at night (mean nighttime benzene 0.73ppbv). These high benzene levels were associated with southwesterly winds. The airborne measurementsindicate that benzene originated from within the WGF, and typical source signatures detected in the canistersamples implicate emissions from ONG activities rather than urban vehicular emissions as primary benzenesource. This conclusion is backed by a regional toluene-to-benzene ratio analysis which associated southerlyflow with vehicular emissions from the Denver area. Weak benzene-to-CO correlations confirmed that trafficemissions were not responsible for the observed high benzene levels. Previous measurements at the BoulderAtmospheric Observatory (BAO) and our data obtained at PAO allow us to locate the source of benzeneenhancements between the two atmospheric observatories. Fugitive emissions of benzene from ONGoperations in the Platteville area are discussed as the most likely causes of enhanced benzene levels at PAO.

  14. Interrelation of geomagnetic storms and earthquakes: Insight from lab experiments and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzhin, Yuri; Kamogawa, Masashi; Novikov, Victor

    statistical approach for the problem of ionosphere-lithosphere coupling, and in each case the possible behavior of fluids should be considered under electromagnetic impact on lithosphere. Experimental results supporting this idea are obtained at the spring-block model simulating the seismic cycle (slow accumulation and sharp drop of stresses in the fault gauge), as well as from field observations of water level variations in the well during ionospheric disturbances are presented and discussed. In the lab experiments it was shown that the earthquake may be triggered by very small fluid content injected into the simulated fault (field observations it was found that water level in the well rises during sunrise, when ionosphere is excited by solar radiation, and drops during sunset (relaxation process in ionosphere). Moreover, it was shown that the water level in well correlates with geomagnetic field perturbations during geomagnetic storms. A simplified model describing interaction of geomagnetic field variations with fluid behavior near the seismogenic fault is presented. References: 1. Duma G., Ruzhin Yu. Diurnal changes of earthquake activity and geomagnetic Sq-variations // Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 3, 2003, p.p.171-177. 2. Novikov V.A. Water imbalance in the geological fault as a possible earthquake trigger // AGU 2012 Fall Meeting, Dec. 3-8, San Francisco, USA, Abstract GC42B-08.

  15. Rainfall Process Partitioning Using S-PROF Radar Observations Collected During the CalWater Field Campaign Winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Creamean, J.; Hughes, M. R.; Moore, B.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Vertically pointing S-band radar (S-PROF) observations collected during the CalWater field campaign winter wet seasons are analyzed to partition the observed rainfall into three primary categories: brightband (BB) rain, non-brightband (NBB) rain, and convective rain. NBB rain is primarily a shallow, warm rain process driven by collision and coalescence. Because of its shallow nature, NBB rain is often undetected by the operational NEXRAD radar network. Previous rainfall process partitioning analysis conducted for a coastal mountain site in California has shown that NBB rain contributes about one-third, on average, of the total wet season precipitation observed there. Shallow moist flow with near neutral stability, which is often present in the coastal environment during the warm sectors of landfalling storms, is a key ingredient in the formation of NBB rain. However, NBB rain also has been observed in other storm regimes (e.g., post-cold frontal). NBB rain has been shown to produce rain rates known by forecasters to be capable of producing floods. During the CalWater field campaign winters, S-PROF radars were located in the Sierra Nevada at Sugar Pine Dam (SPD) for three consecutive winters (2009-2011) and at Mariposa (MPI) for the latter two winters (2010-2011). During the southwesterly flow present in the warm sectors of many California landfalling storms, the SPD site was directly downwind of the gap in coastal terrain associated with the San Francisco Bay Delta. This orientation would allow relatively unmodified maritime flow to arrive at SPD. The MPI site was located further south such that airflow arriving at this site during winter storms likely was processed by the coastal terrain south of San Francisco Bay. In this presentation we will examine whether the relative locations of SPD and MPI relative to the coastal terrain impacted the amount of NBB rain that was observed at each site during the CalWater wet seasons. We will use synoptic and mesoscale

  16. Australian Soil Moisture Field Experiments in Support of Soil Moisture Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Edward; Walker, Jeff; Rudiger, Christopher; Panciera, Rocco

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale field campaigns provide the critical fink between our understanding retrieval algorithms developed at the point scale, and algorithms suitable for satellite applications at vastly larger pixel scales. Retrievals of land parameters must deal with the substantial sub-pixel heterogeneity that is present in most regions. This is particularly the case for soil moisture remote sensing, because of the long microwave wavelengths (L-band) that are optimal. Yet, airborne L-band imagers have generally been large, heavy, and required heavy-lift aircraft resources that are expensive and difficult to schedule. Indeed, US soil moisture campaigns, have been constrained by these factors, and European campaigns have used non-imagers due to instrument and aircraft size constraints. Despite these factors, these campaigns established that large-scale soil moisture remote sensing was possible, laying the groundwork for satellite missions. Starting in 2005, a series of airborne field campaigns have been conducted in Australia: to improve our understanding of soil moisture remote sensing at large scales over heterogeneous areas. These field data have been used to test and refine retrieval algorithms for soil moisture satellite missions, and most recently with the launch of the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, to provide validation measurements over a multi-pixel area. The campaigns to date have included a preparatory campaign in 2005, two National Airborne Field Experiments (NAFE), (2005 and 2006), two campaigns to the Simpson Desert (2008 and 2009), and one Australian Airborne Cal/val Experiment for SMOS (AACES), just concluded in the austral spring of 2010. The primary airborne sensor for each campaign has been the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR), a 6-beam pushbroom imager that is small enough to be compatible with light aircraft, greatly facilitating the execution of the series of campaigns, and a key to their success. An

  17. The Greenland ice sheet during LGM – a model based on field observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.

    based on observations on land, such as weathering limits on coastal mountains, major moraine belts, and altitudes of marine limits. Extrapolation from this gave estimates of LGM ice cover on the shelf ranging from inner to outer shelf, often under the assumption that it had to be either or......In the light of recent years¿ intense discussion on the role of Greenland Ice Sheet in global warming its reaction to past climatic change can contribute valuable information. We have updated the evidence for LGM (c. 23-20 kaBP) icesheet coverage. previous reviews An important part of the main...... The issue is complicated by the circumstance that during LGM (Last glacial maximum) the ice sheet margins around the whole perimeter stood on the shelf and “classical” evidence, such as large moraine belts, extensive sandurs and major drainage diversions do not apply. The first estimates were therefore...

  18. The Greenland ice sheet during LGM – a model based on field observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funder, Svend Visby; Kjeldsen, Kristian Kjellerup; Kjær, Kurt H.

    combine this new evidence with the older observations. This model is conservative because it is, as far as possible, based on tangible evidence minimising the amount of speculation. The LGM ice sheet in this model covered c. 2.7 mio km2, 65% more than the present. Two thirds of this excess relative......In the light of recent years¿ intense discussion on the role of Greenland Ice Sheet in global warming its reaction to past climatic change can contribute valuable information. We have updated the evidence for LGM (c. 23-20 kaBP) icesheet coverage. previous reviews An important part of the main...... The issue is complicated by the circumstance that during LGM (Last glacial maximum) the ice sheet margins around the whole perimeter stood on the shelf and “classical” evidence, such as large moraine belts, extensive sandurs and major drainage diversions do not apply. The first estimates were therefore...

  19. Accessing the inaccessible: making (successful) field observations at tidewater glacier termini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienholz, C.; Amundson, J. M.; Jackson, R. H.; Motyka, R. J.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D.

    2017-12-01

    Glaciers terminating in ocean water (tidewater glaciers) show complex dynamic behavior driven predominantly by processes at the ice-ocean interface (sedimentation, erosion, iceberg calving, submarine melting). A quantitative understanding of these processes is required, for example, to better assess tidewater glaciers' fate in our rapidly warming environment. Lacking observations close to glacier termini, due to unpredictable risks from calving, hamper this understanding. In an effort to remedy this lack of knowledge, we initiated a large field-based effort at LeConte Glacier, southeast Alaska, in 2016. LeConte Glacier is a regional analog for many tidewater glaciers, but better accessible and observable and thus an ideal target for our multi-disciplinary effort. Our ongoing campaigns comprise measurements from novel autonomous vessels (temperature, salinity and current) in the immediate proximity of the glacier terminus and additional surveys (including multibeam bathymetry) from boats and moorings in the proglacial fjord. These measurements are complemented by iceberg and glacier velocity measurements from time lapse cameras and a portable radar interferometer situated above LeConte Bay. GPS-based velocity observations and melt measurements are conducted on the glacier. These measurements provide necessary input for process-based understanding and numerical modeling of the glacier and fjord systems. In the presentation, we discuss promising initial results and lessons learned from the campaign.

  20. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .4. Association of sources with Hubble Deep Field galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the identification of sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at 6.7 and 15 mu m in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) region. We conservatively associate ISO sources with objects in existing optical and near-infrared HDF catalogues using the likelihood ratio method, confirming...... these results (and, in one case, clarifying them) with independent visual searches, We find 15 ISO sources to be reliably associated with bright [I-814(AB) Hubble Flanking Fields (10 galaxies...

  1. Electric Field Observations of Plasma Convection, Shear, Alfven Waves, and other Phenomena Observed on Sounding Rockets in the Cusp and Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R. F.

    2009-01-01

    On December 14,2002, a NASA Black Brant X sounding rocket was launched equatorward from Ny Alesund, Spitzbergen (79 N) into the dayside cusp and subsequently cut across the open/closed field line boundary, reaching an apogee of771 km. The launch occurred during Bz negative conditions with strong By negative that was changing during the flight. SuperDarn (CUTLASS) radar and subsequent model patterns reveal a strong westward/poleward convection, indicating that the rocket traversed a rotational reversal in the afternoon merging cell. The payload returned DC electric and magnetic fields, plasma waves, energetic particle, suprathermal electron and ion, and thermal plasma data. We provide an overview of the main observations and focus on the DC electric field results, comparing the measured E x B plasma drifts in detail with the CUTLASS radar observations of plasma drifts gathered simultaneously in the same volume. The in situ DC electric fields reveal steady poleward flows within the cusp with strong shears at the interface of the closed/open field lines and within the boundary layer. We use the observations to discuss ionospheric signatures of the open/closed character of the cusp/low latitude boundary layer as a function of the IMF. The electric field and plasma density data also reveal the presence of very strong plasma irregularities with a large range of scales (10 m to 10 km) that exist within the open field line cusp region yet disappear when the payload was equatorward of the cusp on closed field lines. These intense low frequency wave observations are consistent with strong scintillations observed on the ground at Ny Alesund during the flight. We present detailed wave characteristics and discuss them in terms of Alfven waves and static irregularities that pervade the cusp region at all altitudes.

  2. Weak-field limit of Kaluza-Klein models with spherically symmetric static scalar field. Observational constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuk, Alexander [The International Center of Future Science of the Jilin University, Changchun City (China); Odessa National University, Astronomical Observatory, Odessa (Ukraine); Chopovsky, Alexey; Fakhr, Seyed Hossein [Odessa National University, Astronomical Observatory, Odessa (Ukraine); Shulga, Valerii [The International Center of Future Science of the Jilin University, Changchun City (China); Institut of Radio Astronomy of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkov (Ukraine); Wei, Han [The International Center of Future Science of the Jilin University, Changchun City (China)

    2017-11-15

    In a multidimensional Kaluza-Klein model with Ricci-flat internal space, we study the gravitational field in the weak-field limit. This field is created by two coupled sources. First, this is a point-like massive body which has a dust-like equation of state in the external space and an arbitrary parameter Ω of equation of state in the internal space. The second source is a static spherically symmetric massive scalar field centered at the origin where the point-like massive body is. The found perturbed metric coefficients are used to calculate the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter γ. We define under which conditions γ can be very close to unity in accordance with the relativistic gravitational tests in the solar system. This can take place for both massive or massless scalar fields. For example, to have γ ∼ 1 in the solar system, the mass of scalar field should be μ >or similar 5.05 x 10{sup -49} g ∝ 2.83 x 10{sup -16} eV. In all cases, we arrive at the same conclusion that to be in agreement with the relativistic gravitational tests, the gravitating mass should have tension: Ω = -1/2. (orig.)

  3. Semiquantitative Decision Tools for FMD Emergency Vaccination Informed by Field Observations and Simulated Outbreak Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willeberg, Preben; AlKhamis, Mohammad; Boklund, Anette

    2017-01-01

    timely, objectively, and efficiently to risk managers and less technically inclined stakeholders about the potential of introducing FMD suppressive emergency vaccination. To explore the FFI principle with complementary field data, we analyzed the FMD outbreaks in Argentina in 2001, with the 17 affected...... provinces as the units of observation. Two different vaccination strategies were applied during this extended epidemic. In a series of 5,000 Danish simulated FMD epidemics, the numbers of outbreak herds at day 14 and at the end of the epidemics were estimated under different control strategies. To simplify...... and optimize the presentation of the resulting data for urgent decisions to be made by the risk managers, we estimated the sensitivity, specificity, as well as the negative and positive predictive values, using a chosen day-14 outbreak number as predictor of the magnitude of the number of remaining post-day-14...

  4. Constraints on the generalized tachyon field models from latest observational data

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Rong-Jia; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Liu, Yuan

    2008-01-01

    We consider constraints on generalized tachyon field (GTF) models from latest observational data (including 182 gold SNIa data, the shift parameter, and the acoustic scale). We obtain at 68.3% confidence level $\\Omega_{\\rm m}=0.37\\pm0.01$, $k_0=0.09^{+0.04}_{-0.03}$, $\\alpha=1.8^{+7.4}_{-0.7}$ (the best-fit values of the parameters) and $z_{q=0}\\sim 0.47-0.51$ (the transitional redshift) for GTF as dark energy component only; $k_0=0.21^{+0.20}_{-0.18}$, $\\alpha=0.57\\pm0.01$ and $z_{q=0}\\sim 0...

  5. Cosmology with hybrid expansion law: scalar field reconstruction of cosmic history and observational constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akarsu, Özgür; Kumar, Suresh; Myrzakulov, R.; Sami, M.; Xu, Lixin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a simple form of expansion history of Universe referred to as the hybrid expansion law - a product of power-law and exponential type of functions. The ansatz by construction mimics the power-law and de Sitter cosmologies as special cases but also provides an elegant description of the transition from deceleration to cosmic acceleration. We point out the Brans-Dicke realization of the cosmic history under consideration. We construct potentials for quintessence, phantom and tachyon fields, which can give rise to the hybrid expansion law in general relativity. We investigate observational constraints on the model with hybrid expansion law applied to late time acceleration as well as to early Universe a la nucleosynthesis

  6. Optimization study of direct morphology observation by cold field emission SEM without gold coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Dan; Fu, Cheng; Xue, Zhigang

    2018-04-06

    Gold coating is a general operation that is generally applied on non-conductive or low conductive materials, during which the morphology of the materials can be examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However, fatal deficiencies in the materials can result in irreversible distortion and damage. The present study directly characterized different low conductive materials such as hydroxyapatite, modified poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fiber, and zinc oxide nanopillar by cold field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) without a gold coating. According to the characteristics of the low conductive materials, various test conditions, such as different working signal modes, accelerating voltages, electron beam spots, and working distances, were characterized to determine the best morphological observations of each sample. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Updated velocity field for the Caribbean plate from COCONet GPS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Jansma, P. E.

    2013-05-01

    The currently accepted kinematic model of the Caribbean plate presented by DeMets et al., 2007, is based on velocities from 6 continuous and 14 campaign GPS sites. Our work attempts to refine the current plate model by evaluating data from the 60+ continuous GPS stations that comprise COCONet. COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean Observation Network) is an NSF-funded collaborative natural hazards research effort that has enhanced the geodetic infrastructure in the region surrounding the Caribbean plate. Data for this study was obtained from the open data archive at UNAVCO. GPS data have been processed with an absolute point positioning strategy using GIPSY-OASIS II, using the non-fiducial, final precise clock and orbit parameters provided by JPL. An updated velocity field for the Caribbean plate will be presented and co-seismic and post-seismic slip, recorded by network stations will be examined for earthquakes that have occurred within the COCONet footprint.

  8. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics in Collective Frog Choruses Examined by Mathematical Modeling and Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu; Mizumoto, Takeshi; Otsuka, Takuma; Awano, Hiromitsu; Nagira, Kohei; Okuno, Hiroshi G.; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports theoretical and experimental studies on spatio-temporal dynamics in the choruses of male Japanese tree frogs. First, we theoretically model their calling times and positions as a system of coupled mobile oscillators. Numerical simulation of the model as well as calculation of the order parameters show that the spatio-temporal dynamics exhibits bistability between two-cluster antisynchronization and wavy antisynchronization, by assuming that the frogs are attracted to the edge of a simple circular breeding site. Second, we change the shape of the breeding site from the circle to rectangles including a straight line, and evaluate the stability of two-cluster and wavy antisynchronization. Numerical simulation shows that two-cluster antisynchronization is more frequently observed than wavy antisynchronization. Finally, we recorded frog choruses at an actual paddy field using our sound-imaging method. Analysis of the video demonstrated a consistent result with the aforementioned simulation: namely, two-cluster antisynchronization was more frequently realized.

  9. Stress analysis of three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement with field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zimo; Chanda, Emmanuel; Zhao, Jingli; Wang, Zhihe

    2018-01-01

    Longwall top-coal caving (LTCC) has been a popular, more productive and cost-effective method for extracting thick (> 5 m) to ultra-thick coal seams in recent years. However, low-level recovery ratio of coal resources and top-coal loss above the supports at both ends of working face are long-term problems. Geological factors, such as large dip angle, soft rock, mining depth further complicate the problems. This paper proposes addressing this issue by adopting three-dimensional roadway layout of stagger arrangement (3-D RLSA). In this study, the first step was to analyse the stress environment surrounding head entry in the replacing working face based on the stress distribution characteristics at the triangular coal-pillar side in gob and the stress slip line field theory. In the second step, filed observation was conducted. Finally, an economic evaluation of the 3-D RLSA for extracting thick to ultra-thick seams was conducted.

  10. Intermittency of magnetic field turbulence: Astrophysical applications of in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyi, Lev M.; Bykov, Andrei M.; Uvarov, Yury A.; Artemyev, Anton V.

    2015-08-01

    We briefly review some aspects of magnetic turbulence intermittency observed in space plasmas. Deviation of statistical characteristics of a system (e.g. its high statistical momenta) from the Gaussian can manifest itself as domination of rare large intensity peaks often associated with the intermittency in the system's dynamics. Thirty years ago, Zeldovich stressed the importance of the non-Gaussian appearance of the sharp values of vector and scalar physical parameters in random media as a factor of magnetic field amplification in cosmic structures. Magnetic turbulence is governing the behavior of collisionless plasmas in space and especially the physics of shocks and magnetic reconnections. Clear evidence of intermittent magnetic turbulence was found in recent in-situ spacecraft measurements of magnetic fields in the near-Earth and interplanetary plasma environments. We discuss the potentially promising approaches of incorporating the knowledge gained from spacecraft in-situ measurements into modern models describing plasma dynamics and radiation in various astrophysical systems. As an example, we discuss supernova remnants (SNRs) which are known to be the sources of energy, momentum, chemical elements, and high-energy cosmic rays (CRs) in galaxies. Supernova shocks accelerate charged particles to very high energies and may strongly amplify turbulent magnetic fields via instabilities driven by CRs. Relativistic electrons accelerated in SNRs radiate polarized synchrotron emission in a broad range of frequencies spanning from the radio to gamma-rays. We discuss the effects of intermittency of magnetic turbulence on the images of polarized synchrotron X-ray emission of young SNRs and emission spectra of pulsar wind nebula.

  11. Field-observed ethylene dibromide in an aquifer after two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatello, Joseph J.; Frink, Charles R.; Marin, Paul A.; Droste, Edward X.

    1990-01-01

    The fate and transport of the soil fumigant, 1,2-dibromoethane (EDB) was studied at a former tobacco field in Simsbury, Connecticut where it was last used in 1967. The subsurface consists of glacial deposits of stratified sand, gravel, and silt underlain by a fractured sandstone/siltstone bedrock. Contaminant plumes in the bedrock had migrated only slightly from beneath the tobacco field after nearly two decades, consistent with calculated flow velocities. Contaminant levels in the overburden aquifer were much lower, which was consistent with higher calculated flow velocities resulting in off-site discharge to a nearby stream, and possibly with faster biodegradation. EDB concentrations in both zones were stable over the study period (1.5-2yr). Earlier demonstration of relatively fast biodegradation of 14C-EDB in aquifer core samples were contradicted by the plume stabilities observed here. EDB was found in vadose cores, particularly topsoils, at concentrations up to 32μg kg -1. These residues could not be extracted with water, even after 20 d, and were unavailable for biodegradation. By contrast added 14C-EDBwas mineralized almost completely in 22 d. EDB was also found in overburden aquifer cores, in some cases at concentrations much greater than predicted from equilibrium partition experiments. The results show that kinetically slow, nonequilibrium sorption is a factor in the decades-long persistence of this chemical in the topsoil and possibly in the aquifer.

  12. Geological implications of radium and helium in oil-field brines: observations, inferences and speculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerche, I.

    1993-01-01

    The 1600 yr half-life of radium restricts the time and thus the distance over which radium can migrate in sediments. The dominant source of unsupported radium in sandstone reservoir brines must then be close by and is likely in shales adjacent to the oil-field reservoirs. The chemical similarity of calcium and radium can be used to argue for a local shale-source contribution to the calcium in reservoir sands -suggesting the probability of calcite cementation early in the sedimentary sequence. Helium production by radium decay increases with time. Concentrations of helium found in reservoir oil field brines are then used to suggest that: (a) such reservoirs are dominantly closed systems over geological times; (b) neither methane nor helium in the reservoirs have migrated any significant distance; and (c) the mechanism responsible for the observed helium in the brine is a continuous on-going process operative today. Diagenetic studies should then deal with both sands and shales interdependently, the two are not separable. Shales control the transport mechanisms of migration so that the primary migration of hydrocarbons, the result of kerogen catagenesis in shales, should occur sufficiently early in the sedimentary sequence in order to avoid exclusion from the reservoir by calcite cementation in association with radium transport. (author)

  13. Observations of Dynamic Triggering in the Coso Geothermal Field 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro-Diaz, R. A.; Velasco, A. A.; Kilb, D.; Pankow, K. L.

    2015-12-01

    Over a ten-year period (2004-2013), we search for remotely triggered seismicity utilizing data from EarthScope's USArray Transportable Array (TA) and the Southern California Seismic Network. In particular, we apply an STA/LTA approach for 154 M ≥ 7 earthquakes and use local earthquake catalogs (magnitude of completeness 0.8) to investigate triggered seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). Of 154 remote mainshocks, we find 34 mainshocks (22%) show triggered seismicity based on the increase in the magnitude and frequency (rate) from pre-mainshock to post-mainshock auto-detection rates and cataloged seismicity. We observe both instantaneous (16) and delayed (18) triggering within ± 5 hours of the mainshock. We also find that remote triggering in the CGF region is enhanced by the orientation (back-azimuth) of the passing seismic (mostly surface) waves in relation to the local stress field (NNE-SSW trending faults), and there appears little correlation between the peak dynamic stress and event triggering. Our results suggest that remote dynamic triggering strongly depends on the regional stress orientation, and for the CGF region the stress threshold for remote M ≥ 7 earthquakes is not critically important for dynamic triggering.

  14. Multi-spacecraft observations of small-scale fluctuations in density and fields in plasmaspheric plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Matsui

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this event study, small-scale fluctuations in plasmaspheric plumes with time scales of ~10 s to minutes in the spacecraft frame are examined. In one event, plasmaspheric plumes are observed by Cluster, while IMAGE measured density enhancement at a similar location. Fluctuations in density exist in plumes as detected by Cluster and are accompanied by fluctuations in magnetic fields and electric fields. Magnetic fluctuations are transverse and along the direction of the plumes. The E/B ratio is smaller than the Alfvén velocity. Another similar event is briefly presented. We then consider physical properties of the fluctuations. Alfvén mode modulated by the feedback instability is one possibility, although non-local generation is likely. It is hard to show that the fluctuations represent a fast mode. Interchange motion is possible due to the consistency between measurements and expectations. The energy source could be a pressure or density gradient in plasmaspheric plumes. When more events are accumulated so that statistical analysis becomes feasible, this type of study will be useful to understand the time evolution of plumes.

  15. Thinning of heterogeneous lithosphere: insights from field observations and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, B.; Duretz, T.; Mohn, G.; Schmalholz, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    The nature and mechanisms of formation of extremely thinned continental crust (continental passive margins document the heterogeneous nature of the lithosphere characterized, among others, by lithological variations and structural inheritance. This contribution aims at investigating the mechanisms of extreme lithospheric thinning by exploring in particular the role of initial heterogeneities by coupling field observations from fossil passive margins and numerical models of lithospheric extension. Two field examples from the Alpine Tethys margins outcropping in the Eastern Alps (E Switzerland and N Italy) and in the Southern Alps (N Italy) were selected for their exceptional level of preservation of rift-related structures. This situation enables us to characterize (1) the pre-rift architecture of the continental lithosphere, (2) the localization of rift-related deformation in distinct portion of the lithosphere and (3) the interaction between initial heterogeneities of the lithosphere and rift-related structures. In a second stage, these observations are integrated in high-resolution, two-dimensional thermo-mechanical models taking into account various patterns of initial mechanical heterogeneities. Our results show the importance of initial pre-rift architecture of the continental lithosphere during rifting. Key roles are given to high-angle and low-angle normal faults, anastomosing shear-zones and decoupling horizons. We propose that during the first stages of thinning, deformation is strongly controlled by the complex pre-rift architecture of the lithosphere, localized along major structures responsible for the lateral extrusion of mid to lower crustal levels. This extrusion juxtaposes mechanically stronger levels in the hyper-thinned continental crust, being exhumed by subsequent low-angle normal faults. Altogether, these results highlight the critical role of the extraction of mechanically strong layers of the lithosphere during the extreme thinning of the

  16. Dual Spacecraft Observations of Lobe Magnetic Field Perturbations Before, During and after Plasmoid Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, J. A.; Hesse, M.; Owen, C. J.; Taguchi, S.; Fairfield, D. H.; Lepping, R. P.; Kokubun, S.; Mukai, T.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Anderson, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    This study examines a unique data set returned by IMP8 and Geotail on January 29, 1995 during a substorm which resulted in the ejection of a plasmoid. The two spacecraft (s/c) were situated in the north lobe of the tail and both observed a traveling compression region (TCR). From single s/c observations only the length of the plasmoid in X and an estimate of its height in Z can be determined. However, we show that dual s/c measurements of TCRs can be used to model all three dimensions of the underlying plasmoid and to estimate of its rate of expansion or contraction. For this event plasmoid dimensions of Delta(X) approximates 18, Delta(Y) approximates 30, and Delta(Z) approximates 10 R(sub e) are inferred from the IMP8 and Geotail lobe magnetic field measurements. The earthward end of the plasmoid was inferred to be near the mean location of the near-earth neutral line, X approximates -26 R(sub e). Its center was underneath IMP 8 at X approximates -34 R(sub e) and its tailward end appeared to be near X approximates -44 R(sub e). Furthermore, a factor of approximately 2 increase in the amplitude of the TCR occurred in the 1.5 min it took to move from IMP 8 to Geotail. Modeled using conservation of the magnetic flux, this increase in lobe compression implies that the underlying plasmoid was expanding at a rate of approximately 140 km/s. Such an expansion is comparable to recently reported V(sub y) speeds in "young" plasmoids in this region of the tail. Finally, the Geotail measurements indicate that a reconfiguration of the lobe magnetic field closely followed the ejection of the plasmoid which moved magnetic flux tubes into the wake behind the plasmoid where they would convect into the near-earth neutral line and reconnect.

  17. Searching for the 3.5 keV Line in the Deep Fields with Chandra: The 10 Ms Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelluti, Nico; Bulbul, Esra; Foster, Adam; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Urry, Megan C.; Bautz, Mark W.; Civano, Francesca; Miller, Eric; Smith, Randall K.

    2018-02-01

    We report a systematic search for an emission line around 3.5 keV in the spectrum of the cosmic X-ray background using a total of ∼10 Ms Chandra observations toward the COSMOS Legacy and Extended Chandra Deep Field South survey fields. We find marginal evidence of a feature at an energy of ∼3.51 keV with a significance of 2.5–3σ, depending on the choice of statistical treatment. The line intensity is best fit at (8.8 ± 2.9) × 10‑7 ph cm‑2 s‑1 when using a simple Δχ 2 or {10.2}-0.4+0.2× {10}-7 ph cm‑2 s‑1 when Markov chain Monte Carlo is used. Based on our knowledge of Chandra and the reported detection of the line by other instruments, an instrumental origin for the line remains unlikely. We cannot, however, rule out a statistical fluctuation, and in that case our results provide a 3σ upper limit at 1.85 × 10‑6 ph cm‑2 s‑1. We discuss the interpretation of this observed line in terms of the iron line background, S XVI charge exchange, as well as potentially being from sterile neutrino decay. We note that our detection is consistent with previous measurements of this line toward the Galactic center and can be modeled as the result of sterile neutrino decay from the Milky Way for the dark matter distribution modeled as a Navarro–Frenk–White profile. For this case, we estimate a mass m ν ∼ 7.01 keV and a mixing angle sin2(2θ) = (0.83–2.75) × 10‑10. These derived values are in agreement with independent estimates from galaxy clusters, the Galactic center, and M31.

  18. LCS-1: a high-resolution global model of the lithospheric magnetic field derived from CHAMP and Swarm satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Nils; Ravat, Dhananjay; Finlay, Christopher C.; Kother, Livia K.

    2017-12-01

    We derive a new model, named LCS-1, of Earth's lithospheric field based on four years (2006 September-2010 September) of magnetic observations taken by the CHAMP satellite at altitudes lower than 350 km, as well as almost three years (2014 April-2016 December) of measurements taken by the two lower Swarm satellites Alpha and Charlie. The model is determined entirely from magnetic 'gradient' data (approximated by finite differences): the north-south gradient is approximated by first differences of 15 s along-track data (for CHAMP and each of the two Swarm satellites), while the east-west gradient is approximated by the difference between observations taken by Swarm Alpha and Charlie. In total, we used 6.2 mio data points. The model is parametrized by 35 000 equivalent point sources located on an almost equal-area grid at a depth of 100 km below the surface (WGS84 ellipsoid). The amplitudes of these point sources are determined by minimizing the misfit to the magnetic satellite 'gradient' data together with the global average of |Br| at the ellipsoid surface (i.e. applying an L1 model regularization of Br). In a final step, we transform the point-source representation to a spherical harmonic expansion. The model shows very good agreement with previous satellite-derived lithospheric field models at low degree (degree correlation above 0.8 for degrees n ≤ 133). Comparison with independent near-surface aeromagnetic data from Australia yields good agreement (coherence >0.55) at horizontal wavelengths down to at least 250 km, corresponding to spherical harmonic degree n ≈ 160. The LCS-1 vertical component and field intensity anomaly maps at Earth's surface show similar features to those exhibited by the WDMAM2 and EMM2015 lithospheric field models truncated at degree 185 in regions where they include near-surface data and provide unprecedented detail where they do not. Example regions of improvement include the Bangui anomaly region in central Africa, the west African

  19. Mars Infrared Spectroscopy: From Theory and the Laboratory To Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Laurel (Editor); Mustard, John (Editor); McAfee, John (Editor); Hapke, Bruce (Editor); Ramsey, Michael (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    The continuity and timely implementation of the Mars exploration strategy relies heavily on the ability of the planetary community to interpret infrared spectral data. However, the increasing mission rate, data volume, and data variety, combined with the small number of spectroscopists within the planetary community, will require a coordinated community effort for effective and timely interpretation of the newly acquired and planned data sets. Relevant spectroscopic instruments include the 1996 TES, 2001 THEMIS, 2003 Pancam, 2003 Mini-TES, 2003 Mars Express OMEGA, 2003 Mars Express PFS, and 2005 CFUSM. In light of that, leaders of the Mars spectral community met June 4-6 to address the question: What terrestrial theoretical, laboratory, and field studies are most needed to best support timely interpretations of current and planned visible infrared spectrometer data sets, in light of the Mars Program goals? A primary goal of the spectral community is to provide a reservoir of information to enhance and expand the exploration of Mars. Spectroscopy has a long history of providing the fundamental compositional discoveries in the solar system, from atmospheric constituents to surface mineralogy, from earth-based to spacecraft-based observations. However, such spectroscopic compositional discoveries, especially surface mineralogies, have usually come after long periods of detailed integration of remote observations, laboratory analyses, and field measurements. Spectroscopic information of surfaces is particularly complex and often is confounded by interference of broad, overlapping absorption features as well as confusing issues of mixtures, coatings, and grain size effects. Thus some spectroscopic compositional discoveries have come only after many years of research. However, we are entering an era of Mars exploration with missions carrying sophisticated spectrometers launching about every 2 years. It is critical that each mission provide answers to relevant questions

  20. Field observations of the developing legal recreational cannabis economy in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric L; Roussell, Aaron

    2016-07-01

    Washington State legalized the sale of recreational cannabis in 2012. This paper describes the unfolding of the market regulatory regime in an eastern portion of the state, including field descriptions to illustrate the setting. We made observations and conducted interviews of the local supply chain comprising a producer/processor, analytic facility, and retail establishments as well as querying the state director of the regulatory board. Interviews and observations of facilities suggest an overwhelming concern for black market diversion drives state regulatory efforts. The ongoing dialogue between market actors and the state has resulted in a more equitable distribution of profits at different stages in the process. State safety regulations have thus far been shifted to independent laboratories. Banks and insurance companies have slowly begun making inroads into the industry, despite federal prohibition. The law was conceived as a social justice remedy, but the bulk of the legal and regulatory activity surrounds cannabis marketplace management. This has been characterized by concerns for black market diversion, producer/processor profits, and a hands-off approach to safety regulation. Minor cannabis violations as a pathway to criminal justice system involvement have been reduced substantially but disproportionate enforcement upon racial/ethnic minorities continues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Methane emission through ebullition from an estuarine mudflat: 2. Field observations and modeling of occurrence probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Schäfer, Karina V. R.; Slater, Lee

    2017-08-01

    Ebullition can transport methane (CH4) at a much faster rate than other pathways, albeit over limited time and area, in wetland soils and sediments. However, field observations present large uncertainties in ebullition occurrences and statistic models are needed to describe the function relationship between probability of ebullition occurrence and water level changes. A flow-through chamber was designed and installed in a mudflat of an estuarine temperate marsh. Episodic increases in CH4 concentration signaling ebullition events were observed during ebbing tides (15 events over 456 ebbing tides) and occasionally during flooding tides (4 events over 455 flooding tides). Ebullition occurrence functions were defined using logistic regression as the relative initial and end water levels, as well as tidal amplitudes were found to be the key functional variables related to ebullition events. Ebullition of methane was restricted by a surface frozen layer during winter; melting of this layer during spring thaw caused increases in CH4 concentration, with ebullition fluxes similar to those associated with large fluctuations in water level around spring tides. Our findings suggest that initial and end relative water levels, in addition to tidal amplitude, partly regulate ebullition events in tidal wetlands, modulated by the lunar cycle, storage of gas bubbles at different depths and seasonal changes in the surface frozen layer. Maximum tidal strength over a few days, rather than hourly water level, may be more closely associated with the possibility of ebullition occurrence as it represents a trade-off time scale in between hourly and lunar periods.

