WorldWideScience

Sample records for previous emergency operations

  1. Train operation in emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on train operation theories and methods in the context of emergencies. It examines and assesses a range of aspects—including the definition of a railway emergency, transport organization modes in emergencies, calculating railway transport capacity in emergencies, line planning in emergencies, train re-pathing in emergencies and train re-scheduling in emergencies—that are urgently needed in the railway transportation field, which faces the serious challenge of dealing with emergencies worldwide. The book highlights the latest research results in an integrated and systematic way, and the methodology presented is oriented on real-world problems, allowing it to be used not only directly in railway operational management, but also as the point of departure for further applications or theoretical research. As such, the book will be of considerable interest to graduate students and researchers in the field of traffic and transportation engineering.>.

  2. Automated emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ramirez, G.; Nelson, P.F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a training tool for the symptom oriented emergency operating procedures used at the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant. EOPs and operator training are intended to assist the operator for managing accident situations. A prototype expert system based on the EOPs has been developed for operator training. The demonstration expert system was developed using a commercial shell. The knowledge base consists of two parts. The specific operator actions to be executed for 5 selected accident sequences and the EOPs steps for the reactor pressure vessel control of the water level, pressure, and power. The knowledge is expressed in the form of IF-THEN production rules. A typical training session will display a set of conditions and will prompt the trainee to indicate the appropriate step to perform. This mode will guide the trainee through selected accident sequences. A second mode of the expert system will prompt the trainee for the current plant conditions and the expert system will respond with the EOPs which are required to be performed under these conditions. This allows the trainee to study What if situations

  3. [Influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on gynecological laparoscopic operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haoran; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Yingfang; Wu, Beisheng; Peng, Chao

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on gynecological laparoscopic operation. A retrospective analysis of 3 283 cases of gynecological diseases by laparoscopic operation patients in Peking University First Hospital from 2007 January to 2012 December, among them, 719 (21.90%) patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery history (study Group), 2 564 (78.10%)patients have no history of abdominopelvic surgery (control group). Study group 719 patients, previous operation times: one time in 525 cases, 194 cases were multiple; previous operation: 185 cases of gynecological surgery, 305 cases of obstetric surgery, 108 cases of general surgery, and 121 complex surgery (include at least two kinds of surgery); previous operative approach: 650 cases laparotomy and 69 cases laparoscopy. Compared two groups of patients with abdominopelvic adhesion and the gynecologic laparoscopic operation situation, analyzed the influence of previous abdominopelvic surgery on abdominopelvic adhesion on and gynecological laparoscopic operation. The incidence of abdominopelvic adhesion in the patients with previous abdominopelvic surgery was 51.2% (368/719), which was significantly higher than that of 8.2% (211/2 564)in patients without previous abdominopelvic surgery (P surgery (23.1%, 166/719) was significantly higher than that in the control group (3.3% , 85/2 564;P laparotomy was 0.6% (4/719) significantly more than the control groups (0.1%, 2/2 564; P = 0.023). Compared with other groups, patients with gynecological or complex surgery or multiple operation history presented more severe abdominopelvic adhesion both in the score and degree (P laparotomy showed no statistical difference between the two groups (P > 0.05). The laparoscopic operation could be carried out successfully and safely in patients with a history of various abdominopelvic operations, but the conversion rate increases, for patients with a history of multiple operation because of pelvic adhesion

  4. Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family planning clinic in Northern Nigeria. Amina Mohammed‑Durosinlorun, Joel Adze, Stephen Bature, Caleb Mohammed, Matthew Taingson, Amina Abubakar, Austin Ojabo, Lydia Airede ...

  5. Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age, education, religion, parity, prior contraception, and interval from the last delivery were significantly associated with the current choice of contraception (P 0.05). Overall, when comparing the pattern among those with a previous operative delivery and those without, ...

  6. Computer managed emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamun, I.; Mavko, B.; Stritar, A.

    1994-01-01

    New computer technology is a very effective tool for developing a new design of nuclear power plant control room. It allows designer possibility to create a tool for managing with large database of power plant parameters and displaying them in different graphic forms and possibility of automated execution of well known task. The structure of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) is very suitable for programming and for creating expert system. The Computerized Emergency Operating Procedures (CEOP) described in this paper can be considered as an upgrading of standard EOP approach. EmDiSY (Emergency Display System - computer code name for CEOP) main purpose is to supply the operator with necessary information, to document all operator actions and to execute well known tasks. It is a function oriented CEOP that gives operator guidance on how to verify the critical safety functions and how to restore and maintain these functions where they are degraded. All knowledge is coded and stored in database files. The knowledge base consists from stepping order for verifying plant parameters, desired values of parameters, conditions for comparison and links between procedures and actions. Graphical shell allows users to read database, to follow instruction and to find out correct task. The desired information is concentrated in one screen and allows users to focus on a task. User is supported in two ways: desired parameter values are displayed on the process picture and automated monitoring critical safety function status trees are all time in progress and available to the user. (author). 4 refs, 4 figs

  7. Emergency Operations Center ribbon cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Center Director Gene Goldman and special guests celebrate the opening of the site's new Emergency Operations Center on June 2. Participants included (l t r): Steven Cooper, deputy director of the National Weather Service Southern Region; Tom Luedtke, NASA associate administrator for institutions and management; Charles Scales, NASA associate deputy administrator; Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour; Gene Goldman, director of Stennis Space Center; Jack Forsythe, NASA assistant administrator for the Office of Security and Program Protection; Dr. Richard Williams, NASA chief health and medical officer; and Weldon Starks, president of Starks Contracting Company Inc. of Biloxi.

  8. Laboratory operation during radiation emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunata, M.; Tecl, J.; Prouza, Z.

    2008-01-01

    During radiation emergency, a special operation mode of laboratories of the Radiation Monitoring Network (hereinafter RMN) is expected. The principal factors differing the emergency mode from the normal one are the following: - significantly higher amount of analyzed samples; - high activities of the majority of the samples; - higher risk of personal and equipment contamination; - higher working and psychological demands on laboratory staff. The assuring of the radiation protection requirements of laboratory staff has to be the primary objective, nevertheless the risk of equipment contamination and of samples cross- contamination of course have to be as well taken into consideration. The presentation describes the experience of the RMN Central Laboratory of the National Radiation Protection Institute in Prague (SURO) which was obtained during realization of field tests, in which a radioactive matter was released. These tests allow us to evaluate the source term or radioactivity dispersal balance based on various detection methods with the aim to estimate exposure of the afflicted persons. Tests provided to simulate emergency working conditions in Central Laboratory -high number of contaminated samples, which have to be analyzed in a short time (short half-time of used radionuclide 99m Tc) using sophisticated laboratory techniques (gamma spectrometers, aerosols collectors, etc.). The testing shows the availability of the SURO laboratory to work during the radiation emergency and to participate on its determination. The suitable settings and the ideal number of staff have been found. The average analysis time was approximately 1 minute per sample and the sample results were available just a few minutes after the counting. Moreover, the settings avoided any danger and kept both the crew and the samples safe and secure from contamination. (authors)

  9. Laboratory operation during radiation emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunata, M.; Prouza, Z.; Tecl, J.

    2009-01-01

    During radiation emergency, a special operation mode of laboratories of the Radiation Monitoring Network (hereinafter RMN) is expected. The principal factors differing the emergency mode from the normal one are the following: - significantly higher amount of analyzed samples; - high activities of the majority of the samples; - higher risk of personal and equipment contamination; - higher working and psychological demands on laboratory staff. The assuring of the radiation protection requirements of laboratory staff has to be the primary objective, nevertheless the risk of equipment contamination and of samples cross- contamination of course have to be as well taken into consideration. The presentation describes the experience of the RMN Central Laboratory of the National Radiation Protection Institute in Prague (SURO) which was obtained during realization of field tests, in which a radioactive matter was released. These tests allow us to evaluate the source term or radioactivity dispersal balance based on various detection methods with the aim to estimate exposure of the afflicted persons. Tests provided to simulate emergency working conditions in Central Laboratory - high number of contaminated samples, which have to be analyzed in a short time (short half-time of used radionuclide 99m Tc) using sophisticated laboratory techniques (gamma spectrometers, aerosols collectors, etc.). The testing shows the availability of the SURO laboratory to work during the radiation emergency and to participate on its determination. The suitable settings and the ideal number of staff have been found. The average analysis time was approximately 1 minute per sample and the sample results were available just a few minutes after the counting. Moreover, the settings avoided any danger and kept both the crew and the samples safe and secure from contamination. (authors)

  10. [Bentall operation after previous repair of tetralogy of Fallot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballore, Luca; Tramontin, Corrado; Manca, Paolo; Tocco, Stefania; Lixi, Giovanni; Matta, Gildo; Cirio, Emiliano Maria; Martelli, Valentino

    2007-04-01

    Pathologies that involve the ascending aorta are described in case reports of patients after complete repair of tetralogy of Fallot. Here, we present a case report. Preoperative tests showed an aortic ratio of > 1.5. The patient was operated on replacement of the ascending aorta according to the Bentall technique. At present, the guidelines for replacement of the ascending aorta recommend an aortic ratio of > 1.5 and in case of Marfan syndrome of > 1.3. In these patient subsets, cystic medial necrosis and an increased risk of aortic dissection have been described. Therefore, as for Marfan syndrome, why an aortic ratio of >1.3 should not be considered a proper surgical indication also for these patients?

  11. Operator behaviors observed in following emergency operating procedure under a simulated emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Park, Jin Kyun

    2012-01-01

    A symptom-based procedure with a critical safety function monitoring system has been established to reduce the operator's diagnosis and cognitive burden since the Three-Mile Island (TMI) accident. However, it has been reported that a symptom-based procedure also requires an operator's cognitive efforts to cope with off-normal events. This can be caused by mismatches between a static model, an emergency operating procedure (EOP), and a dynamic process, the nature of an ongoing situation. The purpose of this study is to share the evidence of mismatches that may result in an excessive cognitive burden in conducting EOPs. For this purpose, we analyzed simulated emergency operation records and observed some operator behaviors during the EOP operation: continuous steps, improper description, parameter check at a fixed time, decision by information previously obtained, execution complexity, operation by the operator's knowledge, notes and cautions, and a foldout page. Since observations in this study are comparable to the results of an existing study, it is expected that the operational behaviors observed in this study are generic features of operators who have to cope with a dynamic situation using a static procedure.

  12. SOFI, a symptom-oriented, fully integrated emergency operating procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobel, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper builds on a previous look at decision-tree emergency operating procedures to describe the symptom-oriented fully integrated (SOFI) process and what has been accomplished. The SOFI emergency operating procedures process results in one emergency operation procedure, thus eliminating the confusion and resultant jumping into and out of the wrong procedure (or the right ones if the operator misdiagnoses the event combination). The SOFI process results in emergency operating procedures that have a simple single-entry condition. The SOFI process results in emergency operating procedures that, once entered, require the operator to, by evaluating symptoms, determine the state of the plant and then provide the operator with the steps necessary to put the plant into a safer state. The full paper describes how, by the SOFI process, the typical boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, pre-TMI emergency procedures inventory (in some cases, abnormal procedures are included) is broken down to provide the steps to be integrated with the BWR Owners Group Emergency Procedures Guidelines into the SOFI emergency operating procedures. In summary, the paper provides a point-by-point comparison of the SOFI emergency operating procedures solution to the procedural problems identified in the post-TMI reviews

  13. An Operational Definition of the Emergence Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotti, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Although acquisition criteria are a fundamental issue for SLA research, they have not always been adequately defined or elaborated in the literature. This article critically scrutinizes one such criterion, the emergence criterion, proposing an explicit, operational definition. After discussing emergence as a theoretical construct, the article…

  14. The human failure factors during emergency operating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bingji

    1994-01-01

    In the case of emergency operating, operating staff usually are in the limit state of mind, so the operating mistake rate will go up sharply, and the disastrous accidents usually will happen at this moment. So to study and resolve the problem is very important and imperative. Basing on raising the reliability of man-machine system, the psychology and pathology of operating staff under the limit state and the behavior characteristic of operating staff in the emergency operation have been expounded here, and the operating staff's psychological gradation partitioned by foreign experts also has been introduced, and the influence factors of psychology and equipment which lead to the limit state of mind also have been analyzed. In addition, taking the emergency operation of the nuclear power plant as a example, The authors has studied the countermeasures to prevent the limit state from occurring, which includes countermeasures to environment effects, measures to improve the technical equipment and the measures that the operating staff should be taken

  15. Operator use of procedures during simulated emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Lewis, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an empirical study of nuclear power plant operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies. During emergencies operators follow highly prescriptive written procedures. The objectives of the study were to understand and document what role higher-level cognitive activities such as diagnosis, or more generally ' situation assessment,' play in guiding operator performance, given that operators utilize procedures in responding to the events. The study examined crew performance in variants of two simulated emergencies: (1) an Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident and (2) a Loss of Heat Sink scenario. Data on operator performance were collected using training simulators at two plant sites. Up to 11 crews from each plant participated in each of two simulated emergencies for a total of 38 cases analyzed. Crew performance was videotaped and partial transcripts were produced and analyzed. The results revealed a number of instances where higher-level cognitive activities such as situation assessment and response planning enabled operators to handle aspects of the situation that were not fully addressed by the procedures. The paper summarizes these cases and their implications for the development and evaluation of training and control room aids, as well as for human reliability analyses. The full report of the study is published as NUREG/CR-6208

  16. Operational Research during the Ebola Emergency.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Operational research aims to identify interventions, strategies, or tools that can enhance the quality, effectiveness, or coverage of programs where the research is taking place. Médecins Sans Frontières admitted ≈5,200 patients with confirmed Ebola virus disease during the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and from the beginning nested operational research within its emergency response. This research covered critical areas, such as understanding how the virus spreads, clinical trials, community perceptions, challenges within Ebola treatment centers, and negative effects on non-Ebola healthcare. Importantly, operational research questions were decided to a large extent by returning volunteers who had first-hand knowledge of the immediate issues facing teams in the field. Such a method is appropriate for an emergency medical organization. Many challenges were also identified while carrying out operational research across 3 different countries, including the basic need for collecting data in standardized format to enable comparison of findings among treatment centers.

  17. Emergency Survey Toolkit for Naval Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. da ConceiçÌo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to deliver the minimum safety conditions for movement of the ships towards restricted waters, urgent survey operations are required whenever we deal with natural disasters; unreliable chart information or uncharted areas requires. In recent years, there has been a huge development in positioning and survey technology. Simultaneously, charts production techniques and GIS software are easily accessible. In this circumstance, a research project was made in order to assess the possibility of developing existing capabilities of emergency hydrographic survey. The toolkit was designed to allow the swift production of usable bottom representation and survey of navigational aids, with a focus on navigational safety, rather than bottom contour accuracy.

  18. Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-05-01

    This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

  19. Emergency medicine: an operations management view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Olan A; Terwiesch, Christian; Pines, Jesse M

    2011-12-01

    Operations management (OM) is the science of understanding and improving business processes. For the emergency department (ED), OM principles can be used to reduce and alleviate the effects of crowding. A fundamental principle of OM is the waiting time formula, which has clear implications in the ED given that waiting time is fundamental to patient-centered emergency care. The waiting time formula consists of the activity time (how long it takes to complete a process), the utilization rate (the proportion of time a particular resource such a staff is working), and two measures of variation: the variation in patient interarrival times and the variation in patient processing times. Understanding the waiting time formula is important because it presents the fundamental parameters that can be managed to reduce waiting times and length of stay. An additional useful OM principle that is applicable to the ED is the efficient frontier. The efficient frontier compares the performance of EDs with respect to two dimensions: responsiveness (i.e., 1/wait time) and utilization rates. Some EDs may be "on the frontier," maximizing their responsiveness at their given utilization rates. However, most EDs likely have opportunities to move toward the frontier. Increasing capacity is a movement along the frontier and to truly move toward the frontier (i.e., improving responsiveness at a fixed capacity), we articulate three possible options: eliminating waste, reducing variability, or increasing flexibility. When conceptualizing ED crowding interventions, these are the major strategies to consider. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. Modified Latarjet Procedure Without Capsulolabral Repair for the Treatment of Failed Previous Operative Stabilizations in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalletta, Maximiliano; Rossi, Luciano A; Bertona, Agustin; Tanoira, Ignacio; Maignon, Gastón D; Bongiovanni, Santiago L

    2018-02-03

    To analyze time to return to sport, functional outcomes, and recurrences of the modified Latarjet procedure without capsulolabral repair in athletes with recurrent anterior shoulder instability after a failed previous operative stabilization. We included athletes with recurrent anterior shoulder instability with a previous failed operative stabilization treated with the modified Latarjet procedure without capsulolabral repair with a minimum of 2-year follow-up. Return to sports, range of motion, the Rowe score, a visual analog scale for pain in sport activity, and the Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System were used to assess functional outcomes. Recurrences were also evaluated. The postoperative bone block position and consolidation were assessed with computed tomography. Between June 2008 and June 2015, 68 athletes were treated with the modified Latarjet procedure without capsulolabral reconstruction for recurrent shoulder instability after a previous failed stabilization surgery. The mean follow-up was 44 months (range, 24-108 months), and the mean age at the time of operation was 26.8 years (range, 17-35 years). All the patients returned to sports, and 95% returned to the same sport they practiced before the surgery, all to the same level. No significant difference in shoulder range of motion was found between preoperative and postoperative results. The Rowe score, visual analog scale, and Athletic Shoulder Outcome Scoring System showed statistical improvement after operation (P Latarjet without capsulolabral repair produced excellent functional outcomes with most athletes returning to sport at the same level they had before the surgery without recurrences. Level IV, therapeutic, case series study. Copyright © 2017 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Research on erroneous judgement and operation of human at emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Huang Shudong; Li Xianyi; Chen Jianhua

    2001-01-01

    The behavior characteristic of human at emergency is analysed, and the root causes and the influencing factors are discussed, which result in erroneous judgement and operation. With experiment on erroneous judgement and operation of human at emergency, the error characteristic values are obtained, then the mathematical models are established. Comparing to foreign data, it is known that there are no marked differences between Chinese and foreigners in percent of erroneous judgement and operation at emergency

  2. Mobile monitoring in routine operations and emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, Joachim; Bucher, Benno; Estier, Sybille

    2011-01-01

    Gaining actuality after the Fukushima accident and in a certain way complementing the main topic of the most recent issue (Emergency Preparedness), articles deal with mobile monitoring in its various aspects. Mobile laboratories and measuring devices are presented ranging from aerosol samplers in aeroplanes over helicopters, environmental monitoring cars, a fire brigades CBRN-reconnaissance vehicle and mobile in-vivo laboratories to the special van of an emergency response team carrying among others hand-held instruments. (orig.)

  3. Simulation of Operators' Response in Emergencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    For the simulation of the accidental course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having...... significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to only skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review...

  4. Emergency obstetric performance with emphasis on operative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Ethiopia, in the previous studies, the rates of perinatal and maternal mortality were reported as one of the highest in the world. Objective: The purpose of the study was to analyze the rates of variables-specific perinatal deaths, maternal and perinatal case fatality rates and to determine common indications of ...

  5. Simulation of operators' response in emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, J.

    1986-09-01

    For the simulation of the accidential course of events in industrial process plants, a model is needed of operators' response to the cues presented by the system. A model is proposed, based on the simplifications which can be made when restricting attention to the operator functions having significants for a probabilistic risk analysis, and to anly skill and rule based performance, i.e., to responses in the early phase of an accident. The model is based on Brunswik's lens model, a model of the normal task repertoire, and on a taxonomy of human errors. To bring the model in perspective, a review of the state of the art of cognitive models of human behaviour is included. (author)

  6. HSIP Emergency Operations Centers (EOC) in New Mexico

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Emergency Operations Centers (EOC) in New Mexico "The physical location at which the coordination of information and resources to support domestic incident...

  7. Analysis of operation events for HFETR emergency diesel generator set

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhiqiang; Ji Xifang; Deng Hong

    2015-01-01

    By the statistic analysis of the historical failure data of the emergency diesel generator set, the specific mode, the attribute, and the direct and root origin for each failure are reviewed and summarized. Considering the current status of the emergency diesel generator set, the preventive measures and solutions in terms of operation, handling and maintenance are proposed, and the potential events for the emergency diesel generator set are analyzed. (authors)

  8. Symptom-based emergency operating procedures development for Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruglov, Y.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper and lecture are presented: (1) Introduction; (2) EOP project work stages and documentation; (3) Selection and justification of accident management strategy; (4) Content of EOP package; (5) Development of EOP package; (6) EOP package verification; (7) EOP package validation; (8) EOP training; (9) EOP implementation; (10) Conditions of symptom-based emergency operating producers package application and its interconnection with event-based emergency operating procedures; (11) Rules of EOP application; EOP maintenance

  9. Design and operation of the emergency support center, CAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caro, R. J.; Lopez Trillo, E.

    2016-01-01

    The enhancements developed in Spain in the area of Emergency Management, as consequence of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi NPP in 2011, included the definition of new emergency response centers; Alternative Center for Emergency Management (CAGE) on each NPP and the Emergency Support Center (CAE), shared by all NPPs. This article summarizes the main features and operation activities undertaken since the establishment of the new CAE, centralized, external to the NPPs shared by all Spanish plants and managed by Tecnatom. (Author)

  10. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    last edition of ENATOM was issued, several factors have warranted some modifications to the existing ENATOM arrangements: the publication of Safety Requirements on Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency, GS-R-2, in the IAEA's Safety Standards Series, in particular those requirements relating to the threshold for early notification and information exchange; feedback from the first meeting of representatives of competent authorities identified under the Early Notification and Assistance Convention, held in June 2001; and lessons identified from the Joint International Exercise CONVEX 3/JINEX 1 (2001) conducted in May 2001 based on a national exercise held at the Gravelines nuclear power plant in France. Other factors that called for updating the ENATOM manual were: changes due to revision of the Joint Plan, in particular those arising from incorporating an additional four co-sponsoring international organizations; recommendations from the Inter-Agency Committee on Nuclear Accidents (IACRNA) concerning the modalities of international exercises; lessons identified from experience in responding to requests for information and assistance during radiological emergencies in the past two years; changes to better reflect that emergency situations can arise from both accidents and deliberate acts; and recent resolutions of the IAEA General Conference. This manual describes arrangements operative from 1 December 2002 and supersedes the previous edition, EPR-ENATOM (2000). A new edition of ENATOM will be reissued in two years time. Any important amendments before completion of the new edition will be communicated through information bulletins. The current version of ENATOM is not restricted and will be maintained on the IAEA public web site under http://www.iaea.org/ns/rasanet/programme/emergency/enatom.htm. The General Conference of the IAEA in resolution GC(44)/RES/16 has encouraged Member States 'to implement instruments for improving their response

  11. Methods for implementing revisions to emergency operating procedures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.; Bell, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    In response to the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published the TMI Action Plan. The TMI Action Plan Item I.C.1 called for the upgrading of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) at nuclear power plants. The program developed from this Action Plan item has resulted in utility efforts to: (1) revise EOPs; (2) train personnel in the use of the EOPs; and (3) implement the revised EOPs. The NRC supported the study presented in this report to identify factors which influence the effectiveness of training and implementation of revised EOPs. The NRC's major concern was the possible effects of negative transfer of training. The report includes a summary of existing methods for implementing revisions to procedures based on interviews of plant personnel, a review of the training literature applicable to the effect of previously learned procedures on the learning of and performance with revised procedures (i.e., negative transfer) and recommendations of methods and schedules for implementing revised EOPs. While the study found that the concern over negative transfer of training was not as great as anticipated, several recommendations were made. These include: (1) overtraining of operators to reduce the effect of observed negative transfer; and (2) implementation of the revised EOPs as soon as possible after training to minimize the time operators must rely upon the old EOPs after having been trained on the revised EOPs. The results of the study should be useful both to the utilities and the NRC in the development and review of EOP implementation programs

  12. Respondents, Operants, and Emergents: Toward an Integrated Perspective on Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Daune M.; Washburn, David A.; Hillix, William A.

    1996-01-01

    A triarchic organization of behavior, building on Skinner's description of respondents and operants, is proposed by introducing a third class of behavior called 'emergents.' Emergents are new responses, never specifically reinforced, that require operations more complex than association. Some of these operations occur naturally only in animals above a minimum level of brain complexity, and are developed in an interaction between treatment and organismic variables. (Here complexity is defined in terms of relative levels of hierarchical integration made possible both by the amount of brain, afforded both by brain-body allometric relationships and by encephalization, and, also, the elaboration of dendritic and synaptic connections within the cortex and connections between various parts/regions of the brain.) Examples of emergents are discussed to advance this triarchic view, of behavior. The prime example is language. This triarchic view reflects both the common goals and the cumulative nature of psychological science.

  13. Safety and emergency preparedness considerations for geotechnical field operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wemple, R.P.

    1989-04-01

    The GEO Energy Technology Department at Sandia National Laboratories is involved in several remote-site drilling and/or experimental operations each year. In 1987, the Geothermal Research Division of the Department developed a general set of Safe Operating Procedures (SOPs) that could be applied to a variety of projects. This general set is supplemented by site-specific SOPs as needed. Effective field operations require: integration of safety and emergency preparedness planning with overall project planning, training of field personnel and inventorying of local emergency support resources, and, developing a clear line of responsibility and authority to enforce the safety requirements. Copies of SOPs used in recent operations are included as examples of working documents for the reader.

  14. Health related quality of life and health status in adult survivors with previously operated complex congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, M.; Ottenkamp, J.; Vliegen, H. W.; Vogels, T.; Zwinderman, K. H.; Kamphuis, R. P.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S. P.

    2002-01-01

    To examine the impact of previously operated complex congenital heart disease on health related quality of life and subjective health status and to determine the relation between these parameters and physical status. Cross sectional; information on medical follow up was sought retrospectively.

  15. 10 CFR 39.63 - Operating and emergency procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... monitoring and the use of personnel monitoring equipment; (g) Transportation of licensed materials to field... follow written operating and emergency procedures that cover— (a) The handling and use of licensed materials including the use of sealed sources in wells without surface casing for protecting fresh water...

  16. An approach to modeling operator's cognitive behavior using artificial intelligence techniques in emergency operating event sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Se Woo; Sur, Sang Moon; Lee, Yong Hee; Park, Young Taeck; Moon, Sang Joon

    1994-01-01

    Computer modeling of an operator's cognitive behavior is a promising approach for the purpose of human factors study and man-machine systems assessment. In this paper, the states of the art in modeling operator behavior and the current status in developing an operator's model (MINERVA - NPP) are presented. The model is constructed as a knowledge-based system of a blackboard framework and is simulated based on emergency operating procedures

  17. Rejection Study of Cancelous Allograft in Emergency Orthopaedic Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjas, Menkher; Hilmy Nazly

    2002-01-01

    The fast development of national and international tissue bank, increased the use of bone allografts in orthopaedic surgery including emergency open reduction and internal fixation at fresh bone fractures. The aim of this work is to evaluate rejection and usefulness of cancelous bone allografts which have been used in emergency orthopaedic operation. Dwing February until June 2000 two group of 20 patients each, were studied. after preferring emergency open reduction and internal fixation. The first group was treated with cancelous allograft transplantation at the site of the fracture, but the second group did not get any graft. Radiation sterilized allograft were used at this study. Parameters observed were local reaction of wound operation, local rejection and callus formation. The results show that there is no rejection of cancelous bone allograft detected from local and systemic reaction of wound operation. After three week, operation there was no significant different number of callus formation can be detected by conventional radiology examination but after 6 weeks there was a significant increasing in number of callus formation in the group of cancelous allograft transplantation (P < 0.05)

  18. Operational intervention levels for reactor emergencies IAEA recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, Laís A. de; Reis, Arlene A. dos; Santos, Raul dos, E-mail: laguiar@ird.gov.br, E-mail: arlene@ird.gov.br, E-mail: raul@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The IAEA publication EPR-NPP-OILs-2017, Operational Intervention Levels for Reactor Emergences and Methodology for their Derivation, provides selected default OIL values, describing a methodology for their derivation, as well as practical tools and recommendations for their use. IAEA recommends that tools and default OIL values be directly integrated into national emergency arrangements or reviewed and modified as necessary to meet the specific emergency preparedness and response arrangements. The Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) has a Radiological Assessment TEAM (EAR) as pare of its Radiation Emergency Response System. Brazilian regulatory standards address actions for radiation emergencies encompassing necessary measures to assess public exposures, intervention levels to protect the public and recommendations for protective actions as, evacuation, relocation, sheltering and food restrictions. The objective of this paper is to present a discussion the use these OILs, to compare those ones established by the Brazilian standards and to propose a methodology on how OILs can be used by EAR/IRD in case of an emergency at the Brazilian NPP. (author)

  19. Operational intervention levels for reactor emergencies IAEA recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Laís A. de; Reis, Arlene A. dos; Santos, Raul dos

    2017-01-01

    The IAEA publication EPR-NPP-OILs-2017, Operational Intervention Levels for Reactor Emergences and Methodology for their Derivation, provides selected default OIL values, describing a methodology for their derivation, as well as practical tools and recommendations for their use. IAEA recommends that tools and default OIL values be directly integrated into national emergency arrangements or reviewed and modified as necessary to meet the specific emergency preparedness and response arrangements. The Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) has a Radiological Assessment TEAM (EAR) as pare of its Radiation Emergency Response System. Brazilian regulatory standards address actions for radiation emergencies encompassing necessary measures to assess public exposures, intervention levels to protect the public and recommendations for protective actions as, evacuation, relocation, sheltering and food restrictions. The objective of this paper is to present a discussion the use these OILs, to compare those ones established by the Brazilian standards and to propose a methodology on how OILs can be used by EAR/IRD in case of an emergency at the Brazilian NPP. (author)

  20. Radio-guided excision of metastatic lymph nodes in thyroid carcinoma: a safe technique for previously operated neck compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, Yeşim; Sari, Serkan; Ağcaoğlu, Orhan; Ersöz, Feyzullah; Bayraktar, Adem; Salmaslioğlu, Artür; Gozkun, Osman; Adalet, Işik; Ozarmağan, Selçuk

    2010-11-01

    Better follow-up of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and more sensitive detection leads to detection of recurrences in the neck. Despite excellent outcomes, the major challenge is controlling locoregional recurrence. We aimed to investigate whether the radio-guided excision of metastatic lymph nodes makes it possible to find the affected lymph nodes in patients with previously operated neck compartments. This prospective study included 46 patients with recurrent/persistent PTC who had previously undergone operation of the neck compartment. Prior to operation, the pathologic node was localized by ultrasound (US) and radiotracer ((99m)Tc-labeled rhenium colloid) was injected directly into the pathologic node. Careful dissection was carried out following the area of maximum radioactivity until the metastatic lymph node(s) were identified and excised. One affected lymph node was removed in 17 patients, and more than one lymph node (affected or additional nodes) was removed in 29 patients. The median count from the lesion was significantly higher than values from the lesion bed (background activity) (16,886 counts/20 s versus 52 counts/20 s; p basal thyroglobulin (Tg). Five patients had suspicious lymph nodes on the operated side. Although the basal Tg level remained above the normal limit, moderately high in 8 patients, no metastases were detected in the neck. Radio-guided excision of metastatic lymph nodes can be performed safely for the detection and excision of recurrent thyroid cancer in the central and lateral neck.

  1. Operation method and operation control device for emergency core cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Tadashi [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mizutani, Akira

    1996-05-07

    The present invention provides a method of reducing continuous load capacity of an emergency cooling system of a BWR type reactor and a device reducing a rated capacity of an emergency power source facility. Namely, the emergency core cooling system comprises a first cooling system having a plurality of power source systems based on a plurality of emergency power sources and a second cooling system having a remaining heat removing function. In this case, when the first cooling system is operated the manual starting under a predetermined condition that an external power source loss event should occur, a power source division different from the first cooling system shares the operation to operate the secondary cooling system simultaneously. Further, the first cooling system is constituted as a high pressure reactor core water injection system and the second cooling system is constituted as a remaining heat removing system. With such a constitution, a high pressure reactor core water injection system for manual starting and a remaining heat removing system of different power source division can be operated simultaneously before automatic operation of the emergency core cooling system upon loss of external power source of a nuclear power plant. (I.S.)

  2. THIS IS A DRILL (HANFORD EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER IN ACTION)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CONNELL, C.W.

    2005-01-01

    ''This is a drill'', these are the words that we're directed to say before and after any verbal communication with other personnel while participating in training exercises for the Hanford Site Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The EOC has multiple components and many personnel outside of the EOC participate in training exercises. ''This is a drill'', describes the operations of the EOC Unified Dose Assessment Center (UDAC) and the tools used by personnel operating the UDAC. The functions and composition of the EOC, UDAC and related organizations are governed by the Hanford Emergency Management Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) and Office of River Protection (ORP) (DOE/RL-94-02, Hanford Emergency Management Plan). This plan presents--in a single document--an overview of the emergency-management program for the entire Hanford Site. At the heart of the UDAC operations is the question, ''How, and in what direction, would a plume of radioactivity potentially disperse in the event of an accident that released radioactive material?'' Key elements of projecting or predicting the impact are the source term (what materials and how much have been released), the details of the current and projected weather conditions, and analyses models that will calculate the predicted movement of the material. ''This is a drill'' loosely describes the organization of the UDAC, the way the personnel go about doing their jobs, and the tools they use to get the answers required by those managing the exercise or event. Key tools are used to evaluate and predict the consequences of a release of hazardous materials: maps and atlases; environmental databases such as the Waste Information Data System (WIDS); scenario-driven weather conditions (or real weather-station information provided by personnel from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]); and analysis codes like MetView (Meteorological Display and Assessment Tool) and APGEMS (models

  3. Tutorials on emerging methodologies and applications in operations research

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Operations Research emerged as a quantitative approach to problem-solving in World War II. Its founders, who were physicists, mathematicians, and engineers, quickly found peace-time uses for this new field. Moreover, we can say that Operations Research (OR) was born in the same incubator as computer science, and through the years, it has spawned many new disciplines, including systems engineering, health care management, and transportation science. Fundamentally, Operations Research crosses discipline domains to seek solutions on a range of problems and benefits diverse disciplines from finance to bioengineering. Many disciplines routinely use OR methods. Many scientific researchers, engineers, and others will find the methodological presentations in this book useful and helpful in their problem-solving efforts. OR’s strengths are modeling, analysis, and algorithm design. It provides a quantitative foundation for a broad spectrum of problems, from economics to medicine, from environmental control to sports,...

  4. Operative team communication during simulated emergencies: Too busy to respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W Austin; Jones, Seth; Crowell-Kuhnberg, Adrianna M; O'Keeffe, Dara; Boyle, Kelly M; Klainer, Suzanne B; Smink, Douglas S; Yule, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Ineffective communication among members of a multidisciplinary team is associated with operative error and failure to rescue. We sought to measure operative team communication in a simulated emergency using an established communication framework called "closed loop communication." We hypothesized that communication directed at a specific recipient would be more likely to elicit a check back or closed loop response and that this relationship would vary with changes in patients' clinical status. We used the closed loop communication framework to code retrospectively the communication behavior of 7 operative teams (each comprising 2 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and nurses) during response to a simulated, postanesthesia care unit "code blue." We identified call outs, check backs, and closed loop episodes and applied descriptive statistics and a mixed-effects negative binomial regression to describe characteristics of communication in individuals and in different specialties. We coded a total of 662 call outs. The frequency and type of initiation and receipt of communication events varied between clinical specialties (P communication events than anesthesiologists. For the average participant, directed communication increased the likelihood of check back by at least 50% (P = .021) in periods preceding acute changes in the clinical setting, and exerted no significant effect in periods after acute changes in the clinical situation. Communication patterns vary by specialty during a simulated operative emergency, and the effect of directed communication in eliciting a response depends on the clinical status of the patient. Operative training programs should emphasize the importance of quality communication in the period immediately after an acute change in the clinical setting of a patient and recognize that communication patterns and needs vary between members of multidisciplinary operative teams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Emergent gynecological operations: A report of 105 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Ender Soydinç

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients that hospitalized with acute abdominopelvic pain (AAP and underwent emergent gynecological operations in obstetrics and gynecology clinics.Methods: This retrospective study was performed at Dicle University Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, from June 2006 to May 2009. The data were collected from hospital records and patients charts. The age, gravidy, parity, last menstrual period, physical examination findings, initial complaints, operation diagnosis, preoperative and postoperative hematocrit values, the type of the operation that performed and the amount of blood products transfusions were investigated.Results: During the study period, a total of 105 patients were operated due to characteristic clinical sign and symptoms of acute abdomen. The initial complaints were abdominopelvic pain in 62 patients (59.0% and abdomino-pelvic pain with vaginal bleeding in 43 patients (41.0%. Of all cases; 60 (57.1% women had ruptured ectopic pregnancy, 29 (27.6% had corpus hemorrhagic cyst rupture. Only 68 (64.76% of the cases were subjected to laparotomy under emergency conditions, while 37 (35.2% of them were subjected to laparoscopy. Fifty five (52.4% women needed blood products transfusion.Conclusion: The initial evaluation of abdominopelvic pain related to gynecologic causes should include taking a careful history, performing abdominopelvic examination, pregnancy test, laboratory studies and color Doppler ultrasound. Although the patients can be followed conservatively, they may need an emergent surgery for life saving. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(1: 12-15

  6. Initial operations in local nuclear emergency response headquarter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    As a result of the Fukushima nuclear accident due to the Great East Japan Earthquake and the tsunami that occurred thereafter, local nuclear emergency response headquarters (local headquarters) was set up at off-site center (OFC). However, several obstacles such as the collapse of means of communication resulting from severed communication lines, food and fuel shortage resulting from stagnant physical distribution, and increasing radiation dose around the center significantly restricted originally intended operation of local headquarters. In such severe situation, the personnel gathered at the OFC from the government, local public bodies and electric companies from March 11 to 15 acted without sufficient food, sleep or rest and did all they could against successively occurring unexpected challenges by using limited means of communication. However, issues requiring further consideration were activities of each functional group, location of OFC and the functions of equipment, machines and materials and reflecting the consideration results into future protective measures and revision of the manual for nuclear emergency response were greatly important. This report described investigated results on initial operations in local headquarters such as situation of activities conducted by local headquarters and operations at functional groups. (T. Tanaka)

  7. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 February 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which, in addition to a large number of States, the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, States that are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). ENATOM was first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States have since then regularly received updates to the manual. In 2000, a complete revision of ENATOM was reissued as EPR-ENATOM (2000) to reflect technological developments, changes in operational concepts, views on standards in the area of emergency preparedness and response, and Member States' expectations. Since then ENATOM has been reviewed and reissued biennially in line with the review cycle of the Joint Radiation Emergency Management Plan of the International Organizations (the 'Joint Plan'). Since the last edition of ENATOM in 2004, several factors have warranted some modifications to

  8. The role of computed tomography after emergent trauma operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Kazuhide; Inaba, Kenji; Dollbaum, Ryan; Khor, Desmond; Jhaveri, Vidhi; Jimenez, Omar; Strumwasser, Aaron; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2016-12-01

    Although computed tomography (CT) has become the preferred diagnostic modality, immediate surgical intervention is often required for severely injured patients with minimum preoperative radiographic evaluation. The utility of postoperative CT (postop-CT) for the identification of undiagnosed injuries and its impact on patient management remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of postop-CT for the identification of clinically significant injuries in patients who underwent an emergent life-saving procedure. A 5-y retrospective study from 2009 to 2013 was conducted at a high-volume level I trauma center. We included blunt and penetrating trauma patients who underwent an emergent operation (neck exploration, thoracotomy, and laparotomy) without preoperative CT. Postop-CT was obtained within 48 h after the initial operation at the discretion of the attending trauma surgeon. Characteristics of newly diagnosed injuries on postop-CT were analyzed. These injuries were considered clinically significant when the patient required (1) immediate intervention; (2) new consultation from a specialty service; or (3) a higher level of care. A total of 89 patients met our inclusion criteria (five neck explorations, 16 thoracotomies, and 74 laparotomies) with the following characteristics: median age of 30 y, 87.6% male, 47.2% penetrating injury, and median injury severity score of 24. New injuries were identified on postop-CT in 59 cases (66%), and clinical management was changed in 51 cases (57%). Patients with an admission Glasgow Coma Scale undergoing an emergent operation before having their full diagnostic workup completed, postop-CT often demonstrates clinically significant injuries. Further prospective study to identify the patients who will benefit from postop-CT is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Emergency notification and assistance technical operations manual. Emergency preparedness and response. Date effective: 1 December 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions, to which the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) are full parties. Since 1989, the arrangements between the IAEA, States which are IAEA Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations, and other States for facilitating the implementation of the Conventions - specifically of those of their articles which are operational in nature have been documented in the Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM). Recent events, for example, the launch of the Cassini satellite (USA, 1997), the Acerinox accident (Spain, 1998), the JCO criticality accident (Japan, 1999), the Istanbul accident (Turkey, 1999) and the Samut Prakarn accident (Thailand, 2000), have raised new issues and highlighted the expectation of States that the IAEA will use the framework of the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions to obtain and provide real-time emergency related information on such events. While the Early Notification Convention requires States Parties to report only accidents that may have significant transboundary radiological consequences, States may under the Assistance Convention legitimately request the assistance of the IAEA or an Accident State in obtaining information concerning a

  10. Continuity of operations planning in college athletic programs: The case for incorporating Federal Emergency Management Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Stacey A; Allen, Brandon L; Phillips, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    College athletic departments have a responsibility to provide a safe environment for student-athletes; however, most colleges do not have a crisis management plan that includes procedures for displaced student-athletes or alternate facilities to perform athletic events. Continuity of operations planning ensures athletic programs are equipped to maintain essential functions during, or shortly after, a disruption of operations due to possible hazards. Previous studies have identified a lack of emergency preparedness and continuity planning in college athletic departments. The purpose of this article is to illustrate in detail one approach to disaster planning for college athletic departments, namely the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) continuity of operations framework. By adhering to FEMA guidelines and promoting a best practices model, athletic programs can effectively plan to address potential hazards, as well as protect the organization's brand, image, and financial sustainability after a crisis event.

  11. Enhancing nuclear emergency response through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.; Aaltonen, H.

    2003-01-01

    perspective however, there are probably substantial resources available for response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The problem is that during an emergency, these resources are not where they are needed. Most resources are under authority control in the respective countries, but if all countries would commit themselves to contribute to such assistance arrangements between countries and invoke all resources available and efficiently co-ordinate and route them to where they are mostly needed, the international community and individual States would achieve a better and more efficient response to emergencies. Resources could in this respect be everything that is needed to respond to an emergency, e.g. equipment, expertise, assessment capabilities or other services. These arrangements should be global arrangements as bi-lateral or regional arrangements are only adequate for some scenarios. The Convention an Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention an Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency established in 1986 are at present acceded by approx. 85 IAEA Member States. These conventions constitute the framework of international co-operation on response to nuclear and radiological emergencies between States and describe the obligations and mechanisms of international notification and assistance. The conventions recognize the need for a co-ordinating and facilitating body in this co-operation and the IAEA has been given this role. The conventions an Assistance and Early Notification provide a good framework for achieving international co-operation an nuclear emergency response. It has however been recognised that the implementation of these conventions needs to be improved. This is the responsibility of acceding states. To efficiently share information between many states, it is necessary to establish a standard international communication platform for information exchange with a communication strategy and standardization

  12. The reliability of emergency generator sets study - experimentation - operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morzelle, M.; Kauffmann, M.; Donnelly, M.

    1989-01-01

    In the 70' s it was no secret that diesel driven emergency sets were insufficient in their availability and reliability. Despite recognition as the sole energy source capable of supplying within 60 seconds the power required to control the major incidents, the diesel engine was however pointed out as being the main cause of these insufficiencies. The technology developed by the manufacturers at that time was capable of guaranteeing satisfactory operation for continuous use generating sets and for diesel engines used for boat and railway propulsion. Now, experience has very quickly shown that even if this technological mastery was necessary, it was not enough to transform a conventional diesel engine into one destined for use as an emergency generating set in a nuclear power plant. We have analysed the reliability of 76 UD 45 type emergency sets installed before 1980 and 175 UD 45 type during the period between 1980 and 1988. The aim of the development today is essentially to reduce the stresses during the starting phase and to better control the aging phenomena by adapting the components in such way as to make them more tolerant to the known conditions of use

  13. Role Allocations and Communications of Operators during Emergency Operation in Advanced Main Control Rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, June Seung

    2009-01-01

    The advanced main control room (MCR) in GEN III + nuclear power plants has been designed by adapting modern digital I and C techniques and an advanced man machine interface system (MMIS). Large Display Panels (LDPs) and computer based workstations are installed in the MCR. A Computerized Procedure System (CPS) and Computerized Operation Support System (COSS) with high degrees of automation are supplied to operators. Therefore, it is necessary to set up new operation concepts in advanced MCRs that are different from those applied in conventional MCRs regarding role allocations and communications of operators. The following presents a discussion of the main differences between advanced MCRs and conventional MCRs from the viewpoint of role allocations and communications. Efficient models are then proposed on the basis of a task analysis on a series of emergency operation steps

  14. Use of National Burden to Define Operative Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John W; Olufajo, Olubode A; Brat, Gabriel A; Rose, John A; Zogg, Cheryl K; Haider, Adil H; Salim, Ali; Havens, Joaquim M

    2016-06-15

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) represents 11% of surgical admissions and 50% of surgical mortality in the United States. However, there is currently no established definition of the EGS procedures. To define a set of procedures accounting for at least 80% of the national burden of operative EGS. A retrospective review was conducted using data from the 2008-2011 National Inpatient Sample. Adults (age, ≥18 years) with primary EGS diagnoses consistent with the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma definition, admitted urgently or emergently, who underwent an operative procedure within 2 days of admission were included in the analyses. Procedures were ranked to account for national mortality and complication burden. Among ranked procedures, contributions to total EGS frequency, mortality, and hospital costs were assessed. The data query and analysis were performed between November 15, 2015, and February 16, 2016. Overall procedure frequency, in-hospital mortality, major complications, and inpatient costs calculated per 3-digit International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes. The study identified 421 476 patient encounters associated with operative EGS, weighted to represent 2.1 million nationally over the 4-year study period. The overall mortality rate was 1.23% (95% CI, 1.18%-1.28%), the complication rate was 15.0% (95% CI, 14.6%-15.3%), and mean cost per admission was $13 241 (95% CI, $12 957-$13 525). After ranking the 35 procedure groups by contribution to EGS mortality and morbidity burden, a final set of 7 operative EGS procedures were identified, which collectively accounted for 80.0% of procedures, 80.3% of deaths, 78.9% of complications, and 80.2% of inpatient costs nationwide. These 7 procedures included partial colectomy, small-bowel resection, cholecystectomy, operative management of peptic ulcer disease, lysis of peritoneal adhesions, appendectomy, and laparotomy. Only 7 procedures account

  15. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2012-02-20

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the

  16. Risks of cardiovascular adverse events and death in patients with previous stroke undergoing emergency noncardiac, nonintracranial surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mia N.; Andersson, Charlotte; Gislason, Gunnar H.

    2017-01-01

    mortality and major adverse cardiovascular events were estimated as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs using adjusted logistic regression models in a priori defined groups (reference was no previous stroke). In patients undergoing surgery immediately (within 1 to 3 days) or early after stroke (within 4 to 14...... and general anesthesia less frequent in patients with previous stroke (all P adverse cardiovascular events and mortality were high for patients with stroke less than 3 months (20.7 and 16.4% events; OR = 4.71 [95% CI, 4.18 to 5.32] and 1.65 [95% CI, 1.45 to 1.88]), and remained...... increased for stroke within 3 to 9 months (10.3 and 12.3%; OR = 1.93 [95% CI, 1.55 to 2.40] and 1.20 [95% CI, 0.98 to 1.47]) and stroke more than 9 months (8.8 and 11.7%; OR = 1.62 [95% CI, 1.43 to 1.84] and 1.20 [95% CI, 1.08 to 1.34]) compared with no previous stroke (2.3 and 4.8% events). Major adverse...

  17. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system.

  18. Emergency operation procedure navigation to avoid commission errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gofuku, Akio; Ito, Koji

    2004-01-01

    New types of operation control system equipped with a large screen and CRT-based operation panels have been installed in newly constructed nuclear power plants. The operators can share important information of plant conditions by the large screen. The operation control system can know the operations by operators through the computers connected to the operation panels. The software switches placed in the CRT-based operation panels have a problem such that operators may make an error to manipulate an irrelevant software switch with their current operation. This study develops an operation procedure navigation technique to avoid this kind of commission errors. The system lies between CRT-based operation panels and plant control systems and checks an operation by operators if it follows the operation procedure of operation manuals. When the operation is a right one, the operation is executed as if the operation command is directly transmitted to control systems. If the operation does not follow the operation procedure, the system warns the commission error to operators. This paper describes the operation navigation technique, format of base operation model, and a proto-type operation navigation system for a three loop pressurized water reactor plant. The validity of the proto-type system is demonstrated by the operation procedure navigation for a steam generator tube rupture accident. (author)

  19. The Impact of Previous Action on Bargaining—An Experiment on the Emergence of Preferences for Fairness Norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Neumann

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The communication of participants to identify an acceptable bargaining outcome in the Nash bargaining game is all about fairness norms. Participants introduce fairness norms which yield a better outcome for themselves in order to convince the other participant of their bargaining proposal. Typically, these fairness norms are in line with theoretical predictions, which support a wide variety of different but fair outcomes the participants can choose from. In this experiment, we play two treatments of the Nash bargaining game: in one treatment, the participants play a dictator game prior to bargaining, and in the other treatment they do not. We find that participants who have not played the dictator game intensively discuss the outcome of the game and come to solutions closer to the equal split of the pie the longer they chat. This effect vanishes as soon as the participants have previous experience from a dictator game: instead of chatting, they establish the fairness norm introduced in the dictator game. Remarkably, if the dictator is unfair in the dictator game, he also gets a higher share of the pie in the Nash bargaining game.