  2. Stochastic Flows: Dispersion of a Mass Distribution and Lagrangian Observations of a Random Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirbel, Craig Lee

    1993-01-01

    We consider two classical problems from statistical fluid mechanics in the modern probabilistic setting of stochastic flows based on stochastic differential equations. Such flows model spatially coherent "noise" superimposed on classical velocity fields. Their theory was developed over the past fifteen years by Kunita, Harris, Baxendale, and Le Jan, among others. The first problem we treat is the dispersion of a mass distribution carried by an isotropic Brownian flow F = {F_{s,t}: 0 M_0 be a measure on IR^{d} and define a random measure M_{t} by M_{t}(R) = M_0( {xinIR^{d} : F_ {o,t}(x)in R}) for sets R in IR^{d}. Then M_{t}(R) is the amount of mass in set R at time t. The dispersion matrix D _{t} is the centered spatial second moment of M_{t}, which describes the spreading of M_{t} relative to its center of mass. We show that, in incompressible flows, {rm I!E }D_{t} grows linearly in t for large t and that deviations from linearity are of order sqrt{t}. This is a signature of classical diffusion. In one dimension we find that {rm I!E}D_{t } goes as sqrt{t} for large t. We give other results for the remaining cases. Our methods involve an exact analysis of a one-dimensional diffusion process and the use of comparison theorems. Finally, to sharpen our intuition about the evolution of M _{t}, we present plots of M _{t}>=nerated by numerical simulations of isotropic Brownian flows. The second problem we consider concerns Lagrangian observations of a random field A made by a particle carried by a general stochastic flow F. Assuming that A and F are homogeneous, we obtain a formula for the distribution of the Lagrangian observation A(F_{0,t }(x),t) in terms of the Eulerian distribution of A and a function representing a tracer density. This result extends the seminal work of Lumley; our proof refines other work along these lines. In addition, we introduce a class of flows which regenerate at certain random times. This independence assumption allows us to prove the

  3. Networked web-cameras monitor congruent seasonal development of birches with phenological field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, Mikko; Aurela, Mika; Böttcher, Kristin; Kolari, Pasi; Loehr, John; Karhu, Jouni; Kubin, Eero; Linkosalmi, Maiju; Melih Tanis, Cemal; Nadir Arslan, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Ecosystems' potential to provide services, e.g. to sequester carbon is largely driven by the phenological cycle of vegetation. Timing of phenological events is required for understanding and predicting the influence of climate change on ecosystems and to support various analyses of ecosystem functioning. We established a network of cameras for automated monitoring of phenological activity of vegetation in boreal ecosystems of Finland. Cameras were mounted on 14 sites, each site having 1-3 cameras. In this study, we used cameras at 11 of these sites to investigate how well networked cameras detect phenological development of birches (Betula spp.) along the latitudinal gradient. Birches are interesting focal species for the analyses as they are common throughout Finland. In our cameras they often appear in smaller quantities within dominant species in the images. Here, we tested whether small scattered birch image elements allow reliable extraction of color indices and changes therein. We compared automatically derived phenological dates from these birch image elements to visually determined dates from the same image time series, and to independent observations recorded in the phenological monitoring network from the same region. Automatically extracted season start dates based on the change of green color fraction in the spring corresponded well with the visually interpreted start of season, and field observed budburst dates. During the declining season, red color fraction turned out to be superior over green color based indices in predicting leaf yellowing and fall. The latitudinal gradients derived using automated phenological date extraction corresponded well with gradients based on phenological field observations from the same region. We conclude that already small and scattered birch image elements allow reliable extraction of key phenological dates for birch species. Devising cameras for species specific analyses of phenological timing will be useful for

  4. Field Observation and Numerical Modeling of Bed-Material Transport Dynamics in the Lower Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, M. T.; Allison, M. A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding specific pathways for sand transport through the lower reaches of large rivers like the Mississippi is a key to addressing (1) significant source-to-sink geologic problems for sediment and particulate organic carbon and (2) environmental restoration efforts in deltas under threat from climate change. Five field studies were performed in the Mississippi River 75-100 km upstream of the Gulf of Mexico outlet in 2010 and 2011 at discharges ranging from 18,500 to 32,000 m3 s-1 to examine sand transport phenomena in the river channel. These studies utilized multibeam sonar bathymetric surveys, acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements of current velocity and acoustic backscatter, point-integrated isokinetic suspended sediment sampling, and channel-bed grab sampling to examine fluid flow and suspended/bedload sediment transport. Substantial interaction was observed between flow conditions in the river (boundary shear stress, turbulence intensity), channel-bed morphology (size and extent of sandy bedforms), and bed-material sand transport (quantity, transport mode, and spatial distribution). A lateral shift was observed in the region of maximum dune size and water column turbulence intensity from deep to shallow areas of lateral sand bars as water discharge increased, and is associated with the expansion of the bar top area experiencing critical shear stress conditions. Bed material was transported both in traction and in suspension at these water discharges, with the highest suspended mass flux rates associated with the part of the channel cross-section where the largest dunes were present, as a result of a relationship between bed shear stress, dune size, and turbulence intensity. We posit that the downriver flux of sand grains alternates between these two modes over relatively short spatial (up to a few km) and temporal scales. These results complicate the task of using cross-sectional flux measurements taken in lower reaches of large river channels

  5. Validation of VIIRS Land Surface Phenology using Field Observations, PhenoCam Imagery, and Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Jayavelu, S.; Wang, J.; Henebry, G. M.; Gray, J. M.; Friedl, M. A.; Liu, Y.; Schaaf, C.; Shuai, A.

    2016-12-01

    A large number of land surface phenology (LSP) products have been produced from various detection algorithms applied to coarse resolution satellite datasets across regional to global scales. However, validation of the resulting LSP products is very challenging because in-situ observations at comparable spatiotemporal scales are generally not available. This research focuses on efforts to evaluate and validate the global 500m LSP product produced from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) NBAR time series for 2013 and 2014. Specifically, we used three different datasets to evaluate six VIIRS LSP metrics of greenup onset, mid-point of greenup phase, maturity onset, senescence onset, mid-point of senescence phase, and dormancy onset. First, we obtained the field observations from the USA National Phenology Network that has gathered extensive phenological data on individual species. Although it is inappropriate to compare these data directly with the LSP footprints, this large and spatially distributed dataset allows us to evaluate the overall quality of VIIRS LSP results. Second, we gathered PhenoCam imagery from 164 sites, which was used to extract the daily green chromatic coordinate (GCC) and vegetation contrast index (VCI)values. Utilizing these PhenoCam time series, the phenological events were quantified using a hybrid piecewise logistic models for each site. Third, we detected the phenological timing at the landscape scale (30m) from surface reflectance simulated by fusing MODIS data and Landsat 8 OLI observations in an agricultural area (in the central USA) and from overlap zones of OLI scenes in semiarid areas (California and Tibetan Plateau). The phenological timing from these three datasets was used to compare with VIIRS LSP data. Preliminary results show that the VIIRS LSP are generally comparable with phenological data from the USA-NPN, PhenoCam, and Landsat data, with differences arising in specific phenological events and land cover types.

  6. Kepler Observations and Asteroseismology of θ Cyg, the Brightest StarObservable in the Kepler Field of View

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guzik, Joyce A.; Houdek, G.; Chaplin, W. J.

    2012-01-01

    -March 2011). We present analyses of the solar-like oscillations first discovered in the Q6 data [1, 2]. We use observational constraints from the literature and recent ground-based observations including angular diameters from optical interferometry in conjunction with the frequency data to derive stellar...... properties (e.g., mass, age, metallicity, extent of convection zones). We also discuss the prospects for detecting longer period gravity-mode pulsations as seen in gamma Doradus variable stars of spectral type A-F, given these constraints. With an effective temperature near 6500 K and near ‘solar’ element....... The calculated envelope convection zone depth depends on the element abundance mixtures adopted for the stellar models [2]. Asteroseismic studies of θ Cyg therefore have potential to shed light on the solar abundance problem [3, 4], as well as to put constraints on the presence and detectability of g...

  7. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .4. Association of sources with Hubble Deep Field galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, R.G.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss the identification of sources detected by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at 6.7 and 15 mu m in the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) region. We conservatively associate ISO sources with objects in existing optical and near-infrared HDF catalogues using the likelihood ratio method, confirmi...

  8. Observations of a transverse magnetic field perturbation at two altitudes on the equatorward edge of the magnetospheric cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, W. K.; Abe, T.; Andre, M.; Engebretson, M. J.; Fukunishi, H.; Hayakawa, H.; Matsuoka, A.; Mukai, T.; Persoon, A. M.; Retterer, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    On January 28, 1990, the Dynamic Explorer 1 (DE-1) and Akebono satellites crossed a magnetic field structure at the equatorward edge of the polar cusp at altitudes od 22,000 and 5000 km, respectively, within 6 min of each other. Locally measured plasma particles and fields and magnetometer data from a ground station near the foot of the magnetic field line are more consistent with an interpretation of the structure as that of a standing Alfven wave than that of a quasi-steady field-aligned current sheet. We discuss the observations supporting this conclusion and other related observations of field-aligned currents, Alfven waves, and ion energization near the equatorward edge of the cusp. These observations suggest that Alfven waves are commonly present near the equatorward edge of the cusp.

  9. Estimation of earthquake source parameters from GRACE observations of changes in Earth's gravitational potential field using normal modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenborg, G.; Simons, F. J.; Welch, E.; Morrow, E.; Mitrovica, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    Since its launch in 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) has yielded tremendous insights into the spatio-temporal changes of mass redistribution in the Earth system. Such changes occur on widely varying spatial and temporal scales and take place both on Earth's surface, e.g., atmospheric mass fluctuations and the exchange of water, snow and ice, as well as in its interior, e.g., glacial isostatic adjustment and earthquakes. Each of these processes causes changes in the Earth's gravitational potential field which GRACE observes. One example is the Antarctic and Greenland ice mass changes inferred from GRACE observations of the changing geopotential as well as the associated time rate of change of its degree 2 and 4 zonal harmonics observed by satellite laser ranging. Deforming the Earth's surface and interior both co- and post-seismically, with some of the deformation permanent, earthquakes can affect the geopotential at a spatial scale up to thousands of kilometers and at temporal scales from seconds to months. Traditional measurements of earthquakes, e.g., by seismometers, GPS and inSAR, observe the co- and post-seismic surface displacements and are invaluable in understanding earthquake triggering mechanisms, slip distributions, rupture dynamics and slow post-seismic changes. Space-based observations of geopotential changes can add a whole new dimension to this as such observations are also sensitive to changes in the Earth's interior, over a larger area affected by the earthquake, over longer timescales, beyond that of Earth's longest period normal mode, and because they have global sensitivity including over sparsely instrumented oceanic domains. We use a joint seismic and gravitational normal-mode formalism to quantify changes in the gravitational potential due to different types of earthquakes, comparing them to predictions from dislocation models. We discuss the inverse problem of estimating the source parameters of large earthquakes

  10. A Global Database of Field-observed Leaf Area Index in Woody Plant Species, 1932-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides global leaf area index (LAI) values for woody species. The data are a compilation of field-observed data from 1,216 locations obtained from...

  11. A Global Database of Field-observed Leaf Area Index in Woody Plant Species, 1932-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set provides global leaf area index (LAI) values for woody species. The data are a compilation of field-observed data from 1,216 locations...

  12. MAVEN Observations of Magnetic Flux Ropes with a Strong Field Amplitude in the Martian Magnetosheath During the ICME Passage on 8 March 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takuya; Luhmann, Janet G.; Halekas, Jasper S.; Espley, Jared R.; Seki, Kanako; Brain, David A.; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; McFadden, James P.; Mitchell, David L.; Mazelle, Christian; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present initial results of strong field amplitude flux ropes observed by Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) mission around Mars during the interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME) passage on 8 March 2015. The observed durations were shorter than 5 s and the magnetic field magnitudes peaked above 80 nT, which is a few times stronger than those usually seen in the magnetosheath barrier. These are the first unique observations that MAVEN detected such flux ropes with a strong field at high altitudes (greater than 5000 km). Across these structures, MAVEN coincidentally measured planetary heavy ions with energies higher than a few keV. The spatial properties inferred from the Grad-Shafranov equation suggest that the speed of the structure can be estimated at least an order of magnitude faster than those previously reported quiet-time counterparts. Hence, the space weather event like the ICME passage can be responsible for generating the observed strong field, fast-traveling flux ropes.

  13. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15: Parsivel2 Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Courtney [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-07-01

    One of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Parsivel2 disdrometers was deployed at the first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil at the beginning of the second Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon)2014/15 intensive operational period (IOP2) in September 2014 through the end of the field campaign in December 2015. The Parsivel2 provided one-minute drop-size distribution (DSD) observations that have already been used for a number of applications related to GoAmazon2014/15 science objectives. The first use was the creation of a reflectivity-rain rate (Z-R) relation enabling the calculation of rain rates from the Brazilian Sistema de Protecao da Amazonia (SIPAM) S-band operational radar in Manaus. The radar-derived rainfall is an important constraint for the variational analysis of a large-scale forcing data set, which was recently released for the two IOPs that took place in the 2014 wet and transition seasons, respectively. The SIPAM radar rainfall is also being used to validate a number of cloud-resolving model simulations being run for the campaign. A second use of the Parsivel2 DSDs has been to provide a necessary reference point to calibrate the vertical velocity retrievals from the AMF1 W Band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) cloud-profiling and ultra-high-frequency (UHF) wind-profiling instruments. Accurate retrievals of in-cloud vertical velocities are important to understand the microphysical and kinematic properties of Amazonian convective clouds and their interaction with the land surface and atmospheric aerosols. Further use of the Parsivel2 DSD observations can be made to better understand precipitation characteristics and their variability during GoAmazon2014/15.

  14. Field Geologic Observation and Sample Collection Strategies for Planetary Surface Exploration: Insights from the 2010 Desert RATS Geologist Crewmembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Jose M., Jr.; Young, Kelsey; Bleacher, Jacob E.; Garry, W. Brent; Rice, James W., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Observation is the primary role of all field geologists, and geologic observations put into an evolving conceptual context will be the most important data stream that will be relayed to Earth during a planetary exploration mission. Sample collection is also an important planetary field activity, and its success is closely tied to the quality of contextual observations. To test protocols for doing effective planetary geologic field- work, the Desert RATS(Research and Technology Studies) project deployed two prototype rovers for two weeks of simulated exploratory traverses in the San Francisco volcanic field of northern Arizona. The authors of this paper represent the geologist crew members who participated in the 2010 field test.We document the procedures adopted for Desert RATS 2010 and report on our experiences regarding these protocols. Careful consideration must be made of various issues that impact the interplay between field geologic observations and sample collection, including time management; strategies relatedtoduplicationofsamplesandobservations;logisticalconstraintson the volume and mass of samples and the volume/transfer of data collected; and paradigms for evaluation of mission success. We find that the 2010 field protocols brought to light important aspects of each of these issues, and we recommend best practices and modifications to training and operational protocols to address them. Underlying our recommendations is the recognition that the capacity of the crew to flexibly execute their activities is paramount. Careful design of mission parameters, especially field geologic protocols, is critical for enabling the crews to successfully meet their science objectives.

  15. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  16. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.; Assef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  17. Numerical simulations and observations of surface wave fields under an extreme tropical cyclone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Y.; Ginis, I.; Hara, T.; Wright, C.W.; Walsh, E.J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of the wave model WAVEWATCH III under a very strong, category 5, tropical cyclone wind forcing is investigated with different drag coefficient parameterizations and ocean current inputs. The model results are compared with field observations of the surface wave spectra from an airborne scanning radar altimeter, National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) time series, and satellite altimeter measurements in Hurricane Ivan (2004). The results suggest that the model with the original drag coefficient parameterization tends to overestimate the significant wave height and the dominant wavelength and produces a wave spectrum with narrower directional spreading. When an improved drag parameterization is introduced and the wave-current interaction is included, the model yields an improved forecast of significant wave height, but underestimates the dominant wavelength. When the hurricane moves over a preexisting mesoscale ocean feature, such as the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico or a warm-and cold-core ring, the current associated with the feature can accelerate or decelerate the wave propagation and significantly modulate the wave spectrum. ?? 2009 American Meteorological Society.

  18. Layer rotation around vertical fault overlap zones: observations from seismic data, field examples, and physical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rykkelid, E. [Norsk Hydro ASA, Oslo (Norway); Fossen, H. [University of Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Geology

    2002-02-01

    Vertically overlapping fault segments are common structures in faulted hydrocarbon reservoirs. Experimental work and field observations show a close relationship between the rotation of layers in the region of overlap, the type of overlap (restraining vs. releasing) and fault curvature. In general, releasing overlap zones (where the normal fault steps upward into the hanging-wall) show normal rotation or drag, thus decreasing the effective throw on the fault. In contrast, restraining overlaps tend to develop reverse rotation in the overlap zone, particularly if the normal fault tips curve toward each other. Releasing overlap zones seem to be more common than the restraining zones, and the overlaps tend to form in shaly layers between thicker sandstones. Narrow overlaps of this type typically develop zones of drag or shale smear that could seal or reduce communication across the adjacent sandstone layers. Hence, overlap zones may significantly influence communication in a reservoir, depending on the fault arrangement, geometry, and lithological properties. Seismic interpreters and structural geologists should pay particular attention to layer rotation to identify vertical overlap structures and to evaluate their influence on reservoir performance. (author)

  19. Field observations of recent transgression on northern and eastern Melville Island, western Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajeunesse, Patrick; Hanson, Michelle A.

    2008-11-01

    After ~ 11,000 years of glacio-isostatically induced forced regression, geomorphological evidence indicates that the coastline of eastern Melville Island, western Canadian Arctic Archipelago, is now being transgressed. Recently developed coastal features associated with this transgression include: drowned gullies and small estuaries, barriers and lagoons, barrier islands, erosional notches, backstepping beaches, and drowned tundra vegetation and vehicle tracks dating from the 1970s. We mainly attribute this relative sea-level rise to the eastward migration of a peripheral crustal forebulge. Furthermore, the reported transgression also includes a component from recent eustatic sea-level rise during the 20th century. Recent earthquakes recorded in the Gustav-Lougheed Arch Seismic Zone located in Byam Martin Channel, 70 km east of Melville Island, suggest that neotectonics could also be involved in local relative sea-level adjustments. Other factors associated with global warming, especially the formation of an earlier shore-ice lead coupled with increased storm activity might also be responsible for some of the coastal changes. Our study indicates that the current zero isobase, separating areas of net transgression from those of net regression, is now located off the east coast of the island. Our field observations support recent glacio-isostatic modelling that shows the island is presently undergoing a transgression.

  20. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rebull, L. M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, M/S 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-530, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  1. Field Reconnaissance Geologic Mapping of the Columbia Hills, Mars: Results from MER Spirit and MRO HiRISE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L.S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; McCoy, T.; Yingst, A.; Ruff, S.; Farrand, W.; McSween, Y.; Powell, M.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F.; Grant, J.; Greeley, R.; DesMarais, D.; Schmidt, M.; Cabrol, N.A.; Haldemann, A.; Lewis, Kevin W.; Wang, A.E.; Schroder, C.; Blaney, D.; Cohen, B.; Yen, A.; Farmer, J.; Gellert, Ralf; Guinness, E.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhofer, G.; McEwen, A.; Rice, J. W.; Rice, M.; deSouza, P.; Hurowitz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical, mineralogic, and lithologic ground truth was acquired for the first time on Mars in terrain units mapped using orbital Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (MRO HiRISE) image data. Examination of several dozen outcrops shows that Mars is geologically complex at meter length scales, the record of its geologic history is well exposed, stratigraphic units may be identified and correlated across significant areas on the ground, and outcrops and geologic relationships between materials may be analyzed with techniques commonly employed in terrestrial field geology. Despite their burial during the course of Martian geologic time by widespread epiclastic materials, mobile fines, and fall deposits, the selective exhumation of deep and well-preserved geologic units has exposed undisturbed outcrops, stratigraphic sections, and structural information much as they are preserved and exposed on Earth. A rich geologic record awaits skilled future field investigators on Mars. The correlation of ground observations and orbital images enables construction of a corresponding geologic reconnaissance map. Most of the outcrops visited are interpreted to be pyroclastic, impactite, and epiclastic deposits overlying an unexposed substrate, probably related to a modified Gusev crater central peak. Fluids have altered chemistry and mineralogy of these protoliths in degrees that vary substantially within the same map unit. Examination of the rocks exposed above and below the major unconformity between the plains lavas and the Columbia Hills directly confirms the general conclusion from remote sensing in previous studies over past years that the early history of Mars was a time of more intense deposition and modification of the surface. Although the availability of fluids and the chemical and mineral activity declined from this early period, significant later volcanism and fluid convection enabled additional, if localized, chemical activity.

  2. Probing Twisted Magnetic Field Using Microwave Observations in an M Class Solar Flare on 11 February, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Myshyakov, I. I.

    2018-02-01

    This work demonstrates the possibility of magnetic-field topology investigations using microwave polarimetric observations. We study a solar flare of GOES M1.7 class that occurred on 11 February, 2014. This flare revealed a clear signature of spatial inversion of the radio-emission polarization sign. We show that the observed polarization pattern can be explained by nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission from the twisted magnetic structure. Using observations of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Nobeyama Radio Observatory, Radio Solar Telescope Network, and Solar Dynamics Observatory, we have determined the parameters of nonthermal electrons and thermal plasma and identified the magnetic structure where the flare energy release occurred. To reconstruct the coronal magnetic field, we use nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) and potential magnetic-field approaches. Radio emission of nonthermal electrons is simulated by the GX Simulator code using the extrapolated magnetic field and the parameters of nonthermal electrons and thermal plasma inferred from the observations; the model radio maps and spectra are compared with observations. We have found that the potential-magnetic-field approach fails to explain the observed circular polarization pattern; on the other hand, the Stokes-V map is successfully explained by assuming nonthermal electrons to be distributed along the twisted magnetic structure determined by the NLFFF extrapolation approach. Thus, we show that the radio-polarization maps can be used for diagnosing the topology of the flare magnetic structures where nonthermal electrons are injected.

  3. Electric Field and Plasma Density Observations of Irregularities and Plasma Instabilities in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Gathered by the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Robert F.; Freudenreich, H.; Rowland, D.; Klenzing, J.; Liebrecht, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Vector Electric Field Investigation (VEFI) on the C/NOFS equatorial satellite provides a unique data set which includes detailed measurements of irregularities associated with the equatorial ionosphere and in particular with spread-F depletions. We present vector AC electric field observations gathered on C/NOFS that address a variety of key questions regarding how plasma irregularities, from meter to kilometer scales, are created and evolve. The talk focuses on occasions where the ionosphere F-peak has been elevated above the C/NOFS satellite perigee of 400 km as solar activity has increased. In particular, during the equinox periods of 2011, the satellite consistently journeyed below the F-peak whenever the orbit was in the region of the South Atlantic anomaly after sunset. During these passes, data from the electric field and plasma density probes on the satellite have revealed two types of instabilities which had not previously been observed in the C/NOFS data set: The first is evidence for 400-500km-scale bottomside "undulations" that appear in the density and electric field data. In one case, these large scale waves are associated with a strong shear in the zonal E x B flow, as evidenced by variations in the meridional (outward) electric fields observed above and below the F-peak. These undulations are devoid of smaller scale structures in the early evening, yet appear at later local times along the same orbit associated with fully-developed spread-F with smaller scale structures. This suggests that they may be precursor waves for spread-F, driven by a collisional shear instability, following ideas advanced previously by researchers using data from the Jicamarca radar. A second result is the appearance of km-scale irregularities that are a common feature in the electric field and plasma density data that also appear when the satellite is near or below the F-peak at night. The vector electric field instrument on C/NOFS clearly shows that the electric field

  4. Astrovirus-induced "white chicks" condition - field observation, virus detection and preliminary characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajewicz-Krukowska, Joanna; Pać, Krzysztof; Lisowska, Anna; Pikuła, Anna; Minta, Zenon; Króliczewska, Bożena; Domańska-Blicharz, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    Chicken astrovirus (CAstV) was recently indicated as the factor of the "white chicks" condition associated not only with increased embryo/chick mortality but also with weakness and white plumage of hatched chicks. In February 2014, organ samples (livers and kidneys) from dead-in-shell embryos, as well as 1-day-old whitish and normal chicks, were delivered from one hatchery in Poland for disease diagnosis. The samples originated from the same 30-week-old breeder flock in which the only observed abnormal signs were 4-5% decrease in the number of hatched chickens and the presence (about 1%) of weaker chicks with characteristic whitish plumage among normal ones. CAstV was detected in submitted samples and was then isolated in 10-day-old embryonated specific pathogen free (SPF) chicken eggs. We also reproduced an infection model for the "white chicks" condition in SPF layer chickens using the isolated PL/G059/2014 strain as the infectious agent. Results of experimental reproduction of the "white chicks" condition were somewhat more serious than field observation. The administration of the CAstV material into the yolk sac of 8-day-old SPF chicken eggs caused delay and prolongation of hatching, as well as death of embryos/chicks, and also a change of plumage pigmentation. Only two chicks of a total of 10 inoculated SPF eggs survived and were observed for 2 months. A gradual elimination of the CAstV genome was noted in this period. Moreover, a few contact-naive SPF chicks, which had been placed in the same cage, were infected with CAstV. Molecular characterization of detected CAstV was performed by nucleotide sequencing of the full ORF2 region encoding the capsid precursor protein gene. Phylogenetic studies showed that the PL/G059/2014 isolate clustered in the subgroup Aiii of CAstV. In the light of the new classification rules, the Polish PL/G059/2014 CAstV isolate could be assigned to a new species of the Avastrovirus genus.

  5. Electromagnetic field interactions with the human body: Observed effects and theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of nonionizing electromagnetic (EM) field interactions with the human body were reported and human related studies were collected. Nonionizing EM fields are linked to cancer in humans in three different ways: cause, means of detection, and effective treatment. Bad and benign effects are expected from nonionizing EM fields and much more knowledge is necessary to properly categorize and qualify EM field characteristics. It is concluded that knowledge of the boundary between categories, largely dependent on field intensity, is vital to proper future use of EM radiation for any purpose and the protection of the individual from hazard.

  6. Observation of Radiolytic Field Alteration of the Uranyl Cation in Bicarbonate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Lanee A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Cho, Herman M.; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-12-01

    In previous work we demonstrated that radiolysis of uranyl tris carbonate in near neutral pH to alkaline carbonate solutions, could be followed by 13C NMR. Radiolysis of the complex produced novel uranyl peroxo carbonate solution state species, whose structures depended on the pH and radiolytic dose rate. In this work, we investigate speciation of the uranyl carbonate trimer which is predominant in bicarbonate solution near pH 5.9. We observe radiolytically derived speciation to different mixed peroxy carbonate species than seen in the higher pH solutions. Auto radiolysis of uranium (VI) carbonate solutions between pH 5.9 and 7.2 is shown to alter the uranium speciation over relatively short periods of time and was followed by 13C NMR and visible spectrophotometry, using dissolved 233(UO2)3(CO3)6 6- both as the radiolysis source (D= 14.9 Gy/hr) and as a trap for the newly formed hydrogen peroxide. Direct addition of hydrogen peroxide to solutions of the uranyl-carbonate trimer is shown to reproduce the 13 C NMR signatures of the complexe(s) formed by radiolysis, but additionally a variety of new complexes are revealed. Ratios of H2O2/trimer < 1.5 produced a uranyl peroxo carbonate adduct, that is shown to be common to the radiolytically produced species. Ratios of H2O2/ trimer >1 resulted in formation of stable higher order peroxo carbonate complexes. The 13C NMR signatures and visible spectra of these complexes are described here. Rigorous characterization of the species is an ongoing effort.

  7. Observer report about field tests with a FALCON 4G stand-off detector by SEC Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.A. van der; Nieuwenhuizen, M.S.

    2016-01-01

    Field testing of the large distance stand-off CB detector FALCON 4G by SEC Technologies in Lipovsky Mikulas (Slovakia) was observed by 2 employees of TNO on 28 and 29 September 2016. Based on the experimental set-up as well as the execution by SEC Technologies TNO observed the tests employing the

  8. Linking field observations, Landsat and MODIS data to estimate agricultural change in European Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beurs, K. M.; Ioffe, G.

    2011-12-01

    and photographs. Russian farmers employ a variety of crop-rotation schemes. In the Russian grain belt, the farmers used to be on a seven-year rotation, which typically included only one year of fallow and a variety of grain crops in the remaining six years. Through field interviews and satellite observations we learned that the crop rotation schedules are changing from a seven year crop cycle focused on grain production to a three year crop cycle focused on the production of sunflower which is currently most profitable. In addition, a switch is underway from the dominant growth of spring wheat to stronger reliance on winter wheat which has better growth potential in the area. The number of cropped years, or the complementary number of fallow years, gives an indication of the type of crop cycle that is applied. In addition, drier areas are predicted to reveal more fallow years due to decisions by farm administrators. We will discuss how the ongoing changes represent adaptations to changing climatological and social circumstances.

  9. Understanding of changes in river flow using recently collected field and observational data from Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiklomanov, A. I.; Tokarev, I. V.; Davydov, S. P.; Davydova, A.; Streletskiy, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    There is substantial evidence supporting increasing river runoff in the Eurasian pan-Arctic, but the causes of these changes are not well understood. To determine the contributions of various water sources to river runoff generation in small streams and large rivers located in the continuous permafrost zone, an extensive field campaign was carried out near the town of Cherskii, Russia. Measurements of hydrometeorological characteristics, as well as stable isotope composition and hydrochemistry of precipitation, river flow and ground ice, were obtained during the 2013-2016 period. When combined with older data (2005-2009), the isotopic composition of atmospheric precipitation showed a general trend towards heavier winter precipitation, attributed mainly to observed increases in winter air temperature. Samples of water and ground ice from several boreholes showed that isotopic compositions of water from the active layer, transient layer and permafrost are significantly different. Thus, stable isotopes can be used to assess contributions of different soil layers to stream flow generation. Increases in streamflow of small test watersheds were observed during dry periods in August-September. These increases were associated with considerable stable isotope depletion in streamflow samples, which is likely caused by thawing of the transient- and possibly upper permafrost layers. The absence of correlation between water and air temperature during these periods (R2 = 0.22 in August-September and R2 = 0.8 in June-July) also suggests an increasing contribution of thawing ground ice to the streamflow. To quantitatively assess the contribution of various water sources to the river runoff of Kolyma River, we used stable isotope data along with a physically based hydrological model developed at the University of New Hampshire. Preliminary results suggest that thawing permafrost increased August-September discharge in Kolyma near Cherskii by 8% in 2013, 11% in 2014 and 4% in 2015

  10. Turbulence-wave interactions associated to drainage flows observed during the BLLAST field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagüe, Carlos; Sun, Jielun; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Sastre, Mariano; Arrillaga, Jon A.

    2016-04-01

    Gravity waves are often observed in the Nocturnal Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer (SBL). One of the main topics in SBL studies, which is still far from being well understood, is the interaction between these waves and the turbulence present at the lower troposphere [1]. However it is not easy to establish the origin of these waves and how they interact with turbulence. Following the case study occurred along the evening transition of 2nd July 2011 over the area of Lannemezan (France) during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign [2], in the present work we have extended the study to all the cases found along the campaign, where the evening transition of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer was followed by the formation of drainage flows. Different multiscale techniques (Wavelet Transform -WT- and MultiResolution Flux Decomposition -MRFD-) have been applied to the extensive records of instrumentation deployed at BLLAST. In this way, we can underline the different features related to surface turbulent parameters in the SBL, where several of the studied processes showed an interaction, producing important variations in turbulence with height and between sites along the steep terrain. [1] Sun, J., C. J. Nappo, L. Mahrt, D. Belusic, B. Grisogono, D. R. Stauffer, M. Pulido, C. Staquet, Q. Jiang, A. Pouquet, C. Yagüe, B. Galperin, R. B. Smith, J. J. Finnigan, S.D. Mayor, G. Svensson, A. A. Grachev, and W.D.Neff. (2015): Review of wave-turbulence interactions in the stable atmospheric boundary layer, Rev. Geophys., 53, 956-993, doi:10.1002/2015RG000487. [2] Román-Cascón, C., Yagüe, C., Mahrt, L., Sastre, M., Steeneveld, G.-J., Pardyjak, E., van de Boer, A., and Hartogensis, O (2015).: Interactions among drainage flows, gravity waves and turbulence: a BLLAST case study, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 9031-9047, doi:10.5194/acp-15-9031-2015.

  11. Chandra and JVLA Observations of HST Frontier Fields Cluster MACS J0717.5+3745

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weeren, R. J.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Pearce, Connor J. J.; David, L.; Kraft, R. P.; Nulsen, P. E. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ogrean, G. A. [Department of Physics, Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Bonafede, A.; Brüggen, M. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Bulbul, E. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Clarke, T. E. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Churazov, E. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741, Garching (Germany); Dawson, W. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Donahue, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Goulding, A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Mason, B. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Merten, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mroczkowski, T., E-mail: rvanweeren@cfa.harvard.edu [ESO—European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. München (Germany); and others

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between thermal and non-thermal components in merger galaxy clusters, we present deep JVLA and Chandra observations of the HST Frontier Fields cluster MACS J0717.5+3745. The Chandra image shows a complex merger event, with at least four components belonging to different merging subclusters. Northwest of the cluster, ∼0.7 Mpc from the center, there is a ram-pressure-stripped core that appears to have traversed the densest parts of the cluster after entering the intracluster medium (ICM) from the direction of a galaxy filament to the southeast. We detect a density discontinuity north-northeast of this core, which we speculate is associated with a cold front. Our radio images reveal new details for the complex radio relic and radio halo in this cluster. In addition, we discover several new filamentary radio sources with sizes of 100–300 kpc. A few of these seem to be connected to the main radio relic, while others are either embedded within the radio halo or projected onto it. A narrow-angled-tailed (NAT) radio galaxy, a cluster member, is located at the center of the radio relic. The steep spectrum tails of this active galactic nucleus lead into the large radio relic where the radio spectrum flattens again. This morphological connection between the NAT radio galaxy and relic provides evidence for re-acceleration (revival) of fossil electrons. The presence of hot ≳20 keV ICM gas detected by Chandra near the relic location provides additional support for this re-acceleration scenario.

  12. Null Arguments in Transitional Trilingual Grammars: Field Observations from Misionero German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Michael T.; Lipski, John

    2016-01-01

    In this field note we discuss findings from pilot research on a variety of heritage German spoken in the Northeastern Province of Misiones of Argentina. Based on sociolinguistic field interviews with 25 consultants possessing varying degrees of proficiency in the language, we show that this variant of heritage German does in fact occasionally…

  13. Infectious bronchitis in Brazilian chickens: current data and observations of field service personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EN Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The infectious bronchitis virus (IBV was detected for the first time in Brazil by Hipólito in 1957 in chickens sold life in the municipal market of Belo Horizonte, MG, when commercial poultry production was just starting in that country. The Massachusetts (Mass serotype was identified. However, the clinical disease was only observed in 1975, when poultry production was intensely growing. The extensive outbreak produced the classical condition in layers and breeders, affecting egg production and quality, whereas broilers presented respiratory and "nephritis-nephrosis" signs. The disease rapidly spread to all poultry-producing regions in the country, and in 1979, both the imports and the manufacturing of live vaccines against IB strains Mass, H120 and H52, were licensed. In 1980, inactivated vaccines were introduced. Molecular techniques, particularly PCR, started to bed in the identification of IBV. A retrospective analysis showed that, up to 1989, the main IBV strain circulating in Brazil was Mass. However, other studies shows the presence of a wide diversity of IBV strains in Brazil since the first strains were isolated, even before vaccination was introduced. Most researchers agree that the incidence of IBV different from Mass has increased, including of exclusively Brazilian genotypes, different from those described in other countries. Indeed, during the last few years, the number of genotypical variants has been much higher than that of the classical Mass serotype. Clinically, in addition of the classic presentations, atypical forms such as testicular atrophy and stones in the epidydimis associated to low fertility have been described. Serological techniques started to be used in vaccination monitoring and as a diagnostic tool. Serological response standards were developed, and have shown to be very useful to determine the expected profile in vaccination programs and when clinical disease is suspected. However, the immuno-enzymatic test

  14. Global analysis of cloud field coverage and radiative properties, using morphological methods and MODIS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Z. Bar-Or

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The recently recognized continuous transition zone between detectable clouds and cloud-free atmosphere ("the twilight zone" is affected by undetectable clouds and humidified aerosol. In this study, we suggest to distinguish cloud fields (including the detectable clouds and the surrounding twilight zone from cloud-free areas, which are not affected by clouds. For this classification, a robust and simple-to-implement cloud field masking algorithm which uses only the spatial distribution of clouds, is presented in detail. A global analysis, estimating Earth's cloud field coverage (50° S–50° N for 28 July 2008, using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS data, finds that while the declared cloud fraction is 51%, the global cloud field coverage reaches 88%. The results reveal the low likelihood for finding a cloud-free pixel and suggest that this likelihood may decrease as the pixel size becomes larger. A global latitudinal analysis of cloud fields finds that unlike oceans, which are more uniformly covered by cloud fields, land areas located under the subsidence zones of the Hadley cell (the desert belts, contain proper areas for investigating cloud-free atmosphere as there is 40–80% probability to detect clear sky over them. Usually these golden-pixels, with higher likelihood to be free of clouds, are over deserts. Independent global statistical analysis, using MODIS aerosol and cloud products, reveals a sharp exponential decay of the global mean aerosol optical depth (AOD as a function of the distance from the nearest detectable cloud, both above ocean and land. Similar statistical analysis finds an exponential growth of mean aerosol fine-mode fraction (FMF over oceans when the distance from the nearest cloud increases. A 30 km scale break clearly appears in several analyses here, suggesting this is a typical natural scale of cloud fields. This work shows different microphysical and optical properties of cloud fields

  15. DACCIWA Cloud-Aerosol Observations in West Africa Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, J Christine [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Blanchard, Yann [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Hill, Peter [Univ. of Reading (United Kingdom); Gregory, Laurie [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, Richard [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Interactions between aerosols and clouds, and their effects on radiation, precipitation, and regional circulations, are one of the largest uncertainties in understanding climate. With reducing uncertainties in predictions of weather, climate, and climate impacts in mind, the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project, funded by the European Commission, set out to improve our understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions in southern West Africa. This region is ideal for studying cloud-aerosol interactions because of its rich mix of natural and anthropogenic aerosols and diverse clouds, and because of the strong dependence on the regional and global climate of the sensitive West African monsoon. The overview of DACCIWA is described in Knippertz et al. 2015. The interdisciplinary DACCIWA team includes not only several European and African universities, but also Met Centres in the UK, France, Germany, Switzerland, Benin, Ghana, and Nigeria. One of the crucial research activities in DACCIWA is the major field campaign in southern West Africa from June to July 2016, comprising a benchmark data set for assessing detailed processes on natural and anthropogenic emissions; atmospheric composition; air pollution and its impacts on human and ecosystem health; boundary layer processes; couplings between aerosols, clouds, and rainfall; weather systems; radiation; and the monsoon circulation. Details and highlights of the campaign can be found in Flamant et al. 2017. To provide aerosol/cloud microphysical and optical properties that are essential for model evaluations and for the linkage between ground-based, airborne, and spaceborne observations, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility loaned two sun photometers to the DACCWIA team for the campaign from June 8 to July 29, 2016. The first sun photometer was deployed at Kumasi, Ghana (6.67962°N, 1.56019°W) by the University of Leeds

  16. Experimental observation of strong radiation reaction in the field of an ultra-intense laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarri, G.; Poder, K.; Tamburini, M.; di Piazza, A.; Keitel, C. H.; Zepf, M.

    2017-10-01

    Describing radiation reaction in an electromagnetic field is one of the most fundamental outstanding problems in electrodynamics. It consists of determining the dynamics of a charged particle fully taking into account self-forces (loosely referred to as radiation reaction) resulting from the radiation fields generated by the particle whilst it is accelerated. Radiation reaction has only been invoked to explain the radiative properties of powerful astrophysical objects, such as pulsars and quasars. From a theoretical standpoint, this phenomenon is subject of fervent debate and this impasse is worsened by the lack of experimental data, due to extremely high fields required to trigger these effects. Here, we report on the first experimental evidence of strong radiation reaction during the interaction of an ultra-relativistic electron beam with an intense laser field, beyond a purely classical description.

  17. TAURUS observations of the emission-line velocity field of Centaurus A (NGC 5128)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.; Atherton, P.D.

    1983-01-01

    Using TAURUS - an Imaging Fabry Perot system in conjunction with the IPCS on the AAT, the authors have studied the velocity field of the Hα emission line at a spatial resolution of 1.7'' over the dark lane structure of Centaurus A. The derived velocity field is quite symmetrical and strongly suggests that the emission line material is orbiting the elliptical component, as a warped disc. (orig.)

  18. Microscopic observation of magnetic bacteria in the magnetic field of a rotating permanent magnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Pieter; Shcherbakov, Valeriy; Petersen, Nikolai

    2015-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are ubiquitous and can be found in both freshwater and marine environments. Due to intracellular chains of magnetic single domain particles, they behave like swimming compass needles. In external magnetic fields like the Earth's magnetic field, a torque is acting on the chain. This will cause the bacterium to be rotated and aligned with the external field. The swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria can be controlled with external magnetic fields, which makes it convenient to study them under a light microscope. Usually, a special set of coils arranged around a light microscope is used to control the swimming magnetotactic bacteria. Here, we present a simple mechanical system with a permanent magnet, which produces a rotating magnetic field of nearly constant amplitude in the focal plane of a light microscope. The device is placed beside the light microscope and easily adaptable to almost any microscope and thus convenient for field experiments. To describe the trajectories qualitatively, a theoretical model of the trajectories is presented. This device can be used to control the swimming direction of magnetotactic bacteria and also for studying their magnetic and hydrodynamic properties.

  19. Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 Observations of Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Two groups have recently used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC 2) to acquire new high-resolution images of the planet Neptune. Members of the WFPC-2 Science Team, lead by John Trauger, acquired the first series of images on 27 through 29 June 1994. These were the highest resolution images of Neptune taken since the Voyager-2 flyby in August of 1989. A more comprehensive program is currently being conducted by Heidi Hammel and Wes Lockwood. These two sets of observations are providing a wealth of new information about the structure, composition, and meteorology of this distant planet's atmosphere.Neptune is currently the most distant planet from the sun, with an orbital radius of 4.5 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles, or 30 Astronomical Units). Even though its diameter is about four times that of the Earth (49,420 vs. 12,742 km), ground-based telescopes reveal a tiny blue disk that subtends less than 1/1200 of a degree (2.3 arc-seconds). Neptune has therefore been a particularly challenging object to study from the ground because its disk is badly blurred by the Earth's atmosphere. In spite of this, ground-based astronomers had learned a great deal about this planet since its position was first predicted by John C. Adams and Urbain Leverrier in 1845. For example, they had determined that Neptune was composed primarily of hydrogen and helium gas, and that its blue color caused by the presence of trace amounts of the gas methane, which absorbs red light. They had also detected bright cloud features whose brightness changed with time, and tracked these clouds to infer a rotation period between 17 and 22 hours.When the Voyager-2 spacecraft flew past the Neptune in 1989, its instruments revealed a surprising array of meteorological phenomena, including strong winds, bright, high-altitude clouds, and two large dark spots attributed to long-lived giant storm systems. These bright clouds and dark spots were tracked as they moved

  20. Magnetopause Erosion During the 17 March 2015 Magnetic Storm: Combined Field-Aligned Currents, Auroral Oval, and Magnetopause Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Luehr, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Singer, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Zhang, Y.; Huang, T.; Bromund, K.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present multimission observations of field-aligned currents, auroral oval, and magnetopause crossings during the 17 March 2015 magnetic storm. Dayside reconnection is expected to transport magnetic flux, strengthen field-aligned currents, lead to polar cap expansion and magnetopause erosion. Our multimission observations assemble evidence for all these manifestations. After a prolonged period of strongly southward interplanetary magnetic field, Swarm and AMPERE observe significant intensification of field-aligned currents .The dayside auroral oval, as seen by DMSP, appears as a thin arc associated with ongoing dayside reconnection. Both the field-aligned currents and the auroral arc move equatorward reaching as low as approx. 60 deg. magnetic latitude. Strong magnetopause erosion is evident in the in situ measurements of the magnetopause crossings by GOES 13/15 and MMS. The coordinated Swarm, AMPERE, DMSP, MMS and GOES observations, with both global and in situ coverage of the key regions, provide a clear demonstration of the effects of dayside reconnection on the entire magnetosphere.

  1. Near?Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R.; Cattell, Cynthia A.; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N.; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J. Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ? 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)?A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50?m...

  2. RADIO POLARIZATION OBSERVATIONS OF THE SNAIL: A CRUSHED PULSAR WIND NEBULA IN G327.1–1.1 WITH A HIGHLY ORDERED MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y. K.; Ng, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Bucciantini, N. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, L.go E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Slane, P. O. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gaensler, B. M. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Temim, T., E-mail: ncy@bohr.physics.hku.hk [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) are suggested to be acceleration sites of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. While the magnetic field plays an important role in the acceleration process, previous observations of magnetic field configurations of PWNe are rare, particularly for evolved systems. We present a radio polarization study of the “Snail” PWN inside the supernova remnant G327.1−1.1 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. This PWN is believed to have been recently crushed by the supernova (SN) reverse shock. The radio morphology is composed of a main circular body with a finger-like protrusion. We detected a strong linear polarization signal from the emission, which reflects a highly ordered magnetic field in the PWN and is in contrast to the turbulent environment with a tangled magnetic field generally expected from hydrodynamical simulations. This could suggest that the characteristic turbulence scale is larger than the radio beam size. We built a toy model to explore this possibility, and found that a simulated PWN with a turbulence scale of about one-eighth to one-sixth of the nebula radius and a pulsar wind filling factor of 50%–75% provides the best match to observations. This implies substantial mixing between the SN ejecta and pulsar wind material in this system.

  3. Magnetic Helicity Estimations in Models and Observations of the Solar Magnetic Field. III. Twist Number Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Y. [School of Astronomy and Space Science and Key Laboratory of Modern Astronomy and Astrophysics in Ministry of Education, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Pariat, E.; Moraitis, K. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-92190 Meudon (France); Valori, G. [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Anfinogentov, S. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics SB RAS 664033, Irkutsk, P.O. box 291, Lermontov Street, 126a (Russian Federation); Chen, F. [Max-Plank-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Georgoulis, M. K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics of the Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, 11527 Athens (Greece); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Thalmann, J. K. [Institute of Physics, Univeristy of Graz, Universitätsplatz 5/II, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Yang, S., E-mail: guoyang@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2017-05-01

    We study the writhe, twist, and magnetic helicity of different magnetic flux ropes, based on models of the solar coronal magnetic field structure. These include an analytical force-free Titov–Démoulin equilibrium solution, non-force-free magnetohydrodynamic simulations, and nonlinear force-free magnetic field models. The geometrical boundary of the magnetic flux rope is determined by the quasi-separatrix layer and the bottom surface, and the axis curve of the flux rope is determined by its overall orientation. The twist is computed by the Berger–Prior formula, which is suitable for arbitrary geometry and both force-free and non-force-free models. The magnetic helicity is estimated by the twist multiplied by the square of the axial magnetic flux. We compare the obtained values with those derived by a finite volume helicity estimation method. We find that the magnetic helicity obtained with the twist method agrees with the helicity carried by the purely current-carrying part of the field within uncertainties for most test cases. It is also found that the current-carrying part of the model field is relatively significant at the very location of the magnetic flux rope. This qualitatively explains the agreement between the magnetic helicity computed by the twist method and the helicity contributed purely by the current-carrying magnetic field.

  4. The sunspot cycle and solar magnetic fields. I - The mechanism as inferred from observation. II - The interaction of flux tubes with the convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanelli, R. G.

    The first part of the present work notes that solar magnetic and velocity field observations can be used to derive the course of events in the solar cycle; such observations differ from those of conventional dynamo theories in the matters of polar field reversal, the sunspot cycle, and the torsional oscillation. In the second part, the mechanisms of interaction between flux tubes or ropes and the convection zone are examined for their relevance to the sunspot cycle. The mechanisms encompass floating, transport, and the penetration of gas from outside the tubes. All previous studies are noted to contain one or more major errors, rendering their conclusions invalid. These errors invariably involve the assumption that Archimede's principle is applicable to flux ropes, that gas entry can be disregarded, or, in some cases, that floating criteria substantially depend on local phenomena. Attention is given to: (1) the transport of flux tubes by the slow poleward motions, and to the even slower systems that carry tube extensions downwards to depths of about 150 Mm and then equatorwards; (2) their magnetic field strengths; and (3) the amplitudes of the torsional oscillation. All major cycle observations are concluded to be accounted for by the novel dynamo mechanism discussed.

  5. Observation of drift motion of a collisional plasma in cross fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.; Kuroda, Tsutomu; Horikoshi, Gen-ichi

    1976-01-01

    The drift velocity of particles in a plasma cylinder immersed in an axial magnetic field and a radial electric field was investigated using a test-wave technique, and plasma parameter measurements were made using a Langmuir probe. The drift velocity is determined directly by the test wave method, and at the same time, calculated from the information concerning the electric and magnetic fields, taking into account the effects of a cylindrical geometry and a finite Larmor radius. From the discrepancy between these two drift velocities, the collision term for a cylindrical geometry can be determined as a function of B. Finally, after making some corrections in E sub(γ), the value of the cross section for collision between ions and neutrals is obtained, which is smaller than the current values in the literature. After some discussion, it is found that a simple estimation of the slowing-down cross section is in good agreement with the experiment. (auth.)

  6. Flat-fielding of Solar Hα Observations Based on the Maximum Correntropy Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gao-Gui; Zheng, Sheng; Lin, Gang-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Fan

    2016-08-01

    The flat-field CCD calibration method of Kuhn et al. (KLL) is an efficient method for flat-fielding. However, since it depends on the minimum of the sum of squares error (SSE), its solution is sensitive to noise, especially non-Gaussian noise. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed to determine the flat field. The idea is to change the criterion of gain estimate from SSE to the maximum correntropy. The result of a test on simulated data demonstrates that our method has a higher accuracy and a faster convergence than KLL’s and Chae’s. It has been found that the method effectively suppresses noise, especially in the case of typical non-Gaussian noise. And the computing time of our algorithm is the shortest.

  7. An ozone episode in the Pearl River Delta: Field observation and model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, F.; Guo, H.; Wang, T. J.; Cheng, H. R.; Wang, X. M.; Simpson, I. J.; Ding, A. J.; Saunders, S. M.; Lam, S. H. M.; Blake, D. R.

    2010-11-01

    In the fall of 2007 concurrent air sampling field measurements were conducted for the first time in Guangzhou (at Wan Qing Sha (WQS)) and Hong Kong (at Tung Chung (TC)), two cities in the rapidly developing Pearl River Delta region of China that are only 62 km apart. This region is known to suffer from poor air quality, especially during the autumn and winter months, when the prevailing meteorological conditions bring an outflow of continental air to the region. An interesting multiday O3 pollution event (daily maximum O3 > 122 ppbv) was captured during 9-17 November at WQS, while only one O3 episode day (10 November) was observed at TC during this time. The mean O3 mixing ratios at TC and WQS during the episode were 38 ± 3 (mean ± 95% confidence interval) and 51 ± 7 ppbv, respectively, with a mean difference of 13 ppbv and a maximum hourly difference of 150 ppbv. We further divided this event into two periods: 9-11 November as Period 1 and 12-17 November as Period 2. The mixing ratios of O3 and its precursors (NOx and CO) showed significant differences between the two periods at TC. By contrast, no obvious difference was found at WQS, indicating that different air masses arrived at TC for the two periods, as opposed to similar air masses at WQS for both periods. The analysis of VOC ratios and their relationship with O3 revealed strong O3 production at WQS during Period 2, in contrast to relatively weak photochemical O3 formation at TC. The weather conditions implied regional transport of O3 pollution during Period 1 at both sites. Furthermore, a comprehensive air quality model system (Weather Research and Forecasting-Community Multiscale Air Quality model (WRF-CMAQ)) was used to simulate this O3 pollution event. The model system generally reproduced the variations of weather conditions, simulated well the continuous high O3 episode event at WQS, and captured fairly well the elevated O3 mixing ratios in Period 1 and low O3 levels in Period 2 at TC. The modeled

  8. Some observations on stray magnetic fields and power outputs from short-wave diathermy equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, R.W.M.; Dunscombe, P.B.

    1984-04-01

    Recent years have seen increasing interest in the possible hazards arising from the use of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation. Relatively large and potentially hazardous fields are to be found in the vicinity of short-wave and microwave equipment used in physiotherapy departments to produce therapeutic temperature rises. This note reports the results of measurements of the stray magnetic field and power output of a conventional short-wave diathermy unit when applied to tissue-equivalent phantoms. The dependence of these quantities on the variables, i.e. power setting of the unit, capacitor plate size, phantom size and phantom-capacitor plate separation, are discussed.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF SIMILARITY THEORY STABILITY CORRECTION TERMS FOR MOMENTUM AND TEMPERATURE, OVER AGRICULTURAL FIELDS AND FORESTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many observations of temperature and wind speed profiles have been taken over "ideal" terrain and analyzed to develop the stability correction terms which are commonly used in the application of similarity theory. Fewer observations have been taken and analyzed in this manner ov...

  10. Fusing Observations and Model Results for Creation of Enhanced Ozone Spatial Fields: Comparison of Three Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents three simple techniques for fusing observations and numerical model predictions. The techniques rely on model/observation bias being considered either as error free, or containing some uncertainty, the latter mitigated with a Kalman filter approach or a spati...

  11. Gauge-invariant observables and marginal deformations in open string field theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kudrna, Matěj; Masuda, T.; Okawa, Y.; Schnabl, Martin; Yoshida, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, č. 1 (2013), s. 1-26 ISSN 1126-6708 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11106 Grant - others:EUROHORC and ESF(XE) EYI/07/E010 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : string field theory * tachyon condensation * D-branes Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 5.618, year: 2012

  12. Observation of enhanced field-free molecular alignment by two laser pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Christer; Poulsen, Mikael Dahlerup; Peronne, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    We show experimentally that field-free alignment of iodobenzene molecules, induced by a single, intense, linearly polarized 1.4-ps-long laser pulse, can be strongly enhanced by dividing the pulse into two optimally synchronized pulses of the same duration. For a given total energy of the two...

  13. Phenocams bridge the gap between field and satellite observations in an arid grassland ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near surface (i.e., camera) and satellite remote sensing metrics have become widely used indicators of plant growing seasons. While robust linkages have been established between field metrics and ecosystem exchange in many land cover types, assessment of how well remotely-derived season start and en...

  14. Exchange magnetic field torques in YIG/Pt bilayers observed by the spin-Hall magnetoresistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlietstra, N.; Shan, J.; Castel, V.; Ben Youssef, J.; Bauer, G. E. W.; van Wees, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    The effective field torque of an yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG) film on the spin accumulation in an attached platinum (Pt) film is measured by the spin-Hall magnetoresistance (SMR). As a result, the magnetization direction of a ferromagnetic insulating layer can be measured electrically. Experimental

  15. Observed periodicities and the spectrum of field variations in Holocene magnetic records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panovska, S.; Finlay, Chris; Hirt, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand mechanisms that maintain and drive the evolution of the Earth's magnetic field, a characterization of its behavior on time scales of centuries to millennia is required. We have conducted a search for periodicities in Holocene sediment magnetic records, by applying three...

  16. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .2. Source detection and photometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldschmidt, P.; Oliver, S.J.; Serjeant, S.B.G.

    1997-01-01

    We present positions and fluxes of point sources found in the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) images of the Hubble Deep Field (HDF) at 6.7 and 15 mu m. We have constructed algorithmically selected 'complete' flux-limited samples of 19 sources in the 15-mu m image, and seven sources in the 6.7-mu m...

  17. In Situ Observation of Reversible Nanomagnetic Switching Induced by Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    theory firmly establishes aconnection between electric and magnetic fieldswhen either has an explicit time dependence, but magnetism and electricity...implementation of this electrically tunable uniaxial anisotropy. Demonstrated and proposed MRAM technologies make use of either Oersted fields21,22 or spin

  18. Cluster observations of magnetic field fluctuations in the high-altitude cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nykyri

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution (22 vector/s magnetic field data from Cluster FGM instrument are presented for the high-altitude cusp crossing on 17 March 2001. Despite the quiet solar wind conditions, the cusp was filled with magnetic field turbulence for much of the crossing. Large-scale fluctuations show some correlation between spacecraft but the higher frequency fluctuations show no correlation, indicating that the length scales of these waves are smaller than the spacecraft separation (500km. In many intervals, there are clear peaks in the wave power around the ion cyclotron frequency (~1Hz, and there is some evidence for waves at the first harmonic of this frequency. Both left- and right-hand polarised waves are found, with angles of propagation with respect to the ambient magnetic field that range from parallel to perpendicular. The regions of enhanced magnetic field fluctuations appear to be associated with plasma flows possibly originating from a lobe reconnection site. The most coherent, long lasting wave trains with frequencies close to local ion cyclotron frequency occur at a boundary between a sheared flow and a stagnant plasma.

  19. Multi-point ground-based ULF magnetic field observations in Europe during seismic active periods in 2004 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prattes

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of ground-based Ultra Low Frequency (ULF magnetic field measurements observed from June to August 2004 during the Bovec earthquake on 12 July 2004. Further we give information about the seismic activity in the local observatory region for an extended time span 2004 and 2005. ULF magnetic field data are provided by the South European Geomagnetic Array (SEGMA where the experience and heritage from the CHInese MAGnetometer (CHIMAG fluxgate magnetometer comes to application. The intensities of the horizontal H and vertical Z magnetic field and the polarization ratio R of the vertical and horizontal magnetic field intensity are analyzed taking into consideration three SEGMA observatories located at different close distances and directions from the earthquake epicenter. We observed a significant increase of high polarization ratios during strong seismic activity at the observatory nearest to the Bovec earthquake epicenter. Apart from indirect ionospheric effects electromagnetic noise could be emitted in the lithosphere due to tectonic effects in the earthquake focus region causing anomalies of the vertical magnetic field intensity. Assuming that the measured vertical magnetic field intensities are of lithospheric origin, we roughly estimate the amplitude of electromagnetic noise in the Earths crust considering an average electrical conductivity of <σ>=10−3 S/m and a certain distance of the observatory to the earthquake epicenter.

  20. Observations of the Hubble Deep Field with the Infrared Space Observatory .1. Data reduction, maps and sky coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serjeant, S.B.G.; Eaton, N.; Oliver, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    We present deep imaging at 6.7 and 15 mu m from the CAM instrument on the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), centred on the Hubble Deep Field (HDF). These are the deepest integrations published to date at these wavelengths in any region of sky. We discuss the observational strategy and the data...

  1. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best…

  2. Dynamics of a two-level system in a classical field. A description in different observation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiner, E.; Steinbeck, L.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of contraction in the description of a two-level quantum system coupled to a classical electromagnetic field are studied. Different observation levels are introduced and the corresponding nonlinear equations of motion are obtained. The solutions are discussed with respect to stability, constants of motion and evolution of relevant entropies. (orig.)

  3. The effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides: Field observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haijun; Cui, Peng; Regmi, Amar Deep; Hu, Sheng; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuzhu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we characterize and consider the effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides. To carry out this study, we employ data on 275 loess slides within Zhidan County, Central Loess Plateau, China. These data were collected in the field and supplemented by the interpretation of remote sensing images. Both the field observations and slope stability analysis show that loess slide size increases with the slope length. Slide sizes is significantly correlated with slope length, showing a power law relationship in both cases. However, the simulation results show that slope gradient is not associated with loess slide size. The main part of the link between slope gradient and slide size seen in the observations is only apparent, as indicated by the strong connection between slope gradient and length. Statistical analysis of the field observations reveals that slope gradient decreases with increasing slope length, and this correlation interferes with the potential relationship between landslide sizes and slope gradient seen in the field observations. In addition, the probability densities of the areas of loess slides occurring on slopes of different slope lengths are determined using kernel density estimation. This analysis shows that slope length controls the rollover of the frequency-size distribution of loess slides. The scaling exponent increases with slope length.

  4. Using ACE Observations of Interplanetary Particles and Magnetic Fields as Possible Contributors to Variations Observed at Van Allen Probes during Major events in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from ACE EPAM including energy spectra of protons, helium, and oxygen will be prepared for coordinated use in estimating the direct and indirect access of energetic particles to inner and outer geomagnetic trapping zones. Complete temporal coverage from ACE at 12 seconds, 5 minutes, 17 minutes, hourly and daily cadences will be used to catalog interplanetary events arriving at Earth including interplanetary magnetic field sector boundaries, interplanetary shocks, and interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs. The first 6 months of 2013 have included both highly disturbed times, March 17 and May 22, and extended quiet periods of little or no variations. Among the specific questions that ACE and Van Allen Probes coordinated observations may aid in resolving are: 1. How much, if any, direct capture of interplanetary energetic particles occurs and what conditions account for it? 2. How much influence do interplanetary field and particle variations have on energization and/or loss of geomagnetically trapped populations? The poster will also present important links and describe methods and important details of access to numerically expressed ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE observations that can be flexibly and easily accessed via the internet for student and senior researcher use.

  5. The First Wide-field X-ray Imaging Telescope for Observations of Charge Exchange

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Soft x-ray emission from the interaction of solar wind with the earth's exosphere provides a very significant foreground to all soft x-ray observations. It is...

  6. Observation of the Avalanche of Runaway Electrons in Air in a Strong Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, A. V.; Mesyats, G. A.; Zybin, K. P.; Yalandin, M. I.; Reutova, A. G.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.

    2012-08-01

    The generation of an avalanche of runaway electrons is demonstrated for the first time in a laboratory experiment. Two flows of runaway electrons are formed sequentially in an extended air discharge gap at the stage of delay of a pulsed breakdown. The first, picosecond, runaway electron flow is emitted in the cathode region where the field is enhanced. Being accelerated in the gap, this beam generates electrons due to impact ionization. These secondary electrons form a delayed avalanche of runaway electrons if the field is strong enough. The properties of the avalanche correspond to the existing notions about the runaway breakdown in air. The measured current of the avalanche exceeds up to an order the current of the initiating electron beam.

  7. LAMOST OBSERVATIONS IN THE KEPLER FIELD: SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION WITH THE MKCLASS CODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, R. O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States); Corbally, C. J. [Vatican Observatory Research Group, Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Cat, P. De [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussel (Belgium); Fu, J. N.; Ren, A. B. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, 19 Avenue Xinjiekouwai, Beijing 100875 (China); Shi, J. R.; Luo, A. L.; Zhang, H. T.; Wu, Y.; Cao, Z.; Li, G. [Key Laboratory for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.; Wang, Y. [Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The LAMOST-Kepler project was designed to obtain high-quality, low-resolution spectra of many of the stars in the Kepler field with the Large Sky Area Multi Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectroscopic telescope. To date 101,086 spectra of 80,447 objects over the entire Kepler field have been acquired. Physical parameters, radial velocities, and rotational velocities of these stars will be reported in other papers. In this paper we present MK spectral classifications for these spectra determined with the automatic classification code MKCLASS. We discuss the quality and reliability of the spectral types and present histograms showing the frequency of the spectral types in the main table organized according to luminosity class. Finally, as examples of the use of this spectral database, we compute the proportion of A-type stars that are Am stars, and identify 32 new barium dwarf candidates.

  8. Application of Stochastic Unsaturated Flow Theory, Numerical Simulations, and Comparisons to Field Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Mantoglou, Aristotelis

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic unsaturated flow theory and a numerical simulation model have been coupled in order to estimate the large-scale mean behavior of an unsaturated flow system in a spatially variable soil. On the basis of the theoretical developments of Mantoglou and Gelhar (1987a, b, c), the theory...... unsaturated flow equation representing the mean system behavior is solved using a finite difference numerical solution technique. The effective parameters are evaluated from the stochastic theory formulas before entering them into the numerical solution for each iteration. The stochastic model is applied...... to a field site in Denmark, where information is available on the spatial variability of soil parameters and variables. Numerical simulations have been carried out, and predictions of the mean behavior and the variance of the capillary tension head and the soil moisture content have been compared to field...

  9. Validation of an orimulsion spill fates model using observations from field test spills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, D. P.; Rines, H. [Applied Science Associates, Inc., Narragansett, RI (United States); Masciangioli, P. [INTEVEP, Filial de Petroleos de Venezuela, SA, Los Teques (Venezuela)

    1997-10-01

    The SIMAP Spill Impact Model system was developed to simulate fates and effects of spilled oil and other fuels in 3-D and time. Orimulsion is a Venezuelan product consisting of 70 per cent bitumen and 30 per cent water which has been shipped to many parts of the world for some time without an accidental spill into coastal or marine waters. In July 1966 two intentional spills of Orimulsion into Carribean waters were made and sampled in detail in order to verify the SIMAP model. Data on physical dispersion was collected at the same time. Data collected in the field was compared with model simulations. Results confirmed SIMAP`s ability to predict the increasing dispersion and shearing of the bitumen plume as wind speed increases, as well as the actual field distribution of subsurface and surface bitumen. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 26 figs.

  10. Validation of an orimulsion spill fates model using observations from field test spills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, D. P.; Rines, H.; Masciangioli, P.

    1997-01-01

    The SIMAP Spill Impact Model system was developed to simulate fates and effects of spilled oil and other fuels in 3-D and time. Orimulsion is a Venezuelan product consisting of 70 per cent bitumen and 30 per cent water which has been shipped to many parts of the world for some time without an accidental spill into coastal or marine waters. In July 1966 two intentional spills of Orimulsion into Carribean waters were made and sampled in detail in order to verify the SIMAP model. Data on physical dispersion was collected at the same time. Data collected in the field was compared with model simulations. Results confirmed SIMAP's ability to predict the increasing dispersion and shearing of the bitumen plume as wind speed increases, as well as the actual field distribution of subsurface and surface bitumen. 17 refs., 7 tabs., 26 figs

  11. Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-forming Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from th...