  20. Flood Inundation Mapping and Emergency Operations during Hurricane Harvey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, N. Z.; Cotter, J.; Gao, S.; Bedient, P. B.; Yung, A.; Penland, C.

    2017-12-01

    Hurricane Harvey struck the Gulf Coast as Category 4 on August 25, 2017 with devastating and life-threatening floods in Texas. Harris County received up to 49 inches of rainfall over a 5-day period and experienced flooding level and impacts beyond any previous storm in Houston's history. The depth-duration-frequency analysis reveals that the areal average rainfall for Brays Bayou surpasses the 500-year rainfall in both 24 and 48 hours. To cope with this unprecedented event, the researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington and Rice University worked closely with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), the National Weather Service (NWS), the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM), Walter P. Moore and Associates, Inc. and Halff Associates, to conduct a series of meteorological, hydrologic and hydraulic analyses to delineate flood inundation maps. Up to eight major watersheds in Harris County were delineated based the available QPE data from WGRFC. The inundation map over Brays Bayou with their impacts from Hurricane Harvey was delineated in comparison with those of 100-, 500-year, and Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) design storms. This presentation will provide insights for both engineers and planners to re-evaluate the existing flood infrastructure and policy, which will help build Houston stronger for future extreme storms. The collaborative effort among the federal, academic, and private entities clearly demonstrates an effective approach for flood inundation mapping initiatives for the nation.

  1. Comparing the operators' behavior in conducting emergency operating procedures with the complexity of procedural steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2003-01-01

    Many kinds of procedures have been used to reduce the operators' workload throughout various industries. However, significant portion of accidents or incidents was caused by procedure related human errors that are originated from non-compliance of procedures. According to related studies, several important factors for non-compliance behavior have been identified, and one if them is the complexity of procedures. This means that comparing the change of the operators' behavior with the complexity of procedures may be meaningful for investigating plausible reasons for the operators' non-compliance behavior. In this study, emergency training records were collected using a full scope simulator in order to obtain data related to the operators' non-compliance behavior. And then, collected data are compared with the complexity of procedural steps. As the result, two remarkable relationships are found, which indicate that the operators' behavior could be reasonably characterized by the complexity of procedural steps. Thus, these relationships can be used as meaningful clues not only to scrutinize the reason of non-compliance behavior but also to suggest appropriate remedies for the reduction of non-compliance behavior that can result in procedure related human errors

  2. Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication. Date Effective: 1 June 2012 (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, the IAEA's Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations (herein referred to as international organizations), and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the present Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication (IEComm). IEComm is the successor to the previous Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM), first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States, have since then regularly received updates to the manual. This manual covers the communication protocols for Contact Points identified under the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, as well as the protocol for users of the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). Since the last edition of ENATOM, several factors have warranted some modifications to the existing arrangements: changes due to lessons identified from experience in exchanging information during incidents and emergencies, responding to requests for information and assistance during nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies in the past few

  3. Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication. Date Effective: 1 June 2012 (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, the IAEA's Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations (herein referred to as international organizations), and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the present Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication (IEComm). IEComm is the successor to the previous Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM), first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States, have since then regularly received updates to the manual. This manual covers the communication protocols for Contact Points identified under the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, as well as the protocol for users of the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). Since the last edition of ENATOM, several factors have warranted some modifications to the existing arrangements: changes due to lessons identified from experience in exchanging information during incidents and emergencies, responding to requests for information and assistance during nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies in the past few

  4. Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication. Date Effective: 1 June 2012 (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the … prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, the IAEA's Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations (herein referred to as international organizations), and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the present Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication (IEComm). IEComm is the successor to the previous Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM), first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States, have since then regularly received updates to the manual. This manual covers the communication protocols for Contact Points identified under the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, as well as the protocol for users of the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). Since the last edition of ENATOM, several factors have warranted some modifications to the existing arrangements: changes due to lessons identified from experience in exchanging information during incidents and emergencies, responding to requests for information and assistance during nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies in the past few

  5. Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication. Date Effective: 1 June 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident (the 'Early Notification Convention') and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (the 'Assistance Convention') are the prime legal instruments that establish an international framework to facilitate the exchange of information and the prompt provision of assistance in the event of a nuclear or radiological incident or emergency, with the aim of minimizing the consequences. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has specific functions assigned to it under these Conventions. The arrangements provided between the IAEA, the IAEA's Member States and/or Parties to one or both Conventions, all other relevant international intergovernmental organizations (herein referred to as international organizations), and other States for facilitating the implementation of these Conventions - specifically concerning those articles that are operational in nature - are documented in the present Operations Manual for Incident and Emergency Communication (IEComm). IEComm is the successor to the previous Emergency Notification and Assistance Technical Operations Manual (ENATOM), first issued on 18 January 1989. Member States, Parties to the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, relevant international organizations and other States, have since then regularly received updates to the manual. This manual covers the communication protocols for Contact Points identified under the Early Notification and Assistance Conventions, as well as the protocol for users of the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES). Since the last edition of ENATOM, several factors have warranted some modifications to the existing arrangements: changes due to lessons identified from experience in exchanging information during incidents and emergencies, responding to requests for information and assistance during nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies in the past few

  6. Post-operative Complications Following Emergency Operations Performed by Trainee Surgeons: A Retrospective Analysis of Surgical Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrah, Noha; Stephan, Karen; Lovell, Janaka; Ibrahim, Joseph; Beiles, Barry

    2018-01-23

    Adequate surgical care of patients and concurrent training of residents is achieved in elective procedures through careful case selection and adequate supervision. Whether this applies when trainees are involved in emergency operations remains equivocal. The aim of this study was therefore to compare the risk of post-operative complications following emergency procedures performed by senior operators compared with supervised trainees. This is a retrospective cohort study examining in-hospital deaths of patients across all surgical specialties who underwent emergency surgery in Australian public hospitals reported to the national surgical mortality audit between 2009 and 2015. Multivariable logistic regression was used to explore whether there was an association between the level of operator experience (senior operator vs trainee) and the occurrence of post-operative surgical complications following an emergency procedure. Our population consisted of 6920 patients. There were notable differences between the trainees and senior operator groups; trainees more often operated on patients aged over 80 years, with cardiovascular and neurological risk factors. Senior operators more often operated on very young and obese patients with advanced malignancy and hepatic disease. Supervised trainees had a lower rate of post-operative complications compared with senior operators; 18% (n = 396) and 25% (n = 1210), respectively (p emergency operations, provided that cases are judiciously selected.

  7. Proposed Standard for a Microclimate Cooling System for Emergency Responder Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    MICROCLIMATE COOLING SYSTEM FOR EMERGENCY RESPONDER OPERATIONS by Brad Laprise February 2012 Final Report August 2007...August 2007 - December 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PROPOSED STANDARD FOR A MICROCLIMATE COOLING SYSTEM FOR EMERGENCY RESPONDER OPERATIONS 5a...of a Microclimate Cooling System (MCS), specifically for the Emergency Responder community. MCS have been shown to significantly improve mission

  8. MODELLING OF DECISION MAKING OF UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE'S OPERATOR IN EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: lack of recommendation action algorithm of UAV operator in emergency situations; decomposition of the process of decision making (DM by UAV’s Operator in emergency situations; development of the structure of distributed decision support system (DDSS for remotely piloted aircraft; development of a database of local decision support system (DSS operators Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS; working-out of models DM by UAV’s Operator. Methods: Algoritm of actions of UAV operator by Wald criterion, Laplace criterion, Hurwitz criterion. Results: The program "UAV_AS" that gives to UAV operator recommendations on how to act in case of emergency. Discussion: The article deals with the problem of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV flights for decision of different tasks in emergency situation. Based on statistical data it was analyzing the types of emergencies for unmanned aircraft. Defined sequence of actions UAV operator and in case of emergencies.

  9. 33 CFR 127.1309 - Operations Manual and Emergency Manual: Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations Manual and Emergency Manual: Use. 127.1309 Section 127.1309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF....1309 Operations Manual and Emergency Manual: Use. Each operator of a waterfront facility handling LHG...

  10. 33 CFR 127.309 - Operations Manual and Emergency Manual: Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operations Manual and Emergency Manual: Use. 127.309 Section 127.309 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Manual and Emergency Manual: Use. The operator shall ensure that— (a) LNG transfer operations are not...

  11. The development of a quantitative measure for the complexity of emergency tasks stipulated in emergency operating procedures of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2006-11-15

    Previous studies have continuously pointed out that human performance is a decisive factor affecting the safety of complicated process systems. Subsequently, as the result of extensive efforts, it has been revealed that the provision of procedures is one of the most effective countermeasures, especially if human operators have to carry out their tasks under a very stressful environment. That is, since good procedures are helpful to not only enhance the performance of human operators but also the reduction of the possibility of a human error through stipulating detailed tasks to be done by human operators. Ironically, it has been emphasized that the performance of human operators could be impaired due to complicated procedures, because procedures directly govern the physical as well as cognitive behavior of human operators by institutionalizing detailed actions. Therefore, it is a prerequisite to develop a systematic framework that properly evaluate the complexity of tasks described in procedures. For this reason, a measure called TACOM (Task Complexity) that can quantify the complexity of emergency tasks described in the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs has been developed. In this report, a technical background as well as practical steps to quantify the complexity of tasks were presented with a series of studies that were conducted to ensure the validity of the TACOM measure. As a result of validation studies, since it is shown that the TACOM measure seem to properly quantify the complexity of emergency tasks, it is desirable that the TACOM measure plays an important role in improving the performance of human operators.

  12. The development of a quantitative measure for the complexity of emergency tasks stipulated in emergency operating procedures of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2006-11-01

    Previous studies have continuously pointed out that human performance is a decisive factor affecting the safety of complicated process systems. Subsequently, as the result of extensive efforts, it has been revealed that the provision of procedures is one of the most effective countermeasures, especially if human operators have to carry out their tasks under a very stressful environment. That is, since good procedures are helpful to not only enhance the performance of human operators but also the reduction of the possibility of a human error through stipulating detailed tasks to be done by human operators. Ironically, it has been emphasized that the performance of human operators could be impaired due to complicated procedures, because procedures directly govern the physical as well as cognitive behavior of human operators by institutionalizing detailed actions. Therefore, it is a prerequisite to develop a systematic framework that properly evaluate the complexity of tasks described in procedures. For this reason, a measure called TACOM (Task Complexity) that can quantify the complexity of emergency tasks described in the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) of NPPs has been developed. In this report, a technical background as well as practical steps to quantify the complexity of tasks were presented with a series of studies that were conducted to ensure the validity of the TACOM measure. As a result of validation studies, since it is shown that the TACOM measure seem to properly quantify the complexity of emergency tasks, it is desirable that the TACOM measure plays an important role in improving the performance of human operators

  13. Guidelines for the preparation of emergency operating procedures. Resolution of comments on NUREG-0799

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify the elements necessary for utilities to prepare and implement a program of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) for use by control room personnel to assist in mitigating the consequences of a broad range of accidents and multiple equipment failures. This document applies only to the EOPs so designated; it does not address emergency preparedness or emergency planning. It also represents the resolution of comments on NUREG-0799, Draft Criteria for Preparation of Emergency Operating Procedures.

  14. Guidelines for the preparation of emergency operating procedures. Resolution of comments on NUREG-0799

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify the elements necessary for utilities to prepare and implement a program of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) for use by control room personnel to assist in mitigating the consequences of a broad range of accidents and multiple equipment failures. This document applies only to the EOPs so designated; it does not address emergency preparedness or emergency planning. It also represents the resolution of comments on NUREG-0799, Draft Criteria for Preparation of Emergency Operating Procedures

  15. City-scale accessibility of emergency responders operating during flood events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Daniel; Yu, Dapeng; Pattison, Ian; Wilby, Robert; Bosher, Lee; Patel, Ramila; Thompson, Philip; Trowell, Keith; Draycon, Julia; Halse, Martin; Yang, Lili; Ryley, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Emergency responders often have to operate and respond to emergency situations during dynamic weather conditions, including floods. This paper demonstrates a novel method using existing tools and datasets to evaluate emergency responder accessibility during flood events within the city of Leicester, UK. Accessibility was quantified using the 8 and 10 min legislative targets for emergency provision for the ambulance and fire and rescue services respectively under "normal" no-flood conditions, as well as flood scenarios of various magnitudes (1 in 20-year, 1 in 100-year and 1 in 1000-year recurrence intervals), with both surface water and fluvial flood conditions considered. Flood restrictions were processed based on previous hydrodynamic inundation modelling undertaken and inputted into a Network Analysis framework as restrictions for surface water and fluvial flood events. Surface water flooding was shown to cause more disruption to emergency responders operating within the city due to its widespread and spatially distributed footprint when compared to fluvial flood events of comparable magnitude. Fire and rescue 10 min accessibility was shown to decrease from 100, 66.5, 39.8 and 26.2 % under the no-flood, 1 in 20-year, 1 in 100-year and 1 in 1000-year surface water flood scenarios respectively. Furthermore, total inaccessibility was shown to increase with flood magnitude from 6.0 % under the 1 in 20-year scenario to 31.0 % under the 1 in 100-year flood scenario. Additionally, the evolution of emergency service accessibility throughout a surface water flood event is outlined, demonstrating the rapid impact on emergency service accessibility within the first 15 min of the surface water flood event, with a reduction in service coverage and overlap being observed for the ambulance service during a 1 in 100-year flood event. The study provides evidence to guide strategic planning for decision makers prior to and during emergency response to flood events at the city

  16. CAMEO (Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations) Software Suite

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — CAMEO is the umbrella name for a system of software applications used widely to plan for and respond to chemical emergencies. All of the programs in the suite work...

  17. Task Analysis of Emergency Operating Procedures for Generating Quantitative HRA Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Kim, Seunghwan; Choi, Sun Yeong; Jung, Wondea; Jang, Inseok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the analysis results of the emergency task in the procedures (EOPs; emergency operating procedures) that can be observed from the simulator data are introduced. The task type, component type, system type, and additional information related with the performance of the operators were described. In addition, a prospective application of the analyzed information to HEP quantification process was discussed. In the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) field, various human reliability analyses (HRAs) have been performed to produce estimates of human error probabilities (HEPs) for significant tasks in complex socio-technical systems. To this end, Many HRA methods have provided basic or nominal HEPs for typical tasks and the quantitative relations describing how a certain performance context or performance shaping factors (PSFs) affects the HEPs. In the HRA community, however, the necessity of appropriate and sufficient human performance data has been recently indicated. This is because a wide range of quantitative estimates in the previous HRA methods are not supported by solid empirical bases. Hence, there have been attempts to collect HRA supporting data. For example, KAERI has started to collect information on both unsafe acts of operators and the relevant PSFs. A characteristic of the database that is being developed at KAERI is that human errors and related PSF surrogates that can be objectively observable are collected from full-scope simulator experiences. In this environment, to produce concretely grounded bases of the HEPs, the traits or attributes of tasks where significant human errors can be observed should be definitely determined. The determined traits should be applicable to compare the HEPs on the traits with the data in previous HRA methods or databases. In this study, task characteristics in a Westinghouse type of EOPs were analyzed with the defining task, component, and system taxonomies.

  18. Overview of JET post-mortem results following the 2007-9 operational period, and comparisons with previous campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coad, J. P.; Gruenhagen, S.; Hole, D. E.; Hakola, A.; Koivuranta, S.; Likonen, J.; Rubel, M.; Widdowson, A.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2011-12-01

    In 2010, all the plasma-facing components were removed from JET so that the carbon-based surfaces could be replaced with beryllium (Be) or tungsten as part of the ITER-like wall (ILW) project. This gives unprecedented opportunities for post-mortem analyses of these plasma-facing surfaces; this paper reviews the data obtained so far and relates the information to studies of tiles removed during previous JET shutdowns. The general pattern of erosion/deposition at the JET divertor has been maintained, with deposition of impurities in the scrape-off layer (SOL) at the inner divertor and preferential removal of carbon and transport into the corner. However, the remaining films in the SOL contain very high Be/C ratios at the surface. The first measurements of erosion using a tile profiler have been completed, with up to 200 microns erosion being recorded at points on the inner wall guard limiters.

  19. Emergency Operations for Bleeding Duodenal Ulcer:A simple option ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emergency surgery was performed. Over sewing (OS) of the ulcer was done and the stenosed first part of duodenum was closed transversely (pyloroplasty). No acid-reducing procedure (ARP) was done. The patient received anti- helicobacter therapy via the intravenous route preoperatively and continued postoperatively.

  20. 47 CFR 2.405 - Operation during emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL... communication facilities are disrupted as a result of hurricane, flood, earthquake, or similar disaster, utilize... emergency transmission on frequencies other than, or with power in excess of, that specified in the...

  1. Role Of Public Transportation Operations In Emergency Management: Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    This project examines the possible roles that public transit agencies can fulfill in the emergency management plans of their cities and/or counties. This report summarizes the first two phases of the project, which incorporate a review of available l...

  2. Post-operative morbidity in elective versus emergency caesarean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja in Nigeria Population : Women who underwent either elective or emergency caesarean sections at the hospital during the designated study period. Main Outcome measures: Wound infection.

  3. L-025: EPR-First Responders: Resource Coordinator and National Center for Emergency Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This conference cover the importance of resource coordinator and the national Center for Emergency Operations which provides a stable environment installation and a valuable aid in the radiological emergency situation.The resources coordinator maintains the registers and resources located in general as well as the National Center for Emergency Operations is the ideal place for the public information Center. Both roles provide support and encourage the efforts to respond to the incident Command

  4. Coordinated protection of the population in emergencies in Switzerland: The National Emergency Operations Centre (NAZ) and the Emergency Organisation Radioactivity (EOR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    As consequence of the nuclear weapons tests Switzerland has since 30 years expert commissions, concepts, monitoring networks, monitoring and emergency teams for the protection of the population following radiological accidents of all types inside or outside the country. Thus Chernobyl hit a prepared country - except information. The Radiological Emergency Organisation (EOR) and its National Emergency Operations Centre (NAZ) have up-to-date legal bases, concepts and operational means. Besides radiological events, NAZ deals also with chemical accidents, satellite, satellite crashes and dam breaks. Unique is the coordinated use of the combined means of civil authorities, civil defense and army in all strategic cases. (author)

  5. The optimization of nuclear power plants operation modes in emergency situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagrebayev, A. M.; Trifonenkov, A. V.; Ramazanov, R. N.

    2018-01-01

    An emergency situations resulting in the necessity for temporary reactor trip may occur at the nuclear power plant while normal operating mode. The paper deals with some of the operation c aspects of nuclear power plant operation in emergency situations and during threatened period. The xenon poisoning causes limitations on the variety of statements of the problem of calculating characteristics of a set of optimal reactor power off controls. The article show a possibility and feasibility of new sets of optimization tasks for the operation of nuclear power plants under conditions of xenon poisoning in emergency circumstances.

  6. Evaluation of emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants. Final report Feb 80-Mar 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, F.; Engelschall, J.; Imlay, G.

    1981-04-01

    The report documents the first of two tasks performed for the NRC relative to emergency operating procedures for nuclear power plants with special emphasis on LOCA procedures. Emergency procedures from nine plants have been evaluated. The recommendations regarding each plant's emergency procedures were made in separate reports. In this report, an analysis is made of problems common to emergency procedures in all nine plants. Recommendations are advanced for improvement in presentation style, level of detail, and administrative control

  7. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  8. The Challenge of New and Emerging Information Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heath, James E; Woodcock, Alexander E

    1999-01-01

    Information operations as defined in Joint Publication 3-13 of the Joint Staff (1998) are aimed at influencing the information and information systems of an adversary and defending one's own information and information systems...

  9. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Blankush, Joseph M.; Leitman, I. Michael; Soleiman, Aron; Tran, Trung

    2016-01-01

    Background: A chronic state of impaired glucose metabolism affects multiple components of the immune system, possibly leading to an increased incidence of post-operative infections. Such infections increase morbidity, length of stay, and overall cost. This study evaluates the correlation between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and post-operative infections. Study design: Adult patients undergoing non-emergent procedures across all surgical subspecialties from January...

  10. The design of Advanced Generation of event-base Emergency Operating Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Yuji; Hollnagel, E.

    2000-01-01

    The system that can convert from the knowledge model (called semantic model) of operators in nuclear power plants to the intermediate database for the computerised presentation for emergency operating procedure is designed. This system is called Advanced Generation of Emergency Operating Procedure (AGEOP). The primary AGEOP system has been installed. In principle, once users specify a goal to be attained, then the system searches all paths of tasks to the specified goal. It converts the syntactical model automatically. Furthermore, considering the maintenance of emergency operating procedures that is the main purpose of developing of the system, the principle design of the Integrated Computerised Procedure Presentation (ICPP) system has been also implemented that consists of five utilities and the kernel; it means the KERNEL function of advanced generation of emergency operating procedure. The ICPP system works of highly advanced EOP maintenance. (author)

  11. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Air Traffic Control System Emergency Operation Federal Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 60 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Pt. 91, SFAR No. 60...

  12. Operational Art and the Commander’s Emergency Response Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-08

    faced with [a] lack of results, to do more of the same.” 54 Social psychologist Kurt Lewin provides a three-stage model for planned change . 55 The...Chiefs of Staff, Joint Operations, final coordination, Joint Publication (JP) 3-0 (Washington, DC: CJCS, 17 September 2006 incorporating Change 1...clear objectives, and measures of effectiveness. Measures of effectiveness should be “used to assess changes in system behavior, capability, or

  13. Emergency response mobile robot for operations in combustible atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Henry W. (Inventor); Ohm, Timothy R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A mobile, self-powered, self-contained, and remote-controlled robot is presented. The robot is capable of safely operating in a combustible atmosphere and providing information about the atmosphere to the operator. The robot includes non-sparking and non-arcing electro-mechanical and electronic components designed to prevent the robot from igniting the combustible atmosphere. The robot also includes positively pressurized enclosures that house the electromechanical and electronic components of the robot and prevent intrusion of the combustible atmosphere into the enclosures. The enclosures are interconnected such that a pressurized gas injected into any one of the enclosures is routed to all the other enclosures through the interconnections. It is preferred that one or more sealed internal channels through structures intervening between the enclosures be employed. Pressure transducers for detecting if the pressure within the enclosures falls below a predetermined level are included. The robot also has a sensing device for determining the types of combustible substances in the surrounding atmosphere, as well as the concentrations of each type of substance relative to a pre-determined lower explosive limit (LEL). In addition, the sensing device can determine the percent level of oxygen present in the surrounding atmosphere.

  14. Manpower development for safe operation of nuclear power plant. China. Emergency operating procedures. Activity: 5.1.4-Task-11. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    This report covers the period of engagement from July 11, 1994 through July 22, 1994. The events and topics of discussion are as follows: History of Emergency Operating Procedure EOP Development; Emergency Operating Procedures (Event Based, Critical Safe Function Status Trees and Functional Recovery Response Procedures); Transition from Emergency Operating Procedures to Severe Accident Management Guidelines

  15. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  16. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  17. Optimization Methods to Minimize Emergence Time While Maintaining Adequate Post-Operative Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Tams, Carl; Syroid, Noah; Johnson, Ken B.; Egan, Talmage D.; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    A rapid emergence from anesthesia combined with an extended duration of adequate analgesia is desired. Difficulties arise when trying to achieve a rapid emergence and provide adequate analgesia for procedures associated with moderate post operative pain. We propose to use pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models with optimization techniques to determine anesthetic drugs ratios to improve post-anesthetic outcomes of emergence and analgesia. We hypothesize that optimized propofol, r...

  18. A Mobile Robot for Emergency Operation of Fuel Exchange Machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yongchil; Lee, Sunguk; Kim, Changhoi; Shin, Hochul; Jung, Seungho; Choi, Changhwan

    2007-01-01

    A Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) uses a heavy water as the coolant and moderator because it does not attenuate the neutron inside the reactor, which makes it possible to use natural uranium for nuclear fuels. However, since the uranium ratio is too low within the natural uranium, the reactor should be refueled everyday while the reactor is working. For that purpose, there is a fuel exchange machine. However as the time passes by, the durability and reliability become a problem. While the fuel handling machine exchanges the reactor fuel, it can be stuck to the pressure tube attached in the Calandra. Although this kind of situation is rarely happen, it can make the reactor be shutdown for normalizing the operation. Since the refueling is performed while the reactor is working, the radiation level is extremely high and the machine can be located at a high position up to nine meters from the floor, that is, the human worker can not approach the machine, so the fuel handling machine should be released remotely. To cope with this situation, the fuel handling machine has a manual drive mechanism at the rear side of it as shown in the circled images. If the worker can handle these manual drive mechanisms, the fuel handling machine can be released form the pressure tube. The KAERI had developed a long-reach manipulator system with a telescophic mast mechanism which can be deployed in the basement of the reactor room and manipulate the manual lever of the fuel exchange machine. Since the manipulator is located in the basement, there are several problems for its application such that the plug hole should be removed before the operation and the vibration of the mast mechanism make it difficult to locate the end effecter of the manipulator

  19. Preparedness of the operating organization (licensee) for emergencies at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Guide outlines the principal elements in devising and implementing emergency plans so that actions to be taken in accordance with the plans ensure an orderly and timely decision-making process and the availability of essential personnel, equipment, supplies and services. Principal elements included in the Guide are: (1) An outline for the basis and content of emergency planning, and the activities to be covered; (2) The responsibilities and arrangements of the operating organization (licensee) in establishing and implementing the Operating Organization Emergency Plan; (3) The liaison between the operating organization (licensee), the regulatory body, and public authorities in relation to the Operating Organization Emergency Plan; (4) Detailed measures to protect persons on-site, and guidance with respect to protection of the public off-site; (5) Facilities and equipment to cope with the emergency situation; (6) Aspects relevant to maintaining the plan and the organization in operational readiness. Although this Guide does not consider emergencies related to the off-site transportation of radioactive materials or new or irradiated fuel, many of its recommendations may be useful in planning how to cope with such emergencies

  20. Civil Defense, U. S. A.: A Programmed Orientation to Civil Defense. Unit 4. Warning, Emergency Operations, and Support Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Battle Creek, MI.

    The need for, and a description of, emergency functions required to save lives and protect property in nuclear or natural disasters are presented. Topics discussed include: (1) The Civil Defense Warning System, (2) Introduction to the Emergency Operations Program, (3) Five subprograms of the Emergency Operations Program, (4) Emergency Operations…

  1. Regional long-term co-operation in the field of nuclear and radiation emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladek, V.; Metke, E.; Janko, K.; Hohenberg, J. K.; Hofer, P.

    2004-01-01

    Emergency preparedness is generally covered by methodical and coordinative activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Member States of the IAEA and by the European Commission (EC) in EU Member and EU Accession Countries. However, the regional harmonisation of emergency arrangements is an important trend of emergency preparedness. The present paper gives a couple of illustrative examples for a regional co-operation in the field of emergency preparedness in Central Europe and an overview on international exercises in this region. The penultimate section contains an outlook on future activities regarding regional co-operation in Central Europe. The following topics have been suggested inter alia: the harmonisation of intervention criteria and countermeasures, co-ordination in the field of information of the public, comprehensive bi lateral and multilateral exercises, exchange of experts between the national nuclear emergency centres and inter-comparison calculations of the computer codes. (authors)

  2. 10 CFR 50.103 - Suspension and operation in war or national emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Suspension and operation in war or national emergency. 50.103 Section 50.103 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND... into any plant or facility in order to recapture special nuclear material or to operate the facility...

  3. 49 CFR 195.402 - Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies. 195.402 Section 195.402 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance § 195.402 Procedural...

  4. Techniques for preparing flowchart-format emergency operating procedures: Background (Sections 1.0-9.0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, V.E.; Moore, C.J.; Wieringa, D.R.; Isakson, C.S.; Kono, B.K.; Gruel, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    This two-volume report describes the activities, findings, and recommendations of a project entitled ''Techniques for Presenting Flowchart-Format Emergency Operating Procedures.'' The project team surveyed the literature pertaining to flowcharts, reviewed existing flowchart emergency operating procedures (EOPs), interviewed consultants who produced flowcharts, and interviewed reactor operator licensing examiners about the use of flowcharts in nuclear power plants. This document, and Volume 1 of this report, discusses the use of flowchart-format EOPs in nuclear power plants and presents issue to be addressed in the design and implementation of flowchart EOPs. 66 refs., 76 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankush, Joseph M; Leitman, I Michael; Soleiman, Aron; Tran, Trung

    2016-09-01

    A chronic state of impaired glucose metabolism affects multiple components of the immune system, possibly leading to an increased incidence of post-operative infections. Such infections increase morbidity, length of stay, and overall cost. This study evaluates the correlation between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and post-operative infections. Adult patients undergoing non-emergent procedures across all surgical subspecialties from January 2010 to July 2014 had a preoperative HbA1c measured as part of their routine pre-surgical assessment. 2200 patient charts (1100 operative infection (superficial surgical site infection, deep wound/surgical space abscess, pneumonia, and/or urinary tract infection as defined by Centers for Disease Control criteria) within 30 days of surgery. Patients with HbA1c infection rate (3.8% in the HbA1c infection. Elevated HbA1c was, however, predictive of significantly increased risk of post-operative infection when associated with increased age (≥81 years of age) or dirty wounds. The risk factors of post-operative infection are multiple and likely synergistic. While pre-operative HbA1c level is not independently associated with risk of post-operative infection, there are scenarios and patient subgroups where pre-operative HbA1c is useful in predicting an increased risk of infectious complications in the post-operative period.

  6. Real-Time Traffic Information for Emergency Evacuation Operations: Phase A Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Zhang, Li [Mississippi State University (MSU); Mahmoud, Anas M. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Wen, Yi [Mississippi State University (MSU)

    2010-05-01

    There are many instances in which it is possible to plan ahead for an emergency evacuation (e.g., an explosion at a chemical processing facility). For those cases, if an accident (or an attack) were to happen, then the best evacuation plan for the prevailing network and weather conditions would be deployed. In other cases (e.g., the derailment of a train transporting hazardous materials), there may not be any previously developed plan to be implemented and decisions must be made ad-hoc on how to proceed with an emergency evacuation. In both situations, the availability of real-time traffic information plays a critical role in the management of the evacuation operations. To improve public safety during a vehicular emergency evacuation it is necessary to detect losses of road capacity (due to incidents, for example) as early as possible. Once these bottlenecks are identified, re-routing strategies must be determined in real-time and deployed in the field to help dissipate the congestion and increase the efficiency of the evacuation. Due to cost constraints, only large urban areas have traffic sensor deployments that permit access to some sort of real-time traffic information; any evacuation taking place in any other areas of the country would have to proceed without real-time traffic information. The latter was the focus of this SERRI/DHS (Southeast Region Research Initiative/Department of Homeland Security) sponsored project. That is, the main objective on the project was to improve the operations during a vehicular emergency evacuation anywhere by using newly developed real-time traffic-information-gathering technologies to assess traffic conditions and therefore to potentially detect incidents on the main evacuation routes. Phase A of the project consisted in the development and testing of a prototype system composed of sensors that are engineered in such a way that they can be rapidly deployed in the field where and when they are needed. Each one of these sensors

  7. Ubiquitous robust communications for emergency response using multi-operator heterogeneous networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verikoukis Christos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A number of disasters in various places of the planet have caused an extensive loss of lives, severe damages to properties and the environment, as well as a tremendous shock to the survivors. For relief and mitigation operations, emergency responders are immediately dispatched to the disaster areas. Ubiquitous and robust communications during the emergency response operations are of paramount importance. Nevertheless, various reports have highlighted that after many devastating events, the current technologies used, failed to support the mission critical communications, resulting in further loss of lives. Inefficiencies of the current communications used for emergency response include lack of technology inter-operability between different jurisdictions, and high vulnerability due to their centralized infrastructure. In this article, we propose a flexible network architecture that provides a common networking platform for heterogeneous multi-operator networks, for interoperation in case of emergencies. A wireless mesh network is the main part of the proposed architecture and this provides a back-up network in case of emergencies. We first describe the shortcomings and limitations of the current technologies, and then we address issues related to the applications and functionalities a future emergency response network should support. Furthermore, we describe the necessary requirements for a flexible, secure, robust, and QoS-aware emergency response multi-operator architecture, and then we suggest several schemes that can be adopted by our proposed architecture to meet those requirements. In addition, we suggest several methods for the re-tasking of communication means owned by independent individuals to provide support during emergencies. In order to investigate the feasibility of multimedia transmission over a wireless mesh network, we measured the performance of a video streaming application in a real wireless metropolitan multi

  8. The safety and prognostic factors for mortality in extremely elderly patients undergoing an emergency operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Young; Chung, Jae Sik; Kim, Sung Hoon; Kim, Young Wan; Ryu, Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-02-01

    As the number of elderly people has increased, the number of elderly patients who need emergency operations has also increased. Although there are many models to evaluate the risk of surgery in elderly patients, they all are associated with limitations. We herein evaluated the prognostic factors for surgical mortality in elderly patients more than 80 years old who needed emergency operations. A total of 171 patients more than 80 years old underwent emergency operations from January 2001 to December 2012. Among them, 79 patients with acute cholecystitis, panperitonitis and intestinal obstruction with strangulation, which included mortality cases, were included. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of the patients and analyzed the prognostic factors for surgical mortality. Forty-eight patients had a co-morbidity. Thirty-one patients initially had systemic inflammatory response syndrome. There were 27 surgical mortality cases. A univariate analysis revealed that panperitonitis, a positive blood culture and the level of albumin were significant prognostic factors predicting a worse prognosis. However, a multivariate analysis revealed that a serum albumin level more than 3.5 g/dL was the only significant prognostic factor (p = 0.037). Surgeons cannot fully evaluate the risk of emergency operation cases. However, our data indicate that if patients do not show hypoalbuminemia, the surgeon may be able to perform an emergency operation without a high risk of surgical mortality.

  9. Duration and predictors of emergency surgical operations - basis for medical management of mass casualty incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber-Wagner S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitals have a critically important role in the management of mass causality incidents (MCI, yet there is little information to assist emergency planners. A significantly limiting factor of a hospital's capability to treat those affected is its surgical capacity. We therefore intended to provide data about the duration and predictors of life saving operations. Methods The data of 20,815 predominantly blunt trauma patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German-Trauma-Society was retrospectively analyzed to calculate the duration of life-saving operations as well as their predictors. Inclusion criteria were an ISS ≥ 16 and the performance of relevant ICPM-coded procedures within 6 h of admission. Results From 1,228 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria 1,793 operations could be identified as life-saving operations. Acute injuries to the abdomen accounted for 54.1% followed by head injuries (26.3%, pelvic injuries (11.5%, thoracic injuries (5.0% and major amputations (3.1%. The mean cut to suture time was 130 min (IQR 65-165 min. Logistic regression revealed 8 variables associated with an emergency operation: AIS of abdomen ≥ 3 (OR 4,00, ISS ≥ 35 (OR 2,94, hemoglobin level ≤ 8 mg/dL (OR 1,40, pulse rate on hospital admission 120/min (OR 1,39, blood pressure on hospital admission Conclusions The mean operation time of 130 min calculated for emergency life-saving surgical operations provides a realistic guideline for the prospective treatment capacity which can be estimated and projected into an actual incident admission capacity. Knowledge of predictive factors for life-saving emergency operations helps to identify those patients that need most urgent operative treatment in case of blunt MCI.

  10. Consensus statement on advancing research in emergency department operations and its impact on patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Ward, Michael J; Chang, Anna Marie; Pines, Jesse M; Jouriles, Nick; Yealy, Donald M

    2015-06-01

    The consensus conference on "Advancing Research in Emergency Department (ED) Operations and Its Impact on Patient Care," hosted by The ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), convened to craft a framework for future investigations in this important but understudied area. The EDOSG is a research consortium dedicated to promoting evidence-based clinical practice in emergency medicine. The consensus process format was a modified version of the NIH Model for Consensus Conference Development. Recommendations provide an action plan for how to improve ED operations study design, create a facilitating research environment, identify data measures of value for process and outcomes research, and disseminate new knowledge in this area. Specifically, we call for eight key initiatives: 1) the development of universal measures for ED patient care processes; 2) attention to patient outcomes, in addition to process efficiency and best practice compliance; 3) the promotion of multisite clinical operations studies to create more generalizable knowledge; 4) encouraging the use of mixed methods to understand the social community and human behavior factors that influence ED operations; 5) the creation of robust ED operations research registries to drive stronger evidence-based research; 6) prioritizing key clinical questions with the input of patients, clinicians, medical leadership, emergency medicine organizations, payers, and other government stakeholders; 7) more consistently defining the functional components of the ED care system, including observation units, fast tracks, waiting rooms, laboratories, and radiology subunits; and 8) maximizing multidisciplinary knowledge dissemination via emergency medicine, public health, general medicine, operations research, and nontraditional publications. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. International Variation in Emergency Operation Rates for Acute Diverticulitis: Insights into Healthcare Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Michael K Y; Skandarajah, Anita R; Higgins, Rose D; Faiz, Omar D; Hayes, Ian P

    2017-08-01

    International comparison of outcomes of surgical diseases has become a global focus because of widespread concern over surgical quality, rising costs and the value of healthcare. Acute diverticulitis is a common disease potentially amenable to optimization of strategies for operative intervention. The aim was to compare the emergency operative intervention rates for acute diverticulitis in USA, England and Australia. Unplanned admissions for acute diverticulitis were found from an international administrative dataset between 2008 and 2014 for hospitals in USA, England and Australia. The primary outcome measured was emergency operative intervention rate. Secondary outcomes included inpatient mortality and percutaneous drainage rate. Multivariable analysis was performed after development of a weighted comorbidity scoring system. There were 15,150 unplanned admissions for acute diverticulitis. The emergency operative intervention rates were 16, 13 and 10% for USA, England and Australia. The percutaneous drainage rate was highest in USA at 10%, while the mortality rate was highest in England at 2.8%. The propensity for emergency operative intervention was higher in USA (OR 1.45, p diverticulitis. International variations raise the issue of healthcare value in terms of differing resource use and outcomes.

  12. An empirical investigation of operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.M.; Mumaw, R.J.; Lewis, P.M.

    1994-07-01

    This report documents the results of an empirical study of nuclear power plant operator performance in cognitively demanding simulated emergencies. During emergencies operators follow highly prescriptive written procedures. The objectives of the study were to understand and document what role higher-level cognitive activities such as diagnosis, or more generally 'situation assessment', play in guiding operator performance, given that operators utilize procedures in responding to the events. The study examined crew performance in variants of two emergencies: (1) an Interfacing System Loss of Coolant Accident and (2) a Loss of Heat Sink scenario. Data on operator performance were collected using training simulators at two plant sites. Up to 11 crews from each plant participated in each of two simulated emergencies for a total of 38 cases. Crew performance was videotaped and partial transcripts were produced and analyzed. The results revealed a number of instances where higher-level cognitive activities such as situation assessment and response planning enabled crews to handle aspects of the situation that were not fully addressed by the procedures. This report documents these cases and discusses their implications for the development and evaluation of training and control room aids, as well as for human reliability analyses

  13. Enhanced Engine Performance During Emergency Operation Using a Model-Based Engine Control Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; Connolly, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the design and application of model-based engine control (MBEC) for use during emergency operation of the aircraft. The MBEC methodology is applied to the Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation 40k (CMAPSS40k) and features an optimal tuner Kalman Filter (OTKF) to estimate unmeasured engine parameters, which can then be used for control. During an emergency scenario, normally-conservative engine operating limits may be relaxed to increase the performance of the engine and overall survivability of the aircraft; this comes at the cost of additional risk of an engine failure. The MBEC architecture offers the advantage of estimating key engine parameters that are not directly measureable. Estimating the unknown parameters allows for tighter control over these parameters, and on the level of risk the engine will operate at. This will allow the engine to achieve better performance than possible when operating to more conservative limits on a related, measurable parameter.

  14. Secure, Autonomous, Intelligent Controller for Integrating Distributed Emergency Response Satellite Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip E.; Miller, Eric M.; Sage, Steen P.

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a Secure, Autonomous, and Intelligent Controller for Integrating Distributed Emergency Response Satellite Operations. It includes a description of current improvements to existing Virtual Mission Operations Center technology being used by US Department of Defense and originally developed under NASA funding. The report also highlights a technology demonstration performed in partnership with the United States Geological Service for Earth Resources Observation and Science using DigitalGlobe(Registered TradeMark) satellites to obtain space-based sensor data.

  15. Magnitude of non-operative surgical emergency admissions; service implications for surgical and radiological practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, R M; Reynolds, I; Ryan, R S; Khan, I; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2017-02-01

    Financial sustainability is an area of sharp ongoing focus across the broad spectrum of the Irish Health Service. Recent attention has been drawn to the financial implications of non-operative surgical admissions, suggesting that some of these may be unnecessary. In this study, we aim to determine the volume of emergency surgical admissions to Mayo University Hospital (MUH), in particular, to identify the scale of non-operative admissions and to assess the wider inherent implications for acute hospital services. An electronic handover system for emergency surgical admissions was introduced in MUH in September 2014. All surgical admissions from September 1st 2014 to August 31st 2015 were identified from this prospectively maintained database. HIPE (Hospital Inpatient Enquiry) data were not used in this study. Theatre logbooks confirmed those patients who required operative intervention. 1466 patients were admitted as emergencies during the study period. 58 % (850) were male and median age was 48 years (0-100). Average length of stay was 5 days (range 1-125). 327 patients (22.3 %) required operative intervention. The most commonly performed procedure was appendicectomy (52.5 %). 48 (3.3 %) patients were transferred to other hospitals. 131 (8.9 %) admissions related to the acute urological conditions. Of the 1466 admissions, 546 underwent a CT scan, while 342 patients proceeded to ultrasound. Almost 80 % of all surgical emergency admissions were discharged without undergoing a formal operative procedure while generating a significant workload for the radiology department. Changes in working practices and hospital network structures will be required to reduce the burden of non-operative emergency admissions.

  16. HUG sets up an emergency operations centre on the CERN site

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    Discussions between CERN and the Hôpitaux universitaires de Genève (HUG), under the aegis of the Swiss authorities, have resulted in the setting-up of an emergency operations centre on the CERN site. This will be the operations base for an emergency doctor, a medical emergency vehicle and a driver. Located on the Swiss part of the Meyrin site, close to Building 57, it will be inaugurated on 20 May.   SMUR team based at CERN. CERN’s medical staff and fire-fighters dispense first aid but in medical emergencies they are obliged to call on outside services to treat and transfer patients to hospital. In the Canton of Geneva, this service is provided by HUG via the 144 emergency line. But HUG is based on the eastern side of Geneva, a long way from CERN, and response times can be substantial. In order to improve the safety of the growing number of people on the site, CERN asked Switzerland, as one of its Host States, to help it reduce the medical emergency response t...

  17. Operational and market risk disclosure by banks a comparison of developed and emerging economies

    OpenAIRE

    Goyal, Abhinav Kant; Wu, Jiajing

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we study the level of the Operational Risk and the Market Risk Management disclosure for a sample of ninety-one commercial banks across the globe and have divided them into developed and emerging economies. To measure the level of Risk Manag

  18. [Anesthetic management for an emergency operation in a patient with von Gierke disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takeru

    2005-08-01

    A 45-year-old patient with von Gierke disease was scheduled for emergency operation due to acute appenditis. He had a significant hepatomegaly and was on oral medication for hyperlipemia and hyperlithuria. General anesthesia was induced with thiopental and suxamethonium, and maintained with nitrous oxide, oxygen, sevoflurane and vecuronium. The perioperative course was uneventful, although the patient revealed mild metabolic acidosis.

  19. [Proposing a physiological model for Emergency Department. Operating principles, classification of overcrowding and guidelines for redesign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Carranza, M; Aguado Correa, F; Padilla Garrido, N; López Camacho, F

    2017-04-30

    The operation of Emergency Departments (ED) is determined by demand, their own organizational structures and the connection to other medical care levels. When these elements are not simultaneous, it hinders patient flow and decreases capacity, making it necessary to employ a systemic approach to the chain of emergency care as a single operational entity. With this theoretical orientation, we suggest a conceptual model similar to the physiological cardiac output, in which the preload is the demand, the contractile or flow pump is the organizational structure, the afterload is the hospital, the pre-ED valve is primary care and outpatient emergencies, and the post-ED valve is the diagnostic support services and the specialist consultants. Based on this theoretical approach we classify the different types of ED overcrowding and systematise its causes and the different waiting lists that it generates, which can help to redesign the service and avoid its saturation.

  20. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries - Volume 1: Concepts and Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner to allow evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key nonmanufacturing sectors. This volume lays out the general concepts and methods used to develop the emergency operating estimates. The historical analysis of capacity extends from 1974 through 1986. Some nonmanufacturing industries are included. In addition to mining and utilities, key industries in transportation, communication, and services were analyzed. Physical capacity and efficiency of production were measured. 3 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs. (JF)

  1. Fact or fiction: updates on how protein-coding genes might emerge de novo from previously non-coding DNA [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan F Schmitz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, there has been an increasing amount of evidence for the de novo emergence of protein-coding genes, i.e. out of non-coding DNA. Here, we review the current literature and summarize the state of the field. We focus specifically on open questions and challenges in the study of de novo protein-coding genes such as the identification and verification of de novo-emerged genes. The greatest obstacle to date is the lack of high-quality genomic data with very short divergence times which could help precisely pin down the location of origin of a de novo gene. We conclude that, while there is plenty of evidence from a genetics perspective, there is a lack of functional studies of bona fide de novo genes and almost no knowledge about protein structures and how they come about during the emergence of de novo protein-coding genes. We suggest that future studies should concentrate on the functional and structural characterization of de novo protein-coding genes as well as the detailed study of the emergence of functional de novo protein-coding genes.

  2. Process improvement of the emergency operating procedures for Embalse Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, A.D.; Pomerantz, M.; Moreno, C., E-mail: dmariotti@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: mpomerantz@na-sa.com.ar, E-mail: cmoreno@na-sa.com.ar [Embalse Nuclear Power Plant, Nuclear Safety Dept., Embalse (Argentina)

    2014-07-01

    Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP) package of the Embalse Nuclear Power Plant (CNE) were made entirely by the plant staff since the beginning of its operation. With the emergence of Severe Accidents Guidelines (SAMG) and the latest events related to Fukushima, the EOP philosophy should include a new concept. It should consider that the EOP may be unsuccessful and an exit to the SAMG must be necessary. However, due to abnormal event mitigation using EOP is the way to prevent the beginning of a severe accident, EOP always had significant relevance in the plant documentation. For this reason, added to the overall requirement of an exit to the SAMG, it emerges a general review of the use efficiency of the EOP during an abnormal event. For this reason, a comprehensive process improvement has emerged using the operating experience, full-scope simulator training of the control room staff, advances in technology and the arrival of new generations. In this work, fundamental changes, new document format and ergonomic redesign for validation at full-scope simulator and use at main control room of new EOP for CNE are presented. (author)

  3. Preliminary study of the pilot's workload during emergency procedures in helicopters air operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Flávio G V; Ribeiro, Selma L O

    2012-01-01

    Military air operations and law enforcement operations in helicopters are examples of activities that require high performance of the operator. This article aimed at presenting a preliminary analysis of data obtained in the initial study in order to validate the instruments and the research protocol that focuses on the analysis of the workload imposed on helicopter pilots in emergency situations. The research was conducted in an environment of real flight training and used the NASA-TLX Scale to assess the workload and an interview guide to obtain reports on the main tasks performed. Preliminary data obtained is related to the participation of 10 (ten) volunteer pilots with experience in different types of helicopters. Four scenarios involving helicopter emergency procedures of HB-350 "Squirrel" were outlined. For this article, the analysis used only the data regarding the Physical and Mental Demands of the NASA-TLX Scale. Preliminarily, the results indicate that the "time pressure" as a factor contributing to increase mental requirement in emergency situations in flight, and that this increase was reflected in the request of mental processes such as: identification of the breakdown, attention and monitoring parameters. Future steps include extending the sample and adding physiological tools to better understand the effects of these types of emergencies on pilot performance and flight safety.

  4. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in US manufacturing and nonmanufacturing industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Serot, D.E. (D/E/S Research, Richland, WA (USA)); Kellogg, M.A. (ERCE, Inc., Portland, OR (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Development of integrated mobilization preparedness policies requires planning estimates of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. Such estimates must be developed in a manner that allows evaluation of current trends in capacity and the consideration of uncertainties in various data inputs and in engineering assumptions. This study, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), developed estimates of emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 446 manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level of aggregation and for 24 key non-manufacturing sectors. This volume presents tabular and graphical results of the historical analysis and projections for each SIC industry. (JF)

  5. Emergency Load Shedding Strategy Based on Sensitivity Analysis of Relay Operation Margin against Cascading Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhou; Chen, Zhe; Sun, Haishun Sun

    2012-01-01

    In order to prevent long term voltage instability and induced cascading events, a load shedding strategy based on the sensitivity of relay operation margin to load powers is discussed and proposed in this paper. The operation margin of critical impedance backup relay is defined to identify the ru...... into account to compensate load shedding amount calculation. And the multi-agent technology is applied for the whole strategy implementation. A test system is built in real time digital simulator (RTDS) and has demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.......In order to prevent long term voltage instability and induced cascading events, a load shedding strategy based on the sensitivity of relay operation margin to load powers is discussed and proposed in this paper. The operation margin of critical impedance backup relay is defined to identify...... the runtime emergent states of related system component. Based on sensitivity analysis between the relay operation margin and power system state variables, an optimal load shedding strategy is applied to adjust the emergent states timely before the unwanted relay operation. Load dynamics is also taken...

  6. Enabling Advanced Automation in Spacecraft Operations with the Spacecraft Emergency Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed, Julie; Fox, Jeffrey A.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    True autonomy is the Holy Grail of spacecraft mission operations. The goal of launching a satellite and letting it manage itself throughout its useful life is a worthy one. With true autonomy, the cost of mission operations would be reduced to a negligible amount. Under full autonomy, any problems (no matter the severity or type) that may arise with the spacecraft would be handled without any human intervention via some combination of smart sensors, on-board intelligence, and/or smart automated ground system. Until the day that complete autonomy is practical and affordable to deploy, incremental steps of deploying ever-increasing levels of automation (computerization of once manual tasks) on the ground and on the spacecraft are gradually decreasing the cost of mission operations. For example, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) has been flying spacecraft with low cost operations for several years. NASA-GSFC's SMEX (Small Explorer) and MIDEX (Middle Explorer) missions have effectively deployed significant amounts of automation to enable the missions to fly predominately in 'light-out' mode. Under light-out operations the ground system is run without human intervention. Various tools perform many of the tasks previously performed by the human operators. One of the major issues in reducing human staff in favor of automation is the perceived increased in risk of losing data, or even losing a spacecraft, because of anomalous conditions that may occur when there is no one in the control center. When things go wrong, missions deploying advanced automation need to be sure that anomalous conditions are detected and that key personal are notified in a timely manner so that on-call team members can react to those conditions. To ensure the health and safety of its lights-out missions, NASA-GSFC's Advanced Automation and Autonomy branch (Code 588) developed the Spacecraft Emergency Response System (SERS). The SERS is a Web-based collaborative environment that enables

  7. Effects of soft control in the nuclear power plants emergency operation condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Harbi, Mohamed Ali Salem; Kim, Ar Ryum; Jang, Inseok; Seong, Poong Hyun; Shirouzu, Shigenori; Katayama, Sotetsu; Kang, Hyun Gook

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of touch screen, known as ESCM, which is a soft control, on emergency operation of nuclear plants. ► Experiments clearly show the occurrence of more human errors in ESCM task groups. ► Physiological measures (ECG, EEG, nose temperature) were analyzed. ► Higher stress levels were consistently observed in ESCM task groups. - Abstract: In addition to the evolution from buttons and switches to the computer-based consoles, the operator may interact with the plant via soft controls. Soft controls are input interfaces connected with control and display systems that are mediated by software, rather than by direct physical connections. However use of soft control may cause unknown difficulties of operation and provide new opportunities of human errors. This study is to investigate the effect of the new interface to human errors in the emergency operation. Based on the emergency operation procedure, the human error modes were identified by using systematic human error reduction and prediction approach. Experiments with 21 graduate students in main control room mockup in the nuclear engineering departments of universities in UAE and Korea were conducted to observe the operators’ behavior resulted from the use of new input interface (Emergency safety feature-component control system Soft Control Module, ESCM). Physiological parameters such as electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram and skin temperature were measured to assess the stress level of the subjects. The experimental results showed more human errors during ESCM tasks than non-ESCM tasks. The analysis of the physiological measurements also demonstrated that subjects were in high stress level during the ESCM tasks in comparison with non-ESCM tasks. It is notable that this study was performed with graduate students without consideration of their expertise levels. Different behaviors of the novice and the expert groups were also discussed

  8. Experience in the operation of the diesel engines of emergency generating sets at Fessenheim and Bugey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorey, J.

    1982-01-01

    The reliability parameters of the diesel engines in the emergency generating sets at Fessenheim and Bugey have been evaluated using informations assembled through the System for Collecting Reliability Data. The results thus obtained have been compared with those resulting from a previous theoretical study. Secondly, an examination of the incident report shows up certain difficulties in the evaluation of reliability that are specific to stand-by equipment [fr

  9. Education and Training of Emergency Medical Teams: Recommendations for a Global Operational Learning Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat Camacho, Nieves; Hughes, Amy; Burkle, Frederick M.; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Redmond, Anthony; Norton, Ian; von Schreeb, Johan

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of international emergency medical teams are deployed to assist disaster-affected populations worldwide. Since Haiti earthquake those teams have been criticised for ill adapted care, lack of preparedness in addition to not coordinating with the affected country healthcare system. The Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) initiative, as part of the Word Health Organization’s Global Health Emergency Workforce program, aims to address these shortcomings by improved EMT coordination, and mechanisms to ensure quality and accountability of national and international EMTs. An essential component to reach this goal is appropriate education and training. Multiple disaster education and training programs are available. However, most are centred on individuals’ professional development rather than on the EMTs operational performance. Moreover, no common overarching or standardised training frameworks exist. In this report, an expert panel review and discuss the current approaches to disaster education and training and propose a three-step operational learning framework that could be used for EMTs globally. The proposed framework includes the following steps: 1) ensure professional competence and license to practice, 2) support adaptation of technical and non-technical professional capacities into the low-resource and emergency context and 3) prepare for an effective team performance in the field. A combination of training methodologies is also recommended, including individual theory based education, immersive simulations and team training. Agreed curriculum and open access training materials for EMTs need to be further developed, ideally through collaborative efforts between WHO, operational EMT organizations, universities, professional bodies and training agencies.  Keywords: disasters; education; emergencies; global health; learning PMID:27917306

  10. Intra-operative maternal complications of emergency cesarean section done in advanced labor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisa, M.U.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emergency cesarean section done in advanced labor is a big challenge in obstetrics due to increased risk of intraoperative complications. In the last decade, a rapid increase in cesarean section done in advanced labor has been observed. Difficult deli-very of the fetal head during cesarean section carries a high risk of intraoperative complications like cervical and uterine tears, intra operative hemorrhage and trauma to the baby. Objectives: The purpose of this study is to find out the frequency and risk factors for intra-operative complications in emergency cesarean section done in advanced labor, so that appropriate management protocols can be planned to reduce these complications. Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: This prospective study was carried out in Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit - 2 of Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Services Hospital, Lahore; from 1st January 2007 to 31st December 2007. All patients undergoing emergency cesarean sections done on laboring mothers were included in the study. The sample was divided into two groups; emergency C-section done in advanced labor as the study group and emergency C-section in early labor as the control group. Data were collected regarding age, parity, booked or unbooked status, indications for cesarean section, level of competence of operating surgeon, intra-operative complications and the risk factors for these complications. Data were recorded on a structured proforma and compared between the two groups. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using computer programme SPSS Version 14 for windows applying student t-test for quantitative and chai square test for qualitative parameters. A p-value < 0.05 was used as statistically significant. Results: Out of 2064 total deliveries in the year 2007, 1290 (62.5%) were vaginal deliveries and 774 (37.5%) were C-Sections. Out of 774 C-Section, 174 (23%) were elective and 600 (77%) were emergency. Out of 600 emergency C

  11. Partnering to develop a talent pipeline for emerging health leaders in operations research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Alfred; Henshaw, Carly; Carter, Michael

    2017-05-01

    In initiating its first central office for Quality Improvement (QI), The Scarborough Hospital (TSH) sought to accelerate momentum towards achieving its "Quality and Sustainability" strategic priority by building internal capacity in the emerging QI specialty of operations research. The Scarborough Hospital reviewed existing models of talent management in conjunction with Lean and improvement philosophies. Through simple guiding principles and in collaboration with the University of Toronto's Centre for Healthcare Engineering, TSH developed a targeted approach to talent management for Operations Research (OR) in the Office of Innovation and Performance Improvement, reduced the time from staffing need to onboarding, accelerated the development of new staff in delivering QI and OR projects, and defined new structures and processes to retain and develop this group of new emerging health leaders.

  12. Development of Operational Safety Monitoring System and Emergency Preparedness Advisory System for CANDU Reactors (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ma Woong; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, Hyun Koon; Yoo, Kun Joong; Ryu, Yong Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Son, Han Seong; Song, Deok Yong [ENESYS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    As increase of operating nuclear power plants, an accident monitoring system is essential to ensure the operational safety of nuclear power plant. Thus, KINS has developed the Computerized Advisory System for a Radiological Emergency (CARE) system to monitor the operating status of nuclear power plant continuously. However, during the accidents or/and incidents some parameters could not be provided from the process computer of nuclear power plant to the CARE system due to limitation of To enhance the CARE system more effective for CANDU reactors, there is a need to provide complement the feature of the CARE in such a way to providing the operating parameters using to using safety analysis tool such as CANDU Integrated Safety Analysis System (CISAS) for CANDU reactors. In this study, to enhance the safety monitoring measurement two computerized systems such as a CANDU Operational Safety Monitoring System (COSMOS) and prototype of CANDU Emergency Preparedness Advisory System (CEPAS) are developed. This study introduces the two integrated safety monitoring system using the R and D products of the national mid- and long-term R and D such as CISAS and ISSAC code.

  13. Development of Operational Safety Monitoring System and Emergency Preparedness Advisory System for CANDU Reactors (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ma Woong; Shin, Hyeong Ki; Lee, Sang Kyu; Kim, Hyun Koon; Yoo, Kun Joong; Ryu, Yong Ho; Son, Han Seong; Song, Deok Yong

    2007-01-01

    As increase of operating nuclear power plants, an accident monitoring system is essential to ensure the operational safety of nuclear power plant. Thus, KINS has developed the Computerized Advisory System for a Radiological Emergency (CARE) system to monitor the operating status of nuclear power plant continuously. However, during the accidents or/and incidents some parameters could not be provided from the process computer of nuclear power plant to the CARE system due to limitation of To enhance the CARE system more effective for CANDU reactors, there is a need to provide complement the feature of the CARE in such a way to providing the operating parameters using to using safety analysis tool such as CANDU Integrated Safety Analysis System (CISAS) for CANDU reactors. In this study, to enhance the safety monitoring measurement two computerized systems such as a CANDU Operational Safety Monitoring System (COSMOS) and prototype of CANDU Emergency Preparedness Advisory System (CEPAS) are developed. This study introduces the two integrated safety monitoring system using the R and D products of the national mid- and long-term R and D such as CISAS and ISSAC code

  14. Medical direction of wilderness and other operational emergency medical services programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Craig R; Millin, Michael G; Hawkins, Seth C; Bradley, Richard N

    2012-03-01

    Within a healthcare system, operational emergency medical services (EMS) programs provide prehospital emergency care to patients in austere and resource-limited settings. Some of these programs are additionally considered to be wilderness EMS programs, a specialized type of operational EMS program, as they primarily function in a wilderness setting (eg, wilderness search and rescue, ski patrols, water rescue, beach patrols, and cave rescue). Other operational EMS programs include urban search and rescue, air medical support, and tactical law enforcement response. The medical director will help to ensure that the care provided follows protocols that are in accordance with local and state prehospital standards, while accounting for the unique demands and needs of the environment. The operational EMS medical director should be as qualified as possible for the specific team that is being supervised. The medical director should train and operate with the team frequently to be effective. Adequate provision for compensation, liability, and equipment needs to be addressed for an optimal relationship between the medical director and the team. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Emergency diesel generating sets for the 900 MW PWR units operation and maintenance policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, A.; Lallier, M.

    1986-01-01

    In order to improve the reliability of the emergency diesel generating EDF has taken steps to ensure that: - sets are only started up when they are really needed, in order to reduce the thermal cycles and the mechanical stresses associated with start-up. - the maintenance policy is adapted to the conditions of use, by including the notion of a start-up being equivalent to a predetermined number of hours of operation. (authors)

  16. Exploring the psychological health of emergency dispatch centre operatives: a systematic review and narrative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Sarah E; Horsfield, Claire; Davies, Annette; Egan, Bernadette; Jones, Martyn; Raleigh, Mary; Schofield, Patricia; Squires, Allison; Start, Kath; Quinn, Tom; Cropley, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to investigate and synthesize available evidence relating to the psychological health of Emergency Dispatch Centre (EDC) operatives, and to identify key stressors experienced by EDC operatives. Eight electronic databases (Embase, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, The Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, and Google Scholar) were searched. All study designs were included, and no date limits were set. Studies were included if they were published in English, and explored the psychological health of any EDC operatives, across fire, police, and emergency medical services. Studies were excluded if they related solely to other emergency workers, such as police officers or paramedics. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using checklists adapted from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A narrative synthesis was conducted, using thematic analysis. A total of 16 articles were included in the review. Two overarching themes were identified during the narrative synthesis: 'Organisational and Operational Factors' and 'Interactions with Others'. Stressors identified included being exposed to traumatic calls, lacking control over high workload, and working in under-resourced and pressured environments. Lack of support from management and providing an emotionally demanding service were additional sources of stress. Peer support and social support from friends and family were helpful in managing work-related stress. EDC operatives experience stress as a result of their work, which appears to be related to negative psychological health outcomes. Future research should explore the long-term effects of this stress, and the potential for workplace interventions to alleviate the negative impacts on psychological health. CRD42014010806.

  17. Exploring the psychological health of emergency dispatch centre operatives: a systematic review and narrative synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Golding

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background The study objective was to investigate and synthesize available evidence relating to the psychological health of Emergency Dispatch Centre (EDC operatives, and to identify key stressors experienced by EDC operatives. Methods Eight electronic databases (Embase, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, The Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection, and Google Scholar were searched. All study designs were included, and no date limits were set. Studies were included if they were published in English, and explored the psychological health of any EDC operatives, across fire, police, and emergency medical services. Studies were excluded if they related solely to other emergency workers, such as police officers or paramedics. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using checklists adapted from the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme. A narrative synthesis was conducted, using thematic analysis. Results A total of 16 articles were included in the review. Two overarching themes were identified during the narrative synthesis: ‘Organisational and Operational Factors’ and ‘Interactions with Others’. Stressors identified included being exposed to traumatic calls, lacking control over high workload, and working in under-resourced and pressured environments. Lack of support from management and providing an emotionally demanding service were additional sources of stress. Peer support and social support from friends and family were helpful in managing work-related stress. Discussion EDC operatives experience stress as a result of their work, which appears to be related to negative psychological health outcomes. Future research should explore the long-term effects of this stress, and the potential for workplace interventions to alleviate the negative impacts on psychological health. PROSPERO Registration Number CRD42014010806.

  18. A knowledge based operator support system for emergency conditions in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh Babu, C.; Subramanium, K.

    1992-01-01

    The control centres of the operating Indian nuclear power plants contain a large number of indicators and controls spread over many panels. In the event of onset of an emergency condition, there results a profusion of information, both numeric and symbolic. The operator may succumb to an information and cognitive overload that may be compounded by a lack of knowledge. The failure to apply knowledge and reasoning to solve an operational problem can lead to human error, which has been a major contributing factor in nuclear accidents. From the viewpoint of Artificial Intelligence, human error occurs if the operational problem requires computing resources that exceed human capabilities. The application of Artificial Intelligence, particularly expert systems, to nuclear power plant control room activities has considerable potential to reduce operator error and improve safety and reliability. The purpose of this paper is to discuss an investigative study of the feasibility of developing an operator support system incorporating Artificial Intelligence techniques. An information processing model of such a system, herein designated as Knowledge Based Operator Support System - KBOSS, employing expert systems technology, has been developed. The features of this system are described, and issues involved in its development are discussed. (author). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. MODELING OF BEHAVIORAL ACTIVITY OF AIR NAVIGATION SYSTEM'S HUMAN-OPERATOR IN FLIGHT EMERGENCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kharchenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  The Air Navigation System is presented as a complex socio-technical system. The influence on decision-making by Air Navigation System's human-operator of the professional factors as well as the factors of non-professional nature has been defined. Logic determined and stochastic models of decision-making by the Air Navigation System's human-operator in flight emergencies have been developed. The scenarios of developing a flight situation in case of selecting either the positive or negative pole in accordance with the reflexive theory have been obtained. The informational support system of the operator in the unusual situations on the basis of Neural Network model of evaluating the efficiency of the potential alternative of flight completion has been built.

  20. Developments in the preparation of operating procedures for emergency conditions of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    In recent years a substantial effort has been devoted by the nuclear community to extend Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) to cover all conceivable events and to develop procedure formats that transmit the essential guidance to operators in an optimum way. The information given in this report is based upon the most recent developments in formulating and applying EOPs. It should therefore provide guidance to those involved in preparing or reviewing EOPs on the scope, technical basis, organization and format of such procedures. It also outlines the actions required to validate the adequacy and applicability of these procedures so that the correct operator actions are achieved. Examples are given to illustrate the developments in some Member States

  1. Surgical speed and risk for maternal operative morbidity in emergent repeat cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leslie; DiNapoli, Marianne; D'Alton, Mary; Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether surgical speed is associated with maternal outcomes in women who have a history of previous cesarean delivery (CD) and who require emergent delivery. This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter, prospective observational study of women with a history of previous CD. Women who attempted a vaginal birth after CD and required emergent CD were dichotomized into those with a skin incision-to-fetal delivery time of ≤2 min (I-D ≤2) or >2 min (I-D >2), based on the mode I-D. Rates of composite maternal complications and specific surgical complications were compared. Seven hundred ninety-three women had an emergency repeat CD: 108 women (13.6%) had I-D ≤2, and 685 women (86.4%) had I-D >2. The composite of maternal morbidity occurred in 36% of women with I-D≤2 and 23% with I-D>2 (P cesarean delivery, surgical speed was associated with an increased risk for maternal complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Laparoscopy After Previous Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfo Godinjak

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Following the abdominal surgery, extensive adhesions often occur and they can cause difficulties during laparoscopic operations. However, previous laparotomy is not considered to be a contraindication for laparoscopy. The aim of this study is to present that an insertion of Veres needle in the region of umbilicus is a safe method for creating a pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic operations after previous laparotomy. In the last three years, we have performed 144 laparoscopic operations in patients that previously underwent one or two laparotomies. Pathology of digestive system, genital organs, Cesarean Section or abdominal war injuries were the most common causes of previouslaparotomy. During those operations or during entering into abdominal cavity we have not experienced any complications, while in 7 patients we performed conversion to laparotomy following the diagnostic laparoscopy. In all patients an insertion of Veres needle and trocar insertion in the umbilical region was performed, namely a technique of closed laparoscopy. Not even in one patient adhesions in the region of umbilicus were found, and no abdominal organs were injured.

  3. Development of graphic display program of reactor operating parameters for emergency exercise at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Yasunori; Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Gotou, Kazuko

    2001-01-01

    A scenario of nuclear emergency exercise based on the result of accident progress analysis is expected to ensure effective training. Thereupon a new graphic display program for reactor operating parameters has been developed to present real-time of plant process values (parameters), released radioactivities from the plant, and dose rate data around the site calculated by using the accident analysis code MAAP4 and other codes. This system has a trend graph screen displaying reactor operating parameters, an environmental dose rate summary screen indicating dose rate distribution around the site on the map, and a plant parameters summary screen showing important plant parameters on a simplified plant system diagram. One screen can be switched to another any time. It also has a jump-function easily accessing any stage during the exercise scenario in accordance with progress of the exercise. As a result of the application of this system to a real nuclear emergency exercise, it has been verified that this system is quite useful for confirming the parameters when the nuclear emergency exercise starts and the licensee reports the plant conditions to related bodied. (author)

  4. Standardization of the Action Verbs used in Emergency Operating Procedures of NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Tong Il; Lee, Yong Hee; Park, Jae Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Seop; Chu, Gang Il [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The action verbs used in Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) for each nuclear power plant are translated respectively from the action verbs used in Emergency Recovery Guidelines (ERG) of the reference plants. The action verbs used in each plant are not largely different with one another. There are, however, some cases that the meanings of the same action verbs used in different plants are not consistent with each other and translations are not exact. In this study, the original English expressions of the action verbs and the translated verbs were compared and their accepted meanings analyzed. And then, standardization for the action verbs which are not exactly translated or which are used with different meanings among the plants was proposed

  5. Mental workload measurement for emergency operating procedures in digital nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qin; Wang, Yang; Song, Fei; Li, Zhizhong; Dong, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    Mental workload is a major consideration for the design of emergency operation procedures (EOPs) in nuclear power plants. Continuous and objective measures are desired. This paper compares seven mental workload measurement methods (pupil size, blink rate, blink duration, heart rate variability, parasympathetic/sympathetic ratio, total power and (Goals, Operations, Methods, and Section Rules)-(Keystroke Level Model) GOMS-KLM-based workload index) with regard to sensitivity, validity and intrusiveness. Eighteen participants performed two computerised EOPs of different complexity levels, and mental workload measures were collected during the experiment. The results show that the blink rate is sensitive to both the difference in the overall task complexity and changes in peak complexity within EOPs, that the error rate is sensitive to the level of arousal and correlate to the step error rate and that blink duration increases over the task period in both low and high complexity EOPs. Cardiac measures were able to distinguish tasks with different overall complexity. The intrusiveness of the physiological instruments is acceptable. Finally, the six physiological measures were integrated using group method of data handling to predict perceived overall mental workload. The study compared seven measures for evaluating the mental workload with emergency operation procedure in nuclear power plants. An experiment with simulated procedures was carried out, and the results show that eye response measures are useful for assessing temporal changes of workload whereas cardiac measures are useful for evaluating the overall workload.

  6. Contextual factors associated with hospitals' decision to operate freestanding emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Nitish; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; O'Connor, Stephen J; Sen, Bisakha; Trimm, J M Mickey; Camargo, Carlos A

    Freestanding emergency departments (FSEDs) are fast growing entities in health care, delivering emergency care outside of hospitals. Hospitals may benefit in several ways by opening FSEDs. The study used the resource dependence theory as a means to analyze the relationship between market and organizational factors and the likelihood of hospitals to operate FSEDs. All acute care hospitals in 14 states with FSEDs present during the study period from 2002 to 2011. Data on FSEDs were merged with American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Cost Reports, and Area Resource File data. The outcome variable consists of whether or not the hospital operates an FSED. Independent variables include per capita income, percent population over age of 65 years, primary care and specialist physicians per capita, urban location, change in the unemployment rate, change in the population, change in poverty level, market competition, total satellite and autonomous FSEDs in the market, Medicare-managed care penetration rate, hospital beds, total margin, and system membership. We used logistic regression analysis with state and year fixed effects. Standard errors in the regression were clustered by hospital. The number of hospitals operating satellite FSEDs increased from 32 (2.33%) in 2002 to 91 (5.76%) hospitals in 2011 among the 14 states included in the study sample. The results support the hypothesis that hospitals located in munificent environments and more competitive environments (presence of other FSEDs) are more likely to operate an FSED. Organizational level factors such as bed size and system membership are associated with a hospital operating an FSED. The findings may be used by policy makers in developing regulations for hospitals opening FSEDs. Also, study findings of this study may be used by hospitals to make informed decisions when formulating strategies regarding FSEDs.

  7. An ergonomics study of computerized emergency operating procedures: Presentation style, task complexity, and training level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Song; Song Fei; Li Zhizhong; Zhao Qianyi; Luo Wei; He Xuhong; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2008-01-01

    Emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are widely used in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the development of information technology, computerized EOPs are taking the place of paper-based ones. Unlike paper-based EOPs, the industrial practice of computerized EOPs is still quite limited. Ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately. This study focuses on the effects of EOP presentation style, task complexity, and training level on the performance of the operators in the execution of computerized EOPs. One simulated computerized EOP system was developed to present two EOPs, each with different task complexity levels, by two presentation styles (Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination). Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. Statistical analysis of the experimental results indicates that: (1) complexity, presentation style, and training level all can significantly influence the error rate. High-complexity tasks and lack of sufficient training may lead to a higher error rate. Style B caused a significantly higher error rate than style A did in the skilled phase. So the designers of computerized procedures should take the presentation styles of EOPs into account. (2) Task complexity and training level can significantly influence operation time. No significant difference was found in operation time between the two presentation styles. (3) Training level can also significantly influence the subjective workload of EOPs operations. This implies that adequate training is very important for the performance of computerized EOPs even if emergency responses with computerized EOPs are much more simple and easy than that with paper-based EOPs

  8. Recovery operations in the event of a nuclear accident or radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Much progress has been made over the last decade in the field of emergency planning and preparedness, including the development of guidance, criteria, training programmes, regulations and comprehensive plans in the support of nuclear facilities. To provide a forum for international review and discussion of actual experiences gained and lessons learned from the different aspects of recovery techniques and operations in response to serious accidents at nuclear facilities and accidents associated with radioactive materials, the IAEA organized the International Symposium on Recovery Operations in the Event of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. The symposium was held from 6 to 10 November 1989 in Vienna, Austria, and was attended by over 250 experts from 35 Member State and 7 international organizations. Although the prime focus was on on-site and off-site recovery from nuclear reactor accidents and on recovery from radiological accidents unrelated to nuclear power plants, development of emergency planning and preparedness resources was covered as well. From the experiences reported, lessons learned were identified. While further work remains to be done to improve concepts, plans, materials, communications and mechanisms to assemble quickly all the special resources needed in the event of an accident, there was general agreement that worldwide preparations to handle any possible future radiological emergencies had vastly improved. A special feature of the symposium programme was the inclusion of a full session on an accident involving a chemical explosion in a high level waste tank a a plutonium extraction plant in the Southern Urals in the USSR in 1957. Information was presented on the radioactive release, its dissemination and deposition, the resultant radiation situation, dose estimates, health effects follow-up, and the rehabilitation of contaminated land. This volume contains the full text of the 49 papers presented at the symposium together with a

  9. Information delivery in team communication of MCR operators for an emergency task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dae

    2005-01-01

    Team performance is a major measure to evaluate the ability of team when a lot of people perform a task of common purpose such as the main control room operators in the nuclear power plant. A team performance is affected the collaboration and communication among operators under dynamic situation as well as by the cognitive process of each team member. Specially, under the emergency situation, more clear and apparent communication in a team is a critical key for the appropriate response to emergency situation. As a general human factor analysis accesses the operator's behavior, it leads to a resulting action of planning, decision, problem-solving. In order to access the internal information and background information of his/her behavior, the verbal protocol analysis is applied. The impact factors on the team performance are derived from the state of the art for team performance, and it is found that the communication is a common key for all impact factors. And, in turn, the impact factors for the communication are accesses and the more detailed analysis is performed. The recorded data for the operator training for emergency situation of nuclear power plant training center are analyzed according to the verbal protocol analysis that are being generally utilized in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and cognitive science. Two aspects, external (syntax) and internal (symantic) aspects of communication are reviewed. From the syntax analysis, it is found that the task of each step in EOP is separated according to each corresponding operator and the ordinary training is important, and the weak-points for a sentence presentation can be found team-by-team. And, from the symantic analysis for the diagnostic procedure of EOP is performed and the communication errors due to different situation awareness by operators could be found, and it lead to a diagnosis failure. The factors for different symantic cognition for a situation are analyzed and the affecting

  10. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  11. Information delivery in team communication of MCR operators for an emergency task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwang Sub; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dae

    2005-01-01

    Team performance is a major measure to evaluate the ability of team when a lot of people perform a task of common purpose such as the main control room operators in the nuclear power plant. A team performance is affected the collaboration and communication among operators under dynamic situation as well as by the cognitive process of each team member. Specially, under the emergency situation, more clear and apparent communication in a team is a critical key for the appropriate response to emergency situation. As a general human factor analysis accesses the operator's behavior, it leads to a resulting action of planning, decision, problem-solving. In order to access the internal information and background information of his/her behavior, the verbal protocol analysis is applied. The impact factors on the team performance are derived from the state of the art for team performance, and it is found that the communication is a common key for all impact factors. And, in turn, the impact factors for the communication are accesses and the more detailed analysis is performed. The recorded data for the operator training for emergency situation of nuclear power plant training center are analyzed according to the verbal protocol analysis that are being generally utilized in cognitive psychology, educational psychology, and cognitive science. Two aspects, external (syntax) and internal (symantic) aspects of communication are reviewed. From the syntax analysis, it is found that the task of each step in EOP is separated according to each corresponding operator and the ordinary training is important, and the weak-points for a sentence presentation can be found team-by-team. And, from the symantic analysis for the diagnostic procedure of EOP is performed and the communication errors due to different situation awareness by operators could be found, and it lead to a diagnosis failure. The factors for different symantic cognition for a situation are analyzed and the affecting factors

  12. Assisting emergency operating procedures execution with AMAS, an Accident Management Advisor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarro, S.; Milici, T.; Wu, J.S.; Apostolakis, G.

    2004-01-01

    In an accident situation, because any decisions that the operators make will depend on how instrumentation readings are ultimately interpreted, the issue of instrument uncertainty is of paramount importance. This uncertainty exists because instrument readings may not be available in the desired form - i.e., only indirect readings for a parameter of interest may exist, with uncertainty on which physical models may be used to deduce its value from these indirect indications -, or because readings may be coming from instruments whose accuracy and reliability in the face of the severe conditions produced by the accident are far from what may be expected under normal operating conditions. In following the EOPs, the operators must rely on instrumentation whose readings may not reflect the real situation. The Accident Management Advisor System (AMAS) is a decision aid intended to supplement plant Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) by accounting for instrumentation uncertainty, and by alerting the operators if they are on the wrong procedures, or otherwise performing an action that is not optimal in terms of preventing core damage. In AMAS, the availability and reliability of certain important instrument readings is treated in probabilistic, rather than deterministic terms. This issue is discussed in greater detail later in the paper, since it relates to one of the key characteristics of the AMAS decision aid. (author)

  13. Operational availability improvement through online monitoring and advice for emergency diesel generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Beom; Kim, Han Gon; Kim, Byong Sup [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Golay, M.; Kang, C. W.; Sui, Y. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Massachusetts (United States)

    1998-12-31

    This research broadens the prime concern of nuclear power plant operations from safe performance to both economic and safe performance. First, emergency diesel generator is identified as one of main contributors for the lost plant availability through the review of plant forced outage records. The framework of an integrated architecture of performing modern on-line condition for operational availability improvement is configured in this work. For the development of the comprehensive sensor networks for complex target systems, and integrated methodology incorporating a structural hierarchy, a functional hierarchy, and a fault-symptom matrix is formulated. The second part of our research is development of intelligent diagnosis and maintenance advisory system, which employs Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) as a high level reasoning tool for incorporating inherent uncertainty for use in probabilistic inference. Our prototype diagnosis algorithms are represented explicitly through topological symbols and links between them in a causal direction. As new evidence from sensor network developed is entered into the model especially, our advisory system provides operational advice concerning both availability and safety, so that the operator is able to determine the likely failure modes, diagnose the system state, locate root causes, and take the most advantageous action. Thereby, this advice improves operational availability. 6 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  14. Experimental fast reactor Joyo emergency operation act in Northeastern Japan Earthquake 3.11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karube, Koji; Aita, Tsuyoshi; Okawa, Toshikatsu

    2012-01-01

    Experimental fast reactor 'Joyo' under facility's periodic inspection received damage at its power incoming unit due to the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake, which incurred loss-of-offsite-power. Immediately, two emergency diesel generators (D/G) automatically started, which supplied emergency system power. During eight days before the power incoming unit got provisional restoration, power supply through D/G continued. During this period, emergency measures for fuel and cooling water securement for D/G were taken, which forced unexperienced long-term load operation for D/G. This paper reports the change of plant conditions of Joyo, as well as the measures taken for keeping fuel and cooling water for continuing the operation of D/G. Since the main machines of the primary system and secondary system were functioning normally after the earthquake, the plant could be maintained in a stable state. As for the fuel for D/G, reduction in fuel consumption based on load suppression was implemented, and the cooperation of trading firms, related facilities, and local suppliers secured the fuel that supported the long-term operation of D/G. As for the cooling water, the cooperation of a self-defense fire brigade allowed to secure the required amount by utilizing the reserved water in the water tank for fire prevention. From these series of experiences of handling the plant, it was possible to extract the future challenges against the time when a massive earthquake or prolonged power failure has occurred. (A.O.)

  15. Architectural and operational considerations emerging from hybrid RF-optical network loading simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yijiang; Abraham, Douglas S.; Heckman, David P.; Kwok, Andrew; MacNeal, Bruce E.; Tran, Kristy; Wu, Janet P.

    2016-03-01

    A technology demonstration of free space optical communication at interplanetary distances is planned via one or more future NASA deep-space missions. Such demonstrations will "pave the way" for operational use of optical communications on future robotic/potential Human missions. Hence, the Deep Space Network architecture will need to evolve. Preliminary attempts to model the anticipated future mission set and simulate how well it loads onto assumed architectures with combinations of RF and optical apertures have been evaluated. This paper discusses the results of preliminary loading simulations for hybrid RF-optical network architectures and highlights key mission and ground infrastructure considerations that emerge.

  16. CAI and training system for the emergency operation procedure in the advanced thermal reactor, FUGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, T.; Imanaga, K.; Nakamura, S.; Maeda, K.; Sakurai, N.; Miyamoto, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR ) of the JNC, 'FUGEN', a symptom based Emergency Operating Procedure (EOF) was introduced in order to operate Fugen more safely and it became necessary for the plant operators to master the EOF. However it took a lot of time for the instructor to teach the EOP to operators and to train them. Thus, we have developed a Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) and Training System for the EOP, by which the operators can learn the EOP and can be trained. This system has two major functions, i.e., CAI and training. In the CAI function, there are three learning courses, namely, the EOP procedure, the simulation with guidance and Q and A, and the free simulation. In the training function, all of necessary control instruments (indicators, switches, annunciators and so forth) and physics models for the EOP training are simulated so that the trainees can be trained for all of the EOPs. In addition, 50 kinds of malfunction models are installed in order to perform appropriate accident scenarios for the EOP. The training of the EOP covers the range from AOO (Anticipated Operational Occurrence) to Over-DBAs (Design Based Accidents). This system is built in three personal computers that are connected by the computer network. One of the computers is expected to be used for the instructor and the other two are for the trainees. The EOP is composed of eight guidelines, such as 'Reactor Control' and 'Depression and Cooling', and the operation screens which are corresponded to the guidelines are respectively provided. According to the trial, we have estimated that the efficiency of the learning and the training would be improved about 30% for the trainee and about 75% for the instructor in the actual learning and training. (author)

  17. Design of test and emergency procedures to improve operator behaviour in French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffon-Fouco, M.; Gomolinski, M.

    1982-09-01

    The incident analyses performed in French nuclear power plants high-lighted that deficiencies in the design of procedures are frequent causes of human errors. The process for developing new guidelines for the writing of test and emergency procedures is presented: this process is based on operators interviews and observations at the plants or at simulators. The main principles for the writing of procedures are developed. For example: - the elaboration of a procedure for action and of a separate educational procedure, - the coordination of crew responses, - the choice of vocabulary, graphs, flow charts and so on as regards the format. Other complementary actions, such as the training of operators in the use of procedures, are described

  18. FOOD AID TO CONFLICT AFFECTED POPULATIONS WFP EMERGENCY OPERATION - THE CASE OF EASTERN UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Tamburelli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of areas where humanitarian emergencies are brought about by armed conflicts, and the enduring nature of these situations, call for research aimed at clarifying the international legal framework for food-aid operations, taking into account the developments and practices in the fields of human rights, humanitarian law, environmental law, and cooperation for sustainable development. In this article, therefore, the Author analyses the general problems of food aid in conflict areas, with a focus on a concrete situation, namely the crisis in Eastern Ukraine. The dramatic situation faced by some Ukrainian regions - where, since the spring of 2014, the World Food Programme (WFP, various other international organizations, the EU and some National Development Cooperations have been operating - underlines, in fact, the importance of reaching a clear understanding of all the different regulatory levels in the field of food aid security and safety.

  19. Simulation of operational processes in hospital emergency units as lean healthcare tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Macedo Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Lean philosophy is gaining importance due to a competitive environment, which increases the need to reduce costs. Lean practices and tools have been applied to manufacturing, services, supply chain, startups and, the next frontier is healthcare. Most lean techniques can be easily adapted to health organizations. Therefore, this paper intends to summarize Lean practices and tools that are already being applied in health organizations. Among the numerous techniques and lean tools used, this research highlights the Simulation. Therefore, in order to understand the use of Simulation as a Lean Healthcare tool, this research aims to analyze, through the simulation technique, the operational dynamics of the service process of a fictitious hospital emergency unit. Initially a systematic review of the literature on the practices and tools of Lean Healthcare was carried out, in order to identify the main techniques practiced. The research highlighted Simulation as the sixth most cited tool in the literature. Subsequently, a simulation of a service model of an emergency unit was performed through the Arena software. As a main result, it can be highlighted that the attendants of the built model presented a degree of idleness, thus, they are able to atend a greater demand. As a last conclusion, it was verified that the emergency room is the process with longer service time and greater overload.

  20. Estimates of emergency operating capacity in U.S. manufacturing industries: 1994--2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzer, D.B.

    1997-02-01

    To develop integrated policies for mobilization preparedness, planners require estimates and projections of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. This report develops projections of national emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 458 US manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level. These measures are intended for use in planning models that are designed to predict the demands for detailed industry sectors that would occur under conditions such as a military mobilization or a major national disaster. This report is part of an ongoing series of studies prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to support mobilization planning studies of the Federal Emergency Planning Agency/US Department of Defense (FEMA/DOD). Earlier sets of EOC estimates were developed in 1985 and 1991. This study presents estimates of EOC through 2005. As in the 1991 study, projections of capacity were based upon extrapolations of equipment capital stocks. The methodology uses time series regression models based on industry data to obtain a response function of industry capital stock to levels of industrial output. The distributed lag coefficients of these response function are then used with projected outputs to extrapolate the 1994 level of EOC. Projections of industrial outputs were taken from the intermediate-term forecast of the US economy prepared by INFORUM (Interindustry Forecasting Model, University of Maryland) in the spring of 1996.

  1. Increasing maintainability and operability of emergency diesel generators with thermographic inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzbach, Richard N.; Hart, Jeffrey E.

    1993-04-01

    In the Nuclear Power Generation Industry, Emergency Diesel Generators are a critical component in ensuring the ability to safely operate the plant. Relegated to a standby role, this equipment must be immediately available to provide power to important plant equipment needed to safely shutdown the reactor, in the event of a loss of normal off-site sources of power. Consequently, maintenance, operation, and surveillance of these generators is performed under close scrutiny, and any deviations from established parameters can potentially lead to the mandatory shutdown of the reactor, and subsequent loss of power generation revenue. At Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Thermographic Inspection has become an integral part of the operation of the Diesel Generators. Generators are operated according to the required surveillance tests, and a Thermographic Inspection is made at least twice a year. Some of the applications include checking for exhaust leaks, generator end bearing and cylinder exhaust temperatures, observing the effects of thermal mixing between crosstied cooling systems, and other mechanical and electrical troubleshooting.

  2. Influence of step complexity and presentation style on step performance of computerized emergency operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Song; Li Zhizhong; Song Fei; Luo Wei; Zhao Qianyi; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2009-01-01

    With the development of information technology, computerized emergency operating procedures (EOPs) are taking the place of paper-based ones. However, ergonomics issues of computerized EOPs have not been studied adequately since the industrial practice is quite limited yet. This study examined the influence of step complexity and presentation style of EOPs on step performance. A simulated computerized EOP system was developed in two presentation styles: Style A: one- and two-dimensional flowcharts combination; Style B: two-dimensional flowchart and success logic tree combination. Step complexity was quantified by a complexity measure model based on an entropy concept. Forty subjects participated in the experiment of EOP execution using the simulated system. The results of data analysis on the experiment data indicate that step complexity and presentation style could significantly influence step performance (both step error rate and operation time). Regression models were also developed. The regression analysis results imply that operation time of a step could be well predicted by step complexity while step error rate could only partly predicted by it. The result of a questionnaire investigation implies that step error rate was influenced not only by the operation task itself but also by other human factors. These findings may be useful for the design and assessment of computerized EOPs

  3. The Operational Canine and K9 Tactical Emergency Casualty Care Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Lee E; Maricle, Richard; Brenner, Jo-Anne

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 20% to 25% of trauma-related, prehospital fatalities in humans are due to preventable deaths. Data are lacking, however, on the nature and the prevalence of operational canine (OC) prehospital deaths. It is plausible that OCs engaged in high-threat operations are also at risk for suffering some type of preventable death. Tactical Combat Casualty Care has significantly reduced human fatality rates on the battlefield. Standardized guidelines specifically for prehospital trauma care have not been developed for the OC caregiver. An initiation has been approved by the Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care to form a K9-Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC) working group to develop such guidelines. The intent of the K9-TECC initiative is to form best practice recommendations for the civilian high-risk OC caregiver. These recommendations are to focus on interventions that (1) eliminate the major causes of canine out-of-hospital preventable deaths, (2) are easily learned and applied by any civilian first responder, and (2) minimize resource consumption. 2015.

  4. The Association of Psychological Empowerment and Job Burnout in Operational Staff of Tehran Emergency Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaniyoun, Aram; Shakeri, Khosro; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background: Workers in social service professions are the first candidates for job burnout. The researchers believe this is due to daily exposure to stressful situations and lack of positive conditions in the workplace. It seems that psychological empowerment of staff can affect their job burnout. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between psychological empowerment and job burnout in operational staff of emergency center. Methods: This was a descriptive correlational study. A total of 1100 operational staff of emergency center were evaluated, and of which, 285 persons were selected by simple random sampling method. Data were collected using Spritzer's psychological empowerment and Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaires. SPSS software, version 18, was used for data analysis along with descriptive analytical tests. Results: The findings of this study revealed that the majority of units (46%) were in intermediate level in terms of empowerment. Similarly, the majority of cases had intermediate level (77.5%), and a minor percentage (8.4%) had low levels of job burnout. Based on Pearson's correlation test, there was a significant invert correlation between psychological empowerment and job burnout. This inverse and significant relationship was also observed between the four components of psychological empowerment (competence, self-determination, impact, and meaning) and job burnout. Conclusions: According to the results of the study, policy makers and health planners can take some measures in enhancing psychological empowerment to prevent problems associated with job burnout, by identifying stressors and strategies to deal with them. PMID:28970654

  5. Methodological Proposal for Optimal Location of Emergency Operation Centers through Multi-Criteria Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Di Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Territorial vulnerability and risk analysis play a fundamental role in urban planning and emergency management. Requirements analysis of such aspects are possible to define more and more effective risk mitigation strategies providing efficient response plans to events. Many mitigation strategies as well as many response plans have in common the purpose of minimizing response time in order to decrease the level of vulnerability of the concerning area. The response time to a perturbing event is in fact an essential parameter to define the hazard of the considered site and literature is unanimous in considering it. In this context, the article proposes a methodology for the optimization of the location on the territory of emergency operation centers (EOCs, reducing response times and mitigating in this way the vulnerability of the area. The proposed methodology is based on a multi-criteria decision making (MCDM hybrid type AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process-Electre. This method has been applied in the territory of Bressanone and Vipiteno (Bolzano-Italy, simulating the need to build a new barrack of Fire Department. A campaign of interviews with operators and industry experts and the collection of spatial data from the portals of the concerned authorities has been carried out in order to get the number of necessary data for the implementation of the proposed methodology.

  6. The Association of Psychological Empowerment and Job Burnout in Operational Staff of Tehran Emergency Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaniyoun, Aram; Shakeri, Khosro; Heidari, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    Workers in social service professions are the first candidates for job burnout. The researchers believe this is due to daily exposure to stressful situations and lack of positive conditions in the workplace. It seems that psychological empowerment of staff can affect their job burnout. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between psychological empowerment and job burnout in operational staff of emergency center. This was a descriptive correlational study. A total of 1100 operational staff of emergency center were evaluated, and of which, 285 persons were selected by simple random sampling method. Data were collected using Spritzer's psychological empowerment and Maslach Burnout Inventory questionnaires. SPSS software, version 18, was used for data analysis along with descriptive analytical tests. The findings of this study revealed that the majority of units (46%) were in intermediate level in terms of empowerment. Similarly, the majority of cases had intermediate level (77.5%), and a minor percentage (8.4%) had low levels of job burnout. Based on Pearson's correlation test, there was a significant invert correlation between psychological empowerment and job burnout. This inverse and significant relationship was also observed between the four components of psychological empowerment (competence, self-determination, impact, and meaning) and job burnout. According to the results of the study, policy makers and health planners can take some measures in enhancing psychological empowerment to prevent problems associated with job burnout, by identifying stressors and strategies to deal with them.

  7. Implementing Data Definition Consistency for Emergency Department Operations Benchmarking and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Scheulen, James; McWade, Conor M; Augustine, James J

    2016-07-01

    The objective was to obtain a commitment to adopt a common set of definitions for emergency department (ED) demographic, clinical process, and performance metrics among the ED Benchmarking Alliance (EDBA), ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), and Academy of Academic Administrators of Emergency Medicine (AAAEM) by 2017. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of available data from three ED operations benchmarking organizations supported a negotiation to use a set of common metrics with identical definitions. During a 1.5-day meeting-structured according to social change theories of information exchange, self-interest, and interdependence-common definitions were identified and negotiated using the EDBA's published definitions as a start for discussion. Methods of process analysis theory were used in the 8 weeks following the meeting to achieve official consensus on definitions. These two lists were submitted to the organizations' leadership for implementation approval. A total of 374 unique measures were identified, of which 57 (15%) were shared by at least two organizations. Fourteen (4%) were common to all three organizations. In addition to agreement on definitions for the 14 measures used by all three organizations, agreement was reached on universal definitions for 17 of the 57 measures shared by at least two organizations. The negotiation outcome was a list of 31 measures with universal definitions to be adopted by each organization by 2017. The use of negotiation, social change, and process analysis theories achieved the adoption of universal definitions among the EDBA, EDOSG, and AAAEM. This will impact performance benchmarking for nearly half of US EDs. It initiates a formal commitment to utilize standardized metrics, and it transitions consistency in reporting ED operations metrics from consensus to implementation. This work advances our ability to more accurately characterize variation in ED care delivery models, resource utilization, and performance. In

  8. Emergency operating procedures improvement based on the lesson learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Wen-Hsiung; Liao, Lih-Yih

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Discuss the problem of EOPs at the time of Fukushima accident to deal with the prolonged SBO. • Elaborate the potential risk accompanied with the emergency depressurization in the SBO. • Describe a special guideline to cope with Fukushima-like accidents and provide its technical basis. • Point out that Fukushima accident might have been prevented if improved EOPs had been used. • Propose key points and suggestions for improving the EOPs. - Abstract: One of the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident is the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) have to be improved. The BWR Owners’ Group revised the emergency procedure guidelines and addressed the lesson learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident in revision 3 in order to avoid loss of turbine-driven makeup water systems during reactor depressurization. However, the improvement deserves much more attention. The existing EOPs at the time of the accident may not be adequate enough for the prolonged station blackout condition, because resources required for performing the EOPs are vastly unavailable or gradually exhausted. The improved EOPs must not only permit early reactor pressure vessel depressurization, but also address the risk accompanied with the emergency depressurization. For this reason, Taiwan Power Company proposed the Ultimate Response Guideline (URG) to cope with Fukushima-like accidents. The main content of the URG is a two-stage depressurization strategy, namely the controlled depressurization and the emergency depressurization. The technical basis of the two-stage depressurization strategy was discussed in this paper. The effectiveness of the URG was verified by using TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE). Besides, the emergency responses performed by Fukushima Daini nuclear power plant (Fukushima Daini NPP) were found to be very similar to the URG. The consequences of Fukushima Daini NPP somehow demonstrate that the URG is effective for Fukushima

  9. Emergency operating procedures improvement based on the lesson learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Hsiung, E-mail: whwu1127@aec.gov.tw [Atomic Energy Council, 2F., No. 80, Sec.1, Chenggong Rd., Yonghe Dist., New Taipei City 234, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Sec. 2, Guangfu Rd., Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Liao, Lih-Yih, E-mail: lyliao@iner.gov.tw [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Jiaan Village, Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 325, Taiwan (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Discuss the problem of EOPs at the time of Fukushima accident to deal with the prolonged SBO. • Elaborate the potential risk accompanied with the emergency depressurization in the SBO. • Describe a special guideline to cope with Fukushima-like accidents and provide its technical basis. • Point out that Fukushima accident might have been prevented if improved EOPs had been used. • Propose key points and suggestions for improving the EOPs. - Abstract: One of the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident is the emergency operating procedures (EOPs) have to be improved. The BWR Owners’ Group revised the emergency procedure guidelines and addressed the lesson learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident in revision 3 in order to avoid loss of turbine-driven makeup water systems during reactor depressurization. However, the improvement deserves much more attention. The existing EOPs at the time of the accident may not be adequate enough for the prolonged station blackout condition, because resources required for performing the EOPs are vastly unavailable or gradually exhausted. The improved EOPs must not only permit early reactor pressure vessel depressurization, but also address the risk accompanied with the emergency depressurization. For this reason, Taiwan Power Company proposed the Ultimate Response Guideline (URG) to cope with Fukushima-like accidents. The main content of the URG is a two-stage depressurization strategy, namely the controlled depressurization and the emergency depressurization. The technical basis of the two-stage depressurization strategy was discussed in this paper. The effectiveness of the URG was verified by using TRAC/RELAP Advanced Computational Engine (TRACE). Besides, the emergency responses performed by Fukushima Daini nuclear power plant (Fukushima Daini NPP) were found to be very similar to the URG. The consequences of Fukushima Daini NPP somehow demonstrate that the URG is effective for Fukushima

  10. Identification of emergent off-nominal operational requirements during conceptual architecting of the more electric aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael James

    Increases in power demands and changes in the design practices of overall equipment manufacturers has led to a new paradigm in vehicle systems definition. The development of unique power systems architectures is of increasing importance to overall platform feasibility and must be pursued early in the aircraft design process. Many vehicle systems architecture trades must be conducted concurrent to platform definition. With an increased complexity introduced during conceptual design, accurate predictions of unit level sizing requirements must be made. Architecture specific emergent requirements must be identified which arise due to the complex integrated effect of unit behaviors. Off-nominal operating scenarios present sizing critical requirements to the aircraft vehicle systems. These requirements are architecture specific and emergent. Standard heuristically defined failure mitigation is sufficient for sizing traditional and evolutionary architectures. However, architecture concepts which vary significantly in terms of structure and composition require that unique failure mitigation strategies be defined for accurate estimations of unit level requirements. Identifying of these off-nominal emergent operational requirements require extensions to traditional safety and reliability tools and the systematic identification of optimal performance degradation strategies. Discrete operational constraints posed by traditional Functional Hazard Assessment (FHA) are replaced by continuous relationships between function loss and operational hazard. These relationships pose the objective function for hazard minimization. Load shedding optimization is performed for all statistically significant failures by varying the allocation of functional capability throughout the vehicle systems architecture. Expressing hazards, and thereby, reliability requirements as continuous relationships with the magnitude and duration of functional failure requires augmentations to the traditional

  11. Integrating Emerging Data Sources into Operational Practice : Opportunities for Integration of Emerging Data for Traffic Management and TMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    With the emergence of data generated from connected vehicles, connected travelers, and connected infrastructure, the capabilities of traffic management systems or centers (TMCs) will need to be improved to allow agencies to compile and benefit from u...