  12. Can a nightside geomagnetic Delta H observed at the equator manifest a penetration electric field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Fraenz, M.; Dubinin, E.; He, M.; Ren, Z.; Zhao, B.; Liu, J.; Wan, W.; Yumoto, K.; Watari, S.; Alex, S.

    2013-06-01

    A prompt penetration electric field (PPEF) usually manifests itself in the form of an equatorial ionospheric electric field being in correlation with a solar wind electric field. Due to the strong Cowling conductivity, a PPEF on the dayside can be inferred from Delta H (ΔH), which is the difference in the magnitudes of the horizontal (H) component between a magnetometer at the magnetic equator and one off the equator. This paper aims to investigate the performance of ΔH in response to a PPEF on the nightside, where the Cowling conductivity is not significant. We first examine the strongest geomagnetically active time during the 20 November 2003 superstorm when the Dst drops to -473 nT and show that the nightside ΔH can indeed manifest a PPEF but with local time dependence and longitude dependence. We then examine a moderately active time by taking advantage of the multiple-penetration event during 11-16 November 2003 when the Dst remains greater than -60 nT. During this event, a series of PPEF pulses recorded in Peru, Japan, and India form a database, allowing us to examine PPEF effects at different local times and longitudes. The results show that (1) the nightside ΔH was caused by attenuation of the effects of the polar electric field with decreasing latitude; (2) the nightside ΔH can manifest a PPEF at least in the midnight-dawn sector (0000-0500 LT), but not always; and (3) the magnitude of the nightside ΔH in the midnight-dawn sector in Peru is on average only 1/18 of that of the dayside ΔH in response to a given PPEF.

  13. Observations and modeling of magnetized plasma jets and bubbles launched into a transverse B-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Zhang, Yue; Wallace, Ben; Gilmore, Mark; Manchester, Ward B., IV; van der Holst, Bart; Rogers, Barrett N.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-10-01

    Hot, dense, plasma structures launched from a coaxial plasma gun on the HelCat dual-source plasma device at the University of New Mexico drag frozen-in magnetic flux into the chamber's background magnetic field providing a rich set of dynamics to study magnetic turbulence, force-free magnetic spheromaks, shocks, as well as CME-like dynamics possibly relevant to the solar corona. Vector magnetic field data from an eleven-tipped B-dot rake probe and images from an ultra-fast camera will be presented in comparison with ongoing MHD modeling using the 3-D MHD BATS-R-US code developed at the University of Michigan. BATS-R-US employs an adaptive mesh refinement grid (AMR) that enables the capture and resolution of shock structures and current sheets and is uniquely suited for flux-rope expansion modeling. Recent experiments show a possible magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability that appears asymmetrically at the interface between launched spheromaks (bubbles) and their entraining background magnetic field. Efforts to understand this instability using in situ measurements, new chamber boundary conditions, and ultra-fast camera data will be presented. Work supported by the Army Research Office Award No. W911NF1510480.

  14. Cognitive Factors that Impact Learning in the Field: Observations from an REU Project on Precambrian Rocks of Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, D.; Mogk, D. W.; Goodwin, C.

    2011-12-01

    Field work requires cognitive processing on many different levels, and constitutes a powerful and important learning environment. To be effective and meaningful, the context of field work must be fully understood in terms of key research questions, earlier published work, regional geology, geologic history, and geologic processes. Scale(s) of observation and sample selection methods and strategies must be defined. Logistical decisions must be made about equipment needed, points of access, and navigation in the field. Professional skills such as field note-taking, measuring structural data, and rock descriptions must be employed, including appropriate use of field tools. Interpretations of geologic features in the field must be interpreted through recall of concepts from the geologic knowledge base (e.g. crystallization history of igneous rocks interpreted through phase diagrams). Field workers need to be able to self-monitor and self-regulate their actions (metacognitively), and make adjustments to daily plans as needed. The results of field work must be accurately and effectively communicated to other geoscientists. Personal and professional ethics and values are brought to bear as decisions are made about whether or not the work has been satisfactorily completed at a field site. And, all of this must be done against a back drop of environmental factors that affect the ability to do this work (e.g. inclement weather, bears, impassable landscapes). The simultaneous relevance of all these factors creates a challenging, but rewarding environment for learning on many different scales. During our REU project to study the Precambrian rocks in the back country of Yellowstone National Park (YNP), we considered these cognitive factors in designing our project curriculum. To reduce the "novelty space" of the project a website was developed that described the project goals and expected outcomes, introduced primary literature, and alerted students about the physical demands

  15. Comparison of Magnetospheric Magnetic Field Variations at Quasi-Zenith Orbit Based on Michibiki Observation and REPPU Global MHD Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y.; Nagatsuma, T.; Den, M.; Nakamizo, A.; Matsumoto, H.; Tanaka, T.

    2017-12-01

    We are developing a numerical simulator for future space weather forecast using magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling global MHD simulation called REPPU (REProduce Plasma Universe) code. We investigate the validity of the MHD simulation result as compared with observation. In this study we simulate some events including both quiet and disturbed geomagnetic conditions using OMNIWeb solar wind data. The simulation results are compared with magnetic field observations from Michibiki satellite, which is on the quasi-zenith orbit (QZO). In quiet geomagnetic condition, magnetic field variations at QZO obtained from simulation results have good consistency as compared correspondence with those from Michibiki observation. In disturbed geomagnetic condition in which the Dst Dst and solar wind.

  16. Observation of Oscillatory Radial Electric Field Relaxation in a Helical Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J A; Sánchez, E; Calvo, I; Velasco, J L; McCarthy, K J; Chmyga, A; Eliseev, L G; Estrada, T; Kleiber, R; Krupnik, L I; Melnikov, A V; Monreal, P; Parra, F I; Perfilov, S; Zhezhera, A I

    2017-05-05

    Measurements of the relaxation of a zonal electrostatic potential perturbation in a nonaxisymmetric magnetically confined plasma are presented. A sudden perturbation of the plasma equilibrium is induced by the injection of a cryogenic hydrogen pellet in the TJ-II stellarator, which is observed to be followed by a damped oscillation in the electrostatic potential. The waveform of the relaxation is consistent with theoretical calculations of zonal potential relaxation in a nonaxisymmetric magnetic geometry. The turbulent transport properties of a magnetic confinement configuration are expected to depend on the features of the collisionless damping of zonal flows, of which the present Letter is the first direct observation.

  17. Swarm Observation of Field-Aligned Currents Associated With Multiple Auroral Arc Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Knudsen, D. J.; Gillies, D. M.; Donovan, E. F.; Burchill, J. K.

    2017-10-01

    Auroral arcs occur in regions of upward field-aligned currents (FACs); however, the relation is not one to one, since kinetic energy of the current-carrying electrons is also important in the production of auroral luminosity. Multiple auroral arc systems provide an opportunity to study the relation between FACs and auroral brightness in detail. In this study, we have identified two types of FAC configurations in multiple parallel arc systems using ground-based optical data from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms all-sky imagers, magnetometers and electric field instruments on board the Swarm satellites. In "unipolar FAC" events, each arc is an intensification within a broad, unipolar current sheet and downward return currents occur outside of this broad sheet. In "multipolar FAC" events, multiple arc systems represent a collection of multiple up/down current pairs. By collecting 17 events with unipolar FAC and 12 events with multipolar FACs, we find that (1) unipolar FAC events occur most frequently between 20 and 21 magnetic local time and multipolar FAC events tend to occur around local midnight and within 1 h after substorm onset. (2) Arcs in unipolar FAC systems have a typical width of 10-20 km and a spacing of 25-50 km. Arcs in multipolar FAC systems are wider and more separated. (3) Upward currents with more arcs embedded have larger intensities and widths. (4) Electric fields are strong and highly structured on the edges of multiple arc system with unipolar FAC. The fact that arcs with unipolar FAC are much more highly structured than the associated currents suggests that arc multiplicity is indicative not of a structured generator deep in the magnetosphere, but rather of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling process.

  18. Toward an improved determination of Earth's lithospheric magnetic field from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiaros, S.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical and numerical analysis of the spectral properties of the gradient tensor, initially performed by Rummel and van Gelderen (1992) for the gravity potential, shows that when the tensor elements are grouped into sets of semi-tangential and pure-tangential parts, they produce almost identical signal content as the normal element. Moreover, simple eigenvalue relations can be derived between these sets and the spherical harmonic expansion of the potential. This theoretical development generally applies to any potential field. First, the analysis of Rummel and van Gelderen (1992) is adapted to the magnetic field case and then the elements of the magnetic gradient tensor are estimated by 2 years of Swarm data and grouped into Γ(1) = {[∇B]rθ,[∇B]rφ} resp. Γ(2) = {[∇B]θθ-[∇B]φφ, 2[∇B]θφ}. It is shown that the estimated combinations Γ(1) and Γ(2) produce similar signal content as the theoretical radial gradient [∇B]rr. These results demonstrate the ability of multi-satellite missions such as Swarm, which cannot directly measure the radial gradient, to retrieve similar signal content by means of the horizontal gradients. Finally, lithospheric field models are derived using the gradient combinations Γ(1) and Γ(2) and compared with models derived from traditional vector and gradient data. The model resulting from Γ(1) leads to a very similar, and in particular cases improved, model compared to models retrieved by using approximately three times more data, i.e. a full set of vector, North-South and East-West gradients. ReferencesRummel, R., and M. van Gelderen (1992), Spectral analysis of the full gravity tensor, Geophysical Journal International, 111 (1), 159-169.

  19. The observation of resistivity change on the ultrasonic treated Fe-Cr ODS sinter alloy under magnetic field influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silalahi, Marzuki; Purwanto, Setyo; Mujamilah; Dimyati, Arbi

    2018-03-01

    About the observation of resistivity change on the ultrasonic treated Fe-Cr ODS sinter alloy under magnetic field influence. This paper reported about the observation of the resistivity change in the ultrasonic pre-treated Fe-Cr ODS sinter alloy under the influence of magnetic field at the Center for Science and Technology of Advanced Material, Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia. Fe-Cr ODS alloy were sinthesized by vacuum sintering of Fe- and Cr-powder dispersed Y2O3. However, before sintering the powder mixture was subjected to the irradiation process by ultrasonic for 50 hours at 20 kHz and then isostatic pressed up to 50.91 MPa to form a coin of 10 mm in diameter. LCR meassurement revealed the decreasing of resistivity about 3 times by increasing of applied magnetic field from 0 to 70 mT. In addition, VSM meassurement was performed on both as powder material and as sintered sample. The results showed increasing the magnetization with increasing magnetic field and the curve exhibits almost exact symmetry S-form with small hysterese indicating fast changing magnetization and demagnetization capability without energy loss. This opens strong speculations about the existence of magnetoresistant property of the material which is important for many application in field of sensors or electro magnetic valves.

  20. Field Observations with Laser-Induced Fluorescence Transient (LIFT Method in Barley and Sugar Beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna R. Raesch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The laser-induced fluorescence transient (LIFT method is a non-invasive remote sensing technique for measurement of photosynthetic performance of plants under laboratory and field conditions. We report here a long-term comparative study to monitor the performance of different cultivars of barley and sugar beet during the growth season of these crops. The LIFT measurements provided useful results about photosynthetic light use efficiency on selected leaves in the canopy of the studied crops. The different canopy architectures, with different optical properties, influenced the LIFT measurements.

  1. Lightning Mapping and Electric Field Change Observations of a Stationary New Mexico Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Hunyady, S. J.; Edens, H. E.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Aulich, G. D.

    2010-12-01

    On August 23, 2010 a classic airmass thunderstorm occurred over high plains immediately east of the Langmuir Laboratory mountaintop observatory in central New Mexico. The energetic storm developed around 2:30 pm MDT (2030 UTC) and remained essentially stationary over its complete lifetime of about 2 hours. The complete sequence of lightning was recorded both by the 16-station Langmuir Laboratory Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and by several electrostatic field change stations around and beneath the storm. The LMA and Delta-E data are both of very high quality and sensitivity. In this initial study we report on the lightning-inferred electrical structure of the storm and on estimated charging currents determined from a simple electrodynamic model of the storm. The electric field change measurements, in combination with the detailed 3-D mapping results, can be used to determine the amounts of charge involved in individual strokes and parts of flashes for comparison and improvement of the modeling. The LMA data regularly detected isolated attempted breakdown events at repeated locations at mid- to high altitudes in the storm that were clearly indicative of localized high-field regions. The attempted breakdown events were often exact pre-cursors of the initial breakdown of full-fledged IC flashes typically several seconds up to several tens of seconds later, but also often did not precurse a subsequent discharge. During both IC and CG flashes, numerous recoil-type, fast negative breakdown events were detected along otherwise undetected positive leader channels in the main, mid-level negative charge region. The localized fast events during IC flashes often repeatedly intensified in strength and number prior to upward negative leader K-events, and then temporarily ceased before starting up again prior to the next K-event. Many of the negative CG flashes in the storm produced strokes with long continuing currents (CCs). The overall electric field changes and hence total

  2. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, Jonathan L.; Miley, Harry S.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook the Integrated Field Exercise (IFE) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5 – 2 kT underground explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research evaluates two of the OSI techniques, including laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in situ gamma-spectrometry for 17 particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear weapon tests. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and OSI timeframes.

  3. Field observations of mating behavior in the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (Serpentes: Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Sasa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We observed the mating behavior of the neck-banded snake Scaphiodontophis annulatus (a common species of colubrid in the South Pacific of Costa Rica in the pre-montane wet forest of Las Cruces Biological Station (San Vito de Java, Costa Rica. Three S. annulatus were observed during courtship between 10-12 AM in a patch of primary forest. The two males were observed to interact with the female, but not signs of male-male agonistic interactions were observed. Their behavior includes grabbing and holding the female, copula, and biting during the copula. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(2: 647-650. Epub 2006 Jun 01.El comportamiento de apareamiento es descrito para la serpiente Scaphiodontophis annulatus, una especie de colúbrido común en el Pacífico sur de Costa Rica. El comportamiento incluye capturar y sujetar a la hembra, mordiscos durante la cópula y coito. Dos machos fueron observados al interactuar con una sola hembra, pero no se detectó señales de interacciones antagónicas macho-macho.

  4. Field computation of winds-aloft velocities from single theodolite pilot balloon observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill C. Ryan

    1976-01-01

    The ability to determine wind speeds and directions in the first few thousand meters of the atmosphere is important in many forestry operations such as smolce management, aircraft seeding and spraying, prescribed burning, and wildfire suppression. A hand-held electronic calculator can be used to compute winds aloft as balloon observations are taken. Calculations can...

  5. Urban field guide: applying social forestry observation techniques to the east coast megalopolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Svendsen; V. Marshall; M.F. Ufer

    2006-01-01

    A changing economy and different lifestyles have altered the meaning of the forest in the northeastern United States, prompting scientists to reconsider the spatial form, stewardship and function of the urban forest. The Authors describe how social observation techniques and the employment of a novel, locally based, participatory hand-held monitoring system could aid...

  6. Field Observation of Egglaying Behavior of a Puddle Frog Occidozyga sumatrana from Bali, Indonesia (Anura: Dicroglossidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Eto, Koshiro; Matsui, Masafumi

    2012-01-01

    Occidozyga sumatrana is not uncommon in some parts of Southeast Asia but its reproduction in nature is poorly known. We observed egg-laying behavior of this species in Bali, Indonesia. The amplectic position was inguinal and the oviposition site was out of the water in O. sumatrana, both of which are unique given its phylogenetic position and the mainly aquatic habits of adults.

  7. First simultaneous lidar observations of sodium layers and VHF radar observations of E-region field-aligned irregularities at the low-latitude station Gadanki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sridharan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations of atmospheric sodium (Na made by a resonance lidar and E-region field-aligned-irregularities (FAI made by the Indian MST radar, both located at Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E and horizontal winds acquired by a SKiYMET meteor radar at Trivandrum (8.5° N, 77° E are used to investigate the relationship among sodium layer, FAI and neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. The altitudes and descent rates of higher altitude (~95 km Na layer and FAI agree quite well. The descending structures of the higher altitude Na layer and FAI are found to be closely related to the diurnal tidal phase structure in zonal winds observed over Trivandrum. At lower altitudes, the descent rate of FAI is larger than that of Na layer and zonal tidal phase. These observations support the hypothesis that the metallic ion layers are formed by the zonal wind shear associated with tidal winds and subsequently get neutralized to manifest in the form of descending Na layers. The descending FAI echoing layers are manifestation of the instabilities setting in on the ionization layer. In the present observations, the altitudes of occurrence of Na layer and FAI echoes being low, we surmise that it is quite possible that the FAI echoes are due to the descent of already formed irregularities at higher altitudes.

  8. The spatial distribution of magnetospheric convection electric fields at ionospheric altitudes: a review. 1. Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudal, G.; Blanc, M.

    1983-01-01

    The different techniques used for the study of the large-scale pattern of magnetospheric convection in the auroral zone are reviewed, with particular emphasis on incoherent and coherent scatter radars. For each technique, typical results are presented that illustrate its most important contributions to our knowledge of plasma convection at ionospheric altitudes, and its main advantages, limitations, and typical spatial and temporal coverage are described. Based upon the results gathered to date, the main features of the convection pattern are presented, namely: the double cell system and its asymmetry depending in particular on the Bsub(y) component of the IMF, the Harang discontinuity and its latitudinal dependence, the dayside throat, the attenuation of convection toward lower latitudes and its reversal at the polar cap boundary. The most interesting problems still open include the establishment of a quantitative model of the latitudinal variation of the electric field intensity at the planetary scale. Others entail separating universal time and local time effects in the field variations. Longitude variations have not yet been evaluated, and the characteristic signature of substorms has not been clearly separated from mere global modulations of the intensity of convection. Global coordinated campaigns, taking advantage of the best that each measurement technique has to offer to achieve the spatial and temporal coverage needed, are the only possible way to attack these problems

  9. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, Jonathan L.; Miley, Harry S.; Milbrath, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014 the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook an Integrated Field Exercise (IFE14) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5–2 kT underground nuclear explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research paper evaluates two of the OSI techniques used during the IFE14, laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in-situ gamma-spectrometry, both of which were implemented to search for 17 OSI relevant particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and within the Treaty/Protocol-specified OSI timeframes. - Highlights: • The 2014 Integrated Field Exercise occurred in Jordan. • The detection sensitivity for two On-site Inspection techniques was evaluated. • The techniques search for 17 particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. • Laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples was the optimum technique.

  10. GMRT observation of neutral atomic hydrogen gas in the COSMOS field at $z \\sim 0.37$

    OpenAIRE

    Rhee, Jonghwan; Lah, Philip; Chengalur, Jayaram N.; Briggs, Frank H.; Colless, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of HI spectral stacking analysis of Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations targeting the COSMOS field. The GMRT data cube contains 474 field galaxies with redshifts known from the zCOSMOS-bright 10k catalogue. Spectra for the galaxies are co-added and the stacked spectrum allows us to make a $\\sim 3\\sigma$ measurement of the average HI mass. Using this average HI mass along with the integral optical $B$-band luminosity of the galaxies and the luminosity den...

  11. Listing of 502 Times When the Ulysses Magnetic Fields Instrument Observed Waves Due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.

    2017-05-01

    In two earlier publications we analyzed 502 intervals of magnetic waves excited by newborn interstellar pickup protons that were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. Due to the considerable effort required in identifying these events, we provide a list of the times for the 502 wave event intervals previously identified. In the process, we provide a brief description of how the waves were found and what their properties are. We also remind the reader of the conditions that permit the waves to reach observable levels and explain why the waves are not seen more often.

  12. Listing of 502 Times When the Ulysses Magnetic Fields Instrument Observed Waves Due to Newborn Interstellar Pickup Protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G.

    2017-01-01

    In two earlier publications we analyzed 502 intervals of magnetic waves excited by newborn interstellar pickup protons that were observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. Due to the considerable effort required in identifying these events, we provide a list of the times for the 502 wave event intervals previously identified. In the process, we provide a brief description of how the waves were found and what their properties are. We also remind the reader of the conditions that permit the waves to reach observable levels and explain why the waves are not seen more often.

  13. Experimental Observation of a Metal-insulator Transition in 2D at Zero Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, S. V.

    1996-03-01

    The scaling theory of Abrahams et al. ^1 has had considerable success in describing many features of metal-insulator transitions. Within this theory, which was developed for non-interacting electrons, no such transition is possible in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in the absence of a magnetic field. However, we show experimentally that an ultra-high-mobility 2DES on the surface of silicon does exhibit the signature of a true metal-insulator phase transition at zero magnetic field at a critical electron density n_c ~10^11 cm-2. The energy of electron-electron interactions, ignored in the scaling theory,^1 is the dominant parameter in this 2DES. The resistivity, ρ, is empirically found to scale near the critical point both with temperature T and electric field E so that it can be represented by the form ρ(T,n_s)=ρ(T/T_0(n_s)) as Earrow0 or ρ(E,n_s)=ρ(E/E_0(n_s)) as Tarrow0. At the transition, the resistivity is close to 3h/e^2. Both scaling parameters, T0 and E_0, show power law behavior at the critical point. This is characteristic of a true phase transition and strongly resembles, in particular, the superconductor-insulator transition in disordered thin films,^2 as well as the transition between quantum Hall liquid and insulator.^3 Many high-mobility samples from two different sources (Institute for Metrological Service, Russia, and Siemens AG, Germany) with different oxide thicknesses and gate materials have been studied and similar results were found. Work done in collaboration with J. E. Furneaux, Whitney Mason, V. M. Pudalov, and M. D'Iorio, supported by NSF. ^1 E. Abrahams, P. W. Anderson, D. C. Licciardello, and T. V. Ramakrishnan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 673 (1979). ^2 Y. Liu, K. A. McGreer, B. Nease, D. B. Haviland, G. Martinez, J. W. Halley, and A. M. Goldman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2068 (1991). ^3 T. Wang, K. P. Clark, G. F. Spencer, A. M. Mack, and W. P. Kirk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 709 (1994).

  14. Mars Infrared Spectroscopy: From Theory and the Laboratory to Field Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, L.; Mustard, J.; McAfee, J.; Hapke, B.; Ramsey, M.

    2002-12-01

    Visible-infrared spectroscopy has a long history of providing compositional discoveries in the solar system. A primary goal of the Mars visible-infrared spectral community is to provide information to enhance the exploration of Mars. We are entering an era of Mars exploration with missions every ~2 years. It is critical that each mission provide information to optimize the success of the next mission. That will not occur effectively unless the data can be analyzed on a ~2-year rate. Our current knowledge of spectral properties of materials and effects of the natural environment are not sufficient for the accurate interpretations needed for such time critical objectives. Relevant instruments include the 1996 TES, 2001 THEMIS, 2003 Mars Express OMEGA and PFS, 2003 MER Pancam and Mini-TES, and the 2005 CRISM. Two critical gaps that cannot be filled by individual researchers alone exist in moving toward the goal of rapid and accurate analysis. These are in coordinated "end-to-end" field testing and public spectral libraries. Three related gaps are in data from terrestrial sites to aid interpretations of the orbited spectrometers, lack of high quality development data to support landers, and delays in funding non-flight team members owing to lack of coordination between research and analysis proposal dues dates and mission data releases. A detailed discussion of the each of these areas is in a workshop report through the web site below. The two critical gaps are summarized below. Field Testing. Field/rover, airborne/satellite, and telescopic measurements are sensitive to very different effects, and these differ from those present in the lab. Thus a convincing determination of uncertainties requires demonstration through coordinated "end-to-end" field testing, using: (1) Data sets of appropriate terrestrial analog sites that are measured with both geometric and spectral fidelity as close as possible to flight instruments; (2) Interpretation as applied to data of Mars; (3

  15. Observation of resonant symmetry lifting by an effective bias field in a parametrically modulated atomic trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yonghee; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Moon, Geol; Kim, Ji-Hyoun; Jhe, Wonho; Noh, Heung-Ryoul

    2010-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate resonant symmetry lifting in a parametrically modulated magneto-optical trap of cold 85 Rb atoms. This is achieved by applying a weak additional modulation at half the frequency of the strong parametric modulation, which acts as an effective static bias field to the system. We measure the system response by varying the amplitude of the additional fictitious bias as well as the relative phase between the bias and the parametric drive, and the results are in good agreement with theory. The additional modulation provides an additional degree of freedom to control the system, which is useful for investigating system properties such as susceptibility, dynamic response, and related critical phenomena. We also have measured the amplitude of the response to higher harmonics of the additional modulation frequency, which allows more precise understanding of the system dynamics.

  16. Laboratory and field observations related to ice particle and aircraft charging in convective storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, H.; Lillie, L.; Saunders, C. P. R.; Hallett, J.

    1983-01-01

    Graupel particle charging in simulated cloud conditions which show the need for the presence of ice crystals and cloud water simultaneously except under conditions where secondary ice crystal production occurs when charging initially occurs in the absence of ice crystals was examined. The magnitude of the charging increases with size of ice crystals, and impact velocity; it is also sensitive to impurities. The magnitude of the charge is also sensitive to temperature and the sign changes between -10 and -20 C, depending on cloud liquid water content. Aircraft studies were carried out in Montana convective clouds to test the validity of the extrapolation of the laboratory data to the atmosphere from the viewpoint of generation of charge, electric field, and aircraft charging during cloud penetration.

  17. Radionuclide observables during the Integrated Field Exercise of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Jonathan L; Miley, Harry S; Milbrath, Brian D

    2016-03-01

    In 2014 the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) undertook an Integrated Field Exercise (IFE14) in Jordan. The exercise consisted of a simulated 0.5-2 kT underground nuclear explosion triggering an On-site Inspection (OSI) to search for evidence of a Treaty violation. This research paper evaluates two of the OSI techniques used during the IFE14, laboratory-based gamma-spectrometry of soil samples and in-situ gamma-spectrometry, both of which were implemented to search for 17 OSI relevant particulate radionuclides indicative of nuclear explosions. The detection sensitivity is evaluated using real IFE and model data. It indicates that higher sensitivity laboratory measurements are the optimum technique during the IFE and within the Treaty/Protocol-specified OSI timeframes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Determining relative bulk viscosity of kilometre-scale crustal units using field observations and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robyn L.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2017-11-01

    Though the rheology of kilometre-scale polymineralic rock units is crucial for reliable large-scale, geotectonic models, this information is difficult to obtain. In geotectonic models, a layer is defined as an entity at the kilometre scale, even though it is heterogeneous at the millimetre to metre scale. Here, we use the shape characteristics of the boundaries between rock units to derive the relative bulk viscosity of those units at the kilometre scale. We examine the shape of a vertically oriented ultramafic, harzburgitic-lherzolitic unit, which developed a kilometre-scale pinch and swell structure at mid-crustal conditions ( 600 °C, 8.5 kbar), in the Anita Shear Zone, New Zealand. The ultramafic layer is embedded between a typical polymineralic paragneiss to the west, and a feldspar-quartz-hornblende orthogneiss, to the east. Notably, the boundaries on either side of the ultramafic layer give the ultramafics an asymmetric shape. Microstructural analysis shows that deformation was dominated by dislocation creep (n = 3). Based on the inferred rheological behaviour from the field, a series of numerical simulations are performed. Relative and absolute values are derived for bulk viscosity of the rock units by comparing boundary tortuosity difference measured on the field example and the numerical series. Our analysis shows that during deformation at mid-crustal conditions, paragneisses can be 30 times less viscous than an ultramafic unit, whereas orthogneisses have intermediate viscosity, 3 times greater than the paragneisses. If we assume a strain rate of 10- 14 s- 1 the ultramafic, orthogneiss and paragneiss have syn-deformational viscosities of 3 × 1022, 2.3 × 1021 and 9.4 × 1020 Pa s, respectively. Our study shows pinch and swell structures are useful as a gauge to assess relative bulk viscosity of rock units based on shape characteristics at the kilometre scale and in non-Newtonian flow regimes, even where heterogeneity occurs within the units at the

  19. Observational constraints on scalar field models of dark energy with barotropic equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergijenko, Olga; Novosyadlyj, Bohdan; Durrer, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the parameters of dynamical dark energy in the form of a classical or tachyonic scalar field with barotropic equation of state jointly with other cosmological parameters using the following datasets: the CMB power spectra from WMAP7, the baryon acoustic oscillations in the space distribution of galaxies from SDSS DR7, the power spectrum of luminous red galaxies from SDSS DR7 and the light curves of SN Ia from 2 different compilations: Union2 (SALT2 light curve fitting) and SDSS (SALT2 and MLCS2k2 light curve fittings). It has been found that the initial value of dark energy equation of state parameter is constrained very weakly by most of the data while the other cosmological parameters are well constrained: their likelihoods and posteriors are similar, their forms are close to Gaussian (or half-Gaussian) and the confidence ranges are narrow. The most reliable determinations of the best-fit value and 1σ confidence range for the initial value of the dark energy equation of state parameter are obtained from the combined datasets including SN Ia data from the full SDSS compilation with MLCS2k2 light curve fitting. In all such cases the best-fit value of this parameter is lower than the value of corresponding parameter for current epoch. Such dark energy loses its repulsive properties and in future the expansion of the Universe changes into contraction. We also perform a forecast for the Planck mock data and show that they narrow significantly the confidence ranges of cosmological parameters values, moreover, their combination with SN SDSS compilation with MLCS2k2 light curve fitting may exclude the fields with initial equation of state parameter > −0.1 at 2σ confidence level

  20. Quantifying the relationship between the plasmapause and the inner boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents, as deduced from Swarm observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Balázs; Lühr, Hermann

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the equatorward boundary of small-scale field-aligned currents (SSFACs) and investigates the relation between this boundary and the plasmapause (PP). The PP data used for validation were derived from in situ electron density observations of NASA's Van Allen Probes. We confirmed the findings of a previous study by the same authors obtained from the observations of the CHAMP satellite SSFAC and the NASA IMAGE satellite PP detections, namely that the two boundaries respond similarly to changes in geomagnetic activity, and they are closely located in the near midnight MLT sector, suggesting a dynamic linkage. Dayside PP correlates with the delayed time history of the SSFAC boundary. We interpreted this behaviour as a direct consequence of co-rotation: the new PP, formed on the night side, propagates to the dayside by rotating with Earth. This finding paves the way toward an efficient PP monitoring tool based on an SSFAC index derived from vector magnetic field observations at low-Earth orbit.

  1. 18–22 cm VLBA Observational Evidence for Toroidal B-Field Components in Six AGN Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Cristina Motter

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The formation of relativistic jets in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN is related to accretion onto their central supermassive black holes, and magnetic (B fields are believed to play a central role in launching, collimating, and accelerating the jet streams from very compact regions out to kiloparsec scales. We present results of Faraday rotation studies based on Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA data obtained at 18–22 cm for six well known AGN (OJ 287, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089, 3C 345, BL Lac, and 3C 454.3, which probe projected distances out to tens of parsecs from the observed cores. We have identified statistically significant, monotonic, transverse Faraday rotation gradients across the jets of all but one of these sources, indicating the presence of toroidal B fields, which may be one component of helical B fields associated with these AGN jets.

  2. Field Observations of Precursors to Large Earthquakes: Interpreting and Verifying Their Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyehiro, K.; Sacks, S. I.; Rydelek, P. A.; Smith, D. E.; Takanami, T.

    2017-12-01

    Many reports of precursory anomalies before large earthquakes exist. However, it has proven elusive to even identify these signals before their actual occurrences. They often only become evident in retrospect. A probabilistic cellular automaton model (Sacks and Rydelek, 1995) explains many of the statistical and dynamic natures of earthquakes including the observed b-value decrease towards a large earthquake or a small stress perturbation to have effect on earthquake occurrence pattern. It also reproduces dynamic characters of each earthquake rupture. This model is useful in gaining insights on causal relationship behind complexities. For example, some reported cases of background seismicity quiescence before a main shock only seen for events larger than M=3 4 at years time scale can be reproduced by this model, if only a small fraction ( 2%) of the component cells are strengthened by a small amount. Such an enhancement may physically occur if a tiny and scattered portion of the seismogenic crust undergoes dilatancy hardening. Such a process to occur will be dependent on the fluid migration and microcracks developments under tectonic loading. Eventual large earthquake faulting will be promoted by the intrusion of excess water from surrounding rocks into the zone capable of cascading slips to a large area. We propose this process manifests itself on the surface as hydrologic, geochemical, or macroscopic anomalies, for which so many reports exist. We infer from seismicity that the eastern Nankai Trough (Tokai) area of central Japan is already in the stage of M-dependent seismic quiescence. Therefore, we advocate that new observations sensitive to detecting water migration in Tokai should be implemented. In particular, vertical component strain, gravity, and/or electrical conductivity, should be observed for verification.

  3. Wind estimation around the shipwreck of Oriental Star based on field damage surveys and radar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhiyong; Yao, Dan; Bai, Lanqiang; Zheng, Yongguang; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Kun; Tian, Fuyou; Wang, Mingjun

    Based on observational analyses and on-site ground and aerial damage surveys, this work aims to reveal the weather phenomena-especially the wind situation-when Oriental Star capsized in the Yangtze River on June 1, 2015. Results demonstrate that the cruise ship capsized when it encountered strong winds at speeds of at least 31 m s -1 near the apex of a bow echo embedded in a squall line. As suggested by the fallen trees within a 2-km radius around the wreck location, such strong winds were likely caused by microburst straight-line wind and/or embedded small vortices, rather than tornadoes.