  12. Emergency Abdominal Operations in the Elderly: A Multivariate Regression Analysis of 430 Consecutive Patients with Acute Abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkonen, Mika; Kivivuori, Antti; Rantanen, Tuomo; Paajanen, Hannu

    2015-12-01

    This study is intended to ascertain if outcome of acute abdominal surgery among elderly patients with acute abdominal pain have improved. Altogether 456 patients aged >65 years underwent emergency abdominal surgery between the years 2007 and 2009 in our hospital. After excluding emergency reoperations of elective surgery, a total of 430 consecutive patients were included in this retrospective audit. The key factors under analysis in this study were the occurrence of major complications and death from any cause within 30 days after the operation. In addition, we compared our results to our previously published data some 20 years ago. The most common diagnoses were cholecystitis (n = 139, 32.3 %, incidence of 125 per 100,000 elderly persons), incarcerated hernia (n = 60, 13.9 %, 54/100,000), malignancy related (n = 50, 11.6 %, 45/100,000), or acute appendicitis (n = 46, 10.7 %, 41/100,000). The majority of operations (80.7 %) were performed using open technique. Of all 112 laparoscopic procedures, 25.9 % were converted to open surgery. Reoperations were rare and postoperative surgical complications were not associated with statistically significant increase in mortality, even if reoperation was needed. The 30-day mortality and morbidity rates were 14.2 and 31.9 %, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that patient's age (p = 0.014), atrial fibrillation (p = 0.017), low body mass index (p = 0.001), open surgery (p = 0.029), ASA grade III or more (p abdominal surgery still have relatively high morbidity and mortality as reported in earlier studies.

  13. Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    In co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on ''Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies'' in the period August 27-August 31, 2001. The Summer School was intended for scientists, engineers and technicians working for nuclear installations, engineering companies, industry and members of universities and research institutes, who wanted to broaden their nuclear background by getting acquainted with Man-Technology-Organisation-related subjects and issues. The Summer School should also serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the nuclear field. The following presentations were given: (1) Overview of the Nuclear Community and Current issues, (2) The Elements of Safety Culture; Evaluation of Events, (3) Quality Management (QM), (4) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PSA), (5) Human Behaviour from the Viewpoint of Industrial Psychology, (6) Technical tour of the Halden Project Experimental Facilities, (7) Human Factors in Control Room Design, (8) Computerised Operator Support Systems (COSSs) and (9) Artificial Intelligence; a new Approach. Most of the contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  14. Sudden water pollution accidents and reservoir emergency operations: impact analysis at Danjiangkou Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hezhen; Lei, Xiaohui; Shang, Yizi; Duan, Yang; Kong, Lingzhong; Jiang, Yunzhong; Wang, Hao

    2018-03-01

    Danjiangkou Reservoir is the source reservoir of the Middle Route of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (MRP). Any sudden water pollution accident in the reservoir would threaten the water supply of the MRP. We established a 3-D hydrodynamic and water quality model for the Danjiangkou Reservoir, and proposed scientific suggestions on the prevention and emergency management for sudden water pollution accidents based on simulated results. Simulations were performed on 20 hypothetical pollutant discharge locations and 3 assumed amounts, in order to model the effect of pollutant spreading under different reservoir operation types. The results showed that both the location and mass of pollution affected water quality; however, different reservoir operation types had little effect. Five joint regulation scenarios, which altered the hydrodynamic processes of water conveyance for the Danjiangkou and Taocha dams, were considered for controlling pollution dispersion. The results showed that the spread of a pollutant could be effectively controlled through the joint regulation of the two dams and that the collaborative operation of the Danjiangkou and Taocha dams is critical for ensuring the security of water quality along the MRP.

  15. Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    In co-operation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on ''Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Plants: Impacts of Human and Organisational Factors and Emerging Technologies'' in the period August 27-August 31, 2001. The Summer School was intended for scientists, engineers and technicians working for nuclear installations, engineering companies, industry and members of universities and research institutes, who wanted to broaden their nuclear background by getting acquainted with Man-Technology-Organisation-related subjects and issues. The Summer School should also serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the nuclear field. The following presentations were given: (1) Overview of the Nuclear Community and Current issues, (2) The Elements of Safety Culture; Evaluation of Events, (3) Quality Management (QM), (4) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PSA), (5) Human Behaviour from the Viewpoint of Industrial Psychology, (6) Technical tour of the Halden Project Experimental Facilities, (7) Human Factors in Control Room Design, (8) Computerised Operator Support Systems (COSSs) and (9) Artificial Intelligence; a new Approach. Most of the contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  16. Exploring of Wireless Technology to Provide Information Sharing Among Military, United Nations and Civilian Organizations During Complex Humanitarian Emergencies and Peacekeeping Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bridges, Douglas

    2003-01-01

    ...) and peacekeeping operations. Humanitarian emergencies and peacekeeping operations are a complex mix of related activities that require the combined efforts of the UN, military, International Organizations (IOs...

  17. Wildlife Impact Assessment and Summary of Previous Mitigation Related to Hydroelectric Projects in Montana, Volume One, Libby Dam Project, Operator, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde, Chris A.

    1984-10-01

    This assessment addresses the impacts to the wildlife populations and wildlife habitats due to the Libby Dam project on the Kootenai River and previous mitigation of these losses. The current assessment documents the best available information concerning the impacts to the wildlife populations inhabiting the project area prior to construction of the dam and creation of the reservoir. Many of the impacts reported in this assessment differ from those contained in the earlier document compiled by the Fish and Wildlife Service; however, this document is a thorough compilation of the available data (habitat and wildlife) and, though conservative, attempts to realistically assess the impacts related to the Libby Dam project. Where appropriate the impacts resulting from highway construction and railroad relocation were included in the assessment. This was consistent with the previous assessments.

  18. Design and operation of the emergency support center, CAE; Diseno y explotacion del centro de apoyo en emergencias, CAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, R. J.; Lopez Trillo, E.

    2016-08-01

    The enhancements developed in Spain in the area of Emergency Management, as consequence of the accident at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi NPP in 2011, included the definition of new emergency response centers; Alternative Center for Emergency Management (CAGE) on each NPP and the Emergency Support Center (CAE), shared by all NPPs. This article summarizes the main features and operation activities undertaken since the establishment of the new CAE, centralized, external to the NPPs shared by all Spanish plants and managed by Tecnatom. (Author)

  19. [A case report of right-sided cardiac and pulmonary thromboembolism treated by emergent operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaoka, M; Sasaki, M; Masumoto, H; Kajiyama, M; Seki, A

    1996-05-01

    A forty-four-year-old man with a clinical diagnosis of diabetes melitus and severe obesity (height 170 cm, weight 108 kg) was admitted to the hospital on 12th January 1995 because of acute myocardial infarction, and on 21st January, he was referred to our hospital with sudden onset of shock, bradycardia, loss of consciousness in spite of having recovered well from myocardial infarction. The echocardiography and pulmonary arteriography revealed a pulmonary embolism and a tumor in the right atrium. Administration of tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) was not sufficiently effective. An emergency operation (pulmonary arteriotomy, right atriotomy, milking of bilateral lungs) with cardiopulmonary bypass revealed a massive consecutive thrombus, which occupied the right atrium, right ventricle and bilateral pulmonary artery. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  20. Guidelines for the presentation of emergency operating procedures using advanced information technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.; Hollnagel, E.; Niwa, Yuji

    1994-01-01

    New methods of information presentation and interface design are changing the conditions for work in the modern NPP control room. One area receiving considerable attention is that of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOP). Conventionally such procedures are presented using hard copy manuals; however, development in IT means that there are new opportunities for the computerization of such procedures. This paper reports on the development of human factors guidelines for the computerized presentation of EOPs. After identifying the principle stages in the transition from procedures as documents to fully automated procedures, computerised procedure presentation is briefly discussed. Guidelines for the presentation of such procedures are outlined starting with the high level goals for guidelines themselves. Such goals also constitute the criteria against which the computerized procedures are measured during implementation. Six dimensions describing computerized procedure presentation are presented and two are explore in more detail by identifying points along each dimension that characterize different levels of IT sophistication. (author). 8 refs, 1 tab

  1. Work responsability evaluation of a nuclear power plant operator during an emergency event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Nilo Garcia da

    2002-01-01

    In this work, a method to evaluate the Man - Machine Interface, using the Model of Human Process utilized by the Combustion Engineer-CE was used in the Licensing Process of a Nuclear Power Plant, applying methodology in the emergency procedure of a SGTR for Angra 1 NPP. The time needed for the operators to perform the tasks step by step in this procedure was calculated. This time was compared to that found in the GOMS model, by which it is possible to perform an evaluation of workload for this accident. The criteria of the Standard ANSI/58.8-1994 was used to establish the reaction and execution times for these tasks. Practical measures in a Angra 2 NPP full scope simulator were done some steps of the SGTR emergency procedure. The time evaluation in the GOMS model has identified that three was a concentration of tasks, with the execution time near the limits regulated in the Standard above as compared with the times from the CE methodology. Finally, after a comparison of the results from Angra 1 and Angra 2, recommendations were done to the Angra 1 NPP utility in order to improve these identified points. (author)

  2. Performing boundary work: The emergence of a new practice in a hybrid operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Kajsa; Walter, Lars; Raviola, Elena

    2017-06-01

    This paper addresses the processes of boundary work, in relation to the introduction of new technology, unfolding during the emergence of new medical practices. Inspired by Gieryn's fluid and practical view of boundaries and boundary work, and by Actor-Network Theory's description of scripting processes, we study the processes of negotiating and (re-)constructing boundaries in order to reveal both the interactions between different kinds of boundary work and their situatedness in the context of the emerging practice. We conducted a longitudinal and qualitative study of a generic Hybrid Operating Room at a Swedish university hospital, where sophisticated imaging devices are combined with open surgery procedures in a single room; consequently, medical requirements regarding radiology, surgery and anesthesia, as well as the specificities of the new technology, all need to be met at the same time. The study shows how the visibility of boundaries is a result of as well as a condition for boundary work, how boundary work is a dynamic and iterative process, and how it unfolds in a recursive relationship between practice and boundaries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Prophylactic plastic surgery closure of neurosurgical scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications in previously-operated patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®) and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golas, Alyssa Reiffel; Boyko, Tatiana; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip E; Boockvar, John A; Spector, Jason A

    2014-09-01

    Neurosurgical craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal interventions are performed for a variety of indications, including the resection of benign or malignant tumors, hematoma evacuation, and for the management of intractable seizure disorders. Despite an overall low complication rate of intervention, wound healing complications such as dehiscence, surgical site infection, and cerebrospinal fluid leak are not uncommon. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent scalp incision closure at a single institution by a single plastic surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Sixty patients (83 procedures) were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (95.0 %) underwent previous craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal procedure. Of the total 60 patients, 35 patients received preoperative radiation. Sixteen patients received bevacizumab prior to their index case, while 12 received bevacizumab postoperatively. Ten patients (16.7 %) required additional plastic surgical intervention for wound complications after their index plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically in 34 patients (38 procedures). When plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically, 4 patients (11.8 %) required further wound revision. None of the 14 patients who underwent prophylactic plastic surgery closure for previous scalp incision, preoperative bevacizumab, and XRT administration required re-intervention. Plastic surgery closure of complex scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications among patients who underwent previous neurosurgical intervention, XRT administration, and preoperative bevacizumab administration. This is particularly true when plastic surgery closure is performed "prophylactically." Further collaboration between the neurosurgical and plastic surgery teams is therefore warranted, particularly in the setting of these high-risk cases.

  4. Association between elevated pre-operative glycosylated hemoglobin and post-operative infections after non-emergent surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Blankush

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The risk factors of post-operative infection are multiple and likely synergistic. While pre-operative HbA1c level is not independently associated with risk of post-operative infection, there are scenarios and patient subgroups where pre-operative HbA1c is useful in predicting an increased risk of infectious complications in the post-operative period.

  5. A study on development of the step complexity measure for emergency operating procedures using entropy concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. K.; Jung, W. D.; Kim, J. W.; Ha, J. J.

    2001-04-01

    In complex systems, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) or airplane control systems, human errors play a major role in many accidents. For example, it was reported that about 70% of aviation accidents are due to human errors, and that approximately 28% of accidents in process industries are caused by human errors. According to related studies, written manuals or operating procedures are revealed as one of the most important factors in aviation and manufacturing industries. In case of NPPs, the importance of procedures is more salient than other industries because not only over 50% of human errors were due to procedures but also about 18% of accidents were caused by the failure of following procedures. Thus, the provision of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) that are designed so that the possibility of human errors can be reduced is very important. To accomplish this goal, a quantitative and objective measure that can evaluate EOPs is indispensable. The purpose of this study is the development of a method that can quantify the complexity of a step included in EOPs. In this regard, the step complexity measure (SC) is developed based on three sub-measures such as the SIC (step information complexity), the SLC (step logic complexity) and the SSC (step size complexity). To verify the SC measure, not only quantitative validations (such as comparing SC scores with subjective evaluation results and with averaged step performance time) but also qualitative validations to clarify physical meanings of the SC measure are performed

  6. A study on development of the step complexity measure for emergency operating procedures using entropy concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. K.; Jung, W. D.; Kim, J. W.; Ha, J. J

    2001-04-01

    In complex systems, such as nuclear power plants (NPPs) or airplane control systems, human errors play a major role in many accidents. For example, it was reported that about 70% of aviation accidents are due to human errors, and that approximately 28% of accidents in process industries are caused by human errors. According to related studies, written manuals or operating procedures are revealed as one of the most important factors in aviation and manufacturing industries. In case of NPPs, the importance of procedures is more salient than other industries because not only over 50% of human errors were due to procedures but also about 18% of accidents were caused by the failure of following procedures. Thus, the provision of emergency operating procedures (EOPs) that are designed so that the possibility of human errors can be reduced is very important. To accomplish this goal, a quantitative and objective measure that can evaluate EOPs is indispensable. The purpose of this study is the development of a method that can quantify the complexity of a step included in EOPs. In this regard, the step complexity measure (SC) is developed based on three sub-measures such as the SIC (step information complexity), the SLC (step logic complexity) and the SSC (step size complexity). To verify the SC measure, not only quantitative validations (such as comparing SC scores with subjective evaluation results and with averaged step performance time) but also qualitative validations to clarify physical meanings of the SC measure are performed.

  7. Preliminary report on operational guidelines developed for use in emergency preparedness and response to a radiological dispersal device incident.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J.; Kamboj, S.; Domotor, S.; Wallo, A.; Environmental Science Division; DOE

    2006-12-15

    This report presents preliminary operational guidelines and supporting work products developed through the interagency Operational Guidelines Task Group (OGT). The report consolidates preliminary operational guidelines, all ancillary work products, and a companion software tool that facilitates their implementation into one reference source document. The report is intended for interim use and comment and provides the foundation for fostering future reviews of the operational guidelines and their implementation within emergency preparedness and response initiatives in the event of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) incident. The report principally focuses on the technical derivation and presentation of the operational guidelines. End-user guidance providing more details on how to apply these operational guidelines within planning and response settings is being considered and developed elsewhere. The preliminary operational guidelines are categorized into seven groups on the basis of their intended application within early, intermediate, and long-term recovery phases of emergency response. We anticipate that these operational guidelines will be updated and refined by interested government agencies in response to comments and lessons learned from their review, consideration, and trial application. This review, comment, and trial application process will facilitate the selection of a final set of operational guidelines that may be more or less inclusive of the preliminary operational guidelines presented in this report. These and updated versions of the operational guidelines will be made available through the OGT public Web site (http://ogcms.energy.gov) as they become finalized for public distribution and comment.

  8. Demographic, Operational, and Healthcare Utilization Factors Associated with Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew W.; Salzman, Joshua G.; LeFevere, Robert C.; Thomas, Avis J.; Isenberger, Kurt M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The primary aim of this study was to determine which objectively-measured patient demographics, emergency department (ED) operational characteristics, and healthcare utilization frequencies (care factors) were associated with patient satisfaction ratings obtained from phone surveys conducted by a third-party vendor for patients discharged from our ED. Methods This is a retrospective, observational analysis of data obtained between September 2011 and August 2012 from all English- and Spanish-speaking patients discharged from our ED who were contacted by a third-party patient satisfaction vendor to complete a standardized nine-item telephone survey by a trained phone surveyor. We linked data from completed surveys to the patient’s electronic medical record to abstract additional demographic, ED operational, and healthcare utilization data. We used univariate ordinal logistic regression, followed by two multivariate models, to identify significant predictors of patient satisfaction. Results We included 20,940 patients for analysis. The overall patient satisfaction ratings were as follows: 1=471 (2%); 2=558 (3%); 3=2,014 (10%), 4=5,347 (26%); 5=12,550 (60%). Factors associated with higher satisfaction included race/ethnicity (Non-Hispanic Black; Hispanic patients), age (patients ≥65), insurance (Medicare), mode of arrival (arrived by bus or on foot), and having a medication ordered in the ED. Patients who felt their medical condition did not improve, those treated in our ED behavioral health area, and those experiencing longer wait times had reduced satisfaction. Conclusion These findings provide a basis for development and evaluation of targeted interventions that could be used to improve patient satisfaction in our ED. PMID:26265963

  9. An Experiment on the Impact of Communication Problems in the Multi-cultural Operation of NPPs' Emergency Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seongkeun; Lee, Chanyoung; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jun Su [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-10-15

    Korean government won a contract of nuclear power plants to UAE government in 2010 and nuclear power plants are now under construction in Barakah, UAE. However, with technology transfer and international cooperation, there needs to consider several potential problems due to the differences between two culture of the countries such as language, technical culture and expectation. It is unknown how potential problems can lead to an unsafe plant operation as well. We got to know language problem is the main issue from analyzing the OERs. Korean nuclear power plant operators will work in UAE and they will operate the NPPs with other countries' operators and managers. Therefore they will have to use English when they communicate each other. The purpose of this paper is to confirm how much operators get stress and how much accuracy is declined when operators communicate together in English. Reducing human error is quite important to make nuclear power plants safety. As mental workload of human operator is increased, operators get more stress, then the probability of occurring human error may be increased. It will affect bad influence to nuclear power plants safety. There are many factors to make mental workload increased. We focused on communication problem which is a key factor of the increasing mental workload because many Korean operators will work in UAE nuclear power plants and they may work together with UAE operators. We designed experimental methods to be able to check this problem qualitatively and quantitatively. We analyzed four factors to find the communication problems from the experiments which are accuracy, efficiency, NASA-TLX, and brain wave. Accuracy, efficiency, brain wave are quantitative factors, and NASA-TLX is qualitative factor. To find the impact of how much English affects the operators' workload, we did two cases of experiments; one is experiment for diagnosis and the other is experiment for execution.

  10. An Experiment on the Impact of Communication Problems in the Multi-cultural Operation of NPPs' Emergency Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seongkeun; Lee, Chanyoung; Seong, Poong Hyun; Ha, Jun Su

    2015-01-01

    Korean government won a contract of nuclear power plants to UAE government in 2010 and nuclear power plants are now under construction in Barakah, UAE. However, with technology transfer and international cooperation, there needs to consider several potential problems due to the differences between two culture of the countries such as language, technical culture and expectation. It is unknown how potential problems can lead to an unsafe plant operation as well. We got to know language problem is the main issue from analyzing the OERs. Korean nuclear power plant operators will work in UAE and they will operate the NPPs with other countries' operators and managers. Therefore they will have to use English when they communicate each other. The purpose of this paper is to confirm how much operators get stress and how much accuracy is declined when operators communicate together in English. Reducing human error is quite important to make nuclear power plants safety. As mental workload of human operator is increased, operators get more stress, then the probability of occurring human error may be increased. It will affect bad influence to nuclear power plants safety. There are many factors to make mental workload increased. We focused on communication problem which is a key factor of the increasing mental workload because many Korean operators will work in UAE nuclear power plants and they may work together with UAE operators. We designed experimental methods to be able to check this problem qualitatively and quantitatively. We analyzed four factors to find the communication problems from the experiments which are accuracy, efficiency, NASA-TLX, and brain wave. Accuracy, efficiency, brain wave are quantitative factors, and NASA-TLX is qualitative factor. To find the impact of how much English affects the operators' workload, we did two cases of experiments; one is experiment for diagnosis and the other is experiment for execution

  11. Emerging contaminants at a closed and an operating landfill in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, William J.; Masoner, Jason R.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2012-01-01

    Landfills are the final depositories for a wide range of solid waste from both residential and commercial sources, and therefore have the potential to produce leachate containing many organic compounds found in consumer products such as pharmaceuticals, plasticizers, disinfectants, cleaning agents, fire retardants, flavorings, and preservatives, known as emerging contaminants (ECs). Landfill leachate was sampled from landfill cells of three different age ranges from two landfills in Central Oklahoma. Samples were collected from an old cell containing solid waste greater than 25 years old, an intermediate age cell with solid waste between 16 and 3 years old, and operating cell with solid waste less than 5 years old to investigate the chemical variability and persistence of selected ECs in landfill leachate of differing age sources. Twenty-eight of 69 analyzed ECs were detected in one or more samples from the three leachate sources. Detected ECs ranged in concentration from 0.11 to 114 μg/L and included 4 fecal and plant sterols, 13 household\\industrial, 7 hydrocarbon, and 4 pesticide compounds. Four ECs were solely detected in the oldest leachate sample, two ECs were solely detected in the intermediate leachate sample, and no ECs were solely detected in the youngest leachate sample. Eleven ECs were commonly detected in all three leachate samples and are an indication of the contents of solid waste deposited over several decades and the relative resistance of some ECs to natural attenuation processes in and near landfills.

  12. Female Genital Mutilation as a Concern for Special Operations and Tactical Emergency Medical Support Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Arthur C

    Female genital mutilation (FGM), frequently called female genital cutting or female circumcision, is the intentional disfigurement of the external genitalia in young girls and women for the purpose of reducing libido and ensuring premarital virginity. This traditional, nontherapeutic procedure to suppress libido and prevent sexual intercourse before marriage has been pervasive in Northern Africa, the Middle East, and the Arabian peninsula for over 2,500 years. FGM permanently destroys the genital anatomy while frequently causing multiple and serious complications. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics proposed a classification system of FGM according to the specific genital anatomy removed and the extensiveness of genital disfigurement. Although it has been ruled illegal in most countries, FGM continues to be performed worldwide. With African, Asian, and Middle Eastern immigration to the United States and Europe, western countries are experiencing FGM in regions where these immigrants have concentrated. As deployments of Special Operations Forces (SOF) increase to regions in which FGM is pervasive, and as African, Asian, and Middle Eastern immigration to the United States increases, SOF and Tactical Emergency Medical Support (TEMS) medics will necessarily be called upon to evaluate and treat complications resulting from FGM. The purpose of this article is to educate SOF/TEMS medical personnel about the history, geographic regions, classification of procedures, complications, and medical treatment of patients with FGM. 2017.

  13. Relation between task complexity and variability of procedure progression during an emergency operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yochan; Park, Jinkyun; Jung, Wondea

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The relation between task complexity and the variability of procedure progression was investigated. • The two quantitative measures, TACOM and VPP, were applied to this study. • The task complexity was positively related with the operator’s procedural variability. • The VPP measure can be useful for explaining the operator’s behaviors. - Abstract: In this study, the relation between task complexity and variability of procedure progression during an emergency operation was investigated by comparing the two quantitative measures. To this end, the TACOM measure and VPP measure were applied to evaluate the complexity of tasks and variability of procedure progression, respectively. The TACOM scores and VPP scores were obtained for 60 tasks in the OPERA database, and a correlation analysis between two measures and a multiple regression analysis between the sub-measures of the TACOM measure and VPP measure were conducted. The results showed that the TACOM measure is positively associated with the VPP measure, and the abstraction hierarchy complexity mainly affected the variability among the sub-measures of TACOM. From these findings, it was discussed that the task complexity is related to an operator’s procedural variability and VPP measure can be useful for explaining the operator’s behaviors

  14. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    al-Ayoubi Fawzi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Methods Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. Results There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1% were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures 276 (60.9% were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4% required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%. Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3–17 and 6 (1–22. Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0–11 and 8 (1–39. Conclusion There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient

  15. Distribution of emergency operations and trauma in a Swedish hospital: need for reorganisation of acute surgical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Ayoubi, Fawzi; Eriksson, Helen; Myrelid, Pär; Wallon, Conny; Andersson, Peter

    2012-09-17

    Subspecialisation within general surgery has today reached further than ever. However, on-call time, an unchanged need for broad surgical skills are required to meet the demands of acute surgical disease and trauma. The introduction of a new subspecialty in North America that deals solely with acute care surgery and trauma is an attempt to offer properly trained surgeons also during on-call time. To find out whether such a subspecialty could be helpful in Sweden we analyzed our workload for emergency surgery and trauma. Linköping University Hospital serves a population of 257 000. Data from 2010 for all patients, diagnoses, times and types of operations, surgeons involved, duration of stay, types of injury and deaths regarding emergency procedures were extracted from a prospectively-collected database and analyzed. There were 2362 admissions, 1559 emergency interventions; 835 were mainly abdominal operations, and 724 diagnostic or therapeutic endoscopies. Of the 1559 emergency interventions, 641 (41.1%) were made outside office hours, and of 453 minor or intermediate procedures (including appendicectomy, cholecystectomy, or proctological procedures) 276 (60.9%) were done during the evenings or at night. Two hundred and fifty-four patients were admitted with trauma and 29 (11.4%) required operation, of whom general surgeons operated on eight (3.1%). Thirteen consultants and 11 senior registrars were involved in 138 bowel resections and 164 cholecystectomies chosen as index operations for standard emergency surgery. The median (range) number of such operations done by each consultant was 6 (3-17) and 6 (1-22). Corresponding figures for senior registrars were 7 (0-11) and 8 (1-39). There was an uneven distribution of exposure to acute surgical problems and trauma among general surgeons. Some were exposed to only a few standard emergency interventions and most surgeons did not operate on a single patient with trauma. Further centralization of trauma care, long

  16. Will a Twenty-First Century Logistics Management System Improve Federal Emergency Management Agency's Capability to Deliver Supplies to Critical Areas, during Future Catastrophic Disaster Relief Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gill, Glenda A

    2007-01-01

    The United States Homeland Security's Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) must be prepared at all times to supplement state and local emergency personnel, or to provide logistics support during disaster relief operations...

  17. Piloting a real-time surface water flood nowcasting system for enhancing operational resilience of emergency responders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dapeng; Guan, Mingfu; Wilby, Robert; Bruce, Wright; Szegner, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Emergency services (such as Fire & Rescue, and Ambulance) can face the challenging tasks of having to respond to or operate under extreme and fast changing weather conditions, including surface water flooding. UK-wide, return period based surface water flood risk mapping undertaken by the Environment Agency provides useful information about areas at risks. Although these maps are useful for planning purposes for emergency responders, their utility to operational response during flood emergencies can be limited. A street-level, high resolution, real-time, surface water flood nowcasting system, has been piloted in the City of Leicester, UK to assess emergency response resilience to surface water flooding. Precipitation nowcasting over 7- and 48-hour horizons are obtained from the UK Met Office and used as inputs to the system. A hydro-inundation model is used to simulate urban surface water flood depths/areas at both the city and basin scale, with a 20 m and 3 m spatial resolution respectively, and a 15-minute temporal resolution, 7-hour and 48-hour in advance. Based on this, we evaluate both the direct and indirect impacts of potential surface water flood events on emergency responses, including: (i) identifying vulnerable populations (e.g. care homes and schools) at risk; and (ii) generating novel metrics of accessibility (e.g. travel time from service stations to vulnerable sites; spatial coverage with certain legislative timeframes) in real-time. In doing so, real-time information on potential risks and impacts of emerging flood incidents arising from intense rainfall can be communicated via a dedicated web-based platform to emergency responders thereby improving response times and operational resilience.

  18. 49 CFR 192.605 - Procedural manual for operations, maintenance, and emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... operation of pressure-limiting and control devices. (6) Maintaining compressor stations, including... operations of a pipeline system commence. Appropriate parts of the manual must be kept at locations where..., operating and shutting down gas compressor units. (8) Periodically reviewing the work done by operator...

  19. Experiments on the Impact of language Problems in the Multi-cultural Operation of NPPs' Emergency Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seongkeun; Kim, Taehoon; Seong, Poong Hyun; Ha, Jun Su

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, The Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) was awarded a multi-billion dollar bid to construct the first nuclear power plant in Barakah, UAE. One must keep in mind however, that with technology transfer and international cooperation comes a host of potential problems arising from cultural differences such as language, everyday habitudes and workplace expectation. As of now, how problematic these potential issues may become is unknown. Of the aforementioned factors, communication is perhaps of foremost importance. We investigated UAE culture-related issues through analysis of operating experience reviews (OERs) and came to the conclusion that the language barrier needed utmost attention. Korean nuclear power plant operators will work in UAE and will operate the NPPs with operators and managers of other nationalities as well. The purpose of this paper is firstly to confirm that operators are put under mental stress, and secondly to demonstrate the decline in accuracy when they must work in English. Reducing human error is quite important to make nuclear power plants safer. As the mental workload of human operator is increased, the probability of a human error occurring also increases. It will have a negative influence on the plant’s safety. There are many factors which can potentially increase mental workload. We focused on communication problem which is a key factor of increasing mental workload because many Korean operators will work in UAE nuclear power plants and may work together with UAE operators. From these experiments we compared how performance of both Korean and UAE subjects were decreased when they use English. We designed experimental methods to be able to check this problem qualitatively and quantitatively. We analyzed four factors to find the communication problems from the experiments which are accuracy, efficiency, NASA-TLX, and brain wave. Accuracy, efficiency, brain wave are quantitative factors, and NASA-TLX is qualitative factor. To

  20. Experiments on the Impact of language Problems in the Multi-cultural Operation of NPPs' Emergency Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seongkeun; Kim, Taehoon; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Jun Su [KUSTAR, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-10-15

    In 2010, The Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) was awarded a multi-billion dollar bid to construct the first nuclear power plant in Barakah, UAE. One must keep in mind however, that with technology transfer and international cooperation comes a host of potential problems arising from cultural differences such as language, everyday habitudes and workplace expectation. As of now, how problematic these potential issues may become is unknown. Of the aforementioned factors, communication is perhaps of foremost importance. We investigated UAE culture-related issues through analysis of operating experience reviews (OERs) and came to the conclusion that the language barrier needed utmost attention. Korean nuclear power plant operators will work in UAE and will operate the NPPs with operators and managers of other nationalities as well. The purpose of this paper is firstly to confirm that operators are put under mental stress, and secondly to demonstrate the decline in accuracy when they must work in English. Reducing human error is quite important to make nuclear power plants safer. As the mental workload of human operator is increased, the probability of a human error occurring also increases. It will have a negative influence on the plant’s safety. There are many factors which can potentially increase mental workload. We focused on communication problem which is a key factor of increasing mental workload because many Korean operators will work in UAE nuclear power plants and may work together with UAE operators. From these experiments we compared how performance of both Korean and UAE subjects were decreased when they use English. We designed experimental methods to be able to check this problem qualitatively and quantitatively. We analyzed four factors to find the communication problems from the experiments which are accuracy, efficiency, NASA-TLX, and brain wave. Accuracy, efficiency, brain wave are quantitative factors, and NASA-TLX is qualitative factor. To

  1. Power production operations management : due diligence and emergency planning. The due diligence - management system connection : an operating managers guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.

    1998-01-01

    Steps taken by BC Hydro in implementing a company-wide emergency management system (EMS) were described. The driving force behind the implementation of the EMS were related to the business, namely: (1) to improve business and environmental performance, (2) to provide employees with the skills and tools to make the right decisions, (3) to retain and attract customers, (4) to build relations with regulators, NGOs and the public, and (5) to prove due diligence. This presentation focused on the due diligence component of the EMS. 1 fig

  2. Necessities of the Development of a Database for the Communications Between Nuclear Power Plant Operators in Simulated Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol; Park, Jin Kyun; Jung, Won Dea

    2007-01-01

    Communications among main control room (MCR) operators is an important factor for understanding how and how well MCR operators manage abnormal or emergency situations in nuclear power plants (NPPs). As mentioned by many researchers, the performance of MCR operators in emergency situations in NPPs is strongly affected by not only the cognitive process of each operator, but also by communications and collaboration among operators. Despite of the importance of correct communications among NPP operators, the possibilities of human errors in communications have not received much attention. A representative example for the lack of interests in communication-related problems is the lack of considering communication-related human errors in human reliability analysis (HRA) methods. HRA methods are used, in general, to provide human error probabilities to probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of NPPs. In THERP (Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction), which was developed by Swain and Guttmann and currently is one of the most widely used HRA method, the human errors in communications are not directly considered. The human error probability (HEP) and error factor (EF) data that we could find as the most related ones to communication-related human errors are the estimated probabilities of errors in recalling oral instruction items which are not written down. But, it is obvious that the failure in recalling oral instruction items and misunderstanding oral instruction items are different error types

  3. Operational Intervention Levels for Reactor Emergencies and Methodology for Their Derivation. Date Effective: March 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication provides selected default OIL values, together with a detailed description of the methodology for their derivation, as well as practical tools and recommendations for their use. The tools and default OIL values provided here may be directly integrated into national emergency arrangements or reviewed and modified as necessary to meet the specific emergency preparedness and response arrangements of the country in which they will be applied.

  4. Digital map table with Fovea-Tablett®: Smart furniture for emergency operation centers

    OpenAIRE

    Bader, T.; Meissner, A.; Tscherney, R.

    2008-01-01

    During large-scale crisis events special emergency management structures are put in place in order to execute administrative-strategic and/or technical-tactical functions for potentially large geographical areas. The adequacy of information systems and the communication capabilities within such management structures largely determine the quality of situation awareness and are thus crucial for the effectiveness and efficiency of the emergency managers' work. In this field, this paper makes a t...

  5. Accounting of possibilities of blade oscillation emergence at the calculation of operating wheel of turbomolecular vacuum pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereslavlev, A.V.

    1988-01-01

    Possibilities of blade oscillation emergence in the operating wheel of turbomolecular vacuum pump (TVP) are considered. Permissible value of safety factor for tensile strength in the operating wheel blade root section, at which the necessary fatigue limit of a material is provided for (k=2 for aluminium alloys and k=1.5 for VT-8 titanium alloy) is determined. Methods of calculating the main dimensions of blade operating wheel on the basis of the specified maximum pumping speed, taking account of possibilities of blade oscillation emergence are presented. Results of calculating the 4S max/πD 2 2 complex, characterizing maximum speed of operating wheel pumping, depending on permissible tensipn in the blade root section (σ), are given. It is shown that (σ increase above (2.5 2.7)x10 8 Pa for aluminium alloys and above ∼ 4x10 8 Pa for VT titanium alloy don't cause increase of operating wheel maximum pumping speed. 8 refs.; 6 figs

  6. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Genard Gilles; Portal Romain; Bouchat Virginie; Vanderperre Serge

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assump...

  7. PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PNLC

    PREVIOUS SECOND TRIMESTER ABORTION: A risk factor for third trimester uterine rupture in three ... for accurate diagnosis of uterine rupture. KEY WORDS: Induced second trimester abortion - Previous uterine surgery - Uterine rupture. ..... scarred uterus during second trimester misoprostol- induced labour for a missed ...

  8. Pre-operative risk scores for the prediction of outcome in elderly people who require emergency surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bates Tom

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decision on whether to operate on a sick elderly person with an intra-abdominal emergency is one of the most difficult in general surgery. A predictive risk-score would be of great value in this situation. Methods A Medline search was performed to identify those predictive risk-scores relevant to sick elderly patients in whom emergency surgery might be life-saving. Results Many of the risk scores for surgical patients include the operative findings or require tests which are not available in the acute situation. Most of the relevant studies include younger patients and elective surgery. The Glasgow Aneurysm Score and Hardman Index are specific to ruptured aortic aneurysm while the Boey Score and the Hacetteppe Score are specific to perforated peptic ulcer. The Reiss Index and Fitness Score can be used pre-operatively if the elements of the score can be completed in time. The ASA score, which includes a significant element of subjective clinical judgement, can be augmented with factors such as age and urgency of surgery but no test has a negative predictive value sufficient to recommend against surgical intervention without clinical input. Conclusion Risk scores may be helpful in sick elderly patients needing emergency abdominal surgery but an experienced clinical opinion is still essential.

  9. 40 CFR 60.4204 - What emission standards must I meet for non-emergency engines if I am an owner or operator of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... non-emergency engines if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60... internal combustion engine? (a) Owners and operators of pre-2007 model year non-emergency stationary CI ICE... percent or more, or limit the emissions of NOX in the stationary CI internal combustion engine exhaust to...

  10. 40 CFR 60.4205 - What emission standards must I meet for emergency engines if I am an owner or operator of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... emergency engines if I am an owner or operator of a stationary CI internal combustion engine? 60.4205... internal combustion engine? (a) Owners and operators of pre-2007 model year emergency stationary CI ICE... by 90 percent or more, or limit the emissions of NOX in the stationary CI internal combustion engine...

  11. Methodology of complexity analysis of Emergency Operating Procedures for Nuclear Power Plants; Metodologia de analisis de complejidad de Procedimientos de Operacion de Emergencia de Centrales Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martorell, P.; Martorell, S.; Marton, I.; Pelayo, F.; Mendizabal, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Emergency Operating Procedures (SOPs) set out the stages and contain actions to be executed by an operator to respond to an emergency situation. Methodologies are being developed to assess aspects such as complexity, completeness and vulnerability of these procedures. A methodology is presented in this paper to develop a network topology POE and analysis focused on the same complexity as a fundamental attribute.

  12. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinkelbein J

    2017-02-01

    undertaken in 10.6% of the cases. Although using a different method of data acquisition, this survey confirms previous data on the nature of emergencies and gives plausible numbers.Conclusion: Our data strongly argue for the establishment of a standardized database for recording the incidence and nature of in-flight medical emergencies. Such a database could inform on required medical equipment and cabin crew training. Keywords: in-flight medical emergencies, medical assistance, emergency medical equipment, on-board emergencies, first aid

  13. MULTILATERALISM AND THE EMERGENCE OF ‘MINILATERALISM’ IN EU PEACE OPERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Attinà

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the multilateral practice of peacekeeping and peace support operations has been growing as legitimate instrument to interrupt violence, strengthen security, and protect against gross human rights violations. Invented by the United Nations, peace operations have passed through a process of change that has given new features to multilateral security. Since the late 1980s, the number of UN-authorized peace operations has been growing. Also regional organisations have engaged themselves in an unprecedented number of peace support operations. Recently, the European Union has entered into the practice of peacekeeping, and put multilateralism at the centre of its presence in the world political system. This paper reviews political science knowledge on peace operations (especially, the legitimacy and efficacy issues, and examines the hypothesis of the appearance of minilateralism as the consequence of the engagement of regional organisations and actors, like the EU, in peace operations. The hypothesis is tested by comparing the data of the peace missions of three European organisations (EU, OSCE, and NATO with those of the United Nations. The paper conclusion is that the European states are developing a preference for selective engagement (i.e. minilateralism in peace operations, and the EU is capable of playing both as multilateral and minilateral security provider.

  14. Emergency presurgical visit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Castro Díaz

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective has been to create a Protocol of Structured Presurgical Visit applicable to the patients who are undergoing an emergency surgery, to provide the user and his family all the necessary cares on the basis of those nursing diagnosis that prevail in all the cases of surgical emergency interventions. The used method has been an analysis of the emergency surgical interventions more prevalent from February 2007 until October 2008 in our area (a regional hospital, and statistic of those nursing diagnosis that more frequently appeared in these interventions, the previous moment to the intervention and in addition common to all of them. The results were the following ones: the more frequent emergency operations were: Caesarean, ginecological curettage, laparotomy, help in risk childbirth, orthopaedic surgery and appendectomy. The more frequent nursing diagnosis in all the emergency operations at the previous moment of the intervention were: risk of falls, pain, anxiety, deficit of knowledge, risk of infection, movement stress syndrome, risk of hemorrhage, cutaneous integrity deterioration. The conclusion is that users present at the previous moment to an emergency operation several problems, which force to the emergency surgical ward nurse to the introduction of the nursing methodology, in order to identify the problems, to mark results and to indicate the interventions to achieve those results, besides in a humanitarian way and with quality. This can be obtained by performing a Structured Emergency Presurgical Visit.

  15. Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis for State and Local Emergency Planning and Response. Operational Requirements Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    quickly can users teach themselves to use the model and its out- puts? Efficient to use. Once users have learned to use the model, how fast can they...The following are examples: Common Alerting Protocol Emergency Data Exchange Language Resource Messaging Hospital Availability Exchange. The... videoconferencing or other technology, implementers need to know what they must consider when planning and imple- menting the solution. Guidance in the

  16. The production and operation of the nuclear industry road emergency response plan (NIREP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higson, J.

    1991-01-01

    For many years, radioactive material, ranging from small sources used for medical and commercial purposes to large consignments of irradiated fuel, has been safely moved by road in Great Britain. All such movements are controlled by law and have to meet clearly specified safety requirements concerning packaging and shielding to ensure that if the transporting vehicle is involved in an accident, there is no increase in the hazards involved because of the nature of its load. There are currently some 40,000 movements by road every year, but over more than 25 years, there has never been an accident which has led to any significant radiological impact to members of the public. A national scheme to provide contingency arrangements in the event of a road accident involving radioactive materials has now been set up by the major users and consignors of radioactive material. Called NIREP (Nuclear Industry Road Emergency Response Plan), the member industries have agreed immediately to despatch, from the nearest organisation to the incident, qualified health physicist personnel to deal with any incident involving radioactive material belonging to (or consigned by) any of the participating companies. With their widespread location of establishments, all parts of the UK mainland are covered. Vehicles covered by the scheme will display a NIREP placard, thus giving the Police, or other emergency services, an emergency telephone number of a coordinating centre and information on the site responsible for the load. (author)

  17. Integrating a framework for conducting public health systems research into statewide operations-based exercises to improve emergency preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Jennifer C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the uncommon nature of large-scale disasters and emergencies, public health practitioners often turn to simulated emergencies, known as “exercises”, for preparedness assessment and improvement. Under the right conditions, exercises can also be used to conduct original public health systems research. This paper describes the integration of a research framework into a statewide operations-based exercise program in California as a systems-based approach for studying public health emergency preparedness and response. Methods We developed a research framework based on the premise that operations-based exercises conducted by medical and public health agencies can be described using epidemiologic concepts. Using this framework, we conducted a survey of key local and regional medical and health agencies throughout California following the 2010 Statewide Medical and Health Exercise. The survey evaluated: (1 the emergency preparedness capabilities activated and functions performed in response to the emergency scenario, and (2 the major challenges to inter-organizational communications and information management. Results Thirty-five local health departments (LHDs, 24 local emergency medical services (EMS agencies, 121 hospitals, and 5 Regional Disaster Medical and Health Coordinators/Specialists (RDMHC responded to our survey, representing 57%, 77%, 26% and 83%, respectively, of target agencies in California. We found two sets of response capabilities were activated during the 2010 Statewide Exercise: a set of core capabilities that were common across all agencies, and a set of agency-specific capabilities that were more common among certain agency types. With respect to one response capability in particular, inter-organizational information sharing, we found that the majority of respondents’ comments were related to the complete or partial failure of communications equipment or systems. Conclusions Using the 2010 Statewide

  18. Risk-informed operational decision-making with reduced emergency power system reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinnie, K.S.; Grunberg, V. [Nuclear Safety Solutions Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a conceptual approach to calculating an allowable outage time in the event of loss of a stand-by safety system, in this case the Emergency Power System (EPS), using risk minimization as the guiding principle. The paper reviews the overall role of the electrical power systems in the context of the general design philosophy for nuclear plants, the risk significance of the EPS and the risk implications if the system becomes unavailable. An example is provided to illustrate the procedure. (author)

  19. Automatic diagnosis of alarms: a system to improve operator emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, H.P.; Gimmy, K.L.; Nomm, E.; Finley, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A system is being developed at the Savannah River Plant to help reactor operators respond to multiple alarms in a developing incident situation. The need for such systems has becme evident in recent years, particularly after the Three Mile Island incident

  20. Integrity, safety and efficiency in LNG transfer: impact of emergency shutdown and release operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst, E. van; Driessen, F.P.G.; Nennie, E.D.; Remans, D.; Smeulers, J.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    Caused by the global increase of demand for natural gas the interest in offshore liquefaction, transport and re-gasification grows rapidly. The installations that are presently developed are in essence copies of the onshore systems that are already many years in operation. However, the fact that the

  1. An approach for quantitative evaluation of operator performance in emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ujita, Hiroshi; Kubota, Ryuji; Kawano, Ryutaro.

    1992-01-01

    To understand expert behavior and define what constitutes good performance, human performance quantification was tried from viewpoints of not only error, but also various cognitive, psychological, and behavioral characteristics. Quantitative and qualitative indexes of human performance are proposed for both operator individual and crew points of view, among which cognitive and behavioral aspects are the most important. (author)

  2. Recent developments in the applications of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) for emergency response planning and operational forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, W.A.; Tremback, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    The authors will summarize ten years of developing and applying the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) to emergency response and operational dispersion forecasting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). RAMS forms the core of two workstation-based operational systems, ERDAS (the Emergency Response Dose Assessment System) and PROWESS (Parallelized RAMS Operational Weather Simulation System) which are undergoing extensive operational testing prior to potential deployment as part of the range forecasting system at KSC. RAMS has been interfaced with HYPACT (the Hybrid Particle and Concentration Transport Model) to produce detailed 3-D dispersion forecasts from a variety of sources including cold spills, routine launch operations, and explosive conflagrations of launch vehicles

  3. A pre-operative nomogram for decision making in oncological surgical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Frédéric; Mazouni, Chafika; Bitsakou, Georgina; Morice, Philippe; Goéré, Diane; Honoré, Charles; Elias, Dominique

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to propose a clinical decision-making tool for predicting mortality in patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery with a palliative intent in the oncology setting. Identification of all emergency surgical procedures performed in a Department of Oncologic Surgery in a Comprehensive Cancer Center between January 2008 and January 2013. Multivariate logistic and Cox regression models were used to identify factors predicitve of mortality at 3 months and survival probabilities. Models were internally validated using bootstrapping and calibration. The mortality rates were 30% at 1 month, 46.7% at 3 months and 83.3% at the end of the study. One model based on the albumin level and the P-POSSUM score (AUC: 0.725) adequately predicted mortality at 3 months. A survival nomogram predicted mortality with a concordance index (CI) of 0.718, using the following factors: WHO performance status (P = 0.02), albumin level (P surgical decision making should be based on the use of these tools. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Applying advanced analytics to guide emergency department operational decisions: A proof-of-concept study examining the effects of boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Taylor, R; Venkatesh, Arjun; Parwani, Vivek; Chekijian, Sharon; Shapiro, Marc; Oh, Andrew; Harriman, David; Tarabar, Asim; Ulrich, Andrew

    2018-01-04

    Emergency Department (ED) leaders are increasingly confronted with large amounts of data with the potential to inform and guide operational decisions. Routine use of advanced analytic methods may provide additional insights. To examine the practical application of available advanced analytic methods to guide operational decision making around patient boarding. Retrospective analysis of the effect of boarding on ED operational metrics from a single site between 1/2015 and 1/2017. Times series were visualized through decompositional techniques accounting for seasonal trends, to determine the effect of boarding on ED performance metrics and to determine the impact of boarding "shocks" to the system on operational metrics over several days. There were 226,461 visits with the mean (IQR) number of visits per day was 273 (258-291). Decomposition of the boarding count time series illustrated an upward trend in the last 2-3 quarters as well as clear seasonal components. All performance metrics were significantly impacted (pboarding count, except for overall Press Ganey scores (pboarding shocks are characterized by changes in the performance metrics within the first day that fade out after 4-5days. In this study regarding the use of advanced analytics in daily ED operations, time series analysis provided multiple useful insights into boarding and its impact on performance metrics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Neuhaus, Christopher; Böhm, Lennert; Kalina, Steffen; Braunecker, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society. Materials and methods Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany), an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM) were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015). Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (pemergency. Demographic parameters in this survey were in concordance with the society members’ demographics. The mean duration of flights was 5.7 hours and the respondents performed 7.1 airline flights per year (median). Cardiovascular (40.0%) and neurological disorders (17.8%) were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7%) provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was undertaken in 10.6% of the cases. Although using a different method of data acquisition, this survey confirms previous data on the nature of emergencies and gives plausible numbers. Conclusion Our data strongly argue for the establishment of a standardized database for recording the incidence and nature of in-flight medical emergencies. Such a database could inform on required medical equipment and cabin crew training. PMID:28260956

  6. Satellite and Aerial Remote Sensing in Support of Disaster Response Operations Conducted by the Texas Division of Emergency Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, G. L.; Tapley, B. D.; Bettadpur, S. V.; Howard, T.; Porter, B.; Smith, S.; Teng, L.; Tapley, C.