  4. Mechanism of Phreatic Eruptions at Aso Volcano Inferred from Near-Field Broadband Seismic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshima, Satoshi; Kawakatsu, Hitoshi; Matsubayashi, Hirotoshi; Sudo, Yasuaki; Tsutsui, Tomoki; Ohminato, Takao; Ito, Hisao; Uhira, Koichi; Yamasato, Hitoshi; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru; Lidaka, Takashi

    1996-08-01

    Broadband seismometers deployed at Aso volcano in Japan have detected a hydrothermal reservoir 1 to 1.5 kilometers beneath the crater that is continually resonating with periods as long as 15 seconds. When phreatic eruptions are observed, broadband seismograms elucidate a dynamic interplay between the reservoir and discharging flow along the conduit: gradual pressurization and long-period (~20 seconds) pulsations of the reservoir during the 100 to 200 seconds before the initiation of the discharge, followed by gradual deflation of the reservoir concurrent with the discharging flow. The hydrothermal reservoir, where water and heat from the deeper magma chamber probably interact, appears to help control the surface activity at Aso volcano.

  5. Field observations of volatile organic compound (VOC) exchange in red oaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellin, Luca; Algarra Alarcon, Alberto; Herdlinger-Blatt, Irina; Sanchez, Juaquin; Biasioli, Franco; Martin, Scot T.; Loreto, Francesco; McKinney, Karena A.

    2017-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by forests strongly affect the chemical composition of the atmosphere. While the emission of isoprenoids has been largely characterized, forests also exchange many oxygenated VOCs (oVOCs), including methanol, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), and acetaldehyde, which are less well understood. We monitored total branch-level exchange of VOCs of a strong isoprene emitter (Quercus rubra L.) in a mixed forest in New England, where canopy-level fluxes of VOCs had been previously measured. We report daily exchange of several oVOCs and investigated unknown sources and sinks, finding several novel insights. In particular, we found that emission of MEK is linked to uptake of methyl vinyl ketone (MVK), a product of isoprene oxidation. The link was confirmed by corollary experiments proving in vivo detoxification of MVK, which is harmful to plants. Comparison of MEK, MVK, and isoprene fluxes provided an indirect indication of within-plant isoprene oxidation. Furthermore, besides confirming bidirectional exchange of acetaldehyde, we also report for the first time direct evidence of benzaldehyde bidirectional exchange in forest plants. Net emission or deposition of benzaldehyde was found in different periods of measurements, indicating an unknown foliar sink that may influence atmospheric concentrations. Other VOCs, including methanol, acetone, and monoterpenes, showed clear daily emission trends but no deposition. Measured VOC emission and deposition rates were generally consistent with their ecosystem-scale flux measurements at a nearby site.

  6. Evolution in Cloud Population Statistics of the MJO: From AMIE Field Observations to Global Cloud-Permiting Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chidong [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2016-08-14

    Motivated by the success of the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign, which collected unprecedented observations of cloud and precipitation from the tropical Indian Ocean in Octber 2011 – March 2012, this project explored how such observations can be applied to assist the development of global cloud-permitting models through evaluating and correcting model biases in cloud statistics. The main accomplishment of this project were made in four categories: generating observational products for model evaluation, using AMIE/DYNAMO observations to validate global model simulations, using AMIE/DYNAMO observations in numerical studies of cloud-permitting models, and providing leadership in the field. Results from this project provide valuable information for building a seamless bridge between DOE ASR program’s component on process level understanding of cloud processes in the tropics and RGCM focus on global variability and regional extremes. In particular, experience gained from this project would be directly applicable to evaluation and improvements of ACME, especially as it transitions to a non-hydrostatic variable resolution model.

  7. Near-Earth injection of MeV electrons associated with intense dipolarization electric fields: Van Allen Probes observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lei; Wang, Chi; Duan, Suping; He, Zhaohai; Wygant, John R; Cattell, Cynthia A; Tao, Xin; Su, Zhenpeng; Kletzing, Craig; Baker, Daniel N; Li, Xinlin; Malaspina, David; Blake, J Bernard; Fennell, Joseph; Claudepierre, Seth; Turner, Drew L; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Funsten, Herbert O; Spence, Harlan E; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Fruehauff, Dennis; Chen, Lunjin; Thaller, Scott; Breneman, Aaron; Tang, Xiangwei

    2015-08-16

    Substorms generally inject tens to hundreds of keV electrons, but intense substorm electric fields have been shown to inject MeV electrons as well. An intriguing question is whether such MeVelectron injections can populate the outer radiation belt. Here we present observations of a substorm injection of MeV electrons into the inner magnetosphere. In the premidnight sector at L ∼ 5.5, Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes)-A observed a large dipolarization electric field (50 mV/m) over ∼40 s and a dispersionless injection of electrons up to ∼3 MeV. Pitch angle observations indicated betatron acceleration of MeV electrons at the dipolarization front. Corresponding signals of MeV electron injection were observed at LANL-GEO, THEMIS-D, and GOES at geosynchronous altitude. Through a series of dipolarizations, the injections increased the MeV electron phase space density by 1 order of magnitude in less than 3 h in the outer radiation belt ( L > 4.8). Our observations provide evidence that deep injections can supply significant MeV electrons.

  8. Observation of a new toroidally localized kink mode and its role in reverse-field--pinch plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamano, T.; Bard, W.D.; Chu, C.; Kondoh, Y.; La Haye, R.J.; Lee, P.S.; Saito, M.; Schaffer, M.J.; Taylor, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of toroidally localized kink instability, which we named the ''slinky mode,'' was observed in a reversed-field--pinch plasma in the OHTE (Ohmic heating toroidal experiment) device. It is found that the slinky mode is the result of the phase locking of several internal kink modes due to nonlinear coupling and is an effective way to approach the Taylor relaxed state

  9. Structure and Composition of the Distant Lunar Exosphere: Constraints from ARTEMIS Observations of Ion Acceleration in Time-Varying Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    By analyzing the trajectories of ionized constituents of the lunar exosphere in time-varying electromagnetic fields, we can place constraints on the composition, structure, and dynamics of the lunar exosphere. Heavy ions travel slower than light ions in the same fields, so by observing the lag between field rotations and the response of ions from the lunar exosphere, we can place constraints on the composition of the ions. Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) provides an ideal platform to utilize such an analysis, since its two-probe vantage allows precise timing of the propagation of field discontinuities in the solar wind, and its sensitive plasma instruments can detect the ion response. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by using fully time-dependent charged particle tracing to analyze several minutes of ion observations taken by the two ARTEMIS probes 3000-5000 km above the dusk terminator on 25 January 2014. The observations from this time period allow us to reach several interesting conclusions. The ion production at altitudes of a few hundred kilometers above the sunlit surface of the Moon has an unexpectedly significant contribution from species with masses of 40 amu or greater. The inferred distribution of the neutral source population has a large scale height, suggesting that micrometeorite impact vaporization and/or sputtering play an important role in the production of neutrals from the surface. Our observations also suggest an asymmetry in ion production, consistent with either a compositional variation in neutral vapor production or a local reduction in solar wind sputtering in magnetic regions of the surface.

  10. Three-dimensional characteristics of alveolar macrophages in vitro observed by dark field microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarat, Dominic; Wiemann, Martin; Lipinski, Hans-Gerd

    2014-05-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AM) are cells from immune defense inside the lung. They engulf particles in vacuoles from the outer membrane. Volume and surface are important parameters to characterize the particle uptake. AM change their shape within a few seconds, therefore it is hard to obtain by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which is commonly used to generate 3D-images. So we used an intensified dark field microscopy (DFM) as an alternative method to generate contrast rich AM gray tone image slices used for 3D-reconstructions of AM cells by VTK software applications. From these 3D-reconstructions approximate volume and surface data of the AM were obtained and compared to values found in the literature. Finally, simple geometrical 3D-models of the AM were created and compared to real data. Averaged volume and surface data from the DFM images are close to values found in the literature. Furthermore, calculation of volume and surface data from DFM images could be done faster if simplified geometrical 3D-models of the cells were used.

  11. Evaluating FIDO: Developing and pilot testing the Field Instantaneous Dog Observation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E. Bauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field assessments of the health and welfare of kenneled dogs (Canis lupus familiaris must be both accurate and rapid. In order to facilitate such evaluations, especially by individuals with limited training in canine behavior and welfare, a non-invasive tool was developed and pilot-tested utilizing dogs housed in commercial breeding facilities. Behavioral responses to approach were organized into three categories: red, indicating a fearful response to approach, green, indicating an affiliative or neutral response to approach, and yellow, indicating an ambivalent response to approach. The inter-rater reliability (IRR of the tool when used by both behavioral experts and novice raters was evaluated with and without the presence of the dog’s familiar caretaker. Utilizing Cohen’s kappa, the experts had almost perfect levels of agreement (kappa=0.87. The novice raters had substantial levels of agreement (kappa=0.74. Overall, the dogs assessed by the novice raters had high proportions of green responses to approach and there was no statistically significant effect of caretaker presence on the proportion of green responses to approach. The assessment tool evaluated herein appears to have a high degree of IRR whether used by experts in canine behavior or by novice raters and may be a useful screening tool to determine the need for more in-depth welfare assessments

  12. On the Critical Behaviour of Observed and Simulated Spatial Soil Moisture Fields during SGP97

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekonnen Gebremichael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aircraft-based ESTAR soil moisture fields from the Southern Great Plains 1997 (SGP97 Hydrology Experiment are compared to the simulated ones obtained by Bertoldi et al. [1] with the GEOtop model [2], with a particular focus on their capability in capturing the critical point behaviour in their space-time dynamics (see [3]. The critical point behaviour should denote the transition of soil moisture spatial patterns from an unorganized to organized appearance, as conditions become wetter. The study region is the Little Washita watershed, located in the southwest Oklahoma, in the Southern Great Plains region of the USA. The case study takes place from June 27 to July 16 and encompasses wetting and drying cycles allowing for exploring the behaviour under transient conditions. Results show that the critical probability value is 0.85 for GEOtop, and 0.80 for ESTAR. The GEOtop patterns appear more fragmented, being more reluctant to organization, as confirmed by the higher value of critical probability. Such behaviour is probably inherited by the model’s parameterization: land use and soil classes impose additional spatial structures to those related to the meteorological forcings and the hillslope morphology, driving to higher degrees of heterogeneity.

  13. Field Observation of the Green Ocean Amazon. Neutral Cluster Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) Final Campaign Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petaja, T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Backman, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manninen, H. E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wimmer, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The neutral cluster and air ion spectrometer (NAIS) was deployed to the T3 site for Intensive Operations Periods 1 and 2 (IOP1 and IOP2). The NAIS is an instrument that measures aerosol particle and ion number size distributions in the mobility diameter range of 0.8 to 42 nm, corresponding to electrical mobility range between 3.2 and 0.0013 cm2 V-1 s-1. New particle formation (NPF) events were detected using the NAIS at the T3 field site during IOP1 and IOP2. Secondary NPF is a globally important source of aerosol number. To fully explain atmospheric NPF and subsequent growth, we need to directly measure the initial steps of the formation processes in different environments, including rain forest. Particle formation characteristics, such as formation and growth rates, were used as indicators of the relevant processes and participating compounds in the initial formation. In a case of parallel ion and neutral cluster measurements, we estimated the relative contribution of ion-induced and neutral nucleation to the total particle formation.

  14. Methane Storage in Nanoporous Media as Observed via High-Field NMR Relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, A.; Kausik, R.

    2015-08-01

    The storage properties of methane gas in Vycor porous glass (5.7 nm) are characterized in a wide pressure range from 0.7 to 89.7 MPa using nuclear magnetic resonance. We demonstrate the capability of high-field nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxometry for the determination of the methane-gas storage capacity and the measurement of the hydrogen index, to a high degree of accuracy. This helps determine the excess gas in the pore space which can be identified to exhibit Langmuir properties in the low pressure regime of 0.7 to 39.6 MPa. The Langmuir model enables us to determine the equilibrium density of the monolayer of adsorbed gas to be 8.5% lower than that of liquid methane. We also identify the signatures of multilayer adsorption at the high pressure regime from 39.6 to 89.7 MPa and use the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller theory to determine the number of adsorbed layers of methane gas. We show how these measurements help us differentiate the gas stored in the Vycor pore space into free and adsorbed fractions for the entire pressure range paving way for similar applications such as studying natural-gas storage in gas shale rock or hydrogen storage in carbon nanotubes.

  15. Direct observation of dipolar chains in ferrofluids in zero field using cryogenic electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Butter, K; Frederik, P M; Vroege, G J; Philipse, A P

    2003-01-01

    The particle structure of ferrofluids is studied in situ, by cryogenic electron microscopy, on vitrified films of iron and magnetite dispersions. By means of synthesis of iron colloids with controlled particle size and different types of surfactant, dipolar particle interactions can be varied over a broad range, which significantly influences the ferrofluid particle structure. Our experiments on iron dispersions (in contrast to magnetite dispersions) for the first time demonstrate, in ferrofluids in zero field, a transition with increasing particle size from separate particles to linear chains of particles (Butter K, Bomans P H, Frederik P M, Vroege G J and Philipse A P 2003 Nature Mater. 2 88). These chains, already predicted theoretically by de Gennes and Pincus (de Gennes P G and Pincus P A 1970 Phys. Kondens. Mater. 11 189), very much resemble the fluctuating chains found in simulations of dipolar fluids (Weis J J 1998 Mol. Phys. 93 361, Chantrell R W, Bradbury A, Popplewell J and Charles S W 1982 J. Appl...

  16. The structure of turbulent jets, vortices and boundary layer: laboratory and field observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekula, E.; Redondo, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of this work is research, understand and describe key aspects of the turbulent jets and effects connected with them such as boundary layer interactions on the effect of a 2D geometry. Work is based principally on experiments but there are also some comparisons between experimental and field results. A series of experiments have been performed consisting in detailed turbulent measurements of the 3 velocity components to understand the processes of interaction that lead to mixing and mass transport between boundaries and free shear layers. The turbulent wall jet configuration occurs often in environmental and industrial processes, but here we apply the laboratory experiments as a tool to understand jet/boundary interactions in the environment. We compare the structure of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images of coastal jets and vortices and experimental jets (plumes) images searching for the relationship between these two kinds of jets at very different Reynolds numbers taking advantage of the self-similarity of the processes. In order to investigate the structure of ocean surface detected jets (SAR) and vortices near the coast, we compare wall and boundary effects on the structure of turbulent jets (3D and 2D) which are non-homogeneous, developing multifractal and spectral techniques useful for environmental monitoring in space.

  17. Irregular focal mechanisms observed at Salton Sea Geothermal Field: Possible influences of anthropogenic stress perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall-Bear, Aren; Barbour, Andrew J.; Schoenball, Martin; Schoenball, Martin

    2018-01-01

    At the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF), strain accumulation is released through seismic slip and aseismic deformation. Earthquake activity at the SSGF often occurs in swarm-like clusters, some with clear migration patterns. We have identified an earthquake sequence composed entirely of focal mechanisms representing an ambiguous style of faulting, where strikes are similar but deformation occurs due to steeply-dipping normal faults with varied stress states. In order to more accurately determine the style of faulting for these events, we revisit the original waveforms and refine estimates of P and S wave arrival times and displacement amplitudes. We calculate the acceptable focal plane solutions using P-wave polarities and S/P amplitude ratios, and determine the preferred fault plane. Without constraints on local variations in stress, found by inverting the full earthquake catalog, it is difficult to explain the occurrence of such events using standard fault-mechanics and friction. Comparing these variations with the expected poroelastic effects from local production and injection of geothermal fluids suggests that anthropogenic activity could affect the style of faulting.

  18. What Do the Hitomi Observations Tell Us About the Turbulent Velocities in the Perseus Cluster? Probing the Velocity Field with Mock Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Miller, E. D.; Bulbul, E.; Zhuravleva, I.

    2018-02-01

    Hitomi made the first direct measurements of galaxy cluster gas motions in the Perseus cluster, which implied that its core is fairly “quiescent,” with velocities less than ∼200 km s‑1, despite the presence of an active galactic nucleus and sloshing cold fronts. Building on previous work, we use synthetic Hitomi/X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) observations of the hot plasma of a simulated cluster with sloshing gas motions and varying viscosity to analyze its velocity structure in a similar fashion. We find that sloshing motions can produce line shifts and widths similar to those measured by Hitomi. We find these measurements are unaffected by the value of the gas viscosity, since its effects are only manifested clearly on angular scales smaller than the SXS ∼1‧ PSF. The PSF biases the line shift of regions near the core as much as ∼40–50 km s‑1, so it is crucial to model this effect carefully. We also infer that if sloshing motions dominate the observed velocity gradient, Perseus must be observed from a line of sight that is somewhat inclined from the plane of these motions, but one that still allows the spiral pattern to be visible. Finally, we find that assuming isotropy of motions can underestimate the total velocity and kinetic energy of the core in our simulation by as much as ∼60%. However, the total kinetic energy in our simulated cluster core is still less than 10% of the thermal energy in the core, in agreement with the Hitomi observations.

  19. Dust attenuation in 2 galaxies from deep ALMA observations of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cullen, F.; Bourne, N.; Best, P. N.; Khochfar, S.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Biggs, A. D.; Geach, J. E.; Scott, D.; Michałowski, M. J.; Rujopakarn, W.; van Kampen, E.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Pope, A.

    2018-05-01

    We present the results of a new study of the relationship between infrared excess (IRX ≡ LIR/LUV), ultraviolet (UV) spectral slope (β) and stellar mass at redshifts 2 galaxies in the mass range 9.25≤ log (M_{\\ast }/M_{⊙}) ≤ 10.75 are fully consistent with the IRX-β relation expected for a relatively grey attenuation curve, similar to the commonly adopted Calzetti law. Based on a large, mass-complete sample of 2 ≤ z ≤ 3 star-forming galaxies drawn from multiple surveys, we proceed to derive a new empirical relationship between β and stellar mass, making it possible to predict UV attenuation (A1600) and IRX as a function of stellar mass, for any assumed attenuation law. Once again, we find that z ≃ 2.5 star-forming galaxies follow A1600-M* and IRX-M* relations consistent with a relatively grey attenuation law, and find no compelling evidence that star-forming galaxies at this epoch follow a reddening law as steep as the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) extinction curve. In fact, we use a simple simulation to demonstrate that previous determinations of the IRX-β relation may have been biased towards low values of IRX at red values of β, mimicking the signature expected for an SMC-like dust law. We show that this provides a plausible mechanism for reconciling apparently contradictory results in the literature and that, based on typical measurement uncertainties, stellar mass provides a cleaner prediction of UV attenuation than β. Although the situation at lower stellar masses remains uncertain, we conclude that for 2 galaxies with log (M_{\\ast }/M_{⊙}) ≥ 9.75, both the IRX-β and IRX-M* relations are well described by a Calzetti-like attenuation law.

  20. Dust emission mechanisms in the central Sahara: new insights from remote field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, C.; Washington, R.; Engelstaedter, S.

    2013-12-01

    North Africa is the world's largest source of mineral aerosol (dust). The Fennec Project, an international consortium led by the University of Oxford, is the first project to systematically instrument the remote central Sahara Desert. These observations have, among others, provided new insights into the atmospheric mechanisms of dust emission. Bordj Badji Mokhtar, in south-west Algeria, is within kilometres of the centre of the global mean summer dust maximum. The site, operated by Fennec partners ONM Algerie, has been heavily instrumented since summer 2011. During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP) in June 2011, four main emission mechanisms were observed and documented: cold pool outflows, low level jets (LLJs), monsoon surges and dry convective plumes. Establishing the relative importance of dust emission mechanisms has been a long-standing research goal. A detailed partitioning exercise of dust events during the IOP shows that 45% of the dust over BBM was generated by local emission in cold pool outflows, 14% by LLJs and only 2% by dry convective plumes. 27% of the dust was advected to the site rather than locally emitted and 12% of the dust was residual or ';background' dust. The work shows the primacy of cold pool outflows for dust emission in the region and also the important contribution of dust advection. In accordance with long-held ideas, the cube of wind speed is strongly correlated with dust emission. Surprisingly however, particles in long-range advection (>500km) were found to be larger than locally emitted dust. Although a clear LLJ wind structure is evident in the mean diurnal cycle during the IOP (12m/s peak winds at 935hPa between 04-05h), LLJs are only responsible for a relatively small amount of dust emission. There is significant daily variability in LLJ strength; the strongest winds are produced by a relatively small number of events. The position and strength of the Saharan Heat Low is strongly associated with the development (or

  1. Observation of Rashba zero-field spin splitting in a strained germanium 2D hole gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, C.; Rhead, S. D.; Foronda, J.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.; Wiśniewski, P.

    2014-01-01

    We report the observation, through Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in the magnetoresistance, of spin splitting caused by the Rashba spin-orbit interaction in a strained Ge quantum well epitaxially grown on a standard Si(001) substrate. The Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations display a beating pattern due to the spin split Landau levels. The spin-orbit parameter and Rashba spin-splitting energy are found to be 1.0 × 10 −28   eVm 3 and 1.4 meV, respectively. This energy is comparable to 2D electron gases in III-V semiconductors, but substantially larger than in Si, and illustrates the suitability of Ge for modulated hole spin transport devices.

  2. Raw data from orientation studies in crystalline rock areas of the southeastern United States. [Maps, tables of field data and analytical data for sections of North and South Carolina and Georgia, previously reported sites of uranium mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, V.

    1976-03-01

    Raw data are presented on orientation studies conducted in crystalline rock areas of the Southeast which were chosen because of published references to uranium mineralization. Preliminary data for four orientation study areas are included. These areas are Lamar County, Georgia; Oconee County, South Carolina; Brush Creek, North Carolina; and North Harper, North Carolina. Sample locality maps, tables of field data, and tables of analytical data are included for each study area. (JGB)

  3. Long-term O3-precursor relationships in Hong Kong: field observation and model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Hao; Guo, Hai; Lyu, Xiaopu; Cheng, Hairong; Ling, Zhenhao; Louie, Peter K. K.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Meinardi, Simone; Blake, Donald R.

    2017-09-01

    Over the past 10 years (2005-2014), ground-level O3 in Hong Kong has consistently increased in all seasons except winter, despite the yearly reduction of its precursors, i.e. nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs), and carbon monoxide (CO). To explain the contradictory phenomena, an observation-based box model (OBM) coupled with CB05 mechanism was applied in order to understand the influence of both locally produced O3 and regional transport. The simulation of locally produced O3 showed an increasing trend in spring, a decreasing trend in autumn, and no changes in summer and winter. The O3 increase in spring was caused by the net effect of more rapid decrease in NO titration and unchanged TVOC reactivity despite decreased TVOC mixing ratios, while the decreased local O3 formation in autumn was mainly due to the reduction of aromatic VOC mixing ratios and the TVOC reactivity and much slower decrease in NO titration. However, the decreased in situ O3 formation in autumn was overridden by the regional contribution, resulting in elevated O3 observations. Furthermore, the OBM-derived relative incremental reactivity indicated that the O3 formation was VOC-limited in all seasons, and that the long-term O3 formation was more sensitive to VOCs and less to NOx and CO in the past 10 years. In addition, the OBM results found that the contributions of aromatics to O3 formation decreased in all seasons of these years, particularly in autumn, probably due to the effective control of solvent-related sources. In contrast, the contributions of alkenes increased, suggesting a continuing need to reduce traffic emissions. The findings provide updated information on photochemical pollution and its impact in Hong Kong.

  4. Observation of high coercive fields in chemically synthesized coated Fe-Pt nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalavi, Shankar B.; Panda, Rabi N., E-mail: rnp@goa.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2017-04-15

    Nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys have been synthesized via chemical reduction route using various capping agents; such as: oleic acid/oleylamine (route-1) and oleic acid/CTAB (route-2). We could able to synthesize Fe50Pt and Fe54Pt alloys via route 1 and 2, respectively. As-prepared Fe-Pt alloys crystallize in disordered fcc phase with crystallite sizes of 2.3 nm and 6 nm for route-1 and route-2, respectively. Disordered Fe-Pt alloys were transformed to ordered fct phase after annealing at 600 °C. SEM studies confirm the spherical shape morphologies of annealed Fe-Pt nanoparticles with SEM particle sizes of 24.4 nm and 21.2 nm for route-1 and route-2, respectively. TEM study confirms the presence of 4.6 nm particles for annealed Fe50Pt alloys with several agglomerating clusters of bigger size and appropriately agrees well with the XRD study. Room temperature magnetization studies of as-prepared Fe-Pt alloys (fcc) show ferromagnetism with negligible coercivities. Average magnetic moments per particle for as-prepared Fe-Pt alloys were estimated to be 753 μ{sub B} and 814 μ{sub B}, for route 1 and 2, respectively. Ordered fct Fe-Pt alloys show high values of coercivities of 10,000 Oe and 10,792 Oe for route-1 and route-2, respectively. Observed magnetic properties of the fct Fe-Pt alloys nps were interpreted with the basis of order parameters, size, surface, and composition effects. - Highlights: • Synthesis of capped nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys via chemical routes. • Ordered fct phase were obtained at 600 °C. • Microstructural studies were carried out using SEM and TEM. • Investigation on evolution of magnetic properties from fcc to fct state. • Maximum values of coercivities up to 10,792 Oe were observed.

  5. Bridging Estimates of Greenness in an Arid Grassland Using Field Observations, Phenocams, and Time Series Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, D. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Rango, A.

    2013-12-01

    Spatially extensive grasslands and savannas in arid and semi-arid ecosystems (i.e., rangelands) require cost-effective, accurate, and consistent approaches for monitoring plant phenology. Remotely sensed imagery offers these capabilities; however contributions of exposed soil due to modest vegetation cover, susceptibility of vegetation to drought, and lack of robust scaling relationships challenge biophysical retrievals using moderate- and coarse-resolution satellite imagery. To evaluate methods for characterizing plant phenology of common rangeland species and to link field measurements to remotely sensed metrics of land surface phenology, we devised a hierarchical study spanning multiple spatial scales. We collect data using weekly standardized field observations on focal plants, daily phenocam estimates of vegetation greenness, and very high spatial resolution imagery from an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) throughout the growing season. Field observations of phenological condition and vegetation cover serve to verify phenocam greenness indices along with indices derived from time series UAS imagery. UAS imagery is classified using object-oriented image analysis to identify species-specific image objects for which greenness indices are derived. Species-specific image objects facilitate comparisons with phenocam greenness indices and scaling spectral responses to footprints of Landsat and MODIS pixels. Phenocam greenness curves indicated rapid canopy development for the widespread deciduous shrub Prosopis glandulosa over 14 (in April 2012) to 16 (in May 2013) days. The modest peak in greenness for the dominant perennial grass Bouteloua eriopoda occurred in October 2012 following peak summer rainfall. Weekly field estimates of canopy development closely coincided with daily patterns in initial growth and senescence for both species. Field observations improve the precision of the timing of phenophase transitions relative to inflection points calculated from phenocam

  6. Relationship between electron field-aligned anisotropy and dawn-dusk magnetic field: Nine years of Cluster observations in the Earth magnetotail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, E.; Petrukovich, A.; Artemyev, A.; Nakamura, R.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the distribution and possible origins of thermal anisotropic electrons in the Earth's magnetotail, using 9 years of Cluster observations. We mainly focus on relation between electron anisotropy and Bz and By magnetic field components (in GSM coordinates). The anisotropy of electron population is characterized by temperature ratio T∥/T⊥ and by the maximum of phase space density ratio F∥/F⊥ (∥ and ⊥ are relative to the background magnetic field). The population identified by large F∥/F⊥ is organized as short-time (dozens of seconds) bursts with enhanced F∥ and can be observed even in the plasma sheet with small T∥/T⊥. The thermal anisotropy T∥/T⊥ is larger for time intervals characterized by stronger Bz and By: the strong By corresponds to the T∥/T⊥ peak around the magnetotail neutral plane Bx=0, whereas the strong Bz corresponds to larger T∥/T⊥ with a flat profile across the magnetotail. There is a dawn-dusk asymmetry: large T∥/T⊥ corresponds mostly to strong Bz at the dusk flank and to strong By at the dawn flank. Using these differences of the electron anisotropy dependence on By and Bz, we discuss two possible mechanisms responsible for the anisotropy formation.

  7. Modelling high Arctic deep permafrost temperature sensitivity in Northeast Greenland based on experimental and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Laura Helene; Zhang, Wenxin; Hollesen, Jørgen; Cable, Stefanie; Hvidtfeldt Christiansen, Hanne; Jansson, Per-Erik; Elberling, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Permafrost affected areas in Greenland are expected to experience a marked temperature increase within decades. Most studies have considered near-surface permafrost sensitivity, whereas permafrost temperatures below the depths of zero annual amplitude is less studied despite being closely related to changes in near-surface conditions, such as changes in active layer thermal properties, soil moisture and snow depth. In this study, we measured the sensitivity of thermal conductivity (TC) to gravimetric water content (GWC) in frozen and thawed permafrost sediments from fine-sandy and gravelly deltaic and fine-sandy alluvial deposits in the Zackenberg valley, NE Greenland. We further calibrated a coupled heat and water transfer model, the "CoupModel", for one central delta sediment site with average snow depth and further forced it with meteorology from a nearby delta sediment site with a topographic snow accumulation. With the calibrated model, we simulated deep permafrost thermal dynamics in four 20-year scenarios with changes in surface temperature and active layer (AL) soil moisture: a) 3 °C warming and AL water table at 0.5 m depth; b) 3 °C warming and AL water table at 0.1 m depth; c) 6 °C warming and AL water table at 0.5 m depth and d) 6 °C warming and AL water table at 0.1 m depth. Our results indicate that frozen sediments have higher TC than thawed sediments. All sediments show a positive linear relation between TC and soil moisture when frozen, and a logarithmic one when thawed. Gravelly delta sediments were highly sensitive, but never reached above 12 % GWC, indicating a field effect of water retention capacity. Alluvial sediments are less sensitive to soil moisture than deltaic (fine and coarse) sediments, indicating the importance of unfrozen water in frozen sediment. The deltaic site with snow accumulation had 1 °C higher mean annual ground temperature than the average snow depth site. Permafrost temperature at the depth of 18 m increased with 1

  8. Boundary Layer Adjustments to the Presence of Absorbing Aerosols Inferred from LASIC Field Campaign Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zuidema, P.; Delgadillo, R.; Adebiyi, A. A.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave radiation efficiently, thereby warming the atmosphere in-situ and cooling the surface below. If the warming stabilizes the atmospheric temperature profile, this will strengthen the low cloud deck. If the absorbing aerosols are mixed into the cloud layer, the cloud response may differ. This study focuses on observations collected by DOE ARM Mobile Facility instruments during the biomass burning season of 2016 and 2017 of the DOE LASIC campaign, or Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC), at Ascension Island (8°S, 14°W), located 2,000 km offshore of continental Africa in the trade-wind regime. The subsiding aerosol layer and deepening boundary layer over this location favor the mixing of smoke into the cloud layer and indeed micropulse-derived extinction profiles reveal that aerosol is almost always present near the top of the cloudy boundary layer during July-October, if in varying amounts. When absorbing aerosols are also present near the surface, the boundary layer is deeper and more well-mixed, the diurnal cycle of potential temperature is more prominent, and the cloud top inversion is stronger. The near-surface aerosol loading is not well-correlated with that in the free troposphere, indicating distinct aerosol transport pathways. In this presentation, ERA-Interim reanalysis data will be applied to improve control for meteorological effects, and the cloud adjustments to the smoke-affected thermodynamic structure will be explored.

  9. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Sounding Enhancement Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Courtney [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this campaign was to provide higher temporal sampling of the vertical structure of the atmosphere during the two intensive observational periods (IOPs) of the GoAmazon 2014/15 campaign. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) baseline launches for 2014 and 2015 was 4 sondes/day at 2 am, 8 am, 2 pm, and 8 pm local time (LT) (6, 12, 18 and 0 Coordinated Universal Time [UTC]). However, rapid changes in boundary layer and free tropospheric temperature, humidity, and wind profiles happen throughout the diurnal cycle over Manaus, Brazil's complex forest canopy with resulting responses in aerosol, cloud, and precipitation characteristics. This campaign increased sampling to 5 sondes/day for the 2014 wet and dry season IOPs by adding a launch at 11 am (15 UTC) to capture rapid changes in boundary layer properties and convective cloud growth during that time. The extra launch also corresponded to the time of day the ARM Gulfstream (G-1) and German HALO aircraft most often flew, thus providing useful measurements of the large-scale environment during the flights. In addition, the extra launch will significantly add to the quality of AMF1 instrument retrievals and variational analysis forcing data set during the IOPs.

  10. Field observations into the environmental soul: spatial configuration and social life for people experiencing dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdous, Farhana; Moore, Keith Diaz

    2015-03-01

    This article focuses on the important, facilitating role architectural design plays in social interaction within long-term care facilities (LTCFs) serving people with dementia. Here, we apply space syntax, a set of theories and techniques for the analysis of spatial configurations, as an objective measure of environmental characteristics. Almost 150 rounds of behavioral observations were collected in the social spaces of 3 LTCFs. Using the visibility and proximity metrics of space syntax, the locations of occurrence of various social activities in relation to the furniture and spatial layout on architectural floor plans have been identified. The results did not confirm the space syntax hypothesis that spaces with greater visibility and proximity promote more social interaction. Further analysis revealed that when in settings with better visibility and accessibility, the residents were more likely to engage in low levels of interaction. High-level social interactions actually were more likely to occur in settings providing greater privacy (eg, less visibility and accessibility). The findings suggest an important nuance that architectural configuration factors impact not only the likelihood but also the type of conversations likely to occur in certain locations. This would have implications for both design and staff training on how best to utilize social spaces for therapeutic effect, particularly within the context of person-centered care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Long-term geomagnetically induced current observations in New Zealand: Earth return corrections and geomagnetic field driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Manus, Daniel H.; Rodger, Craig J.; Dalzell, Michael; Thomson, Alan W. P.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Petersen, Tanja; Wolf, Moritz M.; Thomson, Neil R.; Divett, Tim

    2017-08-01

    Transpower New Zealand Limited has measured DC currents in transformer neutrals in the New Zealand electrical network at multiple South Island locations. Near-continuous archived DC current data exist since 2001, starting with 12 different substations and expanding from 2009 to include 17 substations. From 2001 to 2015 up to 58 individual transformers were simultaneously monitored. Primarily, the measurements were intended to monitor the impact of the high-voltage DC system linking the North and South Islands when it is operating in "Earth return" mode. However, after correcting for Earth return operation, as described here, the New Zealand measurements provide an unusually long and spatially detailed set of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) measurements. We examine the peak GIC magnitudes observed from these observations during two large geomagnetic storms on 6 November 2001 and 2 October 2013. Currents of 30-50 A are observed, depending on the measurement location. There are large spatial variations in the GIC observations over comparatively small distances, which likely depend upon network layout and ground conductivity. We then go on to examine the GIC in transformers throughout the South Island during more than 151 h of geomagnetic storm conditions. We compare the GIC to the various magnitude and rate of change components of the magnetic field. Our results show that there is a strong correlation between the magnitude of the GIC and the rate of change of the horizontal magnetic field (H'). This correlation is particularly clear for transformers that show large GIC current during magnetic storms.