    2014-12-01

    The effective use of remote sensing products as guidance to emergency managers and first responders during field operations requires close coordination and communication with state-level decision makers, incident commanders and the leaders of individual strike teams. Information must be tailored to meet the needs of different emergency support functions and must contain current (ideally near real-time) data delivered in standard formats in time to influence decisions made under rapidly changing conditions. Since 2003, a representative of the University of Texas Center for Space Research (CSR) has served as a member of the Governor's Emergency Management Council and has directed the flow of information from remote sensing observations and high performance computing modeling and simulations to the Texas Division of Emergency Management in the State Operations Center. The CSR team has supported response and recovery missions resulting from hurricanes, tornadoes, flash floods, wildfires, oil spills and other natural and man-made disasters in Texas and surrounding states. Through web mapping services, state emergency managers and field teams have received threat model forecasts, real-time vehicle tracking displays and imagery to support search-and-clear operations before hurricane landfall, search-and-rescue missions following floods, tactical wildfire suppression, pollution monitoring and hazardous materials detection. Data servers provide near real-time satellite imagery collected by CSR's direct broadcast receiving system and post data products delivered during activations of the United Nations International Charter on Space and Major Disasters. In the aftermath of large-scale events, CSR is charged with tasking state aviation resources, including the Air National Guard and Texas Civil Air Patrol, to acquire geolocated aerial photography of the affected region for wide area damage assessment. A data archive for each disaster is available online for years following

  7. Confirmatory Survey Results for the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant, Haddam, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requested that the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) perform a confirmatory survey on the Emergency Operations Facility (EOF) at the Connecticut Yankee Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) in Haddam, Connecticut. The EOF building was used for emergency operations, a training center, and as an in-processing center for the HNP site. Whole body counters and the respirator fit test facility were also located in the EOF. Currently, the EOF is used as office space for the decommissioning project and recently, the Health Physics (HP) Count Room and Final Status Survey (FSS) instrumentation calibration activities were relocated to this facility. The EOF has always been located outside of the Radiological Control Area (RCA). The only known licensed radioactive materials used or stored in the facility were sealed calibration/check sources used for HP instruments and the Whole Body Counter and soil samples containing small amounts of radioactivity. During the free release surveys (FRS), Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) personnel identified several areas of elevated activity; most of the areas of identified elevated activity were deemed to be from naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) within clay tiles. One location of site-generated elevated activity was determined on the floor in the north hallway. At this location, a portion of the carpet was removed for further evaluation by gamma spectroscopy and the results indicated cesium-137 (Cs-137) and cobalt-60 (Co-60) contamination within the carpet. It was suspected that the contamination entered the facility by adhering to the bottom of a workers shoe and was transferred to the carpet. The

  8. Studying the operation of a VVER steam generator in the condensing mode at different parameters of emergency processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. V.; Shlepkin, A. S.; Kalyakin, D. S.; Soshkina, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    The article presents the results of the experimental study of heat and mass transfer processes in an NPP steam generator during the operation of passive safety systems of new-generation VVER reactor installations. At the GE2M-PG test rig in the Leypunsky Institute for Physics and Power Engineering, two series of experiments corresponding to different stages of the accident were completed. In these experiments, the performance of VVER steam generator in the condensing mode with and without the removal of gas-vapor mixture from the "cold" header has been studied. As a result of the first series of experiments, it was found that, for any of the parameters of the emergency process, the steam generator's power does not drop below 80% of the original value. Furthermore, we revealed that the composition and physical properties of gases in the investigated concentration range did not notably affect the processes in the steam generator. In the second series of experiments without removal of noncondensable gases, the influence of parameters of the emergency process on the efficiency of heat transfer in the steam generator operating in the condensing mode was investigated. In order to study the heat transfer processes, we studied the change of the temperature difference between the media of the first and second circuits in our experiments. We found that the value of the temperature difference depends on both the mass of noncondensable gases accumulated in the tube bundle and their accumulation rate. The accumulation rate is determined by the power of the steam generator and the concentration of gases entering the steam generator. As a result of the analysis of experimental data, we obtained the analytical dependence reflecting change in the power of the steam generator operating in the emergency condensing mode.

  9. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genard, Gilles; Portal, Romain; Bouchat, Virginie; Vanderperre, Serge

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  10. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genard Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  11. Electric Vehicles in Logistics and Transportation: A Survey on Emerging Environmental, Strategic, and Operational Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Juan, Angel Alejandro; Mendez, Carlos Alberto; Faulin, Javier; de Armas, Jesica; Grasman, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Current logistics and transportation (L&T) systems include heterogeneous fleets consisting of common internal combustion engine vehicles as well as other types of vehicles using ?green? technologies, e.g., plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles (EVs). However, the incorporation of EVs in L&T activities also raise some additional challenges from the strategic, planning, and operational perspectives. For instance, smart cities are required to provide recharge stations for electr...

  12. Flattening of Sustainment: The Interaction of Technology, Information, Force Structure, and the Emergence of Operational Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-21

    respective theaters. The ballet between the combatant commands, the generating force, and the requirement of operations to maximize the greatest amount...based on the logistics failures of the campaign. 18John J. McGrath, The Brigade: A History ; Its Organization and Employment in the United States Army...of Military History 55, no. 1 (January 1991): 39. http://www.jstor.org/stable/ 1986127?seq=1. 15 Corps, Division, and Brigade trains and movement

  13. Randomized Controlled Study on Safety and Feasibility of Transfusion Trigger Score of Emergency Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Xing Liu

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Peri-operative Transfusion Trigger Score-E evaluation scheme is used to guide the application of RBC. There are no differences in the recent prognosis of patients with the traditional transfusion guidelines. This scheme is safe; Compared with doctor experience-based subjective assessment, the scoring scheme was closer to patient physiological needs for transfusion and more reasonable; Utilization rate and the per capita consumption of RBC are obviously declined, which has clinical significance and is feasible. Based on the abovementioned three points, POTTS-E scores scheme is safe, reasonable, and practicable and has the value for carrying out multicenter and large sample clinical researches.

  14. Computer simulation of WWER - 440 normal and emergency transient operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izbeshesku, M.; Rajka, V.; Untaru, S.; Dumitresku, A.; Paneh, M.; Turku, I.

    1976-01-01

    Results of computer realization of a model for studying transient process in the nuclear system of vapour production at the WWER - 40 peactor nuclear power plant are presented. The first circuit model consists of a number of modules, corresponding to its main parts: for each module derived were the equations describing neutron and thermohydraulic parameters. The second circuit effect is taken into account by heat quantity accepted from a steam generator. The equations are mostly differential with constant coefficients. Coefficient values and initial values of physical quantities are evaluated according to the technical literature. Both manual and automatic operations are modelled [ru

  15. A decision support framework for characterizing and managing dermal exposures to chemicals during Emergency Management and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, G Scott; Hudson, Naomi L; Maier, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Emergency Management and Operations (EMO) personnel are in need of resources and tools to assist in understanding the health risks associated with dermal exposures during chemical incidents. This article reviews available resources and presents a conceptual framework for a decision support system (DSS) that assists in characterizing and managing risk during chemical emergencies involving dermal exposures. The framework merges principles of three decision-making techniques: 1) scenario planning, 2) risk analysis, and 3) multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). This DSS facilitates dynamic decision making during each of the distinct life cycle phases of an emergency incident (ie, preparedness, response, or recovery) and identifies EMO needs. A checklist tool provides key questions intended to guide users through the complexities of conducting a dermal risk assessment. The questions define the scope of the framework for resource identification and application to support decision-making needs. The framework consists of three primary modules: 1) resource compilation, 2) prioritization, and 3) decision. The modules systematically identify, organize, and rank relevant information resources relating to the hazards of dermal exposures to chemicals and risk management strategies. Each module is subdivided into critical elements designed to further delineate the resources based on relevant incident phase and type of information. The DSS framework provides a much needed structure based on contemporary decision analysis principles for 1) documenting key questions for EMO problem formulation and 2) a method for systematically organizing, screening, and prioritizing information resources on dermal hazards, exposures, risk characterization, and management.

  16. Electric Vehicles in Logistics and Transportation: A Survey on Emerging Environmental, Strategic, and Operational Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Alejandro Juan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current logistics and transportation (L&T systems include heterogeneous fleets consisting of common internal combustion engine vehicles as well as other types of vehicles using “green” technologies, e.g., plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles (EVs. However, the incorporation of EVs in L&T activities also raise some additional challenges from the strategic, planning, and operational perspectives. For instance, smart cities are required to provide recharge stations for electric-based vehicles, meaning that investment decisions need to be made about the number, location, and capacity of these stations. Similarly, the limited driving-range capabilities of EVs, which are restricted by the amount of electricity stored in their batteries, impose non-trivial additional constraints when designing efficient distribution routes. Accordingly, this paper identifies and reviews several open research challenges related to the introduction of EVs in L&T activities, including: (a environmental-related issues; and (b strategic, planning and operational issues associated with “standard” EVs and with hydrogen-based EVs. The paper also analyzes how the introduction of EVs in L&T systems generates new variants of the well-known Vehicle Routing Problem, one of the most studied optimization problems in the L&T field, and proposes the use of metaheuristics and simheuristics as the most efficient way to deal with these complex optimization problems.

  17. Use of the Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS) for Emergency Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durling, Jr. R.L.; Price, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    The Homeland-Defense Operational Planning System (HOPS), is a new operational planning tool leveraging Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's expertise in weapons systems and in sparse information analysis to support the defense of the U.S. homeland. HOPS provides planners with a basis to make decisions to protect against acts of terrorism, focusing on the defense of facilities critical to U.S. infrastructure. Criticality of facilities, structures, and systems is evaluated on a composite matrix of specific projected casualty, economic, and sociopolitical impact bins. Based on these criteria, significant unidentified vulnerabilities are identified and secured. To provide insight into potential successes by malevolent actors, HOPS analysts strive to base their efforts mainly on unclassified open-source data. However, more cooperation is needed between HOPS analysts and facility representatives to provide an advantage to those whose task is to defend these facilities. Evaluated facilities include: refineries, major ports, nuclear power plants and other nuclear licensees, dams, government installations, convention centers, sports stadiums, tourist venues, and public and freight transportation systems. A generalized summary of analyses of U.S. infrastructure facilities will be presented

  18. Correlates of team effectiveness: An exploratory study of firefighter's operations during emergency situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouanne, Elise; Charron, Camilo; Chauvin, Christine; Morel, Gaël

    2017-05-01

    This paper examines elements contributing to the effectiveness of firefighting teams carrying out typical tasks. Fourteen firefighter crews were filmed during nineteen real operations and answered questionnaires relating to psychosocial dimensions. Results have shown that "enriched closed-loops" of communication, positive emotional interactions and a "gamma" type of adaptation are positively related to team effectiveness. Conversely, open and incomplete loops of communication, negative emotional interactions, "beta" and "alpha" types of adaptation are negatively related to team effectiveness. Furthermore, there is a mediated link between organisational trust and motivation on the one hand and team effectiveness on the other. These findings highlight the necessity to consider both cognitive and psychosocial variables to account for team effectiveness in the firefighting profession. They also emphasize the need to expand firefighter training to the "non-technical" aspects of the competence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Incidence, characteristics and management of pain in one operational area of medical emergency teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosiński, Sylweriusz; Bryja, Magdalena; Wojtaszowicz, Rafał; Górka, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Experience of pain associated with both chronic as well as acute medical conditions is a main cause for call for ambulance. The aim of this study was to establish both frequency and characteristics of pain reported by patients treated in pre-hospital environment in a single operational area. The supplementary goal was an analysis of methods of pain alleviation applied by medical personnel in the above described scenario. The written documentation of 6 months of year 2009 provided by doctor-manned as well as paramedic-only ambulances operating in Tatra county, Małopolska, Poland was analyzed. Medical personnel inquired about pain experienced in 57.4% of cases, 10-point numerical rating scale was used in 22.3% of patients. Pain was reported by 43.8% of patients, the most frequent reasons of experienced pain were trauma and cardiovascular diseases. In almost half of the cases pain was referred to the areas of chest and abdomen. Non-traumatic pain was reported by 47.7% of patients, post-traumatic in 41.3% of cases, 11% of subjects reported ischemic chest pain. 42.3% of pain-reporting patients received some form of analgesia, yet only 3% of subjects in this group received opiates. Personnel of paramedic-only ambulances tended to use pain intensity scale more often (P pain alleviating drugs noticeably less often than the doctor-manned teams (P pain alleviating drugs, opiates especially, was inadequate in proportion to frequency and intensity of pain reported by patients. General, nation-wide standards of pain measurement and treatment in pre-hospital rescue are suggested as a means to improve the efficacy of pain reduction treatment.

  20. Protocol for bedside laparotomy in trauma and emergency general surgery: a low return to the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jose J; Mejia, Vicente; Subhawong, Andrea Proctor; Subhawong, Ty; Miller, Richard S; O'Neill, Patrick J; Morris, John A

    2005-11-01

    Bedside laparotomy (BSL) was introduced as a heroic procedure in trauma patients too unstable for safe transport to the operating room (OR). We hypothesize a BSL protocol would maintain patient safety while reducing OR use. Patients were prospectively entered into a BSL protocol from July 2002 to June 2003 and retrospectively reviewed. Protocol indications for BSL were abdominal compartment syndrome, decompensation due to hemorrhage, washout/closure, and sepsis in a patient too unstable for safe transport to the OR. Primary outcomes were mortality, emergent return to OR, and primary fascial closure (PFC). Trauma operating room charges and OR time were analyzed. One hundred thirty-three BSL were performed on 60 patients with an overall mortality of 23.3 per cent (14/60). There was an average of 2.2 BSL per patient (range 1-8). Indications for BSL were 1) explore/washout (n = 100, 75.2%), 2) decompression (n = 14, 10.5%), 3) infection/abscess (n = 12, 9.0%), 4) hemorrhage (n = 7, 5.3%). Five of 133 BSL (5.8%) were emergently returned to the OR because of perforation or compromised bowel. Trauma OR charges were dollar 5,300 per cases with 2.12 hours per cases. The protocol standardized the conduct of BSL procedure to allow for a low return to OR rate of 5.8 per cent and had an overall in-hospital mortality rate of 23.3 per cent. Primary fascial closure of the abdomen had a significantly reduced hospital stay. BSL allowed trauma OR charges of dollar 5,300 per cases with 2.12 hours per cases savings.

  1. Methodology for the identification of the factors that can influence the performance of operators of nuclear power plants control room under emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Bernardo Spitz; Santos, Isaac J.A. Luquetti

    2009-01-01

    In order to minimize the human errors of the operators in a nuclear power plan control room, during emergency situations, it has to be considered the factors which affect the human performance. Work situations adequately projected, compatible with the necessities, capacities and human limitations, taking into consideration the factors which affect the operator performance . This paper aims to develop a methodology for identification of the factors affecting the operator performance under emergency situation, using the aspects defined by the human reliability analysis focusing the judgment done by specialists

  2. Development of a quantitative evaluation method for non-technical skills preparedness of operation teams in nuclear power plants to deal with emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We selected important non-technical skills for emergency conditions in NPPs. ► We proposed an evaluation method for the selected non-technical skills. ► We conducted two sets of training, 9 experiments each, with real plant operators. ► Teams showed consistent non-technical skills preparedness with changing scenarios. ► Non-technical skills preparedness gives plausible explanations why teams fail tasks. -- Abstract: Many statistical results from safety reports tell that human related errors are the dominant influencing factor on the safe operation of power plants. Fortunately, training operators for the technical and non-technical skills can prevent many types of human errors. In this study, four important non-technical skills in safety critical industries – medical, aviation, and nuclear – were selected to describe behaviors of operation teams in emergency conditions of nuclear power plants (NPPs): communication, leadership, situation awareness, and decision-making skills. Also, preparedness of the non-technical skills was defined, and a quantification method of those skills called NoT-SkiP (Non-Technical Skills Preparedness) was developed to represent ‘how well operation teams are prepared to deal with emergency conditions’ in the non-technical skills aspect by analyzing monitoring-control patterns and a verbal protocol. Two case studies were conducted to validate the method. The first case was applied to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) training. Independent variables were scenario, training repetition, and members. Relative values of the NoT-SkiP showed a consistent trend with changing scenarios. However, when training was repeated with the same scenario, NoT-SkiP values of some team were changed. It was supposed that leaders of some teams exerted their knowledge acquired from the previous training and gave up thoroughness of using procedures. When members especially who play a dominant role

  3. The development of Operational Intervention Levels (OILs) for Soils - A decision support tool in nuclear and radiological emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee Zhi Yi, Amelia; Dercon, Gerd; Blackburn, Carl; Kheng, Heng Lee

    2017-04-01

    In the event of a large-scale nuclear accident, the swift implementation of response actions is imperative. For food and agriculture, it is important to restrict contaminated food from being produced or gathered, and to put in place systems to prevent contaminated produce from entering the food chain. Emergency tools and response protocols exist to assist food control and health authorities but they tend to focus on radioactivity concentrations in food products as a means of restricting the distribution and sale of contaminated produce. Few, if any, emergency tools or protocols focus on the food production environment, for example radioactivity concentrations in soils. Here we present the Operational Intervention Levels for Soils (OIL for Soils) concept, an optimization tool developed at the IAEA to facilitate agricultural decision making and to improve nuclear emergency preparedness and response capabilities. Effective intervention relies on the prompt availability of radioactivity concentration data and the ability to implement countermeasures. Sampling in food and agriculture can be demanding because it may involve large areas and many sample types. In addition, there are finite resources available in terms of manpower and laboratory support. Consequently, there is a risk that timely decision making will be hindered and food safety compromised due to time taken to sample and analyse produce. However, the OILs for Soils concept developed based on experience in Japan can help in this situation and greatly assist authorities responsible for agricultural production. OILs for Soils - pre-determined reference levels of air dose rates linked to radionuclide concentrations in soils - can be used to trigger response actions particularly important for agricultural and food protection. Key considerations in the development of the OILs for Soils are: (1) establishing a pragmatic sampling approach to prioritize and optimize available resources and data requirements for

  4. Comparison of Two Watch Schedules for Personnel at the White House Military Office President's Emergency Operations Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shattuck, Nita Lewis; Matsangas, Panagiotis; Eriksen, Elke; Kulubis, Spiros

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess effectiveness of an alternative, 24-hr-on/72-hr-off watchstanding schedule on sleep and morale of personnel assigned to the President's Emergency Operations Center (PEOC). As part of the White House Military Office, PEOC personnel historically worked a 12-hr "Panama" watch schedule. Personnel reported experiencing chronic insufficient and disrupted sleep patterns and sought advice for improving their watchstanding schedule. Participants (N = 14 active-duty military members, ages 29 to 42 years) completed the Profile of Mood State (POMS) three times: before, during, and after switching to the alternative schedule with 5-hr sleep periods built into their workday. Participants completed a poststudy questionnaire to assess individual schedule preferences. Sleep was measured actigraphically, supplemented by activity logs. As indicated by POMS scores, mood improved significantly on the new schedule. Although average total sleep amount did not change substantively, the timing of sleep was more consistent on the new schedule, resulting in better sleep hygiene. PEOC personnel overwhelmingly preferred the new schedule, reporting not only that they felt more rested but that the new schedule was more conducive to the demands of family life. Demands of family life and time spent commuting were found to be critical factors for acceptance of the alternative schedule. This new schedule will be most effective if personnel adhere to the scheduled rest periods assigned during their 24-hr duty. A successful schedule should avoid conflicts between social life and operational demands. Results may lead to changes in the work schedules of other departments with similar 24/7 responsibilities. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  5. Relationship between physiologic and psychological measures of autonomic activation in operating room teams during a simulated airway emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phitayakorn, Roy; Minehart, Rebecca D; Hemingway, Maureen W; Pian-Smith, May C M; Petrusa, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Emotional stability is important for individual and team performance during operating room (OR) emergencies. We compared physiologic and psychological anxiety assessments in OR teams during simulated events. Twenty-two teams participated in a "cannot intubate/cannot ventilate" simulation. Participants completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and wore a galvanic skin response (GSR) sensor. Differences in State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores and GSR levels were analyzed. Anxiety scores were correlated with GSR levels. Resident physicians had significantly higher trait anxiety than the nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and surgical technicians (43.9 ± 9.9 vs 38.3 ± 9.3, P groups showed significant increases in GSR. Psychological and physiologic data did not correlate. Senior practitioners and residents have higher levels of baseline trait anxiety for unclear reasons. Also, OR team training results in physiological signs of anxiety that do not correlate to self-reported psychological measurements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Response, Emergency Staging, Communications, Uniform Management, and Evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) : Concept of Operations. [supporting datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    This zip file contains 45 files of data to support FHWA-JPO-13-063 Response, Emergency Staging, Communications, Uniform Management, and Evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) : Concept of Operations. Zip size is 9.9 MB. The files have been uploaded as-is; no fu...

  7. Calculation of the operation mode of the emergency condenser (EC) of the INKA test facility with ATHLET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilschuetz, H.G. [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Leyer, S. [AREVA NP GmbH, Offenbach (Germany); Kruessenberg, A.K.; Schaefer, F. [FZD Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    On 4{sup th} of April 2008 AREVA and E.ON signed a cooperation agreement. An essential part of this is the Final Basic Design Contract SWR 1000. On 28{sup th} of November 2008 AREVA and E.ON have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to develop a commercially viable product and to focus on the successful deployment of the SWR 1000 in a collaborative manner. Meanwhile a rebranding was conducted: the new name of this evolutionary boiling water reactor of the Generation III+ is KERENATM trademark. It is the common intention of AREVA and E.ON to complete the basic design until the end of 2010 so as to reach a design ready for bid and ready for licensing for a construction primarily in a European country. The KERENA trademark is not a completely new plant concept, it is a proven further developed design, based on Gundremmingen NPP and the whole accumulated German BWR operating experience. The design shall fulfill the following major safety items: - further reduction of core damage frequency, - control of postulated core melt accident by in-vessel melt retention without emergency response actions, - introduction of passive safety systems (principle of diversity and redundancy), and - long grace periods for manual intervention (> 3 days). Especially for the newly introduced passive safety systems, which are described in detail, not only an experimental testing and validation is needed, but also thermal-hydraulic system codes have to be qualified, to be able to consider the mostly gravity driven 3D-flow phenomena correctly. Since in some countries the code ATHLET is well established, it is useful to prove its capabilities or to enhance the capabilities, if necessary. Therefore the FZD (Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf) is performing a model development and calculations for code validation of the test results from INKA (INtegral test facility in KArlstein, Germany). This paves the way for licensing procedures later on. (orig.)

  8. DISTANCE ESTIMATION TO THE INTERPHASE-FAULT LOCATION IN THE DISTRIBUTIVE AIR-LINE GRIDS BASED ON ANALYSIS OF THE HARMONIC COMPONENT PARAMETERS OF THE OPERATING EMERGENCY CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Kalentionok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most techniques of the fault location based on the one-side measurement of the emergency mode characteristics use the short-circuit steady-regime parameters in the fundamental mode frequency. This approach compels to seek additional devices for tuning out the loadings of transformer-substations. Besides, it is susceptible to the nonlinearity effect of closed-circuit arc in the fault location which significantly reduces the accuracy of the remote location of the failure.For estimating the distance to the location of interphase failure on the aerial distributive transmission lines the article proposes a new technique employing the harmonic components of the operating emergency parameters. The algorithm of the present method realization includes: taking down oscillograms of the emergency-mode parameter values (e. g. in doublephase failure – the short-circuit current, the linear voltage between the faulty phases with necessary discretization interval; expansion of the operating emergency parameters in a Fourier series (realized with a quick Fourier expansion algorithm; estimating the distance to the fault location by the analytical expression; performing the statistical analysis of a row of distance values and finding the most probable distance to the fault location.For effectiveness investigation of the proposed method of trapping harmonic components the paper considers a 10 kV distributive electrical grid feeding nine transformer substations. The authors performed calculation of normal and emergency modes utilizing computer program MatLab in dynamic simulating environment Simulink. The arc is represented by a block describing the linearized dynamic volt-ampere characteristic of the arc. The built characteristic curves demonstrate dependence of the fault-location distance value from the frequency at which this value is obtained and the number if its reiterations. Based on the calculations, the authors establish that the accuracy of the distance

  9. Operation Sea Signal: U.S. Military Support for Caribbean Migration Emergencies, May 1994 to February 1996

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bentley, David

    1996-01-01

    Both Haitian and Cuban migration flows during this emergency were prompted by a migrant perception that the risk of a hazardous sea voyage was justified by an increased chance of reaching the United States...

  10. Peri-operative management of severe pre-eclampsia with kyphoscoliosis and poliomyelitis for emergency caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Bhiwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37 years old primigravida, 31 weeks gestation with severe preeclampsia [BP = 180/120 mm Hg] with severe kyphoscoliosis and polio affecting right lower limb was admitted in emergency with complaint of blurring of vision and pedal edema. An emergency caesarean section was conducted under general anaesthesia because of a failed spinal anaesthesia. Perioperative anaesthetic management and her postoperative course are discussed.

  11. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  12. Preparedness of Operation Teams' Non-technical Skills in a Main Control Room of Nuclear Power Plants to Manage Emergency Situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Human reliability is one of the important determinants for the system safety. Nuclear Energy Agency reported that approximately half of events reported by foreign nuclear industry were related with inappropriate human actions. The human error problems can be viewed in two ways: the person approach and the system approach. Other terms to represent each approach are active failures and latent conditions. Active failures are unsafe acts committed by people who are in direct contact with systems whereas latent conditions are the inevitable 'resident pathogens' within the system. To identify what kinds of non-technical skills were needed to cope with emergency conditions, a method to evaluate preparedness of task management in emergency conditions based on monitoring patterns was presented. Five characteristics were suggested to evaluate emergency task management and communication: latent mistake resistibility, latent violation resistibility, thoroughness, communication, and assertiveness. Case study was done by analyzing emergency training of 9 different real operation teams in the reference plant. The result showed that the 9 teams had their own emergency task management skills which resulted in good and bad performances

  13. 18 CFR 376.209 - Procedures during periods of emergency requiring activation of the Continuity of Operations Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... staff audit reports; (8) Contacts with the Commission's Enforcement Hotline; (9) Accounting filings.... (b) Standards of conduct for transmission service providers. During periods when the Commission's... each emergency that resulted in any deviation from the standards of conduct within 24 hours of such...

  14. Damage control operations in non-trauma patients: defining criteria for the staged rapid source control laparotomy in emergency general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Robert D; Peitzman, Andrew B; Sperry, Jason L; Gallaher, Jared R; Neff, Lucas P; Sun, Yankai; Miller, Preston R; Chang, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    The staged laparotomy in the operative management of emergency general surgery (EGS) patients is an extension of trauma surgeons operating on this population. Indications for its application, however, are not well defined, and are currently based on the lethal triad used in physiologically-decompensated trauma patients. This study sought to determine the acute indications for the staged, rapid source control laparotomy (RSCL) in EGS patients. All EGS patients undergoing emergent staged RSCL and non-RSCL over 3 years were studied. Demographics, physiologic parameters, perioperative variables, outcomes, and survival were compared. Logistic regression models determined the influence of physiologic parameters on mortality and postoperative complications. EGS-RSCL indications were defined. 215 EGS patients underwent emergent laparotomy; 53 (25 %) were staged RSCL. In the 53 patients who underwent a staged RSCL based on the lethal triad, adjusted multivariable regression analysis shows that when used alone, no component of the lethal triad independently improved survival. Staged RSCL may decrease mortality in patients with preoperative severe sepsis / septic shock, and an elevated lactate (≥3); acidosis (pH ≤ 7.25); elderly (≥70); male gender; and multiple comorbidities (≥3). Of the 162 non-RSCL emergent laparotomies, 27 (17 %) required unplanned re-explorations; of these, 17 (63 %) had sepsis preoperatively and 9 (33 %) died. The acute physiologic indicators that help guide operative decisions in trauma may not confer a similar survival advantage in EGS. To replace the lethal triad, criteria for application of the staged RSCL in EGS need to be defined. Based on these results, the indications should include severe sepsis / septic shock, lactate, acidosis, gender, age, and pre-existing comorbidities. When correctly applied, the staged RSCL may help to improve survival in decompensated EGS patients.

  15. Aircrew Performance Cutting-Edge Tech: Emerging Human Performance Enhancement Technology Vision in Support of Operational Military Aviation Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belland, Kris

    2002-01-01

    Using cutting-edge technology to create a human factors advantage in military operations will contribute to success on the battlefield of the future whether below the surface, on the surface, in the air, or in space...

  16. Aircrew Performance Cutting-Edge Technology: Emerging Human Performance Enhancement Technology Vision in Support of Operational Military Aviation Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belland, Kris M

    2003-01-01

    Using cutting-edge technology to create a human factors advantage in military operations will contribute to success on the battlefield of the future whether below the surface, on the surface, in the air, or in space...

  17. Response, Emergency Staging, Communications, Uniform Management, and Evacuation (R.E.S.C.U.M.E.) : concept of operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    The US DOT sponsored Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA) program seeks to identify, develop, and deploy applications that leverage the full potential of connected vehicles, travelers and infrastructure to enhance current operational practices and tra...

  18. The new emergency structure of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia during the L’Aquila 2009 seismic sequence: the contribution of the COES (Seismological Emergency Operation Center - Centro Operativo Emergenza Sismica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, M.; Govoni, A.; Nostro, C.; La Longa, F.; Crescimbene, M.; Pignone, M.; Selvaggi, G.; Working Group, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Centro Nazionale Terremoti (CNT - National Earthquake Center), departement of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), has designed and setup a rapid response emergency structure to face the occurrence of strong earthquakes. This structure is composed by a real time satellite telemetered temporary seismic network (see Abruzzese et al., 2009 Fall AGU) used to improve the hypocentral locations of the INGV National Seismic Network, a stand alone temporary seismic network whose goal is primarily the high dynamic/high resolution data acquisition in the epicentral area and a mobile operational center, the COES (Centro Operativo Emergenza Sismica, Seismological Emergency Operational Center). The COES structure is a sort of mobile office equipped with satellite internet communication that can be rapidly installed in the disaster area to support all the INGV staff operative needs and to cooperate with the Civil Protection department (DPC) aggregating all the scientific information available on the seismic sequence and providing updated information to Civil Protection for the decision making stage during the emergency. The structure is equipped with a heavy load trolley that carries a 6x6 inflatable tent, a satellite router, an UPS, computers, monitors and furniture. The facility can be installed in a couple of hours in the epicentral area and provides a full featured office with dedicated internet connection and VPN access to the INGV data management center in Rome. Just after the April 6 2009 Mw 6.3 earthquake in L’Aquila (Central Italy) the COES has been installed upon request of the Italian Civil Protection (DPC) in the DICOMAC (Directorate of Command and Control - which is the central structure of the DPC that coordinates the emergency activities in the areas affected by the earthquake) located in the Guardia di Finanza headquarters in Coppito nearby L'Aquila (the same location that hosted the G8 meeting). The COES produces real time reports on the

  19. Establishment of safety analysis system for emergency operating procedures of Kori 3 and 4 and YGN 1 and 2 and reference analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Hee Cheol; Ha, Kwi Seok; Chung, Bub Dong; Jeong, Jae Jun

    1999-02-01

    This report describes the establishment of safety analysis system for emergency operating procedures(EOPs) of Kori 3 and 4 and YGN 1 and 2 and the results of reference analyses. MARS1.3.1 code has been selected as a realistic system analysis tool of the safety analysis system, and the reactor system has been modeled using a fine nodding scheme in order to capture the major thermal-hydraulic phenomena that might occur during the transients. Full power steady state operating conditions are generated based on the plant operation data. Then, the reference analyses have been carried out for the accidents that can represent the typical EOPtransients, that is, a small-break loss-of-coolant-accident,a main steam line break accident and a steam generator tube rupture accident from the full power operation. For the realistic simulation of plant transient responses, reactor control and protection systems and safety systems are modeled based on their realistic performances. Also, the operator actions are modeled based on the current EOP actions. Through the reference analyses, the soundness of the established safety analysis system and the system modeling has been verified and the effectiveness of the current EOP has been partly justified. In conclusion, the safety analysis system established through this study can be used for the generation of technical background in the development and improvement of EOP actions and in the operator training. (Author). 11 refs., 6 tabs., 48 figs.

  20. Collection and analysis of operation data of the ECO-OFFICE system. 2. Analysis of operation data from April 1997 to March 1998 and comparison with previous year; Eko office system no data shushu kaiseki. 2. 1997 nendo no keisoku kekka to zennendo tono hikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, S.; Okada, K. [Shinryo Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Shimizu, H. [Keio University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Environmental Information; Kondo, Y. [National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1999-05-25

    The ECO-OFFICE, applying technologies with low environmental burden, was built at the National Institute for Environmental Studies in 1995 to prove a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the commercial sector could be achieved. We collected and analyzed operation data of the ECO-OFFICE from January 1996 to March 1998. We evaluated quantitatively the overall performance of the system and improved the system performance, based on these results. This paper is based upon data gathered from April 1997 to March 1998 about the energy consumption rate and the performance of a heat source system and a photovoltaic system. We evaluated the effect of improvements of the system by comparing its performance with that of the previous year. And we quantified the effect of introducing technologies with low environmental burden by converting the energy consumption rate and comparing it with that of an ordinary building. We specifically note that a system using photovoltaic cells was more energy efficient than one using solar thermal collectors in the air conditioning of the office building. (author)

  1. Yellow fever in Brazil: thoughts and hypotheses on the emergence in previously free areas Fiebre amarilla en Brasil: reflexiones e hipótesis sobre la emergencia en áreas previamente libres Febre amarela no Brasil: reflexões e hipóteses sobre a emergência em áreas previamente livres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes and discusses factors associated to the reemergence of yellow fever and its transmission dynamics in the states of São Paulo (Southeastern Brazil and Rio Grande do Sul (Southern during 2008 and 2009. The following factors have played a pivotal role for the reemergence of yellow fever in these areas: large susceptible human population; high prevalence of vectors and primary hosts (non-human primates; favorable climate conditions, especially increased rainfall; emergence of a new genetic lineage; and circulation of people and/or monkeys infected by virus. There is a need for an effective surveillance program to prevent the reemergence of yellow fever in other Brazilian states.Son descritos y discutidos factores asociados con la emergencia y dinámica de la transmisión de la fiebre amarilla en los estados de Sao Paulo (Sureste de Brasil y Rio Grande do Sul (Sur de Brasil en los años 2008 y 2009. La interacción de los siguientes factores fue fundamental para la emergencia de fiebre amarilla en esos estados: la gran población humana susceptible; la elevada prevalencia de vectores y hospedadores (primates no humanos; condiciones climáticas favorables, principalmente el exceso de lluvias en el verano; la emergencia de un nuevo linaje viral; y la circulación de personas o monos infectados en fase virémica. Sólo un programa eficiente de vigilancia puede prevenir ocurrencias similares en esos estados brasileros.São descritos e discutidos fatores associados a emergência e dinâmica da transmissão da febre amarela nos estados de São Paulo e Rio Grande do Sul nos anos de 2008 e 2009. A interação dos seguintes fatores foi fundamental para a emergência de febre amarela nesses estados: a grande população humana suscetível; a elevada prevalência de vetores e hospedeiros (primatas não humanos; condições climáticas favoráveis, sobretudo o excesso de chuvas no verão; a emergência de uma nova linhagem viral; e a

  2. Soviet-designed pressurized water reactor symptomatic emergency operating instruction analytical procedure: approach, methodology, development and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    A symptom approach to the analytical validation of symptom-based EOPs includes: (1) Identification of critical safety functions to the maintenance of fission product barrier integrity; (2) Identification of the symptoms which manifest an impending challenge to critical safety function maintenance; (3) Development of a symptomatic methodology to delineate bounding plant transient response modes; (4) Specification of bounding scenarios; (5) Development of a systematic calculational approach consistent with the objectives of the methodology; (6) Performance of thermal-hydraulic computer code calculations implementing the analytical methodology; (7) Interpretation of the analytical results on the basis of information available to the operator; (8) Application of the results to the validation of the proposed operator actions; (9) Production of a technical basis document justifying the proposed operator actions. (author)

  3. Effects of pressure support ventilation mode on emergence time and intra-operative ventilatory function: a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Capdevila

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that pressure-support ventilation (PSV allows a reduction in emergence time and laryngeal mask airway (LMA removal time after general anesthesia compared to volume-controlled mechanical ventilation (CMV. Because spontaneous breathing (SB is often used with LMA under general anesthesia, patients were allocated randomly to three groups (CMV, SB and PSV. Thirty-six consecutive ASA I-II patients scheduled for knee arthroscopic surgery under general anesthesia with a LMA and breathing throughout the ventilator circuit were included. Hemodynamic and ventilatory variables were recorded before and 10-min after general anesthesia-induction, at the surgical incision, at the end of anaesthetic drugs infusion and when the patient was totally awake (which defines emergence time. LMA removal time, drug consumption were recorded at the end of the surgical procedure. Leak fraction around the LMA was also evaluated. LMA removal time was significantly higher in the CMV-group (18 ± 6 min compared to both SB (8 ± 4 min and PSV (7 ± 4 min, P < 0.05 groups as well as for emergence time: CMV-group (32 ± 12 min, SB (17 ± 7 min and PSV (13 ± 6 min, P < 0.05 groups. Total propofol consumption was significantly lower in the PSV-group (610 ± 180 mg than in both CMV (852 ± 330 mg and SB (734 ± 246 mg, P < 0.05 groups. Air leaks around the LMA was significantly higher in the CMV-group than in the SB and PSV groups (16% vs 3% and 7%, all P<0.05. In conclusion, in knee arthroscopic surgery, in comparison to CMV, PSV use during general anesthesia in unparalyzed patients decreases LMA removal time, propofol consumption and leaks around LMA while improving ventilatory variables without adverse effects.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN17382426.

  4. Development and Testing of a Model for Simulation of Process Operators' During Emergencies in Nuclear Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes a program for the development and testing of a model of cognitive processes intended for simulation of operator responses to plant disturbances. It will be a part of a computer program complex called DYLAM for automatic identification of accident scenarios to be included in a ...

  5. Choice of contraception after previous operative delivery at a family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %) ... Kaduna, Nigeria, 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Health Sciences, Benue State University, Makurdi, Nigeria .... 40‑44. 0. 0. 0. 14. Chi square 165.638, degree of freedom 15, P value 0.000. Education (n=164). None.

  6. Long-term Financing in US and European Agricultural Co-operatives: Emerging Methods for Ameliorating Investment Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Iliopoulos, Constantine

    2003-01-01

    During recent years, dramatic changes in the world food system have led to unprecedented competition between agribusiness firms. To compete in this environment, agricultural cooperatives should invest substantially in long-term activities such as R&D and advertisement. Co-operatives have a difficult problem in acquiring equity capital because the residual claimant (benefactor) is the patron of the firm, not the investor. This organizational design poses to cooperatives three investment constr...

  7. Wearable system-on-a-chip UWB radar for health care and its application to the safety improvement of emergency operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Domenico; Pepe, Domenico; Neri, Bruno; De Rossi, Danilo; Lanatà, Antonio; Tognetti, Alessandro; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2007-01-01

    A new wearable system-on-a-chip UWB radar for health care systems is presented. The idea and its applications to the safety improvement of emergency operators are discussed. The system consists of a wearable wireless interface including a fully integrated UWB radar for the detection of the heart beat and breath rates, and a IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee radio interface. The principle of operation of the UWB radar for the monitoring of the heart wall is explained hereinafter. The results obtained by the feasibility study regarding its implementation on a modern standard silicon technology (CMOS 90 nm) are reported, demonstrating (at simulation level) the effectiveness of such an approach and enabling the standard silicon technology for new generations of wireless sensors for heath care and safeguard wearable systems.

  8. Optimizing clinical operations as part of a global emergency medicine initiative in Kumasi, Ghana: application of Lean manufacturing principals to low-resource health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Patrick M; Desmond, Jeffery S; Akanbobnaab, Christopher; Oteng, Rockefeller A; Rominski, Sarah D; Barsan, William G; Cunningham, Rebecca M

    2012-03-01

    Although many global health programs focus on providing clinical care or medical education, improving clinical operations can have a significant effect on patient care delivery, especially in developing health systems without high-level operations management. Lean manufacturing techniques have been effective in decreasing emergency department (ED) length of stay, patient waiting times, numbers of patients leaving without being seen, and door-to-balloon times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction in developed health systems, but use of Lean in low to middle income countries with developing emergency medicine (EM) systems has not been well characterized. To describe the application of Lean manufacturing techniques to improve clinical operations at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana and to identify key lessons learned to aid future global EM initiatives. A 3-week Lean improvement program focused on the hospital admissions process at KATH was completed by a 14-person team in six stages: problem definition, scope of project planning, value stream mapping, root cause analysis, future state planning, and implementation planning. The authors identified eight lessons learned during our use of Lean to optimize the operations of an ED in a global health setting: 1) the Lean process aided in building a partnership with Ghanaian colleagues; 2) obtaining and maintaining senior institutional support is necessary and challenging; 3) addressing power differences among the team to obtain feedback from all team members is critical to successful Lean analysis; 4) choosing a manageable initial project is critical to influence long-term Lean use in a new environment; 5) data intensive Lean tools can be adapted and are effective in a less resourced health system; 6) several Lean tools focused on team problem-solving techniques worked well in a low-resource system without modification; 7) using Lean highlighted that important changes do not require an influx of resources; and

  9. Transient and sustained changes in operational performance, patient evaluation, and medication administration during electronic health record implementation in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael J; Froehle, Craig M; Hart, Kimberly W; Collins, Sean P; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the transient and sustained operational effects of electronic health records on emergency department (ED) performance. We quantify how the implementation of a comprehensive electronic health record was associated with metrics of operational performance, test ordering, and medication administration at a single-center ED. We performed a longitudinal analysis of electronic data from a single, suburban, academic ED during 28 weeks between May 2011 and November 2011. We assessed length of stay, use of diagnostic testing, medication administration, radiologic imaging, and patient satisfaction during a 4-week baseline measurement period and then tracked changes in these variables during the 24 weeks after implementation of the electronic health record. Median length of stay increased and patient satisfaction was reduced transiently, returning to baseline after 4 to 8 weeks. Rates of laboratory testing, medication administration, overall radiologic imaging, radiographs, computed tomography scans, and ECG ordering all showed sustained increases throughout the 24 weeks after electronic health record implementation. Electronic health record implementation in this single-center study was associated with both transient and sustained changes in metrics of ED performance, as well as laboratory and medication ordering. Understanding ways in which an ED can be affected by electronic health record implementation is critical to providing insight about ways to mitigate transient disruption and to maximize potential benefits of the technology. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Organization of emergency plans for a PWR plant accident: Arrangements made by the operator and public authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverie, M.; Bertron, L.

    1984-01-01

    A nuclear accident would be the result of a situation which was mishandled by the operator arising either because of an incorrect analysis made by him of the event or, more probably, of his being unable to apply the instructions available in the event of a multiple failure of safety equipment. To be able to analyse a situation which, by definition, has gone beyond the scope of plant personnel, it is necessary for Electricite de France (EDF) and the Central Service for the Safety of Nuclear Facilities (SCSIN) to have teams which can make available in the shortest possible time the highest expertise in respect of such events. To do so, the SCSIN and EDF have set up, at different analytical and decision-making levels, coherent and coordinated organizational arrangements which, while respecting the responsibilities of each person, would enable a common evaluation to be obtained as quickly as possible of the situation, its possible evolution and the best measures to take to limit the consequences of the accident. Such a level of intervention is necessary to complement the preventive and protective measures taken during the design, construction and operation of nuclear power plants in order to ensure that workers, the public and their environment are fully protected under any circumstances. (author)

  11. Occupational Malfunctioning and Fatigue Related Work Stress Disorders (FRWSDs): An Emerging Issue in Indian Underground Mine (UGM) Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Shibaji Ch.; Dey, Netai Chandra; Sharma, Gourab Dhara

    2017-09-01

    Indian underground mining (UGM) transport system largely deals with different fore and back bearing work processes associated with different occupational disorders and fatigue related work stress disorders (FRWSDs). Therefore, this research study is specifically aimed to determine the fatigue related problems in general and determination of Recovery Heart Rate (Rec HR) pattern and exact cause of FRWSDs in particular. A group of twenty (N = 20) UGM operators are selected for the study. Heart rate profiles and work intensities of selected workforces have been recorded continuously during their regular mine operation and the same workforces are tested on a treadmill on surface with almost same work intensity (%Maximal Heart Rate) which was earlier observed in the mine. Recovery Heart Rate (Rec HR) in both the experiment zones is recorded. It is observed that with almost same work intensity, the recovery patterns of submaximal prolonged work in mine are different as compared to treadmill. This research study indicates that non-biomechanical muscle activity along with environmental stressors may have an influence on recovery pattern and FRWSDs.

  12. Effect of design and operational conditions on the performance of subsurface flow treatment wetlands: Emerging organic contaminants as indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Stefanie; Nivala, Jaime; van Afferden, Manfred; Müller, Roland A; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2017-11-15

    Six pilot-scale subsurface flow treatment wetlands loaded with primary treated municipal wastewater were monitored over one year for classical wastewater parameters and a set of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) serving as process indicators for biodegradation: caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, benzotriazole, diclofenac, acesulfame, and carbamazepine. The wetland technologies investigated included conventional horizontal flow, unsaturated vertical flow (single and two-stage), horizontal flow with aeration, vertical flow with aeration, and reciprocating. Treatment efficiency for classical wastewater parameters and EOCs generally increased with increasing design complexity and dissolved oxygen concentrations. The two aerated wetlands and the two-stage vertical flow system showed the highest EOC removal, and the best performance in warm season and most robust performance in the cold season. These three systems performed better than the adjacent conventional WWTP with respect to EOC removal. Acesulfame was observed to be removed (>90%) by intensified wetland systems and with use of a tertiary treatment sand filter during the warm season. Elevated temperature and high oxygen content (aerobic conditions) proved beneficial for EOC removal. For EOCs of moderate to low biodegradability, the co-occurrence of aerobic conditions and low content of readily available carbon appears essential for efficient removal. Such conditions occurred in the aerated systems and with use of a tertiary treatment sand filter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The effects of body mass index on complications and mortality after emergency abdominal operations: The obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Elizabeth R; Dilektasli, Evren; Haltmeier, Tobias; Beale, Elizabeth; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    Recent literature suggests that obesity is protective in critically illness. This study addresses the effect of BMI on outcomes after emergency abdominal surgery (EAS). Retrospective, ACS-NSQIP analysis. All patients that underwent EAS were included. The study population was divided into five groups based on BMI; regression models were used to evaluate the role of obesity in morbidity and mortality. 101,078 patients underwent EAS; morbidity and mortality were 19.5% and 4.5%, respectively. Adjusted mortality was higher in underweight patients (AOR 1.92), but significantly lower in all obesity groups (AOR's 0.73, 0.66, 0.70, 0.70 respectively). Underweight and class III obesity was associated with increased complications (AOR 1.47 and 1.30), while mild obesity was protective (AOR 0.92). Underweight patients undergoing EAS have increased morbidity and mortality. Although class III obesity is associated with increased morbidity, overweight and class I obesity were protective. All grades of obesity may be protective against mortality after EAS relative to normal weight patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. How to operate a university institute as a radiological emergency service?; Comment faire fonctionner un institut universitaire en service d'intervention radiologique?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besancon, A.; Bochud, F. [Institut de radiophysique, Centre hospitalier universitaire vaudois et Universite de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    The Institute of Radiation Physics (IRA) is attached to the Department of Medical Radiology at the Vaud University Hospital Center (CHUV) in Lausanne. The Institute's main tasks are strongly linked to the medical activities of the Department: radiotherapy, radiodiagnostics, interventional radiology and nuclear medicine. The Institute also works in the fields of operational radiation protection, radiation metrology and radioecology. In the case of an accident involving radioactive materials, the emergency services are able to call on the assistance of radiation protection specialists. In order to avoid having to create and maintain a specific structure, both burdensome and rarely needed, Switzerland decided to unite all existing emergency services for such events. Thus, the IRA was invited to participate in this network. The challenge is therefore to integrate a university structure, used to academic collaborations and the scientific approach, to an interventional organization accustomed to strict policies, a military-style command structure and 'drilled' procedures. The IRA's solution entails mobilizing existing resources and the expertise developed through professional experience. The main asset of this solution is that it involves the participation of committed collaborators who remain in a familiar environment, and are able to use proven materials and mastered procedures, even if the atmosphere of an accident situation differs greatly from regular laboratory routines. However, this solution requires both a commitment to education and training in emergency situations, and a commitment in terms of discipline by each collaborator in order to be integrated into a response plan supervised by an operational command center. (authors)

  15. Emergency gas operation strategy and system establishment for large-scale disaster; Strategie d'operation en urgence et construction de systemes pour parer aux desastres de grande importance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshihira, Hara [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd (Japan); Yoshihisa, Shimizu [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd (Japan); Takashi, Imagawa [Toho Gas Co., Ltd (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Japan's gas companies have wide-ranging experience of earthquakes and other disasters and have for long put the lessons learned from these disasters to good use through regular reviews of their emergency gas operation strategies. However, the Great Hanshin Earthquake disaster of January 1995 made them acutely aware of the need for a more radical review of this strategy. Japan's big gas companies are currently devoting maximum resources to reviewing their emergency strategies and constructing the sorts of systems needed to deal with major disasters. In the first half of the present paper, we discuss the experience of Toho Gas, which has just finished work on a comprehensive group of systems, and explain the 'thinking behind the systems'. In the second half of the paper, we discuss some of the ways in which Tokyo Gas has been endeavoring to further refine and enhance its systems and introduce the reader to the latest emergency strategy support systems in the shape of the 'sub-center concept, training system construction, and damage estimation systems'. These should also make useful references for gas companies from other countries. (authors)

  16. Comparison of statistical and operational properties of subject randomization procedures for large multicenter clinical trial treating medical emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenle; Mu, Yunming; Tayama, Darren; Yeatts, Sharon D.

    2015-01-01

    Large multicenter acute stroke trials demand a randomization procedure with a high level of treatment allocation randomness, an effective control on overall and within-site imbalances, and a minimized time delay of study treatment caused by the randomization procedure. Driven by the randomization algorithm design of A Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Activase (Alteplase) in Patients With Mild Stroke (PRISMS) (NCT02072226), this paper compares operational and statistical properties of different randomization algorithms in local, central, and step-forward randomization settings. Results show that the step-forward randomization with block urn design provides better performances over others. If the concern on the potential time delay is not serious and a central randomization system is available, the minimization method with an imbalance control threshold and a biased coin probability could be a better choice. PMID:25638754

  17. A systemic analysis of patterns of organizational breakdowns in accidents: A case from Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontogiannis, Tom; Malakis, Stathis

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many accident models and techniques have shifted their focus from shortfalls in the actions of practitioners to systemic causes in the organization. Accident investigation techniques (e.g., STAMP) have been developed that looked into the flaws of control processes in the organization. Organizational models have looked into general patterns of breakdown related to structural vulnerabilities and gradual degradation of performance. Although some degree of cross-fertilization has been developed between these two trends, safety analysts are left on their own to integrate this gap between control flaws and patterns of organizational breakdown in accident investigation. This article attempts to elaborate the control dynamics of the Systems Theoretic Accident Model and Process (STAMP) technique on the basis of a theoretical model of organizational viability (i.e., the Viable Systems Model). The joint STAMP–VSM framework is applied to an accident from a Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) organization to help analysts progress from the analysis of control flaws to the underlying patterns of breakdown. The joint framework may help analysts to rethink the safety organization, model new information loops and constraints, look at the adaptation and steering functions of the organization and finally, develop high leverage interventions. - Highlights: ► This article bridges the gap between two parallel trends in systemic accident models. ► Investigation techniques (i.e., STAMP) have looked into the flaws of safety management processes. ► The literature has highlighted many patterns (or archetypes) of organizational breakdowns. ► The Viable System Model is used with STAMP to link control flaws and organizational breakdowns.

  18. Toward an operational neuroethical risk analysis and mitigation paradigm for emerging neuroscience and technology (neuroS/T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James

    2017-01-01

    Research in neuroscience and neurotechnology (neuroS/T) is progressing at a rapid pace with translational applications both in medicine, and more widely in the social milieu. Current and projected neuroS/T research and its applications evoke a number of neuroethicolegal and social issues (NELSI). This paper defines inherent and derivative NELSI of current and near-term neuroS/T development and engagement, and provides an overview of our group's ongoing work to develop a systematized approach to their address. Our proposed operational neuroethical risk assessment and mitigation paradigm (ONRAMP) is presented, which entails querying, framing, and modeling patterns and trajectories of neuroS/T research and translational uses, and the NELSI generated by such advancements and their applications. Extant ethical methods are addressed, with suggestion toward possible revision or re-formulation to meet the needs and exigencies fostered by neuroS/T and resultant NELSI in multi-cultural contexts. The relevance and importance of multi-disciplinary expertise in focusing upon NELSI is discussed, and the need for neuroethics education toward cultivating such a cadre of expertise is emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimizing Clinical Operations as part of a Global Emergency Medicine Initiative in Kumasi, Ghana: Application of Lean Manufacturing Principals to Low Resource Health Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Patrick M.; Desmond, Jeffery S.; Akanbobnaab, Christopher; Oteng, Rockefeller A.; Rominski, Sarah; Barsan, William G.; Cunningham, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many global health programs focus on providing clinical care or medical education, improving clinical operations can have a significant effect on patient care delivery, especially in developing health systems without high-level operations management. Lean manufacturing techniques have been effective in decreasing emergency department (ED) length of stay, patient waiting times, numbers of patients leaving without being seen, and door-to-balloon times for ST-elevation myocardial infarction in developed health systems; but use of Lean in low to middle income countries with developing emergency medicine systems has not been well characterized. Objectives To describe the application of Lean manufacturing techniques to improve clinical operations at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana and to identify key lessons learned to aid future global EM initiatives. Methods A three-week Lean improvement program focused on the hospital admissions process at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital was completed by a 14-person team in six stages: problem definition, scope of project planning, value stream mapping, root cause analysis, future state planning, and implementation planning. Results The authors identified eight lessons learned during our use of Lean to optimize the operations of an ED in a global health setting: 1) the Lean process aided in building a partnership with Ghanaian colleagues; 2) obtaining and maintaining senior institutional support is necessary and challenging; 3) addressing power differences among the team to obtain feedback from all team members is critical to successful Lean analysis; 4) choosing a manageable initial project is critical to influence long-term Lean use in a new environment; 5) data intensive Lean tools can be adapted and are effective in a less resourced health system; 6) several Lean tools focused on team problem solving techniques worked well in a low resource system without modification; 7) using Lean highlighted that

  20. Aortic pseudoaneurysm detected on external jugular venous distention following a Bentall procedure 10 years previously.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Naoto; Shomura, Yu; Nasu, Michihiro; Okada, Yukikatsu

    2010-11-01

    An asymptomatic 49-year-old woman was admitted for the purpose of surgery for aortic pseudoaneurysm. She had Marfan syndrome and had undergone an emergent Bentall procedure 10 years previously. About six months previously, she could palpate distended bilateral external jugular veins, which became distended only in a supine position and without any other symptoms. Enhanced computed tomography revealed an aortic pseudoaneurysm originating from a previous distal anastomosis site. During induction of general anesthesia in a supine position, bilateral external jugular venous distention was remarkable. Immediately after a successful operation, distention completely resolved. The present case emphasizes the importance of physical examination leading to a diagnosis of asymptomatic life-threatening diseases in patients with a history of previous aortic surgery.

  1. The Worker Component At The World Trade Center Cleanup: Addressing Cultural And Language Differences In Emergency Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, B.; Carpenter, C.; Blair. D.

    2003-02-24

    On September 11, 2001, the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) caused astronomical loss of life and property. Systems in place to manage disaster response were strained to the limit because key first responders were among the casualties when the twin towers collapsed. In addition, the evolution of events required immediate response in a rapidly changing and extremely hazardous situation. Rescue, recovery, and clean up became an overpowering and sustained effort that would utilize the resources of federal, state and local governments and agencies. One issue during the response to the WTC disaster site that did not receive much attention was that of the limited and non-English speaking worker. The Operating Engineers National HAZMAT Program (OENHP), with its history of a Hispanic Outreach Program, was acutely aware of this issue with the Hispanic worker. The Hispanic population comprises approximately 27% of the population of New York City (1). The extremely unfortunate and tragic events of that day provided an opportunity to not only provide assistance for the Hispanic workers, but also to apply lessons learned and conduct studies on worker training with language barriers in a real life environment. However, due to the circumstances surrounding this tragedy, the study of these issues was conducted primarily by observation. Through partnerships with other organizations such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the New York Health Department, the New York Department of Design and Construction (DDC), the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH), and private companies such as 3M and MSA, OENHP was able to provide translated information on hazards, protective measures, fit testing of respirators, and site specific safety and health training. The OENHP translated materials on hazards and how to protect workers into Spanish to assist in getting the information to the limited and non- English speaking workers.

  2. The 2017 International Joint Working Group White Paper by INDUSEM, the Emergency Medicine Association and the Academic College of Emergency Experts on Establishing Standardized Regulations, Operational Mechanisms, and Accreditation Pathways for Education and Care Provided by the Prehospital Emergency Medical Service Systems in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Veronica; Gautam, V; Galwankar, Sagar; Guleria, Randeep; Stawicki, Stanislaw P; Paladino, Lorenzo; Chauhan, Vivek; Menon, Geetha; Shah, Vijay; Srivastava, R P; Rana, B K; Batra, Bipin; Kalra, O P; Aggarwal, P; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Krishnan, S Vimal

    2017-01-01

    The government of India has done remarkable work on commissioning a government funded prehospital emergency ambulance service in India. This has both public health implications and an economic impact on the nation. With the establishment of these services, there is an acute need for standardization of education and quality assurance regarding prehospital care provided. The International Joint Working Group has been actively involved in designing guidelines and establishing a comprehensive framework for ensuring high-quality education and clinical standards of care for prehospital services in India. This paper provides an independent expert opinion and a proposed framework for general operations and administration of a standardized, national prehospital emergency medical systems program. Program implementation, operational details, and regulations will require close collaboration between key stakeholders, including local, regional, and national governmental agencies of India.

  3. The 2017 International Joint Working Group white paper by INDUSEM, The Emergency Medicine Association and The Academic College of Emergency Experts on establishing standardized regulations, operational mechanisms, and accreditation pathways for education and care provided by the prehospital emergency medical service systems in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Sikka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The government of India has done remarkable work on commissioning a government funded prehospital emergency ambulance service in India. This has both public health implications and an economic impact on the nation. With the establishment of these services, there is an acute need for standardization of education and quality assurance regarding prehospital care provided. The International Joint Working Group has been actively involved in designing guidelines and establishing a comprehensive framework for ensuring high-quality education and clinical standards of care for prehospital services in India. This paper provides an independent expert opinion and a proposed framework for general operations and administration of a standardized, national prehospital emergency medical systems program. Program implementation, operational details, and regulations will require close collaboration between key stakeholders, including local, regional, and national governmental agencies of India.

  4. Characterization of radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chester, C.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper identifies conditions that should be considered by the designers of mobile teleoperator equipment intended for service in radiological emergencies. We include a definition of radiological emergency and a taxonomy of emergencies. We will indicate the range of operating conditions that an equipment designer should consider and the type of operations that his machine might be expected to perform. 2 refs., 1 tab

  5. Investigation of Apparatus Reliability Applied for Protection of Power Networks in Emergency Operational Cases at Dwelling Sector of the Republic of Belarus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Kulakov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of statistic data analysis it has been established that nearly 10 % of fires that oc­curred in the dwelling sector of the Republic of Belarus in 2006 are related with emergency regime of electric equipment, electric devices and power networks. The paper contains results of experimental comparative investigations concerning operation of fuses for 25 A current and automatic thread fuses for nominal 25 A current.The investigations have shown that fuses do not ensure protection of power networks in a dwelling in 40 % of executed tests. Replacement of these fuses for automatic thread ones permits to reduce a number of fires in a dwelling sector and, first of all, in the rural area.

  6. Popular belief meets surgical reality: impact of lunar phases, Friday the 13th and zodiac signs on emergency operations and intraoperative blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuld, Jochen; Slotta, Jan E; Schuld, Simone; Kollmar, Otto; Schilling, Martin K; Richter, Sven

    2011-09-01

    The influence of superstition, moon calendars, and popular belief on evidence-based medicine is stunning. More than 40% of medical staff is convinced that lunar phases can affect human behavior. The idea that Friday the 13th is associated with adverse events and bad luck is deep-rooted in the population of Western industrial countries. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that these myths are transferable to real-life surgery. We analyzed the extent to which moon phases, zodiac signs, and Friday the 13th influence blood loss, emergency frequency, and intestinal perforations by evaluating the operation records of all 27,914 consecutive patients of our institution undergoing general, visceral, or vascular surgery between August 2001 and August 2010. Dates of surgery were allocated to lunar phases and to zodiac signs, as well as to Friday the 13th. A total of 111 lunar cycles and 15 Fridays the 13th occurred within the 3,281-day observation period. Patients' characteristics did not differ in lunar phases, zodiac signs, or Fridays the 13th. Full moon phases, the presence of Friday the 13th, and zodiac signs influenced neither intraoperative blood loss nor emergency frequency. No statistical peaks regarding perforated aortic aneurysms and gastrointestinal perforations were found on full moon or Friday the 13th. Scientific analysis of our data does not support the belief that moon phases, zodiac signs, or Friday 13th influence surgical blood loss and emergency frequency. Our data indicate that such beliefs are myths far beyond reality.

  7. Optimization of Installation, Operation and Maintenance at Offshore Wind Projects in the U.S.: Review and Modeling of Existing and Emerging Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldock, Nick [Garrad Hassan & Partners Ltd, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Sevilla, Fernando [Garrad Hassan & Partners Ltd, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Redfern, Robin [Garrad Hassan & Partners Ltd, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Storey, Alexis [Garrad Hassan & Partners Ltd, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kempenaar, Anton [Garrad Hassan & Partners Ltd, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Elkinton, Chris [Garrad Hassan America, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2014-12-19

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a grant to GL Garrad Hassan (GL GH) to investigate the logistics, opportunities, and costs associated with existing and emerging installation and operation and maintenance (O&M) activities at offshore wind projects as part of the DOE’s program to reduce barriers facing offshore wind project development in the United States (U.S.). This report (the Report) forms part of Subtopic 5.3 “Optimized Installation, Operation and Maintenance Strategies Study” which in turn is part of the “Removing Market Barriers in U.S. Offshore Wind” set of projects for the DOE. The purpose of Subtopic 5.3 is to aid and facilitate informed decision-making regarding installation and O&M during the development, installation, and operation of offshore wind projects in order to increase efficiency and reduce the levelized cost of energy (LCoE). Given the large area of U.S. territorial waters, the generally higher mean wind speeds offshore, and the proximity to the coast of many large U.S. cities, offshore wind power has the potential to become a significant contributor of energy to U.S. markets. However, for the U.S. to ensure that the development of offshore wind energy projects is carried out in an efficient and cost-effective manner, it is important to be cognizant of the current and emerging practices in both the domestic and international offshore wind energy industries. The U.S. can harness the experience gained globally and combine this with the skills and assets of an already sizeable onshore wind industry, as well as the resources of a mature offshore oil and gas industry, to develop a strong offshore wind sector. The work detailed in this report is aimed at assisting with that learning curve, particularly in terms of offshore specific installation and O&M activities. This Report and the Installation and O&M LCoE Analysis Tool, which were developed together by GL GH as part of this study, allow readers to identify, model

  8. Nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This leaflet, which is in the form of a fold-up chart, has panels of text which summarize the emergencies that could arise and the countermeasures and emergency plans that have been prepared should nuclear accident occur or affect the United Kingdom. The levels of radiation doses at which various measures would be introduced are outlined. The detection and monitoring programmes that would operate is illustrated. The role of NRPB and the responsible government departments are set out together with an explanation of how the National Arrangements for Incidents involving Radioactivity would be coordinated. (UK)

  9. Operational demands on pre-hospital emergency care for burn injuries in a middle-income setting: a study in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgaier, Rachel L; Laflamme, Lucie; Wallis, Lee A

    2017-12-01

    Burns occur disproportionately within low-socioeconomic populations. The Western Cape Province of South Africa represents a middle-income setting with a high rate of burns, few specialists and few burn centres, yet a well-developed pre-hospital system. This paper describes the burn cases from a viewpoint of operational factors important to pre-hospital emergency medical services. A retrospective, cross-sectional study of administrative and patient records was conducted. Data were captured for all pre-hospital burn patients treated by public Emergency Medical Services over a continuous 12-month period. Data were captured separately at each site using a standardised data collection tool. Described categories included location (rural or urban), transport decision (transported or remained on scene), age (child or adult) and urgency (triage colour). EMS treated 1198 patients with confirmed burns representing 0.6% of the total EMS caseload; an additional 819 potential burn cases could not be confirmed. Of the confirmed cases, 625 (52.2%) were located outside the City of Cape Town and 1058 (88.3%) were transported to a medical facility. Patients from urban areas had longer mission times. Children accounted for 37.5% (n = 449) of all burns. The majority of transported patients that were triaged were yellow (n = 238, 41.6% rural and n = 182, 37.4% urban). Burns make up a small portion of the EMS caseload. More burns occurred in areas far from urban hospitals and burn centres. The majority of burn cases met the burn centre referral criteria.

  10. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  11. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR

  12. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  13. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR

  14. Emergency neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarabino, T.; Hospital of Andria; Salvolini, U.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    The book is directed at emergency radiologists and neuroradiologists. It aims at providing exhaustive information that will help the reader understand the clinical problems in the full range of neurological emergencies and to select the methodological and technical options that will ensure prompt and effective response and correct interpretation of the clinical findings. The various chapters address the most common neuroradiological emergencies, summarize their fundamental physiopathological features, describe the main semiological and differential diagnostic features, and provide operative suggestions for the selection of the appropriate techniques to be applied in a sequential order. The book addresses the application of state-of-the-art techniques and their implications for clinical practice (particularly the contributions of standard and functional MRI and of spiral and multislice CT). The illustrations provide not only training but also reference material for routine clinical work. (orig.)

  15. Emergency neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarabino, T. [Scientific Inst. ' Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza' , San Giovanni Rotondo (Italy). Dept. of Neuroradiology]|[Hospital of Andria (Italy). Dept. of Radiology, ASL BA/1; Salvolini, U. [Ancona Univ. (Italy). Neuroradiology and Dept. of Radiology; Jinkins, J.R. (eds.) [New York State Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology, Downstate Medical Center

    2006-07-01

    The book is directed at emergency radiologists and neuroradiologists. It aims at providing exhaustive information that will help the reader understand the clinical problems in the full range of neurological emergencies and to select the methodological and technical options that will ensure prompt and effective response and correct interpretation of the clinical findings. The various chapters address the most common neuroradiological emergencies, summarize their fundamental physiopathological features, describe the main semiological and differential diagnostic features, and provide operative suggestions for the selection of the appropriate techniques to be applied in a sequential order. The book addresses the application of state-of-the-art techniques and their implications for clinical practice (particularly the contributions of standard and functional MRI and of spiral and multislice CT). The illustrations provide not only training but also reference material for routine clinical work. (orig.)

  16. Emergency procedure planning to mitigate event progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, J.

    1987-01-01

    The emergency procedure guidelines (EPGs) specify actions to control key parameters symptomatically, using every possible system to mitigate event response. When EPGs are implemented as plant-specific emergency operating procedures (EOPs), alternate system instructions are incorporated in addition to standard emergency system instructions. These alternative systems were previously excluded because their event mitigation potential had not been considered. However, pre-planning with the DOP implementation program allows the alternate systems to be available to back up emergency systems if needed, so that if the plant gets to extraordinary or unusual conditions, the operator will have appropriate response instructions and methods. These alternative systems are used to maintain adequate core cooling and decay heat removal, thereby preventing an event from progressing to a severe accident to the maximum extent possible

  17. 44 CFR 402.5 - Forwarding commodities previously shipped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Forwarding commodities... commodities previously shipped. Order T-1 applies to transportation on or discharge from ships documented... ship or aircraft, before the issuance of Order T-1, had transported restricted commodities manifested...

  18. Induced vaginal birth after previous caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akylbek Tussupkaliyev

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The rate of operative birth by Caesarean section is constantly rising. In Kazakhstan, it reaches 27 per cent. Research data confirm that the percentage of successful vaginal births after previous Caesarean section is 50–70 per cent. How safe the induction of vaginal birth after Caesarean (VBAC remains unclear. Methodology The studied techniques of labour induction were amniotomy of the foetal bladder with the vulsellum ramus, intravaginal administration of E1 prostaglandin (Misoprostol, and intravenous infusion of Oxytocin-Richter. The assessment of rediness of parturient canals was conducted by Bishop’s score; the labour course was assessed by a partogram. The effectiveness of labour induction techniques was assessed by the number of administered doses, the time of onset of regular labour, the course of labour and the postpartum period and the presence of complications, and the course of the early neonatal period, which implied the assessment of the child’s condition, described in the newborn development record. The foetus was assessed by medical ultrasound and antenatal and intranatal cardiotocography (CTG. Obtained results were analysed with SAS statistical processing software. Results The overall percentage of successful births with intravaginal administration of Misoprostol was 93 per cent (83 of cases. This percentage was higher than in the amniotomy group (relative risk (RR 11.7 and was similar to the oxytocin group (RR 0.83. Amniotomy was effective in 54 per cent (39 of cases, when it induced regular labour. Intravenous oxytocin infusion was effective in 94 per cent (89 of cases. This percentage was higher than that with amniotomy (RR 12.5. Conclusions The success of vaginal delivery after previous Caesarean section can be achieved in almost 70 per cent of cases. At that, labour induction does not decrease this indicator and remains within population boundaries.

  19. At the threshold: emerging opportunities for expanding commercial and governmental space operations in the new century. The 1997 KRAFT EHRICKE Lecture for the 27th Symposium on Economics in Space Operations of the IAA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankins, John C.

    2003-01-01

    We stand at the threshold of a new era in space operations in which a host of potentially profound changes will occur in space systems concepts and technologies. Many of the space systems in use today were originally created in the mid- to late-1960s, based on technologies either already existing or then under development. These concepts—including satellites, launchers and piloted systems—have served well for government and commercial missions during the decades since that era. They will continue to serve—and serve well—as we enter the first decade of the next century. However, in this era of restraint in government spending on civilian space and dramatic growth in investments in existing space commercial ventures, new, breakthrough systems concepts that drive down costs are critically needed. Fortunately these new concepts appear to be at hand. Building on the research foundation of the past 20 years, an array of new technologies are emerging which may make possible highly innovative advanced systems concepts. These technologies include long-lived high-efficiency chemical propulsion, affordable megawatt-class space power systems, advanced electromagnetic systems, breakthrough materials, "brilliant" space machines, robust artificial intelligences onboard and on the ground, low-cost utilization of local resources, and others. Moreover, many of these technologies appear common to both new space industries and very affordable future government missions. Forerunners of this new era can be seen today in the systems of large telecommunications satellite constellations such as the Iridium venture and in the technologies of the reusable launch vehicle program. Driving down the cost of space access will be the linchpin for this prospective future. In addition, during the coming decade, a wide range of civilian government space investments will likely be focused on vitally-needed research and development. Our choices now are exceptionally important and must be made

  20. 'We didn't know anything, it was a mess!' Emergent structures and the effectiveness of a rescue operation multi-team system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleştea, Alina Maria; Fodor, Oana Cătălina; Curşeu, Petru Lucian; Miclea, Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Multi-team systems (MTS) are used to tackle unpredictable events and to respond effectively to fast-changing environmental contingencies. Their effectiveness is influenced by within as well as between team processes (i.e. communication, coordination) and emergent phenomena (i.e. situational awareness). The present case study explores the way in which the emergent structures and the involvement of bystanders intertwine with the dynamics of processes and emergent states both within and between the component teams. Our findings show that inefficient transition process and the ambiguous leadership generated poor coordination and hindered the development of emergent phenomena within the whole system. Emergent structures and bystanders substituted leadership functions and provided a pool of critical resources for the MTS. Their involvement fostered the emergence of situational awareness and facilitated contingency planning processes. However, bystander involvement impaired the emergence of cross-understandings and interfered with coordination processes between the component teams. Practitioner Summary: Based on a real emergency situation, the present research provides important theoretical and practical insights about the role of bystander involvement in the dynamics of multi-team systems composed to tackle complex tasks and respond to fast changing and unpredictable environmental contingencies.

  1. Serratia liquefaciens Infection of a Previously Excluded Popliteal Artery Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Coelho

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Popliteal artery aneurysms (PAAs are rare in the general population, but they account for nearly 70% of peripheral arterial aneurysms. There are several possible surgical approaches including exclusion of the aneurysm and bypass grafting, or endoaneurysmorrhaphy and interposition of a prosthetic conduit. The outcomes following the first approach are favorable, but persistent blood flow in the aneurysm sac has been documented in up to one third of patients in the early post-operative setting. Complications from incompletely excluded aneurysms include aneurysm enlargement, local compression symptoms, and sac rupture. Notably infection of a previously excluded and bypassed PAA is rare. This is the third reported case of PAA infection after exclusion and bypass grafting and the first due to Serratia liquefaciens. Methods: Relevant medical data were collected from the hospital database. Results: This case report describes a 54 year old male patient, diagnosed with acute limb ischaemia due to a thrombosed PAA, submitted to emergency surgery with exclusion and venous bypass. A below the knee amputation was necessary 3 months later. Patient follow-up was lost until 7 years following surgical repair, when he was diagnosed with aneurysm sac infection with skin fistulisation. He had recently been diagnosed with alcoholic hepatic cirrhosis Child–Pugh Class B. The patient was successfully treated by aneurysm resection, soft tissue debridement and systemic antibiotics. Conclusion: PAA infection is a rare complication after exclusion and bypass procedures but should be considered in any patient with evidence of local or systemic infection. When a PAA infection is diagnosed, aneurysmectomy, local debridement, and intravenous antibiotic therapy are recommended. The “gold standard” method of PAA repair remains controversial. PAA excision or endoaneurysmorrhaphy avoids complications from incompletely excluded aneurysms, but is associated with

  2. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgical Skills for Exposure in Trauma Advanced Trauma Life Support Advanced Trauma Operative Management Basic Endovascular Skills for Trauma Disaster Management and Emergency ...

  3. Eye Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  4. Placental complications after a previous cesarean section

    OpenAIRE

    Milošević Jelena; Lilić Vekoslav; Tasić Marija; Radović-Janošević Dragana; Stefanović Milan; Antić Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complic...

  5. Implant breast reconstruction after salvage mastectomy in previously irradiated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichetti, Paolo; Cagli, Barbara; Simone, Pierfranco; Cogliandro, Annalisa; Fortunato, Lucio; Altomare, Vittorio; Trodella, Lucio

    2009-04-01

    The most common surgical approach in case of local tumor recurrence after quadrantectomy and radiotherapy is salvage mastectomy. Breast reconstruction is the subsequent phase of the treatment and the plastic surgeon has to operate on previously irradiated and manipulated tissues. The medical literature highlights that breast reconstruction with tissue expanders is not a pursuable option, considering previous radiotherapy a contraindication. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the influence of previous radiotherapy on 2-stage breast reconstruction (tissue expander/implant). Only patients with analogous timing of radiation therapy and the same demolitive and reconstructive procedures were recruited. The results of this study prove that, after salvage mastectomy in previously irradiated patients, implant reconstruction is still possible. Further comparative studies are, of course, advisable to draw any conclusion on the possibility to perform implant reconstruction in previously irradiated patients.

  6. Electric power emergency handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labadie, J.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Emergency Electric Power Administration's Emergency Operations Handbook is designed to provide guidance to the EEPA organization. It defines responsibilities and describes actions performed by the government and electric utilities in planning for, and in operations during, national emergencies. The EEPA Handbook is reissued periodically to describe organizational changes, to assign new duties and responsibilities, and to clarify the responsibilities of the government to direct and coordinate the operations of the electric utility industry under emergencies declared by the President. This Handbook is consistent with the assumptions, policies, and procedures contained in the National Plan for Emergency Preparedness. Claimancy and restoration, communications and warning, and effects of nuclear weapons are subjects covered in the appendices.

  7. Emerging contaminants in groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Stuart, M.E.; Manamsa, K.; Talbot, J.C.; Crane, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    The term ‘emerging contaminants’ is generally used to refer to compounds previously not considered or known to be significant to groundwater (in terms of distribution and/or concentration) which are now being more widely detected. As analytical techniques improve, previously undetected organic micropollutants are being observed in the aqueous environment. Many emerging contaminants remain unregulated, but the number of regulated contaminants will continue to grow slowly over th...

  8. Preoperative screening: value of previous tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, D S; Snow, R; Lofgren, R P

    1990-12-15

    To determine the frequency of tests done in the year before elective surgery that might substitute for preoperative screening tests and to determine the frequency of test results that change from a normal value to a value likely to alter perioperative management. Retrospective cohort analysis of computerized laboratory data (complete blood count, sodium, potassium, and creatinine levels, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time). Urban tertiary care Veterans Affairs Hospital. Consecutive sample of 1109 patients who had elective surgery in 1988. At admission, 7549 preoperative tests were done, 47% of which duplicated tests performed in the previous year. Of 3096 previous results that were normal as defined by hospital reference range and done closest to the time of but before admission (median interval, 2 months), 13 (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.2% to 0.7%), repeat values were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery. Most of the abnormalities were predictable from the patient's history, and most were not noted in the medical record. Of 461 previous tests that were abnormal, 78 (17%; CI, 13% to 20%) repeat values at admission were outside a range considered acceptable for surgery (P less than 0.001, frequency of clinically important abnormalities of patients with normal previous results with those with abnormal previous results). Physicians evaluating patients preoperatively could safely substitute the previous test results analyzed in this study for preoperative screening tests if the previous tests are normal and no obvious indication for retesting is present.

  9. Full Scale Evaluation of How Task-Based Overview Displays Impact Operator Workload and Situation Awareness When in Emergency Procedure Space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielman, Zachary; Hill, Racheal; LeBlanc, Katya; Rice, Brandon; Bower, Gordon; Joe, Jeffrey; Powers, David

    2016-07-01

    Control room modernization is critical to extending the life of the 99 operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP) within the United States. However, due to the lack of evidence demonstrating the efficiency and effectiveness of recent candidate technologies, current NPP control rooms operate without the benefit of various newer technologies now available. As nuclear power plants begin to extend their licenses to continue operating for another 20 years, there is increased interest in modernizing the control room and supplementing the existing control boards with advanced technologies. As part of a series of studies investigating the benefits of advanced control room technologies, the researchers conducted an experimental study to observe the effect of Task-Based Overview Displays (TODs) on operator workload and situation awareness (SA) while completing typical operating scenarios. Researchers employed the Situation Awareness Rating Technique (SART) and the NASA Task Load Index (TLX) as construct measures.

  10. On-site emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1980-01-01

    This lecture covers the Emergency Planning of the Operating organization and is based on the Code of Practice and Safety Guides of the IAEA as well as on arrangements in use at the Swiss Nuclear Power Station Beznau and - outlines the basis and content of an emergency plan - describes the emergencies postulated for emergency planning purposes - describes the responsibilities, the organization and the procedures of the operating organization to cope with emergency situations and the liaison between the operating organization, the regulatory body and public authorities - describes the facilities and equipment which should be available to cope with emergency sitauations - describes the measures and actions to be taken when an emergency arises in order to correct abnormal plant conditions and to protect the persons on-and off-site - describes the aid to be given to affected personnel - describes the aspects relevant to maintaining the emergency plan and organization in operational readiness. (orig./RW)

  11. Safety and Feasibility of a Ketamine Package to Support Emergency and Essential Surgery in Kenya when No Anesthetist is Available: An Analysis of 1216 Consecutive Operative Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas F; Suarez, Sebastian; Sessler, Daniel I; Senay, Ayla; Yusufali, Taha; Masaki, Charles; Guha, Moytrayee; Rogo, Debora; Jani, Pankaj; Nelson, Brett D; Rogo, Khama

    2017-12-01

    Lack of access to emergency and essential surgery is widespread in low- and middle-income countries. Scarce anesthesia services contribute to this unmet need. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of the Every Second Matters for Emergency and Essential Surgery-Ketamine (ESM-Ketamine) package for emergency and essential procedures when no anesthetist was available. From November 2013 to September 2017, the ESM-Ketamine package was used for patients requiring emergency or life-improving surgeries in fifteen selected facilities across Kenya when no anesthetist was available. A mixed-methods approach was used to assess safety and feasibility of the ESM-Ketamine package, including demand, acceptability, and practicality. The primary outcome was ketamine-related adverse events. Key-informant interviews captured perceptions of providers, hospital administrators, and surgeons/proceduralists. Non-anesthetist mid-level providers used ESM-Ketamine for 1216 surgical procedures across the fifteen study facilities. The median ketamine dose was 2.1 mg/kg. Brief (30 s) oxygen desaturations occurred in seven patients (0.6%). There were 157 (13%) reported cases of hallucinations and agitation which were treated with diazepam. All patients recovered uneventfully, and no ketamine-related deaths were reported. Twenty-seven key-informant interviews showed strong support for the program with four main themes: financial considerations, provision of services, staff impact, and scaling considerations. The ESM-Ketamine package appears safe and feasible and is capable of expanding access to emergency and essential surgeries in rural Kenya when no anesthetist is available.

  12. Automatic electromagnetic valve for previous vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granados, C. E.; Martin, F.

    1959-01-01

    A valve which permits the maintenance of an installation vacuum when electric current fails is described. It also lets the air in the previous vacuum bomb to prevent the oil ascending in the vacuum tubes. (Author)

  13. Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Markus; Büser, Natalie; Scherer, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - Patients with osteoporosis who present with an acute onset of back pain often have multiple fractures on plain radiographs. Differentiation of an acute osteoporotic vertebral fracture (AOVF) from previous fractures is difficult. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of concomitant AOVFs and previous OVFs in patients with symptomatic AOVFs, and to identify risk factors for concomitant AOVFs. Patients and methods - This was a prospective epidemiological study based on the Registry of Pathological Osteoporotic Vertebral Fractures (REPAPORA) with 1,005 patients and 2,874 osteoporotic vertebral fractures, which has been running since February 1, 2006. Concomitant fractures are defined as at least 2 acute short-tau inversion recovery (STIR-) positive vertebral fractures that happen concomitantly. A previous fracture is a STIR-negative fracture at the time of initial diagnostics. Logistic regression was used to examine the influence of various variables on the incidence of concomitant fractures. Results - More than 99% of osteoporotic vertebral fractures occurred in the thoracic and lumbar spine. The incidence of concomitant fractures at the time of first patient contact was 26% and that of previous fractures was 60%. The odds ratio (OR) for concomitant fractures decreased with a higher number of previous fractures (OR =0.86; p = 0.03) and higher dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry T-score (OR =0.72; p = 0.003). Interpretation - Concomitant and previous osteoporotic vertebral fractures are common. Risk factors for concomitant fractures are a low T-score and a low number of previous vertebral fractures in cases of osteoporotic vertebral fracture. An MRI scan of the the complete thoracic and lumbar spine with STIR sequence reduces the risk of under-diagnosis and under-treatment.

  14. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the uterus CHOICES FOR EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION Two emergency contraceptive pills may be bought without a prescription. Plan ... to provide ongoing birth control. MORE ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVE PILLS Women of any age can buy Plan ...

  15. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at increased risk of sudden lung ...

  16. Entrepreneurship, Emerging Technologies, Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thukral, Inderpreet S.; Von Ehr, James; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter; Adham, Khairul Akmaliah

    2008-01-01

    Academics and practitioners alike have long understood the benefits, if not the risks, of both emerging markets and emerging technologies.Yet it is only recently that foresighted firms have embraced emerging technologies and emerging markets through entrepreneurial activity. Emerging technologies

  17. Incorporating Emerging Voices into the Assessment Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabau, Ashli A.; Stolzenberg, Ellen Bara

    2017-01-01

    This chapter addresses emerging voices in the assessment process. These emerging voices include a variety of newly assessed aspects of student identity. Emerging voices also include new institutional participants and unique collaborations previously not commonly considered in the assessment process.

  18. Uterine rupture without previous caesarean delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisted, Dorthe L. A.; H. Mortensen, Laust; Krebs, Lone

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine incidence and patient characteristics of women with uterine rupture during singleton births at term without a previous caesarean delivery. STUDY DESIGN: Population based cohort study. Women with term singleton birth, no record of previous caesarean delivery and planned...... vaginal delivery (n=611,803) were identified in the Danish Medical Birth Registry (1997-2008). Medical records from women recorded with uterine rupture during labour were reviewed to ascertain events of complete uterine rupture. Relative Risk (RR) and adjusted Relative Risk Ratio (aRR) of complete uterine...... rupture with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were ascertained according to characteristics of the women and of the delivery. RESULTS: We identified 20 cases with complete uterine rupture. The incidence of complete uterine rupture among women without previous caesarean delivery was about 3...

  19. Technical subsidies for the operation of IRD/CNEN emergency vehicles in the case of a nuclear accident at the Angra Nuclear Power Plant with associated radioactive releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, J.L.B.

    1982-03-01

    Technical support is provided for the operation of an emergency vehicle of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria/Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in the event of uncontrolled release of radioactivity from the Angra Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) to the atmosphere. It is based on internationally adopted emergency decision process philosophy, the concept of 'Protective Action Guide' (PAG), the exposure pathways relevant to nuclear accidents, the measuring systems to be used in obtaining the exposure rate in the effluent 'plume', the methods utilized to predict dose to the population, radioiodine suppression measures, the monitoring instrumentation available to the emergency group, some post-accident considerations and finally, the monitoring that may be carried out from an aircraft. Information is given about the NPP operator's responsabilities with respect to the prediction of the consequences of an accident, as well as methods for thyroid and whole body dose estimation based on exposure to the radioiodine and noble gases present in the effluent plume. The example of the Three Mile Island's incident is used to formulate some observations regarding collective dose to the public estimates derived from measurements made from a helicopter. (Author) [pt

  20. Operational Law Handbook,2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    ...), human rights, rules of engagement, emergency essential civilians supporting military operations, contingency contractor personnel, foreign and deployment, criminal law, environmental law, fiscal law...

  1. Emergency Handling for MAC Protocol in Human Body Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Youngmi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human body communication (HBC is a technology that enables short range data communication using the human body as a medium, like an electrical wire. Thus it removes the need for a traditional antenna. HBC may be used as a type of data communication in body area network (BAN, while the devices are being in contact with body. One of important issues in BAN is an emergency alarm because it may be closely related to human life. For emergency data communication, the most critical factor is the time constraint. IEEE 802.15.6 specifies that the emergency alarm for the BAN must be notified in less than 1 sec and must provide prioritization mechanisms for emergency traffic and notification. As one type of BAN, the HBC must follow this recommendation, too. Existing emergency handling methods in BAN are based on the carrier sensing capability on radio frequencies to detect the status of channels. However, PHY protocol in HBC does not provide the carrier sensing. So the previous methods are not well suitable for HBC directly. Additionally, in the environment that the emergency rate is very low, the allocation of dedicated slot(s for emergency in each superframe is very wasteful. In this work, we proposed specific emergency handling operation for human body communication's medium access control (HBC-MAC protocol to meet the emergency requirements for BAN. We also showed the optimal number of emergency slots for the various combinations of beacon intervals and emergency rates.

  2. Inspection of Emergency Arrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The Working Group on Inspection Practices (WGIP) was tasked by the NEA CNRA to examine and evaluate the extent to which emergency arrangements are inspected and to identify areas of importance for the development of good inspection practices. WGIP members shared their approaches to the inspection of emergency arrangements by the use of questionnaires, which were developed from the requirements set out in IAEA Safety Standards. Detailed responses to the questionnaires from WGIP member countries have been compiled and are presented in the appendix to this report. The following commendable practices have been drawn from the completed questionnaires and views provided by WGIP members: - RBs and their Inspectors have sufficient knowledge and information regarding operator's arrangements for the preparedness and response to nuclear emergencies, to enable authoritative advice to be given to the national coordinating authority, where necessary. - Inspectors check that the operator's response to a nuclear emergency is adequately integrated with relevant response organisations. - Inspectors pay attention to consider the integration of the operator's response to safety and security threats. - The efficiency of international relations is checked in depth during some exercises (e.g. early warning, assistance and technical information), especially for near-border facilities that could lead to an emergency response abroad. - RB inspection programmes consider the adequacy of arrangements for emergency preparedness and response to multi-unit accidents. - RBs assess the adequacy of arrangements to respond to accidents in other countries. - The RB's role is adequately documented and communicated to all agencies taking part in the response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. - Inspectors check that threat assessments for NPPs have been undertaken in accordance with national requirements and that up-to-date assessments have been used as the basis for developing emergency plans for

  3. INTRODUCTION Previous reports have documented a high ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pregnancy if they were married, educated, had dental insurance, previously used dental services when not pregnant, or had knowledge about the possible connection between oral health and pregnancy outcome8. The purpose of this study was to explore the factors determining good oral hygiene among pregnant women ...

  4. Empowerment perceptions of educational managers from previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The perceptions of educational manag ers from previously disadvantaged primary and high schools in the Nelson Mandela Metropole regarding the issue of empowerment are outlined and the perceptions of educational managers in terms of various aspects of empowerment at different levels reflected. A literature study ...

  5. Management of choledocholithiasis after previous gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S; Egan, R; Cross, N; Guru Naidu, S; Somasekar, K

    2017-09-01

    Common bile duct stones in patients with a previous gastrectomy can be a technical challenge because of the altered anatomy. This paper presents the successful management of two such patients using non-traditional techniques as conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was not possible.

  6. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  7. The Potential Linkage between Emergency Medical Services Systems and Health Systems Agencies to Civil Defense Related Health and Medical Care Plans and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    Attendees Madge R. Swann HRA 436-7234 Bob Handy HRA 436-7240 Dick Salamandra HSA-EMS 436-6295 Jonetta Darden PHS 443-1167 Gordon Johnson PHS/FDA/BRH 443...Francsico area. He said all Federal agencies have been working under General Woodward’s leadership to develop a plan. Mr. Salamandra asked Ms. Darden how...Anderson then introduced Dick Salamandra whose topic was Overview of Emergency Medical Services Systems. Mr. Salamandra said the intent of the EMS Act of

  8. Guide to Nongovernmental Organizations for the Military. A primer for the military about private, voluntary, and nongovernmental organizations operating in humanitarian emergencies globally

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    mission or charter; can o en become too removed and lose in uence over NGO o cers and sta . Problema c if poor decision- making becomes common...4,604.87 $11,565.24 40 Social infrastructure and services $ 1,216.31 $3,252.96 37 Economic infrastructure $3,121.84 $11,793.81 26 Agriculture, forestry...bibliography/en. �“Public health leaders using social media to convey emergencies: New tools a boon.�” Social media tools such as Twi er and

  9. Childhood Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Waiting So Long? Admission to the Hospital Heroes on Medicine's Front Line Observation Emergency Care Fact Sheet Health & Safety Tips Campaigns SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every parent’s No. 1 ...

  10. Hanaro operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Bok; Jeon, Byung Jin; Kwack, Byung Ho [and others

    1997-01-01

    HANARO was configurated its first operating core in 1995. Long term operation test was conducted up to 3-1 cycle during 1996, in order to investigate the reactor characteristics due to fuel depletion and additional fuel loading. Now HANARO has accumulated 168.4 days of total operation time and 2,687.5 MWD of total thermal output. Reactor analysis, producing operation datum and its validation with test, periodic inspection and maintenance of the facility are continuously conducted for safe operation of the HANARO. Conducted the verification tests for installed utilization facilities, and successfully performed the radiation emergency drill. The shutdown report of TRIGA Mark II and III was submitted to MOST, and decommissioning will be started from 1997. (author). 70 tabs., 50 figs., 27 refs.

  11. Previously unknown organomagnesium compounds in astrochemical context

    OpenAIRE

    Ruf, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    We describe the detection of dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates (CHOMg) in astrochemical context. CHOMg was detected in meteorites via ultrahigh-resolving chemical analytics and represents a novel, previously unreported chemical class. Thus, chemical stability was probed via quantum chemical computations, in combination with experimental fragmentation techniques. Results propose the putative formation of green-chemical OH-Grignard-type molecules and triggered fundamental questions within chemica...

  12. [Placental complications after a previous cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosević, Jelena; Lilić, Vekoslav; Tasić, Marija; Radović-Janosević, Dragana; Stefanović, Milan; Antić, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of cesarean section has been rising in the past 50 years. With the increased number of cesarean sections, the number of pregnancies with the previous cesarean section rises as well. The aim of this study was to establish the influence of the previous cesarean section on the development of placental complications: placenta previa, placental abruption and placenta accreta, as well as to determine the influence of the number of previous cesarean sections on the complication development. The research was conducted at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Nis covering 10-year-period (from 1995 to 2005) with 32358 deliveries, 1280 deliveries after a previous cesarean section, 131 cases of placenta previa and 118 cases of placental abruption. The experimental groups was presented by the cases of placenta previa or placental abruption with prior cesarean section in obstetrics history, opposite to the control group having the same conditions but without a cesarean section in medical history. The incidence of placenta previa in the control group was 0.33%, opposite to the 1.86% incidence after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections and as high as 14.28% after three cesarean sections in obstetric history. Placental abruption was recorded as placental complication in 0.33% pregnancies in the control group, while its incidence was 1.02% after one cesarean section (pcesarean sections. The difference in the incidence of intrapartal hysterectomy between the group with prior cesarean section (0.86%) and without it (0.006%) shows a high statistical significance (pcesarean section is an important risk factor for the development of placental complications.

  13. Executive Function in Previously Institutionalized Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Emily C; Harlé, Katia M; Noble, Kimberly G; McCall, Robert B

    2016-06-01

    In studies of children adopted from institutions, being raised in an institution has been associated consistently with an increased risk of persistent cognitive, academic, and social-emotional problems. These findings raise questions about the neurocognitive mechanisms that contribute to these negative outcomes. Theory and models based on studies of animals indicate that development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) may be particularly susceptible to environmental influences during early childhood. In this article, we review recent studies of postinstitutionalized children that examined EF components such as inhibitory control, working memory, shifting, and planning. We then describe emerging research on the structure and function of the PFC. Converging evidence suggests both EF difficulties and alterations in development of the PFC following early institutionalization. We conclude by discussing possible explanations for these findings and implications for prevention and intervention, and by offering suggestions for ongoing research.

  14. KAERI Radiological Emergency Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oui, Khang Byung; Lee, Goan Yup; Lee, Jong Tai

    2004-06-15

    The Radiological Emergency Plan of KAERI is to draw up based on the Civil Defence Law, the Disaster and Safety Management Law, the Act of Physical Protection and Emergency Preparedness in Nuclear Facilities, the National Radiological Emergency Plan, and made reference to the DOE order and IAEA TECDOC etc. This plan describes the preventive measures, emergency response, re-entry and restoration to ensure adequate response capabilities to the nuclear accidents which would cause a significant risk to the KAERI staffs and the public near to the site. And the Operation of Radiological Emergency Management System is included in this plan to test the effectiveness of this plan and to improve the response capabilities of the emergency staffs against nuclear accidents.

  15. Achieving Information Superiority Using Hastily Formed Networks and Emerging Technologies for the Royal Thai Armed Forces Counterinsurgency Operations in Southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    carried out mostly in remote villages while RTARF forces conduct escort missions to protect teachers and Buddhist 12 monks (Abuza, 2011, p. 6). However...security, village stabilization operations, protection detail for Buddhist monks and teachers and overall restoration of law and order. The RTARF force...the official census conducted in 2000. The vast majority of the Thai population is Buddhist , while Thai- Muslims represent just 4.5% of the

  16. Defining an emerging disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutou, F; Pastoret, P-P

    2015-04-01

    Defining an emerging disease is not straightforward, as there are several different types of disease emergence. For example, there can be a 'real' emergence of a brand new disease, such as the emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in the 1980s, or a geographic emergence in an area not previously affected, such as the emergence of bluetongue in northern Europe in 2006. In addition, disease can emerge in species formerly not considered affected, e.g. the emergence of bovine tuberculosis in wildlife species since 2000 in France. There can also be an unexpected increase of disease incidence in a known area and a known species, or there may simply be an increase in our knowledge or awareness of a particular disease. What all these emerging diseases have in common is that human activity frequently has a role to play in their emergence. For example, bovine spongiform encephalopathy very probably emerged as a result of changes in the manufacturing of meat-and-bone meal, bluetongue was able to spread to cooler climes as a result of uncontrolled trade in animals, and a relaxation of screening and surveillance for bovine tuberculosis enabled the disease to re-emerge in areas that had been able to drastically reduce the number of cases. Globalisation and population growth will continue to affect the epidemiology of diseases in years to come and ecosystems will continue to evolve. Furthermore, new technologies such as metagenomics and high-throughput sequencing are identifying new microorganisms all the time. Change is the one constant, and diseases will continue to emerge, and we must consider the causes and different types of emergence as we deal with these diseases in the future.