  12. Observations of magnetic field and TEC fluctuations caused by ionospheric responses to acoustic and gravity waves from ground-level, natural hazard sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inchin, P.; Zettergren, M. D.; Snively, J. B.; Komjathy, A.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies have reported magnetic field fluctuations following intense seismic hazard events [e.g. Aoyama et al., EPS, 68, 2016; Toh et al., JGR, 116, 2011]. These perturbations can be associated with ionospheric dynamo phenomena driven by seismically generated acoustic and gravity waves (AGWs). AGW-related dynamo effects can be separated from other sources of magnetic fluctuations (e.g. piezo magnetic effects, magnetospheric forcing or Rayleigh surface waves) based on time delays from event onset (corresponding closely with travel times for AGWs from ground to the ionosphere) and spectral content measured concurrently in total electron content (TEC). Modeling studies aimed at understanding these magnetic field fluctuations have demonstrated the idea that AGWs propagating through the conducting ionosphere can induce current densities sufficient to produce observable magnetic signatures [Zettergren and Snively, JGR, 120, 2017]. Here, we investigate the features of seismic-related magnetic field fluctuations in data and their generation via the effects of seismically-forced AGWs on the ionosphere [Iyemori et al., EPS, 65, 2013; Hasbi et al., JASTP, 71, 2005]. Concurrent magnetic field and TEC data are analyzed for several events: the Chilean earthquakes of 2010 and 2015, Chile's Calbuco volcano eruption and the Sumatran earthquake on March 28, 2005. We investigate the qualitative features of the disturbances as well as quantitative spectral and timing analysis of the data. For Chilean earthquakes, TEC and ground-based magnetometer data reveal fluctuations in magnetic field exhibiting 4-5 mHz frequencies, the same as in TEC. For the Calbuco volcano eruption and Sumatran earthquake both TEC and magnetic field perturbations exhibit frequencies of 4-5 mHz. The results are consistent with previous reports [Aoyama et al., EPS, 68, 2016, Hasbi et al., JASTP, 71, 2005, Iyemori et al., EPS, 65, 2013]. These observations are further interpreted through detailed numerical

  13. A new perspective on the Fukushima releases brought by newly available air concentration observations (Tsuruta et al, 2014) and reliable meteorological fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Olivier; Mathieu, Anne; Sekiyama, Thomas; Kajino, Mizuo; Adachi, Kouji; Bocquet, Marc; Igarashi, Yasuhito; Didier, Damien

    2016-04-01

    In case of nuclear power plant accident, the assessment of the temporal evolution in the amount of radionuclides released (source term) is required to evaluate human health and environment impacts. It is with in mind that IRSN has developed an operational tool based on inverse modeling techniques to evaluate the source term of a radioactive release. If the release amount is sufficiently strong as for the Fukushima accident, dose rate observations are primarily used to assess the source term (Saunier et al. 2013). Secondly, air concentrations measurements can also be used when available. For minor release events, air concentrations measurements are used. Five years after the Fukushima accident, many estimations of the source term based on the use of observations in the environment have been published. There is not yet consensus on the magnitudes on the releases rates, mainly due to the high uncertainties on meteorological fields used to assess the source term. Within the framework of cooperation between IRSN and Meteorological Research Institute (MRI) of Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), meteorological fields with higher spatial resolution (3 km) have been used (Sekiyama et al. 2013) to improve the simulation of the atmospheric dispersion from the Fukushima accident. Besides, new dataset of Cs137 atmospheric concentration obtained from the sampling tapes of the Suspended Particle Matter (SPM) monitoring network by the method of Tsuruta et al. (2014) are available. These data are very useful since several plumes, unknown until now, could be identified in addition with the two major plumes on March 15 and March 21. Therefore, the inverse modeling method has been applied to assess a new source term using Tsuruta air concentration measurements, dose rate measurements and meteorological fields provided by MRI. The simulations performed using this new inverted source term help enhance our knowledge about the Fukushima accident. Several releases events are better

  14. Zooming into local active galactic nuclei: the power of combining SDSS-IV MaNGA with higher resolution integral field unit observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Schnorr Müller, Allan; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Greene, Jenny E.; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Kelly, Michael; Liu, Guilin; Law, David R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Thomas, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Ionized gas outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are ubiquitous in high-luminosity AGN with outflow speeds apparently correlated with the total bolometric luminosity of the AGN. This empirical relation and theoretical work suggest that in the range Lbol ˜ 1043-45 erg s-1 there must exist a threshold luminosity above which the AGN becomes powerful enough to launch winds that will be able to escape the galaxy potential. In this paper, we present pilot observations of two AGN in this transitional range that were taken with the Gemini North Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit (IFU). Both sources have also previously been observed within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. While the MaNGA IFU maps probe the gas fields on galaxy-wide scales and show that some regions are dominated by AGN ionization, the new Gemini IFU data zoom into the centre with four times better spatial resolution. In the object with the lower Lbol we find evidence of a young or stalled biconical AGN-driven outflow where none was obvious at the MaNGA resolution. In the object with the higher Lbol we trace the large-scale biconical outflow into the nuclear region and connect the outflow from small to large scales. These observations suggest that AGN luminosity and galaxy potential are crucial in shaping wind launching and propagation in low-luminosity AGN. The transition from small and young outflows to galaxy-wide feedback can only be understood by combining large-scale IFU data that trace the galaxy velocity field with higher resolution, small-scale IFU maps.

  15. Multiple new-particle growth pathways observed at the US DOE Southern Great Plains field site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Hodshire

    2016-07-01

    observed differing growth pathways, while also predicting that ELVOCs contribute more to growth than organic salt formation. However, most MABNAG model simulations tend to underpredict the observed growth rates between 10 and 20 nm in diameter; this underprediction may come from neglecting the contributions to growth from semi-to-low-volatility species or accretion reactions. Our results suggest that in addition to sulfuric acid, ELVOCs are also very important for growth in this rural setting. We discuss the limitations of our study that arise from not accounting for semi- and low-volatility organics, as well as nitrogen-containing species beyond ammonia and amines in the model. Quantitatively understanding the overall budget, evolution, and thermodynamic properties of lower-volatility organics in the atmosphere will be essential for improving global aerosol models.

  16. Observation of high coercive fields in chemically synthesized coated Fe-Pt nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalavi, Shankar B.; Panda, Rabi N.

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline Fe-Pt alloys have been synthesized via chemical reduction route using various capping agents; such as: oleic acid/oleylamine (route-1) and oleic acid/CTAB (route-2). We could able to synthesize Fe50Pt and Fe54Pt alloys via route 1 and 2, respectively. As-prepared Fe-Pt alloys crystallize in disordered fcc phase with crystallite sizes of 2.3 nm and 6 nm for route-1 and route-2, respectively. Disordered Fe-Pt alloys were transformed to ordered fct phase after annealing at 600 °C. SEM studies confirm the spherical shape morphologies of annealed Fe-Pt nanoparticles with SEM particle sizes of 24.4 nm and 21.2 nm for route-1 and route-2, respectively. TEM study confirms the presence of 4.6 nm particles for annealed Fe50Pt alloys with several agglomerating clusters of bigger size and appropriately agrees well with the XRD study. Room temperature magnetization studies of as-prepared Fe-Pt alloys (fcc) show ferromagnetism with negligible coercivities. Average magnetic moments per particle for as-prepared Fe-Pt alloys were estimated to be 753 μB and 814 μB, for route 1 and 2, respectively. Ordered fct Fe-Pt alloys show high values of coercivities of 10,000 Oe and 10,792 Oe for route-1 and route-2, respectively. Observed magnetic properties of the fct Fe-Pt alloys nps were interpreted with the basis of order parameters, size, surface, and composition effects.

  17. Solving the field line resonance equation in the FLIP model and comparison with FLR observations in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Jared; Chi, Peter; Moldwin, Mark; Jorgensen, Anders; Richards, Phil; Zesta, Eftyhia; Boudouridis, Athanasios; Stone, William

    2012-07-01

    Field Line Resonances (FLR) have been shown to be an effective method for remote sensing of the plasmaspheric mass density. A power law solution models the mass density well in the outer plasmasphere, and solutions have been tabulated that allow direct conversion between resonance frequency and mass density. The plasma density in the inner plasmasphere, L SAMBA), magnetometers along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education (MEASURE), and Mid-continent Magnetoseismic Chain (McMAC). We find good agreement in comparison between the FLIP model and observations during quiet times. During a large storm, we find significant differences between the FLIP model and observations. The agreement can be improved by including the effects of flux tube depletion and electric convection. By comparing with observations, we can infer the importance of these drivers in the inner magnetosphere during large storms.

  18. Small-scale field-aligned currents caused by tropical cyclones as observed by the SWARM satellites above the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, T.; Iyemori, T.; Nakanishi, K.

    2014-12-01

    We present case studies of small-scale magnetic fluctuations above typhoons, hurricanes and cyclones as observed by the swarm constellation. It is reported lately that AGWs(atmospheric gravity waves) generated by meteorological phenomena in the troposphere such as typhoons and tornadoes, large earthquakes and volcanic eruptions propagate to the mesosphere and thermosphere. We observe them in various forms(e.g. airglows, ionospheric disturbances and TEC variations). We are proposing the following model. AGWs caused by atmospheric disturbances in the troposphere propagate to the ionospheric E-layer, drive dynamo action and generate field-aligned currents. The satellites observe magnetic fluctuations above the ionosphere. In this presentation, we focus on cases of tropical cyclone(hurricanes in North America, typhoons in North-West Pacific).

  19. Evolution in Cloud Population Statistics of the MJO: From AMIE Field Observations to Global-Cloud Permitting Models Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Dept.

    2017-02-09

    This is a multi-institutional, collaborative project using a three-tier modeling approach to bridge field observations and global cloud-permitting models, with emphases on cloud population structural evolution through various large-scale environments. Our contribution was in data analysis for the generation of high value cloud and precipitation products and derive cloud statistics for model validation. There are two areas in data analysis that we contributed: the development of a synergistic cloud and precipitation cloud classification that identify different cloud (e.g. shallow cumulus, cirrus) and precipitation types (shallow, deep, convective, stratiform) using profiling ARM observations and the development of a quantitative precipitation rate retrieval algorithm using profiling ARM observations. Similar efforts have been developed in the past for precipitation (weather radars), but not for the millimeter-wavelength (cloud) radar deployed at the ARM sites.

  20. More than a century of bathymetric observations and present-day shallow sediment characterization in Belfast Bay, Maine, USA: implications for pockmark field longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Maynard, Melissa Landon

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and timescales responsible for pockmark formation and maintenance remain uncertain, especially in areas lacking extensive thermogenic fluid deposits (e.g., previously glaciated estuaries). This study characterizes seafloor activity in the Belfast Bay, Maine nearshore pockmark field using (1) three swath bathymetry datasets collected between 1999 and 2008, complemented by analyses of shallow box-core samples for radionuclide activity and undrained shear strength, and (2) historical bathymetric data (report and smooth sheets from 1872, 1947, 1948). In addition, because repeat swath bathymetry surveys are an emerging data source, we present a selected literature review of recent studies using such datasets for seafloor change analysis. This study is the first to apply the method to a pockmark field, and characterizes macro-scale (>5 m) evolution of tens of square kilometers of highly irregular seafloor. Presence/absence analysis yielded no change in pockmark frequency or distribution over a 9-year period (1999-2008). In that time pockmarks did not detectably enlarge, truncate, elongate, or combine. Historical data indicate that pockmark chains already existed in the 19th century. Despite the lack of macroscopic changes in the field, near-bed undrained shear-strength values of less than 7 kPa and scattered downcore 137Cs signatures indicate a highly disturbed setting. Integrating these findings with independent geophysical and geochemical observations made in the pockmark field, it can be concluded that (1) large-scale sediment resuspension and dispersion related to pockmark formation and failure do not occur frequently within this field, and (2) pockmarks can persevere in a dynamic estuarine setting that exhibits minimal modern fluid venting. Although pockmarks are conventionally thought to be long-lived features maintained by a combination of fluid venting and minimal sediment accumulation, this suggests that other mechanisms may be equally active in

  1. More than a century of bathymetric observations and present-day shallow sediment characterization in Belfast Bay, Maine, USA: implications for pockmark field longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Laura L.; Kelley, Joseph T.; Belknap, Daniel F.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Maynard, Melissa Landon

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms and timescales responsible for pockmark formation and maintenance remain uncertain, especially in areas lacking extensive thermogenic fluid deposits (e.g., previously glaciated estuaries). This study characterizes seafloor activity in the Belfast Bay, Maine nearshore pockmark field using (1) three swath bathymetry datasets collected between 1999 and 2008, complemented by analyses of shallow box-core samples for radionuclide activity and undrained shear strength, and (2) historical bathymetric data (report and smooth sheets from 1872, 1947, 1948). In addition, because repeat swath bathymetry surveys are an emerging data source, we present a selected literature review of recent studies using such datasets for seafloor change analysis. This study is the first to apply the method to a pockmark field, and characterizes macro-scale (>5 m) evolution of tens of square kilometers of highly irregular seafloor. Presence/absence analysis yielded no change in pockmark frequency or distribution over a 9-year period (1999–2008). In that time pockmarks did not detectably enlarge, truncate, elongate, or combine. Historical data indicate that pockmark chains already existed in the 19th century. Despite the lack of macroscopic changes in the field, near-bed undrained shear-strength values of less than 7 kPa and scattered downcore 137Cs signatures indicate a highly disturbed setting. Integrating these findings with independent geophysical and geochemical observations made in the pockmark field, it can be concluded that (1) large-scale sediment resuspension and dispersion related to pockmark formation and failure do not occur frequently within this field, and (2) pockmarks can persevere in a dynamic estuarine setting that exhibits minimal modern fluid venting. Although pockmarks are conventionally thought to be long-lived features maintained by a combination of fluid venting and minimal sediment accumulation, this suggests that other mechanisms may be equally active in

  2. Transition of basaltic lava from pahoehoe to aa, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii: Field observations and key factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.; Tilling, Robert I.

    1980-01-01

    Nearly all Hawaiian basaltic lava erupts as pahoehoe, and some changes to aa during flowage and cooling; factors governing the transition involve certain critical relations between viscosity and rate of shear strain. If the lava slows, cools, and stops in direct response to concomitant increase in viscosity before these critical relations are reached, it remains pahoehoe. But, if flow mechanics (flow rate, flow dimensions, slope, momentum, etc.) impel the lava to continue to move and deform even after it has become highly viscous, the critical relations may be reached and the lava changes to aa.Typical modes of transition from pahoehoe to aa include: (1) spontaneous formation of relatively stiff clots in parts of the flowing lava where shear rate is highest; these clots grow into discrete, rough, sticky masses to which the remaining fluid lava incrementally adheres; (2) fragmentation and immersion of solid or semi-solid surface crusts of pahoehoe by roiling movements of the flow, forming cores of discrete, tacky masses; (3) sudden renewed movement of lava stored and cooled within surface reservoirs to form clots. The masses, fragments, and clots in these transition modes are characterized by spinose, granulated surfaces; as flow movement continues, the masses and fragments aggregate, fracture, and grind together, completing the transition to aa.Observations show that the critical relation between viscosity and rate of shear strain is inverse: if viscosity is low, a high rate of shear is required to begin the transition to aa; conversely, if viscosity is high, a much lower rate of shear will induce the transition. These relations can be demonstrated qualitatively with simple graphs, which can be used to examine the flow history of any selected finite lava element by tracing the path represented by its changing viscosity and shear rate. A broad, diffuse “transition threshold zone” in these graphs portrays the inverse critical relation between viscosity and shear

  3. Beach ridge sedimentology: field observation and palaeoenvironmental interpretation for Anegada Island, British Virgin Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescon, Anna Lisa; Cooper, J. Andrew G.; Jackson, Derek W. T.

    2014-05-01

    Beach ridge landforms have been observed in different environments and in settings that range from polar to tropical. Their stratigraphy and sedimentology has received a limited amount of discussion in the literature (Tamura, 2012). In coastal geomorphology a beach ridge can be seen as a transitional deposit between onshore and offshore environments. They are regarded as representing high level wave action along a coastline. In the Caribbean the origin of beach ridges has been variously attributed to one of three extreme wave events: extreme swell, extreme storm or tsunami waves. Beach ridges are arranged in beach ridge plains where there is succession of the landforms and can be several kilometres long. Beach ridge accumulation is not continuous and the coast shows alternating accretion and erosion periods. The use of beach ridges as palaeostorm archives is therefore not straightforward. The temporal continuity of beach ridge formation is being assessed on the beach ridge plains of Anegada, British Virgin Islands (Lesser Antilles). This carbonate platform surrounded by a fringing reef contains two beach ridge plains. There are more than 30 ridges in the Atlantic facing- coast and around 10 in the south, Caribbean- facing coast. The sediments of the modern beaches are dominated by the sand fraction and are 100% biogenic origin due to the isolation of Anegada from terrestrial sediment sources. The beach ridge sections have been studied in different area of Anegada beach ridge plains and present low angle seaward-dipping bedding. The sand fraction is dominant in the stratigraphy with a few intact shells. At only one site were coral pebbles deposited in association with the sand fraction. Aeolian deposits represent the upper part of the beach ridges and reflect the stabilization of the beach ridges with ongoing accretion. The sedimentology of the contemporary beach and dunes will be discussed in terms of their implications for understanding beach ridge genesis and its

  4. Initial Observations and Activities of Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) at the Gale Field Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aileen Yingst, R.; Edgett, Kenneth; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    delivered to the rover's observation tray exhibited at least four distinct grain types, including clear, translucent crystal fragments.

  5. Kinetic-Scale Electric and Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind at 1 AU: THEMIS/ARTEMIS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, C. S.; Hanson, E.; Bonnell, J. W.; Chaston, C. C.; Bale, S. D.; Mozer, F.

    2017-12-01

    We present here an analysis of kinetic-scale electromagnetic fluctuations in the solar wind using data from THEMIS and ARTEMIS spacecraft. We use high-time resolution electric and magnetic field measurements, as well as density fluctuations, up to 128 samples per second, as well as particle burst plasma data during carefully selected solar wind intervals. We focus our analysis on a few such intervals spanning different values of plasma beta and angles between the local magnetic field and the radial Sun-Earth direction. We discuss the careful analysis process of characterizing and removing the different instrumental effects and noise sources affecting the electric and magnetic field data at those scales, above 0.1 Hz or so, above the breakpoint marking the start of the so-called dissipation range of solar wind turbulence. We compute parameters such as the electric to magnetic field ratio, the magnetic compressibility, magnetic helicity, and other relevant quantities in order to diagnose the nature of the fluctuations at those scales between the ion and electron cyclotron frequencies, extracting information on the dominant modes composing the fluctuations. We also discuss the presence and role of coherent structures in the measured fluctuations. The nature of the fluctuations in the dissipation or dispersive scales of solar wind turbulence is still debated. This observational study is also highly relevant to the current Turbulent Dissipation Challenge.

  6. An initial response of magnetic fields at geosynchronous orbit to Pi 2 onset as observed from the dip-equator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saka

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluxgate magnetometer data recorded at the dip-equator (Huancayo, Peru; 1.44°N, 355.9° in geomagnetic coordinates; 12.1°S, 75.2°W in geographic coordinates; L = 1.00 with higher accuracy of timing (0.1 s and amplitude resolution (0.01 nT were utilized to survey an onset of Pi 2 pulsations in the midnight sector (2100–0100 LT during PROMIS (Polar Region and Outer Magnetosphere International Study periods (1 March–20 June, 1986. It is found that changing field line magnitude and vector as observed by magnetometer on board the synchronous satellites in the midnight sector often takes place simultaneously with the onset of Pi 2 pulsations at the dip-equator. The field disturbances that follow thereafter tend to last for some time both at the geosynchronous altitudes and the dip-equator. In this report, we examine the initial response of the field lines in space, and attempt to classify how the field line vector changed in the meridional plane. Key words. Magnetospheric physics · Magnetospheric configuration and dynamics · MHD waves and instabilities · Plasmasphere

  7. Study on the Effects of Diverting Water into Upper Burnt Pocket, Navigation Pool Number 18, Illinois and A Field Test of the Regression Simulation Model Previously Developed on Navigation Pool Number 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    The concomitant ecological responses are visible in virtually every pool. The vast increase in the surface area of water by the inundation of the...abundant on 7-2V-78 and 8-14-78. Lesser amounts of Aphanizominon flos- aguae were also observed at MC and FP-B on 10-2-78, and FP-Aand FP-C on 9-6-78

  8. 2CALIS doubling the sensitivity of CALIS for calibration of the rf field strength for indirectly observed nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benie, Andrew J.; Sørensen, Ole W.

    2006-10-01

    A new set of pulse sequences, 2CALIS, that exhibit double sensitivity of the recent CALIS pulse sequences for accurate calibration of the rf field strength for an indirectly observed spin is introduced. The sensitivity gain is a result of not forming heteronuclear coherence transfer gradient echoes although they are excellent for artifact suppression. It is, however, demonstrated that the scheme in 2CALIS for suppression of non 13C-attached proton magnetization is adequate for calibration of the 13C rf field strength even on natural abundance samples. A 2CALIS version with Watergate applicable to biomolecules in aqueous solution is also presented and demonstrated both in 13C natural abundance and on a 13C, 15N enriched protein sample.

  9. Direct observation of unstained biological specimens in water by the frequency transmission electric-field method using SEM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiko Ogura

    Full Text Available Scanning electron microscopy (SEM is a powerful tool for the direct visualization of biological specimens at nanometre-scale resolution. However, images of unstained specimens in water using an atmospheric holder exhibit very poor contrast and heavy radiation damage. Here, we present a new form of microscopy, the frequency transmission electric-field (FTE method using SEM, that offers low radiation damage and high-contrast observation of unstained biological samples in water. The wet biological specimens are enclosed in two silicon nitride (SiN films. The metal-coated SiN film is irradiated using a focused modulation electron beam (EB at a low-accelerating voltage. A measurement terminal under the sample holder detects the electric-field frequency signal, which contains structural information relating to the biological specimens. Our results in very little radiation damage to the sample, and the observation image is similar to the transmission image, depending on the sample volume. Our developed method can easily be utilized for the observation of various biological specimens in water.

  10. Impacts of field of view configuration of Cross-track Infrared Sounder on clear-sky observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Likun; Chen, Yong; Han, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Hyperspectral infrared radiance measurements from satellite sensors contain valuable information on atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles and greenhouse gases, and therefore are directly assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as inputs for weather forecasting. However, data assimilations in current operational NWP models still mainly rely on cloud-free observations due to the challenge of simulating cloud-contaminated radiances when using hyperspectral radiances. The limited spatial coverage of the 3×3 field of views (FOVs) in one field of regard (FOR) (i.e., spatial gap among FOVs) as well as relatively large footprint size (14 km) in current Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) instruments limits the amount of clear-sky observations. This study explores the potential impacts of future CrIS FOV configuration (including FOV size and spatial coverage) on the amount of clear-sky observations by simulation experiments. The radiance measurements and cloud mask products (VCM) from the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to simulate CrIS clear-sky observation under different FOV configurations. The results indicate that, given the same FOV coverage (e.g., 3×3), the percentage of clear-sky FOVs and the percentage of clear-sky FORs (that contain at least one clear-sky FOV) both increase as the FOV size decreases. In particular, if the CrIS FOV size were reduced from 14 km to 7 km, the percentage of clear-sky FOVs increases from 9.02% to 13.51% and the percentage of clear-sky FORs increases from 18.24% to 27.51%. Given the same FOV size but with increasing FOV coverage in each FOR, the clear-sky FOV observations increases proportionally with the increasing sampling FOVs. Both reducing FOV size and increasing FOV coverage can result in more clear-sky FORs, which benefit data utilization of NWP data assimilation.

  11. Field Operations For The "Intelligent River" Observation System: A Basin-wide Water Quality Observation System In The Savannah River Basin And Platform Supporting Related Diverse Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, A.; Koons, M.; O'Brien-Gayes, P.; Moorer, R.; Hallstrom, J.; Post, C.; Gayes, P. T.

    2017-12-01

    The Intelligent River (IR) initiative is an NSF sponsored study developing new data management technology for a range of basin-scale applications. The technology developed by Florida Atlantic and Clemson University established a network of real-time reporting water quality sondes; from the mountains to the estuary of the Savannah River basin. Coastal Carolina University led the field operations campaign. Ancillary studies, student projects and initiatives benefitted from the associated instrumentation, infrastructure and operational support of the IR program. This provided a vehicle for students to participate in fieldwork across the watershed and pursue individual interests. Student projects included: 1) a Multibeam sonar survey investigating channel morphology in the area of an IR sensor station and 2) field tests of developing techniques for acquiring and assimilating flood velocity data into model systems associated with a separate NSF Rapid award. The multibeam survey within the lower Savannah basin exhibited a range of complexity in bathymetry, bedforms and bottom habitat in the vicinity of one of the water quality stations. The complex morphology and bottom habitat reflect complex flow patterns, localized areas of depositional and erosive tendencies providing a valuable context for considering point-source water quality time series. Micro- Lagrangian drifters developed by ISENSE at Florida Atlantic University, a sled mounted ADCP, and particle tracking from imagery collected by a photogrammetric drone were tested and used to develop methodology for establishing velocity, direction and discharge levels to validate, initialize and assimilate data into advance models systems during future flood events. The prospect of expanding wide scale observing systems can serve as a platform to integrate small and large-scale cooperative studies across disciplines as well as basic and applied research interests. Such initiatives provide opportunities for embedded education

  12. The Fate of Saharan Dust Across the Atlantic: An Integrated Modeling and Observational Study of the TC4 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, P. R.; daSilva, A.; McGill, M.; Hlavka, D.

    2010-01-01

    During the NASA TC-4 field campaign in July 2007, several Saharan dust events were observed over the Caribbean basin. A-Train observations suggest that these Saharan dust events are confined the Caribbean and rarely transported across Central America to the Pacific Ocean. We investigate the nature of this barrier to dust transport using the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model. Our simulations with GEOS-5 are driven by the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological analyses, and include online simulation of aerosol distributions using a version of the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) model. Simulated dust distributions are evaluated using A-Train observations from MODIS and CALIOP, as well as MISR and ground-based AERONET sun photometers, and show good agreement with the observations in terms of the timing and magnitude of dust events. A component analysis of the dust transport and removal pathways is used to evaluate the relative roles of these processes in establishing the observed dust transport barrier. From this analysis, we show that while both atmospheric dynamics and wet removal contribute towards the Caribbean dust barrier, northward dust transport is the more dominant term. Additional simulations are performed to ascertain the sensitivity of our results to uncertain loss processes (i.e., wet removal) in our model.

  13. Strength of the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field - A Comparison of Independent Estimates Using Contemporaneous Radio and White-Light Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Anshu; Ramesh, R.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2017-11-01

    We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength (B) during the 23 July 2016 coronal mass ejection (CME) event using i) the flux rope structure of the CME in the white-light coronagraph images and ii) the band-splitting in the associated type II burst. No models were assumed for the coronal electron density (N(r)) we used in the estimation. The results obtained with these two independent methods correspond to different heliocentric distances (r) in the range {≈} 2.5 - 4.5 R_{⊙}, but they show excellent consistency and could be fit with a single power-law distribution of the type B(r)=5.7r^{-2.6} G, which is applicable in that distance range. The power-law index ( i.e. -2.6) is in good agreement with the results obtained in previous studies by different methods.

  14. Simultaneous prenoon and postnoon observations of three field-aligned current systems from Viking and DMSP-F7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T. A.; Newell, P. T.; Zanetti, L. J.; Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Yamauchi, M.; Elphinstone, R. D.; De La Beauijardie, O.; Blomberg, L. G.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial structure of dayside large-scale field-aligned current (FAC) systems is examined by using Viking and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program-F7 (DMSP-F7) data. We focus on four events in which the satellites simultaneously observed postnoon and prenoon three FAC systems: the region 2, the region 1, and the mantle (referred to as midday region O) systems, from equatorward to poleward. These events provide the most solid evidence to date that the midday region O system is a separate and unique FAC system, and is not an extension of the region 1 system from other local times. The events are examined comprehensively by making use of a mulit-instrumental data set, which includes magnetic field, particle flux, electric field, auroral UV image data from the satellites, and the Sondrestrom convection data. The results are summarized as follows: (1) Region 2 currents flow mostly in the central plasma sheet (CPS) precipitation region, often overlapping with the boundary plasma sheet (BPD) at their poleward edge. (2) The region 1 system is located in the core part of the auroral oval and is confined in a relatively narrow range in latitude which includes the convection reversal. The low-latitude boundary layer, possibly including the outer part of the plasma sheet, and the external cusp are the major source regions of dayside region 1 currents. (2) Midday region O currents flow on open field lines and are collocated with the shear of antisunward convection flows with velocites decreasing poleward. On the basis of these results we support the view that both prenoon and postnoon current systems consist of the three-sheet structure when the disctortion ofthe convection pattern associated with interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub Y) is small and both morningside and eveningside convection cells are crescent-shaped. We also propose that the midday region O and a part of the region 1 systems are closely coupled to the same source.

  15. LCS-1: A high-resolution global model of the lithospheric magnetic field derived from CHAMP and Swarm satellite observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Ravat, Dhananjay; Finlay, Chris

    2017-01-01

    We derive a new model, named LCS-1, of Earth’s lithospheric field based on four years (Sept 2006 – Sept 2010) of magnetic observations taken by the CHAMP satellite at altitudes lower than 350 km, as well as almost three years (April 2014 to December 2016) of measurements taken by the two lower...... Swarm satellites Alpha and Charlie. The model is determined entirely from magnetic “gradient” data (approximated by finite differences): the North-South gradient is approximated by first differences of 15 second along-track data (for CHAMP and each of the two Swarm satellites), while the East...

  16. Evaluating water controls on vegetation growth in the semi-arid sahel using field and earth observation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdi, Abdulhakim M.; Boke-Olen, Niklas; Tenenbaum, David E.

    2017-01-01

    identify the main biophysical limitations that induce canopy water stress in Sahelian vegetation and evaluate the relationships between field data and Earth observation-derived spectral products for up-scaling GPP. We find that plant-available water and vapor pressure deficit together control the GPP......Water loss is a crucial factor for vegetation in the semi-arid Sahel region of Africa. Global satellite-driven estimates of plant CO2 uptake (gross primary productivity, GPP) have been found to not accurately account for Sahelian conditions, particularly the impact of canopy water stress. Here, we...

  17. The genesis of Typhoon Nuri as observed during the Tropical Cyclone Structure 2008 (TCS08 field experiment – Part 2: Observations of the convective environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of thermodynamic data gathered from airborne dropwindsondes during the Tropical Cyclone Structure (2008 experiment are presented for the disturbance that became Typhoon Nuri. Although previous work has suggested that Nuri formed within the protective recirculating "pouch" region of a westward propagating wave-like disturbance and implicated rotating deep convective clouds in driving the inflow to spin up the tangential circulation of the system-scale flow, the nature of the thermodynamic environment that supported the genesis remains a topic of debate. During the genesis phase, vertical profiles of virtual potential temperature show little variability between soundings on a particular day and the system-average soundings likewise show a negligible change. There is a tendency also for the lower and middle troposphere to moisten. However, the data show that, on the scale of the recirculating region of the disturbance, there was no noticeable reduction of virtual temperature in the lower troposphere, but a small warming (less than 1 K in the upper troposphere. Vertical profiles of pseudo-equivalent potential temperature, θe, during the genesis show a modestly decreasing deficit of θe in the vertical between the surface and the height of minimum θe (between 3 and 4 km, from 17.5 K to 15.2 K. The findings reported here are consistent with those found for developing disturbances observed in the Pre-Depression Investigation of Cloud Systems in the Tropics (PREDICT experiment in 2010. Some implications of the findings are discussed.