  17. Flame retardant emission from e-waste recycling operation in northern Vietnam: Environmental occurrence of emerging organophosphorus esters used as alternatives for PBDEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukami, Hidenori, E-mail: matsukami.hidenori@nies.go.jp [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8563 (Japan); Tue, Nguyen Minh [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Suzuki, Go [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Someya, Masayuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Research Institute for Environmental Protection, 1-7-5 Shinsuna Koto, Tokyo 136-0075 (Japan); Tuyen, Le Huu; Viet, Pham Hung [Centre for Environmental Technology and Sustainable Development (CETASD), Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Takahashi, Shin [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Center of Advanced Technology for the Environment, Faculty of Agriculture, Ehime University, 3-5-7 Tarumi, Matsuyama 790-8566 (Japan); Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, 2-5 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Takigami, Hidetaka [Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8563 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    Three oligomeric organophosphorus flame retardants (o-PFRs), eight monomeric PFRs (m-PFRs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were identified and quantified in surface soils and river sediments around the e-waste recycling area in Bui Dau, northern Vietnam. Around the e-waste recycling workshops, 1,3-phenylene bis(diphenyl phosphate) (PBDPP), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) (BPA-BDPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), TBBPA, and PBDEs were dominant among the investigated flame retardants (FRs). The respective concentrations of PBDPP, BPA-BDPP, TPHP, TBBPA and the total PBDEs were 6.6–14000 ng/g-dry, < 2–1500 ng/g-dry, 11–3300 ng/g-dry, < 5–2900 ng/g-dry, and 67–9200 ng/g-dry in surface soils, and 4.4–78 ng/g-dry, < 2–20 ng/g-dry, 7.3–38 ng/g-dry, 6.0–44 ng/g-dry and 100–350 ng/g-dry in river sediments. Near the open burning site of e-waste, tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP), (2-ethylhexyl)diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), TPHP, and the total PBDEs were abundantly with respective concentrations of < 2–190 ng/g-dry, < 2–69 ng/g-dry, < 3–51 ng/g-dry and 1.7–67 ng/g-dry in surface soils. Open storage and burning of e-waste have been determined to be important factors contributing to the emissions of FRs. The environmental occurrence of emerging FRs, especially o-PFRs, indicates that the alternation of FRs addition in electronic products is shifting in response to domestic and international regulations of PBDEs. The emissions of alternatives from open storage and burning of e-waste might become greater than those of PBDEs in the following years. The presence and environmental effects of alternatives should be regarded as a risk factor along with e-waste recycling. - Highlights: • Open storage and burning of e-waste contributed to emission of FRs. • Types of FRs currently in emission are shifting in response to regulations of PBDEs. • Emerging PFRs were detected in soils and sediments around e

  18. Flame retardant emission from e-waste recycling operation in northern Vietnam: Environmental occurrence of emerging organophosphorus esters used as alternatives for PBDEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsukami, Hidenori; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Someya, Masayuki; Tuyen, Le Huu; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2015-01-01

    Three oligomeric organophosphorus flame retardants (o-PFRs), eight monomeric PFRs (m-PFRs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were identified and quantified in surface soils and river sediments around the e-waste recycling area in Bui Dau, northern Vietnam. Around the e-waste recycling workshops, 1,3-phenylene bis(diphenyl phosphate) (PBDPP), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) (BPA-BDPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), TBBPA, and PBDEs were dominant among the investigated flame retardants (FRs). The respective concentrations of PBDPP, BPA-BDPP, TPHP, TBBPA and the total PBDEs were 6.6–14000 ng/g-dry, < 2–1500 ng/g-dry, 11–3300 ng/g-dry, < 5–2900 ng/g-dry, and 67–9200 ng/g-dry in surface soils, and 4.4–78 ng/g-dry, < 2–20 ng/g-dry, 7.3–38 ng/g-dry, 6.0–44 ng/g-dry and 100–350 ng/g-dry in river sediments. Near the open burning site of e-waste, tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP), (2-ethylhexyl)diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), TPHP, and the total PBDEs were abundantly with respective concentrations of < 2–190 ng/g-dry, < 2–69 ng/g-dry, < 3–51 ng/g-dry and 1.7–67 ng/g-dry in surface soils. Open storage and burning of e-waste have been determined to be important factors contributing to the emissions of FRs. The environmental occurrence of emerging FRs, especially o-PFRs, indicates that the alternation of FRs addition in electronic products is shifting in response to domestic and international regulations of PBDEs. The emissions of alternatives from open storage and burning of e-waste might become greater than those of PBDEs in the following years. The presence and environmental effects of alternatives should be regarded as a risk factor along with e-waste recycling. - Highlights: • Open storage and burning of e-waste contributed to emission of FRs. • Types of FRs currently in emission are shifting in response to regulations of PBDEs. • Emerging PFRs were detected in soils and sediments around e

  19. Range of the radiation monitor for the rigid vent of primary containment during normal and emergency operation for a BWR-5 in Laguna Verde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tijerina S, F.; Pozos S, A. M.; Cabrera U, S.; Mata A, J. A.; Sandoval V, S.; Ovando C, R.; Vargas A, A.; Gallardo R, I.; Cruz G, M.; Amador C, C.

    2014-10-01

    The earthquake followed by a tsunami, happened in March, 2011 in the coasts of oriental Japan, caused damages in the nuclear power plants 1 at 4 of Fukushima Daiichi leading to damage of the fuel in three of the reactors and to the radiation liberation to the exterior. As consequence of those events, the regulations requires that the power plants with Primary Containment type Mark I and II evaluate to have a system of rigid vent with a monitoring equipment of radiation effluents. The present work covers the rigid vent of diameter 12 of the Primary Containment, type Mark-II, of nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde in conditions of severe accident and normal operation, low regime of Extended Power Up rate (EPU - 2317 MWt), using the codes MAAP3B, MICROSHILED 5.05 and the Bardach Black Boxes methodology. As a result the measurement range of the radiation monitor that is required for monitoring the gassy liberation to the atmosphere was determined. The conclusion is that the superior limit of the range of the radiation meter during a Severe Accident is of 8.55 E + 05 R/h (8.55 E + 08 m R/h) and the superior limit in normal operation of 1.412 E-11 at 2.540 E-7 R/h (1.412 E-14 at 2.540 E-10 m R/h). (Author)

  20. Flame retardant emission from e-waste recycling operation in northern Vietnam: environmental occurrence of emerging organophosphorus esters used as alternatives for PBDEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukami, Hidenori; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Someya, Masayuki; Tuyen, Le Huu; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Takigami, Hidetaka

    2015-05-01

    Three oligomeric organophosphorus flame retardants (o-PFRs), eight monomeric PFRs (m-PFRs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were identified and quantified in surface soils and river sediments around the e-waste recycling area in Bui Dau, northern Vietnam. Around the e-waste recycling workshops, 1,3-phenylene bis(diphenyl phosphate) (PBDPP), bisphenol A bis(diphenyl phosphate) (BPA-BDPP), triphenyl phosphate (TPHP), TBBPA, and PBDEs were dominant among the investigated flame retardants (FRs). The respective concentrations of PBDPP, BPA-BDPP, TPHP, TBBPA and the total PBDEs were 6.6-14000 ng/g-dry, waste, tris(methylphenyl) phosphate (TMPP), (2-ethylhexyl)diphenyl phosphate (EHDPP), TPHP, and the total PBDEs were abundantly with respective concentrations of waste have been determined to be important factors contributing to the emissions of FRs. The environmental occurrence of emerging FRs, especially o-PFRs, indicates that the alternation of FRs addition in electronic products is shifting in response to domestic and international regulations of PBDEs. The emissions of alternatives from open storage and burning of e-waste might become greater than those of PBDEs in the following years. The presence and environmental effects of alternatives should be regarded as a risk factor along with e-waste recycling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Books average previous decade of economic misery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, R Alexander; Acerbi, Alberto; Ormerod, Paul; Lampos, Vasileios

    2014-01-01

    For the 20(th) century since the Depression, we find a strong correlation between a 'literary misery index' derived from English language books and a moving average of the previous decade of the annual U.S. economic misery index, which is the sum of inflation and unemployment rates. We find a peak in the goodness of fit at 11 years for the moving average. The fit between the two misery indices holds when using different techniques to measure the literary misery index, and this fit is significantly better than other possible correlations with different emotion indices. To check the robustness of the results, we also analysed books written in German language and obtained very similar correlations with the German economic misery index. The results suggest that millions of books published every year average the authors' shared economic experiences over the past decade.

  2. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a doctor to have an IUD inserted. Emergency contraceptive pills can be very effective if they are ... use. Some women feel nauseous after they take emergency contraceptive pills. This feeling should go away in about ...

  3. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call the ... visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you in the event of a ...

  4. External plans for radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, G.; Vizuet G, J.; Benitez S, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1989, the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico shares in the task of Food and Water Control corresponding to the FT-86 task force of External Plans for Radiological Emergency (PERE), in charge of the Veracruz Health Services. In the PERE preparation stage previous actions are necessary developed for the preparation and updating of this plan and the task organization with the purpose to maintaining standing and operable in any time and circumstance, the capability to response in the face of an emergency. This stage englobes activities which must be realized before to carry out the Plan as they are the specialized training of personnel which participates and the execution of exercises and simulacrums. Until 1998, training and exercises for this task had been realized under diverse possible sceneries but in conditions that simulated the presence of radioactive material. For this reason, it should be emphasized the training realized during the days 6th, 7th, 8th July, 1999, in the emergency planning zone of the Plan, which to carry out using radioactive material. The National Institute of Nuclear Research had in charge of the training. This work describes all the activities for the realization of this training. (Author)

  5. Emergent Expertise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The concept of emergence appears in various places within the literature on expertise and expert practice. Here, I examine some of these applications of emergence in the light of two prominent accounts of emergence from the philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. I evaluate these accounts with respect to several specific contexts in which…

  6. On the improvement of the response capability of the control room operator in a pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant in a severe earthquake through the use of emergency response guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    1989-01-01

    Recent probabilistic risk assessment studies indicate that potential accidents initiated by large earthquakes are among the major contributors to public risk from nuclear power plants. During a severe earthquake, the symptoms presented to operators may be unreliable and may endanger the validity of actions in emergency response guidelines (ERGs). The objective of the present study is to improve the operator capability of responding to seismic damage through the use of ERGS. The methods used are to deterministically identify the possible weakness of ERGs, given a severe earthquake, and to probabilistically evaluate those identified weaknesses. Several cases are postulated. Each of them contains system failures with or without indicator failures and leads the core to meltdown conditions if the operator follows the ERGs strictly without any deviation. The likelihood of each case is estimated. A LISP program is developed to estimate the plant seismic risk with which the relative risk contribution of each postulated case is estimated. As a result, ten cases are postulated and possible remedies for each case are discussed. The likelihood of each case is estimated to be not negligible. The identified indicator failures should be considered in future refinement of the ERGS. The development of an expert system to provide remedial procedures should be considered after a more thorough study in which many more cases are postulated

  7. Structural Emergency Control Paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vu, Thanh Long; Chatzivasileiadis, Spyros; Chiang, Hsiao-Dong

    2017-01-01

    demand and hopefully stabilize the system. This traditional emergency control results in interrupted service with severe economic damage to customers. Also, such control is usually less effective due to the lack of coordination among protective devices. In this paper, we propose a novel structural......Power grids normally operate at some stable operating condition where power supply and demand are balanced. In response to emergency situations, load shedding is a prevailing approach where local protective devices are activated to cut a suitable amount of load to quickly rebalance the supply...

  8. Incidence of previously undetected disease in routine paediatric otolaryngology admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitoun, H; Robinson, P

    1996-06-01

    The process of clerking routine pre-operative admissions involves the house officer taking a full medical history and performing a full physical examination. The diagnostic yield is thought to be low, and the educational value to the house officer is also small. This study addresses the question as to whether routine physical examination is always indicated. One hundred and nine children admitted for routine Otolaryngology procedures were prospectively studied to identify the importance of examination in the pre-operative assessment of patients. The results showed that 51 per cent of the children admitted had risk factors. The medical history was sufficient to identify these risk factors in all patients with the exception of one cardiac condition. This study concludes that a suitable alternative to the current process of clerking such as a standardized nurse history could be safely and efficiently undertaken. Eliminating the tiny percentage of previously unrecognized disease would be a prerequisite for such a change.

  9. FCS UGV safe operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Scott; Ruedin, Joshua; Perschbacher, Michael; Bares, John

    2008-04-01

    The US Army Future Combat System (FCS) will implement Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV) in numbers not previously seen before in military operations. Many of these vehicles will also be larger and faster than the small robots typically used today for explosive ordnance disposal and general improvised explosive device handling. More importantly, FCS will implement these UGV's in scenarios were they will be in much closer proximity to soldiers and other non-combatant personnel. This paper describes the plan for developing an appropriate match of technology for autonomous UGV maneuver with the emerging need for safety release verification for these systems prior to fielding. The plan is followed by descriptions of initial data collections with a UGV, that will form the starting point in this safety release process, and stimulate further use and refinement of this process for large UGV's in applications beyond FCS.

  10. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Marke

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  11. Reproductive emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, L Ari

    2005-03-01

    The emergency clinician is frequently called on to manage problems relating to the female reproductive tract. Because owners sel-dom have the medical knowledge needed to differentiate normal from abnormal reproductive behaviors, they frequently look to the emergency veterinarian for guidance and information during and after parturition. For this reason, it is essential that the veterinarian have a good understanding of the normal reproductive cycle as well as the common emergencies that may occur. This article reviews the events surrounding normal parturition in the dog and cat and the reproductive emergencies seen most commonly in practice.

  12. Chapter 10. Emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Emergency preparedness is a set of measures the aim of which is to mitigate possible impacts of incident radiation accidents at nuclear installations and their consequences to the environment. Emergency Response Centre of Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD) was established as a technical support tool of UJD to evaluate the technical conditions of nuclear installations and also for assessment of radiation situation in case of accident and for prognosis of development of possible accident and evolution of its impact on the population and the environment. At the same time it serves as an advisory body for the national Emergency Commission for the Radiation Accidents for planning of optimal protective measures focusing on minimising the impact on population and the vicinity of NPP. Besides of completion of emergency procedures related to NPPs Bohunice also the first part of procedures for NPP Mochovce and procedures using a new EU code system RODOS. In 2000 UJD focused activities in emergency preparedness area on inspections, approval of on-site emergency plans of nuclear installations, review of emergency transport orders and of-site emergency plans. In accordance with an UJD inspection plan the inspectors of UJD carried out several inspections in area of emergency preparedness at all NPPs. The inspections were focused on checking the emergency exercises, review of preparedness of NPP staff in the area of emergency planning and review of documentation. There were no important insufficiencies revealed during the inspections. During the year 2000 the exercises were performed at all nuclear installations and the emergency transport orders were exercised as well. Testing of communication, preparedness of individual members of emergency headquarters, co-operation, operability of emergency centres and exchange of information were the main tasks of these exercises. In March the emergency exercise at the National Radioactive waste Repository on Mochovce

  13. Clinical features and management of equine post operative ileus (POI): Survey of Diplomates of the American Colleges of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, D; Hudson, N P H; Elce, Y A; Blikslager, A; Divers, T J; Handel, I G; Tremaine, W H; Pirie, R S

    2016-11-01

    A recent survey of European Colleges (European College of Equine Internal Medicine [ECEIM] and European College of Veterinary Surgeons [ECVS]) revealed the different strategies implemented by, and some of the challenges facing, European clinicians presented with cases of post operative ileus (POI). It was concluded that further comparative analysis of opinions, canvassed from additional colleges of equine veterinary specialism worldwide, would provide valuable additional insight into current POI knowledge on a more global scale. To report and compare the current strategies favoured by American veterinary specialists when managing POI in horses that underwent emergency colic surgery. Cross-sectional survey. Electronic invitations were sent to 814 Large Animal specialists, including 3 colleges: the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM), American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and the American College of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care (ACVECC). The response rate was 14% (115/814). The majority of respondents (68%) reported an estimated prevalence range of POI of 0-20%. The presence of reflux on nasogastric intubation was the main criterion used to define POI. A lesion involving the small intestine was considered the main risk factor for POI. Anti-inflammatory drugs, intravenous (i.v.) fluids and antimicrobial drugs were the primary strategies used when managing POI. Flunixin meglumine and i.v. lidocaine were the drugs most commonly used in the treatment of horses with POI. Supplementary management strategies targeted mainly the prevention of post operative adhesions, infection and inflammation. There is a lack of consensus on the clinical definition of POI. Prospective and objective clinical assessment of the effectiveness of the different strategies contained within this and the European survey is necessary in order to identify a standardised approach to the management of equine POI. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  14. Effective emergency management: reconsidering the bureaucratic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, D M; Phillips, B D

    1995-12-01

    The command and control approach is compared with the Emergent Human Resources Model (EHRM) approach to emergency management. Four decades of systematic research shows that a rigid, bureaucratic command and control approach to emergency management generally leads to an ineffective emergency response. Previous studies and our own research suggest that flexible, malleable, loosely coupled, organizational configurations can create a more effective disaster response.

  15. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  16. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures

  17. Hanford Emergency Response Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagoner, J.D.

    1994-04-01

    The Hanford Emergency Response Plan for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), incorporates into one document an overview of the emergency management program for the Hanford Site. The program has been developed in accordance with DOE orders, and state and federal regulations to protect worker and public health and safety and the environment in the event of an emergency at or affecting the Hanford Site. This plan provides a description of how the Hanford Site will implement the provisions of DOE 5500 series and other applicable Orders in terms of overall policies and concept of operations. It should be used as the basis, along with DOE Orders, for the development of specific contractor and RL implementing procedures.

  18. Rates of induced abortion in Denmark according to age, previous births and previous abortions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Louise H. Hansen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Whereas the effects of various socio-demographic determinants on a woman's risk of having an abortion are relatively well-documented, less attention has been given to the effect of previous abortions and births. Objective: To study the effect of previous abortions and births on Danish women's risk of an abortion, in addition to a number of demographic and personal characteristics. Data and methods: From the Fertility of Women and Couples Dataset we obtained data on the number of live births and induced abortions by year (1981-2001, age (16-39, county of residence and marital status. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the influence of the explanatory variables on the probability of having an abortion in a relevant year. Main findings and conclusion: A woman's risk of having an abortion increases with the number of previous births and previous abortions. Some interactions were was found in the way a woman's risk of abortion varies with calendar year, age and parity. The risk of an abortion for women with no children decreases while the risk of an abortion for women with children increases over time. Furthermore, the risk of an abortion decreases with age, but relatively more so for women with children compared to childless women. Trends for teenagers are discussed in a separate section.

  19. Emergency preparedness at Barsebaeck NPP in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, R.; Lindvall, C.

    1998-01-01

    On-site emergency preparedness plan at Barsebaeck NPP is presented. In an emergency the responsibility of the NPP is to alarm the emergency organizations, spend all efforts to restore safe operation, assess the potential source term as to size and time, protect their own personnel, inform personnel and public. Detailed emergency procedures overview is provided

  20. Emergency preparedness at Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kairys, A.

    1998-01-01

    Brief review of Ignalina NPP safety upgrading and personnel preparedness to act in cases of accidents is presented. Though great activities are performed in enhancing the plant operation safety, the Ignalina NPP management pays a lot of attention to preparedness for emergency elimination and take measures to stop emergency spreading. A new Ignalina NPP emergency preparedness plan was drawn up and became operational. It is the main document to carry out organizational, technical, medical, evacuation and other activities to protect plant personnel, population, the plant and the environment from accident consequences. Great assistance was rendered by Swedish experts in drawing this new emergency preparedness plan. The plan consists of 3 parts: general part, operative part and appendixes. The plan is applied to the Ignalina NPP personnel, Special and Fire Brigade and also to other contractor organizations personnel carrying out works at Ignalina NPP. There are set the following emergency classes: incident, emergency situation, alert, local emergency, general emergency. Separate intervention level corresponds to each emergency class. Overview of personnel training to act in case of an emergency is also presented

  1. Emergency Communications Console

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    NASA has applied its communications equipment expertise to development of a communications console that provides, in a compact package only slightly larger than an electric typewriter, all the emergency medical services communications functions needed for a regional hospital. A prototype unit, built by Johnson Space Center, has been installed in the Odessa (Texas) Medical Center Hospital. The hospital is the medical control center for the 17-county Permian Basin Emergency Medical System in west Texas. The console project originated in response to a request to NASA from the Texas governor's office, which sought a better way of providing emergency medical care in rural areas. Because ambulance travel time is frequently long in remote areas of west Texas, it is important that treatment begin at the scene of the emergency rather than at the hospital emergency room. A radio and telephone system linking ambulance emergency technicians and hospital staff makes this possible. But earlier equipment was complex, requiring specialized operators. A highly reliable system was needed to minimize breakdowns and provide controls of utmost simplicity, so that the system could be operated by physicians and nurses rather than by communications specialists. The resulting console has both radio and telephone sections. With the radio equipment, hospital personnel can communicate with ambulance drivers and paramedics, receive incoming electrocardiagrams, consult with other hospitals, page hospital staff and set up a radio-to-telephone "patch." The telephone portion of the system includes a hotline from the Permian Basin Emergency Medical Service's resource control center, an automatic dialer for contacting special care facilities in the Permian Basin network, a hospital intercom terminal and a means of relaying cardioscope displays and other data between hospitals. The integrated system also provides links with local disaster and civil defense organizations and with emergency "Dial 911

  2. [Emergency Decompressive Craniotomy in the Emergency Room was Effective in Severe Acute Subdural Hematoma Treatment:Two Case Reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Naoto; Echigo, Tadashi; Oka, Hideki; Nozawa, Masahiro; Okada, Michiko; Hiraizumi, Shiho; Kato, Fumitaka; Koseki, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Yoichi; Hino, Akihiko

    2017-02-01

    The outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma is unfavorable. In particular, patients with levels of consciousness of Glasgow Coma Scale(GCS)3 or 4 tend to be refractory to treatment. Decompressive craniotomy should be promptly performed to remove hematoma. However, if an operating room is not immediately available, emergency burr hole surgery is sometimes performed in the emergency room(primary care room)prior to craniotomy. A previous study has reported that the interval from injury to surgery influences the outcome of severe acute subdural hematoma. Therefore, emergency decompression is important to effectively treat patients with severe acute subdural hematoma. We present the cases of two patients with acute subdural hematomas. In both cases, emergency decompressive craniotomy(hematoma removal after craniotomy and external decompression)was performed in the emergency room of the Emergency and Critical Care Center. In both cases, the surgery was followed by favorable outcomes. Case 1 was a 36-year-old female. The patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 3. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 75 minutes. Surgery began 20 minutes after diagnosis. Case 2 was a 25-year-old male. The second patient's level of consciousness upon arrival was GCS 4. The interval from injury to diagnosis on the basis of CT findings was 60 minutes. Surgery was begun 40 minutes after diagnosis. In both patients, we observed anisocoria and the loss of the light reflex. However, the postoperative course was favorable, and both patients were discharged. In summary, to treat severe acute subdural hematomas, early emergency decompressive craniotomy is optimal. Emergency decompressive surgery in the emergency room is independent of operating room or staff. Therefore, emergency decompressive craniotomy may improve the outcome of patients with severe acute subdural hematomas.

  3. Studying Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia; Rodegher, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The Emerge event, held in Tempe, AZ in March 2012, brought together a range of scientists, artists, futurists, engineers and students in order to experiment with innovative methods for thinking about the future. These methodological techniques were tested through nine workshops, each of which made...... use of a different format; Emerge as a whole, then, offered an opportunity to study a diverse set of future-oriented engagement practices. We conducted an event ethnography, in which a team of 11 researchers collaboratively developed accounts of the practices at play within Emerge and its workshops...

  4. Congruency sequence effects are driven by previous-trial congruency, not previous-trial response conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Weissman, Daniel H.; Carp, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Congruency effects in distracter interference tasks are often smaller after incongruent trials than after congruent trials. However, the sources of such congruency sequence effects (CSEs) are controversial. The conflict monitoring model of cognitive control links CSEs to the detection and resolution of response conflict. In contrast, competing theories attribute CSEs to attentional or affective processes that vary with previous-trial congruency (incongruent vs. congruent). The present study s...

  5. HEART TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH PREVIOUS OPEN HEART SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart Transplantation (HTx to date remains the most effective and radical method of treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. The defi cit of donor hearts is forcing to resort increasingly to the use of different longterm mechanical circulatory support systems, including as a «bridge» to the follow-up HTx. According to the ISHLT Registry the number of recipients underwent cardiopulmonary bypass surgery increased from 40% in the period from 2004 to 2008 to 49.6% for the period from 2009 to 2015. HTx performed in repeated patients, on the one hand, involves considerable technical diffi culties and high risks; on the other hand, there is often no alternative medical intervention to HTx, and if not dictated by absolute contradictions the denial of the surgery is equivalent to 100% mortality. This review summarizes the results of a number of published studies aimed at understanding the immediate and late results of HTx in patients, previously underwent open heart surgery. The effect of resternotomy during HTx and that of the specifi c features associated with its implementation in recipients previously operated on open heart, and its effects on the immediate and long-term survival were considered in this review. Results of studies analyzing the risk factors for perioperative complications in repeated recipients were also demonstrated. Separately, HTx risks after implantation of prolonged mechanical circulatory support systems were examined. The literature does not allow to clearly defi ning the impact factor of earlier performed open heart surgery on the course of perioperative period and on the prognosis of survival in recipients who underwent HTx. On the other hand, subject to the regular fl ow of HTx and the perioperative period the risks in this clinical situation are justifi ed as a long-term prognosis of recipients previously conducted open heart surgery and are comparable to those of patients who underwent primary HTx. Studies

  6. Emergency Support Function 15 Standard Operating Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    offices, and various field offices to coordinate federal messaging.  Outreach materials were translated in 22 languages to ensure information was...effective formats. The function is also responsible for managing the translation of information into languages other than English which have been...of Defense and Deputy Secretary of Defense for public information, internal information, community relations, information training, and audiovisual

  7. Information Operations during the Malayan Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    hear both stations was part of the larger PSYOP designed to appeal to the materialistic urge of the rural Chinese. The British radios created two...Insurrection in Malaya, 1948-1960, 437. 49 contests, debating societies, supervised moonlight parties and excursions for teenagers .188 After several

  8. Proteomics Analysis Reveals Previously Uncharacterized Virulence Factors in Vibrio proteolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Ann; Kinch, Lisa N; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Grishin, Nick V; Orth, Kim; Salomon, Dor

    2016-07-26

    Members of the genus Vibrio include many pathogens of humans and marine animals that share genetic information via horizontal gene transfer. Hence, the Vibrio pan-genome carries the potential to establish new pathogenic strains by sharing virulence determinants, many of which have yet to be characterized. Here, we investigated the virulence properties of Vibrio proteolyticus, a Gram-negative marine bacterium previously identified as part of the Vibrio consortium isolated from diseased corals. We found that V. proteolyticus causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements followed by cell lysis in HeLa cells in a contact-independent manner. In search of the responsible virulence factor involved, we determined the V. proteolyticus secretome. This proteomics approach revealed various putative virulence factors, including active type VI secretion systems and effectors with virulence toxin domains; however, these type VI secretion systems were not responsible for the observed cytotoxic effects. Further examination of the V. proteolyticus secretome led us to hypothesize and subsequently demonstrate that a secreted hemolysin, belonging to a previously uncharacterized clan of the leukocidin superfamily, was the toxin responsible for the V. proteolyticus-mediated cytotoxicity in both HeLa cells and macrophages. Clearly, there remains an armory of yet-to-be-discovered virulence factors in the Vibrio pan-genome that will undoubtedly provide a wealth of knowledge on how a pathogen can manipulate host cells. The pan-genome of the genus Vibrio is a potential reservoir of unidentified toxins that can provide insight into how members of this genus have successfully risen as emerging pathogens worldwide. We focused on Vibrio proteolyticus, a marine bacterium that was previously implicated in virulence toward marine animals, and characterized its interaction with eukaryotic cells. We found that this bacterium causes actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and leads to cell death. Using a

  9. Heat emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... directly) to the person's skin and use a fan to lower body temperature. Place cold compresses on ... RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  10. Ear emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from an explosion, blow to the head, flying, scuba diving, falling while water skiing, or being slapped on ... Byyny RL, Shockley LW. Scuba diving and dysbarism. In: Marx JA, ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  11. EMERGENCY TRIAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Rajapakse

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes emergency triage. It presents the reasons for implementation of triage and its benefits. Focuses on the Manchester triage system, which is formally validated triage model in Slovenia.

  12. Emergent emotion

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Elaine Finbarr

    2016-01-01

    I argue that emotion is an ontologically emergent and sui generis. I argue that emotion meets both of two individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for ontological emergence. These are, (i) that emotion necessarily has constituent parts to which it cannot be reduced, and (ii) that emotion has a causal effect on its constituent parts (i.e. emotion demonstrates downward causation).\\ud \\ud I argue that emotion is partly cognitive, partly constituted by feelings and partly perceptu...

  13. Dermatologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Simón Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologic emergencies represent about 8–20% of the diseases seen in the Emergency Department of hospitals. It is often a challenge for primary care physicians to differentiate mundane skin ailments from more serious, life threatening conditions that require immediate intervention. In this review we included the following conditions: Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrosis, pemphigus vulgaris, toxic shock syndrome, fasciitis necrotising, angioedema/urticaria, meningococcemia, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

  14. The Impact of Emerging Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Groody, Michael

    2000-01-01

    .... The question arises, is a change required? The operational functions performed by a CINC in today's military can still be carried out in a historic manner in the dynamic environment of emerging technology...

  15. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  16. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  17. Anorectal emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-01-01

    Anorectal emergencies refer to anorectal disorders presenting with some alarming symptoms such as acute anal pain and bleeding which might require an immediate management. This article deals with the diagnosis and management of common anorectal emergencies such as acutely thrombosed external hemorrhoid, thrombosed or strangulated internal hemorrhoid, bleeding hemorrhoid, bleeding anorectal varices, anal fissure, irreducible or strangulated rectal prolapse, anorectal abscess, perineal necrotizing fasciitis (Fournier gangrene), retained anorectal foreign bodies and obstructing rectal cancer. Sexually transmitted diseases as anorectal non-surgical emergencies and some anorectal emergencies in neonates are also discussed. The last part of this review dedicates to the management of early complications following common anorectal procedures that may present as an emergency including acute urinary retention, bleeding, fecal impaction and anorectal sepsis. Although many of anorectal disorders presenting in an emergency setting are not life-threatening and may be successfully treated in an outpatient clinic, an accurate diagnosis and proper management remains a challenging problem for clinicians. A detailed history taking and a careful physical examination, including digital rectal examination and anoscopy, is essential for correct diagnosis and plan of treatment. In some cases, some imaging examinations, such as endoanal ultrasonography and computerized tomography scan of whole abdomen, are required. If in doubt, the attending physicians should not hesitate to consult an expert e.g., colorectal surgeon about the diagnosis, proper management and appropriate follow-up. PMID:27468181

  18. FPGA Based Intelligent Co-operative Processor in Memory Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, Zaki; Sotudeh, Reza; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar

    2011-01-01

    In a continuing effort to improve computer system performance, Processor-In-Memory (PIM) architecture has emerged as an alternative solution. PIM architecture incorporates computational units and control logic directly on the memory to provide immediate access to the data. To exploit the potential...... benefits of PIM, a concept of Co-operative Intelligent Memory (CIM) was developed by the intelligent system group of University of Hertfordshire, based on the previously developed Co-operative Pseudo Intelligent Memory (CPIM). This paper provides an overview on previous works (CPIM, CIM) and realization...

  19. LNG - emergency control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berardinelli, Ricardo Porto; Correa, Kleber Macedo; Moura Filho, Nelson Barboza de; Fernandez, Carlos Antonio [TRANSPETRO, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Matos, Jose Eduardo Nogueira de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The operation of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is pioneering within the PETROBRAS System. PETROBRAS Transporte - TRANSPETRO is going to operate two flexible LNG terminals, located in Ceara and Rio de Janeiro. In accordance with the Corporate Health, Safety and Environmental (HSE) Directive - Training, Education and Awareness, PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. - TRANSPETRO has prepared an action plan with the objective of ensuring the operational safety of the undertaking. Among other actions a training program for the emergency control of LNG will be inserted into the timetable. The above mentioned training program was held over a period of 20 hours, and was divided between theory and practice. In the theoretical part, the characteristics of the product, the history of accidents and the emergency response procedures were covered. In the practical part, 3000 gallons of LNG were utilized where the behavior of the product could be confirmed following a confined leak, thereby verifying the efficacy of the emergency control resources. The teaching process of the course was developed in the company through the preparation of specific procedures, emergency plans and the formation of internal instructors. (author)

  20. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L.

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig

  1. SICOEM: emergency response data system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Villota, C.; Francia, L. (UNESA, Madrid (Spain))

    1993-01-01

    The main characteristics of the SICOEM emergency response system are: -direct electronic redundant transmission of certain operational parameters and plant status informations from the plant process computer to a computer at the Regulatory Body site, - the system will be used in emergency situations, -SICOEM is not considered as a safety class system. 1 fig.

  2. Uterine rupture after previous low segment transverse cesarean is rarely catastrophic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltsman, Sofia; Perlitz, Yuri; Ben Ami, Moshe; Ben Shlomo, Izhar

    2018-03-01

    The cornerstone of concerns over trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) is the risk of uterine rupture. The purpose of this study was to document the rate of uterine rupture during TOLAC and to delineate its severity and consequences. We retrospectively collected the data on vaginal and cesarean deliveries after a previous cesarean section with specific emphasis on uterine rupture and dehiscence in our center from 2006 through 2013. 22,670 deliveries were registered, with 18.2% rate of cesarean section. 2890 women had a single cesarean scar; of them 1206 delivered vaginally and 194 were re-operated during unsuccessful TOLAC. Seven cases of uterine rupture and 16 cases of dehiscence were recorded. There were no maternal, intrapartum or neonatal deaths, and no cesarean hysterectomy. There was one re-laparotomy, one ICU admission, and one blood transfusion; one neonate was admitted to NICU. TOLAC was successful in 86.1% of cases. Cautious selection and close monitoring of candidates are the cornerstones of successful management of TOLAC. Readily available facilities for emergency cesarean delivery and concerted obstetrical team can save the mother and child from catastrophic complications.

  3. Ultrasonography in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risi, D.; Alessi, G.; Meli, C.; Marzano, M.; Fiori, E.; Caterino, S.

    1989-01-01

    From February 1986 to March 1988 113 abdominal US exams were performed in emergency situation to evaluate the accuracy of this methodology: 13 were blunt traumas, 18 post-operative complications. A real-time scanner with a linear probe of 5 MHz was employed. The results were confirmed by surgical and/or clinical and instrumental evaluation. In 81% of the examinations, ultrasonography allowed a diagnosis to be made. Gallbladder and biliary pathologies were the most common findings. The results (sensibility 96%, specificity 88%, accuracy 95%) confirm the affidability of ultrasonography in abdominal emergencies, as shown in literature

  4. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuko Koyama; Laura Hagopian; Judith Linden

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others...

  5. Measles Outbreak among Previously Immunized Adult Healthcare Workers, China, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyi Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measles is caused by measles virus belonging to genus Morbillivirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. Vaccination has played a critical role in controlling measles infection worldwide. However, in the recent years, outbreaks of measles infection still occur in many developing countries. Here, we report an outbreak of measles among healthcare workers and among the 60 measles infected patients 50 were healthcare workers including doctors, nurses, staff, and medics. Fifty-one patients (85% tested positive for IgM antibodies against the measles virus and 50 patients (83.3% tested positive for measles virus RNA. Surprisingly, 73.3% of the infected individuals had been previously immunized against measles. Since there is no infection division in our hospital, the fever clinics are located in the Emergency Division. In addition, the fever and rash were not recognized as measles symptoms at the beginning of the outbreak. These factors result in delay in isolation and early confirmation of the suspected patients and eventually a measles outbreak in the hospital. Our report highlights the importance of following a two-dose measles vaccine program in people including the healthcare workers. In addition, vigilant attention should be paid to medical staff with clinical fever and rash symptoms to avoid a possible nosocomial transmission of measles infection.

  6. Hematologic emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Vallisa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the surprising progress made in other areas of hematology (advances in the understanding of leukemogenesis, improved transplant techniques has been conspicuously absent in the management of hematologic emergencies. And yet, every step toward greater knowledge, every new treatment option will be of little value unless we are able to manage the acute complications of hematologic diseases. These complications are better defined as hematologic emergencies, and they are characterized by a high rate of mortality. This review is based on a search of the literature that was initially confined to articles published in the journal Hematology from 2000 to 2009. The search was then extended to the Cochrane Library and to Pub Med in February 2010 with the following Keywords emergencies; urgencies; hematology. The same key words were employed in a search of the archives of Blood and the New England Journal of Medicine from 2000 to 2010. The results confirm that hematologic emergencies can be caused by hematologic malignancies as well as by non-neoplastic hematologic diseases. Within the former category; this review examines the causes; manifestations; treatment and prevention of disseminated intravascular coagulation; superior vena caval syndrome; spinal cord compression; tumor lysis syndrome; hyperleukocytosis; and hypercalcemia. We also review emergency situations associated with non-neoplatic haematological diseases; such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; drug-induced hemolytic anemia; and acute sickle-cell crisis.

  7. Emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear activities are exercised so as to prevent the accidents. They are subjected to a rule whom application is controlled by the Asn. The risk of grave accident is so limited to a very low level of probability. He cannot be however completely pushed aside. The expression ' radiological emergency situation ' indicates a situation which ensues from an incident or of an accident risking to lead to an emission of radioactive materials or a level of radioactivity susceptible to strike a blow at the public health. The term ' nuclear crisis ' is used for the events which can lead to a radiological emergency situation on a nuclear basic installation or during a transport of radioactive materials. The preparation and the management of emergency situations, that they are of natural, accidental or terrorist origin, became a major concern of our society. We propose you of to know more about it in this file. (N.C.)

  8. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  9. EMERGING MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE CARALICEA-MĂRCULESCU

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The emerging markets are winning the currency war, because at this very moment its the battle of global financial institutions , as to who is more vulnerable and more exposed to the debt crisis and have their hands in more risky assets. US and Euro with their intertwining the financial stuff of the nation, the banks and the corporations are in a deep mess. One goes down, takes the other ones too. Right now , they all are struggling and getting beaten up , while the emerging markets are quiet and not really expressing their stands on the current situation except are reacting by all only putting their own houses in order.

  10. Emergency Preparedness

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The trends of RPC work in the area of preparedness for nuclear and radiological accidents are listed. RPC in cooperation with Swedish Government developed the project on preparation for iodine prophylaxis in case of accident at Ignalina NPP and arranged seminar on emergency preparedness issues in 2001.

  11. Emerging Materiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Breinbjerg, Morten; Pold, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The authors examine how materiality emerges from complex chains of mediation in creative software use. The primarily theoretical argument is inspired and illustrated by interviews with two composers of electronic music. The authors argue that computer mediated activity should not primarily...

  12. Emergent Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, H.A.P.; Everdij, M.H.C.; Bouarfa, S.; Cook, A; Rivas, D

    2016-01-01

    In complexity science a property or behaviour of a system is called emergent if it is not a property or behaviour of the constituting elements of the system, though results from the interactions between its constituting elements. In the socio-technical air transportation system these interactions

  13. Emergence delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Louise; Andersen, Lars Peter Holst; Gögenur, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Emergence delirium (ED) is a well-known phenomenon in the postoperative period. However, the literature concerning this clinical problem is limited. This review evaluates the literature with respect to epidemiology and risk factors. Treatment strategies are discussed. The review concludes...

  14. Emergency plan belgian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clymans, A.

    1989-01-01

    The Chernobyl disaster prompted authorities in Belgium to carry out a comprehensive review of all emergency plans and, in particular, those designed specifically for nuclear accidents. This review was aimed at determining what type of plans existed and to what extent such plans were operational. This paper sets out to present a broad overview of different aspects of this problem: organization of public emergency plans, co-ordination of operations, merits and demerits of centralization as opposed to decentralization, planning zones, obligation to release information to the public and relations with the media, and finally the international dimension to the problem. The author expresses the hope that the latter area will inspire practical suggestions [fr

  15. Corruption in emergency procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jessica; Søreide, Tina

    2008-12-01

    Corruption in emergency procurement reduces the resources available for life-saving operations, lowers the quality of products and services provided, and diverts aid from those who need it most.(1) It also negatively influences public support for humanitarian relief, both in the affected country and abroad. This paper aims to unpack and analyse the following question in order to mitigate risk: how and where does corruption typically occur, and what can be done? Suggested strategies reflect a multi-layered approach that stresses internal agency control mechanisms, conflict-sensitive management, and the need for common systems among operators.

  16. EDF national emergency organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverge, J.

    1992-01-01

    The scope of French nuclear power led Electricite de France (EDF) to design standard products, manufactured in series but adaptable to different sites. Standardization is based on the decision on a single technology: pressurized water reactors (PWR). Thirty-four 900 MW and seventeen 1300 MW units are in operation on seventeen sites. The specific nature of French organization for normal operation and accident management results from equipment standardization and single licensee. This specificity is based on emergency plan standardization and highly structured national organization. Figs

  17. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  18. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Koyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency post-coital contraception (EC is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method, and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference.

  19. [Medical emergency teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunkenborg, G.; Lund, C.; Petersen, John Asger

    2008-01-01

    The aim of medical emergency teams (MET) is to identify and treat deteriorating patients on general wards, and to avoid cardiac arrest, unplanned intensive care unit admission and death. The effectiveness of METs has yet to be proven, as the only two randomised, controlled trials on the subject...... show conflicting results. Despite the lack of evidence, METs are gaining popularity and are being implemented in Danish hospitals as part of Operation Life Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8/25...

  20. The Relationship between Prisoners' Educational Motives and Previous Incarceration, Sentence Length, and Sentence Served

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Beate Buanes; Manger, Terje

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine Norwegian prisoners' educational motives, and how previous incarceration, sentence length, and sentence served influence such motives. Three motive categories emerged: future planning (Factor 1), social reasons and escapism (Factor 2), and competence building (Factor 3). Among prisoners who participated in…

  1. Emerging Multinationals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peter

    ) and books (e.g. Goldstein 2007; Benito and Narula 2007). This paper takes stock of the mounting trend of outward FDI from emerging economies, with special focus on a group of five countries, which are becoming increasingly economically and politically influential, viz. the ‘BRICS' countries. An ‘S......' is appended here to the conventional acronym of ‘BRIC' (Brazil, Russia, India, China) to include the largest economy on the African continent, South Africa. The five BRICS countries produced some USD25 billion of outward FDI flows in 2004, corresponding to some 3 percent of world FDI flows and well over half...... (61 percent) of total developing country outflows. OFDI from the BRICS countries has grown rapidly over the last few years, while still remaining modest compared to many developed countries. Following a brief discussion of FDI and emerging economies in general the article proceeds to hypothesise...

  2. Emergency Medical Rescue in a Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briesmeister, L.; Ellington, Y.; Hollis, R.; Kunzman, J.; McNaughton, M.; Ramsey, G.; Somers, B.; Turner, A.; Finn, J.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experience with emergency medical rescues in the presence of radiation or contamination indicates that the training provided to emergency responders is not always appropriate. A new course developed at Los Alamos includes specific procedures for emergency response in a variety of radiological conditions

  3. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  4. Emergency and post-emergency control in the formation of micro-grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyushin Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, there is a worldwide tendency to clustering the electrical power systems at LV and MV levels – creating the micro-grids. In this connection, numerous of technical issues appear in control approaches in general and in particular in emergency and post-emergency control. As micro-grids are meant to operate both in interconnected and islanded modes, the ability to steadily island and backward synchronize with an upper grid provides reduction of the negative impact of failure rate of electrical power system’s elements, as well as power quality parameters influence toward operation regime of the loads. The consequence of previously described features is particular requirements for the following emergency automatics: overload-preventing automatics for overhead lines, cables and transformers; out-of-step automatics and under-frequency load shedding. Low inertia constants of some distributed generation units and low time constants of electromagnetic transients of generating units and ESS, interconnected with a grid by means of power-electronics, provide an ability to realize additional (fast control signals in overload-preventing automatics, dispatching generating units and ESS with an aim to prevent considered elements tripping.

  5. 33 CFR 127.307 - Emergency Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency Manual. 127.307 Section... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Natural Gas Operations § 127.307 Emergency Manual. Each Emergency Manual must contain— (a) LNG release response procedures, including contacting local response...

  6. 33 CFR 127.1307 - Emergency Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency Manual. 127.1307... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1307 Emergency Manual. (a) Each Emergency Manual must contain— (1) For each LHG handled— (i) A physical description of the LHG; (ii) A...

  7. 46 CFR 154.1020 - Emergency power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency power. 154.1020 Section 154.1020 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS... § 154.1020 Emergency power. The emergency generator must be designed to allow operation at the final...

  8. 77 FR 38248 - Passenger Train Emergency Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-27

    ...-0062, Notice No. 1; 2130-AC33] Passenger Train Emergency Preparedness AGENCY: Federal Railroad...: FRA is proposing to revise its regulations for passenger train emergency preparedness. These proposed... emergency situations receive initial and periodic training and are subject to operational (efficiency) tests...

  9. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Trauma Operative Management Basic Endovascular Skills for Trauma Disaster Management and Emergency Preparedness Rural Trauma Team Development ... 202-5001 (E) postmaster@facs.org Copyright © 1996-2018 by the American College of Surgeons, Chicago, IL ...

  10. Forest operations and woody biomass logistics to improve efficiency, value, and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel Anderson; Dana Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the most recent work conducted by scientists and engineers of the Forest Service of the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) in the areas of forest operations and woody biomass logistics, with an emphasis on feedstock supply for emerging bioenergy, biofuels, and bioproducts applications. This work is presented in the context of previous...

  11. Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, R. A.; And Others

    This manual for the development of emergency operating plans for municipal wastewater treatment systems was compiled using information provided by over two hundred municipal treatment systems. It covers emergencies caused by natural disasters, civil disorders and strikes, faulty maintenance, negligent operation, and accidents. The effects of such…

  12. Effectiveness of Emergency Medicine Wards in reducing length of stay and overcrowding in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shuk Man; Choi, Kenny Tze Ying; Wong, Eliza Mi Ling; Lee, Larry Lap Yip; Yeung, Richard Sai Dat; Chan, Jimmy Tak Shing; Chair, Sek Ying

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of an Emergency Medicine Ward (EMW) in reducing the length of stay (LOS) in the emergency department, length of hospitalization, emergency medical admission rate, and the hospital bed occupancy rate. This study is a cross-sectional, observational study with a retrospective, quantitative record review conducted at the EMW of a regional acute hospital in Hong Kong from January 2009 to June 2009. During the study, a retrospective audit was conducted on 1834 patient records. The five main groups of patients admitted into EMW suffered from cardiac disease (26.5%), pneumonia (19.6%), dizziness (16.2%), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (12.3%), and gastroenteritis (7.9%). The mean LOS in the EMW was 1.27 days (SD=0.59). The average emergency medical admission rate within the six-month period was significantly reduced relative to that before the EMW became operational (January 2008 to June 2008). Clinically, the medical in-patient bed occupancy was significantly reduced by 6.2%. The average LOS during in-patient hospitalization after the EMW was established decreased to 4.13 days from the previous length of 5.16 days. EMWs effectively reduce both the LOS during in-patient hospitalization and the avoidable medical admission rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Upgrading France's emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moures, Y.

    1991-01-01

    In France as elsewhere, the Chernobyl accident spurred a new stage in the development of nuclear safety. In the months following the accident, France's Minister of Industry launched a campaign to strengthen research and safety measures to: prevent reactor accidents; reinforce the concept of quality in operations; train staff, in areas such as crisis management; systematically review plans, installations and techniques related to crisis management; study accident containment procedures. There was also a systematic review of communication links with authorities and outside emergency organizations during the critical phase of an accident. On the operational level regulatory monitoring procedures were reorganized and reinforced. France has not opted for the permanent presence of on-site inspectors, but rather for the total, continuous responsibility of the power plant operator, with the safety authority intervening at frequent intervals. A major programme was also established to increase capabilities for investigation and intervention in a radioactive environment in nuclear installations. (author)

  14. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: June 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-08-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  15. Manual for first responders to a radiological emergency. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-10-01

    Under Article 5.a(ii) of the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. As stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2 'Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency', which establishes the requirements for an adequate level of preparedness for and response to a nuclear or radiological emergency in any State, 'first responders shall take all practicable and appropriate actions to minimize the consequences of a nuclear or radiological emergency'. The IAEA General Conference, in resolution GC(49)/RES/9, continues to encourage Member States 'to adopt the relevant Agency standards, procedures and practical tools' and underlines 'the need for first responders to have appropriate training for dealing with ionizing radiation during nuclear and radiological emergencies'. This publication is intended to assist in meeting these requirements and to fulfil Article 5 of the Assistance Convention. Its aim is to provide practical guidance for those who will respond during the first few hours to a radiological emergency (referred to here as 'first responders') and for national officials who would support this early response. It provides guidance in the form of action guides, instructions, and supporting data that can be easily applied by a State to build a basic capability to respond to a radiological emergency. This guidance should be adapted to fit the user State's organizational arrangements, language, terminology, concept of operation and capabilities. This report, published as part of the IAEA Emergency Preparedness and Response Series, replaces and builds on IAEA-TECDOC-1162 in the area of early response and first responders' actions. It takes account of the

  16. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive

  17. Emergency surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoneham, M; Murray, D; Foss, N

    2014-01-01

    undertaken on elderly patients with limited physiological reserve. National audits have reported variations in care quality, data that are increasingly being used to drive quality improvement through professional guidance. Given that the number of elderly patients presenting for emergency surgery is likely...... to rise as the population ages, this review summarises the evidence on which such guidance is based, and provides information about how anaesthetists might participate in audit and research aimed at improving local and national outcomes for these most vulnerable of patients....

  18. Emerging Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Amaliris; Musallam, Khaled M; Taher, Ali T; Rivella, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    At present, the only definitive cure for β-thalassemia is a bone marrow transplant (BMT); however, HLA-blood-matched donors are scarcely available. Current therapies undergoing clinical investigation with most potential for therapeutic benefit are the β-globin gene transfer of patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells followed by autologous BMT. Other emerging therapies deliver exogenous regulators of several key modulators of erythropoiesis or iron homeostasis. This review focuses on current approaches for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies caused by disruptions of β-globin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. India Emerging

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The increase in products and/or services in those areas either create a demand for domestic consumption or for export. Ever since ..... While conjectures on the efficiency introduced by ICT in the operating environment are high, a concrete example which illustrates the role of ICT is that of Reliance Industries. Reliance ...

  20. Sellafield Site (including Drigg) emergency scheme manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This Scheme defines the organisation and procedures available should there be an accident at the Sellafield Site which results in, or may result in, the release of radioactive material, or the generation of a high radiation field, which might present a hazard to employees and/or the general public. Several categories of emergencies on the Sellafield Site are mentioned; a building emergency which is confined to one building, a Site emergency standby when the effects of a building emergency go outside that building, a Site emergency alert (District Emergency Standby) when a release of activity affects Site operations and could have serious Site effects and a District Emergency Alert when a radioactivity release may interfere with the normal activity of the General Public. A Drigg Emergency Standby situation would operate similarly at the Drigg Site. The detailed arrangements and responsibilities of appointed personnel are set out in this manual. (UK)

  1. 22 CFR 40.91 - Certain aliens previously removed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certain aliens previously removed. 40.91... IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Aliens Previously Removed § 40.91 Certain aliens previously removed. (a) 5-year bar. An alien who has been found inadmissible, whether as a result...