  18. The synergistic use of models and observations: understanding the mechanisms behind observed biomass dynamics at 14 Amazonian field sites and the implications for future biomass change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, N. M.; Galbraith, D.; Christoffersen, B. J.; Imbuzeiro, H. A.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.; Malhi, Y.; Saleska, S. R.; Costa, M. H.; Phillips, O.; Andrade, A.; Moorcroft, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Amazonian rainforests play a vital role in global water, energy and carbon cycling. The sensitivity of this system to natural and anthropogenic disturbances therefore has important implications for the global climate. Some global models have predicted large-scale forest dieback and the savannization of Amazonia over the next century [Meehl et al., 2007]. While several studies have demonstrated the sensitivity of dynamic global vegetation models to changes in temperature, precipitation, and dry season length [e.g. Galbraith et al., 2010; Good et al., 2011], the ability of these models to accurately reproduce ecosystem dynamics of present-day transitional or low biomass tropical forests has not been demonstrated. A model-data intercomparison was conducted with four state-of-the-art terrestrial ecosystem models to evaluate the ability of these models to accurately represent structure, function, and long-term biomass dynamics over a range of Amazonian ecosystems. Each modeling group conducted a series of simulations for 14 sites including mature forest, transitional forest, savannah, and agricultural/pasture sites. All models were run using standard physical parameters and the same initialization procedure. Model results were compared against forest inventory and dendrometer data in addition to flux tower measurements. While the models compared well against field observations for the mature forest sites, significant differences were observed between predicted and measured ecosystem structure and dynamics for the transitional forest and savannah sites. The length of the dry season and soil sand content were good predictors of model performance. In addition, for the big leaf models, model performance was highest for sites dominated by late successional trees and lowest for sites with predominantly early and mid-successional trees. This study provides insight into tropical forest function and sensitivity to environmental conditions that will aid in predictions of the

  19. Changes in the ultra-low frequency wave field during the precursor phase to the Sichuan earthquake: DEMETER observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Walker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic phenomena observed in association with increases in seismic activity have been studied for several decades. These phenomena are generated during the precursory phases of an earthquake as well as during the main event. Their occurrence during the precursory phases may be used in short-term prediction of a large earthquake. In this paper, we examine ultra-low frequency (ULF electric field data from the DEMETER satellite during the period leading up to the Sichuan earthquake. It is shown that there is an increase in ULF wave activity observed as DEMETER passes in the vicinity of the earthquake epicentre. This increase is most obvious at lower frequencies. Examination of the ULF spectra shows the possible occurrence of geomagnetic pearl pulsations, resulting from the passage of atmospheric gravity waves generated in the vicinity of the earthquake epicentre.

  20. Eigenstate thermalization in the two-dimensional transverse field Ising model. II. Off-diagonal matrix elements of observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaini, Rubem; Rigol, Marcos

    2017-07-01

    We study the matrix elements of few-body observables, focusing on the off-diagonal ones, in the eigenstates of the two-dimensional transverse field Ising model. By resolving all symmetries, we relate the onset of quantum chaos to the structure of the matrix elements. In particular, we show that a general result of the theory of random matrices, namely, the value 2 of the ratio of variances (diagonal to off-diagonal) of the matrix elements of Hermitian operators, occurs in the quantum chaotic regime. Furthermore, we explore the behavior of the off-diagonal matrix elements of observables as a function of the eigenstate energy differences and show that it is in accordance with the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis ansatz.

  1. Long-term photometric observations of pre-main sequence objects in the field of North America/Pelican Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljančić, Beljan I.; Jurdana-Šepić, R.; Semkov, E. H.; Ibryamov, S.; Peneva, S. P.; Tsvetkov, M. K.

    2014-08-01

    To broaden the search and study stars in the early evolutionary phase, we investigated a sample of 17 pre-main sequence objects previously detected as either Hα emission-line pre-main sequence stars or T Tauri variables located in the field of the North America/Pelican Nebula complex. Johnson-Cousins B, V, Rc, Ic magnitudes and mean color indices for the program stars are determined from more than 12 400 measurements from archive photographic plates and from CCD data collected at 7 observatories covering the period of almost 60 years from 1954 up to 2013. We complemented previously rare insights on the photometry of the program stars and presented their photometric history, which for almost all program stars is the first long term photometric monitoring on a timescale of 6 decades. Eight program stars are found to be classical T Tauri stars of variability type II, while 6 program stars are weak-line T Tauri stars of variability type I. For the first time, periodicity is found for three stars: V1716 Cyg indicates a 4.15 day period, V2051 Cyg indicates a 384 day period, and V521 Cyg a period of 503 days. Full Tables 4 and 5 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/568/A49

  2. Determination of concrete cover thickness in a reinforced concrete pillar by observation of the scattered electromagnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Pietro Paolo; Frezza, Fabrizio; Mangini, Fabio; Pajewski, Lara

    2017-04-01

    The electromagnetic scattered field by a reinforced concrete structure is calculated by means of frequency-domain numerical simulations and by making use of the scattered-field formulation. The concrete pillar, used as supporting architectural element, is modelled as a parallelepiped shell made of concrete material inside which are present steel bars. In order to make the model simpler, the steel bars are supposed running parallel to the air-pillar interface. To excite the model, a linearly-polarized plane wave impinging normally with respect to the pillars surface, is adopted. We consider two different polarizations in order to determine the most useful in terms of scattered-field sensitivity. Moreover, a preliminary frequency sweep allows us to choose the most suitable operating frequency depending on the dimensions of the pillar cross-section, the steel bars cross-section and the concrete cover. All the three components of the scattered field are monitored along a line just above the interface air-pillar. The electromagnetic properties of the materials employed in this study are present in the literature and, since a frequency-domain technique is adopted, no further approximation is needed. The results obtained for different values of the concrete cover are compared, with the goal of determining the scattered field dependence on the concrete cover thickness. Considering different concrete cover thicknesses, we want to provide an electromagnetic method to obtain this useful parameter by observation of the scattered electromagnetic field. One of the practical applications of this study in the field of Civil Engineering may be the use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) techniques to monitor the thickness of the concrete that separates the metal bars embedded in the pillar from the outer surface. A correct distance is useful because the concrete cover serves as a protection against external agents avoiding corrosion of the bars that might prejudice the reinforced

  3. 3D Visualization of near real-time remote-sensing observation for hurricanes field campaign using Google Earth API

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P.; Turk, J.; Vu, Q.; Knosp, B.; Hristova-Veleva, S. M.; Lambrigtsen, B.; Poulsen, W. L.; Licata, S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is planning a new field experiment, the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP), in the summer of 2010 to better understand how tropical storms form and develop into major hurricanes. The DC-8 aircraft and the Global Hawk Unmanned Airborne System (UAS) will be deployed loaded with instruments for measurements including lightning, temperature, 3D wind, precipitation, liquid and ice water contents, aerosol and cloud profiles. During the field campaign, both the spaceborne and the airborne observations will be collected in real-time and integrated with the hurricane forecast models. This observation-model integration will help the campaign achieve its science goals by allowing team members to effectively plan the mission with current forecasts. To support the GRIP experiment, JPL developed a website for interactive visualization of all related remote-sensing observations in the GRIP’s geographical domain using the new Google Earth API. All the observations are collected in near real-time (NRT) with 2 to 5 hour latency. The observations include a 1KM blended Sea Surface Temperature (SST) map from GHRSST L2P products; 6-hour composite images of GOES IR; stability indices, temperature and vapor profiles from AIRS and AMSU-B; microwave brightness temperature and rain index maps from AMSR-E, SSMI and TRMM-TMI; ocean surface wind vectors, vorticity and divergence of the wind from QuikSCAT; the 3D precipitation structure from TRMM-PR and vertical profiles of cloud and precipitation from CloudSAT. All the NRT observations are collected from the data centers and science facilities at NASA and NOAA, subsetted, re-projected, and composited into hourly or daily data products depending on the frequency of the observation. The data products are then displayed on the 3D Google Earth plug-in at the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) website. The data products offered by the TCIS in the Google Earth display include image overlays, wind vectors, clickable

  4. The Double Star magnetic field investigation: instrument design, performance and highlights of the first year's observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Carr

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary objectives of the Double Star mission is the accurate measurement of the magnetic field vector along the orbits of the two spacecraft. The magnetic field is an essential parameter for the understanding of space plasma processes and is also required for the effective interpretation of data from the other instruments on the spacecraft. We present the design of the magnetic field instrument onboard both of the Double Star spacecraft and an overview of the performance as measured first on-ground and then in-orbit. We also report the results of in-flight calibration of the magnetometers, and the processing methods employed to produce the final data products which are provided to Double Star investigators, and the wider community in general. Particular attention is paid to the techniques developed for removing magnetic interference generated by the solar arrays on the first (equatorial orbiting spacecraft. Results from the first year of operations are reviewed in the context of combined observations by Double Star and Cluster, and examples given from the different regions visited by the spacecraft to date.

  5. Numerical Modeling of 3D magnetic field topology under RMPs and the comparison with experimental observations on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Manni; Zhong, F.C.; Sun, Y.W.; Wang, L.; Gan, K.

    2015-01-01

    A numerical code using field line tracing for modeling the three-dimensional magnetic field topology under resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) has been developed and applied in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) 2014 campaign. Currently, the model is simplified by using vacuum paradigm and neglecting the toroidal field ripple. The modeling result predicts that the possible strike point splitting on plasma facing component and the lobes like structure on the boundary are observable in various diagnostics at different locations. lt is shown that the strike point splitting strongly depends on the edge stochasticity, which is a combined effect of both perturbation spectrum and equi librium properties. In a lower single null configuration, it is found that RMP may also change the magnetic structure near the upper x-point and form a similar strike point splitting on the upper divertor. It depends on the distance between the two separatrix, which threshold value depends on both the RMP strength and the equilibrium properties. To examine the RMP system on EAST and its effect on plasmas, some experiments with RMPs were hold in the 2014 campaign. The static and rotational perturbation were both tested and results confirm the RMP efficiency. Particle flux profiles on divertor targets measured by divertor probes had verified the existing strike point splitting induced by RMPs. The results are consistent with the numerical modeling within measurement uncertainties and confirm the edge stochasticity induced by RMPs. (author)

  6. Observer variability in screen-film mammography versus full-field digital mammography with soft-copy reading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaane, Per; Young, Kari [Ullevaal University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging Center, Oslo (Norway); Diekmann, Felix; Diekmann, Susanne [University Charite, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Balleyguier, Corinne [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Piguet, Jean-Charles [Institut Imagerive, Geneva (Switzerland); Abdelnoor, Michael [Ullevaal University Hospital, Center for Clinical Research, Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Oslo (Norway); Niklason, Loren [Hologic Inc., Hillsborough, NC (United States)

    2008-06-15

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) with soft-copy reading is more complex than screen-film mammography (SFM) with hard-copy reading. The aim of this study was to compare inter- and intraobserver variability in SFM versus FFDM of paired mammograms from a breast cancer screening program. Six radiologists interpreted mammograms of 232 cases obtained with both techniques, including 46 cancers, 88 benign lesions, and 98 normals. Image interpretation included BI-RADS categories. A case consisted of standard two-view mammograms of one breast. Images were scored in two sessions separated by 5 weeks. Observer variability was substantial for SFM as well as for FFDM, but overall there was no significant difference between the observer variability at SFM and FFDM. Mean kappa values were lower, indicating less agreement, for microcalcifications compared with masses. The lower observer agreement for microcalcifications, and especially the low intraobserver concordance between the two imaging techniques for three readers, was noticeable. The level of observer agreement might be an indicator of radiologist performance and could confound studies designed to separate diagnostic differences between the two imaging techniques. The results of our study confirm the need for proper training for radiologists starting FFDM with soft-copy reading in breast cancer screening. (orig.)

  7. Use of portable ladders - field observations and self-reported safety performance in the cable TV industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Brunette, Christopher; Lee, Jin

    2017-11-01

    Portable ladders incidents remain a major cause of falls from heights. This study reported field observations of environments, work conditions and safety behaviour involving portable ladders and their correlations with self-reported safety performance. Seventy-five professional installers of a company in the cable and other pay TV industry were observed for 320 ladder usages at their worksites. The participants also filled out a questionnaire to measure self-reported safety performance. Proper setup on slippery surfaces, correct method for ladder inclination setup and ladder secured at the bottom had the lowest compliance with best practices and training guidelines. The observation compliance score was found to have significant correlation with straight ladder inclined angle (Pearson's r = 0.23, p self-reported safety participation (r = 0.29, p < 0.01). The results provide a broad perspective on employees' safety compliance and identify areas for improving safety behaviours. Practitioner Summary: A checklist was used while observing professional installers of a cable company for portable ladder usage at their worksites. Items that had the lowest compliance with best practices and training guidelines were identified. The results provide a broad perspective on employees' safety compliance and identify areas for improving safety behaviours.

  8. The HST Frontier Fields: Complete Observations and High-Level Science Data Products for All 6 Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.; Mack, Jennifer; Lotz, Jennifer M.; Borncamp, David; Khandrika, Harish G.; Lucas, Ray A.; Martlin, Catherine; Martlin, Catherine; Porterfield, Blair; Sunnquist, Ben; Anderson, Jay; Avila, Roberto J.; Barker, Elizabeth A.; Grogin, Norman A.; Gunning, Heather C.; Hilbert, Bryan; Ogaz, Sara; Robberto, Massimo; Sembach, Kenneth; Flanagan, Kathryn; Mountain, Matt; HST Frontier Fields Team

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields program is a large Director's Discretionary program of 840 orbits, to obtain ultra-deep observations of six strong lensing clusters of galaxies, together with parallel deep blank fields, making use of the strong lensing amplification by these clusters of distant background galaxies to detect the faintest galaxies currently observable in the high-redshift universe. The entire program has now completed successfully for all 6 clusters, namely Abell 2744, Abell S1063, Abell 370, MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J0717.5+3745 and MACS J1149.5+2223,. Each of these was observed over two epochs, to a total depth of 140 orbits on the main cluster and an associated parallel field, obtaining images in ACS (F435W, F606W, F814W) and WFC3/IR (F105W, F125W, F140W, F160W) on both the main cluster and the parallel field in all cases. Full sets of high-level science products have been generated for all these clusters by the team at STScI, including cumulative-depth data releases during each epoch, as well as full-depth releases after the completion of each epoch. These products include all the full-depth distortion-corrected drizzled mosaics and associated products for each cluster, which are science-ready to facilitate the construction of lensing models as well as enabling a wide range of other science projects. Many improvements beyond default calibration for ACS and WFC3/IR are implemented in these data products, including corrections for persistence, time-variable sky, and low-level dark current residuals, as well as improvements in astrometric alignment to achieve milliarcsecond-level accuracy. The full set of resulting high-level science products and mosaics are publicly delivered to the community via the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) to enable the widest scientific use of these data, as well as ensuring a public legacy dataset of the highest possible quality that is of lasting value to the entire community.

  9. GRT-WF (Goddard Robotic Telescope Wide Field) Observations on Sprites to Study Correlations Between Sprites and TGFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ken; Hegley, Jakob; Vydra, Ekaterina; Sakamoto, Takanori; Okajima, Takashi; Gehrels, Neil

    2015-08-01

    It is believed that accelerated electrons are responsible for both Sprites and terrestrial gamma- ray flashes (TGFs). Although several theoretical explanations have been made, we still do not fully understand how TGFs are generated. Therefore, we search for correlations between Sprites and TGFs. We constructed a wide field optical camera system (GRT- WF) using off- the- shelf hardware in June, 2011 at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU), Fort Myers, Florida where a high thunderstorm activity during summer is observed. Seven cameras have been set to point along azimuth directions to cover most of the visible sky. The field of view of each camera is ~40 x 60 deg. The events are captured automatically by off- the- shelf software. We have observed around five hundred Sprites in the past four years. We have compared these Sprites with the TGFs detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope LAT in times and locations as well as other instruments. We discuss the preliminary results of our study.

  10. Large-amplitude Longitudinal Oscillations Triggered by the Merging of Two Solar Filaments: Observations and Magnetic Field Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, M.; Su, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Chandra, R.; Kucera, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    We follow the eruption of two related intermediate filaments observed in Hα (from GONG) and EUV (from Solar Dynamics Observatory SDO/Atmospheric Imaging assembly AIA) and the resulting large-amplitude longitudinal oscillations of the plasma in the filament channels. The events occurred in and around the decayed active region AR12486 on 2016 January 26. Our detailed study of the oscillation reveals that the periods of the oscillations are about one hour. In Hα, the period decreases with time and exhibits strong damping. The analysis of 171 Å images shows that the oscillation has two phases: an initial long-period phase and a subsequent oscillation with a shorter period. In this wavelength, the damping appears weaker than in Hα. The velocity is the largest ever detected in a prominence oscillation, approximately 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1. Using SDO/HMI magnetograms, we reconstruct the magnetic field of the filaments, modeled as flux ropes by using a flux-rope insertion method. Applying seismological techniques, we determine that the radii of curvature of the field lines in which cool plasma is condensed are in the range 75-120 Mm, in agreement with the reconstructed field. In addition, we infer a field strength of ≥7 to 30 Gauss, depending on the electron density assumed, that is also in agreement with the values from the reconstruction (8-20 Gauss). The poloidal flux is zero and the axis flux is on the order of 1020 to 1021 Mx, confirming the high shear existing even in a non-active filament.

  11. A modified ‘NanoSuit®’ preserves wet samples in high vacuum: direct observations on cells and tissues in field-emission scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Ohta, Isao; Ishii, Daisuke; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Takami; Matsumoto, Haruko; Takehara, Sayuri; Nakane, Chinatsu; Sakaida, Kana; Suzuki, Chiaki; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki; Shimomura, Masatsugu

    2017-01-01

    Although field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) has proven very useful in biomedical research, the high vacuum required (10−3 to 10−7 Pa) precludes direct observations of living cells and tissues at high resolution and often produces unwanted structural changes. We have previously described a method that allows the investigator to keep a variety of insect larvae alive in the high vacuum environment of the electron microscope by encasing the organisms in a thin, vacuum-proof suit, the ‘NanoSuit®'. However, it was impossible to protect wet tissues freshly excised from intact organisms or cultured cells. Here we describe an improved ‘NanoSuit' technique to overcome this limitation. We protected the specimens with a surface shield enhancer (SSE) solution that consists of glycerine and electrolytes and found that the fine structure of the SSE-treated specimens is superior to that of conventionally prepared specimens. The SSE-based NanoSuit affords a much stronger barrier to gas and/or liquid loss than the previous NanoSuit did and, since it allows more detailed images, it could significantly help to elucidate the ‘real' organization of cells and their functions. PMID:28405375

  12. A modified 'NanoSuit®' preserves wet samples in high vacuum: direct observations on cells and tissues in field-emission scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Ohta, Isao; Ishii, Daisuke; Hirakawa, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Takami; Matsumoto, Haruko; Takehara, Sayuri; Nakane, Chinatsu; Sakaida, Kana; Suzuki, Chiaki; Muranaka, Yoshinori; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Konno, Hiroyuki; Shimomura, Masatsugu; Hariyama, Takahiko

    2017-03-01

    Although field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) has proven very useful in biomedical research, the high vacuum required (10 -3 to 10 -7  Pa) precludes direct observations of living cells and tissues at high resolution and often produces unwanted structural changes. We have previously described a method that allows the investigator to keep a variety of insect larvae alive in the high vacuum environment of the electron microscope by encasing the organisms in a thin, vacuum-proof suit, the 'NanoSuit®'. However, it was impossible to protect wet tissues freshly excised from intact organisms or cultured cells. Here we describe an improved 'NanoSuit' technique to overcome this limitation. We protected the specimens with a surface shield enhancer (SSE) solution that consists of glycerine and electrolytes and found that the fine structure of the SSE-treated specimens is superior to that of conventionally prepared specimens. The SSE-based NanoSuit affords a much stronger barrier to gas and/or liquid loss than the previous NanoSuit did and, since it allows more detailed images, it could significantly help to elucidate the 'real' organization of cells and their functions.

  13. Evaluation of biomass burning aerosols in the HadGEM3 climate model with observations from the SAMBBA field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Johnson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present observations of biomass burning aerosol from the South American Biomass Burning Analysis (SAMBBA and other measurement campaigns, and use these to evaluate the representation of biomass burning aerosol properties and processes in a state-of-the-art climate model. The evaluation includes detailed comparisons with aircraft and ground data, along with remote sensing observations from MODIS and AERONET. We demonstrate several improvements to aerosol properties following the implementation of the Global Model for Aerosol Processes (GLOMAP-mode modal aerosol scheme in the HadGEM3 climate model. This predicts the particle size distribution, composition, and optical properties, giving increased accuracy in the representation of aerosol properties and physical–chemical processes over the Coupled Large-scale Aerosol Scheme for Simulations in Climate Models (CLASSIC bulk aerosol scheme previously used in HadGEM2. Although both models give similar regional distributions of carbonaceous aerosol mass and aerosol optical depth (AOD, GLOMAP-mode is better able to capture the observed size distribution, single scattering albedo, and Ångström exponent across different tropical biomass burning source regions. Both aerosol schemes overestimate the uptake of water compared to recent observations, CLASSIC more so than GLOMAP-mode, leading to a likely overestimation of aerosol scattering, AOD, and single scattering albedo at high relative humidity. Observed aerosol vertical distributions were well captured when biomass burning aerosol emissions were injected uniformly from the surface to 3 km. Finally, good agreement between observed and modelled AOD was gained only after scaling up GFED3 emissions by a factor of 1.6 for CLASSIC and 2.0 for GLOMAP-mode. We attribute this difference in scaling factor mainly to different assumptions for the water uptake and growth of aerosol mass during ageing via oxidation and condensation of organics. We also note

  14. Field monoterpene emission of Mediterranean oak (Quercus ilex) in the central Iberian Peninsula measured by enclosure and micrometeorological techniques: Observation of drought stress effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, J.; NúñEz, L.; Pujadas, M.; PéRez-Pastor, R.; Bermejo, V.; GarcíA-Alonso, S.; Elvira, S.

    2005-02-01

    An experimental characterization of biogenic emission from Quercus ilex ssp. rotundifolia in a forest near Madrid, Spain, was carried out in the early autumn of the years 2000-2003. A dynamic branch enclosure technique was implemented to determine the monoterpene emission rates of this evergreen oak species during the 2000 and 2001 campaigns. Major compounds emitted during both measurement periods were limonene, α-pinene, β-pinene, sabinene, and myrcene. In the 2000 field campaign the light- and temperature-dependent model of [1993] did not fit the data due to drastic reductions of emission rates (and leaf gas exchange related parameters) observed at high air temperature and low air humidity (high water vapor pressure deficit). This plant physiological activity depletion and the subsequent emission reduction were attributed to severe water soil deficit conditions, as precipitation was very scarce during the growing season. In contrast, during the 2001 field campaign, neither emission nor physiological activity showed strong decreases in hot days. A good fit of experimental data to Guenther model was achieved in this field campaign (r2 = 0.90), and linear regression gave a standard emission factor (ES) of 14.0 μg gdw-1 h-1 (gdw is grams dry weight). Soil moisture was presumably higher than during the 2000 campaign due to recent rain events. With the purpose of documenting the drought stress effect at canopy level, monoterpene oak fluxes were measured by the modified Bowen ratio micrometeorological technique throughout the 2001 field campaign and in the late summer of 2002 and 2003. The measured emission by both techniques showed a reasonably good correlation, although micrometeorological fluxes were, in general, lower than upscaled branch emission rates. According to Guenther's parameterization, standard emission fluxes (FS) of 0.30 μg m-2 s-1 (r2 = 0.61) and 0.28 μg m-2 s-1 (r2 = 0.67) were derived for the 2001 and 2002 field campaigns, respectively. However

  15. Data rescue of NASA First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment (FIFE) aerial observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhana Vannan, S. K.; Boyer, A.; Deb, D.; Beaty, T.; Wei, Y.; Wei, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers. ORNL DAAC (https://daac.ornl.gov) is responsible for data archival, product development and distribution, and user support for biogeochemical and ecological data and models. In particular, ORNL DAAC has been providing data management support for NASA's terrestrial ecology field campaign programs for the last several decades. Field campaigns combine ground, aircraft, and satellite-based measurements in specific ecosystems over multi-year time periods. The data collected during NASA field campaigns are archived at the ORNL DAAC (https://daac.ornl.gov/get_data/). This paper describes the effort of the ORNL DAAC team for data rescue of a First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) dataset containing airborne and satellite data observations from the 1980s. The data collected during the FIFE campaign contain high resolution aerial imageries collected over Kansas. The data rescue workflow was prepared to test for successful recovery of the data from a CD-ROM and to ensure that the data are usable and preserved for the future. The imageries contain spectral reflectance data that can be used as a historical benchmark to examine climatological and ecological changes in the Kansas region since the 1980s. Below are the key steps taken to convert the files to modern standards. Decompress the imageries using custom compression software provided with the data. The compression algorithm created for MS-DOS in 1980s had to be set up to run on modern computer systems. Decompressed files were geo-referenced by using metadata information stored in separate compressed header files. Standardized file names were applied (File names and details were described in separate readme documents). Image files were converted to GeoTIFF format with embedded georeferencing information. Leverage Open Geospatial

  16. WIDE-FIELD VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF M31: A UNIQUE PROBE OF THE IONIZED INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM OF A NEARBY GALAXY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, John S.; Argo, Megan K.; Trott, Cathryn M.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Miller-Jones, James; Tingay, Steven J.; Deller, Adam; Middelberg, Enno

    2013-01-01

    The Very Long Baseline Array was used at 1.6 GHz to observe a target field 50' in diameter including the core of M31. Novel very long baseline interferometry correlation techniques were used to observe 200 sources simultaneously, of which 16 were detected. We classify all 16 as background active galactic nuclei based on their X-ray properties and arcsecond- and mas-scale morphology. The detected sources were then analyzed for evidence of scatter-broadening due to the ionized interstellar medium (ISM) of M31. The detection of a compact background source only 0.25 kpc projected distance from M31* places a constraint on the extent of any extreme scattering region associated with the center of M31. However, the two sources closest to the core show evidence of scatter broadening consistent with that which would be seen for a compact source if it were observed through the inner disk of our Galaxy, at the inclination of M31. We interpret this as a detection of the ionized ISM of M31 along two lines of sight. With the increases in bandwidth and sensitivity envisaged for future long-baseline interferometers, this should prove to be a remarkably powerful technique for understanding the ionized ISM in external galaxies.

  17. Dependence of the open-closed field line boundary in Saturn's ionosphere on both the IMF and solar wind dynamic pressure: comparison with the UV auroral oval observed by the HST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Belenkaya

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We model the open magnetic field region in Saturn's southern polar ionosphere during two compression regions observed by the Cassini spacecraft upstream of Saturn in January 2004, and compare these with the auroral ovals observed simultaneously in ultraviolet images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope. The modelling employs the paraboloid model of Saturn's magnetospheric magnetic field, whose parameters are varied according to the observed values of both the solar wind dynamic pressure and the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF vector. It is shown that the open field area responds strongly to the IMF vector for both expanded and compressed magnetic models, corresponding to low and high dynamic pressure, respectively. It is also shown that the computed open field region agrees with the poleward boundary of the auroras as well as or better than those derived previously from a model in which only the variation of the IMF vector was taken into account. The results again support the hypothesis that the auroral oval at Saturn is associated with the open-closed field line boundary and hence with the solar wind interaction.

  18. Experimental observations to the electrical field for electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel in the Mark-IV electrorefiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-01-01

    Experimental results from the pilot scale electrorefiner (Mark-IV ER) treating spent nuclear fuel are reported in this article. The electrorefining processes were carried out in a LiCl-KCl-UCl 3 electrolyte. It has been noted that spool of molten cadmium below the electrolyte plays an important role in the electrorefining operations. In addition, formations of electrical shorting path between anode baskets and the electrorefiner vessel were observed, which lessened the uranium dissolution process from anode baskets, however appeared to improve the morphology of cathode deposit. The FIDAP simulation code was used to calculate the electrical potential field distributions and the potential gradient near the cathode. The effect of the electrical shorting between anode baskets and electrorefiner vessel on the morphology of cathode products is discussed

  19. UV-DROPOUT GALAXIES IN THE GOODS-SOUTH FIELD FROM WFC3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathi, N. P.; Ryan, R. E.; Cohen, S. H.; Windhorst, R. A.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Yan, H.; McCarthy, P. J.; O'Connell, R. W.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Balick, B.; Calzetti, D.; Disney, M. J.; Dopita, M. A.; Frogel, Jay A.; Hall, D. N. B.; Holtzman, J. A.; Kimble, R. A.; Paresce, F.; Saha, A.

    2010-01-01

    We combine new high sensitivity ultraviolet (UV) imaging from the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) with existing deep HST/Advanced Camera for Surveys optical images from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) program to identify UV-dropouts, which are Lyman break galaxy (LBG) candidates at z ≅ 1-3. These new HST/WFC3 observations were taken over 50 arcmin 2 in the GOODS-South field as a part of the Early Release Science program. The uniqueness of these new UV data is that they are observed in three UV/optical (WFC3 UVIS) channel filters (F225W, F275W, and F336W), which allows us to identify three different sets of UV-dropout samples. We apply Lyman break dropout selection criteria to identify F225W-, F275W-, and F336W-dropouts, which are z ≅ 1.7, 2.1, and 2.7 LBG candidates, respectively. We use multi-wavelength imaging combined with available spectroscopic and photometric redshifts to carefully access the validity of our UV-dropout candidates. Our results are as follows: (1) these WFC3 UVIS filters are very reliable in selecting LBGs with z ≅ 2.0, which helps to reduce the gap between the well-studied z ∼> 3 and z ∼ 0 regimes; (2) the combined number counts with average redshift z ≅ 2.2 agree very well with the observed change in the surface densities as a function of redshift when compared with the higher redshift LBG samples; and (3) the best-fit Schechter function parameters from the rest-frame UV luminosity functions at three different redshifts fit very well with the evolutionary trend of the characteristic absolute magnitude, M*, and the faint-end slope, α, as a function of redshift. This is the first study to illustrate the usefulness of the WFC3 UVIS channel observations to select z ∼< 3 LBGs. The addition of the new WFC3 on the HST has made it possible to uniformly select LBGs from z ≅ 1 to z ≅ 9 and significantly enhance our understanding of these galaxies using HST sensitivity and resolution.

  20. 3D Online Submicron Scale Observation of Mixed Metal Powder's Microstructure Evolution in High Temperature and Microwave Compound Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence on the mechanical properties caused by microstructure evolution of metal powder in extreme environment, 3D real-time observation of the microstructure evolution of Al-Ti mixed powder in high temperature and microwave compound fields was realized by using synchrotron radiation computerized topography (SR-CT technique; the spatial resolution was enhanced to 0.37 μm/pixel through the designed equipment and the introduction of excellent reconstruction method for the first time. The process of microstructure evolution during sintering was clearly distinguished from 2D and 3D reconstructed images. Typical sintering parameters such as sintering neck size, porosity, and particle size of the sample were presented for quantitative analysis of the influence on the mechanical properties and the sintering kinetics during microwave sintering. The neck size-time curve was obtained and the neck growth exponent was 7.3, which indicated that surface diffusion was the main diffusion mechanism; the reason was the eddy current loss induced by the external microwave fields providing an additional driving force for mass diffusion on the particle surface. From the reconstructed images and the curve of porosity and average particle size versus temperature, it was believed that the presence of liquid phase aluminum accelerated the densification and particle growth.

  1. Study of directivity effect on electromagnetic emissions in the HF band as earthquake precursors: Preliminary results on field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrakas, I.; Clarke, M.; Koulouras, G.; Stavrakakis, G.; Nomicos, C.

    2007-02-01

    This work focuses on the use of electromagnetic emissions (EM) in the HF band as a warning event for earthquakes. EM at HF components 41 MHz and 46 MHz were monitored and recorded from eight field stations in Greece and correlated with seismological events. Directivity effect raised since EM emissions at specific station locations were correlated to earthquake events from prescribed regions. EM recordings during 1999 were used and by visual inspection were associated to most of the earthquake events greater than 5R. Using these observations a novel algorithm based on the ratio of short term to long term signal average, together with a prediction rules set derived from 1999's EM emissions study were developed to combine results from several field stations. Performance of the system was promising, but was dependent on the geographic area of interest. Overall performance for earthquakes events of magnitude greater than 5.7 R was 75% of seismic events were correctly predicted by EM activity, while 25% were not predicted.

  2. A study of variation characteristics of Gobi broadband emissivity based on field observational experiments in northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhi-yuan; Wei, Zhi-gang; Wen, Zhi-ping; Dong, Wen-jie; Li, Zhen-chao; Wen, Xiao-hang; Zhu, Xian; Chen, Chen; Hu, Shan-shan

    2018-02-01

    Land surface emissivity is a significant variable in energy budgets, land cover assessments, and environment and climate studies. However, the assumption of an emissivity constant is being used in Gobi broadband emissivity (GbBE) parameterization scheme in numerical models because of limited knowledge surrounding the spatiotemporal variation characteristics of GbBE. To address this issue, we analyzed the variation characteristics of GbBE and possible impact factor-surface soil moisture based on long-term continuous and high temporal resolution field observational experiments over a typical Gobi underlying surface in arid and semiarid areas in northwestern China. The results indicate that GbBE has obvious daily and diurnal variation features, especially diurnal cycle characteristics. The multi-year average of the daily average of GbBE is in the range of 0.932 to 0.970 with an average of 0.951 ± 0.008, and the average diurnal GbBE is in the range of 0.880 to 0.940 with an average of 0.906 ± 0.018. GbBE varies with surface soil moisture content. We observed a slight decrease in GbBE with an increase in soil moisture, although this change was not very obvious because of the low soil moisture in this area. Nevertheless, we think that soil moisture must be one of the most significant impact factors on GbBE in arid and semiarid areas. Soil moisture must be taken into account into the parameterization schemes of bare soil broadband emissivity in land surface models. Additional field experiments and studies should be carried out in order to clarify this issue.