  2. Preoperative electrocardiography: its cost-effectiveness in detecting abnormalities when a previous tracing exists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabkin, S W; Horne, J M

    1979-01-01

    In 812 patients who underwent routine preoperative electrocardiography a mean of 24.6 months after undergoing electrocardiography at the same institution, the frequency of new abnormalities was estimated to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of this procedure prior to an operation. New abnormalities were judged to be either relevant or irrelevant to the assessment of operative risk, depending upon their previously demonstrated correlation with operative and postoperative morbidity and mortality. Since new abnormalities, especially new relevant abnormalities, were found to be relatively infrequent, the cost-effectiveness of routine preoperative electrocardiography was considered to be low. The evidence suggested that when a previous tracing exists preoperative electrocardiography is most clearly indicated for patients who are 60 years of age or older or whose previous tracing exhibited abnormalities. However, further research is required to develop more sensitive and specific protocols, and to evaluate the role of repeat electrocardiography in clinical decision-making. PMID:111793

  3. Environmental monitoring in emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This manual gives technical guidance on emergency monitoring procedures to those who would have to assess the situation after an accident leading to the uncontrolled release of radioactive substances to the environment. Its aim is to draw attention to the important factors that should be considered in formulating emergency plans. The seven annexes contain inventories of fission products and possible releases; dispersion, deposition and dose-exposure relationships for airborne releases; α-, β- and γ-radiation surveys; information on sample collection and field evaluation; and brief descriptions of the environmental monitoring procedures adopted in previous emergencies (Windscale 1957, AERE Harwell 1961 and NRTS Idaho 1961).

  4. Determining root correspondence between previously and newly detected objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglieroni, David W.; Beer, N Reginald

    2014-06-17

    A system that applies attribute and topology based change detection to networks of objects that were detected on previous scans of a structure, roadway, or area of interest. The attributes capture properties or characteristics of the previously detected objects, such as location, time of detection, size, elongation, orientation, etc. The topology of the network of previously detected objects is maintained in a constellation database that stores attributes of previously detected objects and implicitly captures the geometrical structure of the network. A change detection system detects change by comparing the attributes and topology of new objects detected on the latest scan to the constellation database of previously detected objects.

  5. Emergency management information system (EMINS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desonier, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    In a time of crisis or in an emergency, a manager is required to make many decisions to facilitate the proper solution and conclusion to the emergency or crisis. In order to make these decisions, it is necessary for the manager to have correct up-to-date information on the situation, which calls for an automated information display and entry process. The information handling needs are identified in terms of data, video, and voice. Studies of existing Emergency Operations Centers and evaluations of hardware and software have been completed. The result of these studies and investigations is the design and implementation of an automated Emergency Management Information System. Not only is the system useful for Emergency Management but for any information management requirement

  6. Emergency response strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrilo, D.; Dias de la Cruz, F.

    1984-01-01

    In the present study is estimated, on the basis of a release category (PWR4) and several accident scenarios previously set up, the emergency response efficacy obtained in the application of different response strategies on each of the above mentioned scenarios. The studied strategies contemplate the following protective measures: evacuation, shelter and relocation. The radiological response has been obtained by means of CRAC2 (Calculation of Reactor Accident Consequences) code, and calculated in terms of absorbed dose equivalent (Whole body and thyroid), as well as early and latent biological effects. (author)

  7. Emergent cardiopulmonary bypass during pectus excavatum repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Craner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum is a chest wall deformity that produces significant cardiopulmonary disability and is typically seen in younger patients. Minimally invasive repair of pectus excavatum or Nuss procedure has become a widely accepted technique for adult and pediatric patients. Although it is carried out through a thoracoscopic approach, the procedure is associated with a number of potential intraoperative and post-operative complications. We present a case of cardiac perforation requiring emergent cardiopulmonary bypass in a 29-year-old male with Marfan syndrome and previous mitral valve repair undergoing a Nuss procedure for pectus excavatum. This case illustrates the importance of vigilance and preparation by the surgeons, anesthesia providers as well as the institution to be prepared with resources to handle the possible complications. This includes available cardiac surgical backup, perfusionist support and adequate blood product availability.

  8. Timing of elective repeated cesarean delivery in patients with previous two or more cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdel-Baset F; Bayo, Arabo I; Abu-Jubara, Mahmoud F

    2013-01-01

    To assess the maternal and neonatal consequences of scheduling elective repeated cesarean section (ERCS) at 39 weeks rather than 38 weeks and to assess the impacts of delivering by emergency cesarean section (CS) before the planned date. Retrospective Cohort study. Patients with previous two or more CS planned for ERCS at term during the period from January to June 2011. Medical records were reviewed for demographic and clinical data, planned timing of CS, emergency cesarean and any adverse maternal or neonatal outcome. Adverse maternal or neonatal outcome. Four hundred and twenty women were included, 71.4% of cases were posted <39 weeks and 28.6% were posted at ≥39 weeks. Patients posted ≥ 39 weeks were more prone to deliver by emergency CS (16.6 vs. 10.6%) and the neonates were less prone to RDS and NICU admission (p < 0.05). Our data support the justification to book patients for ERCS at ≥39 weeks.

  9. Managing emergency department overcrowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshaker, Jonathan S

    2009-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding and ambulance diversion has been an increasingly significant national problem for more than a decade. More than 90% of hospital ED directors reported overcrowding as a problem resulting in patients in hallways, full occupancy of ED beds, and long waits, occurring several times a week. Overcrowding has many other potential detrimental effects including diversion of ambulances, frustration for patients and ED personnel, lesser patient satisfaction, and most importantly, greater risk for poor outcomes. This article gives a basic blueprint for successfully making hospital-wide changes using principles of operational management. It briefly covers the causes, significance, and dangers of overcrowding, and then focuses primarily on specific solutions.

  10. Planning and training in emergency preparedness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    Link Simulation Systems Division of the Singer Company is combining its tactical simulation and display system with state-of-the-art decision and control technology to provide a combined operations, planning, and training (COPAT) system. This system provides for the total integration of the three primary responsibilities of emergency managers: planning and training for and decision and control of an emergency. The system is intended to be a complete operations center for emergency management personnel. In the event of a natural disaster or man-made emergency, the national, state, county, and city emergency managers require a secure and reliable operations center. The COPAT system combines the decision and control capabilities with proven simulation techniques allowing for integrated planning and training. The hardware system, software, data bases, and maps used during planning and training are the same as those used during actual emergencies

  11. Technological considerations in emergency instrumentation preparedness. Phase II-D. Evaluation testing and calibration methodology for emergency radiological instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramson, P.E.; Andersen, B.V.; Fleming, D.M.; Kathren, R.L.; Mulhern, O.R.; Newton, C.E.; Oscarson, E.E.; Selby, J.M.

    1976-09-01

    In response to recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the Division of Operational Safety, U.S. ERDA has contracted with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories to survey the adequacy of existing instrumentation at nuclear fuel cycle facilities to meet emergency requirements and to develop technical criteria for instrumentation systems to be used in assessment of environmental conditions following plant emergencies. This report, the fifth in a series, provides: (1) calibration methods to assure the quality of radiological measurements and (2) testing procedures for determining whether an emergency radiological instrument meets the performance specifications. Three previous reports in this series identified the emergency instrumentation needs for power reactors, mixed oxide fuel plants, and fuel reprocessing facilities. Each of these three reports contains a Section VI, which sets forth applicable radiological instrument performance criteria and calibration requirements. Testing and calibration procedures in this report have been formatted in two parts: IV and V, each divided into three subsections: (1) Power Reactors, (2) Mixed Oxide Fuel Plants, and (3) Fuel Reprocessing Facilities. The three performance criteria subsections directly coincide with the performance criteria sections of the previous reports. These performance criteria sections have been reproduced in this report as Part III with references of ''required action'' added

  12. Technological considerations in emergency instrumentation preparedness. Phase II-D. Evaluation testing and calibration methodology for emergency radiological instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramson, P.E.; Andersen, B.V.; Fleming, D.M.; Kathren, R.L.; Mulhern, O.R.; Newton, C.E.; Oscarson, E.E.; Selby, J.M.

    1976-09-01

    In response to recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the Division of Operational Safety, U.S. ERDA has contracted with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories to survey the adequacy of existing instrumentation at nuclear fuel cycle facilities to meet emergency requirements and to develop technical criteria for instrumentation systems to be used in assessment of environmental conditions following plant emergencies. This report, the fifth in a series, provides: (1) calibration methods to assure the quality of radiological measurements and (2) testing procedures for determining whether an emergency radiological instrument meets the performance specifications. Three previous reports in this series identified the emergency instrumentation needs for power reactors, mixed oxide fuel plants, and fuel reprocessing facilities. Each of these three reports contains a Section VI, which sets forth applicable radiological instrument performance criteria and calibration requirements. Testing and calibration procedures in this report have been formatted in two parts: IV and V, each divided into three subsections: (1) Power Reactors, (2) Mixed Oxide Fuel Plants, and (3) Fuel Reprocessing Facilities. The three performance criteria subsections directly coincide with the performance criteria sections of the previous reports. These performance criteria sections have been reproduced in this report as Part III with references of ''required action'' added.

  13. Towards accurate emergency response behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T.O.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactor operator emergency response behavior has persisted as a training problem through lack of information. The industry needs an accurate definition of operator behavior in adverse stress conditions, and training methods which will produce the desired behavior. Newly assembled information from fifty years of research into human behavior in both high and low stress provides a more accurate definition of appropriate operator response, and supports training methods which will produce the needed control room behavior. The research indicates that operator response in emergencies is divided into two modes, conditioned behavior and knowledge based behavior. Methods which assure accurate conditioned behavior, and provide for the recovery of knowledge based behavior, are described in detail

  14. Emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  15. Emerging memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Livio; Bez, Roberto; Sandhu, Gurtej

    2014-12-01

    Memory is a key component of any data processing system. Following the classical Turing machine approach, memories hold both the data to be processed and the rules for processing them. In the history of microelectronics, the distinction has been rather between working memory, which is exemplified by DRAM, and storage memory, exemplified by NAND. These two types of memory devices now represent 90% of all memory market and 25% of the total semiconductor market, and have been the technology drivers in the last decades. Even if radically different in characteristics, they are however based on the same storage mechanism: charge storage, and this mechanism seems to be near to reaching its physical limits. The search for new alternative memory approaches, based on more scalable mechanisms, has therefore gained new momentum. The status of incumbent memory technologies and their scaling limitations will be discussed. Emerging memory technologies will be analyzed, starting from the ones that are already present for niche applications, and which are getting new attention, thanks to recent technology breakthroughs. Maturity level, physical limitations and potential for scaling will be compared to existing memories. At the end the possible future composition of memory systems will be discussed.

  16. Emergency preparedness at the UJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seliga, Mojmir

    2001-01-01

    and international agreements as well as the information for media and public. Information group was in all these exercises responsible for co-ordination the technical briefing material prepared by the Reactor Safety Group and Radiological Assessment Group. The Information Group was also preparing messages, which were sent to international bodies such as IAEA and, to neighbouring countries as a part of Slovak Republic bilateral arrangements. The endeavour of the UJD is to create in the emergency response centre such a room, logistic, hardware and software base that the emergency headquarters could act timely and operatively. The protection measures proposed by the emergency headquarters, however, can be realised neither by the emergency headquarters nor by the UJD - it has no executive power in this area. That is why the emergency headquarters prepares, in co-operation with the operative expert group of the National Commission for Nuclear Accidents, optimum measures to cope with the situation and submits them to the National Emergency Commission for Radiation accidents, which co-ordinates realisation of protective measures on the national level. The emergency preparedness is verified by various types emergency exercises at national as well as international level

  17. Tubal anastomosis after previous sterilization: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Seeters, Jacoba A H; Chua, Su Jen; Mol, Ben W J; Koks, Carolien A M

    2017-05-01

    Female sterilization is one of the most common contraceptive methods. A small number of women, however, opt for reversal of sterilization procedures after they experience regret. Procedures can be performed by laparotomy or laparoscopy, with or without robotic assistance. Another commonly utilized alternative is IVF. The choice between surgery and IVF is often influenced by reimbursement politics for that particular geographic location. We evaluated the fertility outcomes of different surgical methods available for the reversal of female sterilization, compared these to IVF and assessed the prognostic factors for success. Two search strategies were employed. Firstly, we searched for randomized and non-randomized clinical studies presenting fertility outcomes of sterilization reversal up to July 2016. Data on the following outcomes were collected: pregnancy rate, ectopic pregnancy rate, cost of the procedure and operative time. Eligible study designs included prospective or retrospective studies, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case-control studies and case series. No age restriction was applied. Exclusion criteria were patients suffering from tubal infertility from any other reason (e.g. infection, endometriosis and adhesions from previous surgery) and studies including sterilization reversal procedures were then evaluated: female age, BMI and duration and method of sterilization. Secondly, we searched for randomized and non-randomized clinical studies that compared reversal of sterilization to IVF and evaluated them for pregnancy outcomes and cost effectiveness. We included 37 studies that investigated a total of 10 689 women. No randomized controlled trials were found. Most studies were retrospective cohort studies of a moderate quality. The pooled pregnancy rate after sterilization reversal was 42-69%, with heterogeneity seen from the different methods utilized. The reported ectopic pregnancy rate was 4-8%. The only prognostic factor affecting the

  18. Multidisciplinary emergent removal of a metal penoscrotal constriction device

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, GJ

    2017-03-01

    Strangulation of the genital organs is a rare presentation to the emergency department which requires urgent intervention to avoid long term complications. Penoscrotal constriction devices are either used for autoerotic stimulus or to increase sexual performance by maintaining an erection for a longer period. We report a case of a man who presented with penile strangulation following the application of a titanium penoscrotal constriction ring during sexual intercourse seven hours previously. The Fire Brigade department attended with an electric operated angle grinder to facilitate removal of the ring as standard medical equipment (orthopaedic saws, bolt and bone cutters) were insufficient. Fully functional recovery was achieved.

  19. Microkernel operating systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rudić, Ratko

    2016-01-01

    This thesis outlines history, development and design of microkernel based operating systems. While the idea of microkernel based architecture emerged early in computer science, there are still very few systems adopting this technology. Microkernel operating systems are divided into several different groups and families that frequently share rules, design decisions and development processes. This master thesis focuses on the main representatives of these groups as well as their mutual...

  20. MNE R&D Subsidiary Mandates Evolution in Emerging Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulzmann, David; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the results of a systematic literature review (SLR) on the subject of Research and Development (R&D) subsidiary mandate evolution in emerging economies and to illustrate what triggers R&D mandate upgrade. The subject of R&D mandates is of crucial importance to ...... on subsidiary evolution in general and particularly in emerging markets. From a practical perspective, a better-integrated framework can provide guidance to businesses in emerging economies on how to start and successfully upgrade their R&D activities.......The aim of this paper is to present the results of a systematic literature review (SLR) on the subject of Research and Development (R&D) subsidiary mandate evolution in emerging economies and to illustrate what triggers R&D mandate upgrade. The subject of R&D mandates is of crucial importance...... to many multinational enterprises (MNEs) striving to utilize the potential of their foreign operations towards higher-value-added activities. While developed economies have long been a destination for R&D activities, emerging economies are increasingly recognized for their innovation potential. Previous...

  1. 2 CFR 1.215 - Relationship to previous issuances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuances. 1.215 Section 1.215 Grants and Agreements ABOUT TITLE 2 OF THE CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS AND SUBTITLE A Introduction toSubtitle A § 1.215 Relationship to previous issuances. Although some of the guidance was...

  2. 2 CFR 230.45 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 230.45 Section 230.45 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (OMB CIRCULAR A-122) § 230.45 Relationship to previous issuance. (a...

  3. Research Note Effects of previous cultivation on regeneration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Note Effects of previous cultivation on regeneration of Julbernadia globiflora and Brachystegia spiciformis in grazing areas of Mupfurudzi ... Plant attributes for Julbernadia globiflora and Brachystegia spiciformis were measured in previously cultivated and uncultivated sites making up rangelands of the scheme.

  4. 49 CFR 173.23 - Previously authorized packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Previously authorized packaging. 173.23 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Preparation of Hazardous Materials for Transportation § 173.23 Previously authorized packaging. (a) When the regulations specify a packaging with a specification marking...

  5. 75 FR 76056 - FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT:

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting FEDERAL REGISTER CITATION OF PREVIOUS ANNOUNCEMENT: STATUS: Closed meeting. PLACE: 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC. DATE AND TIME OF PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED MEETING: Thursday, December 9, 2010 at 2 p.m. CHANGE IN THE MEETING: Time change. The closed...

  6. Triple outlet right ventricle: a previously unknown cardiac malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingo, Jennifer E; Carroll, Sheila J; Crystal, Matthew A

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of an infant with three distinct outflow tracts from the right ventricle. Three outlets from the heart have been previously named the "Tritruncal Heart". We review the two previously reported cases of tritruncal hearts and describe the anatomy, diagnosis, surgical management, and outcome of our case. Embryologic implications are also discussed.

  7. H1N1 infection in emergency surgery: A cautionary tale.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galbraith, J G

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic 2009 influenza A H1N1 has spread rapidly since its first report in Mexico in March 2009. This is the first influenza pandemic in over 40 years and it atypically affects previously healthy young adults, with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. The medical literature has been inundated with reports of H1N1 infection, the majority found in critical care and internal medicine journals with a relative paucity in the surgical literature. Despite this, it remains an important entity that can impact greatly on acute surgical emergencies. We present a case of previously healthy 31-year-old male who underwent open appendectomy. His post-operative recovery was complicated by acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to H1N1 infection. This case report highlights the impact that H1N1 virus can have on acute surgical emergencies and how it can complicate the post-operative course.

  8. No discrimination against previous mates in a sexually cannibalistic spider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromhage, Lutz; Schneider, Jutta M.

    2005-09-01

    In several animal species, females discriminate against previous mates in subsequent mating decisions, increasing the potential for multiple paternity. In spiders, female choice may take the form of selective sexual cannibalism, which has been shown to bias paternity in favor of particular males. If cannibalistic attacks function to restrict a male's paternity, females may have little interest to remate with males having survived such an attack. We therefore studied the possibility of female discrimination against previous mates in sexually cannibalistic Argiope bruennichi, where females almost always attack their mate at the onset of copulation. We compared mating latency and copulation duration of males having experienced a previous copulation either with the same or with a different female, but found no evidence for discrimination against previous mates. However, males copulated significantly shorter when inserting into a used, compared to a previously unused, genital pore of the female.

  9. Operative Start Time Does Not Affect Post-Operative Infection Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Christopher A; Davies, Stephen W; Willis, Rhett N; Dietch, Zachary C; Shah, Puja M; Sawyer, Robert G

    2016-10-01

    Surgical care is delivered 24 h a day at most institutions. Alarmingly, some authors have found that certain operative start times are associated with greater morbidity and mortality rates. This effect has been noted in both the public and private sector. Although some of these differences may be related to process, they may also be caused by the human circadian rhythm and corresponding changes in host defenses. We hypothesized that the time of day of an operation would impact the frequency of certain post-operative outcomes significantly. Cases at a single tertiary-care center reported to the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program over a 10-year period were identified. Operative start times were divided into six-hour blocks, with 6 am to noon serving as the reference. Standard univariable techniques were applied. Multivariable logistic regression with mixed effects modeling then was used to determine the relation between operative start times and infectious outcomes, controlling for surgeon clustering. Statistical significance was set at p operative infectious complication. Seventy percent of these infections (n = 1,506) were surgical site infections. On univariable analysis considering all cases, nighttime and evening operations had higher rates of post-operative infections than those in performed during the day (9.1% from 6 am to noon; 9.7% from noon to 6 pm; 14.8% from 6 pm to midnight; and 14.4% from midnight to 6 am; p operative start time was not associated with the risk of post-operative infection, even when emergency cases were considered independently. Our data suggest that operative start times have no correlation with post-operative infectious complications. Further work is required to identify the source of the time-dependent outcome variability observed in previous studies.

  10. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-11-01

    Procedures are presented for reactor operation; instrumentation and control; reactor components; research facilities; cooling systems; containment heating, venting, and air conditioning; emergency procedures; waste systems; on-site utilities; records and data accumulation; auxiliary equipment; and technical specification requirements.

  11. 14 CFR 91.1083 - Crewmember emergency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... operation of emergency equipment including— (i) Equipment used in ditching and evacuation; (ii) First aid... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crewmember emergency training. 91.1083... Operations Program Management § 91.1083 Crewmember emergency training. (a) Each training program must provide...

  12. On-site emergency planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kueffer, K.

    1981-01-01

    This lecture covers the Emergency Planning of the Operating Organization and does not describe the functions and responsibilities of the Regulatory Body and public authorities. The lecture is based on the Codes of Practice and Safety Guides of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and arrangements as in use in the Swiss Nuclear Power Station Beznau. (orig.)

  13. Developing an emergency ultrasound app

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kim Thestrup; Subhi, Yousif; Aagaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Focused emergency ultrasound is rapidly evolving as a clinical skill for bedside examination by physicians at all levels of education. Ultrasound is highly operator-dependent and relevant training is essential to ensure appropriate use. When supplementing hands-on focused ultrasound courses, e...

  14. Emergency condensator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamazaki, Ryoichi.

    1992-01-01

    The condensator of the present invention has a condensate return pipe for returning condensates formed by concentration of steams in a bundle of heat transfer tubes. A flow rate control valve is disposed to the return pipe, and the opening degree of the control valve is controlled by a valve opening degree control device which receives a reactor pressure signal under control. The valve opening degree control device outputs a control signal of 0% valve opening degree when reactor pressure is lower than the lowermost control value and outputs control signal of 100% value opening degree if it is greater than the uppermost control value. On the other hand, when it is between the lowermost value and the uppermost value, it outputs a control signal for demanding an opening degree in proportion to the difference between the reactor pressure and the lowermost control value. Since it is thus controlled, even if steams and condensaes are circulated as they are by natural convection, there is no worry that reactor pressure lowers excessively and no operator's manual handling is necessary. (T.M.)

  15. Simplifying Operational Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Terraine’s spider web metaphor reflects the complex, highly interactive operating environment that appropriately should be analyzed through a...describing it as, “not prescriptive or a checklist , design is based on critical thinking, conceptual planning, visualization, emergence of a hypothesis

  16. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism experiencing mental health problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Heathcote

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available No research has previously been done regarding the phenomenon of adolescents who have previously been involved in Satanism and who experience obstacles in their strive for mental health. Adolescents previously involved in Satanism present behavioral problems like aggressive outbursts, depression, “ psychosis” or suicide attempts, that could lead to suicide. In the phenomenonanalysis semi-structured, phenomenological interviews were performed with the respondents and their parents. The respondents were requested to write a naïve sketch about their life. After completion of the data-control, guidelines for nursing staff were set.

  17. A methodology to respond to emergency situations - emergency response guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierard, A.; Contratto, R.J.; Prokopovich, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The world-wide operating record of nuclear power plants, including the accident at Three Mile Island, has demonstrated the adequacy of inherent design features. At the same time, experience has led to the development of emergency response guidelines adequately structured to the needs of operating staff. An uniquevocal indication of an actual or potential emergency condition, i.e. reactor trip or emergency safety injection actuation, is used to enter the diagnostic procedure. Pertinent plant conditions are evaluated systematically. If an event can be diagnosed, the operator is directed to the appropriate optimal recovery guideline. These guidelines enable the operator to bring the plant to a stable and safe status (e.g. cold shutdown). Independently of the course of events, the operating staff proceeds with the monitoring of the critical safety functions. These are defined as that set of functions which protect the integrity of the physical barriers against radiation release. A systematic review of the plant condition is efficiently and accurately accomplished by use of critical safety function status trees. Challenges to critical safety functions identified with the status trees are treated in accordance with a series of function restoration guidelines. They are written to restore a lost function (requiring prompt, possibly drastic action) or to minimize the effects of a minor challenge. (author)

  18. Influence of previous participation in physical activity on its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... participation can influence perceptions of PA among the students. Physical activity promotion programmes should consider the role of these factors which should be emphasised from childhood. Keywords: physical activity, students, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, previous participation, sedentary lifestyle, Rwanda

  19. Payload specialist Reinhard Furrer show evidence of previous blood sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Reinhard Furrer shows evidence of previous blood sampling while Wubbo J. Ockels, Dutch payload specialist (only partially visible), extends his right arm after a sample has been taken. Both men show bruises on their arms.

  20. Delivery outcomes at term after one previous cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani-Zamzami, Tarik Y

    2007-12-01

    To determine the maternal and perinatal outcomes at term in women with one previous cesarean delivery and with no history of vaginal birth. This is a case-control study conducted at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2002. One hundred sixty-two women with one previous cesarean delivery and with no previous vaginal birth were compared with 324 control women. The cesarean section rate was higher in the study group 40 (24.7%) versus 23 (7.1%) in the control group and was statistically significant (phistory of vaginal delivery are considered less favorable, the vaginal birth after cesarean section success rate may be even lower if the indication for previous primary cesarean delivery was failure to progress, and may be associated with increased risk of uterine rupture. Further study is required to confirm our findings.

  1. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs.......The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  2. Perceptions of Emergency Department Crowding in Pennsylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pines, Jesse M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The state of emergency department (ED crowding in Pennsylvania has not previously been reported.Methods: We assessed perceptions of ED crowding by surveying medical directors/chairs from Pennsylvania EDs in the spring of 2008.Results: A total of 106 completed the questionnaire (68% response rate. A total of 83% (86/104 agreed that ED crowding was a problem; 26% (27/105 reported that at least half of admitted patients boarded for more than 4 hours. Ninety-eight percent (102/104 agreed that patient satisfaction suffers during crowding and 79% (84/106 stated that quality suffers. Sixty-five percent (68/105 reported that crowding had worsened during the past 2 years. Several hospital interventions were used to alleviate crowding: expediting discharges, 81% (86/106; prioritizing ED patients for inpatient beds, 79% (84/ 106; and ambulance diversion, 55% (57/105. Almost all respondents who had improved ED operations reported that it had reduced crowding.Conclusion: ED crowding is a common problem in Pennsylvania and is worsening in the majority of hospitals, despite the implementation of a variety of interventions. [West J EmergMed. 2013;14(1:1–10.

  3. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2011-01-01

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  4. Secondary recurrent miscarriage is associated with previous male birth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ooi, Poh Veh

    2012-01-31

    Secondary recurrent miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses after delivery of a viable infant. Previous reports suggest that a firstborn male child is associated with less favourable subsequent reproductive potential, possibly due to maternal immunisation against male-specific minor histocompatibility antigens. In a retrospective cohort study of 85 cases of secondary RM we aimed to determine if secondary RM was associated with (i) gender of previous child, maternal age, or duration of miscarriage history, and (ii) increased risk of pregnancy complications. Fifty-three women (62.0%; 53\\/85) gave birth to a male child prior to RM compared to 32 (38.0%; 32\\/85) who gave birth to a female child (p=0.002). The majority (91.7%; 78\\/85) had uncomplicated, term deliveries and normal birth weight neonates, with one quarter of the women previously delivered by Caesarean section. All had routine RM investigations and 19.0% (16\\/85) had an abnormal result. Fifty-seven women conceived again and 33.3% (19\\/57) miscarried, but there was no significant difference in failure rates between those with a previous male or female child (13\\/32 vs. 6\\/25, p=0.2). When patients with abnormal results were excluded, or when women with only one previous child were considered, there was still no difference in these rates. A previous male birth may be associated with an increased risk of secondary RM but numbers preclude concluding whether this increases recurrence risk. The suggested association with previous male birth provides a basis for further investigations at a molecular level.

  5. Fluid therapy in the emergency unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Senior Specialist Paediatrician, Department of Ambulatory and Emergency Paediatrics, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape. Town. Dr Diedericks is currently head of the Paediatric Emergency Service at Red Cross Hospital. He has previous experience ... intravenous fluid administration. Choosing the correct ...

  6. Prediction of bacteremia in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Kristine Jessen; Mackenhauer, Julie; Hvass, Anne Mette Sondrup Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate a previously published clinical decision rule for predicting a positive blood culture in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection on the basis of major and minor criteria and a total score (Shapiro et al., J Emerg Med, 2008...

  7. Understanding Public Responses to Emerging Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macnaghten, Philip; Davies, S.R.; Kearnes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies aimed at understanding public responses to emerging technologies have given limited attention to the social and cultural processes through which public concerns emerge. When probed, these have tended to be explained either in cognitive social psychological terms, typically in the

  8. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  9. Radiation Emergency Planning in Petroleum Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shinawy, R.M.K.; El-Naggar, M.A.; Abdel-Fattah, A.T.; Gomaa, A.M.

    2001-01-01

    Similar to all industrial activities utilizing radiation sources, or dealing with radioactive materials in its operations, petroleum industry requires the organization of a Radiation Emergency Plan. This plan should be based on a comprehensive and subtle understanding of the extensive multidisciplinary operations involved in petroleum processing and the dangers that threaten human health, environment and property; both from ordinary emergency situations common to petroleum industry activities and also from radiation emergency events. Radiation emergencies include radiological source accidents involving occurrence of high dose exposures. Radioactive contamination or spill are also major problems that may cause low dose exposures and environmental radioactive contamination. The simultaneous occurrence of other industrial emergency events such as fires or structural collapses will add to the seriousness of the emergency situation. The essential aspects of Radiation Emergency Planning include notification, assessment of situation, foresight, definition of roles and responsibilities including health safety and environmental concepts. An important contribution to the Emergency Planning is the proper intelligent medical response. Another essential parameter is the training of personnel that will undertake the responsibility of executing the emergency procedures according to the various emergency situations. The main features of the radiation Emergency Plan in Petroleum industry is presented in the text

  10. In View of Current and Future Fiscal Restraints and the Need for Efficiency and Joint Operations, What Is the Army’s Primary Role in Defense Support to Civil Authorities During Homeland Disaster and Emergency Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    emergency, both in the number of deaths and the untold damage and destruction caused by the storm. After this unmitigated disaster in 2005... volcanic eruptions ). In situations where advance warning is pertinent, DHS through FEMA mobilize available support before disasters and assists local...Katrina caused widespread devastation along the central Gulf Coast states. In cities such as New Orleans, Louisiana; Mobile, Alabama; and Gulfport

  11. Company finds emerging niche for its global-rescue business

    OpenAIRE

    Kent, Heather

    1996-01-01

    A Singapore-based company with a subsidiary office in Seattle offers emergency medical assistance to employees of North American companies operating in Asia and South America. The company offers routine medical service and emergency evacuation around the clock.

  12. 30 CFR 47.84 - Non-emergency disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Trade Secret Hazardous Chemical § 47.84 Non-emergency disclosure. Upon request, the operator must disclose the identity of a trade secret chemical in a non-emergency situation to an exposed...

  13. Prevalence of operator fatigue in winter maintenance operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camden, Matthew C; Medina-Flintsch, Alejandra; Hickman, Jeffrey S; Bryce, James; Flintsch, Gerardo; Hanowski, Richard J

    2018-02-02

    Similar to commercial motor vehicle drivers, winter maintenance operators are likely to be at an increased risk of becoming fatigued while driving due to long, inconsistent shifts, environmental stressors, and limited opportunities for sleep. Despite this risk, there is little research concerning the prevalence of winter maintenance operator fatigue during winter emergencies. The purpose of this research was to investigate the prevalence, sources, and countermeasures of fatigue in winter maintenance operations. Questionnaires from 1043 winter maintenance operators and 453 managers were received from 29 Clear Road member states. Results confirmed that fatigue was prevalent in winter maintenance operations. Over 70% of the operators and managers believed that fatigue has a moderate to significant impact on winter maintenance operations. Approximately 75% of winter maintenance operators reported to at least sometimes drive while fatigued, and 96% of managers believed their winter maintenance operators drove while fatigued at least some of the time. Furthermore, winter maintenance operators and managers identified fatigue countermeasures and sources of fatigue related to winter maintenance equipment. However, the countermeasures believed to be the most effective at reducing fatigue during winter emergencies (i.e., naps) were underutilized. For example, winter maintenance operators reported to never use naps to eliminate fatigue. These results indicated winter maintenance operations are impacted by operator fatigue. These results support the increased need for research and effective countermeasures targeting winter maintenance operator fatigue. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Delayed complications of emergency airway management: a study of 533 emergency department intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakles, John C; Deacon, John M; Bair, Aaron E; Keim, Samuel M; Panacek, Edward A

    2008-11-01

    Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs). Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs). All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9%) were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period. The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553). Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553) of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%]) developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%]) had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway management. Three patients (0.5% [95% CI 0

  15. Delayed Complications of Emergency Airway Management: A Study of 533 Emergency Department Intubations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keim, Samuel M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Airway management is a critical procedure performed frequently in emergency departments (EDs. Previous studies have evaluated the complications associated with this procedure but have focused only on the immediate complications. The purpose of this study is to determine the incidence and nature of delayed complications of tracheal intubation performed in the ED at an academic center where intubations are performed by emergency physicians (EPs.METHODS: All tracheal intubations performed in the ED over a one-year period were identified; 540 tracheal intubations were performed during the study period. Of these, 523 charts (96.9% were available for review and were retrospectively examined. Using a structured datasheet, delayed complications occurring within seven days of intubation were abstracted from the medical record. Charts were scrutinized for the following complications: acute myocardial infarction (MI, stroke, airway trauma from the intubation, and new respiratory infections. An additional 30 consecutive intubations were examined for the same complications in a prospective arm over a 29-day period.RESULTS: The overall success rate for tracheal intubation in the entire study group was 99.3% (549/553. Three patients who could not be orally intubated underwent emergent cricothyrotomy. Thus, the airway was successfully secured in 99.8% (552/553 of the patients requiring intubation. One patient, a seven-month-old infant, had unanticipated subglottic stenosis and could not be intubated by the emergency medicine attending or the anesthesiology attending. The patient was mask ventilated and was transported to the operating room for an emergent tracheotomy. Thirty-four patients (6.2% [95% CI 4.3 - 8.5%] developed a new respiratory infection within seven days of intubation. Only 18 patients (3.3% [95% CI 1.9 - 5.1%] had evidence of a new respiratory infection within 48 hours, indicating possible aspiration pneumonia secondary to airway

  16. Effect of previous abdominal surgery on outcomes following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masashi; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Kondo, Keisaku; Asai, Keiko; Kayano, Hajime; Masubuchi, Shinsuke; Uchiyama, Kazuhisa

    2013-03-01

    The impact of previous abdominal surgeries on the need for conversion to open surgery and on short-term outcomes during/after laparoscopic colectomy was retrospectively investigated. This retrospective cohort study was conducted from December 1996 through December 2009. This study was conducted at Osaka Medical College Hospital. A total of 1701 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic resection of the colon and rectum were classified as not having previous abdominal surgery (n = 1121) or as having previous abdominal surgery (n = 580). Short-term outcomes were recorded, and risk factors for conversion to open surgery were analyzed. There were no significant differences in operative time, blood loss, number of lymph nodes removed, or conversion rate between the groups. The rate of inadvertent enterotomy was significantly higher in the previous abdominal surgery group than in the not having previous abdominal surgery group (0.9% versus 0.1%; p = 0.03), and the postoperative recovery time was significantly longer in the previous abdominal surgery group than in the not having previous abdominal surgery group. Ileus was more frequent in the previous abdominal surgery group than in the not having previous abdominal surgery group (3.8% versus 2.1%; p = 0.04). Significant risk factors for conversion to open surgery were T stage ≥3 (OR, 2.81; 95% CI, 1.89-3.75), median incision (OR, 4.34; 95% CI, 1.23-9.41), upper median incision (OR, 2.78; 95% CI, 1.29-5.42), lower median incision (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.09-3.12), and transverse colectomy (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.29-2.41). The incidence of successfully completed laparoscopic colectomy after previous abdominal surgery remains high, and the short-term outcomes are acceptable.

  17. [The evaluation of academic emergency department design].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Turgut; Aydinuraz, Kuzey; Oktay, Cem; Saygun, Meral; Ağalar, Fatih

    2007-01-01

    In our study which was based upon a questionnaire, the inner and outer architectural designs of emergency services of Emergency Medicine Departments were investigated. In this descriptive study, a standard questionnaire was sent to 26 Emergency Medicine Departments which were operating at that time. In the questionnaire, the internal, external architectural and functional features were questioned. Answers of 22 Emergency Medicine Departments were analysed. Two Emergency Medicine Departments that were not operating at that time were not included in the study. The analysis of the replies revealed that only 59% (n=13) of the Emergency Medicine Departments were designed as an emergency service prior to the construction. The ambulance parking areas were not suitable in 77% of the emergency units while only 54.5% (n=12) had protection against adverse weather conditions. In only 59% (n=13) of the emergency units, a triage unit was present and in only one of the in only one (4.5%), a decontamination room was available. It was understood that only 32% (n=8) of the emergency units were appropriate in enlarging their capacity taking the local risk factors into consideration. There was a toilette for disabled patients in only 18% (n=4) of the units as well. Considering a 12-year of history of the Emergency Medicine in Turkey, the presence of a lecture room is still 68% (n=15) in emergency departments which reflects that academic efforts in this field is emerging in challenging physical conditions. The results of our study revealed that emergency service architecture was neglected in Turkey and medical care given was precluded by the insufficient architecture. The design of emergency services has to be accomplished under guidance of scientific data and rules taking advices of architects who have knowledge and experience on this field.

  18. Integrated emergency management in KKG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluegel, J.U.; Plank, H.

    2007-01-01

    The development and introduction of emergency measures in Switzerland was mainly characterized by the evaluation of international experience and by systematic analysis of beyond-design basis accidents within the framework of plant-specific probabilistic safety analyses. As early as in the mid-eighties, the Swiss regulatory authority demanded that measures be taken against severe accidents, and periodically added more detailed requirements, most recently in 2000 when the introduction of Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SMAG) was demanded for power operation as well as operation in the non-power mode. The SMAG were introduced at the Goesgen nuclear power station within a project in the period between 2003 and 2005. For this purpose, a concept of integrated emergency management was developed which is based on updates of the proven emergency manual. One important aspect of this integrative concept is the distinction between preventive and mitigating procedures by defining appropriate criteria. The findings made in the implementation phase of the project include the realization that the introduction of procedures dealing with severe accidents also requires the ability to develop new ways of thinking and acting in accident management. This implies the awareness that procedures covering severe accidents must be applied much more flexibly and in the light of the situation than regulations covering fault conditions. Also possibilities to simulate severe accidents were created within the project both for the development of procedures and for training plant operators and members of the emergency staff. (orig.)

  19. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  20. 40 ANAESTHETIC MANAGEMENT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCIES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... ABSTRACT. Anaesthesia for surgical procedures carries some risks. These risks are accentuated when the surgical operation is performed as an emergency procedure. The value of emergency in risk stratification underscores its relevance in clinical anaesthesia. Limited time for evaluation of patient ...

  1. A Tactical Emergency Response Management System (Terms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-01

    Mar 1, 2013 ... Emergencies are incidents that threaten public safety, health ... very critical role in responding to an incident. Information systems designed for emergency response operations can provide valuable help for better planning and coordination during .... Object Modeling Technique (OMT) and. Object-Oriented ...

  2. 47 CFR 90.407 - Emergency communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency communications. 90.407 Section 90.407 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Operating Requirements § 90.407 Emergency communications. The licensee of any...

  3. Emergency thoracotomies: Two center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Ibrahim Sersar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim: Emergency thoracotomy is performed either immediately at the scene of injury, in the emergency department or in the operating room. It aims to evacuate the pericardial tamponade, control the haemorrhage, to ease the open cardiac massage and to cross-clamp the descending thoracic aorta to redistribute blood flow and maybe to limit sub-diaphragmatic haemorrhage, bleeding and iatrogenic injury are the common risk factors. We aimed to review our experience in the field of emergency thoracotomies, identify the predictors of death, analyze the early results, detect the risk factors and asses the mortalities and their risk factors. Patients and Methods: Our hospital records of 197 patients who underwent emergency thoracotomy were reviewed. We retrospectively analyzed a piece of the extensive experience of the Mansoura University Hospitals and Mansoura Emergency Hospital; Egypt and Saudi German Hospitals; Jeddah in the last 12 years in the management of trauma cases for whom emergency thoracotomy. The aim was to analyse the early results of such cases and to detect the risk factors of dismal prognosis. Results: Our series included 197 cases of emergency thoractomies in Mansoura; Egypt and SGH; Jeddah; KSA in the last 12 years. The mean age of the victims was 28 years and ranged between 5 and 62 years. Of the 197 patients with emergency thoracotomy, the indications were both penetrating and blunt chest trauma, iatrogenic and postoperative hemodynamito a surgical cause. The commonest indication was stab heart followed by traumatic diaphragmatic ruptures. Conclusion: The results of emergency thoracotomy in our series were cooping with the results of other reports, mainly due to our aggressive measures to achieve rapid stabilization of the hemodynamic condition. We emphasize the importance of emergency medicine education programs on rapid diagnosis of traumatic injuries with early intervention, and adequate hemodynamic and respiratory

  4. Clinical outcomes of Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy at patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riza Odabasi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine clinical outcomes of Laparoscopically Assisted Vaginal Hysterectomy (LAVH at patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery.\tDesign: A clinical observational, prospective, non randomised trial comparing outcomes of 13 patients who had previous abdominopelvic surgery with outcomes of 19 patients who had not surgery.\tSetting: Adnan Menderes University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.\tPatients: Thirty-two subjects [average age 51,1±6,9 (37-66] who had indication of total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral\tsalpingooferectomy due to benign pathologies.\tInterventions: According to ACOG, LAVH was performed by using the Garry technique at the trocar insertions, the Reich technique\tat the laparoscopic phase and the Heaney technique at the vaginal phase by the same operator. After adhesiolysis and diagnostic procedures, ureters were dissected medially. By coagulating, bilateral round and infundibulopelvic ligaments were cut after the\tmobilisation of bladder. The operation was completed by the same operation team by vaginal approach consequently. At all operations, 80 W unipolar or 150 W bipolar diathermic dissection and 25-35 W unipolar diathermic cutting were performed.\tMain outcome measures: Age, parity, menopausal status, preoperative indications, type of previous abdominopelvic surgey and incision, intraoperative indications, adhesion scores, rate of unintended laparotomy, operative time, uterus weight, loss of blood,\tcomplications, postoperative pain scores and analgesic requirements, time necessary for returning to normal intestinal function, length of hospitalisation and rate of readmission to hospital.\tRESULTS: When compared with the patients who had not previous abdominopelvic surgery, all adhesion scores, uterus weight, operative time and the number of total postoperative complications were found significantly high at patients who had previous\tsurgery. Loss of blood, the rate

  5. Operational amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Dostal, Jiri

    1993-01-01

    This book provides the reader with the practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. It presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits.Provides the reader with practical knowledge necessary to select and use operational amplifier devices. Presents an extensive treatment of applications and a practically oriented, unified theory of operational circuits

  6. Spatial Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda VELICANU

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a brief description of the most important operations that can be performed on spatial data such as spatial queries, create, update, insert, delete operations, conversions, operations on the map or analysis on grid cells. Each operation has a graphical example and some of them have code examples in Oracle and PostgreSQL.

  7. Serial Change in Cervical Length for the Prediction of Emergency Cesarean Section in Placenta Previa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Eun Shin

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether serial change in cervical length (CL over time can be a predictor for emergency cesarean section (CS in patients with placenta previa.This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with placenta previa between January 2010 and November 2014. All women were offered serial measurement of CL by transvaginal ultrasound at 19 to 23 weeks (CL1, 24 to 28 weeks (CL2, 29 to 31 weeks (CL3, and 32 to 34 weeks (CL4. We compared clinical characteristics, serial change in CL, and outcomes between the emergency CS group (case group and elective CS group (control group. The predictive value of change in CL for emergency CS was evaluated.A total of 93 women were evaluated; 31 had emergency CS due to massive vaginal bleeding. CL tended to decrease with advancing gestational age in each group. Until 29-31 weeks, CL showed no significant differences between the two groups, but after that, CL in the emergency CS group decreased abruptly, even though CL in the elective CS group continued to gradually decrease. On multivariate analysis to determine risk factors, only admissions for bleeding (odds ratio, 34.710; 95% CI, 5.239-229.973 and change in CL (odds ratio, 3.522; 95% CI, 1.210-10.253 were significantly associated with emergency CS. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curve showed that change in CL could be the predictor of emergency CS (area under the curve 0.734, p < 0.001, with optimal cutoff for predicting emergency cesarean delivery of 6.0 mm.Previous admission for vaginal bleeding and change in CL are independent predictors of emergency CS in placenta previa. Women with change in CL more than 6 mm between the second and third trimester are at high risk of emergency CS in placenta previa. Single measurements of short CL at the second or third trimester do not seem to predict emergency CS.

  8. The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease assessment test improves the predictive value of previous exacerbations for poor outcomes in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravitlles, Marc; García-Sidro, Patricia; Fernández-Nistal, Alonso; Buendía, María Jesús; Espinosa de Los Monteros, María José; Esquinas, Cristina; Molina, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations have a negative impact on the quality of life of patients and the evolution of the disease. We have investigated the prognostic value of several health-related quality of life questionnaires to predict the appearance of a composite event (new ambulatory or emergency exacerbation, hospitalization, or death) over a 1-year follow-up. This was a multicenter, prospective, observational study. Patients completed four questionnaires after recovering from an exacerbation (COPD Assessment Test [CAT], a Clinical COPD Questionnaire [CCQ], COPD Severity Score [COPDSS], and Airways Questionnaire [AQ20]). Patients were followed-up until the appearance of the composite event or for 1 year, whichever came first. A total of 497 patients were included in the study. The majority of them were men (89.7%), with a mean age of 68.7 (SD 9.2) years, and a forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 47.1% (SD 17.5%). A total of 303 (61%) patients experienced a composite event. Patients with an event had worse mean scores of all questionnaires at baseline compared to patients without event: CAT=12.5 vs 11.3 (P=0.028); CCQ=2.2 vs 1.9 (P=0.013); COPDSS=12.3 vs 10.9 (P=0.001); AQ20=8.3 vs 7.5 (P=0.048). In the multivariate analysis, only previous history of exacerbations and CAT score ≥13.5 were significant risk factors for the composite event. A CAT score ≥13.5 increased the predictive value of previous exacerbations with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.864 (95% CI: 0.829-0.899; P=0.001). The predictive value of previous exacerbations significantly increased only in one of the four trialled questionnaires, namely in the CAT questionnaire. However, previous history of exacerbations was the strongest predictor of the composite event.

  9. Radiological emergencies the first response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-11-01

    This national training course about radiological emergencies first answer include: Targets and preparation for emergency response in case of a nuclear or radiological accident. Operations center, action guide for fire fighting, medical coverage, forensic test, first aid, basic instrumentation for radiation, safety equipment, monitoring radiation, gamma rays, personnel exposed protection , radiation exposure rate, injury and illness for radiation, cancer risk, contamination, decontamination and treatment, markers, personnel dosimetry, training, medical and equipment transportation, shielded and tools. Psychological, physical (health and illness), economical (agriculture and industry) and environment impacts. Terrorist attacks, security belts. Support and international agreements (IAEA)

  10. 2 CFR 225.45 - Relationship to previous issuance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Relationship to previous issuance. 225.45 Section 225.45 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET CIRCULARS AND GUIDANCE Reserved COST PRINCIPLES FOR STATE, LOCAL, AND INDIAN TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS (OMB CIRCULAR A-87) § 225.45 Relationship to...

  11. Cryptococcal meningitis in a previously healthy child | Chimowa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An 8-year-old previously healthy female presented with a 3 weeks history of headache, neck stiffness, deafness, fever and vomiting and was diagnosed with cryptococcal meningitis. She had documented hearing loss and was referred to tertiary-level care after treatment with fluconazole did not improve her neurological ...

  12. Rapid fish stock depletion in previously unexploited seamounts: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid fish stock depletion in previously unexploited seamounts: the case of Beryx splendens from the Sierra Leone Rise (Gulf of Guinea) ... A spectral analysis and red-noise spectra procedure (REDFIT) algorithm was used to identify the red-noise spectrum from the gaps in the observed time-series of catch per unit effort by ...

  13. Obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with previous tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with previous tuberculosis: Pathophysiology of a community-based cohort. B.W. Allwood, R Gillespie, M Galperin-Aizenberg, M Bateman, H Olckers, L Taborda-Barata, G.L. Calligaro, Q Said-Hartley, R van Zyl-Smit, C.B. Cooper, E van Rikxoort, J Goldin, N Beyers, E.D. Bateman ...

  14. Balance and bilateral skills of selected previously disadvantaged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Balance and bilateral skills of selected previously disadvantaged children aged 9 to 12 years. Eileen K Africa, Karel J Van Deventer. Abstract. The main aim of the study was to design an appropriate motor skills development programme that could be implemented in any primary school to improve the fundamental motor ...

  15. Outcome Of Pregnancy Following A Previous Lower Segment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A previous ceasarean section is an important variable that influences patient management in subsequent pregnancies. A trial of vaginal delivery in such patients is a feasible alternative to a secondary section, thus aiding to reduce the ceasarean section rate and its associated co-morbidities. Objective: To ...

  16. Suburethral sling procedures after previous surgery for urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare the outcome of suburethral sling procedures (tension-free vaginal tape (TVT), obturator tape (Ob-tape)) for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women with previous surgery for SUI or pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Methods. A comparative, descriptive, retrospective study was done using information ...

  17. 5 CFR 532.405 - Use of highest previous rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of highest previous rate. 532.405 Section 532.405 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS... rate may be based upon a rate of pay received during a temporary promotion, so long as the temporary...

  18. 24 CFR 1710.552 - Previously accepted state filings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of Substantially Equivalent State Law § 1710.552 Previously accepted state filings. (a) Materials... and contracts or agreements contain notice of purchaser's revocation rights. In addition see § 1715.15..., unless the developer is obligated to do so in the contract. (b) If any such filing becomes inactive or...

  19. 5 CFR 9701.352 - Use of highest previous rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Pay and Pay Administration Pay Administration § 9701.352 Use of... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of highest previous rate. 9701.352 Section 9701.352 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT...

  20. Bilateral orbital infarction and retinal detachment in a previously ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this report, we present a case of an 11‑year‑old previously undiagnosed sickle cell disease Nigerian girl with severe acute bilateral orbital infarction and retinal detachment to highlight that hemoglobinopathy induced orbital infarction should be considered in African children with acute onset proptosis with or without ...