  3. Toggenburg Orbivirus, a new bluetongue virus: initial detection, first observations in field and experimental infection of goats and sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaignat, Valérie; Worwa, Gabriella; Scherrer, Nicole; Hilbe, Monika; Ehrensperger, Felix; Batten, Carrie; Cortyen, Mandy; Hofmann, Martin; Thuer, Barbara

    2009-07-02

    A novel bluetongue virus termed "Toggenburg Orbivirus" (TOV) was detected in two Swiss goat flocks. This orbivirus was characterized by sequencing of 7 of its 10 viral genome segments. The sequencing data revealed that this virus is likely to represent a new serotype of bluetongue virus [Hofmann, M.A., Renzullo, S., Mader, M., Chaignat, V., Worwa, G., Thuer, B., 2008b. Genetic characterization of Toggenburg Orbivirus (TOV) as a tentative 25th serotype of bluetongue virus, detected in goats from Switzerland. Emerg. Infect. Dis. 14, 1855-1861]. In the field, no clinical signs were observed in TOV-infected adult goats; however, several stillborn and weak born kids were reported. Although born during a period of extremely low vector activity, one of these kids was found to be antibody and viral genome positive and died 3.5 weeks postpartum. Experimental infection of goats and sheep, using TOV-positive field blood samples, was performed to assess the pathogenicity of this virus. Goats did not show any clinical or pathological signs, whereas in sheep mild bluetongue-like clinical signs were observed. Necropsy of sheep demonstrated bluetongue-typical hemorrhages in the wall of the pulmonary artery. Viral RNA was detected in organs, e.g. spleen, palatine tonsils, lung and several lymph nodes of three experimentally infected animals. Unlike other bluetongue virus serotypes, it was not possible to propagate the virus, either from naturally or experimentally infected animals in any of the tested mammalian or insect cell lines or in embryonated chicken eggs. In small ruminants, TOV leads to mild bluetongue-like symptoms. Further investigations about prevalence of this virus are needed to increase the knowledge on its epidemiology.

  4. LOFAR low-band antenna observations of the 3C 295 and Boötes fields: source counts and ultra-steep spectrum sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Weeren, R. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Williams, W. L.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rafferty, D. A.; Van der Tol, S. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Tasse, C. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, P.O. Box 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Heald, G. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), P.O. Box 2, NL-7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); White, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Buckinghamshire MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Shulevski, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Best, P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Intema, H. T.; Bhatnagar, S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Reich, W. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Van Velzen, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Institute for Mathematics, Astrophysics and Particle Physics (IMAPP), Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Enßlin, T. A. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Prandoni, I.; Brunetti, G. [INAF—Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); De Gasperin, F. [Hamburger Sternwarte, University of Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Jamrozy, M., E-mail: rvanweeren@cfa.harvard.edu [Astronomical Observatory, Jagiellonian University, ul. Orla 171, 30-244 Kraków (Poland); and others

    2014-10-01

    We present Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) Low Band observations of the Boötes and 3C 295 fields. Our images made at 34, 46, and 62 MHz reach noise levels of 12, 8, and 5 mJy beam{sup –1}, making them the deepest images ever obtained in this frequency range. In total, we detect between 300 and 400 sources in each of these images, covering an area of 17-52 deg{sup 2}. From the observations, we derive Euclidean-normalized differential source counts. The 62 MHz source counts agree with previous GMRT 153 MHz and Very Large Array 74 MHz differential source counts, scaling with a spectral index of –0.7. We find that a spectral index scaling of –0.5 is required to match up the LOFAR 34 MHz source counts. This result is also in agreement with source counts from the 38 MHz 8C survey, indicating that the average spectral index of radio sources flattens toward lower frequencies. We also find evidence for spectral flattening using the individual flux measurements of sources between 34 and 1400 MHz and by calculating the spectral index averaged over the source population. To select ultra-steep spectrum (α < –1.1) radio sources that could be associated with massive high-redshift radio galaxies, we compute spectral indices between 62 MHz, 153 MHz, and 1.4 GHz for sources in the Boötes field. We cross-correlate these radio sources with optical and infrared catalogs and fit the spectral energy distribution to obtain photometric redshifts. We find that most of these ultra-steep spectrum sources are located in the 0.7 ≲ z ≲ 2.5 range.

  5. Application of solar disinfection for treatment of contaminated public water supply in a developing country: field observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Atif; Scholz, Miklas; Khan, Sadia; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2013-03-01

    A sustainable and low-cost point-of-use household drinking water solar disinfection (SODIS) technology was successfully applied to treat microbiologically contaminated water. Field experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of SODIS and evaluate the potential benefits and limitations of SODIS under local climatic conditions in Karachi, Pakistan. In order to enhance the efficiency of SODIS, the application of physical interventions were also investigated. Twenty per cent of the total samples met drinking water guidelines under strong sunlight weather conditions, showing that SODIS is effective for complete disinfection under specific conditions. Physical interventions, including black-backed and reflecting rear surfaces in the batch reactors, enhanced SODIS performance. Microbial regrowth was also investigated and found to be more controlled in reactors with reflective and black-backed surfaces. The transfer of plasticizer di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) released from the bottle material polyethylene terephthalate (PET) under SODIS conditions was also investigated. The maximum DEHP concentration in SODIS-treated water was 0.38 μg/L less than the value of 0.71 μg/L reported in a previous study and well below the WHO drinking-quality guideline value. Thus SODIS-treated water can successfully be used by the people living in squatter settlements of mega-cities, such as Karachi, with some limitations.

  6. THE LOW-FREQUENCY CHARACTERISTICS OF PSR J0437–4715 OBSERVED WITH THE MURCHISON WIDE-FIELD ARRAY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; Tingay, S. J.; Oronsaye, S.; Emrich, D. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Deshpande, A. A. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India); Van Straten, W.; Briggs, F. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6102 (Australia); Bernardi, G. [Square Kilometre Array South Africa, 3rd Floor, The Park, Park Road, Pinelands, 7405 (South Africa); Bowman, J. D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E. [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Goeke, R.; Hewitt, J. N. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Greenhill, L. J.; Kasper, J. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hazelton, B. J. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Johnston-Hollitt, M. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand); Kaplan, D. L. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); and others

    2014-08-20

    We report on the detection of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0437–4715 with the Murchison Wide-field Array (MWA) at a frequency of 192 MHz. Our observations show rapid modulations of pulse intensity in time and frequency that arise from diffractive scintillation effects in the interstellar medium (ISM), as well as prominent drifts of intensity maxima in the time-frequency plane that arise from refractive effects. Our analysis suggests that the scattering screen is located at a distance of ∼80-120 pc from the Sun, in disagreement with a recent claim that the screen is closer (∼10 pc). Comparisons with higher frequency data from Parkes reveal a dramatic evolution of the pulse profile with frequency, with the outer conal emission becoming comparable in strength to that from the core and inner conal regions. As well as demonstrating the high time resolution science capabilities currently possible with the MWA, our observations underscore the potential to conduct low-frequency investigations of timing-array millisecond pulsars, which may lead to increased sensitivity in the detection of nanoHertz gravitational waves via the accurate characterization of ISM effects.

  7. FRONTIER FIELDS CLUSTERS: DEEP CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF THE COMPLEX MERGER MACS J1149.6+2223

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogrean, G. A.; Weeren, R. J. van; Jones, C.; Forman, W.; Andrade-Santos, F.; Murray, S. S.; Nulsen, P.; Bulbul, E.; Kraft, R.; Randall, S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dawson, W. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Golovich, N. [University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Roediger, E. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Section, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Zitrin, A.; Sayers, J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Goulding, A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Umetsu, K. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Mroczkowski, T. [U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Bonafede, A. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Churazov, E., E-mail: gogrean@cfa.harvard.edu [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741, Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-03-10

    The Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields cluster MACS J1149.6+2223 is one of the most complex merging clusters, believed to consist of four dark matter halos. We present results from deep (365 ks) Chandra observations of the cluster, which reveal the most distant cold front (z  =  0.544) discovered to date. In the cluster outskirts, we also detect hints of a surface brightness edge that could be the bow shock preceding the cold front. The substructure analysis of the cluster identified several components with large relative radial velocities, thus indicating that at least some collisions occur almost along the line of sight. The inclination of the mergers with respect to the plane of the sky poses significant observational challenges at X-ray wavelengths. MACS J1149.6+2223 possibly hosts a steep-spectrum radio halo. If the steepness of the radio halo is confirmed, then the radio spectrum, combined with the relatively regular ICM morphology, could indicate that MACS J1149.6+2223 is an old merging cluster.

  8. Modelling small groundwater systems - the role of targeted field investigations and observational data in reducing model uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abesser, Corinna; Hughes, Andrew; Boon, David

    2017-04-01

    Coastal dunes are delicate systems that are under threat from a variety of human and natural influences. Groundwater modelling can provide a better understanding of how these systems operate and can be a useful tool towards the effective management of a coastal dune system, e.g. through predicting impacts from climatic change, sea level rise and land use management. Because of their small size, typically 10 - 100 km2, models representing small dune aquifer systems are more sensitive to uncertainties in input data, model geometry and model parameterisation as well as to the availability of observational data. This study describes the development of a groundwater flow model for a small (8 km2) spit dune system, Braunton Burrows, on the Southwest coast of England, UK. The system has been extensively studied and its hydrology is thought to be well understood. However, model development revealed a high degree of uncertainty relating to model structure (definition of model boundary conditions) and parameterisation (e.g., transmissivity distributions within the model domain). An iterative approach was employed, integrating (1) sensitivity analyses, (2) targeted field investigations and (3) Monte Carlo simulations within a cycle of repeated interrogation of the model outputs, observed data and conceptual understanding. Assessment of "soft information" and targeted field investigations were an important part of this iterative modelling process. For example, a passive seismic survey (TROMINO®) provided valuable new data for the characterisation of concealed bedrock topography and thickness of superficial deposits. The data confirmed a generally inclined underlying wave cut rock shelf platform (as suggested by literature sources), revealed a buried valley, and led to a more detailed delineation of transmissivity zones within the model domain. Constructing models with increasingly more complex spatial distributions of transmissivity, resulted in considerable improvements in

  9. Field and Satellite Observations of the Formation and Distribution of Arctic Atmospheric Bromine Above a Rejuvenated Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Rigor, Ignatius G.; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Shepson, Paul B.; Bottenheim, Jan; Barber, David G.; Steffen, Alexandra; Latonas, Jeff; Wang, Feiyue; hide

    2012-01-01

    Recent drastic reduction of the older perennial sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has resulted in a vast expansion of younger and saltier seasonal sea ice. This increase in the salinity of the overall ice cover could impact tropospheric chemical processes. Springtime perennial ice extent in 2008 and 2009 broke the half-century record minimum in 2007 by about one million km2. In both years seasonal ice was dominant across the Beaufort Sea extending to the Amundsen Gulf, where significant field and satellite observations of sea ice, temperature, and atmospheric chemicals have been made. Measurements at the site of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen ice breaker in the Amundsen Gulf showed events of increased bromine monoxide (BrO), coupled with decreases of ozone (O3) and gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), during cold periods in March 2008. The timing of the main event of BrO, O3, and GEM changes was found to be consistent with BrO observed by satellites over an extensive area around the site. Furthermore, satellite sensors detected a doubling of atmospheric BrO in a vortex associated with a spiral rising air pattern. In spring 2009, excessive and widespread bromine explosions occurred in the same region while the regional air temperature was low and the extent of perennial ice was significantly reduced compared to the case in 2008. Using satellite observations together with a Rising-Air-Parcel model, we discover a topographic control on BrO distribution such that the Alaskan North Slope and the Canadian Shield region were exposed to elevated BrO, whereas the surrounding mountains isolated the Alaskan interior from bromine intrusion.

  10. Field Observation on Seed Arrival into Surface Layers of Sand Bars after Several Floods in Kinugawa River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Hitoshi; Oishi, Tetsuya; Ohtsuki, Kazuaki; Ohmura, Sohei; Iimura, Hayata

    2017-04-01

    This presentation gives the results of field observation on seed arrival into surface layers of sand bars after several floods during 2016 in Kinugawa River, Japan. The seed arrival could be an onset of secondary succession on sand bars, leading to their well-vegetated states after several decades that cause river management issues both on flood disaster prevention and riverine ecosystem alteration. Kinugawa River had the largest record flood in September 9-10, 2015. It resulted in the levee failure and the corresponding flood disaster in Joso City located in the downstream part of Kinugawa River. It also had the large impact on the riverine vegetation environment, resulting in making many sand bars and gravel beds be bare surface states. In order to investigate the very initial state of the seed arrival into the created bare surfaces by small to medium flood events, 3 channel sections with 6 observation points in total were chosen and observed during the rainy season in 2016. A steel ling with a pile was used for measuring the depth of active surface layers on the sand bars during the flood events. The sediments in the active surface layers were sampled for making the grain size accumulation curve as well as for counting the number of seeds within the sample sediments. The results showed that the sample sediments with the smaller mean diameters, ranging around 0.1 - 6.4 mm, kept much more seeds than those with the larger mean diameters over 12 mm. The number of seeds decreases with the small percentile (around 10-20th) in particle diameter rather than the mean diameter. Furthermore, relationships were discussed in detail between the number of seeds, the depth of the active layers, and bed shear stresses calculated by a numerical simulation model.

  11. Observation of the Spectrally Invariant Properties of Clouds in Cloudy-to-Clear Transition Zones During the MAGIC Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weidong; Marshak, Alexander; McBride, Patrick; Chiu, J. Christine; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Flynn, Connor; Lewis, Ernie R.; Eloranta, Edwin W.

    2016-01-01

    We use the spectrally invariant method to study the variability of cloud optical thickness tau and droplet effective radius r(sub eff) in transition zones (between the cloudy and clear sky columns) observed from Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) and Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer-Zenith (SASZe) during the Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds (MAGIC) field campaign. The measurements from the SSFR and the SASZe are different, however inter-instrument differences of self-normalized measurements (divided by their own spectra at a fixed time) are small. The spectrally invariant method approximates the spectra in the cloud transition zone as a linear combination of definitely clear and cloudy spectra, where the coefficients, slope and intercept, characterize the spectrally invariant properties of the transition zone. Simulation results from the SBDART (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) model demonstrate that (1) the slope of the visible band is positively correlated with the cloud optical thickness t while the intercept of the near-infrared band has high negative correlation with the cloud drop effective radius r(sub eff)even without the exact knowledge of tau; (2) the above relations hold for all Solar Zenith Angle (SZA) and for cloud-contaminated skies. In observations using redundant measurements from SSFR and SASZe, we find that during cloudy-to-clear transitions, (a) the slopes of the visible band decrease, and (b) the intercepts of the near-infrared band remain almost constant near cloud edges. The findings in simulations and observations suggest that, while the optical thickness decreases during the cloudy-to-clear transition, the cloud drop effective radius does not change when cloud edges are approached. These results support the hypothesis that inhomogeneous mixing dominates near cloud edges in the studied cases.

  12. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC) and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, M. L.; Wild, J. A.; Waters, C. L.; Lester, M.; Lucek, E. A.; Décréau, P. M. E.

    2007-02-01

    An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC) is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC), the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER), a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES) which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~-200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM) provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2 downward FAC

  13. An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC and its relationship to field-aligned current, ring current, and plasmapause location determined using multiple spacecraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available An auroral westward flow channel (AWFC is a latitudinally narrow channel of unstable F-region plasma with intense westward drift in the dusk-to-midnight sector ionosphere. AWFCs tend to overlap the equatorward edge of the auroral oval, and their life cycle is often synchronised to that of substorms: they commence close to substorm expansion phase onset, intensify during the expansion phase, and then decay during the recovery phase. Here we define for the first time the relationship between an AWFC, large-scale field-aligned current (FAC, the ring current, and plasmapause location. The Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar, observed a jet-like AWFC during ~08:35 to 13:28 UT on 7 April 2001. The initiation of the AWFC was preceded by a band of equatorward expanding ionospheric scatter (BEES which conveyed an intense poleward electric field through the inner plasma sheet. Unlike previous AWFCs, this event was not associated with a distinct substorm surge; rather it occurred during an interval of persistent, moderate magnetic activity characterised by AL~−200 nT. The four Cluster spacecraft had perigees within the dusk sector plasmasphere, and their trajectories were magnetically conjugate to the radar observations. The Waves of High frequency and Sounder for Probing Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER instruments on board Cluster were used to identify the plasmapause location. The Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE EUV experiment also provided global-scale observations of the plasmapause. The Cluster fluxgate magnetometers (FGM provided successive measurements specifying the relative location of the ring current and filamentary plasma sheet current. An analysis of Iridium spacecraft magnetometer measurements provided estimates of large-scale ionospheric FAC in relation to the AWFC evolution. Peak flows in the AWFC were located close to the peak of a Region 2

  14. Impacts of an ethanol-blended fuel release on groundwater and fate of produced methane: Simulation of field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasa, Ehsan; Bekins, Barbara A.; Mackay, Douglas M.; de Sieyes, Nicholas R.; Wilson, John T.; Feris, Kevin P.; Wood, Isaac A.; Scow, Kate M.

    2013-08-01

    In a field experiment at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) designed to mimic the impact of a small-volume release of E10 (10% ethanol and 90% conventional gasoline), two plumes were created by injecting extracted groundwater spiked with benzene, toluene, and o-xylene, abbreviated BToX (no-ethanol lane) and BToX plus ethanol (with-ethanol lane) for 283 days. We developed a reactive transport model to understand processes controlling the fate of ethanol and BToX. The model was calibrated to the extensive field data set and accounted for concentrations of sulfate, iron, acetate, and methane along with iron-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, fermentative bacteria, and methanogenic archaea. The benzene plume was about 4.5 times longer in the with-ethanol lane than in the no-ethanol lane. Matching this different behavior in the two lanes required inhibiting benzene degradation in the presence of ethanol. Inclusion of iron reduction with negligible growth of iron reducers was required to reproduce the observed constant degradation rate of benzene. Modeling suggested that vertical dispersion and diffusion of sulfate from an adjacent aquitard were important sources of sulfate in the aquifer. Matching of methane data required incorporating initial fermentation of ethanol to acetate, methane loss by outgassing, and methane oxidation coupled to sulfate and iron reduction. Simulation of microbial growth using dual Monod kinetics, and including inhibition by more favorable electron acceptors, generally resulted in reasonable yields for microbial growth of 0.01-0.05.

  15. Direct observation of ring-opening dynamics in strong-field ionized selenophene using femtosecond inner-shell absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Florian; Chatterley, Adam S.; Pemmaraju, C. D.; Closser, Kristina D.; Prendergast, David; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.; Gessner, Oliver

    2016-12-01

    Femtosecond extreme ultraviolet transient absorption spectroscopy is used to explore strong-field ionization induced dynamics in selenophene (C4H4Se). The dynamics are monitored in real-time from the viewpoint of the Se atom by recording the temporal evolution of element-specific spectral features near the Se 3d inner-shell absorption edge (˜58 eV). The interpretation of the experimental results is supported by first-principles time-dependent density functional theory calculations. The experiments simultaneously capture the instantaneous population of stable molecular ions, the emergence and decay of excited cation states, and the appearance of atomic fragments. The experiments reveal, in particular, insight into the strong-field induced ring-opening dynamics in the selenophene cation, which are traced by the emergence of non-cyclic molecules as well as the liberation of Se+ ions within an overall time scale of approximately 170 fs. We propose that both products may be associated with dynamics on the same electronic surfaces but with different degrees of vibrational excitation. The time-dependent inner-shell absorption features provide direct evidence for a complex relaxation mechanism that may be approximated by a two-step model, whereby the initially prepared, excited cyclic cation decays within τ1 = 80 ± 30 fs into a transient molecular species, which then gives rise to the emergence of bare Se+ and ring-open cations within an additional τ2 = 80 ± 30 fs. The combined experimental and theoretical results suggest a close relationship between σ* excited cation states and the observed ring-opening reactions. The findings demonstrate that the combination of femtosecond time-resolved core-level spectroscopy with ab initio estimates of spectroscopic signatures provide new insights into complex, ultrafast photochemical reactions such as ring-opening dynamics in organic molecules in real-time and with simultaneous sensitivity for electronic and structural

  16. Modifications to the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Continuum by Hedgerows - Observations from a field site in Northern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    UK farming practices have changed significantly over the past 100 years. This is evident in arable fields, where the use of larger machinery has led to the removal of hedgerows. In the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK this has led to a doubling in field size since 1892. The national-wide change is responsible for longer slope lengths, increased runoff velocities and greater potential for connectivity, which may be responsible for an increase in flood risk at the catchment scale. However there is a lack of physical evidence to support this theory. Hedgerows are a widespread, man-made boundary feature in the rural UK landscape. They play an important ecological role in providing shelter, changing the local climate, reducing erosion and have a strong influence on local soil properties. Their impact on hydrology has not been widely studied but it is hypothesised that their presence could alter soil moisture levels and the soil structure, therefore affecting runoff. This paper presents observations of a hedgerow on the Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Continuum, through 15 months field monitoring conducted in the River Skell catchment. Firstly, to assess soil moisture levels TDR probes were installed at different depths and distances from the hedgerow. To assess the soil quality and therefore its infiltration capacity, soil cores were collected to determine soil horizons and root density. Also, laboratory tests were undertaken to determine the soil type and the porosity. Secondly, to assess the physical impact of the hedgerow plant on the partitioning of rainfall, gauges were installed to capture the spatial distribution of rainfall, along a transect perpendicular to the hedgerow, as well as stemflow. Throughfall gauges were also installed within the hedgerow and leaf area index calculated. Thirdly, to assess the impact of the hedgerow on the micro-climate, temperature sensors and four leaf wetness sensors were installed to determine evapotranspiration and interception

  17. Comparison of the Active Bagnold Dune Field with Other Aeolian Deposits Observed at Gale using ChemCam Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousin, A.; Dehouck, E.; Meslin, P. Y.; Williams, A. J.; Stein, N.; Gasnault, O.; Bridges, N.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Schröder, S.; Payre, V.; Rapin, W.; Pinet, P. C.; Sautter, V.; Lanza, N.; Lasue, J.; Maurice, S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Curiosity rover at Gale crater, Mars, had the opportunity to investigate an active dune field called Bagnold Dunes for the first time on another planet. The objectives of this campaign were threefold: Understand the present-day aeolian processes on Mars by investigating the grain size of the particles and their dynamics; Understand the past aeolian processes by looking at the morphology and texture of the dunes; and Investigate the source of the dunes material by measuring their chemistry and mineralogy. The ChemCam instrument acquired a large data volume during this campaign: 18 targets on barchan dunes, 15 targets on a linear dune and then 3 targets on a mega-ripple. In this study, we compare the Bagnold Dunes data to those acquired on soil patches (Aeolis Palus soils) along the traverse corresponding to 60 targets. We have observed that the major oxide composition of the dunes is similar to that of Aeolis Palus soils, with the exception of the FeO and MnO contents that are slightly more elevated in the dunes. Moreover, the material from the dunes and more particularly the coarser particles ( 200 microns) are depleted in volatiles (mostly H) compared to the Aeolis Palus soils. The grain size analyses show that the dunes are depleted in fine-grained particles (fine-grained particles is that the dunes, being active, have undergone physical sorting and therefore have lost their finest particles that seem to be the carrier of the volatiles (amorphous component and dust). Moreover, the dunes seem to be enriched in mafic minerals compared to the Aeolis Palus soils, as also shown by the CheMin and APXS instruments. However, thanks to the small footprint of ChemCam, we have shown that the coarsest particles were even more enriched in mafic minerals than the finer ones, in agreement with multispectral ChemCam passive and Mastcam observations. Therefore, the olivine abundance measured by CheMin (analysing only particles < 150 microns) could represent a lower limit with

  18. Global observations of electromagnetic and particle energy flux for an event during northern winter with southward interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of the polar ionosphere–thermosphere (I-T system to electromagnetic (EM energy input is fundamentally different to that from particle precipitation. To understand the I-T response to polar energy input one must know the intensities and spatial distributions of both EM and precipitation energy deposition. Moreover, since individual events typically display behavior different from statistical models, it is important to observe the global system state for specific events. We present an analysis of an event in Northern Hemisphere winter for sustained southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, 10 January 2002, 10:00–12:00 UT, for which excellent observations are available from the constellation of Iridium satellites, the SuperDARN radar network, and the Far-Ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the IMAGE satellite. Using data from these assets we determine the EM and particle precipitation energy fluxes to the Northern Hemisphere poleward of 60° MLAT and examine their spatial distributions and intensities. The accuracy of the global estimates are assessed quantitatively using comparisons with in-situ observations by DMSP along two orbit planes. While the location of EM power input evaluated from Iridium and SuperDARN data is in good agreement with DMSP, the magnitude estimated from DMSP observations is approximately four times larger. Corrected for this underestimate, the total EM power input to the Northern Hemisphere is 188 GW. Comparison of IMAGE FUV-derived distributions of the particle energy flux with DMSP plasma data indicates that the IMAGE FUV results similarly locate the precipitation accurately while underestimating the precipitation input somewhat. The total particle input is estimated to be 20 GW, nearly a factor of ten lower than the EM input. We therefore expect the thermosphere response to be determined primarily by the EM input even under winter conditions, and accurate assessment of the EM energy input is therefore key

  19. Conjugate Observations of Field-Line Resonances in the Inner Magnetosphere from the MEASURE and SAMBA Magnetometer Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zesta, E.; Boudouridis, A.; Berube, D.; Moldwin, M.

    2004-12-01

    The newly installed SAMBA (South American Meridional B-field Array) chain is a low latitude meridional chain of 11 magnetometers at L=1.1 to L=2.5 along the coast of Chile and in the Antarctica peninsula. Five of the SAMBA magnetometers at L=1.7 to L=2.5 are directly conjugate to an equivalent number of northern hemisphere magnetometers of the MEASURE (Magnetometers Along the Eastern Atlantic Seaboard for Undergraduate Research and Education) chain. A unique characteristic is that both the SAMBA and the MEASURE magnetometers are set up as pairs of stations making it possible to determine the local Field-Line Resonance (FLR) from conjugate points and thus testing the accuracy of the technique and the models used. An initial study of the local FLR from conjugate pairs of stations at L=1.6 and L=1.7 was done during the moderate storm of July 11, 2003. The frequency of the local resonance can be used to determine the equatorial mass density of the resonating flux tube. From our two conjugate pairs we found, surprisingly, that the difference between the derived mass density between these two very close L values does not agree with densities predicted by any of the existing models or from past observations. If this result is general and not an isolated or rare occurrence it indicates that our understanding of the inversion of FLRs to determine the equatorial mass density is not complete and existing models could be constrained by our observations. We have now isolated a period of approximately 60 days during 2003 with complete coverage from conjugate pairs of stations and we are extending the study of conjugate FLRs to a large amount of days in order to determine the generality, or not, of the results from the July 11, 2003 storm. Initial analysis indicates quite a number of asymmetries in the ULF wave power between the two hemispheres, which might be a contributing factor to the difference in the mass density derived from the conjugate pairs. We plan to investigate

  20. Visible/near-infrared spectral diversity from in situ observations of the Bagnold Dune Field sands in Gale Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Achilles, Cherie; Bell, James F.; Bender, Steve; Cloutis, Edward; Ehlmann, Bethany; Fraeman, Abigail; Gasnault, Olivier; Hamilton, Victoria E.; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Maurice, Sylvestre; Pinet, Patrick; Thompson, Lucy; Wellington, Danika; Wiens, Roger C.

    2017-12-01

    As part of the Bagnold Dune campaign conducted by Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity, visible/near-infrared reflectance spectra of dune sands were acquired using Mast Camera (Mastcam) multispectral imaging (445-1013 nm) and Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) passive point spectroscopy (400-840 nm). By comparing spectra from pristine and rover-disturbed ripple crests and troughs within the dune field, and through analysis of sieved grain size fractions, constraints on mineral segregation from grain sorting could be determined. In general, the dune areas exhibited low relative reflectance, a weak 530 nm absorption band, an absorption band near 620 nm, and a spectral downturn after 685 nm consistent with olivine-bearing sands. The finest grain size fractions occurred within ripple troughs and in the subsurface and typically exhibited the strongest 530 nm bands, highest relative reflectances, and weakest red/near-infrared ratios, consistent with a combination of crystalline and amorphous ferric materials. Coarser-grained samples were the darkest and bluest and exhibited weaker 530 nm bands, lower relative reflectances, and stronger downturns in the near-infrared, consistent with greater proportions of mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene. These grains were typically segregated along ripple crests and among the upper surfaces of grain flows in disturbed sands. Sieved dune sands exhibited progressive decreases in reflectance with increasing grain size, as observed in laboratory spectra of olivine size separates. The continuum of spectral features observed between the coarse- and fine-grained dune sands suggests that mafic grains, ferric materials, and air fall dust mix in variable proportions depending on aeolian activity and grain sorting.

  1. Global Hawk dropsonde observations of the Arctic atmosphere obtained during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Intrieri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In February and March of 2011, the Global Hawk unmanned aircraft system (UAS was deployed over the Pacific Ocean and the Arctic during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR field campaign. The WISPAR science missions were designed to (1 mprove our understanding of Pacific weather systems and the polar atmosphere; (2 evaluate operational use of unmanned aircraft for investigating these atmospheric events; and (3 demonstrate operational and research applications of a UAS dropsonde system at high latitudes. Dropsondes deployed from the Global Hawk successfully obtained high-resolution profiles of temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind information between the stratosphere and surface. The 35 m wingspan Global Hawk, which can soar for ~ 31 h at altitudes up to ~ 20 km, was remotely operated from NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base (AFB in California. During the 25 h polar flight on 9–10 March 2011, the Global Hawk released 35 sondes between the North Slope of Alaska and 85° N latitude, marking the first UAS Arctic dropsonde mission of its kind. The polar flight transected an unusually cold polar vortex, notable for an associated record-level Arctic ozone loss, and documented polar boundary layer variations over a sizable ocean–ice lead feature. Comparison of dropsonde observations with atmospheric reanalyses reveal that, for this day, large-scale structures such as the polar vortex and air masses are captured by the reanalyses, while smaller-scale features, including low-level jets and inversion depths, are mischaracterized. The successful Arctic dropsonde deployment demonstrates the capability of the Global Hawk to conduct operations in harsh, remote regions. The limited comparison with other measurements and reanalyses highlights the potential value of Arctic atmospheric dropsonde observations where routine in situ measurements are practically nonexistent.

  2. MAVEN Observations of the Effects of Crustal Magnetic Fields on Electron Density and Temperature in the Martian Dayside Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Casey L.; Vogt, Marissa F.; Withers, Paul; Andersson, Laila; England, Scott; Liu, Guiping

    2017-11-01

    Mars lacks a global magnetic field but possesses concentrated regions of crustal magnetic field that influence the planet's interaction with the solar wind and the structure of the Martian ionosphere. In this study we survey 17 months of MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves dayside electron density and temperature measurements to study how these quantities are affected in regions with strong crustal magnetic fields. Above 200 km altitude, we find that regions of strong crustal magnetic fields feature cooler electron temperatures and enhanced electron densities compared to regions with little or no crustal magnetic field. Neutral densities and temperatures are not significantly affected. Closed field lines on which electrons can be trapped are more prevalent in strong crustal field regions than elsewhere. Trapped on closed field lines, electrons are protected against loss processes involving the solar wind. This would lead to longer plasma lifetimes, higher densities, and lower temperatures.

  3. Field-aligned current associated with low-latitude plasma blobs as observed by the CHAMP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we give two examples of low-latitude plasma blobs accompanied by linearly polarized perpendicular magnetic deflections which imply that associated field-aligned currents (FACs have a 2-D sheet structure located at the blob walls. The estimated FAC density is of the order of 0.1 μA/m2. The direction of magnetic deflections points westward of the magnetic meridian and there is a linear correlation between perpendicular and parallel variations. All these properties are similar to those of equatorial plasma bubbles (EPBs. According to CHAMP observations from August 2000 to July 2004, blobs show except for these two good examples no clear signatures of 2-D FAC sheets at the walls. Generally, perpendicular magnetic deflections inside blobs are weaker than inside EPBs on average. Our results are consistent with existing theories: if a blob exists, (1 a significant part of EPB FAC will be closed through it, exhibiting similar perpendicular magnetic deflection inside EPBs and blobs, (2 the FAC closure through blobs leads to smaller perpendicular magnetic deflection at its poleward/downward side, and (3 superposition of different FAC elements might result in a complex magnetic signature around blobs.

  4. The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program: The First Field Experiment (MATERHORN-X1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, H.; Pardyjak, E.; Zajic, D.; De Wekker, S.; Pace, J.

    2012-12-01

    The prediction of weather in complex terrain continues to be a difficult challenge due to a host of physical and thermodynamic processes and numerical issues involved. While many theoretical and observational studies have been conducted on flow over gradually varying low slopes (hills), flow over high mountains with steep slopes of practical consequence under diurnal forcing still remains an understudied topic. The atmospheric boundary layer therein is forced by diurnal thermal forcing (valley and slope flows), large-scale synoptic influence or a combination thereof, and in all cases the boundary layer is replete with interesting sub-grid scale phenomena that are paramount for mesoscale modeling. Parameterizations of such processes, reducing model errors and their growth, model validations and new technologies for measurements are some of the overarching issues that need to be addressed in improving weather predictions in mountainous terrain. To this end, the MATERHORN program was conceived in response to the 2011 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) of the Department of Defense to address scientific issues akin to mountain weather. The participants include the University of Notre Dame, Naval Post Graduate School, University of California at Berkeley, University of Utah, University of Virginia, Naval Research Laboratory, US Army Dugway Proving Ground (DPG) and the Army Research Laboratory. The MATERHORN includes a comprehensive field experimental component (MATERHORN-X) in the Granite Mountain Atmospheric Test Bed (GMAST) of DPG; the first experiment is to be conducted during September 25-October 25, 2012. Preliminary experimental results of the program will be described in this presentation.

  5. Field reconnaissance geologic mapping of the Columbia Hills, Mars, based on Mars Exploration Rover Spirit and MRO HiRISE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crumpler, L.S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.; McCoy, T.; Yingst, A.; Ruff, S.; Farrand, W.; McSween, Y.; Powell, M.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Bell, J.F.; Grant, J.; Greeley, R.; DesMarais, D.; Schmidt, M.; Cabrol, N.A.; Haldemann, A.; Lewis, K.W.; Wang, A.E.; Schroder, C.; Blaney, D.; Cohen, B.; Yen, A.; Farmer, J.; Gellert, Ralf; Guinness, E.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Klingelhfer, G.; McEwen, A.; Rice, J.W.; Rice, M.; deSouza, P.; Hurowitz, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical, mineralogic, and lithologic ground truth was acquired for the first time on Mars in terrain units mapped u